Best Choice for Retiring Boomers: Head South An Analysis of Selected U.S. Cities 
       
The Washington Economics Group, Inc.  April 16, 2012     

Representative Office in Washington, D.C.  Dawson & Associates, Inc.  1225 I Street, NW, Suite 250  Washington, DC 20005 

U.S. and Global Headquarters  2655 LeJeune Road  Suite 608  Coral Gables, FL 33134 

   

Contents   
Executive Summary ............................................................................................................. 1  Overview .................................................................................................................................. 3  Methodology ........................................................................................................................... 5  Cities Analyzed ...................................................................................................................... 7  1. Tallahassee, Florida: The Number One Choice ......................................... 7  2. Memphis, Tennessee ......................................................................................... 10  3. Athens, Georgia .................................................................................................... 12  4. Tuscaloosa, Alabama ......................................................................................... 14  5. Atlanta, Georgia ................................................................................................... 16  6. Tied at 6 ‐ Oxford, Mississippi ....................................................................... 19  6.   Tied at 6 ‐ Charleston, South Carolina ........................................................ 21  8.   Louisville, Kentucky ........................................................................................... 23  9.  Tied at 9 ‐ Richmond, Virginia ....................................................................... 25  9. Tied at 9 ‐ Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania ........................................................... 27  Conclusion ...........................................................................................................................  30    List of Tables:   Table 1.  Ranking of Retirement Destination Cities ............................................... 6  Table 2.  Scores for City Factors .................................................................................. 31  Table 3.  Overall Scores for Cities ............................................................................... 32  Appendix:  The  Washington  Economics  Group  Qualifications  and  Project Team .......................................................................................... 33       

 

i   

Executive Summary 
 “Baby Boomers” are one of the largest generational groups in the U.S. More than  25 percent of the U.S. population belongs to this generation, born between 1946  and 1964.   The  “leading  edge”  Boomers  are  beginning  to  retire  in  large  numbers  –  up  to  10,000  a  day  –  and  many  of  them  will  relocate  to  a  city  that  better  serves  the  needs and desires of retirees.  Mason‐Dixon  Polling  and  Research  Inc.  conducted  a  survey  among  Boomers  between Nov. 14 and 22, 2011 for the Consumer Federation of the Southeast, to  gauge  their  preferences  toward  a  number  of  factors  that  would  most  directly  influence  their  retirement  relocation  decision  –  such  as  climate,  taxes  or  recreation.  The  survey  also  asked  participants  to  rank  the  importance  of  each  factor when deciding where to relocate.   The  Washington  Economics  Group  (WEG)  developed  a  methodology,  based  on  the above‐mentioned survey, to rank 20 cities based on a number of factors and  city  characteristics.  The  20  destinations  were  chosen  because  they  are  cities  with an already high number of retirees, or cities that are classified as typically  popular destinations for retirees or because they possess more than one factor  favored by the Baby Boomers surveyed in the Mason‐Dixon poll.     WEG’s White Paper analyzes, in detail, the Top 10 cities of this list,  and, overall, a  “Top 20” that can potentially attract a great number of “Baby Boomer” retirees.     WEG’s  analysis  includes  a  detailed  description  of  each  city’s  climate,  cost  of  living,  availability  of  healthcare  services,  competitiveness  of  local  fiscal  obligations  and  offering  of  recreational  and  other  amenities.  The  analysis  scores  each  factor  for  each  city  and  based  on  this,  determines  an  overall  score/ranking for that city among all of those evaluated.   WEG’s analysis concluded that the number one retirement destination city  among  the  20  cities  on  the  list  would  be  Tallahassee,  Florida.  Tallahassee  possesses  more  of  the  priority  features  and  characteristics  cited  by  Boomers  necessary  to  provide  a  high  quality  of  life  for  retirees.  These  distinct  and  desirable characteristics that Tallahassee exemplifies are: 
White Paper  |Page 1  

  

The Washington Economics Group, Inc. 

 

o An extremely pleasant climate: Best described as “warm with cool months.”  o A  significantly  low  cost  of  living:  Tallahassee’s  Cost  of  Living  Index  is  significantly below the national average.  o High  quality  and  affordable  healthcare  services:  In  2010,  Tallahassee’s  Capital  Health  Plan  was  ranked  the  No.  1  Medicare  Advantage  plan  in  the  nation.  That vaults an already‐high‐ranking community further up the scale  of  top  locations.  The  new  Florida  State  University  College  of  Medicine  enhances  the  availability  of  health  services,  and  area  hospitals  are  of  very  good  quality.    Tallahassee  Memorial  Regional  Medical  Center  has  been  recognized for its quality of care multiple years in a row.  o Low local tax rates: The State of Florida does not assess an income tax, and  Tallahassee  residents  only  pay  a  7.5  percent  sales  tax.  An  abundance  of  recreational amenities that includes easy access to the ocean and beaches,  an  award‐winning  city  park  system,  museums,  restaurants  and  organized  festivals and events in the city. 

The Washington Economics Group, Inc. 

White Paper 

|Page 2  

 

Overview 
During the next few years, it is estimated that 78 million individuals (slightly over 25  percent  of  the  U.S.  population)  born  between  1946  and  1964,  will  reach  retirement  age1. Many of these individuals, known as “Baby Boomers,” will find themselves making  the  decision  of  where to  spend  their  retirement  years. Many  “Baby  Boomers”  want  to  move to a city or town that can better serve their needs and desires during retirement.  There  are  numerous  reasons  for  “Baby  Boomers”  to  want  to  relocate,  among  these  reasons  are  a  desirable  climate,  more  entertainment  and  recreation  amenities,  an  affordable cost of living and peace and quiet.  Mason‐Dixon Polling and Research Inc. conducted a survey for Consumer Federation of  the Southeast between November 14 and 22, 2011, among adults between the ages of  47  and  65  (those  individuals  who  qualify  as  “Baby  Boomers”)2  to  gauge  their  preferences regarding retirement and the features and amenities they desire to find in a  retirement destination. All participants in the poll were considering moving once they  reached retirement.  The poll results show that there are five main factors that are most  important  for  these  individuals.  These  factors  are:  climate,  cost  of  housing,  quality  of  healthcare services, local taxes and recreational options.    In reviewing the survey, we noted that, even within the five broad categories identified,  some  factors  appear  to  weigh  more  heavily  than  others  with  Boomers  who  are  considering relocation during their retirement.  For example, when survey respondents  were asked to rank desired characteristics of a relocation destination in priority order,  climate  came  first  and  housing  costs  second.    Within  those  top  priorities,  the  survey  results also indicated that more than 50 percent of respondents preferred a city with a  climate  described  as  “warm  with cool  months.”  In  addition,  the  issue  of  housing  costs  includes  more  elements  than  simply  the  purchase  price  of  real  estate.    Both  homeowners and renters must also consider local taxes – a key issue in the Consumer  Federation survey – and also homeowners’ insurance costs.  Residents of inland areas  in the United States far removed from the hurricane zone often are surprised to learn  that windstorm insurance rates in coastal communities in the Southeast have increased  quite  sharply  in  the  last  decade,  significantly  adding  to  total  housing  costs  for  those  considering a move to a Gulf Coast state.  Communities that are not located directly on  the  coast  may  have  some  advantages  in  housing  costs  over  a  coastal  location  when  housing  costs  are  considered.    Similarly,  more  than  70  percent  preferred  a  medium‐
                                                            
1Hellmich, Nancy. "“Baby Boomers” by the Numbers: Census reveals trends." USA Today, March 03, 2010. 

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/census/2009‐11‐10‐topblline10_ST_N.htm (accessed February 04, 2012).  2 1,000 adults between the ages of 47 and 65 were interviewed by telephone from November 14 through November  22, 2011. All respondents lived in states east of the Mississippi River and were considering moving to another state  when they retired. 

The Washington Economics Group, Inc. 

White Paper 

|Page 3  

 

sized  city  or  small  town.  Additionally,  more  than  20  percent  of  respondents  indicated  that proximity to ocean and beach‐related recreational activities was either the most or  second most important factor when deciding where to retire.  Less than an hour’s drive  from  a  coastline  with  good  beaches  is  a  key  consideration  with  the  Boomers  whose  retirement  looms  –  a  choice  that  also  allows  relocating  Boomers  to  mitigate  high  insurance costs.  The  Washington  Economics  Group  (WEG)  developed  a  methodology  that  ranks  cities  based  on  the  previously  mentioned  factors  extracted  from  the  results  of  the  Mason‐ Dixon/CFSE poll.  WEG evaluated a group of 20 cities with an already high number of  retirees and cities that are classified as typically popular destinations for retirees. Cities  were  also  chosen  based  on  those  whose  population  is  consistent  with  or  close  to  the  size Boomers favored in the poll or those cities that possess more than one factor that  was  indicated  as  favorable  by  the  respondents  of  the  Mason‐Dixon  poll.  This  White  Paper  presents  the  ranking  of  the  20  cities  analyzed  by  WEG  and  includes  a  detailed  analysis  of  the  Top  10  cities  on  the  list.  The  following  sections  introduce  the  methodology used by WEG to rank the cities and present the detailed analyses for the  Top 10 ranked cities on the list.  

The Washington Economics Group, Inc. 

White Paper 

|Page 4  

 

Methodology 
WEG  developed  a  straightforward  methodology  that  clearly  demonstrates  how  each  city  is  scored.  The  methodology  is  complex  enough  to  reflect  why  one  city  might  be  ranked higher than another.  At the same time, it is simple enough to be replicated. This  methodology  allowed  WEG  to  rank  the  cities  based  on  a  system  of  point  scores  that  were assessed after scoring each one of the five factors for each city.  The survey results also showed that, among these five factors, individuals value some  factors  higher  than  others.  On  average,  cost  of  housing  is  the  most  important  factor,  followed in order by climate, quality of healthcare services, local taxes and recreational  options.  In  addition,  respondents  to  the  Mason‐Dixon  poll  indicated  their  preferences  for  individual  factors  such  as  climate  (warm  and  cool  months)  and  recreational  amenities (preference for proximity to the ocean and beaches).   Once these preferences were identified, WEG proceeded to score each one  of the five factors for each city on a scale from 1 to 4, with 4 being the best  available score and 1 being the lowest available score. Once each city was  given a score for each factor considered, the next step was to compare the  overall city package.   
Scores  4  3  2  1 

In  order  to  rank  the  cities,  WEG  quantified  the  importance  of  each  factor  based  on  survey responses.  For example, WEG needed a way of taking into account that climate  is  more  important  than  recreational  amenities. The  solution  was  to  assign  weights  to  each one of the categories, thus reflecting its importance. Climate was given a weight of  10,  cost  of  living  a  weight  of  8,  quality  and  affordability  of  available  healthcare  a  6,  state/local taxes a weight of 4 and recreational options a weight of 2.    To  compare  the  overall  scores  for  each  city,  WEG  Factor Weight combined  the  individual  scores  assigned  to  each  Climate 10 factor  and  the  weights  for  each  factor  by  Cost of Living  8 multiplying  the  weights  by  the  scores.  This  Healthcare 6 4 procedure  resulted  in  a  total  weighted  score  for  Local Taxes 2 each  factor  of  each  city.  Finally,  WEG  summed  all  Recreational Amenities  the scores for each category to obtain a total score for each city. Once the final score for  each  city  was  obtained,  the  cities  were  ranked  from  highest  to  lowest.  Based  on  this  methodology, the following section is a detailed analysis of the Top 10 cities from the  list. The table below lists the ranking of these Top 10 communities and the percentage 
The Washington Economics Group, Inc.  White Paper  |Page 5  

 

of points earned by each city. Tables 2 and 3 on pages 31 and 32 respectively, detail the  measurements used to formulate this ranked list of the top five retirement factors and  Top 10 cities out of 20 cities.   
Table 1.  Ranking of Retirement Destination Cities  Ranking  City Percentage  of Points Scored  1  Tallahassee, FL 93% 2  Memphis, TN 88% Athens, GA 85% 3  4  Tuscaloosa, AL 82% Atlanta, GA 78% 5  6 (Tie)  Oxford, MS 73% 6 (Tie)  Charleston, SC 73% 8  Louisville, KY 68% Richmond, VA 65% 9 (Tie)  9 (Tie)  Pittsburgh, PA 65%

                           
The Washington Economics Group, Inc.  White Paper  |Page 6  

 

 

Cities Analyzed 
1. Tallahassee, Florida: The Number One Choice  Tallahassee  is  the  capital  city  of  the  State  of  Florida.  It  is  located  in  the  middle  of  Florida’s panhandle, only miles away from  the  Alabama  and  Georgia  borders.   Tallahassee’s  metropolitan  area  has  more  than 300,000 residents3, and that is why it  can be considered either a mid‐size city or  a  small  town.  Tallahassee  has  something  to  offer  individuals  with  distinct  needs  and preferences. From the peace and quiet  experienced  in  its  family  neighborhoods  to  the  festivities  such  as  Springtime  Tallahassee  and  the  celebrations  that  accompany  a  Florida  State  University  Seminoles  or  Florida  A&M  Rattlers  football  game,  Tallahassee  possesses  the  size to make residents feel that they live in  a  small  town,  but  with  the  amenities,  facilities  and  institutions  of  a  larger  city.   Tallahassee earns the top ranking on this list because it offers the best available match  among  the  five  priority  characteristics  that  relocating  Boomers  say  they  want,  ad  require in a retirement destination.    Climate    Tallahassee ranks Number 1 on this list in the climate category. High temperatures in  the summer can reach 90 degrees or more, but usually average around 87. Autumn and  spring  temperatures  oscillate  between  the  60s  and  70s,  and  the  winter  averages  temperatures  in  the  50s4.  There  is  no  snowfall  during  the  winter,  but  for  those  individuals interested in snow‐related recreation activities there are specialized resorts  and attractions only a few hours away in Alabama or Georgia.   
                                                            
3 U.S. Census Bureau, "Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas." Accessed February 04, 2012. 

http://www.census.gov/population/metro/.  4 Infoplease, "Climate of 100 Selected U.S. Cities." Accessed February 04, 2012.  http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0762083.html. 

The Washington Economics Group, Inc. 

White Paper 

|Page 7  

 

Cost of Living/Housing    Tallahassee’s residents enjoy a relatively low cost of living. The Cost of Living Index for  Tallahassee is 95, considerably below the national average of 1005. This is reflected by  lower‐than‐average housing, healthcare, gas and food prices. The median sales price of  a single‐family home in Tallahassee is less than $150,0006, which is exceptionally low  when compared with other cities on this list.  Healthcare   The City of Tallahassee offers high‐quality healthcare options for its residents.  Capital  Health Plan, based in Tallahassee, was ranked the nation’s top Medicare Advantage plan  in  2010  –  and  that  national  ranking  of  leadership  provides  a  super  magnet  on  a  key  indicator for Boomers.  The city is served by two major hospitals and various walk‐in  clinics.  Hospitals  in  Tallahassee  offer  a  wide  range  of  specialized  healthcare  services  from  cancer  treatment  to  intensive  care  services.  Tallahassee  Memorial  Regional  Medical  Center  (TMRMC)  has  been  recognized  numerous  times  in  the  past,  most  recently  for  significantly  reducing  mortality  rates.    The  Hospital  has  also  received  the  National  Consumer  Choice  award  for  outstanding  service  for  6  years  in  a  row7.  Additionally, in 2005, the Florida State University College of Medicine established a new  community‐based  medical  school  that  focuses  on  educating  physicians  to  treat  older  Floridians and residents of smaller communities.      Local Taxes    Tallahassee is an appealing city for those individuals looking to pay the least amount of  taxes. The city’s residents pay a state sales tax of 6 percent, and the city’s residents pay  an  additional  1.5  percent  local  sales  tax8  for  a  total  of  7.5  percent.  A  significantly  important and attractive feature of Tallahassee is that there is no local or state income  tax in the State of Florida.  Recreation  

                                                            
5

 U.S. Census Bureau, "2012 U.S. Statistical Abstract." Accessed February 04, 2012.  http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/2012/tables/12s0728.xls.  6 National Association of Realtors, "Metropolitan Area Existing‐Home Prices and State Existing‐Home Sales."  Accessed February 04, 2012. http://www.realtor.org/research/research/metroprice.  7 Tallahassee Memorial Hospital, "Tallahassee Memorial Receives National Consumer Choice Award for Sixth  Consecutive Year." Accessed February 04, 2012. http://www.tmh.org/body.cfm?ID=758.  8 City Data, "U.S. Cities." Accessed February  04, 2012. http://www.city‐data.com/us‐ cities/thesouth/Tallahassee.html. 

The Washington Economics Group, Inc. 

White Paper 

|Page 8  

 

The  City  of  Tallahassee  and  the  neighboring  “Big  Bend”  region  enjoy  a  rich  cultural  history,  and  also  offers  a  wide  range  of  recreational  amenities  for  its  residents.  For  individuals looking for ocean activities, the coastline of the Gulf of Mexico is only about  25 miles away from the city and is easily accessible by car.  The Apalachicola National Forest and the Wakulla Springs  State  Park  are  located  in  close  proximity  to  the  city,  as  well  as  many  other  state  parks  where  individuals  can  participate  in  numerous  outdoor  activities  year  round.  Florida State University and Florida A&M University have  widely recognized sports programs such as the nationally‐ ranked Seminole football and baseball teams that provide  additional entertainment options for the city’s residents.     Overall Score  The city offers the lifestyle that retirees are looking for. Tallahassee is a small city that  provides high quality services, in which residents can enjoy peace and quiet while at the  same  time,  participate  in  a  wide  variety  of  recreational and cultural activities.   Overall Score and Score 
  Tallahassee  is  Number  1  on  this  list  Overall Score  % of possible total points  112  93% 

because  it  possesses  the  most  desirable  climate,  a  relatively  low  cost  of  living,  quality  healthcare  institutions,  relatively  low  local  taxes,  and  many  recreational  alternatives, all of which have been identified as extremely important to individuals  that are retired or about to retire. 

     

The Washington Economics Group, Inc. 

White Paper 

|Page 9  

 

2. Memphis, Tennessee 
Memphis  is  a  city  with  a  population  of  almost  700,000  residents9  and  is  located  in  western  Tennessee  next  to  the  Mississippi  River.  Memphis  is  an  attractive  option  for  retirees  because it can offer a particularly  low  cost  of  living,  an  exceptional  healthcare  system  and  competitive tax rates.   Climate   Memphis experiences all four seasons throughout the year. Summers can be extremely  warm with high temperatures reaching over 90 degrees and precipitation on more than  100  days  of  the  year.  Winter  months  can  be  particularly  cold  with  average  low  temperatures reaching the low 30’s.  The city does not experience much snowfall as it  only collects 5.1 inches on average each year10.   Cost of Living/Housing   The cost of living in the City of Memphis is lower than average. Memphis’ Cost of Living  Index is 8911, significantly lower than the national average of 100.  The city’s residents  enjoy low prices on food, utilities, healthcare and housing. The median sales price for a  single‐family  home  in  Memphis  is  just  above  $120,00012,  which  ranks  it  among  the  lowest found in the cities on this list.  Healthcare   Memphis residents can find a full range of healthcare services offered in the numerous  hospitals in the city. The Methodist Healthcare system, which manages and operates 7 
                                                            
9 U.S. Census Bureau, "Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas." Accessed February 04, 2012. 

http://www.census.gov/population/metro/.  10 Infoplease, "Climate of 100 Selected U.S. Cities." Accessed February 04, 2012.  http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0762083.html.  11 U.S. Census Bureau, "2012 U.S. Statistical Abstract." Accessed February 04, 2012.  http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/2012/tables/12s0728.xls.  12 National Association of Realtors, "Metropolitan Area Existing‐Home Prices and State Existing‐Home Sales."  Accessed February 04, 2012. http://www.realtor.org/research/research/metroprice. 

The Washington Economics Group, Inc. 

White Paper 

|Page 10  

 

hospitals, and Baptist Memorial Hospitals are located in Memphis. Many of them have  been nationally recognized in the past for the quality of their healthcare services.  Local Taxes   Memphis offers low tax obligations for its residents. Individuals in Memphis only pay a  2 percent local sales tax in addition to the state sales tax of 7 percent13. Thus, Memphis  residents pay a 9 percent sales tax in total. Memphis residents are not subject to paying  any state or local income taxes.   Recreation   Memphis  offers  a  wide  range  of  leisure  activities  for  its  residents.  The  city  has  many  parks, museums and historical sites such as the Victorian Village and the National Civil  Rights  Museum,  located  in  the  same  hotel  building  where  Martin  Luther  King  Jr.  was  assassinated. Residents of the City of Memphis can enjoy numerous live sporting events  in  the  city.  The  Memphis  Grizzlies  NBA  franchise  and  one  triple‐A  baseball  team  play  their home games in Memphis. The Memphis University Tigers have a traditionally top‐ ranked  and  popular  basketball  program,  and  the  FedEx/St.  Jude  Classic  PGA  golf  tournament  is  held  every  year  in  the  city.  Residents  interested  in  ocean  and  beach‐ related activities must travel in excess of five hours to reach such destinations.     Overall, Memphis can be an attractive destination for retirees as it has a highly regarded  healthcare system and offers a low cost of living as well as low local tax rates.     Overall Score 
Memphis  drawbacks  are  its  considerable  distance  to  the  ocean  and  beaches.  The  climate  during  winters  and  summers  can  also  be  difficult for retirees.  Overall Score and Score  Score  % of possible total points  106  88% 

 

                                                            
13 City Data, "U.S. Cities." Accessed February 04, 2012. http://www.city‐data.com/us‐cities/thesouth/Memphis.html. 

The Washington Economics Group, Inc. 

White Paper 

|Page 11  

 

3. Athens, Georgia
Athens is a college town located  in  North  Georgia  with  a  population  of  slightly  over  100,000 residents14. Athens is an  attractive alternative for retirees  because  the  city  offers  some  of  the  most  sought  after  amenities  for  retirees.  Athens  offers  its  residents  a  low  cost  of  living,  competitive  tax  rates,  an  adequate  healthcare  system  and  numerous recreational options.   Climate   Athens residents experience the four seasons throughout the year. The summer months  can average high temperatures around 90 degrees, and the winter months average low  temperatures in the 30’s. There is an average of 4 inches of rainfall each month15 and  even though it is not very common, there can be snowfall during the winter months.  Cost of Living/Housing   Residents of Athens enjoy a lower cost of living than the national average. Athens’ Cost  of Living Index is 9216, significantly lower than the national average of 100. Gas prices  are  about  1  percent  higher  than  the  national  average.  Food  and  healthcare  prices  are  slightly  below  national  averages,  but  housing  prices  are  significantly  lower  than  the  average.  The  median  sales  price  for  a  single‐family  home  in  Athens  is  close  to  $120,00017, which is among the lowest found in the cities on this list.      

                                                            
14 U.S. Census Bureau, "Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas." Accessed February 04, 2012. 

http://www.census.gov/population/metro/.  15 Infoplease, "Climate of 100 Selected U.S. Cities." Accessed February 04, 2012.  http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0762083.html.  16 U.S. Census Bureau, "2012 U.S. Statistical Abstract." Accessed February 04, 2012.  http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/2012/tables/12s0728.xls.  17 National Association of Realtors, "Metropolitan Area Existing‐Home Prices and State Existing‐Home Sales."  Accessed February 04, 2012. http://www.realtor.org/research/research/metroprice. 

The Washington Economics Group, Inc. 

White Paper 

|Page 12  

 

Healthcare   The  City  of  Athens  has  two  main  providers  of  healthcare  services:  Athens  Regional  Medical Center and St. Mary’s Healthcare System. Both provide a full range of medical  services to Athens’s residents.  Local Taxes   The  City  of  Athens  offers  competitive  tax  rates.  The  city’s  residents  pay  Georgia’s  income  tax that  extends  between  1‐6  percent  and  the  state  sales  tax  of  4  percent18. A  positive factor and potential advantage offered by the City of Athens is that it does not  assess any additional local income or sales tax to its residents.  Recreation   Athens  offers  a  variety  of  leisure  activities  to  its  residents.    City  residents  can  enjoy  parks, restaurants, cinemas and museums. However, the University of Georgia’s sports  teams  that  play  in  the  highest  division  of  collegiate  sports  provide  much  of  the  entertainment. Individuals that enjoy ocean and beach activities must drive in excess of  four hours to reach these destinations.  Overall Score  Athens  is  a  small  city  with  attractive  features  and  amenities  to  offer  its  retirees.  The  city’s  low  cost  of  living  and  competitive  tax  rates  make  it  attractive  for  individuals  selecting  a  retirement  destination.  The  city’s  healthcare  system  is  adequate,  and  the  climate is not extreme even though residents do experience the four seasons.  
  Athens  offers  numerous  recreational  options, an adequate healthcare system  and a low cost of living. However, there  is a great distance between the city and  the ocean and beaches.  Score  % of possible total points  Overall Score and Score  102  85% 

 

 

 
.    White Paper  |Page 13  

                                                            
18 City Data, "U.S. Cities." Accessed February 04, 2012. http://www.city‐data.com/city/Athens‐Georgia.html

  The Washington Economics Group, Inc. 

 

4. Tuscaloosa, Alabama 
Tuscaloosa  is  a  small  city  in  the  middle  of  the  State  of  Alabama.  The  Tuscaloosa  metropolitan  area  has  a  population  of  almost  200,000  residents19. The city can be an  alternative  for  retirees  because  it  has  some  of  the  characteristics  and  offers  a  selection of the amenities that  retirees  look  for  when  deciding  where  to  locate.  Tuscaloosa  offers  a  pleasant  climate  with  mild  winters  and  almost  no  snowfall.  Residents  of  Tuscaloosa  enjoy  a  relatively  low  cost  of  living  and  an  adequate  healthcare  system.  Recreational  options  in  Tuscaloosa center on the University of Alabama athletic programs.   Climate   Tuscaloosa’s  residents  experience  the  four  seasons  throughout  the  year,  however,  the  winter  is  mild  when  compared  to  other  cities  on  this  list.    The  summer  months  can  average high temperatures close to 90 degrees, while winter months have low‐average  temperatures  close  to  40  degrees.  Even  though  temperatures  are  not  extremely  cold,  there are small amounts of snowfall each winter20.   Cost of Living/Housing   Tuscaloosa’s  residents  enjoy  a  lower‐than‐average  cost  of  living.  Tuscaloosa’s  Cost  of  Living  Index  is  9421,  significantly  below  the  national  average  of  100.  Healthcare  and  food prices are slightly lower than the national average as well. Gas prices are almost 15  percent  lower  than  the  national  average.  In  Tuscaloosa,  the  median  sales  price  for  a  single‐family home is slightly above $130,00022, which is low when compared to other  cities on this list.      

                                                            
19 U.S. Census Bureau, "Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas." Accessed February 04, 2012. 

http://www.census.gov/population/metro/.  20 Infoplease, "Climate of 100 Selected U.S. Cities." Accessed February 04, 2012.  http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0762083.html.  21 U.S. Census Bureau, "2012 U.S. Statistical Abstract." Accessed February 04, 2012.  http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/2012/tables/12s0728.xls.  22 National Association of Realtors, "Metropolitan Area Existing‐Home Prices and State Existing‐Home Sales."  Accessed February 04, 2012. http://www.realtor.org/research/research/metroprice. 

The Washington Economics Group, Inc. 

White Paper 

|Page 14  

 

Healthcare   Tuscaloosa’s main hospital is the DCH Regional Medical Center, and it offers a full range  of  healthcare  services.  The  DCH  Regional  Medical  Center,  which  is  part  of  the  DCH  Health System, has the most technologically‐advanced trauma center in the region, and  it serves all of Western Alabama.  Local Taxes   Tuscaloosa is a city in which the fiscal obligations of its residents are on par with the  national average. The State of Alabama has income tax rates between 2‐5 percent and a  state sales tax of 4 percent. In addition, the City of Tuscaloosa charges a 2 percent local  sales tax23.  Recreation    Tuscaloosa  is  a  city  heavily  influenced  by  the  student  population  of  the  University  of  Alabama.  One  in  three  residents  of  Tuscaloosa  is  a  student,  which  is  why  activities  related  to  the  University  of  Alabama  and  its  athletic  programs,  especially  the  men’s  football team, are the main attractions in Tuscaloosa. The city also has various cultural  attractions such as historical sites and museums like the Alabama Museum of Natural  History and the Paul W. Bryant Museum.  Overall Score  Tuscaloosa can be an attractive option for retirees due to the city’s comfortable climate  and low cost of living.  The healthcare system is small but adequate, and local taxes do  not present a disadvantage.    
Recreational options are not numerous  and individuals interested in the ocean  and  beaches  will  have  to  drive  almost  four hours to get there.  Score  % of possible total points  Overall Score and Score  98  82% 

 

 

 

                                                            
23 City Data, "U.S. Cities." Accessed February 04, 2012. http://www.city‐data.com/us‐

cities/thesouth/Tuscaloosa.html. 

The Washington Economics Group, Inc. 

White Paper 

|Page 15  

 

5. Atlanta, Georgia 
Atlanta  is  one  of  the  biggest  and  most  dynamic  cities  in  the  southern  United  States.  Atlanta’s  metropolitan  area  has  a  population  of  over  5  million  residents24.  Atlanta  can  offer  retirees  an  outstanding  healthcare  system  that  is  nationally  recognized  and  a  cost  of  living  that  is  slightly  below  the  national  average.  The  city  also  offers  numerous  recreational options ranging from cultural attractions to professional sports teams.   Climate   Like  many  cities,  Atlanta  also  experiences  the  four  seasons.  Warm  months  can  bring  high  temperatures  over  90 degrees,  and  there  is  precipitation  on  more  than  100  days  out  of  the  year25.  Winter  months  can  bring  temperatures  down  to  the  mid  30’s;  however,  they  average  around  45  degrees.  The  city  experiences  minimal  snowfall  during the winter months.   Cost of Living/Housing  The cost of living in the City of Atlanta is slightly lower than the national average. At 95,  the Cost of Living Index is below the national average of 10026. Food and gas prices are  at the same level or slightly lower than national averages.  However, housing prices are  some  of  the  lowest  of  any  city  in  America.  The  median  sales  price  for  a  single‐family  home  in  Atlanta  is  almost  $120,00027.  Therefore,  the  city  is  considered  to  have  “the  most affordable major market in the U.S.”  
                                                            
24 U.S. Census Bureau, "Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas." Accessed February 04, 2012. 

http://www.census.gov/population/metro/.  25 Infoplease, "Climate of 100 Selected U.S. Cities." Accessed February 04, 2012.  http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0762083.html.  26 U.S. Census Bureau, "2012 U.S. Statistical Abstract." Accessed February 04, 2012.  http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/2012/tables/12s0728.xls.  27 National Association of Realtors, "Metropolitan Area Existing‐Home Prices and State Existing‐Home Sales."  Accessed February 04, 2012. http://www.realtor.org/research/research/metroprice. 

The Washington Economics Group, Inc. 

White Paper 

|Page 16  

 

Healthcare   Atlanta  is  a  national  leader  in  the  healthcare  field  with  more  than  50  hospitals  in  its  metropolitan  area.  The  city’s  hospitals  have  been  continuously  recognized  as  some  of  the  best  in  the  country.  The  Grady  Health  System  is  the  main  healthcare  provider  in  Atlanta  and  serves  the  medical  students  and  schools  of  Emory  University  and  Morehouse College.  Local Taxes   When comparing the fiscal obligations of Atlanta’s residents to those of the rest of the  country,  the  city  finds  itself  in  the  middle  of  the  ranks.  Atlanta’s  residents  pay  the  Georgia  state  income  tax  which  ranges  from  1  to  6  percent  and  a  state  sales  tax  of  4  percent. In addition, Atlanta’s residents must also pay a 3 percent additional local sales  tax28.  Recreation   The City of Atlanta has a wide variety of recreational amenities and activities available  to its residents. The City offers a number of museums and cultural heritage sites as well  as  events  and  festivals  such  as  the  Dogwood  and  Arts  Festivals  and  the  Atlanta  Oysterfest.   The  city  also  enjoys  the  presence  of  major  sports  franchises.  The  Falcons,  the  Braves  and  the  Hawks  are  franchises  of  the  National  Football  League,  Major  League  Baseball  and the National Basketball Association respectively that play their home games in the  City of Atlanta. Georgia Tech University is also located in Atlanta and fields teams in all  major collegiate sports.   Residents of the City of Atlanta that are interested in ocean activities and/or the beach  must travel approximately five hours away from the city to reach such destinations – a  considerable distance.  Overall Score  Atlanta  can  provide  retirees  a  leading  healthcare  system  that  offers  a  variety  of  specialized  care,  a  relatively  low  cost  of  living,  and  many  recreational  options  are  all  available in Atlanta.    
                                                            
28 City Data, "U.S. Cities." Accessed February  04, 2012. http://www.city‐data.com/us‐cities/thesouth/Atlanta.html. 

The Washington Economics Group, Inc. 

White Paper 

|Page 17  

 

    The  city’s  size  presents  some  problems  for  its  residents,  which  is  one  of  the  reasons  it  receives  a  lower  score  than  other  smaller  cities.  Traffic  congestion  Score  % of possible total points  Overall Score and Score  94  78% 

is exceptionally common in Atlanta’s daily life, and city residents may find it difficult  to enjoy the peace and quiet found in smaller cities. 

         

 

 

The Washington Economics Group, Inc. 

White Paper 

|Page 18  

 

6. Oxford, Mississippi (Tied at #6) 
Oxford  is  a  small  city  with  a  population  of  just  under  20,000  individuals29.  It  is  located  in  northern  Mississippi  near  the  Tennessee  border.  The  population  of  the  City  of  Oxford  consists  mainly  of  young  people  due  to  the  presence  of  the  University  of  Mississippi.  Oxford  can  be  attractive  for  retirees  for  reasons  such  as  a  low  cost  of  living; however, Oxford’s location, size and population composition may not best fit the  needs of a retiree.  Climate   Residents  of  Oxford  experience  the  four  seasons.  Summer  months  average  high  temperatures  between  85  and  90  degrees,  and  winter  months  average  low  temperatures  in  the  30’s.    On  average,  there  are  only  small  amounts  of  snowfall  each  year and above‐average rainfall levels during June and July.   Cost of Living/Housing   The  Cost  of  Living  Index  for  Oxford,  MS  is  8830,  significantly  lower  than  the  national  average of 100. Housing, healthcare and food prices in Oxford are all significantly lower  than national averages. Gas prices are almost 2 percent lower than the national average.   Healthcare  The City of Oxford has one main hospital, the Baptist Memorial Hospital. It offers a full  range  of  healthcare  services  for  northern  Mississippi  residents  including  the  Baptist  Heart Care Center, which specializes in the treatment of heart‐related ailments.     

                                                            
29 City Data, "U.S. Cities." Accessed February 04, 2012. http://www.city‐data.com/city/Oxford‐Mississippi.html.  30 U.S. Census Bureau, "2012 U.S. Statistical Abstract." Accessed February 04, 2012. 

http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/2012/tables/12s0728.xls. 

The Washington Economics Group, Inc. 

White Paper 

|Page 19  

 

Local Taxes   The fiscal obligations of residents of Oxford rank in the middle when compared to the  other cities on this list. Oxford residents are not obligated to pay income or sales taxes  to the city. However, they must pay the State of Mississippi a state income tax between  3 to 5 percent and a state sales tax of 8 percent31.   Recreation    Oxford  residents  can  enjoy  various  leisure  activities.  The  city  has  parks,  restaurants,  cultural attractions and heritage sites. The University of Mississippi fields teams in all  major  sports,  which  can  offer  a  leisure  alternative  almost  all  year  long.    However,  individuals that enjoy ocean and beach‐related activities must travel at least six hours  to reach such destinations.   Overall Score  Oxford is a small college city that can offer retirees benefits such as a relatively low cost  of  living.  However,  the  city  is  small  and  most  of  its  population  is  college‐age  young  adults.    

Oxford  possesses  options  for  its  older  residents:  it  has  parks,  heritage  sites,  cultural attractions and the University  of Mississippi’s educational and sports  Score 

Overall Score and Score  88  73% 

% of possible total points 

activities.  However, the city is located six hours away from the ocean and beaches.  The  healthcare  system  is  rather  limited,  and  some  patients  in  need  of  specialized  care would need to travel to a bigger healthcare hub. 

     

                                                            
31 City Data, "U.S. Cities." Accessed February 04, 2012. http://www.city‐data.com/city/Oxford‐Mississippi.html. 

The Washington Economics Group, Inc. 

White Paper 

|Page 20  

 

6. 

Charleston, South Carolina (Tied at #6) 
Charleston  is  a  mid‐sized  colonial  city  located  on  the  coast  of  South  Carolina.  Charleston’s  metropolitan  area  has  a  population  of  over  650,000 individuals32. The City  offers  retirees  a  highly‐ regarded  healthcare  system  and competitive local tax rates.  The  city’s  colonial  heritage  provides  a  dynamic  environment full of culture and  a  wide  range  of  entertainment  options for its residents. 

Climate   Charleston  is  another  city  that  experiences  the  four  seasons.    Summers  can  be  extremely  warm  with  average  high  temperatures  reaching  over  90  degrees.  There  is  precipitation  more  than  110  days  out  of  the  year33.    Cold  weather  months  experience  average low temperatures around 40 degrees, and there is little snowfall in the city.   Cost of Living/Housing   Charleston offers its residents a cost of living that is close to the national average. The  Cost of Living Index for the City of Charleston is 10134 (the national average is 100). The  median sales price for a single‐family home in Charleston is slightly above $200,00035.  However, Charleston’s residents have to bear the burden of paying gas prices that are  more than 5 percent higher than the national average.   Healthcare   Charleston’s  healthcare  system  consists  of  numerous  hospitals  and  healthcare  centers  that  provide  a  wide  range  of  services  for  the  residents  of  eastern  South  Carolina.  The 
                                                            
32 U.S. Census Bureau, "Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas." Accessed February 04, 2012. 

http://www.census.gov/population/metro/.  33 Infoplease, "Climate of 100 Selected U.S. Cities." Accessed February 04, 2012.  http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0762083.html.  34 U.S. Census Bureau, "2012 U.S. Statistical Abstract." Accessed February 04, 2012.  http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/2012/tables/12s0728.xls.  35 National Association of Realtors, "Metropolitan Area Existing‐Home Prices and State Existing‐Home Sales."  Accessed February 04, 2012. http://www.realtor.org/research/research/metroprice. 

The Washington Economics Group, Inc. 

White Paper 

|Page 21  

 

Medical University of South Carolina Medical Center is the main healthcare provider in  the  region,  and  the  Medical  University  of  South  Carolina  is  one  of  the  oldest  medical  schools  in  the  United  States.  Its  facilities  and  personnel  are  equipped  to  offer  a  full  range of healthcare services to Charleston’s residents.  Local Taxes   Charleston is one of the cities on our list of selected locations that does not assess city  income taxes and city sales taxes. Residents of Charleston have to pay the State of South  Carolina  income  and  sales  tax.  The  state  income  tax  can  vary  from  3  percent  to  6.5  percent, and the state sales tax rate is 6 percent36.  Recreation   Charleston possesses a rich colonial heritage. The city has many cultural attractions and  is  in  close  proximity  to  Francis  Marion  National  Forest.  Charleston  sits  next  to  the  Atlantic Ocean on the South Carolina coast. Thus, its residents enjoy a perfect location  for ocean and beach‐related activities. The city is home to a minor league baseball team,  but no major professional sports teams are located in the State of South Carolina. The  University  of  South  Carolina’s  and  Clemson  University’s  sports  teams  are  located  in  other cities of South Carolina.  Overall Score  Charleston, SC is a city full of heritage and destinations of historical importance. It is a  city  that  can  offer  retirees  an  adequate  healthcare  system  and  competitive  local  tax  rates. The city has many recreational options and is located on the Atlantic coast.  
   Charleston receives a lower score as its  climate can be cold  in the winter. Cost  of living is average at best.  Score  % of possible total points  Overall Score and Score  88  73% 

   

                                                            
36 City Data, "U.S. Cities." Accessed February 04, 2012. http://www.city‐data.com/us‐

cities/thesouth/Charleston.html. 

The Washington Economics Group, Inc. 

White Paper 

|Page 22  

 

8.      Louisville, Kentucky 
Louisville  is  located  in  the  heart  of  the  mid‐western  United  States.  Slightly over 1 million people inhabit  the  city’s  metropolitan  area.   Louisville  offers  retirees  a  low  cost  of  living  and  many  entertainment  alternatives.  Climate  is  not  a  strong  point  for  Louisville,  and  local  taxes  are  average  when  compared  to  the  other cities on this list.   Climate   The City of Louisville is located in the heart of the mid‐western United States, which is  why  it  experiences  a  continental  climate.  Louisville’s  climate  is  characterized  by  temperature  differences  between  seasons.  Louisville  has  very  cold  months  with  low  temperatures  reaching  less  than  25  degrees  with  little  snowfall  and  summer  months  with average high temperatures reaching 90 degrees37.    Cost of Living/Housing   Louisville is another low cost city found on our list of the top cities to retire. Louisville’s  Cost  of  Living  Index  is  90,  significantly  lower  than  the  national  average.    This  is  reflected  in  lower  food,  healthcare  and  housing  prices.  The  median  price  for  a  single‐ family home in Louisville is below $135,00038. On the other hand, gas prices are about 2  percent higher than the national average.  Healthcare   The City of Louisville offers an adequate healthcare system for its residents. There are a  number  of  specialized  centers  such  as  the  Caritas  Medical  Center  that  offers  a  wide  range of expertise in different health‐related disorders such as cancer and diabetes.     

                                                            
37Infoplease, "Climate of 100 Selected U.S. Cities." Accessed February 04, 2012. 

http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0762083.html.  38 National Association of Realtors, "Metropolitan Area Existing‐Home Prices and State Existing‐Home Sales."  Accessed February 04, 2012. http://www.realtor.org/research/research/metroprice. 

The Washington Economics Group, Inc. 

White Paper 

|Page 23  

 

Local Taxes   Louisville  has  a  tax  environment  that  is  best  described  as  average.  The  city  is  in  the  State of Kentucky, which assesses a state income tax between 2 – 6 percent and a state  sales  tax  of  6  percent.  Additionally,  Louisville  residents  must  pay  a  1.75  percent  local  sales tax39.  Recreation   It  can  be  said  that  Louisville’s  most  famous  attraction  is  Churchill  Downs,  the  horseracing  track  where  the  Kentucky  Derby  is  held  every  year.  There  are  other  cultural attractions such as historical monuments and buildings. The city is home to the  River  Bats,  a  triple‐A  baseball  team.  The  University  of  Louisville  Cardinals  also  fields  teams in all major sports; however, the University’s men basketball team captures most  of the attention. For the would‐be retirees who are interested in the ocean and beaches,  Louisville  would  not  be  attractive  to  them  as  the  ocean  and  beaches  are  many  miles  away.   Overall Score  Louisville  can  be  attractive  for  some  individuals  looking  for  a  retirement  destination.  The city offers a low cost of living and an adequate healthcare system. On top of that,  Louisville has been ranked among the safest cities in America for many years40.  

Louisville’s  drawbacks  are  the  city’s  climate,  which  consists  of  intense  summers  and  winters,  average  local  tax  rates  and  the  significant  distance  Score 

Overall Score and Score  82  68% 

% of possible total points 

between the city and the ocean and beaches. 

   

                                                            
39 City Data, "U.S. Cities." Accessed February 04, 2012. http://www.city‐data.com/us‐cities/thesouth/Lousville.html.  40 "Ten safest U.S. cities? Winners may surprise you." USA Today, September 28, 2010. 

http://content.usatoday.com/communities/greenhouse/post/2010/09/safest‐us‐cities‐may‐suprise‐you/1  (accessed February 18, 2012). 

The Washington Economics Group, Inc. 

White Paper 

|Page 24  

 

9. Richmond, Virginia (Tied at #9) 
Richmond  is  located  in  eastern  Virginia.  The  population  of  Richmond’s  metropolitan  area  is  more  than  one  million  individuals.    The  City  of  Richmond  can  offer  retirees  a  good  healthcare  system  and  a  wide  variety  of  entertainment  options.  However,  cost  of  living  in Richmond is higher than most  of the other cities on this list, and  local  taxes  are  around  the  national average.    Climate   The  City  of  Richmond  experiences  all  four  seasons.  However,  its  climate  can  be  best  described as having cold winters and mild summers. Typically, there is precipitation on  more  than  100  days41  out  of  the  year.  Warm  months  have  average  temperatures  between  75  and  80  degrees.  The  winter  months  have  an  average  temperature  in  the  mid 30’s, and the city averages only small amounts of snowfall each year.   Cost of Living/Housing   Richmond’s residents endure a relatively high cost of living. The Cost of Living Index for  Richmond  is  10742,  above  the  national  average  of  100.  This  is  reflected  in  the  median  sales  price  for  a  single  family  home,  which  is  over  $223,00043  and  the  relatively  high  price of healthcare services, food and other goods. Gas prices in Richmond are typically  around the national average.   Healthcare   Richmond  has  a  recognized  healthcare  system  with  a  strong  reputation.  This  system  includes more than 18 hospitals  within the Richmond  metropolitan area. The Virginia  Commonwealth University Center is one of the largest healthcare providers in the state. 
                                                            
41 Infoplease, "Climate of 100 Selected U.S. Cities." Accessed February 04, 2012. 

http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0762083.html.  42 U.S. Census Bureau, "2012 U.S. Statistical Abstract." Accessed February 04, 2012.  http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/2012/tables/12s0728.xls.  43 National Association of Realtors, "Metropolitan Area Existing‐Home Prices and State Existing‐Home Sales."  Accessed February 04, 2012. http://www.realtor.org/research/research/metroprice. 

The Washington Economics Group, Inc. 

White Paper 

|Page 25  

 

Also,  Richmond’s  hospitals  are  national  leaders  in  neuro‐science  research  and  heart  bypass surgery44.   Local Taxes   Richmond ranks in the middle of our list of selected cities when evaluating the level of  tax its residents pay. The city is located in the State of Virginia, which assesses a state  income  tax  with  a  rate  between  2  percent  to  5.75  percent  and  a  state  sales  tax  of  4  percent.  The  City  of  Richmond  does  not  have  an  additional  income  tax,  but  it  does  charge a 1 percent sales tax45.  Recreation   Richmond  is  a  city  full  of  history  and  is  home  to  more  than  100  tourist  and  visitor  destinations that range from historical battlegrounds found in  the National Battlefield  Park  to  colonial‐time  houses  and  buildings.    The  city  also  offers  other  cultural  and  recreational amenities such as the Richmond Symphony, a number of ballet companies,  the  city’s  planetarium  and  many  of  museums.  Richmond  is  host  to  a  triple‐A  baseball  team  and  the  sports  teams  for  the  University  of  Virginia  Commonwealth.  In  addition,  the  city  also  hosts  two  NASCAR  races  each  year  at  the  Richmond  International  Speedway. Residents that want to enjoy the ocean and beaches will have to drive a little  over two hours to Virginia Beach.   Overall Score    Richmond can be best described as an average city for retirees. It offers some amenities,  but nothing that makes it superior to the other cities on this list.    
Richmond’s  cost  of  living  is  higher  than  the  national  average.  The  city’s  local  taxes  and  climate  are  average.  Score  % of possible total points  Overall Score and Score  78  65% 

                                                            
44 City Data, "U.S. Cities." Accessed February 04, 2012. http://www.city‐data.com/us‐cities/thesouth/richmond.html.  45 Ditto. 

The Washington Economics Group, Inc. 

White Paper 

|Page 26  

 

9.    Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Tied at #9) 
Pittsburgh  is  a  city  located  in  western  Pennsylvania  with  more  than  2  million46  individuals  living  in  its  metropolitan  area.  The  city  has  experienced  dramatic  changes  over  the  recent  decades  as  it  has  transformed  itself  from  an  industrial  town  heavily  dependent on low skill jobs  to  a  knowledge  city  with  strong industry clusters in fields such as science and technology. Pittsburgh has many  positive attributes such as a low cost of living and outstanding healthcare institutions,  which makes it an attractive city for retired individuals.     Climate   Pittsburgh’s  climate  is  predominantly  cold  year  round.    The  city  experiences  mild  summers and very cold winters. Warm months have average temperatures in the mid  70’s, and there is precipitation during more than 150 days47 out of the year. The winter  months’  average  temperatures  are  below  28  degrees,  and  the  city  endures  large  amounts of snowfall each year.    Cost of Living/Housing   The  City  of  Pittsburgh  offers  its  residents  a  lower‐than‐average  cost  of  living.  In  fact,  Pittsburgh is one of the cities on our selected list with the lowest cost of living. The Cost  of Living Index for Pittsburgh is 9048 (the national average is 100). Additionally, median  sales price for a single‐family home in Pittsburgh is slightly over $120,00049.  One of the 
                                                            
46 U.S. Census Bureau, "Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas." Accessed February 04, 2012. 

http://www.census.gov/population/metro/.  47 Infoplease, "Climate of 100 Selected U.S. Cities." Accessed February 04, 2012.  http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0762083.html.  48U.S. Census Bureau, "2012 U.S. Statistical Abstract." Accessed February 04, 2012.  http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/2012/tables/12s0728.xls.  49 National Association of Realtors, "Metropolitan Area Existing‐Home Prices and State Existing‐Home Sales."  Accessed February 04, 2012. http://www.realtor.org/research/research/metroprice. 

The Washington Economics Group, Inc. 

White Paper 

|Page 27  

 

few  factors  that  negatively  influence  the  cost  of  living  for  Pittsburgh  are  gas  prices,  which are almost 2 percent higher than the national average.       Healthcare    Pittsburgh offers a highly regarded healthcare system for its residents.  The University  of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) consists of more than 20 hospitals in the region  and  offers  a  full  range  of  medical  services  including  specialized  research  and  surgical  centers.  The UPMC system has been ranked among the top healthcare systems in the  United States for many years.     Local Taxes   The  City  of  Pittsburgh  is  not  an  attractive  choice  for  those  retirees  looking  to  pay  the  lowest  tax  rates  available.  The  State  of  Pennsylvania  has  a  state  income  tax  rate  of  3  percent  and  a  state  sales  tax  of  6  percent.  In  addition  to  these  taxes,  the  City  of  Pittsburgh also assesses its residents a local income tax with a rate of 3 percent and a  local sales tax of 1 percent. The combination of state and local taxes in Pittsburgh is a  significant negative factor that should be considered by individuals deciding where to  live when they retire.     Recreation   The City of Pittsburgh offers a variety of recreational amenities for its residents. There  are  historical  monuments  and  buildings  as  well  as  many  other  cultural  attractions  spread throughout the city, such as Point State Park, the Pennsylvania Station and the  University  of  Pittsburgh’s  Cathedral  of  Learning50.  The  city  is  home  to  the  renowned  Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra and a number of performing arts centers.     One  of  the  city’s  main  recreational  attractions  includes  its  sports  teams.  The  National  Football  League’s  Pittsburgh  Steelers,  Major  League  Baseball’s  Pittsburgh  Pirates  and  the  National  Hockey  League’s  Penguins  play  their  home  games  in  Pittsburgh.  In  addition,  the  University  of  Pittsburgh  also  fields  teams  in  all  major  American  sports.  There are state parks with lakes within a few hours from the city; however, individuals  interested  in  the  ocean  and  beaches  would  have  to  drive  approximately  three  hours  away  from  the  city.  It  must  be  noted  that  many  of  these  recreational  activities  are  limited since they are only available during warm weather months. 
                                                              
50

City Data, "U.S. Cities." Accessed February 04, 2012. http://www.city‐data.com/us‐ cities/thenortheast/Pittsburgh.html. 

The Washington Economics Group, Inc. 

White Paper 

|Page 28  

 

Overall Score  The City of Pittsburgh can be an attractive alternative for retirees. It offers a low cost of  living  coupled  with  a  good  healthcare  system  and  numerous  recreational  options.   Pittsburgh  can  be  a  good  option  for  individuals  interested  in  sports  and  cultural  activities who do not mind the cold weather or do not need to be within close proximity  to the ocean or beaches.   
Pittsburgh’s  climate  is  cold  most  of  the  year.  The  city  is  not  located  close  to  the  ocean,  and  local  taxes  can  become  a  heavy  burden  for  its  Score  % of possible total points  Overall Score and Score  78  65% 

residents in comparison to the other cities on this list. 

                            

The Washington Economics Group, Inc. 

White Paper 

|Page 29  

 

Conclusion 
Close to 80 million individuals in the U.S. will soon be making choices regarding their  retirement, and one important decision will be the city or town in which they choose to  reside.  In  this  White  Paper,  The  Washington  Economics  Group  developed  a  methodology that ranked cities based on a number of factors extracted from the results  of  the  Mason‐Dixon  survey  among  “Baby  Boomers”  regarding  their  retirement  preferences.  The survey asked participants about different features and characteristics they wished  to find in the city they chose to retire. Additionally, the survey asked which factors were  most important when deciding where to reside. The results of the Mason‐Dixon survey  show that “Baby Boomers” place a high value on some characteristics of the city where  they choose to spend their retirement years, while other factors are not as important.  There are five main factors that “Baby Boomers” highly consider when choosing where  to live, and these factors were analyzed in detail in this White Paper. They are: climate,  cost of living, quality and affordability of available healthcare services, local taxes and  recreational amenities. WEG developed a methodology that ranked all 20 cities on the  list based on scoring each factor for each city and included a detailed analysis for each  one of the Top 10 cities.                    

WEG’s Analysis demonstrates  that based on the Mason­ Dixon survey results, the city  with the most desirable set of  characteristics for retiring  “Baby Boomers” is  Tallahassee, Florida.   Tallahassee possesses the right  combination of features that  make it an ideal destination  for retirees. 

The Washington Economics Group, Inc. 

White Paper 

|Page 30  

 

Table 2. Scores for City Factors 
Weight  City  10  Climate  8  Cost of Living/Housing   6  Health Care  4  Local Taxes  2  Recreation 

Tallahassee, FL 
Memphis, TN  Athens, GA  Tuscaloosa, AL  Atlanta, GA  Oxford, MS  Charleston, SC  Louisville, KY  Richmond, VA  Pittsburgh, PA  Raleigh‐Durham, NC  Indianapolis, IN  Lexington, KY  Toledo, OH  Cleveland, OH  Boston, MA  Milwaukee, WI  Washington, DC  Philadelphia, PA  New York, NY 


3  3  4  3  3  3  2  2  1  3  2  2  1  1  1  1  1  1  1 


4  4  3  3  4  2  3  2  4  2  4  3  4  3  1  2  1  1  1 


4  4  3  4  2  4  4  4  4  4  4  2  3  4  4  4  4  4  4 


4  3  3  3  3  3  3  3  2  3  2  2  1  1  3  2  2  2  1 


2  2  2  2  1  3  1  3  2  2  1  1  1  1  3  2  3  2  3 

 

 

The Washington Economics Group, Inc. 

White Paper/Page 31 

 

Table 3. Overall Scores for Cities 
Weight:  Rank  City  10  Climate  8  6  4  Local  Taxes  2  Recreation  TOTAL  Cost of  Healthcare  Living/Housing  % of  possible  points  obtained 


2  3  4  5  6  6  8  9  9  11  11  13  13  15  16  16  18  19  20 

Tallahassee, FL 
Memphis, TN  Athens, GA  Tuscaloosa, AL  Atlanta, GA  Oxford, MS  Charleston, SC  Louisville, KY  Richmond, VA  Pittsburgh, PA  Raleigh‐Durham, NC  Indianapolis, IN  Lexington, KY  Toledo, OH  Cleveland, OH  Boston, MA  Milwaukee, WI  Washington, DC  Philadelphia, PA  New York, NY 

40 
30  30  40  30  30  30  20  20  10  20  10  20  10  10  10  10  10  10  10 

24 
32  32  24  24  32  16  24  16  32  16  32  24  32  24  8  16  8  8  8 

24 
24  24  18  24  12  24  24  24  24  24  24  12  18  24  24  24  24  24  24 

16 
16  12  12  12  12  12  12  12  8  12  8  8  4  4  12  8  8  8  4 


4  4  4  4  2  6  2  6  4  4  2  2  2  2  6  2  6  4  6 

112 
106  102  98  94  88  88  82  78  78  76  76  66  66  64  60  60  56  54  52 

0.93 
0.88  0.85  0.82  0.78  0.73  0.73  0.68  0.65  0.65  0.63  0.63  0.55  0.55  0.53  0.50  0.50  0.47  0.45  0.43 

The Washington Economics Group, Inc. 

White Paper/Page 32 

 

 

APPENDIX:  THE WASHINGTON ECONOMICS GROUP QUALIFICATIONS  AND PROJECT TEAM 

The Washington Economics Group, Inc. 

 

White Paper/ Page 33  

 

The Washington Economics Group (WEG) has been successfully meeting client objectives  since  1993  through  economic  consulting  services  for  corporations,  institutions  and  governments  of  the  Americas.  We  have  the  expertise,  high‐level  contacts,  and  business  alliances to strengthen your competitive positioning in the growing marketplaces of Florida  and Latin America.  Our  roster  of  satisfied  clients,  over  the  past  eighteen  years,  includes  multinational  corporations,  financial  institutions,  public  entities,  and  non‐profit  associations  expanding  their operations in the Americas.    EXCLUSIVE CONSULTING APPROACH:  Each  client  is  unique  to  us.  We  spend  considerable  time  and  effort  in  understanding  the  operations, goals, and objectives of clients as they seek our consulting and strategic advice.  We are not a mass‐production consulting entity nor do we accept every project that comes  to us. We engage a limited number of clients each year that require customized consulting  services  in  our  premier  areas  of  specialization.    These  premier  and  exclusive  services  are  headed by former U.S. Under Secretary of Commerce, Dr. J. Antonio Villamil, with over thirty  years  of  experience  as  a  business  executive  and  as  a  senior  public  official  of  the  U.S.  and  most recently of Florida.   PREMIER CONSULTING SERVICES:  Comprehensive  Corporate  Expansion  Services.  Our  seamless  and  customized  service  includes  site  selection  analysis,  development  of  incentive  strategies  and  community  and  governmental relations.  Economic Impact Studies highlight the importance of a client's activities in the generation  of income, output and employment in the market area serviced by the entity. These studies  are  also  utilized  to  analyze  the  impact  of  public  policies  on  key  factors  that  may  affect  a  client's activities such as tax changes, zoning, environmental permits and others.  Strategic  Business  Development  Services.  These  services  are  customized  to  meet  client  objectives, with particular emphasis in the growing marketplaces of Florida, Mexico, Central  and  South  America.  Recent  consulting  assignments  include  customized  marketing  strategies, country risk assessments for investment decisions and corporate spokesperson  activities and speeches on behalf of the client at public or private meetings.   

For a full description of WEG capabilities and services,   please visit our website at: 

www.weg.com   
 

 

The Washington Economics Group, Inc.  Representative Client List  1993­2011   
MULTINATIONAL CORPORATIONS                        Lockheed Martin  FedEx Latin America  IBM  Motorola  SBC Communications  Ameritech International  Lucent Technologies  MediaOne/AT&T  Joseph E. Seagram & Sons, Inc. (Vivendi)  Microsoft Latin America  Carrier  Medtronic  Phelps Dodge  Esso Inter‐America  Visa International  MasterCard International  Telefonica Data Systems  Bureau Veritas (BIVAC)  Merck Latin America  DMJM & Harris  Wilbur Smith Associates  PBSJ    FLORIDA­BASED CORPORATIONS                           Sprint of Florida  Florida Marlins  Flo‐Sun Sugar Corp.  Farm Stores  The BMI Companies  Spillis Candela & Partners  The Biltmore Hotel/Seaway  Trammel Crow Company  Advantage Capital   WCI Development Companies  Iberia Tiles  Florida Hospital  Mercy Hospital  The St. Joe Companies  Florida Power & Light (FPL)  International Speedway Corporation  LATIN AMERICA­BASED INSTITUTIONS  Federation of Inter‐American Financial Institutions  (FIBAFIN)  The Brunetta Group of Argentina  Association of Peruvian Banks  Peruvian Management Institute (IPAE)  Mercantil Servicios Financieros, Venezuela  Allied‐Domecq, Mexico  Fonalledas Enterprises                     FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS  International Bank of Miami  Pan American Life  ABN‐AMRO Bank  Barclays Bank  Lazard Freres & Co.  Banque Nationale de Paris  HSBC/Marine Midland  Fiduciary Trust International  Sun Trust Corporation  First Union National Bank (Wachovia)  Union Planters Bank of Florida (Regions)  Bank Atlantic Corp.  Hemisphere National Bank  BankUnited, FSB  Mercantil Commercebank N.A.  PointeBank, N.A.  The Equitable/AXA Advisors  PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS, NON­PROFIT   ORGANIZATIONS & UNIVERSITIES  Baptist Health Systems  Jackson Health Systems  Miami‐Dade Expressway Authority  Miami‐Dade College  Miami Museum of Science  Zoological Society of Florida  Florida International University  University of Miami  Inter‐American Development Bank (IDB)  United Nations Economic Development Program (UNDP) Universidad Politécnica de Puerto Rico  Sistema Universitario Ana G. Méndez (SUAGM)  Keiser University  Full Sail Real World Education  Florida Ports Council  Florida Sports Foundation  Florida Citrus Mutual  Florida Nursing Homes Alliance  Florida Bankers Association  Florida Outdoor Advertising Association  City of Plantation  City of West Palm Beach   Econ. Dev. Commission of Lee County  Econ. Dev. Commission of Miami‐Dade (Beacon Council) Econ. Dev. Commission of Mid‐Florida  Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce  SW Florida Regional Chamber of Commerce  Enterprise Florida, Inc.  The Beacon Council  Visit Florida  Louisiana Committee for Economic Development  University of South Florida/ENLACE  Space Florida  State of Florida

 

                                 

 

 

J. ANTONIO “TONY” VILLAMIL 
Principal Advisor, The Washington Economics Group (WEG).  Dean, School of Business of St. Thomas University of Florida 

  Tony  Villamil  has  over  30  years  of  successful  career  as  a  business  economist,  university  educator and high‐level policymaker for both federal and state governments. He has served  as a Presidential appointee U.S. Undersecretary of Commerce for Economic Affairs, and he is  the  founder  of  a  successful  economic  consulting  practice,  The  Washington  Economics  Group,  Inc.  (WEG).  Since  August  2008,  Tony  is  the  Dean  and  Research  Professor  of  Economics at the School of Business of St. Thomas University, while continuing to serve as  Principal Economic Advisor to the clients of WEG.  Tony  is  a  recent  member  of  the  President’s  Advisory  Committee  on  Trade  Policy  and  Negotiations  in  Washington,  D.C.    He  is  the  immediate  past  Chairman  of  the  Governor’s  Council  of  Economic  Advisors  of  Florida,  and  during  1999‐2000, he  directed  the  Tourism,  International  Trade  and  Economic  Development  Department  of  the  State  in  the  Office  of  Governor Jeb Bush.  Presently, he is on the Board of Directors of the Spanish Broadcasting  System  (NASDAQ),  Mercantil  Commercebank,  N.A.,  Pan‐American  Life  Insurance  Group  (PALIG) and Enterprise Florida – the State’s principal economic development organization.    Among other leadership positions, he is currently Chairman of the Economic Roundtable of  the Beacon Council—Miami‐Dade County’s official economic development organization. He  also serves as Senior Research Fellow of Florida TaxWatch, an established fiscal and policy  research  organization  of  the  State.  Tony  is  a  member  of  the  Superintendent’s  Business  Advisory  Council  of  Miami‐Dade  County  Public  School  System;  one  of  the  largest  school  systems of the nation.  Mr.  Villamil  earned  bachelor  and  advanced  degrees  in  Economics  from  Louisiana  State  University  (LSU),  where  he  also  completed  coursework  for  the  Ph.D.  degree.  In  1991,  Florida International University (FIU) awarded him a doctoral degree in Economics (hc), for  “distinguished contributions to the Nation in the field of economics.” He speaks frequently  to  business,  government  and  university  audiences  on  economic  topics,  and  was  until  the  summer  of  2008  a  member  of  the  Graduate  Business  Faculty  of  Florida  International  University (FIU). 

 

 

 

 
Associate Consultant for Economics  Pablo  Cepeda  is  an  Associate  Consultant  for  Economics  at  The  Washington  Economics  Group (WEG). In this role, Pablo serves as an economic consultant to WEG clients, providing  expert economic analysis for business and public policy decision‐making.  Pablo received his Bachelors of Science Degree in Economics and International Affairs and  his Masters Degree in Applied Economics from Florida State University.  The  Washington  Economics  Group,  headquartered  in  Coral  Gables,  Florida,  has  been  successfully  meeting  client  objectives  since  1993  through  strategic  consulting  services  for  corporations and institutions based in the Americas. The Group has the expertise, high‐level  contacts,  and  business  alliances  to  strengthen  a  firm’s  competitive  position  in  the  rapidly  expanding market places of Florida and Latin America.                  

Pablo Cepeda 

 

 

 

       
Managing Director of Client Services 

MARY SNOW 

Mary  Snow  is  the  Managing  Director  of  Client  Services  at  The  Washington  Economics  Group,  Inc. (WEG). She serves as WEG’s client liaison, working with clients to facilitate their business  interests and achieve their goals.    Prior to joining WEG, Mary was a governmental consultant for Robert M. Levy & Associates with  offices in Miami and Tallahassee.  She represented clients’ interests at the local level and to the  State Legislature.  Mary  received  her  undergraduate  degree  in  Political  Science  with  a  minor  in  Education  from  Florida State University.   Mary is a resident of Coral Gables, Florida. 

  HAYDEE M. CARRION 
Executive and Senior Research Assistant 

Ms.  Carrion  has  been  Executive  Assistant  to  Dr.  Villamil  since  the  firm’s  founding  in  1993.    Ms.  Carrion is a specialist in multi‐media presentations and in the preparation and design of reports and  documents for clients.    She  also  is  the  Senior  and  Project  Research  Assistant  and  has  extensive  experience  in  the  preparation  of  electronic  data,  presentation  of  quantitative  information,  Internet  research  and  desktop publishing.   Haydee  has  been  with  WEG  for  17  years.  Ms.  Carrion  holds  AA  and  AS  degrees  in  Business  Administration and Office System Technologies from Miami‐Dade College.   Haydee is a resident of  Miami‐Dade County. 

 

 

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful