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Upfront

Sports
Obituaries 2
State/Local 3
Politics 4
Community 5
Sports 6-7
Church 8
Classifieds 10
Television 11
World briefs 12
Index
Friday, April 20, 2012
50¢ daily Delphos, Ohio
Forecast
DELPHOS HERALD
The
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Lady ’Cats get first win of season,
p6
New vinyl album releases give
record stores a kick, p9
www.delphosherald.com
Photo submitted
Jaxon Prine, held by his mother, Stacy, right, was born with Hirschsprung’s disease.
After surgery on Feb. 21, he is a healthy 6-month-old at home with his sister, Noelle, and
father, Butch Prine Jr.
Delphos infant born
with Hirschsprung’s will
lead normal, healthy life
BY NANCY SPENCER
nspencer@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — Many
expecting parents say they
don’t care about the gender
of their child; they just want
them to be healthy. When
Butch and Stacy Prine’s sec-
ond child was born Oct. 10,
all seemed well.
“When he was born, Jaxon
looked absolutely perfect,”
his mother said. “He looked
so content.”
Jaxon threw up his first
meal and although it’s com-
mon for newborns to have
trouble eating because they
may have swallowed amni-
otic fluid, it didn’t take long
to see something was wrong.
Little Jaxon didn’t eat all day
and he hadn’t had his first
bowel movement.
An X-ray confirmed
problems and Jaxon was
transferred to Nationwide
Children’s Hospital in
Columbus.
By the evening of Oct. 12,
Jaxon had endured an upper
GI and a barium enema tests.
He was placed in the Neonatal
Intensive Care Unit.
“I was post-partem and
still recovering from giving
birth and all I wanted to do
was hold my baby,” Prine
said. “We were in Columbus
and my immediate family was
in Delphos. It was hard.”
On Oct. 14, he had an anal
rectal biopsy and for the first
time, Hirschsprung’s disease
was mentioned.
“Up until Jaxon was diag-
nosed, we were just scared. It
was unknown. No one could
tell us what was wrong,”
Prine said. “Once he was
diagnosed, it was easier to
cope with. We knew what
was wrong and doctors said
it could be fixed. That was a
big relief.”
Hirschsprung’s disease
occurs when some of the
nerve cells that are normally
present in the intestine do not
form properly while a baby
is developing during preg-
nancy.
As food is digested,
muscles move food forward
through the intestines in a
movement called peristalsis.
When eating, nerve cells that
are present in the wall of
the intestines receive signals
from the brain telling the
intestinal muscles to move
food forward.
In children with
Hirschsprung’s disease, a
lack of nerve cells in part
of the intestine interrupts the
signal from the brain and
prevents peristalsis in that
segment of the intestine.
Because stool cannot move
forward normally, the intes-
tine can become partially or
completely obstructed and
begins to expand to a larger-
than-normal size.
The problems a child
will experience with
Hirschsprung’s disease
depend on how much of the
intestine has normal nerve
cells present. Seventy percent
of babies with Hirschsprung’s
disease are missing nerve
cells in only the last one to
two feet of the large intes-
tine.
Eventually, a bacterial
infection can develop in the
digestive tract, causing seri-
ous problems.
Hirschsprung’s disease
causes 25 percent of intesti-
nal obstructions that occur in
newborns and occurs in 1 out
of every 5,000 live births.
4 German students
need host families
The Delphos-Verl
Friendship Link is still look-
ing to place four German
cultural exchange students
with host families. The
students are scheduled to
be in Delphos from mid-
August to early December.
They can attend either
local high
school.
Interested
families can
view their
profiles at
www.egw-
erther.de/del-
phos2012/;
contact Rick
Hanser at
419-695-
1876 or friendshiplink@
wcoil.com; or Ginger
Denman at 419-695-1502
or gkdenman@yahoo.com.
Here are letters to pro-
spective host families from
the remaining four students:
Dear host family,
One day at school, a
young girl told my class that
there is an opportunity to
go to Delphos for 4 months.
Everyone was very excited
about it. But after a couple
of weeks,
most pupils
of my class
weren’t sure
anymore if
they would
be brave
enough
to live in
America
for a lon-
ger time,
except myself.
Unfortunately I don’t
know anything about your
family yet, so I’m just going
to tell you something about
me and my life. At first
I would like to introduce
myself. My name is Celine
Elsner and I am fourteen
years old. I live with my
parents and my brother in a
district of Verl in Germany.
My brother is called Viktor
and he is 17 years old.
Now, I am in grade 9 of
the ‘Gymnasium Verl’. After
I will have finished school
in 3 years I would like to
do anything with the lan-
guages English and French.
In my free time I love to
do something creative like
playing piano or taking pho-
tos. But in the same manner
I like to jog and play soccer.
My brother plays in a soc-
cer team, which is called
FC Gütersloh and my Dad
jogs almost every day. Our
favorite German soccer team
is the FC Bayern Munich.
A few years ago, our fam-
ily took two cats in. They
were called ‘Tiger’ and
‘Pauli’. They lived over two
years with us in our house,
but then they were gone
and never came back. I love
animals very much and I
would not have a problem,
if your family has got pets.
When I meet my friends,
we often go to the nearest
town, Gütersloh and there,
we go shopping or watch a
movie in the cinema. That
makes a lot of fun and I
incidentally take a lot of
pictures of
my friends.
I hope
you got
a small
but good
impression
of me by
reading this
letter and
I want to
thank you
very much if you would like
to accommodate me. I hope
you are interested in giving
me a new home in Delphos
next year and in helping me
to live the ‘American way
of live.’
I am real-
ly looking
forward to
spend time
with you in
the USA.
Yours
sincerely,
Celine
Elsner
Dear host family,
My name is Chiara
Peine, I am fifteen years
old and I join the 9th class
of the ‘Gymnasium Verl’.
The exchange from Verl to
Delphos is a long lasting
tradition and to be a part of
this would be really nice. I
believe America is so dif-
ferent in the opposite of
Germany and this exchange
would be a really big chance
to get to know how you
live. As I was younger I
thought America is a con-
tinent so far away I could
never get there. But then I
heard from this exchange
and the USA comes a
little bit nearer to me.
Here in Verl I live
together with my mum, my
dad, my two brothers and my
granddad in a house near the
school. My family and my
parents say I am a friendly,
helpful, polite and funny
person. Sometimes a little
Lima juvenile
may face charge
in Delphos
bomb threat
A Lima juvenile may
face a charge of making
false alarms following a
Delphos Police Department
investigation into a bomb
threat called in to a Delphos
resident on April 13.
The charge will be
reviewed by the Allen County
Juvenile Prosecutors Office.
A Delphos Police report
indicates a Delphos man
reported he had received
a threat from a blocked
number in which the male
caller warned the vic-
tim’s house was going to
explode within minutes at
12:14 p.m. last Friday.
Officers and Delphos Fire
and Rescue responded to the
call in the 200 block of West
Seventh Street. No explosive
device was found by inves-
tigators. Police investigators
determined the origin of the
call later that same afternoon.
The subsequent investi-
gation revealed a juvenile
from Lima was responsible
for making the threaten-
ing call. Police established
this was a random call with
no ties to the victim.
The juvenile was turned
over to the custody of his
parents pending the formal
review by prosecutors.
Elsner
Boseila
Wille
Peine
Partly cloudy
and cool
Saturday
with high
in mid 50s.
See page 2.
See GERMAN, page 12 See JAXON, page 12
Delphos Project Recycle
will be held from 9-11:30
a.m. Saturday at Delphos
Truck and Fuel Wash.
Entry is gained by
traveling north from East
Fifth Street east of Double
AA Trailer Sales.
Newspaper, phone books,
plastic bags, cardboard,
magazines and aluminum
cans need to be in separate
containers. Recycle is now
accepting worn U.S. flags.
All other items: tin cans,
plastic and glass containers
need to be rinsed clean; there
is no need to remove labels
and they can be co-mingled.
Delphos Recycle does not
accept window or plate glass,
light bulbs, ornamental glass,
Pyrex or cookware glass.
Computers, etc.,
are accepted. No
TVs or monitors.
Project Recycle
taking worn flags
TODAY (5 p.m.)
Baseball: St. John’s at
Mar. Loc. (MAC); LCC
at Fort Jennings (ppd. to
noon Saturday); Ottoville at
P-G (PCL); Spencerville at
Botkins; Elida at Shawnee
(WBL); CG at Kalida (PCL).
Softball: Kalida at CV.
Track and Field:
Spencerville at Wapak
Relays, 4:30 p.m.
Tennis: Shawnee at
Elida (WBL), 4:30 p.m.
It’s My Job
Van Wert County Recorder Hughes loves diversity, challenge of job
BY STACY TAFF
staff@delphosherald.com
VAN WERT — As Van
Wert County Recorder, Kim
Hughes is responsible for one
of the most important archives
in the county. Hughes and her
staff record and manage all
documents pertaining to real
estate.
“We record deeds, mort-
gages, leases, affidavits, liens,
military discharge papers and
any documents related to
mortgages,” she said. “There
are so many documents that
come through here that con-
cern mortgages. When we get
a document, we have a pro-
cess we use that’s in accor-
dance with the Ohio Revised
Code, which governs our
office. The first thing we do
is inspect it to make sure it
meets the recording require-
ments. Then the document
is recorded. Next we do the
indexing, dealing with the
names of partners involved,
who owned the land. Then we
scan the document and type it
in abstract. After all of that
is done, no matter who does
it, someone else has to proof
it. All of our documents are
proofed by multiple people.
Then it’s returned because
we don’t keep the original
document here, just scans.”
As for how the records
are stored, Hughes says it
depends on the date of the
document.
“These are permanent
records; we keep them for-
ever,” Hughes said. “All are
public record as well, except
for military discharge papers.
This office has kept accu-
rate accounts since the early
1800’s. From the earliest time
until 1986, everything was
kept in book form. Then in
1986, they moved to putting
everything on microfiche.
From 1994 until the present,
everything has been put on
the computer. So depending
on the document you’re look-
ing for, you may be looking
in a book or on the computer
or in microfiche.”
“Everything we record is
also put onto microfilm and
stored in the iron mountain
facility in the iron mines of
Pennsylvania for safe keep-
ing,” she continued. “This
includes the oldest records
and the newest as well. That
way, if the records were lost
in some kind of disaster, we’d
still have them. Past record-
ers have had the chance to go
and visit the facility. I hope
I’ll get the chance sometime
soon.”
Having been appointed
this past August, Hughes is
relatively new to the post.
However, she’s been groomed
for it over the years.
“I actually first started
working in the recorder’s
office in the year 2000,”
Hughes said. “Nancy Harting
was the recorder back then.
In 2008, when Jan McIntosh
was recorder, I was named
Chief Deputy. She was sort
of preparing me for the
job of recorder. After she
retired, I was appointed
by the Republican Central
Committee.”
One aspect of the job
Hughes was prepared for
beforehand was the many
challenges that keep it inter-
esting.
“The most challenging
thing for me was getting used
to the administrative aspect,”
she said. “My predecessor sort
of prepared me for all of that
but there are always changes
in the way things are run. As
far as day to day challenges,
there are always documents
that will trip us up. We work
together and always refer to
the Ohio Revised Code. It’s
never a huge problem but it
keeps us on our toes.”
“I’m also required to have
continuing education,” she
added. “In 2011, I logged
15 credit hours and I will
be required to do that every
year. I serve on the Records
Committee, Data Processing
and Microfilming boards. As
recorder, I’m also required to
be the Chief Administrator
of the Micrographics
Department we have here.”
In the recorder’s office,
Hughes has one full-time
employee, one part-time and
one “as-needed.”
“The as-needed employee
is actually former Recorder
Jan McIntosh,” Hughes said.
“She told me she’d be avail-
able to help us if we ever
needed it. All of us work well
together as a team.”
Hughes also enjoys work-
ing with the diverse group of
people who come in to delve
Stacy Taff photo
Van Wert County Recorder Kim Hughes stands in front
of books containing county records, some of which date
back to the early 1800’s.
See HUGHES, page 12
2
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Utilities ∙ Desirable
Water & sewer tap fees included
in lot purchase price
Retreat
@ ORCHARD ACRES
The
in Elida
Students can pick up their
awards in their school offices.
St. John’s Scholar of the
Day is Mallory
Maclennan.
Congratulations
Mallory!
Jefferson’s Scholar of the
Day is Madelyn
Saunders.
Congratulations
Madelyn!
Scholars of the Day
2 – The Herald Friday, April 20, 2012
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
OBITUARY
FUNERAL
BIRTHS
LOTTERY
LOCAL PRICES
WEATHER
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 142 No. 233
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager
Delphos Herald, Inc.
Don Hemple,
advertising manager
Tiffany Brantley,
circulation manager
The Daily Herald (USPS 1525
8000) is published daily except
Sundays and Holidays.
By carrier in Delphos and
area towns, or by rural motor
route where available $2.09 per
week. By mail in Allen, Van
Wert, or Putnam County, $105
per year. Outside these counties
$119 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
No mail subscriptions will be
accepted in towns or villages
where The Daily Herald paper
carriers or motor routes provide
daily home delivery for $2.09
per week.
405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DAILY HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
Delphos weather Kenneth Schnipke
The high temperature
Thursday in Delphos was
76 and the low was 49. A
year ago today, the high was
65 and the low was 40. The
record high for today is 84, set
in 2005 and the record low of
25 was set in 1956.
Kenneth Schnipke, 75, of
Delphos died on Thursday at
his residence.
Arrangements are incom-
plete at Harter and Schier
Funeral Home.
MARTIN, Marjorie M.
“Marge,” 62, of Delphos,
fuenral services will begin at
11 a.m. Saturday at Harter
and Schier Funeral Home.
Burial will be at a later date
in Walnut Grove Cemetery.
Friends may call one hour
prior to services Saturday at
the funeral home. Memorial
contributions may be made to
Angels for Animals Rescue
League.
ST. RITA’S
A boy was born April 19 to
Michael and Aimee Klaus of
Spencerville.
A girl was born April 19
to Jay and Kathy Nieto of
Delphos.
Corn: $6.21
Wheat: $6.25
Beans: $13.94
CLEVELAND (AP) —
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Thursday:
Mega Millions
Estimated jackpot: $65
million
Pick 3 Evening
9-9-8
Pick 4 Evening
5-6-8-6
Powerball
Estimated jackpot: $152
million
Rolling Cash 5
04-11-22-31-39
Estimated jackpot:
$120,000
Ten OH Evening
14-18-21-31-32-49-52-55-
58-61-62-63-64-66-67-68-71-
73-76-77
WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-county
Associated Press
TONIGHT: Cloudy with a
chance of showers in the eve-
ning. Then mostly cloudy with
a slight chance of showers over-
night. Lows in the upper 30s.
North winds 10 to 15 mph.
Chance of measurable precipi-
tation 50 percent.
SATURDAY: Partly cloudy
in the morning then clearing.
Cooler. Highs in the mid 50s.
North winds 10 to 15 mph.
SATURDAY NIGHT:
Mostly clear. Areas of frost
overnight. Lows in the mid 30s.
Northeast winds 5 to 10 mph.
SUNDAY: Mostly sunny
in the morning then becoming
partly cloudy. Highs in the mid
50s. Northeast winds 10 to 15
mph.
SUNDAY NIGHT: Partly
cloudy. Lows in the upper 30s.
MONDAY, MONDAY
NIGHT: Mostly clear. Highs
in the mid 50s. Lows in the
upper 30s.
TUESDAY: Partly cloudy.
Highs in the upper 50s.
TUESDAY NIGHT,
WEDNESDAY: Partly cloudy
with a 20 percent chance of
showers. Lows in the mid 40s.
Highs in the upper 60s.
Judge to decide if George
Zimmerman can leave jail
By MIKE SCHNEIDER
and CURT ANDERSON
Associated Press
SANFORD, Fla. — The
neighborhood watch volunteer
charged with killing Trayvon
Martin is asking a Florida judge
to let him out of jail while he
awaits trial, and legal experts
say he stands a good chance of
being granted bail at the hearing
today.
George Zimmerman’s attor-
ney will make the request at the
hearing at the Seminole County
Criminal Justice Center. Two
questions likely to be at the
center of the proceeding are
whether he would be allowed
out of the country and how he
would remain safe.
Family members of
Zimmerman’s are expected to
testify by phone at the hearing.
Legal experts say factors in
Zimmerman’s favor include
that he has ties to the local
community and that he doesn’t
appear to be a flight risk since
he turned in voluntarily after
second-degree murder charg-
es were filed against him last
week. He also has never been
convicted of a crime, which
would indicate he doesn’t pose
a threat to society.
“Although it’s not routine
for people charged with murder
to get bond, they do get bond,
and I think there is an excellent
argument to be made in his spe-
cific case for him to be released
on bond,” said defense attorney
Randy McClean, who practices
in Seminole County, about 15
miles northeast of Orlando.
A spokeswoman for
special prosecutor Angela
Corey’s office said Thursday
she wouldn’t comment on
whether Corey would object
to Zimmerman being released
on bond.
Defense attorney Mark
O’Mara indicated he would ask
that Zimmerman be allowed to
leave the area, if he is grant-
ed bond, because of concerns
about his safety. Circuit Judge
Kenneth Lester was assigned
the case Wednesday after a
previous judge recused herself
because of a potential conflict
of interest.
“Normally, the conditions
are that you stay local. I think
that is going to be difficult,”
O’Mara said in an interview. “I
think nobody would deny the
fact that if George Zimmerman
were walking down the street
today, he would be at risk. That
is a reality.”
O’Mara has said he would
prefer that Zimmerman be
released so he can assist in
building a defense case.
The judge would have dis-
cretion to allow Zimmerman to
live elsewhere along with a num-
ber of restrictions such as a cur-
few, regular reporting require-
ment and possibly an electronic
monitoring ankle bracelet, said
Florida International University
law professor Joelle Moreno.
O’Mara said he would
ask for assistance from law
enforcement. Kim Cannaday, a
spokeswoman for the Seminole
County Sheriff’s Office, said
she couldn’t comment on what
security procedures will be in
place for Zimmerman if he is
released. The sheriff’s office
does have the ability to monitor
defendants outside the county if
a judge requests a GPS moni-
tor to be used as a condition of
release.
Zimmerman is charged with
second-degree murder in the
17-year-old Martin’s death dur-
ing a Feb. 26 confrontation in
a Sanford, Fla., gated commu-
nity. Martin was walking home
from a convenience store when
Zimmerman spotted him from his
truck and called police to report
him as suspicious. Zimmerman
has claimed self-defense under
Florida’s “stand your ground”
law, which eliminates a person’s
duty to retreat under threat of
death or serious injury.
The lack of an arrest for 44
days spurred protests nationwide,
several in Seminole County,
in which participants chanted
and held signs that said, “Arrest
Zimmerman Now!” Anger over
a delay in Zimmerman’s arrest
led to the Sanford police chief
stepping down temporarily and
the recusal of the prosecutor
who normally handles cases out
of Sanford. Sanford city offi-
cials were holding a town hall
meeting Thursday to address
some of the residual anger from
the case.
(Continued from page 1)
into the records.
“What’s interesting about
this office is it’s basically a
real estate library,” she said.
“People come in to view the
documents and do research.
Aside from the general pub-
lic, the people we get in here
most often are lawyers, bank-
ers, title searchers, realtors,
surveyors and genealogists.
We have a lot of regulars.
I really enjoy that part of
it, dealing with the people.
Genealogists are a lot of fun,
they really dig in and get so
excited. We genuinely want
to make the people who come
in feel welcome and glad they
came into the office. We try
to be as helpful as we can.”
Another thing Hughes
loves about her job is the sense
of pride that radiates from the
office and its employees.
“When I first came in
2000, I noticed everyone here
really took great pride in how
the records were kept, made
accessible to everyone and
the emphasis on accuracy,”
she said. “That’s something
we strive to continue.”
Hughes and her husband
Kent live in rural Van Wert
County. They have two sons,
Christopher (Tricia) Hughes
and Cody (Katie) Hughes,
and two grandchildren, Beth
and Ila Hughes.
Van Wert Cinemas
www.vanwertcinemas.com
419-238-2100
April 20-26
th
, 2012
All shows before 6 pm $5.00
Adults $7.00  • Kids & Seniors $5.00
Book your parties & company outings with us!
Check us our on Facebook
COMING SOON: The Avengers-Men In Black 3
Madagascar 3
S
P
L
I
T
Hughes
CINCINNATI (AP) — An
owner of three medical clinics
and six doctors who worked
for him have been charged
with illegal drug distribution
related to the alleged improp-
er dispensing of prescription
painkillers.
An indictment alleges
that dozens of customers a
week would travel hundreds
of miles to visit the clinics
in southern and central Ohio
and pay $200 per visit for
painkillers.
The indictment announced
by federal prosecutors on
Thursday alleges 47-year-
old Tracy Bias of West
Portsmouth oversaw six doc-
tors who wrote illegal pre-
scriptions and also opened
unlicensed dispensaries
after legitimate pharmacists
refused to fill prescriptions.
The indictment says pre-
scriptions were written with-
out meaningful physical
exams and resulted in the
death of at least two patients.
A message was left with
the attorney recommended by
the federal public defender to
represent Bias.
HILLSBORO (AP) —
Police in the small southwest
Ohio city of Hillsboro have
returned an 82-year-old man
to his home 280 miles away
after he apparently got lost
while driving in his Indiana
hometown.
The Hillsboro Times-
Gazette reports auto shop
employees called police
Wednesday to say a man was
sitting in his pickup truck,
apparently confused. Police
talked to Earl Lutterman and
learned he got lost while driv-
ing in Evansville, Ind.
Officer Shawn Kelley drove
Lutterman home in his cruis-
er and finished the 10-hour
round-trip early Thursday.
Kelley left the man with his
brother Norman Lutterman,
who was very thankful that
police returned him.
Norman Lutterman said
learning that his brother drove
so far away was a shock. Earl
Lutterman no longer had a
driver’s license, and his
license plate was expired.
Ohio police
return man to
Indiana home
MEDINA (AP) — A rela-
tive of a 10-year-old girl who
survived a shooting by her
father that killed her sister and
mother says the girl is show-
ing signs of improvement but
remains in critical condition in
a Cleveland hospital.
The girl’s aunt, Michelle
Jindra, tells WEWS-TV that
Kayla Allen is responding to
simple commands.
Police say Kevin Allen shot
and killed Katherina Allen and
their 10-year-old daughter, Kerri
Allen, and wounded Kayla Allen
in a crowded Cracker Barrel res-
taurant in suburban Brooklyn
last week. He was then shot and
killed by police.
Media outlets report that
roughly 300 people attended
a memorial service Thursday
for the victims at a church in
Medina.
One teacher at the service
says Kerri Allen gave up
recesses to help other kids in
special needs classes.
Victims in
Cracker Barrel
shooting
remembered
By MIKE
HOUSEHOLDER
The Associated Press
BIG RAPIDS, Mich. —
The objects displayed in
Michigan’s newest museum
range from the ordinary, such
as simple ashtrays and fishing
lures, to the grotesque — a
full-size replica of a lynch-
ing tree. But all are united by
a common theme: They are
steeped in racism so intense
that it makes visitors cringe.
That’s the idea behind the
Jim Crow Museum of Racist
Memorabilia, which says it
has amassed the nation’s larg-
est public collection of arti-
facts spanning the segrega-
tion era, from Reconstruction
until the civil rights move-
ment, and beyond.
Some of the objects in the
museum are a century old.
Others were made as recently
as this year.
Ferris State sophomore
Nehemiah Israel was particu-
larly troubled by a series of
items about President Barack
Obama.
One T-shirt on display
reads: “Any White Guy
2012.” Another shirt that says
“Obama ’08” is accompanied
by a cartoon monkey holding
a banana. A mouse pad shows
robe-wearing Ku Klux Klan
members chasing an Obama
caricature above the words,
“Run Obama Run.”
“I was like, ‘Wow. People
still think this. This is crazy,”’
Israel said.
The museum in a gleam-
ing new exhibit hall at Ferris
State University “is all about
teaching, not a shrine to rac-
ism,” said David Pilgrim,
the founder and curator who
started building the collection
as a teenager.
Pilgrim, who is African-
American, makes no apolo-
gies for the provocative
exhibits. The goal of the $1.3
million gallery, he explained,
is “to get people to think
deeply.”
The displays are startling.
The n-word is prevalent
throughout, and many items
portray African-American
men as lazy, violent or inar-
ticulate. African-American
women are shown as ker-
chief-wearing mammies,
sexually charged Jezebels or
other stereotypes.
The shocking images exact
an emotional cost.
“There’s parts in that room
— the main room — where
it’s quite gut-wrenching,” said
Nancy Mettlach, a student
conduct specialist at Ferris.
“And the thought that was
going through my mind was:
‘How can one human being
do this to another human
being?”’
Pilgrim, a former sociol-
ogy professor at Ferris State,
started the collection in the
1970s in Alabama. Along the
way, he “spent more time in
antique and flea markets than
the people who work there.”
His quest for more examples
was boundless.
“At some point, the col-
lecting becomes the thing,”
he said. “It became the way
I relaxed.” He spent most of
his free time and money on
acquisitions.
In 1996, Pilgrim donated
his 2,000-piece collection to
the school after concluding
that it “needed a real home.”
The collection spent the
next 15 years housed in a
single room and could be
seen only by appointment.
Thanks to the financial sup-
port of the university and
donors — notably from the
charitable arm of Detroit util-
ity DTE Energy — Pilgrim’s
collection now has a perma-
nent home, which will have
a grand opening ceremony
April 26. Admission is free.
Today, the school has 9,000
pieces that depict African-
Americans in stereotypical
ways and, in some cases, glo-
rify violence against them.
Newest Michigan museum
showcases racist artifacts
Pain clinic
owner, 6 doctors
face charges
The Kentucky Derby takes
place on the first Saturday
in May at Churchill Downs,
Louisville, Kentucky. It is the
most famous horse race in the
United States.
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Friday, April 20, 2012 The Herald –3
STATE/LOCAL
www.delphosherald.com
BRIEFS
From the Vantage Point
Photo submitted
Vantage names Blue Chippers
Vantage has announced students with a 4.0 GPA and perfect attendance for the third nine weeks of the school
year. Blue Chippers are, front from left, Tressa Ringwald (Lincolnview), Jr. Interactive Media; Samantha
Spangler (Wayne Trace), Jr. Health Technology; Destiny Hines (Van Wert), Jr. Cosmetology; Nacole Mansfield
(Continental), Sr. Early Childhood Education; and Kayla Garb (Crestview), Sr. Culinary Arts; and back, Mac
Kensey Bendele (Ottoville), Jr. Building & Grounds; Harley-Davidson Lane (Continental), Sr. Electricity; Harley
Noll (Parkway), Jr. Health Technology; Austin Eschbach (Parkway), Sr. Precision Machining; Cora Finfrock
(Crestview), Jr. Culinary Arts; and Hope Nehls (Paulding), Sr. Early Childhood Education. Unavailable for the
picture was Gary Carter (Van Wert), Jr. Welding.
Humane society
to hold open house
The Humane Society of
Allen County is hosting their
first open house of the year
on Saturday.
Starting at noon, the shel-
ter will be hosting a “Baby
Shower” for our animals that
include tours of the facility
and children activates such as
face painting. There will also
be a raffle fundraiser to help
raise funds for the shelter.
This time of year is impor-
tant for donations in order to
facilitate for the influx of ani-
mals and ‘shower’ our cur-
rent animals with extra love
and resources.
The Humane Society of
Allen County is location at
3606 Elida in Lima. The
shelter is open to the public
during adoption hours from
3-7 p.m. on Thursdays and
from noon to 4:30 p.m. on
Saturdays.
For more information
about this event or to sched-
ule an interview, contact
Humane Society of Allen
County board member Helen
Miller at 419-226-9542 or
e-mail at hmiller@hsoac.org.
Scholarship
applications
available
Charitable Italian
American Organization
(CIAO) scholarship appli-
cations are available in the
guidance offices at all Allen
County high schools.
Any Allen County high
school senior with a grade
point average of 3.0 or above
is eligible to apply for the
$1000 scholarship.
Scholarships will be
awarded based on academic
achievement, participation in
extra-curricular, civic, com-
munity service and religious
activities as well as recom-
mendations and individual
need.
The application deadline
is May 1.
Putnam County hosts Medication
Take Back/Drop Off event
On the morning of April
28, Putnam County will host
its 4th Medication Take Back/
Drop Off event.
Sheriff Beutler, Deputies
and other law enforcement
officers will be on hand to
collect any potentially dan-
gerous, expired, unused and
unwanted prescription, over
the counter or veterinary
medications. Only medica-
tions in powder and pill form
will be accepted.
The event will be held at the
Ottawa Glandorf High School
during the Ottawa Kiwanis
Health Fair. Medications can
be dropped off from 6-10 a.m.
with no questions asked.
This is a free service, being
held in conjunction with the
National D.E.A. Drug Take
Back Day.
ArtSpace/Lima’s 57th annual
Spring Show runs April 27-June 2
The ArtSpace/Lima
Spring Show 2012 will open
April 27 with a public recep-
tion for the artists and their
friends from 6:30-8:30 p.m.
in the Ellen Nelson Gallery.
Awards will be presented at
7:15 pm.
Spring Show 2012 is the
57th annual exhibit of that
name at ArtSpace/Lima.
Entries are accepted from
within a 100-mile radius of
Lima in the following catego-
ries: painting, drawing, print-
making, photography, ceram-
ics, sculpture, textiles, digital
art and mixed media.
Jurors for the Spring
Show 2012 exhibit are
Lowell Tolstedt (Professor
of Art Emeritus, Columbus
College of Art and Design)
and Jack Earl (Ceramist, MA,
The Ohio State University).
Professor Tolstedt is a promi-
nent figure on the Columbus
and national art scenes. His
work was recently seen in
Lima when he was one of the
nine contemporary artists in
the Still Life Now exhibit.
Jack Earl is an internation-
ally known ceramist who
pioneered works with a rural
Ohio theme and a folk art per-
spective. His work has been
featured in galleries in New
York, Chicago, San Francisco
and Atlanta, and he has been
the recipient of grants from
the Ohio Arts Council and the
National Endowment for the
Arts. Earl was the subject of a
major ArtSpace retrospective
in 2005.
A highlight of the open-
ing reception will be the
announcement and awarding
of prizes, including Best of
Show ($500), First Award,
Second Award, Third Award,
The Martha Farmer Award for
Sculpture, Photography Club
Award, Award for Ceramics,
Award for Painting, and “The
People’s Choice Award”
(chosen by polling guests in
the course of the exhibit).
The exhibit will also feature
a Salon des refuses, mounted
in the ArtZone Gallery, and
consisting of work not origi-
nally juried into the show, but
re-juried into the Salon.
Spring Show 2012 will
be on display from April 27
through June 2.
For further information
on Spring Show 2012 or for
information regarding other
ArtSpace/Lima programs,
call Operations Manager Bill
Sullivan at 419-222-1721.
Place a Classified Ad
TODAY!
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The Delphos Herald
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YOUR NEWSPAPER ... STILL LOADED
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The way newspapers are sold may
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“We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit.”
— Will Durant, American historian (1885-1981)
IT WAS NEWS THEN
4 — The Herald Friday, April 20, 2012
POLITICS
www.delphosherald.com
Moderately confused
One Year Ago
• Knights of Columbus, 4th Degree Bishop Neumann
Assembly announced the 2011 Patriotism Essay winners. In
first place was Megan Klausing of St. John’s High School; sec-
ond place went to Steven Rickard of Crestview High School;
and third place went to Evan Burgei of St. John’s.
25 Years Ago — 1962
• Youngsters winning first-place prizes in the Delphos
Jaycees’ Easter egg hunt were Nikki Grothouse, daughter of
Bill and Barb Grothouse, waffle ball and bat; Jodi John, daugh-
ter of Terry and Linda John, big bunny; and Chase Brantley,
daughter of Glen and Carol Brantley, tennis racket.
• Perry swept a double-header from Fort Jennings Saturday
with some late inning run production. Neil Duffman blasted
a three-run home run in the seventh inning to help the
Commodores post an 8-5 win in the first game. Perry put five
runs on the board in the seventh inning and won the second
game 7-3. Dean Von Sossan was the losing pitcher in the
first game, and Bruce Von Sossan took the loss in the second
game.
•Jeremy Stemen found a balloon with a note attached from
a school in Indiana. He found the balloon in a tree along
Leatherwood Run at the Allen County/Putnam County line
where he lives outside Gomer. Jeremy’s mother, Becky, is
sending a letter, Jeremy’s photo and a map showing the location
the balloon was found to the sender of the balloon.
50 Years Ago — 1962
• The full committee in charge of the Easter Egg Hunt annu-
ally sponsored by the Delphos Junior Chamber of Commerce
has been announced by Stan Backus, chairman. Committee
members are Jerry Backus, Jim Mesker, Dick Schlagbaum,
Bernie Art, Mack Endsley, Jay Hinton, Bob Schultz, Jack
Swick, Keith Kiggins, Tom Osting, Bill DeWeese, Jim Irey and
Tom Eilerman.
• Delphos television viewers will have the opportunity to see
and hear a former resident of this city, Mrs. R. H. Jettinghoff,
in an Easter morning program, over Dayton’s Channel 7 and
Fort Wayne’s Channel 15. Mrs. Jettinghoff, a resident of
Providence, R.I., sings with the Peloquin Chorale, the group
that will be presenting the cantata, “The Hound of Heaven,” at
10 a.m. over both stations.
• Mrs. Tom Vorst was elected president of the Miss and
Master Chapter of the Child Conservation League in Ottoville
at a meeting held recently at the home of Mrs. James Turnwald.
Other officers chosen to serve are Mrs. Richard Kortokrax, vice
president; Mrs. Jerome Turnwald, secretary, and Mrs. Arthur
Schimmoeller, treasurer.
75 Years Ago — 1937
• Blaine Metcalfe, general manager of the Delphos plant of
the Hinde and Dauch Paper Company, announced that because
of the general uptrend in business conditions and the rushing
business at the Delphos plant, a fourth shift has been placed at
work in the local plant. The fact that this company furnishes an
outlet for straw also brings out that approximately 12 trucks and
drivers are kept busy trucking baled straw to the plant.
• The Jefferson baseball team handed Wapakoneta a Western
League contest Monday afternoon without much of a battle.
The final score was 14 to 5 in favor of the Auglaize County
team. Jefferson scored twice in the first inning on two hits, a
walk and one error. They scored one run in the second inning
on a double by Erickson and an error. Their final two runs were
scored in the fifth inning on three hits and an error.
• Four students of the high school at Fort Jennings are eli-
gible for membership on the Putnam County Scholarship team
which will compete in the contests at Bowling Green during the
middle of May. The students who are members of the team are
Eleanore Wittler, who placed first in American History; Ruth
Kohls, first in English Three; Suzanne Plasic, first in Modern
History, and Edward Klima, second in English Two.
By ANNE GEARAN
and JAMEY KEATEN
Associated Press
PARIS — U.S. Secretary of
State Hillary Rodham Clinton
called Thursday for the U.N.
Security Council to adopt
an arms embargo and other
tough measures against Syria
to try to halt 13 months of
bloodshed, but she acknowl-
edged such diplomatic actions
would likely be vetoed.
Clinton’s comments to
Western and Arab diplomats
from the so-called “Friends
of Syria” group came as the
head of the United Nations
accused Syrian President
Bashar Assad of failing to
honor a peace plan that went
into effect a week ago.
In a transcript of her remarks
on the State Department’s
website, Clinton stopped
short of calling for outside
military intervention in Syria
— something there is little to
no foreign appetite for — but
said it was time to impose
more consequential measures
on Assad’s regime.
“We have to keep Assad
off balance by leaving options
on the table,” she told the
gathering of 16 top diplo-
mats.
Clinton’s address sug-
gested the U.S. wanted the
“Friends of Syria” group to
more actively consider con-
tingency plans if the peace
plan by U.N. and Arab
League envoy Kofi Annan
fell apart. Although U.S.
policy has amounted to an
acknowledgment that Assad
is unlikely to be dislodged,
the U.N. resolution Clinton
seeks could strengthen Syrian
rebels fighting his regime.
“We need to start moving
very vigorously in the Security
Council for a Chapter 7 sanc-
tions resolution, including
travel, financial sanctions, an
arms embargo, and the pres-
sure that that will give us on
the regime to push for com-
pliance with Kofi Annan’s
six-point plan,” Clinton said,
referring to a resolution under
the U.N. Charter that would
be militarily enforceable.
Any attempt to push for
U.N. sanctions on Syria
would likely meet resistance
from Syrian allies Russia and
China, which hold vetoes in
the Security Council. Moscow
and Beijing have already
twice shielded Syria from
U.N. sanctions over Assad’s
crackdown on a popular
uprising that is estimated to
have left 9,000 people dead
and led refugees to pour into
neighboring countries.
Clinton said she’d laid out
the case for Security Council
resolve earlier Thursday to
Russian Foreign Minister
Sergey Lavrov, whom she
said “has recognized that we
are not in a static situation but
a deteriorating one.”
At the Paris meeting, French
Foreign Minister Alain Juppe
said the “Friends of Syria”
group believes Annan’s plan
is the “last chance” for Syria
to avoid civil war. But he
didn’t rule out the possibil-
ity of tougher action at the
Security Council, including
“in the direction that Madame
Clinton indicated.”
The prospect of mili-
tary action, however faint,
remained in some minds
in Paris. Foreign Minister
Saad-Eddine El-Othmani
of Morocco, whose coun-
try holds a Security Council
seat, said: “We hope the Kofi
Annan plan works to avoid
this (possible) military inter-
vention.”
Earlier, U.N. Secretary-
General Ban Ki-moon said
Syria was not honoring the
cease-fire, which took effect
last week, and that violence
was escalating. Syrian activ-
ists said regime forces took
control of a southern town
and shot at activists in anoth-
er soon after international
observers left.
By BETH FOUHY
Associated Press
NEW YORK — Get ready.
The presidential ad campaign
coming to a TV and radio
near you is going to be nasty,
expensive and heavily influ-
enced by independent groups,
particularly those that favor
Republican Mitt Romney over
Democrat Barack Obama.
Commercials airing in a
handful of states offer a pre-
view of what’s to come.
“Mitt Romney stood with
big oil, for their tax breaks,”
Obama’s campaign says in
an ad already running in six
general election battleground
states.
“No matter how Obama
spins it, gas costs too much.
Tell Obama, stop blaming oth-
ers,” the Republican-leaning
group Crossroads GPS says
in its latest ad, also airing in
swing states.
The scorching ads that
helped define the GOP nomi-
nating contest have yielded to
the early stages of what will
be an epic air battle between
Romney and Obama as they
scramble to define in the most
unflattering terms and bring
each other down. The emer-
gence of outside groups known
as super PACs is all but certain
to ratchet up the negativity,
adding a level of slash-and-
burn rhetoric to the campaign
that the candidates themselves
might seek to avoid.
“The 2012 Republican pri-
mary was by far the most
negative we’ve seen and my
expectation will be that the
2012 general election will be
one of the most negative in
history,” said William Benoit,
who studies campaign adver-
tising at Ohio University.
“The super PAC ads will
make it even more so.”
Super PACs were borne
from a 2010 U.S. Supreme
Court decision easing cam-
paign finance restrictions on
corporations and wealthy
people. Republican-leaning
groups were very active in the
2010 contest, helping to wrest
the House from Democratic
control and picking up six
Republican Senate seats.
The proliferation of super
PACs and expected closeness
of the Obama-Romney con-
test guarantee a TV ad rival-
ry much different than what
voters saw in 2008, when
Obama’s campaign opted out
of public financing and the
state by state spending limits
such financing requires. That
decision allowed Obama to
bury Republican Sen. John
McCain beneath some $244
million worth of ads — a
roughly a 4-to-1 spending
advantage for Obama.
This cycle, that figure
is likely to be swamped
by spending by American
Crossroads and Crossroads
GPS alone. The sister groups,
both tied to President George
W. Bush’s longtime politi-
cal director Karl Rove and
largely financed by a handful
of wealthy businessmen, have
announced plans to pour as
much as $300 million into
attack ads against Obama and
other Democrats.
Romney turned down pub-
lic financing for the primary
campaign and is expected to
do the same for the general
election, as is Obama. That
clears the way for a full-
fledged ad war between the
two campaigns, amplified by
ads from super PACs.
The Obama campaign has
already spent about $2 million
on its ad this month in Iowa,
Ohio, Colorado, Virginia,
Florida and Nevada, accord-
ing several media buyers who
provided information to The
Associated Press. Crossroads
isn’t far behind, having spent
$1.8 million on its ad in the
six states.
Crossroads’ spokesman,
Jonathan Collegio, said the
group’s current role is in part
to fill the gap for Romney’s
campaign as it raises the
money it needs for the cam-
paign against Obama.
Collegio said the months
between the primaries and the
political conventions is a criti-
cal period where an outside
group can provide “air cover”
while a candidate regroups.
Romney’s campaign spent
$18.1 million on ads during
the primary campaign but has
gone dark since rival Rick
Santorum suspended his
campaign last week. Records
show the campaign has not
yet bought any television time
to begin running ads again.
By ERIC TUCKER
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — The
Department of Veterans
Affairs said Thursday it was
increasing its staff of men-
tal health workers by roughly
1,900, part of an effort to
address a shortage of special-
ists and to better prepare for
the medical needs of veterans
returning home from war.
The department plans to add
about 1,600 clinicians, includ-
ing psychologists, psychia-
trists, nurses, social workers
and professional counselors,
and about 300 support staff to
an existing mental health staff
of roughly 20,590.
“As the tide of war recedes,
we have the opportunity, and
the responsibility, to antici-
pate the needs of returning
veterans,” VA Secretary Eric
Shinseki said in a statement.
“History shows that the costs
of war will continue to grow
for a decade or more after the
operational missions in Iraq
and Afghanistan have ended.
As more veterans return
home, we must ensure that all
veterans have access to qual-
ity mental health care.”
The new hires follow a
months-long VA review that
determined shortages in men-
tal health staff nationwide,
leading veterans in some areas
to wait longer than they should
for treatment, VA Under
Secretary for Health Robert
Petzel said. Recruitment is
expected to begin soon, and
the VA plans to attract spe-
cialists from the military, the
private sector and fresh out of
school, Petzel said.
The move was cheered by
Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans
of America, which also called
on the VA to reduce its claims
backlog and urged President
Barack Obama to issue a
national call for service for
mental health professionals.
Since 2007, the VA has
experienced a 35 percent
increase in the number of vet-
erans receiving mental health
services. The department says
it’s made strides by devel-
oping a more extensive sui-
cide prevention program and
increasing counseling centers.
The mental well-being of
U.S. veterans has been a criti-
cal area of concern in recent
years, especially amid reports
showing high suicide rates
and long wait times for those
seeking treatment. A VA
survey released last fall, for
instance, reported that nearly
40 percent of the 272 men-
tal health providers surveyed
said they could not schedule
a new patient for an appoint-
ment in their own clinic within
the VA-mandated window of
14 days, and 70 percent said
they lacked adequate space
and staff.
Petzel said those problems
were largely a reflection by
vacancies and a staff short-
age, problems the new hires
are intended to address.
Rep. Jeff Miller, a Florida
Republican and chairman
of the House Veterans’
Affairs Committee, said the
announcement was a good
start, but that the VA also
needs to strengthen training
of employees who encounter
veterans suffering from post-
traumatic stress disorder.
“Right now, too many vet-
erans fall through the cracks.
We can avert tragedy with
the proper outreach and care,”
Miller said in a statement.
Sen. Patty Murray, who
chairs the Senate Veterans’
Affairs Committee, has sched-
uled a hearing on the topic for
next week. She noted that the
VA’s announcement comes
days before the release of an
inspector general’s report on
the subject, but Petzel said the
review had been underway
for months and was not timed
to the report. Murray said the
new hires were “desperately
needed” at a time when “staff
vacancies, scheduling delays
and red tape” are leaving vet-
erans without the help they
need.
WASHINGTON (AP) —
For the first time since the
Super Tuesday primaries,
voters are getting a look at
just how much money presi-
dential candidates and their
supporters have been raking
in. And whether big-dollar
donors are heeding President
Barack Obama’s belated call
for supporting an independent
political action committee.
Financial reports due
today to the Federal Election
Commission will also show
how much red ink the cam-
paigns are bleeding — or, in
the case of the Republican
super PAC American
Crossroads, how much money
some groups have been stuff-
ing in their war chests.
Indeed, much has changed
since the March 6 Super
Tuesday contests, when
Republican voters in six
out of 10 states chose Mitt
Romney as their preferred
nominee to compete against
Obama. Rick Santorum has
since folded his campaign,
and Newt Gingrich has been
working with a shoestring
budget.
Obama’s campaign
already said it raised $53
million between it and the
Democratic Party last month.
But today’s reports will detail
just where his donors’ money
came from, and if he’s added
to an already-sizeable army of
500 paid staffers that — as of
March 1 — was roughly five
times the size of Romney’s
operation.
But Obama’s fundrais-
ing advantage puts him at a
less-than-solid position when
compared with the tens of
millions of dollars American
Crossroads and its nonprofit
arm, Crossroads GPS, have
amassed so far. During the
last six months of 2011 alone,
GPS brought in $28 million
from only a few dozen major
donors, recent tax filings
show. Crossroads has said it
plans to raise more than $300
million to beat Obama.
Countering Crossroads’
millions in ad spending is
Priorities USA Action, a
super PAC founded by for-
mer Obama advisers. From
early 2011 through the end of
February, however, the group
and its nonprofit arm raised
about $10 million. Priorities
USA Action, like other super
PACs supporting GOP candi-
dates, has counted on major
financial support from a
handful of wealthy donors.
Those include sugar
daddies like Las Vegas casi-
no magnate Sheldon Adelson
and his wife, who have given
more than $10 million com-
bined to a super PAC sup-
porting Gingrich. It’s unclear,
however, if the Winning Our
Future PAC will still receive
big contributions from
Adelson now that Romney is
the presumptive nominee.
Obama, for his part,
is facing the prospect of
being swamped by out-
side Republican groups in
fundraising. That’s why he
decided three months ago
to reverse course and give
his blessing to super PACs,
which can accept unlimited
donations from corporations,
labor unions and wealthy
individuals.
Most super PACs and
presidential campaigns have
until midnight today to sub-
mit their reports.
Reports to detail
post-Super
Tuesday cash
Clinton urges tougher
UN pressure on Syria
Campaign ads give hint of war to come
VA to add about 1,900 to its mental health staff
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1122 Elida Avenue
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Friday, April 20, 2012 The Herald – 5
COMMUNITY
Happy Birthday
LANDMARK
www.delphosherald.com
Columbus Grove
City Building
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
TODAY
1-4 p.m. — Interfaith Thrift
Store is open for shopping.
SATURDAY
9-11:30 a.m.— Delphos
Project Recycle at Delphos
Fuel and Wash.
9 a.m. to noon — Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shop-
ping.
St. Vincent DePaul Society,
located at the east edge of the
St. John’s High School park-
ing lot, is open.
10 a.m to 2 p.m. — Delphos
Postal Museum is open.
12:15 p.m. — Testing of
warning sirens by Delphos
Fire and Rescue
1-3 p.m. — Delphos Canal
Commission Museum, 241 N.
Main St., is open.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St.
John’s Little Theatre.
SUNDAY
1-3 p.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
1-4 p.m. — Putnam County
Museum is open, 202 E. Main
St. Kalida.
1:30 p.m. — Amvets Post
698 Auxiliary meets at the
Amvets post in Middle Point.
4 p.m. — Amvets Post 698
regular meeting at the Amvets
post in Middle Point.
7:30 p.m. — Sons of
Amvets Post 698 meet at
Amvets Post in Middle Point.
MONDAY
9 a.m. to 7 p.m. — Ottoville
Branch Library is open.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
7 p.m. — Ottoville village
council meets at the municipal
building.
Marion Township Trustees
meet at the township house.
7:30 p.m. — Delphos
Eagles Aerie 471 meets at the
Eagles Lodge.
TUESDAY
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
7 p.m. — Delphos Area
Simply Quilters meets at the
Delphos Area Chamber of
Commerce, 306 N. Main St.
7:30 p.m. — Alcoholics
Anonymous, First Presbyterian
April 21
Brooke Etzkorn
Andrea Rode
Abby Hirn
Fred Davis
Paws to Consider
Tick-tock: An eight-legged Ohio invader
BY DR. SARA SMITH
Although we are just mov-
ing into spring, I would like to
share some information with
my readers to help you pre-
pare for the next tick season,
especially since the tick spe-
cies migrating into our state
can be active during any time
of year, even in snow. I am
talking about Ixodes scapu-
laris, the blacklegged tick, or
more commonly known as
the deer tick. Found in Ohio
for the first time in 2010
(in Coshocton County), and
since then in several other
counties, it has not been con-
firmed yet in Allen County.
This tiny little arachnid is the
cause of Lyme disease, the
most common tick-borne ill-
ness, and in heavily infested
areas of the northeast U. S.,
thousands of cases of Lyme
disease are reported each
year.
Deer are one of the many
types of animals that black-
legged ticks feed on – adult
ticks are most active dur-
ing fall around deer hunting
season but have no impor-
tance in harboring the Lyme
disease bacterium, Borrelia
burgdorferi. The common
whitefooted mouse is the
largest reservoir. Once a
blacklegged tick feeds on a
carrier mouse, it will also be
a Lyme carrier for the rest
of its life. The
complex lifecy-
cle of this tick
takes at least
two years to
complete, with
the greatest risk
of Lyme disease
transmission in
the late spring
and summer
from the nymph
(pre-adult) stage of the tick.
We have all heard of the
characteristic bulls-eye rash
that can develop when a
person is first infected with
the Lyme bacteria. Flu-like
symptoms, muscle and joint
pain and swollen lymph
nodes are other early signs
of the disease in humans and
should be reported to your
physician immediately so
testing and treatment can be
done. Lyme disease is rarely
life-threatening but can lead
to chronic symptoms such
as arthritis and fatigue if not
treated. Animals do not get a
characteristic rash after being
infected. Fever, decreased
appetite and joint pain are
some symptoms we see in
dogs (and rarely cats) but
not until a few weeks after
infection. Lyme
disease testing
for dogs requires
a blood sample
and treatment
involves an oral
antibiotic. Other
species of ticks
can transmit
diseases, too.
The most com-
mon tick in Ohio,
the American dog tick, can
carry diseases such as Rocky
Mountain Spotted Fever.
Tick prevention is the best
practice to avoid contract-
ing Lyme and other diseases.
Blacklegged ticks live in
wooded areas, as opposed to
tall grasses, where the dog
tick resides, so be careful to
check for ticks after enter-
ing woods, especially May
through August. Blacklegged
ticks can be as small as a pin
head, and quick – they can
move to a hidden location of
the body, such as the groin
or scalp, within a matter of
minutes. Do not worry about
ticks “jumping” out of trees
– they are blind creatures.
They grab on to fur or cloth-
ing as a pet or person passes
by them.
For people, use repellents
with 30 percent DEET on
exposed clothing and skin
during peak tick season.
Pets should be treated with
a veterinarian-recommended
monthly flea and tick pre-
ventative medication (do not
use permethrin products on
cats), and checked regularly
as well.
Parasites that feed on
blood, ticks have special
mouthparts designed just for
the task. They are like two
tiny “saws” side by side that
burrow to a capillary in the
skin. Two types of saliva mix
together to form an epoxy
that cements the mouthparts
into the skin. Needless to say,
it’s very difficult to make
a tick budge with nail pol-
ish, mineral oil, matches or
alcohol (or any combination
of the above) and you may
harm yourself more than the
tick. The best way to remove
a tick is to grasp it close to
the skin with tweezers and
pull up with steady, even
pressure. Clean the site with
soap and water. Don’t panic
if the mouthparts are left in
the skin – tick borne diseases
are transferred from the gut
in the main part of the body
only after the tick has been
embedded for more than 36
hours.
Educate yourself on
simple tick identification at
www.odh.ohio.gov. If you
find a tick other than the
Dog Tick, the best place to
bring it is your veterinar-
ian’s office. We should sub-
mit it to the proper health
department for ID and Lyme
testing. Research is currently
being conducted on popula-
tions of blacklegged ticks in
Ohio, which will continue
to spread as wildlife carries
the bugs to new locations.
Remember, they defy com-
monly held views of ticks as
they reside in woods and are
active even in cold weath-
er. Now, saying “I want to
check you for ticks” might
not be such a cheesy pick-up
line!
Dr. Sara is an associ-
ate veterinarian at Delphos
Animal Hospital.
At the movies . . .
Van Wert Cinemas
10709 Lincoln Hwy. Van Wert
The Lucky One (PG-13) Fri.: 5:00/7:00/9:00;
Sat.-Sun.: 2:00/4:00/6:00/8:00; Mon.-Thurs.:
5:00/7:00
The Three Stooges (PG) Fri.: 5:00/7:00/9:00;
Sat.-Sun.: 2:00/4:00/6:00/8:00; Mon.-Thurs.:
5:00/7:00
Cabin in the Woods (R) 5:00/7:00/9:00; Sat.-
Sun.: 2:00/4:00/6:00/8:00; Mon.-Thurs.: 5:00/7:00
The Hunger Games (PG-13) Fri.: 5:00/7:45; Sat.-
Sun.: 2:00/4:45/7:30; Mon.-Thurs.: 5:00/7:45
Mirror Mirror (PG) Fri.: 5:00; Sat.-Sun.:
2:00/4:15; Mon.-Thurs.: 5:00
American Reunion (R) Fri.: 7:30; Sat.-Sun.:
7:00; Mon.-Thurs.: 7:15
American Mall Stadium 12
2830 W. Elm St., Lima
Saturday and Sunday
Chimpanzee (G) 1:55/4:20/7:15/9:20
The Lucky One (PG-13) 1:30/4:35/7:25/9:50
Think Like a Man (PG-13) 1:10/4:10/7:00/10:00
The Cabin in the Woods (R) 1:15/4:15/7:45/
10:10
Lockout (PG-13) 1:50/4:45/7:10/9:35
The Three Stooges (PG) 2:00/4:25/7:20/9:40
American Reunion (R) 1:35/4:50/7:40/10:20
Titanic 3D (PG-13 1:00/5:00/9:05
Mirror Mirror (PG) 4:30/9:25
Wrath of the Titans (PG-13) 4:55/9:55
Wrath of the Titans 3D 1:40/7:30
Hunger Games (PG-13) 1:05/4:05/7:05/10:05
October Baby (PG-13) 1:25/6:55
21 Jump Street (R) 1:45/4:40/7:35/10:15
Eastgate Dollar Movies
2100 Harding Hwy. Lima
Saturday and Sunday
Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax (PG) 1:00/3:00/5:00/7:00/
(Sat. only 9:00)
Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance (PG-13)
1:15/3:15/5:15/7:30/(Sat. only 9:25)
Journey 2: The Mysterious Island (PG)
1:00/3:00/5:00/7:15/(Sat. only 9:15)
The Vow (PG-13) 1:00/3:00/5:00/7:20/(Sat. only
9:20)
Shannon Theater
119 S. Main St., Bluffton
Journey 2: The Mysterious Island (PG) Show
times are every evening at 7 p.m. with 1:30 p.m.
And 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday matinees.
The Vow (PG-13) Show times are every
evening at 9:30 p.m. only.
Dr. Sara
The Delphos Herald ...
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6 – The Herald Friday, April 20, 2012
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@delpho-
sherald.com
LAFAYETTE —
Jefferson’s fast-pitch softball
unit has struggled with slow
starts this season in losing its
first 11 games of 2012.
The Lady Wildcats finally
got that vastly-needed surge
early — a 7-run first inning
— and then did enough the
rest of the way to hold off
a late Allen East rally for a
12-7 Northwest Conference
triumph — their first of the
campaign — on a pleasant
spring afternoon at Allen East
High School.
Jefferson (1-11, 1-3 NWC)
put together 15 hits against a
pair of Lady Mustang (5-11,
0-5 NWC) pitchers): starter
Courtney Reneau (1-plus
frames, 8 hits, 7 runs, 5 earned,
1 base-on-balls, 1 strikeout)
and Aubrin Davis (6 IPs, 7
hits, 5 runs, 4 earned, 2 BBS,
2 Ks).
“We hit the ball very well
today from top to bottom. We
looked at our batting stats
and saw some holes in the
lineup; we altered it some and
it paid off,” Jefferson coach
Dave Wollenhaupt explained.
“Alexis Cook was our des-
ignated player and she went
3-for-4. Obviously, getting a
7-run lead is so much better
than coming from behind all
the time. For the most part, we
maintained our focus at the
plate all game long and tacked
on some important runs.”
Mustang coach Bill Mattevi
could only shake his head.
“On our part, we were not
ready to play coming into this
game. Bottom line, we didn’t
show up until it was too late; I
had my supposedly ace pitcher
out there from the start and it
didn’t last,” he explained. “On
the other hand, I don’t know
how Jefferson hadn’t won a
game before this. They took
us right out of the game from
the first inning and kept hitting
the ball. (Taylor) Branham is
too good of a pitcher to be
struggling like that. If they
didn’t play good defense
before, they did today.”
The Red and White put
together seven hits alone in
the first frame, sending 12
batters to the dish, with senior
leadoff hitter Sarah Thitoff
(3-for-4, 3 runs scored, 1 run
batted in) getting a leadoff
triple and scoring on a single
by Corrine Metzger (3-for-4,
2 runs, 3 RBIs). Fallon Van
Dyke singled and both scored
as Cassidy Bevington (2-for-
4, 3 RBIs) lined a bad-hop tri-
ple that handcuffed leftfielder
Alex Mertz. She scored as
Taylor Branham (2-for-5, 2
RBIs) lined a hit into cen-
ter. Shayla Rice was safe on
a fielder’s-choice fly ball —
courtesy-runner Samantha
Branham had to hold up just
in case and an error on the
throw to the infield allowed
her to be safe. Kayla Kill
sacrificed both up a a base
and both scored via a 2-run
liner to right by Alexis Cook
(3-for-4). She advanced on
a wild pitch and scored an
out later as Thitoff whacked
a double to left center. She
advanced on a wild pitch and
Metzger walked but the hosts
finally got out of the inning.
The early uprising made
things much easier for Delphos
starting right-hander Taylor
Branham (1-11; 7 IPs, 10 hits,
7 runs, 2 earned, 2 BBS, 2 Ks;
102 pitches, 65 for strikes),
setting down the Mustangs in
order in the first.
Bevington’s leadoff shot to
left and an error on the play
put her at second, finishing
Reneau for Davis. She got
out of the frame with no more
damage after Bevington stole
third with two outs.
Allen East got two back
in the home half of the sec-
ond with Maddie Schantz and
Reneau — the first two batters
who singled and advanced on
a Taylor Richardson sacrifice
— scoring on an error to make
it 7-2.
Jefferson got the first two
runners on in the third: a liner
and stolen base by Cook and
a hit batter (Rachel Miller);
both advanced on a 1-out
ground ball by Metzger but
they were left stranded (10 for
the game).
The Mustangs left Erin
Conkle on second with two
down in the bottom half.
The Jeffcats wasted a
1-out double in the fourth by
Branham and a groundout by
Rice that advanced courtesy-
runner Samantha Branham to
third.
The Mustangs had a chal-
lenge in the home half but
Richardson, who walked with
one down, was caught steal-
ing by Bevington and the
hosts wasted 2-out singles
by Alyssa Thomas and Sierra
Sizemore.
The Delphos fifth saw the
visitors scored two important
runs. With one gone, Miller
beat out a nibbler in front
of the plate and Thitoff sin-
gled to left. After a wild pitch
moved both up, both scored
as Metzger thumped a 2-run
single to center, taking second
on the throw home as Thitoff
eluded the tag by catcher
Conkle. A bounceout by Van
Dyke put Metzger at third but
she remained.
Allen East could not
respond in their half, again
stranding a runner.
The Wildcats scored three
more times in the seventh, bat-
ting around. Cook hit a sharp
shot up the middle to lead it off
and advanced as pinch-hitter
Whitney Hohlbein bounced
out. Thitoff walked and a liner
by Metzger loaded the bases.
Back-to-back walks by Van
Dyke and Bevington plated
Cook and Thitoff. Taylor
Branham bounced to third but
Metzger hustled home to beat
the throw from Schantz. Rice
bounced to third but this time,
the throw was in time at home
to get Van Dyke. The final
batter was retired as Jefferson
held a 12-2 edge.
The Mustangs then batted
around in the home seventh to
raise the blood pressure of the
Jefferson partisans. They uti-
lized four hits — including a
leadoff double by pinch-hitter
Taylor Llody, a run-scoring
double by Thomas and a run-
scoring fielder’s choice by
Richardson, as well as two
Jefferson errors, to score five
times. Finally, T. Branham
induced a comebacker by
Sizemore to finish the game.
“There were only two
innings when we lost our
focus defensively; the sec-
ond and the seventh. Other
than that, we played very well
there,” Wollenhaupt added. “I
put the last inning on the girls
being so excited they were
about to win a game that they
were celebrating too early.
They had to pull it together
because it could have turned
into one of those ‘bleeder’
innings and they pulled it out.
It’s part of learning how to
finish a game.”
Allen East hosts USV for
a doubleheader Saturday,
while Jefferson hosts Bluffton
Monday.
Jefferson senior Samantha Thitoff kicks up a lot of dust
around home plate as she slides safely in during the fifth
inning Thursday versus Allen East. She scored 3 runs and
helped the Lady Wildcats get their first win of the 2012
season, 12-7, over the host Mustangs.
Photo submitted
JEFFERSON (12)
ab-r-h-rbi
Samantha Thitoff ss 4-3-3-1,
Corrine Metzger 2b 4-2-3-3, Fallon Van
Dyke cf 4-1-1-1, Cassidy Bevington
c 4-1-2-3, Taylor Branham p 5-0-2-2,
Samantha Branham cr 0-1-0-0, Shayla
Rice 3b 5-1-0-0, Kayla Kill 1b 3-0-0-0,
Destiny Thompson ph 1-0-0-0, Alexis
Cook dp 4-2-3-2, Sarah Thitoff rf 0-0-0-
0, Kimber Kill lf 0-0-0-0, Rachel Miller lf/
rf 2-1-1-0, Whitney Hohlbein ph 1-0-0-
0. Totals 37-12-15-12.
ALLEN EAST (7)
ab-r-h-rbi
Audrey Rodriguez ss 4-1-0-0, Alex
Mertz lf 3-0-0-0, Erin Conkle c 4-1-2-1,
Maddie Schantz 3b 4-2-1-0, Courtney
Reneau p/c 4-2-2-0, Taylor Richardson
2b 2-0-1-1, Alyssa Thomas dp/rf 4-0-
2-1, Taylor Lloyd 1b 0-0-0-0, Kennedy
Rex 1b 0-0-0-0, Sierra Sizemore cf 4-0-
1-0, Aubrin Davis rf/p 2-0-0-0, Taylor
Lloyd ph 1-1-1-0. Totals 32-7-10-3.
Score by Innings:
Jefferson 7 0 0 0 2 0 3 - 12
Allen East 0 2 0 0 0 0 5 - 7
E: Sam. Thitoff, Van Dyke, T.
Branham, Rice, Mertz, Richardson;
LOB: Jefferson 10, Allen East 7; 2B:
Sam. Thitoff, T. Branham, Thomas,
Lloyd; 3B: Sam. Thitoff, Bevington;
SB: Bevington, Cook, Rodriguez,
Conkle, Schantz; CS: Richardson (by
Bevington); Sac: Ka. Kill, Richardson.
IP H R ER BB SO
JEFFERSON
Branham (W, 1-11) 7.0 10 7 2 2 2
ALLEN EAST
Reneau (L) 1.0 8 7 5 1 1
Davis 6.0 7 5 4 2 2
Reneau pitched to 1 batter in 2nd
WP: Reneau 2, Branham, Davis;
HBP: Miller (by Davis); PB: Bevington.
Wildcats use quick start, hold off
Mustangs late, for 1st win in 2012
Mustangs secure 4-1 NWC
baseball win over Jeffcats
LAFAYETTE — Braden
Goodwin tossed a 2-hitter for
Allen East Thursday after-
noon at Allen
East High
School, lead-
ing the host
Mustangs to a
4-1 Northwest
Conf er ence
triumph over Jefferson.
Jeff Schleeter (2-2) took
the loss for the Wildcats (7-11,
2-3), while the Mustangs (9-5,
3-2) only collected five hits
but used them to utmost effec-
tiveness.
“Jeff struggled with com-
mand early on but settled in
and gave us another quality
start……….With preseason
injuries to a couple of our
pitchers, Jeff’s stepped into
the number 1 spot and has
more that exceeded our
expectations; we can’t ask
anymore of what he’s giv-
ing us,” Jefferson coach Doug
Geary noted.
The Wildcats (7-11, 2-3
NWC) did work their way
for nine walks against the
Mustang (9-5, 3-2 NWC)
freshman but he fanned eight
to help make up the differ-
ence.
“I wasn’t expecting to see
Goodwin pitch. He threw
seven innings Monday vs.
Crestview, then he turns
around and throws 121 (pitch-
es) tonight; only a freshman,
he’s going to be a good one,”
Geary added. “We had some
opportunities to dent the
plate but couldn’t cash in.
Obviously, we didn’t hit it
well with only two hits but we
have a bunch of base-runners
with the nine walks. Getting
doubled up twice in the first
three innings was huge.
“Overall I’m happy with
the way we’ve played this
week. We competed against
three above-average teams.
Hopefully, we can carry this
momentum into tournament
in a couple weeks.”
Senior Tony George went
2-for-2 for the visitors, while
Ketchlim went 2-for-3 (RBI)
for Allen East.
Jefferson hosts Bluffton 5
p.m. Monday.
JEFFERSON
ab r h rbi
Austin Jettinghoff ss 4 0 0 0,
Seth Wollenhaupt rf 2 0 0 0, Ross
Thompson 3b 4 0 0 0, Curtis Miller 1b
2 1 0 0, Zach Kimmett dh 2 0 0 0, Drew
Kortokrax pr 0-0-0-0, Jeff Schleeter p
0 0 0 0, Justin Rode c 1 0 0 0, Tony
George cf/2b 2 0 2 0, Mike Joseph lf/cf
3 0 0 0, Zach Ricker 2b/p 1 0 0 0, Kyle
Anspach ph 0 0 0 0. Totals 21 1 2 0.
ALLEN EAST
ab r h rbi
Wilson lf 2 2 1 0, Ketchlim cf 3 0 2
1, Stevens ss 3 0 0 1, Swaney 1b 2 0 0
0, Lawrence c 2 1 1 0, Wireman c 0 0 0
0, Kohlreiser 2b 3 1 1 1, Carey dh 3 0 0
1, Goodwin p 0 0 0 0, Crow 3b 2 0 0 0,
McAdoo rf 2 0 0 0. Totals 22 4 5 4.
Score by Innings:
Jefferson 000 100 0 - 1 2 1
Allen East 120 010 0 - 4 5 0
E: George; DP: Allen East 2; LOB:
Jefferson 9, Allen East 4; 2B--Wilson.
SB--Miller, Rode, Ricker, Stevens,
Wilson.
IP H R ER BB SO
JEFFERSON
Schleeter (L, 2-2) 5.1 5 4 4 2 3
Ricker 0.2 0 0 0 0 1
ALLEN EAST
Braden Goodwin (W) 7.0 2 1 0 9 8
PB--Lawrence (3). WP--Goodwin.
SO--Wollenhaupt (2), Joseph (2),
Kimmett, Jettinghoff (2), Thompson,
Carey, Kohlreiser, Wilson, Lawrence.
BB--George, Anspach, Wollenhaupt
(2), Miller, Kimmett, Rode (2), Ricker,
Swaney, Wilson. HBP: Wireman (by
Schleeter).
-------
Lady Bearcats
down T-Birds
SPENCERVILLE — Tori
Johnston tossed a 4-hitter for
Spencerville Thursday, pac-
ing the Lady Bearcats to a 7-3
Northwest Conference soft-
ball triumph over invading
Lima Central
Catholic.
J ohns t on
hit one batter
and walked
four, fanning
seven. The defense also com-
mitted three miscues.
Spencerville (4-9, 2-3
NWC) amassed 10 hits,
including a double from
Maddie Hollar and a triple
from Mackenzie Ringwald.
LCC falls to 4-8.
Lima Cen. Cat. 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 - 3 4 0
Spencerville 0 2 0 4 0 1 x - 7 10 3
WP: Tori Johnston; LP: M. Niese.
2B: Maddie Hollar (S). 3B: Mackenzie
Ringwald (S).
----
T-Birds blast Bearcats
in NWC baseball
SPENCERVILLE — Lima
Central Catholic defeated
Spencerville 15-1 in five
innings Thursday night in
Northwest Conference base-
ball action in Spencerville.
With the win, LCC moves
to 11-4 (5-0 NWC), while
Spencerville falls to 7-8 (2-3
NWC).
The Thunderbirds not only
bashed 12 hits but the Bearcats
committed five miscues. Matt
Youngpeter took the loss in
his two innings (7 hits, 8 runs,
3 BBs, 3 Ks).
Travis Clark threw a 2-hit-
ter (7 Ks) for the visitors.
Spencerville visits Botkins
tonight.
Lima Cen. Cat. 5 3 5 2 0 - 15 12 1
Spencerville 1 0 0 0 0 - 1 2 5
WP: Travis Clark; LP: Matt
Youngpeter.
----
Shick, Bullock
no-hit Lady ’Dawgs
ELIDA — Kay Shick threw
four innings and Bullock two
in combining to no-no Elida
10-0 in a 6-innings Western
Buckeye League softball
matchup Thursday night at
Dorothy Edwards Field.
The Lady Indians backed
the pitching duo with 12 hits,
including three by Mo Truxal
(2 runs batted in) and two each
by Brittany
Lauck (2
RBIs), Megan
B u e t t n e r
(1) and Tori
Runneals (1).
Elida is at Houston for a
doubleheader Saturday.
Shawnee 0 0 5 0 3 2 - 10 12 1
Elida 0 0 0 0 0 0 - 0 0 4
WP: Shick (9-2); LP: Caitlin Shroyer
(2-5).
----
Big late inning lifts
Ada girls past Grove
By Cort Reynolds
Ada Herald writer
ADA - Host Ada scored
seven runs in the bottom of a
wild sixth inning to break a tie
and pull out a 13-6 Northwest
Conference softball victory
over
Columbus Grove Thursday
night.
Ada improved to 9-2 and
stayed second in the league at
4-1 with the win. Grove fell to
7-7 and 3-2 in the NWC after
their loss in the battle for
second place behind
Crestview.
G r o v e
p u s h e d
across three
runs in the
top of the
first to grab
an early lead. Deanna Kleman
singled and moved to second
on a single by Cece Utendorf.
Both then scored on a dou-
ble by Bobbi Heckel. Heckel
advanced to third on a sin-
gle by Ashley Langhals and
scored on a sacrifice fly by
Schroeder.
Winning pitcher Ashlie
Kindle hammered a solo line
drive home run over the left-
center field fence to put Ada
on the scoreboard with two
outs.
In the bottom of the sec-
ond, Ada took the lead with
a big inning. Ashley Windle
reached on an infield single
and advanced to third after
a passed ball and a stolen
base. Sam Wildman drove
her in with a sharp single to
center field on a 3-2 pitch.
Cozy Brodeur reached on a
bad-hop single to shortstop.
Katelyn Guagenti smacked
a hard single down the first
base line into right field to
plate Wildman and tie it 3-3.
Lindsay Simmons laid down
a bunt single and Brodeur
scored on a delayed piece of
base-running. After a strike-
out, Kindle rifled a 2-run dou-
ble off the base of the center-
field fence to give the hosts a
6-3 cushion.
In the top of the third, CG
rallied for a pair of runs. After
a double by pitcher Heckel,
Grove scored twice on three
errors following a shortstop
error off the bat of Schroeder.
Ada escaped further damage
when a hard shot headed to
right center hit the CG base-
runner to end the inning.
In the fourth, CG tied it
with a single run. After a
single, Simmons turned a
fine double play. But after a
Kleman swinging bunt and
an infield hit, Grove tied it
on a double to center field by
Utendorf.
Ada threatened in their half
of the fourth. Guagenti and
Simmons singled to lead off.
But Guagenti was thrown out
at home and CG wriggled
out of the jam when Kindle’s
drive was caught in center.
In the top of the sixth,
Grove fumbled a golden
opportunity to break the 6-6
knot. Two infield hits were
followed by an error but they
tried to score on the miscue
and Windle blocked the play
well at home to record the
LOCAL ROUNDUP
See ROUNDUP, page 7 See MLB, page 7
The Associated Press
CHICAGO — Mikkel
Boedker scored in overtime
for the second straight game
and the Phoenix Coyotes beat
the Chicago Blackhawks 3-2
on Thursday night to take
a 3-1 lead in the first-round
series.
Boedker skated ahead of
defenseman Nick Leddy and
shoveled the puck under goal-
ie Corey Crawford at 2:15 in
the fourth straight game that
has gone to an extra period.
Game 5 is Saturday night
in Arizona.
Michael Frolik’s tap-in
from the left side with 1:26
left in regulation tied it and
marked the third time in four
games the Blackhawks ral-
lied to force overtime after
pulling Crawford for an extra
attacker.
Shane Doan and Taylor
Pyatt scored 44 seconds apart
to give the Coyotes a 2-0
lead in the third. But Brendan
Morrison, making his first
appearance in the series,
scored to make it 2-1.
Doan stripped the puck
from Chicago’s Johnny
Oduya, made a nice cross-
ice pass to Ray Whitney and
then scored on a rebound of
Whitney’s shot at 7:03 of
the third. The Coyotes struck
again quickly when Antoine
Vermette got the puck near
the boards and made a nice
feed to Pyatt.
The Blackhawks played
without star right wing Marian
Hossa, who was driven to
the ice and carried off on a
stretcher in Game 3 after a
shoulder-to-head hit from the
Coyotes’ Raffi Torres.
Torres was suspended
indefinitely Wednesday and
was scheduled for a hearing
with the league today.
DEVILS 4, PANTHERS 0
NEWARK, N.J. — Martin Brodeur
bounced back from his shortest post-
season performance with a record-
setting 24th playoff shutout and New
Jersey beat Florida to tie the series
2-all.
Brodeur made 26 saves in taking
over sole possession of the shutout
mark from Patrick Roy. The 39-year-
old goalie also added his second
assist of the series, giving him 10
for his career — four behind leader
Grant Fuhr. The effort came two days
after Brodeur was lifted after giving
up three goals in 22:18 in a 4-3 loss.
Zach Parise, Steve Bernier,
Travis Zajac and Ilya Kovalchuk
scored for New Jersey.
Brodeur made at least six outstand-
ing saves in winning his 101st career
postseason game, while seemingly
benefiting from some early luck when
Sean Bergenheim hit a post.
Game 5 is Saturday night.
CAPITALS 2, BRUINS 1
WASHINGTON — Playoff rookie
Braden Holtby followed up a shaky
outing with a superb one by mak-
ing 44 saves and Alexander Semin
scored the go-ahead goal, helping
Washington beat Stanley Cup cham-
pion Boston to tie the series at two
games apiece.
Marcus Johansson put the puck
past Tim Thomas less than 1 1/2
minutes after the opening faceoff
but Boston’s Rich Peverley tied it
later in the first period. Semin put
Washington ahead for good with 1:17
left in the second on a power-play
goal, his second score of the series.
Game 5 is Saturday in Boston.
BLUES 2, SHARKS 1
SAN JOSE, Calif. — Brian Elliott
made 24 saves, B.J. Crombeen
and Andy McDonald scored and St.
Louismoved one win away from the
second round of the playoffs, beating
San Jose to take a 3-1 series lead.
Patrik Berglund and David Perron
each assisted on both goals for the
Blues, who can win their first playoff
series since 2002 by beating the
Sharks in Game 5 at home Saturday
night.
San Jose played well for long
stretches, especially in the second
and third period, but once again
struggled to score against St. Louis’
stingy defense that allowed the few-
est goals ever in an 82-game sea-
son. Joe Thornton broke the shutout
with 1:07 remaining but the Sharks
couldn’t get the equalizer.
The Sharks are in danger of being
knocked out in the first round after
making it to the Western Conference
final the previous two seasons. They
need to win three straight games
against a team they have beaten
once in eight tries this season.
NHL PLAYOFF CAPSULES
The Associated Press
National League
ST. LOUIS — It was a
day of firsts for several
Cincinnati Reds hitters. And
another day to forget for Adam
Wainwright.
Brandon Phillips homered
for his first RBI of the sea-
son and Drew Stubbs hom-
ered for his first extra-base hit
Thursday as the Reds backed
soft-tossing Bronson Arroyo’s
eight innings and broke loose
for a 6-3 victory over the St.
Louis Cardinals that averted a
3-game sweep.
Ryan Ludwick also hom-
ered for the Reds, who had
connected just once in their
previous nine games and
began the day with a .211 bat-
ting average.
The Reds picked on
Wainwright (0-3), a 20-game
winner in 2010 coming off
reconstructive elbow surgery
that sidelined him all of 2011.
Wainwright is winless in his
first three decisions for the
first time in his career. He
allowed multiple home runs in
consecutive starts for just the
second time ever.
Wainwright allowed four
runs in five innings, leaving
him with a 9.88 ERA.
Phillips hit his first homer
since Sept. 20 against the
Astros, a span of 53 at-bats,
and earned his first RBI in 40
at-bats. Stubbs was 3-for-5
and the homer was his first
extra-base hit in 50 at-bats.
Ludwick’s 2-run homer was
the Reds’ second in a span
of three at-bats in the fourth.
Stubbs hit his first off Victor
Marte in the seventh.
Matt Holliday’s 3-run homer
in the sixth was the only dam-
age against Arroyo (1-0), who
struck out five and walked
none while scattering five hits.
Arroyo threw just 90 pitches.
Joey Votto added an
RBI single in the Reds ninth
off Fernando Salas. Sean
Marshall struck out the side
after allowing a leadoff hit in
the ninth for his second save
in second chances.
Cardinals centerfielder Jon
Jay left after the seventh with
a sprained right shoulder after
bumping into the wall trying to
snare Stubbs’ homer. Jay said
X-rays showed no significant
damage and he was day-to-
day.
Earlier Thursday, gen-
eral manager John Mozeliak
announced 1B Lance Berkman
would be placed on the 15-day
disabled list with a left calf
injury. The Cardinals plan
on activating utilityman Skip
Schumaker from the 15-day
disabled list from a pulled
right side muscle sustained in
spring training.
Phillips got his RBI with
one out in the third, Jay Bruce
followed with a single and
Ludwick hit the next pitch
beyond the visitor’s bullpen.
Arroyo allowed two hits
the first five innings but the
Cardinals opened the sixth
with three straight hits. Rafael
Furcal and Jay singled before
Holliday hit his third homer to
cut the deficit to 4-3.
The NL Central-leading
Cardinals are 9-4. A sweep
over the Reds would have
given the franchise its best
start to the season since it was
13-3 in 1982, a World Series
title year.
MARLINS 5, CUBS 3
MIAMI — Greg Dobbs hit a
two-run double and the Miami
Marlins’ strong bullpen fin-
ished off a three-game sweep
that sent Chicago to its fifth
straight loss.
Ricky Nolasco (2-0) went 5
1/3 innings for the victory. Five
relievers combined to throw 3
2/3 perfect innings and Heath
Bell recorded his second save
in four chances.
An announced attendance
MLB CAPSULES
1
Friday, April 20, 2012 The Herald — 7
www.delphosherald.com

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EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business April 19, 2012
The Associated Press
(x-if necessary)
FIRST ROUND
(Best-of-7)
Thursday’s Results
New Jersey 4, Florida 0, series
tied 2-2
Washington 2, Boston 1, series
tied 2-2
Phoenix 3, Chicago 2, OT,
Phoenix leads series 3-1
St. Louis 2, San Jose 1, St. Louis
leads series 3-1
Today’s Games
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 7:30
p.m., Philadelphia leads series 3-1
Detroit at Nashville, 8 p.m.,
Nashville leads series 3-1
Saturday’s Games
Washington at Boston, 3 p.m.
New Jersey at Florida, 6:30 p.m.
Ottawa at NY Rangers, 7 p.m.,
series tied 2-2
San Jose at St. Louis, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Boston at Washington, TBD
x-Pittsburgh at Philadelphia,
TBD
x-Nashville at Detroit, TBD
Los Angeles at Vancouver, TBD,
Los Angeles leads series 3-1
NHL DAILY PLAYOFF
GLANCE
The Associated Press
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
y-Boston 37 26 .587 —
x-New York 33 29 .532 3 1/2
Philadelphia 32 30 .516 4 1/2
New Jersey 22 41 .349 15
Toronto 22 41 .349 15
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
y-Miami 45 17 .726 —
x-Atlanta 37 25 .597 8
x-Orlando 36 26 .581 9
Washington 16 46 .258 29
Charlotte 7 54 .115 37 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
y-Chicago 47 16 .746 —
x-Indiana 41 22 .651 6
Milwaukee 29 33 .468 17 1/2
Detroit 23 40 .365 24
Cleveland 20 41 .328 26
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
y-San Antonio 45 16 .738 —
x-Memphis 37 25 .597 8 1/2
x-Dallas 35 28 .556 11
Houston 32 31 .508 14
New Orleans 20 43 .317 26
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
y-Oklahoma Cty 45 17 .726 —
Denver 34 28 .548 11
Utah 33 30 .524 12 1/2
Portland 28 35 .444 17 1/2
Minnesota 26 38 .406 20
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
x-L.A. Lakers 40 23 .635 —
x-L.A. Clippers 39 24 .619 1
Phoenix 33 30 .524 7
Golden State 22 39 .361 17
Sacramento 20 42 .323 19 1/2
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
———
Thursday’s Results
Indiana 118, Milwaukee 109
Minnesota 91, Detroit 80
New Orleans 105, Houston 99, OT
Miami 83, Chicago 72
Phoenix 93, L.A. Clippers 90
Today’s Games
Boston at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Memphis at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
New York at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Golden State at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at San Antonio, 9:30
p.m.
Oklahoma City at Sacramento, 10
p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Denver at Phoenix, 5:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Washington at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Golden State at Houston, 8 p.m.
Portland at Memphis, 8 p.m.
New Jersey at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Orlando at Utah, 10:30 p.m.
NBA GLANCE
The Associated Press
National League
East Division
W L Pct GB
Washington 10 4 .714 —
Atlanta 8 5 .615 1 1/2
New York 7 5 .583 2
Miami 7 6 .538 2 1/2
Philadelphia 6 7 .462 3 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 9 4 .692 —
Milwaukee 6 7 .462 3
Pittsburgh 5 7 .417 3 1/2
Cincinnati 5 8 .385 4
Houston 5 8 .385 4
Chicago 3 10 .231 6
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 10 3 .769 —
Arizona 7 6 .538 3
Colorado 6 6 .500 3 1/2
San Francisco 6 6 .500 3 1/2
San Diego 3 11 .214 7 1/2
———
Thursday’s Results
Miami 5, Chicago Cubs 3
L.A. Dodgers 4, Milwaukee 3
Cincinnati 6, St. Louis 3
Houston 11, Washington 4
Atlanta 10, Arizona 2
Philadelphia 2, San Diego 0
Today’s Games
Cincinnati (Bailey 0-2) at Chicago
Cubs (Volstad 0-1), 2:20 p.m.
Miami (Zambrano 0-0) at Washington
(Detwiler 1-0), 7:05 p.m.
St. Louis (Lynn 2-0) at Pittsburgh
(Morton 0-0), 7:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Zito 1-0) at N.Y. Mets
(Niese 2-0), 7:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Lilly 1-0) at Houston
(Happ 1-0), 8:05 p.m.
Colorado (Chacin 0-1) at Milwaukee
(Marcum 1-1), 8:10 p.m.
Atlanta (Beachy 1-1) at Arizona
(Cahill 1-0), 9:40 p.m.
Philadelphia (Hamels 1-1) at San
Diego (Volquez 0-1), 10:05 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Cincinnati (Leake 0-1) at Chicago
Cubs (Maholm 0-2), 1:05 p.m.
Miami (A.Sanchez 1-0) at Washington
(Strasburg 2-0), 1:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Vogelsong 0-1) at
N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey 0-0), 1:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 0-0) at
Houston (Weiland 0-2), 7:05 p.m.
St. Louis (Westbrook 2-0) at
Pittsburgh (Correia 1-0), 7:05 p.m.
Colorado (Pomeranz 0-1) at
Milwaukee (Narveson 1-1), 7:10 p.m.
Atlanta (Hanson 1-2) at Arizona
(J.Saunders 1-0), 8:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Halladay 3-0) at San
Diego (Luebke 1-1), 8:35 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
San Francisco (Lincecum 0-2) at N.Y.
Mets (Gee 1-1), 1:10 p.m.
Miami (Jo.Johnson 0-2) at Washington
(G.Gonzalez 1-0), 1:35 p.m.
St. Louis (Lohse 2-0) at Pittsburgh
(Bedard 0-3), 1:35 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 2-0) at
Houston (W.Rodriguez 0-2), 2:05
p.m.
Colorado (Guthrie 1-1) at Milwaukee
(Gallardo 1-1), 2:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (Cueto 1-0) at Chicago
Cubs (Dempster 0-1), 2:20 p.m.
Philadelphia (Blanton 1-2) at San
Diego (Bass 0-2), 4:05 p.m.
Atlanta (Delgado 2-0) at Arizona
(I.Kennedy 2-0), 4:10 p.m.
----
American League
East Division
W L Pct GB
Baltimore 8 5 .615 —
New York 7 6 .538 1
Tampa Bay 7 6 .538 1
Toronto 6 6 .500 1 1/2
Boston 4 8 .333 3 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 9 4 .692 —
Cleveland 6 5 .545 2
Chicago 6 6 .500 2 1/2
Minnesota 4 9 .308 5
Kansas City 3 9 .250 5 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 11 2 .846 —
Oakland 7 7 .500 4 1/2
Seattle 7 7 .500 4 1/2
Los Angeles 4 9 .308 7
———
Thursday’s Results
Baltimore 5, Chicago White Sox 3
N.Y. Yankees 7, Minnesota 6
Texas 10, Detroit 3
Tampa Bay 9, Toronto 4
Oakland 4, L.A. Angels 2
Cleveland 2, Seattle 1
Today’s Games
N.Y. Yankees (Nova 2-0) at Boston
(Buchholz 1-0), 3:15 p.m.
Texas (M.Harrison 2-0) at Detroit
(Porcello 1-0), 7:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Hendriks 0-0) at Tampa
Bay (Moore 0-1), 7:10 p.m.
Toronto (Drabek 2-0) at Kansas City
(Hochevar 1-1), 8:10 p.m.
Baltimore (Matusz 0-2) at L.A. Angels
(Williams 0-1), 10:05 p.m.
Cleveland (Jimenez 1-0) at Oakland
(Godfrey 0-2), 10:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Sale 1-1) at
Seattle (Noesi 1-1), 10:10 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Texas (Feliz 1-0) at Detroit (Verlander
1-1), 1:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Humber 0-0) at
Seattle (Beavan 1-1), 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (F.Garcia 0-1) at
Boston (Doubront 0-0), 4:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Pavano 1-1) at Tampa
Bay (Shields 2-0), 7:10 p.m.
Toronto (Hutchison 0-0) at Kansas
City (Mendoza 0-2), 7:10 p.m.
Baltimore (Arrieta 1-0) at L.A. Angels
(Weaver 2-0), 9:05 p.m.
Cleveland (J.Gomez 0-0) at Oakland
(McCarthy 0-2), 9:05 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Texas (Lewis 2-0) at Detroit (Smyly
0-0), 1:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Liriano 0-2) at Tampa
Bay (Niemann 0-2), 1:40 p.m.
Toronto (R.Romero 2-0) at Kansas
City (Duffy 1-1), 2:10 p.m.
Baltimore (W.Chen 1-0) at L.A.
Angels (Haren 0-1), 3:35 p.m.
Cleveland (Masterson 0-1) at Oakland
(T.Ross 0-0), 4:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Danks 1-2) at
Seattle (Millwood 0-0), 4:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 1-0) at
Boston (Bard 0-2), 7:05 p.m.
MLB GLANCE
By TIM REYNOLDS
The Associated Press
MIAMI — The earliest
Miami and Chicago could
meet again is Game 1 of the
Eastern Conference finals.
Good thing. The tempers
could use a little time to cool
down. And after a game filled
with shoves and take-
downs, the race for the
No. 1 seed in the East is
still going strong.
LeBron James had 27
points and 11 rebounds,
Dwyane Wade scored
18 points and Miami
tightened up the race in
the East by beating the
Bulls 83-72 on Thursday
night in a scuffle-filled
win that pulled the Heat
within 1 1/2 games of
Chicago in the conference
standings.
“This is what the postsea-
son is all about,” James said.
“Both teams struggling to
score offensively and defen-
sively, two very good defen-
sive teams. It’s a possession
game. That’s what happens
in the postseason. The game
slows down. Not many fast-
break points. You’ve got to
work for every attempt, work
for every shot.”
Mario Chalmers scored 16
points and Udonis Haslem
grabbed 10 rebounds for
Miami, which held the Bulls
to a season-low point total.
The Bulls had been 23-0 this
season when holding teams to
86 points or less.
John Lucas scored 16
points for Chicago, which
was again without reigning
MVP Derrick Rose because
of injuries. Joakim Noah had
15 points and 10 rebounds,
Luol Deng added 11 points
and Carlos Boozer had 10
for the Bulls, who split four
games with Miami this season
and could have clinched the
top spot in the East with a win
on Thursday.
“We wanted it bad but
they wanted it more,” Noah
said. “That can’t happen.”
The teams combined for
four individual technical
fouls, two flagrant fouls and
Miami reserve James Jones
was ejected.
But above all else, Miami
decided this one with
defense. The Bulls went
up 21-20 on a layup by
Deng with 3:36 left in
the first quarter, mak-
ing them 10-of-14 from
the field at that point.
They shot 15-for-56 —
27 percent — the rest of
the way.
Chicago (47-16)
has games with Dallas,
Indiana and Cleveland
left, while Miami (45-
17) still has matchups with
Washington (twice), Houston
and Boston.
Miami won despite play-
ing without Chris Bosh, side-
lined for the second straight
night to rest minor bumps and
bruises.
In case anyone forgot that
the Heat and Bulls don’t par-
ticularly care for one another,
the refresher courses came
often in this one.
The first real salvo came
with 6:05 left in the first half,
when Jones was ejected after
being assessed a flagrant-2
for excessive contact against
Noah while trying for a
rebound. Jones stretched out
both arms to move Noah out
of the way, making contact
around the head.
By the end of the game,
that play seemed like a love
tap.
“Every time we play them
that’s how it’s going to be,”
Bulls coach Tom Thibodeau
said. “You have to have
the mental toughness to get
through all of that.”
Wade and Chicago guard
Richard Hamilton — rivals
for years — raised the level
of angst a few more notches
early in the third quarter.
Hamilton led with his elbow
and shoulder to create some
space and Wade took excep-
tion — so he delivered an
elbow and shoulder back, send-
ing the Bulls’ guard sprawling
to the court. The jousting then
turned verbal, enough to merit
a technical foul for each, plus a
flagrant-1 on Wade.
And then things really got
hot a few minutes later, not
long after James was pulled
down under the basket. James
set a screen to free Chalmers
from some pressure and was
run into by Lucas, who gives
up nine inches and 85 pounds
to the 2-time NBA MVP.
Predictably, Lucas went flying.
Even more predictably, Lucas
— who was leapfrogged for a
dunk by James in Chicago’s
first trip to Miami this season
— got angry.
After Deng fouled
Chalmers to stop the play and
reopened a cut over his own
left eye in the process, Lucas
ran at James and the other
eight players on the court at
the time quickly converged
on the area. It took referees
about 5 minutes to sort out
the mess, which only resulted
in a personal foul on Deng
and technicals on Lucas and
James (who, upon hearing his
name announced, shouted,
“For what?).
James shrugged off
the next hit, a hard foul by
Chicago’s Omer Asik about a
half-minute later, converting
a 3-point play in the process.
“It was a physical, compet-
itive game against two teams
that defend,” Heat coach Erik
Spoelstra said. “That tends to
lead to a little bit more pas-
sion. And nobody was really
backing down.”
SUNS 93, CLIPPERS 90
PHOENIX — Steve Nash hit a
crucial driving layup, then made two
free throws for the deciding points and
Phoenix bolstered its playoff hopes.
There were 24 lead changes in
the Suns’ 10th straight win over the
Clippers in Phoenix.
Chris Paul scored 19 points and
Blake Griffin added 16 — only two after
the first quarter — in just the third loss
in 16 games for the Clippers.
Jared Dudley scored 18 points and
Channing Frye had 16 for the Suns,
who moved into a tie with Utah for
the eighth and final playoff spot in the
Western Conference.
PACERS 118, BUCKS 109
INDIANAPOLIS — Danny Granger
scored 29 points to help Indiana clinch
homecourt advantage in the first round
of the playoffs.
George Hill had 22 points and
eight assists and David West added 21
points, 14 rebounds and seven assists
for the Pacers, who won their seventh
straight and 11th of 12. The Pacers
have scored at least 100 points in 12
of their last 13 games.
Brandon Jennings scored 27 points
and Mike Dunleavy added 23 for the
Bucks. Monta Ellis, one of Milwaukee’s
top scorers, finished with 12 points on
5-for-14 shooting. Milwaukee lost its
third straight and is running out of time
to catch Philadelphia for the No. 8 spot
in the Eastern Conference standings.
HORNETS 105, ROCKETS 99,
OT
NEW ORLEANS — Eric Gordon
scored 27 points and Carl Landry had
20 points and 10 rebounds as New
Orleans dealt a blow to Houston’s
playoff hopes by handing the Rockets
their sixth straight loss.
Goran Dragic scored 23 points and
Chase Budinger tied a season-high
with 22 points for Houston (32-31),
which dropped one game behind Utah
(33-30) for the final playoff spot in
the Western Conference with three
games left.
Al-Farouq Aminu scored 17 points,
Marco Belinelli had 13 points and
Gustavo Ayon had nine points and 10
rebounds for New Orleans, which went
ahead for good in the overtime with a
9-0 run.
The Hornets have won seven of
their last 10 games.
Gordon missed a step-back jumper
in the final seconds of regulation.
TIMBERWOLVES 91, PISTONS 80
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. —
Nikola Pekovic scored 23 points and
Minnesota ended an 11-game losing
streak.
The Timberwolves never trailed
and took a 49-31 halftime lead after
shooting 57 percent (21-of-37) from
the field. An 8-0 run pushed the lead
to over 20 points midway through the
third quarter.
Tayshaun Prince had 18 points to
lead to lead Detroit, which lost for the
second time in as many nights.
Anthony Randolph added 15 points
and 10 rebounds for Minnesota, while
Michael Beasley and J.J. Barea had 13
points each. Barea had 12 assists and
six rebounds.
Pekovic made 5 of his first six
shots to start the game and had 13
points in the first half to pace the
Wolves, who hadn’t won since March
28 at Charlotte. He finished with nine
rebounds.
Heat top Bulls 83-72,
tighten East race
(Continued from Page 6)
first out. Kindle then got out
of the jam with a strikeout
and a flyout to Taylor Willeke
in center field.
Ada then blew the game
open in its half of the sixth.
With one out, the Grove
pitcher misplayed a Brodeur
grounder to the rubber. After
a Guagenti walk, Simmons
ripped an RBI double to right
that put the hosts ahead 7-6.
Alexis Gonzaga walked and
Kindle came up with the bases
loaded. The senior looped a
single in front of the cen-
terfielder to score two runs
for a 9-6 edge. Kendra Paul
followed with a run-scoring
single to right-center field
to score pinch-runner Quinn
High. Windle walked and
an out later, three runs came
home on a misplayed ground
ball and subsequent overthrow
at third as Grove unraveled.
Willeke made a nice out-
field catch to highlight the
top of the seventh. Utendorf
doubled high off the center-
field wall but Kindle retired
the final batter on a pop-out
to Simmons.
Kindle scattered 12 hits
and allowed four earned runs
in seven innings. She struck
out five. She drove in five
runs as well to aid her own
pitching cause.
Simmons, Wildman and
Guagenti also had multiple-
hit games. Simmons record-
ed a double and two singles.
Wildman and Guagenti hit two
singles apiece. Windle and
Simmons each scored twice.
Kleman and Utendorf each
collected three hits as both
teams knocked out a dozen
safeties.
Grove visits Continental
tonight and Fort Loramie for
a Saturday twinbill (9 a.m.).
Ada visits Arlington today in
a non-league makeup game,
then resumes league play
Monday at Paulding.
CG 3 0 2 1 0 0 0 6 12 4
Ada 1 0 5 0 0 7 x 13 12 5
WP-Kindle (7-2); LP-Heckel.
2B-Kindle 2 (A), Paul (A), Simmons
(A), Utendorf (CG), Roose (CG),
Heckel 2 (CG). HR-Kindle (A).
----
Early Grove outburst
buries Ada baseballers
By Cort Reynolds
Ada Herald writer
ADA - Visiting Columbus
Grove piled up 25 first-inning
runs and went on to defeat
Ada 42-4 in a Northwest
Conference baseball game
Thursday evening.
The loss dropped Ada to
2-10 overall and 0-5 in the
NWC. Grove improved to
12-5 overall and 4-1 in the
league with the lopsided win.
Zack Barrientes led the
28-hit Grove assault with
four base hits. Blake Hoffman
and Griffith added three hits
apiece. CG followed up its
25-run first frame with 11
more scores in the second; the
game was called by the run-
rule after five innings.
Justin Archer topped the
purple and gold by collecting
half of their four hits. The
hosts committed nine errors.
Ada scored three runs in the
bottom of the third and one in
the fifth.
Grove is at Kalida this
afternoon and hosts New
Riegel for a 10 a.m. Saturday
doubleheader. Ada hosts
Perry for a noontime twinbill
Saturday.
CG 25 11 4 0 2 42 28 0
Ada 0 0 3 0 1 4 4 9
WP-Brubaker; LP-C. English
(0-2).
Roundup
(Cotinued from Page 6)
of 23,168 saw the Marlins com-
plete their first home series sweep
against the Cubs since September
2007 and improve to 5-2 in their
new ballpark.
Jeff Samardzija (2-1) was
tagged for five runs and eight hits
in 3 2/3 innings.
DODGERS 4, BREWERS 3
MILWAUKEE — Matt Kemp hit
his seventh home run of the sea-
son and the Los Angeles Dodgers
avoided a 3-game sweep.
Andre Ethier and Juan Rivera
added RBI singles while third
baseman Jerry Hairston Jr. made
two big late-inning defensive plays
for the Dodgers.
Aaron Harang (1-1) went six
innings and Javy Guerra pitched
a scoreless ninth, his sixth save in
seven opportunities this season.
Brewers starter Randy Wolf
(0-2) went six innings.
ASTROS 11, NATIONALS 4
WASHINGTON — Houston
set a franchise record by hitting
three triples in a 5-run first inning,
backing starter Bud Norris with
a season-high 17 hits against
Washington.
Norris (1-0) pitched six innings
for the win and helped himself with
a 2-run single. Brian Bogusevic
and Jason Castro each had three
hits for the Astros.
The Nationals entered with a
major league-leading 1.92 ERA
but they allowed more runs or hits
than they had in any of their first
13 games.
Ryan Zimmerman hit a 3-run
homer for the Nationals. Edwin
Jackson (1-1) gave up five runs
and seven hits in five innings.
PHILLIES 2, PADRES 0
SAN DIEGO — Vance Worley
struck out a career-high 11 in
seven innings and combined
with two relievers on a 4-hitter as
Philadelphia blanked San Diego.
Worley (1-1) held San Diego
to four hits while walking three.
Jonathan Papelbon pitched the
ninth for his fourth save.
Joe Wieland (0-2), making his
second big league start, allowed
Jimmy Rollins’ sacrifice fly in the
first. Philadelphia added a run in
the ninth on a passed ball.
BRAVES 10,
DIAMONDBACKS 2
PHOENIX — Freddie Freeman
hit a pair of two-run homers and
drove in five, Mike Minor struck
out nine in a career-high eight
innings and Atlanta cruised past
Arizona.
The Braves scored three runs
each in the sixth and eighth, high-
lighted by a 2-run single from
Juan Francisco in the sixth and
Martin Prado’s 2-run double in
the eighth.
Arizona starter Josh Collmenter
(0-1) had his longest outing of the
season after struggling in his first
two. He was charged with four
earned runs and six hits in 5
1/3 innings, dropping his ERA to
10.22.
The Diamondbacks, defending
NL West champions, lost their
third straight — all without star
right fielder Justin Upton (thumb)
in the starting lineup.
American League
SEATTLE — Jack Hannahan
was 7-for-15 against Seattle
ace Felix Hernandez going into
Thursday night’s game.
Hannahan added a base hit
in three at-bats against the 2010
AL Cy Young Award winner but it
was his fourth trip to the plate that
made the difference.
Hannahan’s 2-run single in the
ninth inning off closer Brandon
League rallied the Cleveland
Indians to a 2-1 victory over the
Mariners that cost Hernandez a
win after his dominant outing.
Hernandez struck out 12 and
walked one. He allowed five hits,
three in the eighth inning, but
ended up with a no-decision.
Indians starter Josh Tomlin
(1-1) just about matched
Hernandez. Tomlin tossed eight
innings, yielding one run and five
hits. He struck out seven, walked
none and threw just 96 pitches.
Carlos Santana walked
and Travis Hafner singled to
open the ninth against League.
Casey Kotchman’s sacrifice bunt
advanced both runners.
League (0-1) walked Shelley
Duncan, loading the bases, before
Hannahan’s first-pitch single
scored Santana and pinch-runner
Aaron Cunningham to give the
Indians a 2-1 lead.
It was League’s first blown
save since Aug. 23, also against
Cleveland.
Lucas Luetge replaced League
with two outs and intentionally
walked Michael Brantley to load
the bases again before getting
Jason Kipnis on a groundout.
Chris Perez got three outs for
his fourth save.
The Indians tried to mount a
rally in the eighth, too, but couldn’t
break through. They loaded the
bases on three consecutive sin-
gles by Hannahan, Jason Donald
and Brantley. Donald’s hit was
a possible double-play ball that
glanced off Hernandez’s leg.
Brantley’s grounder went off the
tip of Dustin Ackley’s glove at sec-
ond and was kept in the infield.
Hernandez responded by strik-
ing out Kipnis and Shin-Soo Choo
on his 126th pitch.
Seattle gave Hernandez
a slim lead in the fifth. Michael
Saunders doubled and went to
third on Miguel Olivo’s sacrifice.
John Jaso hit a hard grounder
at second baseman Kipnis, who
was pulled in with the rest of the
Cleveland infield, and he threw
high to home plate. Saunders was
safe and Jaso moved to second
on the throwing error.
Santana picked up the first hit
for the Indians with two outs in the
fourth when he hit a 2-1 pitch to
left-center for a double.
Olivo grounded into a double
play with one out and runners
on first and third in the second.
Mariners third baseman Kyle
Seager doubled and Saunders
singled.
Hernandez also allowed
Hafner’s double in the seventh. He
went to a 2-1 count on Kotchman
before coming back to get an
inning-ending strikeout.
YANKEES 7, TWINS 6
NEW YORK — Curtis
Granderson hit three home runs in
the first four innings and matched
a career high with five hits, send-
ing the New York Yankees to a
7-6 victory over the Minnesota
Twins on Thursday night.
Granderson homered in each
of his first three at-bats, driv-
ing in four runs, and helped Phil
Hughes (1-2) overcome a 4-run
first inning.
Mark Teixeira hit his first home
run of the year and the Yankees
earned a split of the four-game
set.
Granderson got two chances
to tie the major-league record of
four homers in a game. In the
sixth, he lined a single to right
field. In the eighth, he beat out
a dribbler down the first-base line.
Granderson’s first two homers
came off starter Anthony Swarzak
(0-3).
Mariano Rivera worked a per-
fect ninth for his third save of the
season and record 606th of his
career.
Derek Jeter had an RBI single
for his 3,110th hit, tying him with
childhood idol Dave Winfield for
18th on the career list.
RANGERS 10, TIGERS 3
DETROIT — Yu Darvish
pitched two-hit ball into the sev-
enth inning and Mike Napoli hom-
ered for the fourth straight game,
leading Texas past Detroit for its
seventh consecutive victory.
The Rangers beat the Tigers
in six games in last year’s AL
championship series, winning the
clincher 15-5. This one wasn’t
much closer, with Texas scoring
five runs in the eighth and finish-
ing with 19 hits.
Darvish (2-0) showed impres-
sive poise in the opener of a
4-game set at Comerica Park,
allowing one run over 6 1/3 innings
in his toughest test since coming
over from Japan.
Adam Wilk (0-2) gave up two
earned runs and 10 hits in 4-plus
innings for the Tigers.
RAYS 9, BLUE JAYS 4
TORONTO — Evan Longoria
hit a 2-run homer and came within
a triple of the cycle, Desmond
Jennings added a solo shot and
Tampa Bay ended a 10-game
road trip by beating Toronto
Longoria went 3 for 4 with
a season-high four RBIs and
reached base four times as the
Rays tagged Henderson Alvarez
(0-1) for a career-high six earned
runs in 6 1/3 innings.
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701 Ambrose Drive
Delphos, O.
A.C.T.S.
NEW TESTAMENT FELLOWSHIP
Rev. Linda Wannemacher-Pastor
Jaye Wannemacher-Worship Leader
Contact: 419-695-3566
Sunday - 7:00 p.m. Bible Study with
worship @ ACTS Chapel-8277 German
Rd., Delphos
Thursday - 7:00 p.m. “For Such A
Time As This” All & Non Denominational
Tri-County Community Intercessory
Prayer Meeting @ Presbyterian Church
(Basement), 310 W. 2nd St. Delphos -
Everyone Welcome.
DELPHOS BAPTIST CHURCH
Pastor Terry McKissack
302 N Main, Delphos
Contact: 419-692-0061 or 419-302-6423
Sunday - 10:00 a.m. Sunday School
(All Ages) , 11:00 a.m. Sunday Service,
6:00 p.m Sunday Evening Service
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Bible Study,
Youth Study
Nursery available for all services.
FIRST UNITED PRESBYTERIAN
310 W. Second St.
419-692-5737
Pastor Harry Tolhurst
Sunday: 11:00 Worship Service -
Everyone Welcome
Communion first Sunday of every
month.
Communion at Van Crest Health
Care Center - First Sunday of each
month at 2:30 p.m., Nursing Home and
assisted living.
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH
422 North Pierce St., Delphos
Phone 419-695-2616
Rev. Angela Khabeb
Saturday-8:00 a.m. Prayer Breakfast;
11:00 a.m. Emma (Mittermaier) Frey
Memorial Service
Sunday-8:45 a.m. Sunday School;
10:00 a.m. Worship Service
Saturday - 8:00 a.m. Prayer
Breakfast; 8:30 a.m. TDTR Retreat

FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD
“Where Jesus is Healing
Hurting Hearts!”
808 Metbliss Ave., Delphos
One block south of Stadium Park.
419-692-6741
Lead Pastor - Dan Eaton
Sunday - 10:30 a.m. - “Celebration of
Worship” with Kids Church & Nursery
provided.; 6:00 p.m. Youth Ministry at
The ROC
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Discipleship
in The Upper Level
For more info see our website: www.
delphosfirstassemblyofgod.com.
DELPHOS CHRISTIAN UNION
Pastor: Rev. Gary Fish
470 S. Franklin St., (419) 692-9940
9:30 Sunday School
10:30 Sunday morning service.
Youth ministry every Wednesday
from 6-8 p.m.
Children’s ministry every third
Saturday from 11 to 1:30.
ST. PAUL’S UNITED METHODIST
335 S. Main St. Delphos
Pastor - Rev. David Howell
Sunday - 9:00 a.m. Worship Service

DELPHOS WESLEYAN CHURCH
11720 Delphos Southworth Rd.
Delphos - Phone 419-695-1723
Pastor Wayne Prater
Sunday - 10:30 a.m. Worship; 9:15
a.m. Sunday School for all ages.
Wednesday - 7 p.m. Service and
prayer meeting.
TRINITY UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
211 E. Third St., Delphos
Rev. David Howell, Pastor
Sunday - 8:15 a.m. Worship Service/
Lindeman Baptism; 9:30 a.m. Church
School for all ages; 10:30 a.m. Worship
Service; 11:30 a.m. Radio Worship on
WDOH: 3:30-5:30 p.m. Confirmation
Class; 4:30 p.m.-9:00 p.m. Jr. & Sr. High
Outing to Laser Zone @ Ft. Wayne
Monday - 7:00 p.m. Trustees Meeting
Tuesday - 8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Region II
Garden Club Meeting
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Chancel Choir
Thursday - 4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m.
HARTFORD CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Independent Fundamental)
Rt. 81 and Defiance Trial
Rt. 2, Box 11550
Spencerville 45887
Rev. Robert King, Pastor
Sunday - 9:30 a.m. Sunday school;
10:30 a.m. Worship Service; 7:00 p.m.
Evening worship and Teens Alive
(grades 7-12).
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Bible ser-
vice.
Tuesday & Thursday– 7- 9 p.m.
Have you ever wanted to preach the
“Word of God?” This is your time to
do it. Come share your love of Christ
with us.
IMMANUEL UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
699 Sunnydale, Elida, Ohio 454807
Pastor Kimberly R. Pope-Seiberlin
Sunday - 8:30 a.m. traditional; 10:45
a.m. contemporary
NEW HOPE CHRISTIAN CENTER
2240 Baty Road, Elida Ph. 339-5673
Rev. James F. Menke, Pastor
Sunday – 10 a.m. Worship.
Wednesday – 7 p.m. Evening ser-
vice.
CORNERSTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
2701 Dutch Hollow Rd. Elida
Phone: 339-3339
Rev. Frank Hartman
Sunday - 10 a.m. Sunday School (all
ages); 11 a.m. Morning Service; 6 p.m.
Evening Service.
Wednesday - 7 p.m. Prayer
Meeting.
Office Hours: Monday-Friday,
8-noon, 1-4- p.m.
ZION UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of Zion Church & Conant Rd.,
Elida
Pastors: Mark and D.J. Fuerstenau
Sunday - Service - 9:00 a.m.
PIKE MENNONITE CHURCH
3995 McBride Rd., Elida
Phone 419-339-3961
LIGHTHOUSE CHURCH OF GOD
Elida - Ph. 222-8054
Rev. Larry Ayers, Pastor
Service schedule: Sunday– 10 a.m.
School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 6
p.m. Sunday evening.
FAITH BAPTIST CHURCH
4750 East Road, Elida
Pastor - Brian McManus
Sunday – 9:30 a.m. Sunday School;
10:30 a.m. Worship, nursery avail-
able.
Wednesday – 6:30 p.m. Youth
Prayer, Bible Study; 7:00 p.m. Adult
Prayer and Bible Study; 8:00 p.m. -
Choir.
GOMER UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST
7350 Gomer Road, Gomer, Ohio
419-642-2681
gomererucc@bright.net
Rev. Brian Knoderer
Sunday – 10:30 a.m. Worship
BREAKTHROUGH
101 N. Adams St., Middle Point
Pastor Scott & Karen Fleming
Sunday – Church Service - 10 a.m,
6 p.m.
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m.
CALVARY EVANGELICAL CHURCH
10686 Van Wert-Decatur Rd.
Van Wert, Ohio
419-238-9426
Rev. Clark Williman. Pastor
Saturday - 8:45 a.m.-2:00 p.m.
Youth-Trash-A-Thon
Sunday- 8:45 a.m. Friends and
Family; 9:00 a.m. Sunday School
LIVE; 10:00 a.m. Worship LIVE; 4:30
p.m. Calvary Family Event - Roller
skating in Fort Wayne
Tuesday - 9:30 a.m. - Hearth and
Home Ministry
Wednesday - 6:45 p.m. Calvary
Youth, Women’s Bible Study; 7:00
p.m. Men’s Bible Study

SALEM UNITED
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
15240 Main St. Venedocia
Rev. Wendy S. Pratt, Pastor
Church Phone: 419-667-4142
Sunday - 8:30 a.m. - Adult Bell
Choir; 8:45 a.m. Jr. Choir; 9:30
a.m. - Worship; 10:45 a.m. - Sunday
school; 6:30 p.m. - Capital Funds
Committee.
Monday - 6 p.m. Senior Choir.
ST. MARY’S CATHOLIC CHURCH
601 Jennings Rd., Van Wert
Sunday 8:30 a.m., 10:30 a.m.;
Monday 8:30 a.m.; Tuesday 7 p.m.;
Wednesday 8:30 a.m.; Thursday 8:30
a.m. - Communion Service; Friday
8:30 a.m.; Saturday 4 p.m.
VAN WERT VICTORY
CHURCH OF GOD
10698 US 127S., Van Wert
(Next to Tracy’s Auction Service)
Tommy Sandefer, lead pastor
Ron Prewitt, sr. adult pastor
Sunday worship & children’s minis-
try - 10:00 a.m.
www.vwvcoh.com
facebook: vwvcoh
TRINITY LUTHERAN
303 S. Adams, Middle Point
Rev. Tom Cover
Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Sunday
School; 10:30 a.m. Worship service.
GRACE FAMILY CHURCH
634 N. Washington St., Van Wert
Pastor: Rev. Ron Prewitt
Sunday - 9:15 a.m. Morning wor-
ship with Pulpit Supply.
KINGSLEY UNITED METHODIST
15482 Mendon Rd., Van Wert
Phone: 419-965-2771
Pastor Chuck Glover
Sunday School - 9:30 a.m.; Worship
- 10:25 a.m.
Wednesday - Youth Prayer and
Bible Study - 6:30 p.m.
Adult Prayer meeting - 7:00 p.m.
Choir practice - 8:00 p.m.
TRINITY FRIENDS CHURCH
605 N. Franklin St., Van Wert 45891
Ph: (419) 238-2788
Sr. Pastor Stephen Savage
Outreach Pastor Neil Hammons
Sunday - 8:15 a.m. - Prayer time;
9:00 a.m. Worship, Sunday School,
SWAT, Nursery; Single; 10:30 a.m.
Worship, Nursery, Children’s Church,
Discipleship class; Noon - Lunch
Break; 2:00 p.m. Service for men
at Van Wert Correctional Fac.; 3:00
p.m. Service for women at Van Wert
Correctional Fac., Service at Paulding
jail
Tuesday - 1:00 p.m. - Share, Care,
Prayer Group in Fireside Room;
10-noon - Banquet Table Food
Pantry; 6:30 p.m. Quilting Friends
in Fellowship Hall; 7 p.m. B.R.E.A.L.
Women’s group in Room 108.
Wednesday - 6:30 p.m. Small
groups, Discipleship Series in sanc-
tuary, Christian Life Club, Nursery,
Preschool; 7 p.m. R.O.C.K. Youth; 8
p.m. Worship Team rehearsal.
Thursday - 4-5:30 p.m. Banquet
Table Food Pantry.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
13887 Jennings Rd., Van Wert
Ph. 419-238-0333
Children’s Storyline: 419-238-2201
Email: fbaptvw@bright.net
Pastor Steven A. Robinson
Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Sunday School
for all ages; 10:30 a.m. Family Worship
Hour; 6:30 p.m. Evening Bible Hour.
Wednesday - 6:30 p.m. Word of Life
Student Ministries; 6:45 p.m. AWANA;
7:00 p.m. Prayer and Bible Study.
MANDALE CHURCH OF CHRIST
IN CHRISTIAN UNION
Rev. Don Rogers, Pastor
Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Sunday School
all ages. 10:30 a.m. Worship
Services; 7:00 p.m Worship.
Wednesday - 7 p.m. Prayer meet-
ing.
PENTECOSTAL WAY CHURCH
Pastors: Bill Watson
Rev. Ronald Defore
1213 Leeson Ave., Van Wert 45891
Phone (419) 238-5813
Head Usher: Ted Kelly
10:00 a.m. - Sunday School 11:10
a.m. - Worship 10:00 a.m. until 11:30
a.m. - Wednesday Morning Bible Class
6:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. - Wednesday
Evening Prayer Meeting
7:00 p.m. - Wed. Night Bible
Study.
Thursday - Choir Rehearsal
Anchored in Jesus Prayer Line -
(419) 238-4427 or (419) 232-4379.
Emergency - (419) 993-5855
FAITH MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
Road U, Rushmore
Pastor Robert Morrison
Sunday – 10 am Church School;
11:00 Church Service; 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Evening
Service
ST. ANTHONY OF PADUA
CATHOLIC CHURCH
512 W. Sycamore, Col. Grove
Office 419-659-2263
Fax: 419-659-5202
Father Tom Extejt
Masses: Tuesday-Friday - 8:00 a.m.;
First Friday of the month - 7 p.m.;
Saturday - 4:30 p.m.; Sunday - 8:30
a.m. and 11:00 a.m.
Confessions - Saturday 3:30 p.m.,
anytime by appointment.
CHURCH OF GOD
18906 Rd. 18R, Rimer
419-642-5264 Fax: 419-642-3061
Rev. Mark Walls
Sunday - 9:30 a.m. Sunday
School; 10:30 a.m. Worship Service.
HOLY FAMILY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Rev. Robert DeSloover, Pastor
7359 St. Rt. 109 New Cleveland
Saturday Mass - 7:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass - 8:30 a.m.
IMMACULATE CONCEPTION
CATHOLIC CHURCH
Ottoville
Rev. John Stites
Mass schedule: Saturday - 4 p.m.;
Sunday - 10:30 a.m.

ST. BARBARA CHURCH
160 Main St., Cloverdale 45827
419-488-2391
Fr. John Stites
Mass schedule: Saturday 5:30 p.m.,
Sunday 8:00 a.m.

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC CHURCH
135 N. Water St., Ft. Jennings
Rev. Joe Przybysz
Phone: 419-286-2132
Mass schedule: Saturday 5 p.m.;
Sunday 7:30 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.
ST. MICHAEL CHURCH
Kalida
Fr. Mark Hoying
Saturday – 4:30 p.m. Mass.
Sunday – 8:00 a.m. & 10:00 a.m.
Masses.
Weekdays: Masses on Mon., Tues.,
Wed. and Friday at 8:00 am; Thurs.
7:30 p.m.
Suppers on Us
Friday - 3:00-5:00 p.m. Mustard Seeds
Swimming Outing @ Van Wert YMCA
Saturday - 12 Noon-3:00 p.m. Baby
Shower

MARION BAPTIST CHURCH
2998 Defiance Trail, Delphos
Pastor Jay Lobach 419-339-6319
Services: Sunday - 11:00 a.m. and
6:00 p.m.; Wednesday - 7:00 p.m.
ST. JOHN’S CATHOLIC CHURCH
331 E. Second St., Delphos
419-695-4050
Rev. Mel Verhoff, Pastor
Rev. Jacob Gordon, Asst. Pastor
Fred Lisk and Dave Ricker, Deacons
Mary Beth Will, Liturgical
Coordinator; Mrs. Trina Shultz, Pastoral
Associate. Mel Rode, Parish Council
President
Celebration of the Sacraments
Eucharist – Lord’s Day Observance;
Saturday 4:30 p.m., Sunday 7:30, 9:15,
11:30 a.m.; Weekdays as announced on
Sunday bulletin.
Baptism – Celebrated first Sunday
of month at 1:30 p.m. Call rectory to
schedule Pre-Baptismal instructions.
Reconciliation – Tuesday and
Friday 7:30-7:50 a.m.; Saturday 3:30-
4:00 p.m. Anytime by request.
Matrimony – Arrangements must be
made through the rectory six months
in advance.
Anointing of the Sick – Communal
celebration in May and October.
Administered upon request.
ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST CHURCH
Landeck - Phone: 419-692-0636
Rev. Mel Verhoff, Pastor
Administrative aide: Rita Suever
Masses: 8:30 a.m. Sunday.
Sacrament of Reconciliation:
Saturday.
Newcomers register at parish.
Marriages: Please call the parish
house six months in advance.
Baptism: Please call the parish.
ST. PATRICK’S CHURCH
500 S. Canal, Spencerville
419-647-6202
Saturday - 4:30 p.m. Reconciliation;
5 p.m. Mass, May 1 - Oct. 30. Sunday -
10:30 a.m. Mass.
SPENCERVILLE FULL GOSPEL
107 Broadway St., Spencerville
Pastor Charles Muter
Home Ph. 419-657-6019
Sunday: Morning Services - 10:00
a.m. Evening Services - 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday: 7:00 p.m. Worship ser-
vice.
SPENCERVILLE CHURCH
OF THE NAZARENE
317 West North St. - 419-296-2561
Pastor Tom Shobe
9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 10:30
a.m. Morning Worship; 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service
TRINITY UNITED METHODIST
Corner of Fourth & Main, Spencerville
Phone 419-647-5321
Rev. Jan Johnson, Pastor
Sunday - 9:30 a.m. Sunday School;
10:30 a.m. Worship service.
UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST
Spencerville
Rev. Ron Shifley, Pastor
Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Church School;
10:30 a.m. Worship Service.
AGAPE FELLOWSHIP MINISTRIES
9250 Armstrong Road, Spencerville
Pastors Phil & Deb Lee
Sunday - 10:00 a.m. Worship ser-
vice.
Wed. - 7:00 p.m. Bible Study
ELIDA/LIMA/GOMER
VAN WERT COUNTY
PUTNAM COUNTY
LANDECK
DELPHOS
SPENCERVILLE
Our local churches invite you to join them for their activities and services.
L
e
h
m
a
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s
We thank the sponsors of this page and ask you to please support them.
8— The Herald www.delphosherald.com Friday, April 20, 2012
Titanic sermons, 100 years later
Worship at the
church of your
choice this weekend.
By Terry Mattingly
The White Star Line publicists pulled out all the stops
when promoting the Titanic and its sister ship the Olympic,
even claiming in one brochure that these giants “were de-
signed to be unsinkable.”
By the time Titanic put to sea, this language had evolved
into a boast -- reportedly shared with passengers -- that “God
Himself couldn’t sink this ship.”
Thus, when the liner sank on April 15, 1912, preachers on
both sides of the Atlantic were among the first commenta-
tors to raise their voices in judgment, as well as consolation.
Newspapers promptly printed many of these sermons.
One fact gripped preachers more than any other: In an age
of great power and wealth, the Titanic carried only 20 life-
boats for its 2,200 passengers.
This was a deadly form of pride, said the Rev. William
D. Moss at the Washington Heights Presbyterian Church in
Washington, D.C. But it would be wrong to condemn only
the businessmen who built the Titanic and plotted its course.
“Yonder where the ruthless deep yawned to receive its
unwilling and innocent victims, the law of life exercised its
ancient prerogative that whatsoever a man soweth, that shall
he also reap. ... In the tragedy of this hour we have witnessed
the wrong-doing not of one man or a body of men, but of the
age,” proclaimed Moss.
“The fact is driven home to us today that as an age, as a
nation, and as individuals we lack moral vision,” he said. “We
worship success. We worship money. We worship luxury. We
worship display. We worship the material. We worship the
ephemeral. We worship self-interest. We worship competi-
tion. In other words, we worship speed. ... And so this tragedy
of the ocean has its daily counterpart on the land.”
The moral messages captured in these sermons were com-
pletely different than the vision offered in 1997 by Holly-
wood director James Cameron. His “Titanic” blockbuster
portrayed the doomed ship as a symbol of the corrupt values
of an old-fashioned culture that would soon be conquered by
science, social change and the sexual revolution.
For the preachers of 1912, the Titanic was the ultimate
symbol, not of the past, but of modernity and the dawn of
a century in which ambitious tycoons and scientists would
solve most, if not all, of humanity’s thorniest problems.
The liner was, in other words, a triumph of Darwinian
logic and the march of progress. Its sinking was a dream-
shattering tragedy of biblical proportions.
The events of April 14 and 15, 1912, are the “closest thing
that we have to a modern-day Bible story,” according to
Douglas Phillips of TitanicSociety.com, in an essay saluting
the men who went down with the ship. “Everything about
Titanic was larger-than-life: her conception, her launch, her
sins, her heroes and her judgment. ...
“Many perceived the ship to be a modern incarnation of
the Tower of Babel. The sinking represented God’s unwill-
ingness to allow man to build any edifice of invincibility or
to seek salvation through technology,” he said.
However, days after the tragedy, a young pastor in Swit-
zerland stressed that technology itself was not to blame, but
the “playful arrogance” of those who wielded it.
“God has not set a limit to technology, to progress, to the
human mind,” said the Rev. Karl Barth, who would become
one of the new century’s most famous theologians. “Quite the
reverse! ... When we become godless about the headway we
have made, i.e. when we become bumptious and conceited
and childish, then we need to be called to order.” Thus, he
argued: “It is true that God set the iceberg on its course, but
no one was compelled to get in its way.”
There was, however, an inspiring side to this story, as well.
While there was cruel logic behind the decisions that caused
the disaster, there was a radically different belief system at
work in the heroic, self-sacrificial acts on that night, noted the
Rev. Henry van Dyke, a Princeton University professor.
The bottom line: “Greater love hath no man than this, that
a man lay down his life for his friends.”
Thus, van Dyke concluded: “Only through the belief that
the strong are bound to protect and save the weak because
God wills it can we hope to keep self-sacrifice, and love, and
heroism and all the things that make us glad to live and not
afraid to die.”
PITSENBARGER
SUPPLY
234 N. Canal St.
Delphos, O.
Ph. 692-1010
Professional Parts People
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11260 Elida Road
DELPHOS, OH 45833
Ph. 692-0055
Toll Free 1-800-589-7876
HARTER
& SCHIER
FUNERAL
HOME
209 W. 3rd St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
419-692-8055
130 N. MAIN ST.
DELPHOS
PHONE
419-692-0861
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Daily 9-5:30
Sat. 9-4, Sun. 12-4
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AUTOMATIC
AND HAND
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PRODUCTS
701 Ambrose Drive
Delphos, O.
A.C.T.S.
NEW TESTAMENT FELLOWSHIP
Rev. Linda Wannemacher-Pastor
Jaye Wannemacher-Worship Leader
Contact: 419-695-3566
Sunday - 7:00 p.m. Bible Study with
worship @ ACTS Chapel-8277 German
Rd., Delphos
Thursday - 7:00 p.m. “For Such A
Time As This” All & Non Denominational
Tri-County Community Intercessory
Prayer Meeting @ Presbyterian Church
(Basement), 310 W. 2nd St. Delphos -
Everyone Welcome.
DELPHOS BAPTIST CHURCH
Pastor Terry McKissack
302 N Main, Delphos
Contact: 419-692-0061 or 419-302-6423
Sunday - 10:00 a.m. Sunday School
(All Ages) , 11:00 a.m. Sunday Service,
6:00 p.m Sunday Evening Service
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Bible Study,
Youth Study
Nursery available for all services.
FIRST UNITED PRESBYTERIAN
310 W. Second St.
419-692-5737
Pastor Harry Tolhurst
Sunday: 11:00 Worship Service -
Everyone Welcome
Communion first Sunday of every
month.
Communion at Van Crest Health
Care Center - First Sunday of each
month at 2:30 p.m., Nursing Home and
assisted living.
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH
422 North Pierce St., Delphos
Phone 419-695-2616
Rev. Angela Khabeb
Saturday-8:00 a.m. Prayer Breakfast;
11:00 a.m. Emma (Mittermaier) Frey
Memorial Service
Sunday-8:45 a.m. Sunday School;
10:00 a.m. Worship Service
Saturday - 8:00 a.m. Prayer
Breakfast; 8:30 a.m. TDTR Retreat

FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD
“Where Jesus is Healing
Hurting Hearts!”
808 Metbliss Ave., Delphos
One block south of Stadium Park.
419-692-6741
Lead Pastor - Dan Eaton
Sunday - 10:30 a.m. - “Celebration of
Worship” with Kids Church & Nursery
provided.; 6:00 p.m. Youth Ministry at
The ROC
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Discipleship
in The Upper Level
For more info see our website: www.
delphosfirstassemblyofgod.com.
DELPHOS CHRISTIAN UNION
Pastor: Rev. Gary Fish
470 S. Franklin St., (419) 692-9940
9:30 Sunday School
10:30 Sunday morning service.
Youth ministry every Wednesday
from 6-8 p.m.
Children’s ministry every third
Saturday from 11 to 1:30.
ST. PAUL’S UNITED METHODIST
335 S. Main St. Delphos
Pastor - Rev. David Howell
Sunday - 9:00 a.m. Worship Service

DELPHOS WESLEYAN CHURCH
11720 Delphos Southworth Rd.
Delphos - Phone 419-695-1723
Pastor Wayne Prater
Sunday - 10:30 a.m. Worship; 9:15
a.m. Sunday School for all ages.
Wednesday - 7 p.m. Service and
prayer meeting.
TRINITY UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
211 E. Third St., Delphos
Rev. David Howell, Pastor
Sunday - 8:15 a.m. Worship Service/
Lindeman Baptism; 9:30 a.m. Church
School for all ages; 10:30 a.m. Worship
Service; 11:30 a.m. Radio Worship on
WDOH: 3:30-5:30 p.m. Confirmation
Class; 4:30 p.m.-9:00 p.m. Jr. & Sr. High
Outing to Laser Zone @ Ft. Wayne
Monday - 7:00 p.m. Trustees Meeting
Tuesday - 8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Region II
Garden Club Meeting
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Chancel Choir
Thursday - 4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m.
HARTFORD CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Independent Fundamental)
Rt. 81 and Defiance Trial
Rt. 2, Box 11550
Spencerville 45887
Rev. Robert King, Pastor
Sunday - 9:30 a.m. Sunday school;
10:30 a.m. Worship Service; 7:00 p.m.
Evening worship and Teens Alive
(grades 7-12).
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Bible ser-
vice.
Tuesday & Thursday– 7- 9 p.m.
Have you ever wanted to preach the
“Word of God?” This is your time to
do it. Come share your love of Christ
with us.
IMMANUEL UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
699 Sunnydale, Elida, Ohio 454807
Pastor Kimberly R. Pope-Seiberlin
Sunday - 8:30 a.m. traditional; 10:45
a.m. contemporary
NEW HOPE CHRISTIAN CENTER
2240 Baty Road, Elida Ph. 339-5673
Rev. James F. Menke, Pastor
Sunday – 10 a.m. Worship.
Wednesday – 7 p.m. Evening ser-
vice.
CORNERSTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
2701 Dutch Hollow Rd. Elida
Phone: 339-3339
Rev. Frank Hartman
Sunday - 10 a.m. Sunday School (all
ages); 11 a.m. Morning Service; 6 p.m.
Evening Service.
Wednesday - 7 p.m. Prayer
Meeting.
Office Hours: Monday-Friday,
8-noon, 1-4- p.m.
ZION UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of Zion Church & Conant Rd.,
Elida
Pastors: Mark and D.J. Fuerstenau
Sunday - Service - 9:00 a.m.
PIKE MENNONITE CHURCH
3995 McBride Rd., Elida
Phone 419-339-3961
LIGHTHOUSE CHURCH OF GOD
Elida - Ph. 222-8054
Rev. Larry Ayers, Pastor
Service schedule: Sunday– 10 a.m.
School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 6
p.m. Sunday evening.
FAITH BAPTIST CHURCH
4750 East Road, Elida
Pastor - Brian McManus
Sunday – 9:30 a.m. Sunday School;
10:30 a.m. Worship, nursery avail-
able.
Wednesday – 6:30 p.m. Youth
Prayer, Bible Study; 7:00 p.m. Adult
Prayer and Bible Study; 8:00 p.m. -
Choir.
GOMER UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST
7350 Gomer Road, Gomer, Ohio
419-642-2681
gomererucc@bright.net
Rev. Brian Knoderer
Sunday – 10:30 a.m. Worship
BREAKTHROUGH
101 N. Adams St., Middle Point
Pastor Scott & Karen Fleming
Sunday – Church Service - 10 a.m,
6 p.m.
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m.
CALVARY EVANGELICAL CHURCH
10686 Van Wert-Decatur Rd.
Van Wert, Ohio
419-238-9426
Rev. Clark Williman. Pastor
Saturday - 8:45 a.m.-2:00 p.m.
Youth-Trash-A-Thon
Sunday- 8:45 a.m. Friends and
Family; 9:00 a.m. Sunday School
LIVE; 10:00 a.m. Worship LIVE; 4:30
p.m. Calvary Family Event - Roller
skating in Fort Wayne
Tuesday - 9:30 a.m. - Hearth and
Home Ministry
Wednesday - 6:45 p.m. Calvary
Youth, Women’s Bible Study; 7:00
p.m. Men’s Bible Study

SALEM UNITED
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
15240 Main St. Venedocia
Rev. Wendy S. Pratt, Pastor
Church Phone: 419-667-4142
Sunday - 8:30 a.m. - Adult Bell
Choir; 8:45 a.m. Jr. Choir; 9:30
a.m. - Worship; 10:45 a.m. - Sunday
school; 6:30 p.m. - Capital Funds
Committee.
Monday - 6 p.m. Senior Choir.
ST. MARY’S CATHOLIC CHURCH
601 Jennings Rd., Van Wert
Sunday 8:30 a.m., 10:30 a.m.;
Monday 8:30 a.m.; Tuesday 7 p.m.;
Wednesday 8:30 a.m.; Thursday 8:30
a.m. - Communion Service; Friday
8:30 a.m.; Saturday 4 p.m.
VAN WERT VICTORY
CHURCH OF GOD
10698 US 127S., Van Wert
(Next to Tracy’s Auction Service)
Tommy Sandefer, lead pastor
Ron Prewitt, sr. adult pastor
Sunday worship & children’s minis-
try - 10:00 a.m.
www.vwvcoh.com
facebook: vwvcoh
TRINITY LUTHERAN
303 S. Adams, Middle Point
Rev. Tom Cover
Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Sunday
School; 10:30 a.m. Worship service.
GRACE FAMILY CHURCH
634 N. Washington St., Van Wert
Pastor: Rev. Ron Prewitt
Sunday - 9:15 a.m. Morning wor-
ship with Pulpit Supply.
KINGSLEY UNITED METHODIST
15482 Mendon Rd., Van Wert
Phone: 419-965-2771
Pastor Chuck Glover
Sunday School - 9:30 a.m.; Worship
- 10:25 a.m.
Wednesday - Youth Prayer and
Bible Study - 6:30 p.m.
Adult Prayer meeting - 7:00 p.m.
Choir practice - 8:00 p.m.
TRINITY FRIENDS CHURCH
605 N. Franklin St., Van Wert 45891
Ph: (419) 238-2788
Sr. Pastor Stephen Savage
Outreach Pastor Neil Hammons
Sunday - 8:15 a.m. - Prayer time;
9:00 a.m. Worship, Sunday School,
SWAT, Nursery; Single; 10:30 a.m.
Worship, Nursery, Children’s Church,
Discipleship class; Noon - Lunch
Break; 2:00 p.m. Service for men
at Van Wert Correctional Fac.; 3:00
p.m. Service for women at Van Wert
Correctional Fac., Service at Paulding
jail
Tuesday - 1:00 p.m. - Share, Care,
Prayer Group in Fireside Room;
10-noon - Banquet Table Food
Pantry; 6:30 p.m. Quilting Friends
in Fellowship Hall; 7 p.m. B.R.E.A.L.
Women’s group in Room 108.
Wednesday - 6:30 p.m. Small
groups, Discipleship Series in sanc-
tuary, Christian Life Club, Nursery,
Preschool; 7 p.m. R.O.C.K. Youth; 8
p.m. Worship Team rehearsal.
Thursday - 4-5:30 p.m. Banquet
Table Food Pantry.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
13887 Jennings Rd., Van Wert
Ph. 419-238-0333
Children’s Storyline: 419-238-2201
Email: fbaptvw@bright.net
Pastor Steven A. Robinson
Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Sunday School
for all ages; 10:30 a.m. Family Worship
Hour; 6:30 p.m. Evening Bible Hour.
Wednesday - 6:30 p.m. Word of Life
Student Ministries; 6:45 p.m. AWANA;
7:00 p.m. Prayer and Bible Study.
MANDALE CHURCH OF CHRIST
IN CHRISTIAN UNION
Rev. Don Rogers, Pastor
Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Sunday School
all ages. 10:30 a.m. Worship
Services; 7:00 p.m Worship.
Wednesday - 7 p.m. Prayer meet-
ing.
PENTECOSTAL WAY CHURCH
Pastors: Bill Watson
Rev. Ronald Defore
1213 Leeson Ave., Van Wert 45891
Phone (419) 238-5813
Head Usher: Ted Kelly
10:00 a.m. - Sunday School 11:10
a.m. - Worship 10:00 a.m. until 11:30
a.m. - Wednesday Morning Bible Class
6:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. - Wednesday
Evening Prayer Meeting
7:00 p.m. - Wed. Night Bible
Study.
Thursday - Choir Rehearsal
Anchored in Jesus Prayer Line -
(419) 238-4427 or (419) 232-4379.
Emergency - (419) 993-5855
FAITH MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
Road U, Rushmore
Pastor Robert Morrison
Sunday – 10 am Church School;
11:00 Church Service; 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Evening
Service
ST. ANTHONY OF PADUA
CATHOLIC CHURCH
512 W. Sycamore, Col. Grove
Office 419-659-2263
Fax: 419-659-5202
Father Tom Extejt
Masses: Tuesday-Friday - 8:00 a.m.;
First Friday of the month - 7 p.m.;
Saturday - 4:30 p.m.; Sunday - 8:30
a.m. and 11:00 a.m.
Confessions - Saturday 3:30 p.m.,
anytime by appointment.
CHURCH OF GOD
18906 Rd. 18R, Rimer
419-642-5264 Fax: 419-642-3061
Rev. Mark Walls
Sunday - 9:30 a.m. Sunday
School; 10:30 a.m. Worship Service.
HOLY FAMILY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Rev. Robert DeSloover, Pastor
7359 St. Rt. 109 New Cleveland
Saturday Mass - 7:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass - 8:30 a.m.
IMMACULATE CONCEPTION
CATHOLIC CHURCH
Ottoville
Rev. John Stites
Mass schedule: Saturday - 4 p.m.;
Sunday - 10:30 a.m.

ST. BARBARA CHURCH
160 Main St., Cloverdale 45827
419-488-2391
Fr. John Stites
Mass schedule: Saturday 5:30 p.m.,
Sunday 8:00 a.m.

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC CHURCH
135 N. Water St., Ft. Jennings
Rev. Joe Przybysz
Phone: 419-286-2132
Mass schedule: Saturday 5 p.m.;
Sunday 7:30 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.
ST. MICHAEL CHURCH
Kalida
Fr. Mark Hoying
Saturday – 4:30 p.m. Mass.
Sunday – 8:00 a.m. & 10:00 a.m.
Masses.
Weekdays: Masses on Mon., Tues.,
Wed. and Friday at 8:00 am; Thurs.
7:30 p.m.
Suppers on Us
Friday - 3:00-5:00 p.m. Mustard Seeds
Swimming Outing @ Van Wert YMCA
Saturday - 12 Noon-3:00 p.m. Baby
Shower

MARION BAPTIST CHURCH
2998 Defiance Trail, Delphos
Pastor Jay Lobach 419-339-6319
Services: Sunday - 11:00 a.m. and
6:00 p.m.; Wednesday - 7:00 p.m.
ST. JOHN’S CATHOLIC CHURCH
331 E. Second St., Delphos
419-695-4050
Rev. Mel Verhoff, Pastor
Rev. Jacob Gordon, Asst. Pastor
Fred Lisk and Dave Ricker, Deacons
Mary Beth Will, Liturgical
Coordinator; Mrs. Trina Shultz, Pastoral
Associate. Mel Rode, Parish Council
President
Celebration of the Sacraments
Eucharist – Lord’s Day Observance;
Saturday 4:30 p.m., Sunday 7:30, 9:15,
11:30 a.m.; Weekdays as announced on
Sunday bulletin.
Baptism – Celebrated first Sunday
of month at 1:30 p.m. Call rectory to
schedule Pre-Baptismal instructions.
Reconciliation – Tuesday and
Friday 7:30-7:50 a.m.; Saturday 3:30-
4:00 p.m. Anytime by request.
Matrimony – Arrangements must be
made through the rectory six months
in advance.
Anointing of the Sick – Communal
celebration in May and October.
Administered upon request.
ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST CHURCH
Landeck - Phone: 419-692-0636
Rev. Mel Verhoff, Pastor
Administrative aide: Rita Suever
Masses: 8:30 a.m. Sunday.
Sacrament of Reconciliation:
Saturday.
Newcomers register at parish.
Marriages: Please call the parish
house six months in advance.
Baptism: Please call the parish.
ST. PATRICK’S CHURCH
500 S. Canal, Spencerville
419-647-6202
Saturday - 4:30 p.m. Reconciliation;
5 p.m. Mass, May 1 - Oct. 30. Sunday -
10:30 a.m. Mass.
SPENCERVILLE FULL GOSPEL
107 Broadway St., Spencerville
Pastor Charles Muter
Home Ph. 419-657-6019
Sunday: Morning Services - 10:00
a.m. Evening Services - 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday: 7:00 p.m. Worship ser-
vice.
SPENCERVILLE CHURCH
OF THE NAZARENE
317 West North St. - 419-296-2561
Pastor Tom Shobe
9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 10:30
a.m. Morning Worship; 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service
TRINITY UNITED METHODIST
Corner of Fourth & Main, Spencerville
Phone 419-647-5321
Rev. Jan Johnson, Pastor
Sunday - 9:30 a.m. Sunday School;
10:30 a.m. Worship service.
UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST
Spencerville
Rev. Ron Shifley, Pastor
Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Church School;
10:30 a.m. Worship Service.
AGAPE FELLOWSHIP MINISTRIES
9250 Armstrong Road, Spencerville
Pastors Phil & Deb Lee
Sunday - 10:00 a.m. Worship ser-
vice.
Wed. - 7:00 p.m. Bible Study
ELIDA/LIMA/GOMER
VAN WERT COUNTY
PUTNAM COUNTY
LANDECK
DELPHOS
SPENCERVILLE
Our local churches invite you to join them for their activities and services.
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8— The Herald www.delphosherald.com Friday, April 20, 2012
Titanic sermons, 100 years later
Worship at the
church of your
choice this weekend.
By Terry Mattingly
The White Star Line publicists pulled out all the stops
when promoting the Titanic and its sister ship the Olympic,
even claiming in one brochure that these giants “were de-
signed to be unsinkable.”
By the time Titanic put to sea, this language had evolved
into a boast -- reportedly shared with passengers -- that “God
Himself couldn’t sink this ship.”
Thus, when the liner sank on April 15, 1912, preachers on
both sides of the Atlantic were among the first commenta-
tors to raise their voices in judgment, as well as consolation.
Newspapers promptly printed many of these sermons.
One fact gripped preachers more than any other: In an age
of great power and wealth, the Titanic carried only 20 life-
boats for its 2,200 passengers.
This was a deadly form of pride, said the Rev. William
D. Moss at the Washington Heights Presbyterian Church in
Washington, D.C. But it would be wrong to condemn only
the businessmen who built the Titanic and plotted its course.
“Yonder where the ruthless deep yawned to receive its
unwilling and innocent victims, the law of life exercised its
ancient prerogative that whatsoever a man soweth, that shall
he also reap. ... In the tragedy of this hour we have witnessed
the wrong-doing not of one man or a body of men, but of the
age,” proclaimed Moss.
“The fact is driven home to us today that as an age, as a
nation, and as individuals we lack moral vision,” he said. “We
worship success. We worship money. We worship luxury. We
worship display. We worship the material. We worship the
ephemeral. We worship self-interest. We worship competi-
tion. In other words, we worship speed. ... And so this tragedy
of the ocean has its daily counterpart on the land.”
The moral messages captured in these sermons were com-
pletely different than the vision offered in 1997 by Holly-
wood director James Cameron. His “Titanic” blockbuster
portrayed the doomed ship as a symbol of the corrupt values
of an old-fashioned culture that would soon be conquered by
science, social change and the sexual revolution.
For the preachers of 1912, the Titanic was the ultimate
symbol, not of the past, but of modernity and the dawn of
a century in which ambitious tycoons and scientists would
solve most, if not all, of humanity’s thorniest problems.
The liner was, in other words, a triumph of Darwinian
logic and the march of progress. Its sinking was a dream-
shattering tragedy of biblical proportions.
The events of April 14 and 15, 1912, are the “closest thing
that we have to a modern-day Bible story,” according to
Douglas Phillips of TitanicSociety.com, in an essay saluting
the men who went down with the ship. “Everything about
Titanic was larger-than-life: her conception, her launch, her
sins, her heroes and her judgment. ...
“Many perceived the ship to be a modern incarnation of
the Tower of Babel. The sinking represented God’s unwill-
ingness to allow man to build any edifice of invincibility or
to seek salvation through technology,” he said.
However, days after the tragedy, a young pastor in Swit-
zerland stressed that technology itself was not to blame, but
the “playful arrogance” of those who wielded it.
“God has not set a limit to technology, to progress, to the
human mind,” said the Rev. Karl Barth, who would become
one of the new century’s most famous theologians. “Quite the
reverse! ... When we become godless about the headway we
have made, i.e. when we become bumptious and conceited
and childish, then we need to be called to order.” Thus, he
argued: “It is true that God set the iceberg on its course, but
no one was compelled to get in its way.”
There was, however, an inspiring side to this story, as well.
While there was cruel logic behind the decisions that caused
the disaster, there was a radically different belief system at
work in the heroic, self-sacrificial acts on that night, noted the
Rev. Henry van Dyke, a Princeton University professor.
The bottom line: “Greater love hath no man than this, that
a man lay down his life for his friends.”
Thus, van Dyke concluded: “Only through the belief that
the strong are bound to protect and save the weak because
God wills it can we hope to keep self-sacrifice, and love, and
heroism and all the things that make us glad to live and not
afraid to die.”
1
Prices good 8am to 8pm Saturday, April 21, 2012 at all Chief & Rays Supermarket locations. Manufacturer’s coupons up to 50¢ or less will be tripled.
www.ChiefSupermarkets.com | www.facebook.com/ChiefSupermarket
Save up to $3.00 lb.
Walnut Creek
Hot Pepper
Cheese
Save $2.00
Super Dip
Ice Cream
selected varieties
Save up to $2.50 lb.
Walnut Creek
Cooked Ham
Save up to $1.67 lb.
Broccoli
Crowns
Save up to $2.02
Navel
Oranges
Save up to 72¢ lb.
Red Seedless
Grapes
Save up to $4.02 on 2
Kellogg’s
Cereal
selected varieties
Save $2.40 on 3
Large Eggs
Save $6.00 on 2
Homelife Awesome
Paper Towels
Save $6.48 on 4
Capri Sun
Drinks
selected varieties
Save $7.02 on 2
Super Chill
Water
$
3
99 $
2
99 $
3
99
99
¢ $
1
97 $
1
57 $
2
38
99
¢ $
3
99 $
1
77 $
2
48
gal.
lb. 4 lbs. lb. 5.81-18 oz.
doz. 8 rl. 10 ct. 24 ct.
In the Deli
In the Deli
Save $2.50
Prilosec OTC
Heartburn
Relief
$
8
99
14 ct.
Save up to $2.00
Sweet Grape
Tomatoes
88
¢
pkg.
Save up to 31¢
Altaulfo
Mangoes
68
¢
ea.
Arps
Milk
Whole, 2%, 1%, Skim
2/$
5
$
5
99
10/$
10
gal.
lb.
pounds
Save $17.92 on 8
Regular, Diet
Pepsi Products
6 pk 24 oz NR
4/$
11
Limit 8 - Add’tl 3/$9.99
12
Saturday 8am to 8pm
Hour Sale
TRIPLE COUPONS
p
l
u
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LOCAL FAVORITE
Save up to $19.90 on 10 lbs.
All Natural
Pork Loin Bone-In
Sirloin Roast
Save up to $6.00 lb.
USDA Choice Boneless Beef
Ribeye Steaks
regular or thick cut
Nutrition
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Limit 3 - Add’tl $1.79 Limit 2 - Add’tl $4.99 Limit 4 - Add’tl 2/$5 Limit 2 - Add’tl $3.99
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Friday, April 20, 2012 The Herald — 9
www.delphosherald.com
New vinyl album releases
give record stores a kick
By DAVID SHARP
The Associated Press
PORTLAND, Maine —
Think Katy Perry and vinyl,
and a hip-hugging dress
might come to mind.
The 27-year-old pop artist
is among musicians going old
school — releasing music on
pressed vinyl records to help
celebrate Record Store Day.
Perry, who’s too young
to have thumbed through
45-rpm singles when she was
a girl, joins an eclectic mix
that includes David Bowie,
Paul McCartney, the Misfits,
White Stripes, the late James
Brown and The Flaming Lips
and Heady Fwends with spe-
cial vinyl releases to celebrate
the hometown record store on
Saturday.
All of that vinyl — more
than 300 offerings — rep-
resents a bright spot for the
roughly 2,000 indie music
retailers facing stiff com-
petition from online music
sales and streaming music
services.
“There would be fewer
stores, if it wasn’t for the
resurgence of vinyl,” said
Chris Brown from Bull
Moose, a chain of 10 stores in
Maine and New Hampshire,
who hatched the idea for
Record Store Day.
Now in its fifth year,
Record Store Day got off to
a raucous start with Metallica
in San Francisco in 2008, a
year after the idea was tossed
out by Brown at a conference
of indie retailers.
It’s evolved into an annual
event that gave an 8 percent
sales bump to stores last year
and is now being celebrated
around the world in countries
including Brazil, Australia,
Romania and Germany.
For a time, it was unclear
whether independent record
stores would survive mega
stores like Tower Records,
and then the move to online
sales with the ubiquitous
iPod and now the growing
popularity online services
like Rhapsody, Pandora and
Spotify. Indeed, hundreds of
mom-and-pop stores did shut
their doors.
But about 2,000 stores
remain in business today, and
the number has been rela-
tively stable over the past few
years, said Ken Glaser, vice
president of sales for Alliance
Entertainment, the nation’s
largest wholesale distributor
of compact discs, DVDs and
vinyl record albums.
“I still see a place for a
strong indie store in every
community that can support
one. I just think there’s still
the lure of people wanting to
walk into a store and touch
and feel things and talk to
people,” said Joel Oberstein,
president of Almighty
Institute of Music Retail, a
market research firm based in
Studio City, Calif.
These days, vinyl records
play an increasing role in
bringing people through the
doors or music stores.
It turns out vinyl records
never really died after the
compact disc became domi-
nant after its 1980s intro-
duction. These days, a new
generation of young hipsters
is helping to drive demand
along with people who grew
up with albums and audio
purists who think vinyl
albums still sound better than
today’s digital music.
Last year, vinyl albums
sales grew 39 percent, with
about 3.9 million albums
being sold, and sales are up
about 10 percent so far this
year, according to Nielsen
Soundscan.
Record Store Day last year
represented the biggest day
of the year for vinyl sales.
Perry, for her part, is releas-
ing a 12-inch pink vinyl single
“Part of Me” with “Tommie
Sunshine’s Megasix Smash-
Up” on the flipside. Arcade
Fire is releasing “Sprawl II”
as a 12-inch vinyl single, and
Bowie is releasing a 7-inch
“Starman” picture disc.
McCartney is rereleasing a
7-inch single with “Another
Day” and “Oh Woman Oh
Why.” Two never-before-
released James Brown tracks
from the upcoming “Live at
the Apollo 50th Anniversary”
will be released on a single.
Many of the offerings will
be unique pressings.
The Flaming Lips and
Heady Fwends are releas-
ing a swirly-colored double
LP featuring collaborations
with a number of artists.
White Stripes is releasing
a red-and-black single with
“Handsprings” and “Red
Death at 6:14.” The Misfits,
a punk band, will release the
1982 “Walk Among Us” on
colored vinyl.
David Bakula, senior
vice president for analytics
at Nielsen, said he thinks
there’ll always be room for
record stores because they
cater to hardcore music fans
and offer special formats.
“I still see a place
for a strong indie
store in every
community that
can support one. I
just think there’s
still the lure of
people wanting to
walk into a store
and touch and
feel things and
talk to people.”
— Joel Oberstein,
president of Almighty
Institute of Music Retail
Austin to unveil 8-foot
monument to Willie Nelson
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) —
Country music legend Willie
Nelson was expected to help
unveil an 8-foot statue of him-
self in downtown Austin today,
which happens to be a national
day of protest for the legaliza-
tion of marijuana.
The privately funded mon-
ument near the new Moody
Theater shows Nelson in a
relaxed, standing pose and
holding his guitar to the side, as
if in conversation. Philadelphia
sculptor Clete Shields said the
leaning pose and heroic scale
are intended to show Nelson’s
openness and whimsical side
while honoring his tremendous
influence on music and the
city.
“We wanted to get a time-
less Willie, an ageless Willie,”
Shields said.
Nelson is a 10-time
Grammy Award-winning
musician who has sold more
than 40 million copies of 105
albums in a career built on not
conforming to country music
norms. Nelson fused country
music with jazz and rock in
the early 1970s to create the
“outlaw country” movement in
Austin and helped give the city
a reputation as a music city.
His first major hit came when
Patsy Cline recorded his song
“Crazy” in 1961.
Nelson was also a founder
of the Farm Aid movement to
help family farmers and has
appeared in 37 films and tele-
vision shows, ranging from a
starring role in the 1982 west-
ern “Barbarosa” to making
a cameo in the 1998 Dave
Chappelle stoner comedy “Half
Baked.”
The unveiling takes place
on April 20, or 4/20, which
is slang for smoking marijua-
na and a day pro-legalization
forces have used for annual
gatherings to demonstrate in
support of the cause. Nelson
is a well-known advocate of
legalizing marijuana and has
been arrested several times for
possessing it.
But the group that raised
money for the statue and gave
it to the city said the date of the
unveiling is just a coincidence.
The Willie Monument is the
third statue put up by Capital
Area Statues Inc., a group of
prominent Texas writers, film
producers and musicians. One
of the others honors three
Texas writers and is located at
Barton Springs and the other
honors the woman who fired a
cannon to prevent the remov-
al of the state archives from
Austin. Capital Area Statues
was formed to add more stat-
ues in Austin’s public places
and raises money for them
by selling scale models of the
work.
Lawrence Wright, one of
the group’s founders, said
April 20 was chosen because
Nelson was scheduled to per-
form at a tribute to Johnny
Cash in Austin that night, not
because of the counterculture
significance.
“We didn’t know anything
about it; it seems everyone else
knew the story on this,” Wright
said, laughing, adding that
he doesn’t think Nelson was
doing it intentionally either.
But he said the group decided
to embrace the city’s unofficial
motto of “Keep Austin Weird”
and take the additional step of
arranging for the unveiling to
take place at 4:20 p.m. to add
to the symbolism.
10 – The Herald Friday, April 20, 2012 www.delphosherald.com
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Classifieds
Deadlines:
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Each word is $.30 2-5 days
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or more prepaid
THANKS TO ST. JUDE: Runs 1 day at the
price of $3.00.
GARAGE SALES: Each day is $.20 per
word. $8.00 minimum charge.
“I WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
DEBTS”: Ad must be placed in person by
the person whose name will appear in the ad.
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We accept
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950 Miscellaneous
Forresters
Hall
LANDECK
is available
to rent
for all occasions
Accommodates up
to 80
Full kitchen,
bathrooms,
heating & air.
BIG BACK YARD
Rent $90/day
Contact
Jim Miller
419-692-9867
COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY
419-692-0032
Across from Arby’s
950 Pets
BRENDA’S
CUDDLES & CUTS
1333 N. Main, Delphos
419-692-1075
419-695-9735
KENNELS
•Grooming•Boarding
•Day Care
950 Tree Service
TEMAN’S
OUR TREE
SERVICE
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
Since 1973
419-692-7261
• Trimming • Topping • Thinning
• Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
L.L.C.
• Trimming & Removal
• Stump Grinding
• 24 Hour Service • Fully Insured
KEVIN M. MOORE
(419) 235-8051
Amish Crew
Needing work
Roofing • Remodeling
Bathrooms • Kitchens
Hog Barns • Drywall
Additions • Sidewalks
Concrete • etc.
FREE ESTIMATES
419-733-9601
950 Lawn Care
AFFORDABLE
PROPERTY
MAINTENANCE
•LAWN CARE
•LANDSCAPING
•EDGING
Insured!
419-692-0092
SPEARS
LAWN CARE
Total Lawncare &
Snow Removal
22 Years Experience • Insured
Commercial & Residential
Lindell Spears
419-695-8516
check us out at
www.spearslawncare.com
•LAWN MOWING•
•FERTILIZATION•
•WEED CONTROL
PROGRAMS•
•LAWN AERATION•
•SPRING CLEANUP•
•MULCHING & MULCH
DELIVERY•
•SHRUB INSTALLATION,
TRIMMING & REMOVAL•
“Your Full Service Lawn
& Landscape Provider”
www.ElwerLawnCare.com
(419) 235-3708
Travis Elwer
• Mulch
• Topsoil
• Purina Feeds
419-339-6800
On S.R. 309 in Elida
950 Construction
Tim Andrews
MASONRY
RESTORATION
Chimney Repair
419-204-4563
POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential
& Commercial
• Agricultural Needs
• All Concrete Work
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
950 Home Improvement
A S HOME
IMPROVEMENT LLC
•WINDOWS-DOORS
•DECKS-CUSTOM TRIM
•FLOORING-SIDING
•TEXTURED CEILINGS
FREE ESTIMATES
Be sure to get my quote-
Quality Service-Best Price!
Andy Schwinnen
419-303-0844
LEO E. GEISE
& ASSOCIATES
Interior & Exterior Painting
Drywall & Plaster Repair
Water Proofing
Pressure Washing
Since 1963
Residential • Commercial
419-692-2002
or 419-203-9006
KLIMA’S
CARPET
CLEANING
•Residential, auto,
commercial
•Free Estimates
•Certified Warranty Work
•Locally Owned, Operated
Call Bob Klima
1-888-872-1445
950 Cakes
www.elegantcakesbynikki.com
419-203-4784
“Nikki’s Cakes”
Order your special
occasion cakes by
950 Car Care
FLANAGAN’S
CAR CARE
816 E. FIFTH ST. DELPHOS
Ph. 419-692-5801
Mon.-Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-2
OIL - LUBE FILTER
Only
$
22.95*
*up to 5 quarts oil
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up
950 Computers
GERDEMAN’S TV
& COMPUTERS
* New Location *
203 N. Main
(old Westrich building)
LG LED/Plasma TVs
New & Used Laptops & Towers
Computer Repair
Delphos 419-692-5831
dangerd@wcoil.com
AT YOUR
S
ervice
in print & online
www.delphosherald.com
Call 419-695-0015
out with the old.
in with the new.
Sell it in
The Delphos Herald’s
CLASSIFIEDS
Cash in on your collectibles
with the Classifieds.
INTERESTED
IN SPORTS?
Interested in sports, fall,
winter or spring
and doing some writing?
Would you like to make some extra
money covering the local sports
teams, no matter your age?
If so, contact Sports Editor Jim
Metcalfe at
(419) 695-0015, extension 133;
or by e-mail at
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
See site for restrictions.
Spacious Villa Style
Apartment Homes
263 Elida Road
Delphos, OH 45833
Now Leasing!
419-238-6558
Delphos
Senior Villas
! 2 Bedroom / 2 Full Baths
! Attached Garages
! Washer / Dryer Connections
! Vaulted Ceilings
! Walk-In Closets
! Pet-Friendly
419-692-0141 or 419-238-6558
Delphos Senior Villas
Independent senior living 55+
Spacious 2 bdrm.,
2 full bath,
att. garages,
washer/dryer
connection,
walk-in closets.
Fitness center,
pet friendly.
010

Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU can
place a 25 word classified
ad in more than 100 news-
papers with over one and
a half million total circula-
tion across Ohio for $295.
It's easy...you place one
order and pay with one
check t hrough Ohi o
Scan-Ohi o St at ewi de
Classified Advertising Net-
work. The Delphos Herald
advertising dept. can set
this up for you. No other
classified ad buy is sim-
pler or more cost effective.
Call 419-695-0015, ext
138.
040

Services
LAMP REPAIR
Table or floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
SPRING
HOUSECLEANING,
or regular basis. Honest,
dependable, hard worker.
Good references. 21 years
experience. 419-692-1305
080

Help Wanted
HIRING DRIVERS
with 5+ years OTR experi-
ence! Our drivers average
42cents per mile & higher!
Home every weekend!
$55,000-$60,000 annually.
99% no touch freight!
We will treat you with
respect!
PLEASE CALL
419-222-1630
OTR SEMI DRIVER
NEEDED
Benefits: Vacation,
Holiday pay, 401k. Home
weekends & most nights.
Call Ulm!s Inc.
419-692-3951
080

Help Wanted
ST. MARY of the Assump-
tion Catholic School is ac-
cepting applications for
teachi ng posi ti ons i n
grades 2, 5, and 6. Seek-
ing highly qualified indi-
viduals trained and certi-
fied in these particular
grade levels. Applicants
must be caring, compas-
sionate Christian individu-
als. Being Catholic is pre-
ferred but not required.
Submit resume to 611
Jennings Rd., Van Wert,
Ohio, by Friday, April 27
120

Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist
in the investigation of
these businesses. (This
notice provided as a cus-
tomer service by The Del-
phos Herald.)
290

Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
340

Garage Sales
216 W. 6th St, Thurs, Fri &
Sat -9am-5pm. Depres-
sion glass, antique dishes,
beer mirrors, furniture, pic-
tures, bicycles, puzzles,
tapes, misc.
HUGE SALE
1105 William Ave in
Menke addition. Thurs &
Fri - 9am-7pm. Sat -
9am-2pm. Dishes, furni-
ture, new appliances, new
ceiling lights and fan, air
filters, electronics, cloth-
ing- infant thru adult, infant
car seat, toys, books,
stuffed animals, CDs,
DVDs, video tapes, so
much more!
501

Misc. for Sale
MUST SEE! 2 Designer
Prom Dresses, perfect
condition. 1 Teal Sequins
Strapless by Maggie Sot-
tero. 1 Fuchsia Pink Chif-
fon - Night Moves by Al-
lure. Original prices over
$375 each. Call (419)
863-9441 with any ques-
tions.
550

Pets & Supplies
ADORABLE MALTESE
Male puppy, $300. Born
12-8-11. Raised with fam-
ily in home, non-shedding,
fully vaccinated.
Call or Text Amanda-
231-852-0703
780

Business Property
FURNISHED OFFICE
space. 3 large upstairs of-
fices conveniently located
in downtown Delphos.
Completely furnished with:
desks, file cabinets, book
cases, chairs, phones,
copier available. Private
entrance, waiting room,
kitchen & copy room. All
utilities included. Rent 1 or
2 for $350/mo. each, or all
3 for $950/mo. Cal l
(419)236-6616 for details.
810

Auto Repairs/
Parts/Acc.
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
840

Mobile Homes
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
920

Free & Low Price
Merchandise
FREE ELECTRIC Range.
Works very well.
419-692-4861
Shop Herald
Classifieds for
Great Deals
Today’s Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS
1 “Hey, --!”
4 Expose
8 Ride the rapids
12 Pause fillers
13 Home products
brand
14 NYC theater
award
15 Almost grown
17 Vital thing
18 Campaign topic
19 Wash off
20 JAMA subscrib-
ers
22 Skillet
23 Spill the beans
26 Parka feature
28 Wildlife refuge
31 Has the flu
32 Hearty laugh
33 Ames inst.
34 -- & Perrins
35 Mo n s i e u r ’ s
summer
36 Tent dweller
37 Country hotel
38 Gorby’s realm
39 -- ex machina
40 Addams Family
cousin
41 Nearest star
43 Sluggard
46 747 flier
50 Root crops
51 Valentine offer-
ing
54 Number of Mus-
es
55 Get word of
56 Wrap
57 Work for a mag-
azine
58 Killer whale
59 Go wrong
DOWN
1 Ab o mi n a b l e
Snowman
2 Raw metals
3 Consumes
4 Bleated
5 Batting stat
6 Caviar, actually
7 Put a stop to
8 Chariot race bet-
tor
9 Lean against
10 Chips partner
11 Paris head
16 Deadens
19 Scolding word
21 Most bashful
22 Fire irons
23 “-- Ha’i”
24 Mortgage, e.g.
25 Mr. Pakula
27 Ump’s calls
28 Catastrophic
29 Hairy twin
30 Gists
36 Bob Hope spe-
cialty(2 wds.)
38 Pass near Pikes
Peak
40 Map within a
map
42 Soap --
43 Unit of force
44 Speakeasy risk
45 Hotel chain
47 Grease job
48 Polecat’s trade-
mark
49 Bygone despot
51 Letter before
sigma
52 Above, in verse
53 Kangaroo pouch
Answer to Puzzle
REAL
ESTATE
TRANSFERS
Putnam County
Jerry J. Brinkman
and Amy T. Brinkman
fka Amy T. Verhoff, Lot
127, Columbus Grove, to
Jerry J. Brinkman and
Amy T. Brinkman.
Joseph W. Donaldson
and Ruth A. Donaldson,
2.384 acres, Pleasant
Township, to Ryan G.
Stechschulte and Sarah
L. Stechschulte.
Michael P. Teman and
Kay L. Teman, parcels,
Jennings Township to
Michael P. Teman and
Kay L. Teman.
Norma J. Meyer LE,
Lot 630 and Lot 631,
Ottawa, to Michael J.
Meyer and Douglas L.
Meyer.
Ruth L. Miller, .138
acre Monterey Township
to Marsha K. Epstein.
Matthew J. Reiter,
Matthew R. Reiter and
Stephanie Reiter, Lot
39, Pandora, to Diane L.
Hardesty.
Eugene A. Odenweller,
Lot 148, Ottoville, to
Troy D. Wenzlick.
Helen F. Steward, John
M. Steward and Jone
A. Steward, 40.0 acres,
Van Buren Township to
Randal E. Rader and
Rodney E. Rader.
Stephen K. Snavely
TR and Bennett Family
Living TR, Lot 195 and
Lot 161, Continental, to
Roger W. Bennett.
Croghan Colonial
Bank, 2.793 acres, Union
Township to Ronald A.
Schimmoller.
Thomas Wayne
Diemer and Mary
Katherine Diemer, Lot
41, North reek, to Steven
Diemer.
Wells Fargo Bank TR,
Lot 202 and Lot 203,
Continental, to Paulding
Auto Group LLC.
Mario Hernandez Jr.
and Rosa M. Hernandez,
Lot 104, Leipsic, to Citi
Corp Trust Bank.
Janet L. Limpach,
Jerome A. Limpach,
Becky S. Lauer, Kevin
A. Lauer, and Linus
Bockrath, Lot 239,
Glandorf, to Nathan
J. Nelson and Dana L.
Nelson.
Kay Sue Cherry TR
and Kenneth B. Cherry
TR, 40.80 acres Riley
Township, 40.0 acres
Riley Township, 20.0
acres Riley Township,
12.96 acres Riley
Township, 5.0 acres
Riley Township, 31.0
acres Riley Township,
29.0 acres Riley
Township and 1.0 acre,
Riley Township, to Kay
Sue Cherry.
Q: I attended a dinner party
recently and ended up with food
poisoning. It was very unpleasant
and, although I’d hoped to host
next year myself, I don’t want
to make anyone sick. How can I
prepare a good meal that is also
safe for my guests?
A: One of the best parts about
a party is the food. Unfortunately,
as you experienced, people can
develop foodborne illness (food
poisoning or infections) if the
food is not prepared carefully.
The good news is you can greatly
reduce the chance that your guests
will become ill by taking a few
precautions.
There are three basic rules you
can follow to ensure your food is
safe to eat:
-- First, avoid cross-
contamination, which is the
transfer of bacteria from one
food item to another. All fresh
food contains some bacteria.
Most of the bacteria on fruit and
vegetables can be washed off,
but you can destroy the bacteria
on meat, fish and poultry only by
cooking it.
To avoid cross-contamination,
keep meat, fish and poultry
apart from salad greens, fruits
and other foods that you plan
to eat raw. Fully separate them
from each other in the grocery
cart and in the refrigerator. Wash
your hands, utensils and cutting
surfaces whenever you switch
from working with uncooked
meat, fish or poultry to anything
that will be eaten raw.
-- Second, check the
temperature of the foods you
store and cook. Bacteria grow
fast at temperatures between 40
degrees F and 140 degrees F. Use
a food thermometer to make sure
you’re keeping your raw dishes
cold enough and that hot dishes
have been cooked enough.
-- Third, make sure you follow
the two-hour rule. That is, do
not leave raw meat or poultry in
the temperature danger zone for
more than two hours. If you do,
they may produce illness-causing
toxins that can’t be destroyed by
cooking.
You should also be aware
that some traditional holiday
dishes and drinks provide perfect
opportunities for bacterial
contamination and growth.
If you plan to serve a turkey,
use special care. Raw poultry is
one of the most common
causes of bacterial diarrhea,
so proper cooking and
storage are critical. A
frozen turkey should be
thawed in the refrigerator
to prevent the surface from
reaching temperatures
above 40 degrees F. For
a faster thawing time, the
turkey can be submerged
in cold water, as long
as you change the water
every 30 minutes.
A fresh turkey must
reach your refrigerator
within two hours of leaving the
merchant’s cooler. Cook it until
the temperature is 165 degrees
F in the innermost breast, thighs
and wings, and serve it within
two hours. For storage, all the
meat should be removed from the
bone, divided into smaller pieces,
placed in shallow containers and
refrigerated or frozen. Leftover
meat should be reheated to 165
degrees F before serving.
The way you prepare stuffing
is also important. Stuffing the
turkey before you roast it raises
the risk of contamination. The
stuffing can absorb bacteria
from internal drippings as the
bird cooks, and the stuffing may
not get hot enough to eliminate
the bacteria before the turkey is
done. The best thing to do is to
cook the stuffing separately and
refrigerate leftover stuffing in a
separate container.
If you still want to stuff your
turkey, chill the ingredients
ahead of time (keeping wet
and dry ingredients separate)
and combine them just before
stuffing the bird. Then cook the
turkey immediately, using a meat
thermometer to make sure both
the bird and the stuffing reach
an internal temperature of 165
degrees F.
You also need to be careful
when preparing treats that contain
eggs, such as pumpkin pie and
eggnog. Eggs often contain
bacteria that can cause illness in
humans. Illness can be avoided
by cooking egg-containing foods
to a temperature of 160 degrees
F.
The way you serve the food
may also influence how safe it
is for guests to eat. If you plan
to serve it buffet-style, use the
two-hour rule mentioned above.
The two-hour rule applies to all
prepared foods on the table. It
may help to divide each food item
into smaller portions and refill
dishes as they empty. If you reuse
a serving dish, wash it before
refilling.
Lastly, pay attention to any
gifted food. Prepared food that
travels more than two hours must
be kept chilled or frozen en route.
If a frozen food arrives fully
thawed or a chilled food arrives
at room temperature, thank the
giver but discreetly discard the
food.
If you follow these rules, your
holiday meals can be festive, tasty
and also safe. For more advice on
preventing foodborne illnesses,
visit foodsafety.gov.
Distributed by Universal
UClick for UFS
© 2012 Harvard University.
Common causes of foodborne illness
Every year, 48 million Americans develop foodborne illness (also known as food poisoning
or stomach flu), most of which isn’t reported to health authorities. Festive dinners and buffets
offer more opportunities for contamination than most meals, but you can greatly reduce your
risk by taking a few precautions.
Pathogen Common sources Time after
ingesting
Symptoms and duration of illness
Campylobacter Raw poultry, unpasteurized milk 2 to 5 days Cramps, diarrhea (often bloody); 2 to 10 days
E. coli O157:H7 Undercooked beef, unpasteurized dairy 1 to 8 days Cramps, bloody diarrhea; 5 to 10 days
Noroviruses Raw produce, contaminated water,
infected food handling, shellfish
12 to 48 hours Cramps, nausea, diarrhea, fever, headache;
12 to 60 hours
Salmonella Eggs, poultry, unpasteurized dairy, raw
produce
6 to 48 hours Cramps, diarrhea, fever; 4 to 7 days
Source: FDA, at www.fda.gov/Food/ResourcesForYou/Consumers.
Simple precautions prevent food poisoning
DR. KOMAROFF, M.D.
On
Health
10 – The Herald Friday, April 20, 2012 www.delphosherald.com
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
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950 Miscellaneous
Forresters
Hall
LANDECK
is available
to rent
for all occasions
Accommodates up
to 80
Full kitchen,
bathrooms,
heating & air.
BIG BACK YARD
Rent $90/day
Contact
Jim Miller
419-692-9867
COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY
419-692-0032
Across from Arby’s
950 Pets
BRENDA’S
CUDDLES & CUTS
1333 N. Main, Delphos
419-692-1075
419-695-9735
KENNELS
•Grooming•Boarding
•Day Care
950 Tree Service
TEMAN’S
OUR TREE
SERVICE
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
Since 1973
419-692-7261
• Trimming • Topping • Thinning
• Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
L.L.C.
• Trimming & Removal
• Stump Grinding
• 24 Hour Service • Fully Insured
KEVIN M. MOORE
(419) 235-8051
Amish Crew
Needing work
Roofing • Remodeling
Bathrooms • Kitchens
Hog Barns • Drywall
Additions • Sidewalks
Concrete • etc.
FREE ESTIMATES
419-733-9601
950 Lawn Care
AFFORDABLE
PROPERTY
MAINTENANCE
•LAWN CARE
•LANDSCAPING
•EDGING
Insured!
419-692-0092
SPEARS
LAWN CARE
Total Lawncare &
Snow Removal
22 Years Experience • Insured
Commercial & Residential
Lindell Spears
419-695-8516
check us out at
www.spearslawncare.com
•LAWN MOWING•
•FERTILIZATION•
•WEED CONTROL
PROGRAMS•
•LAWN AERATION•
•SPRING CLEANUP•
•MULCHING & MULCH
DELIVERY•
•SHRUB INSTALLATION,
TRIMMING & REMOVAL•
“Your Full Service Lawn
& Landscape Provider”
www.ElwerLawnCare.com
(419) 235-3708
Travis Elwer
• Mulch
• Topsoil
• Purina Feeds
419-339-6800
On S.R. 309 in Elida
950 Construction
Tim Andrews
MASONRY
RESTORATION
Chimney Repair
419-204-4563
POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential
& Commercial
• Agricultural Needs
• All Concrete Work
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
950 Home Improvement
A S HOME
IMPROVEMENT LLC
•WINDOWS-DOORS
•DECKS-CUSTOM TRIM
•FLOORING-SIDING
•TEXTURED CEILINGS
FREE ESTIMATES
Be sure to get my quote-
Quality Service-Best Price!
Andy Schwinnen
419-303-0844
LEO E. GEISE
& ASSOCIATES
Interior & Exterior Painting
Drywall & Plaster Repair
Water Proofing
Pressure Washing
Since 1963
Residential • Commercial
419-692-2002
or 419-203-9006
KLIMA’S
CARPET
CLEANING
•Residential, auto,
commercial
•Free Estimates
•Certified Warranty Work
•Locally Owned, Operated
Call Bob Klima
1-888-872-1445
950 Cakes
www.elegantcakesbynikki.com
419-203-4784
“Nikki’s Cakes”
Order your special
occasion cakes by
950 Car Care
FLANAGAN’S
CAR CARE
816 E. FIFTH ST. DELPHOS
Ph. 419-692-5801
Mon.-Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-2
OIL - LUBE FILTER
Only
$
22.95*
*up to 5 quarts oil
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up
950 Computers
GERDEMAN’S TV
& COMPUTERS
* New Location *
203 N. Main
(old Westrich building)
LG LED/Plasma TVs
New & Used Laptops & Towers
Computer Repair
Delphos 419-692-5831
dangerd@wcoil.com
AT YOUR
S
ervice
in print & online
www.delphosherald.com
Call 419-695-0015
out with the old.
in with the new.
Sell it in
The Delphos Herald’s
CLASSIFIEDS
Cash in on your collectibles
with the Classifieds.
INTERESTED
IN SPORTS?
Interested in sports, fall,
winter or spring
and doing some writing?
Would you like to make some extra
money covering the local sports
teams, no matter your age?
If so, contact Sports Editor Jim
Metcalfe at
(419) 695-0015, extension 133;
or by e-mail at
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
See site for restrictions.
Spacious Villa Style
Apartment Homes
263 Elida Road
Delphos, OH 45833
Now Leasing!
419-238-6558
Delphos
Senior Villas
! 2 Bedroom / 2 Full Baths
! Attached Garages
! Washer / Dryer Connections
! Vaulted Ceilings
! Walk-In Closets
! Pet-Friendly
419-692-0141 or 419-238-6558
Delphos Senior Villas
Independent senior living 55+
Spacious 2 bdrm.,
2 full bath,
att. garages,
washer/dryer
connection,
walk-in closets.
Fitness center,
pet friendly.
010

Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU can
place a 25 word classified
ad in more than 100 news-
papers with over one and
a half million total circula-
tion across Ohio for $295.
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advertising dept. can set
this up for you. No other
classified ad buy is sim-
pler or more cost effective.
Call 419-695-0015, ext
138.
040

Services
LAMP REPAIR
Table or floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
SPRING
HOUSECLEANING,
or regular basis. Honest,
dependable, hard worker.
Good references. 21 years
experience. 419-692-1305
080

Help Wanted
HIRING DRIVERS
with 5+ years OTR experi-
ence! Our drivers average
42cents per mile & higher!
Home every weekend!
$55,000-$60,000 annually.
99% no touch freight!
We will treat you with
respect!
PLEASE CALL
419-222-1630
OTR SEMI DRIVER
NEEDED
Benefits: Vacation,
Holiday pay, 401k. Home
weekends & most nights.
Call Ulm!s Inc.
419-692-3951
080

Help Wanted
ST. MARY of the Assump-
tion Catholic School is ac-
cepting applications for
teachi ng posi ti ons i n
grades 2, 5, and 6. Seek-
ing highly qualified indi-
viduals trained and certi-
fied in these particular
grade levels. Applicants
must be caring, compas-
sionate Christian individu-
als. Being Catholic is pre-
ferred but not required.
Submit resume to 611
Jennings Rd., Van Wert,
Ohio, by Friday, April 27
120

Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist
in the investigation of
these businesses. (This
notice provided as a cus-
tomer service by The Del-
phos Herald.)
290

Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
340

Garage Sales
216 W. 6th St, Thurs, Fri &
Sat -9am-5pm. Depres-
sion glass, antique dishes,
beer mirrors, furniture, pic-
tures, bicycles, puzzles,
tapes, misc.
HUGE SALE
1105 William Ave in
Menke addition. Thurs &
Fri - 9am-7pm. Sat -
9am-2pm. Dishes, furni-
ture, new appliances, new
ceiling lights and fan, air
filters, electronics, cloth-
ing- infant thru adult, infant
car seat, toys, books,
stuffed animals, CDs,
DVDs, video tapes, so
much more!
501

Misc. for Sale
MUST SEE! 2 Designer
Prom Dresses, perfect
condition. 1 Teal Sequins
Strapless by Maggie Sot-
tero. 1 Fuchsia Pink Chif-
fon - Night Moves by Al-
lure. Original prices over
$375 each. Call (419)
863-9441 with any ques-
tions.
550

Pets & Supplies
ADORABLE MALTESE
Male puppy, $300. Born
12-8-11. Raised with fam-
ily in home, non-shedding,
fully vaccinated.
Call or Text Amanda-
231-852-0703
780

Business Property
FURNISHED OFFICE
space. 3 large upstairs of-
fices conveniently located
in downtown Delphos.
Completely furnished with:
desks, file cabinets, book
cases, chairs, phones,
copier available. Private
entrance, waiting room,
kitchen & copy room. All
utilities included. Rent 1 or
2 for $350/mo. each, or all
3 for $950/mo. Cal l
(419)236-6616 for details.
810

Auto Repairs/
Parts/Acc.
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
840

Mobile Homes
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
920

Free & Low Price
Merchandise
FREE ELECTRIC Range.
Works very well.
419-692-4861
Shop Herald
Classifieds for
Great Deals
Today’s Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS
1 “Hey, --!”
4 Expose
8 Ride the rapids
12 Pause fillers
13 Home products
brand
14 NYC theater
award
15 Almost grown
17 Vital thing
18 Campaign topic
19 Wash off
20 JAMA subscrib-
ers
22 Skillet
23 Spill the beans
26 Parka feature
28 Wildlife refuge
31 Has the flu
32 Hearty laugh
33 Ames inst.
34 -- & Perrins
35 Mo n s i e u r ’ s
summer
36 Tent dweller
37 Country hotel
38 Gorby’s realm
39 -- ex machina
40 Addams Family
cousin
41 Nearest star
43 Sluggard
46 747 flier
50 Root crops
51 Valentine offer-
ing
54 Number of Mus-
es
55 Get word of
56 Wrap
57 Work for a mag-
azine
58 Killer whale
59 Go wrong
DOWN
1 Ab o mi n a b l e
Snowman
2 Raw metals
3 Consumes
4 Bleated
5 Batting stat
6 Caviar, actually
7 Put a stop to
8 Chariot race bet-
tor
9 Lean against
10 Chips partner
11 Paris head
16 Deadens
19 Scolding word
21 Most bashful
22 Fire irons
23 “-- Ha’i”
24 Mortgage, e.g.
25 Mr. Pakula
27 Ump’s calls
28 Catastrophic
29 Hairy twin
30 Gists
36 Bob Hope spe-
cialty(2 wds.)
38 Pass near Pikes
Peak
40 Map within a
map
42 Soap --
43 Unit of force
44 Speakeasy risk
45 Hotel chain
47 Grease job
48 Polecat’s trade-
mark
49 Bygone despot
51 Letter before
sigma
52 Above, in verse
53 Kangaroo pouch
Answer to Puzzle
REAL
ESTATE
TRANSFERS
Putnam County
Jerry J. Brinkman
and Amy T. Brinkman
fka Amy T. Verhoff, Lot
127, Columbus Grove, to
Jerry J. Brinkman and
Amy T. Brinkman.
Joseph W. Donaldson
and Ruth A. Donaldson,
2.384 acres, Pleasant
Township, to Ryan G.
Stechschulte and Sarah
L. Stechschulte.
Michael P. Teman and
Kay L. Teman, parcels,
Jennings Township to
Michael P. Teman and
Kay L. Teman.
Norma J. Meyer LE,
Lot 630 and Lot 631,
Ottawa, to Michael J.
Meyer and Douglas L.
Meyer.
Ruth L. Miller, .138
acre Monterey Township
to Marsha K. Epstein.
Matthew J. Reiter,
Matthew R. Reiter and
Stephanie Reiter, Lot
39, Pandora, to Diane L.
Hardesty.
Eugene A. Odenweller,
Lot 148, Ottoville, to
Troy D. Wenzlick.
Helen F. Steward, John
M. Steward and Jone
A. Steward, 40.0 acres,
Van Buren Township to
Randal E. Rader and
Rodney E. Rader.
Stephen K. Snavely
TR and Bennett Family
Living TR, Lot 195 and
Lot 161, Continental, to
Roger W. Bennett.
Croghan Colonial
Bank, 2.793 acres, Union
Township to Ronald A.
Schimmoller.
Thomas Wayne
Diemer and Mary
Katherine Diemer, Lot
41, North reek, to Steven
Diemer.
Wells Fargo Bank TR,
Lot 202 and Lot 203,
Continental, to Paulding
Auto Group LLC.
Mario Hernandez Jr.
and Rosa M. Hernandez,
Lot 104, Leipsic, to Citi
Corp Trust Bank.
Janet L. Limpach,
Jerome A. Limpach,
Becky S. Lauer, Kevin
A. Lauer, and Linus
Bockrath, Lot 239,
Glandorf, to Nathan
J. Nelson and Dana L.
Nelson.
Kay Sue Cherry TR
and Kenneth B. Cherry
TR, 40.80 acres Riley
Township, 40.0 acres
Riley Township, 20.0
acres Riley Township,
12.96 acres Riley
Township, 5.0 acres
Riley Township, 31.0
acres Riley Township,
29.0 acres Riley
Township and 1.0 acre,
Riley Township, to Kay
Sue Cherry.
Q: I attended a dinner party
recently and ended up with food
poisoning. It was very unpleasant
and, although I’d hoped to host
next year myself, I don’t want
to make anyone sick. How can I
prepare a good meal that is also
safe for my guests?
A: One of the best parts about
a party is the food. Unfortunately,
as you experienced, people can
develop foodborne illness (food
poisoning or infections) if the
food is not prepared carefully.
The good news is you can greatly
reduce the chance that your guests
will become ill by taking a few
precautions.
There are three basic rules you
can follow to ensure your food is
safe to eat:
-- First, avoid cross-
contamination, which is the
transfer of bacteria from one
food item to another. All fresh
food contains some bacteria.
Most of the bacteria on fruit and
vegetables can be washed off,
but you can destroy the bacteria
on meat, fish and poultry only by
cooking it.
To avoid cross-contamination,
keep meat, fish and poultry
apart from salad greens, fruits
and other foods that you plan
to eat raw. Fully separate them
from each other in the grocery
cart and in the refrigerator. Wash
your hands, utensils and cutting
surfaces whenever you switch
from working with uncooked
meat, fish or poultry to anything
that will be eaten raw.
-- Second, check the
temperature of the foods you
store and cook. Bacteria grow
fast at temperatures between 40
degrees F and 140 degrees F. Use
a food thermometer to make sure
you’re keeping your raw dishes
cold enough and that hot dishes
have been cooked enough.
-- Third, make sure you follow
the two-hour rule. That is, do
not leave raw meat or poultry in
the temperature danger zone for
more than two hours. If you do,
they may produce illness-causing
toxins that can’t be destroyed by
cooking.
You should also be aware
that some traditional holiday
dishes and drinks provide perfect
opportunities for bacterial
contamination and growth.
If you plan to serve a turkey,
use special care. Raw poultry is
one of the most common
causes of bacterial diarrhea,
so proper cooking and
storage are critical. A
frozen turkey should be
thawed in the refrigerator
to prevent the surface from
reaching temperatures
above 40 degrees F. For
a faster thawing time, the
turkey can be submerged
in cold water, as long
as you change the water
every 30 minutes.
A fresh turkey must
reach your refrigerator
within two hours of leaving the
merchant’s cooler. Cook it until
the temperature is 165 degrees
F in the innermost breast, thighs
and wings, and serve it within
two hours. For storage, all the
meat should be removed from the
bone, divided into smaller pieces,
placed in shallow containers and
refrigerated or frozen. Leftover
meat should be reheated to 165
degrees F before serving.
The way you prepare stuffing
is also important. Stuffing the
turkey before you roast it raises
the risk of contamination. The
stuffing can absorb bacteria
from internal drippings as the
bird cooks, and the stuffing may
not get hot enough to eliminate
the bacteria before the turkey is
done. The best thing to do is to
cook the stuffing separately and
refrigerate leftover stuffing in a
separate container.
If you still want to stuff your
turkey, chill the ingredients
ahead of time (keeping wet
and dry ingredients separate)
and combine them just before
stuffing the bird. Then cook the
turkey immediately, using a meat
thermometer to make sure both
the bird and the stuffing reach
an internal temperature of 165
degrees F.
You also need to be careful
when preparing treats that contain
eggs, such as pumpkin pie and
eggnog. Eggs often contain
bacteria that can cause illness in
humans. Illness can be avoided
by cooking egg-containing foods
to a temperature of 160 degrees
F.
The way you serve the food
may also influence how safe it
is for guests to eat. If you plan
to serve it buffet-style, use the
two-hour rule mentioned above.
The two-hour rule applies to all
prepared foods on the table. It
may help to divide each food item
into smaller portions and refill
dishes as they empty. If you reuse
a serving dish, wash it before
refilling.
Lastly, pay attention to any
gifted food. Prepared food that
travels more than two hours must
be kept chilled or frozen en route.
If a frozen food arrives fully
thawed or a chilled food arrives
at room temperature, thank the
giver but discreetly discard the
food.
If you follow these rules, your
holiday meals can be festive, tasty
and also safe. For more advice on
preventing foodborne illnesses,
visit foodsafety.gov.
Distributed by Universal
UClick for UFS
© 2012 Harvard University.
Common causes of foodborne illness
Every year, 48 million Americans develop foodborne illness (also known as food poisoning
or stomach flu), most of which isn’t reported to health authorities. Festive dinners and buffets
offer more opportunities for contamination than most meals, but you can greatly reduce your
risk by taking a few precautions.
Pathogen Common sources Time after
ingesting
Symptoms and duration of illness
Campylobacter Raw poultry, unpasteurized milk 2 to 5 days Cramps, diarrhea (often bloody); 2 to 10 days
E. coli O157:H7 Undercooked beef, unpasteurized dairy 1 to 8 days Cramps, bloody diarrhea; 5 to 10 days
Noroviruses Raw produce, contaminated water,
infected food handling, shellfish
12 to 48 hours Cramps, nausea, diarrhea, fever, headache;
12 to 60 hours
Salmonella Eggs, poultry, unpasteurized dairy, raw
produce
6 to 48 hours Cramps, diarrhea, fever; 4 to 7 days
Source: FDA, at www.fda.gov/Food/ResourcesForYou/Consumers.
Simple precautions prevent food poisoning
DR. KOMAROFF, M.D.
On
Health
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
PICKLES
BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
Friday Evening April 20, 2012
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30
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©2009 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it
Friday, April 20, 2012 The Herald – 11
Tomorrow’s
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
One night stand
has ripple effect
Dear Annie: Bob and I
are both divorced from our
previous spouses. His ex-
wife was unfaithful and so
was my ex-husband. We
fell in love even though we
live miles apart. I recently
visited him for the second
time to talk about our future
plans. He wanted me to meet
his friends and I happily
agreed.
“Tina” is a longtime fam-
ily friend. Bob is godfather
to two of her children. She
claims to be best friends with
Bob’s ex-wife. But during
dinner, Tina made inappro-
priate advances
toward Bob. He
finally confessed
that they had a one-
night stand when he
discovered his wife
was cheating. They
swore never to
speak of their tryst.
This happened long
before he met me
and Bob says he
feels terrible about
it. But Tina made
sure I knew they
had a sexual history. It took
every bit of reserve to main-
tain my composure that eve-
ning.
While I have zero respect
for a woman who sleeps with
her best friend’s man, I am
also unhappy with Bob. He
has done everything within
his power since then to prove
that he loves me and wants
a future with me, includ-
ing marriage but I cannot
get past the fact that he and
Tina crossed a boundary
and still expect to remain
friendly. What kind of man
would try to merge his past
with his present? -- Feeling
Confused
Dear Confused: Bob has
been honest with you, but as
godfather to Tina’s children,
she will always be in the pic-
ture. Do you trust him not to
put himself in a compromis-
ing position? That is the sole
issue. You cannot change the
past. You can only accept
it and move forward. You
and Bob might benefit from
premarital counseling. He
sounds worth it.
Dear Annie: My daughter
is planning a wedding to a
great guy, and I am thrilled
for her. The problem is, he
comes from a very wealthy
family. I live in a mobile
home. If I’m lucky, I could
scratch together $3,000 to
put toward their wedding,
but that’s it.
I don’t want to use the little
money I’ve saved toward my
retirement. I’ve already spent
a fortune on my dress, the
gifts and all the little extras.
So my question is, how do I
offer $3,000 and say that is
all I have to give toward the
actual wedding? Do I need to
apologize? Should I take out
a loan or borrow from my
retirement to save face? This
whole thing is keeping me
up at night. -- The Bride’s
Mother
Dear Mother: Parents
should never put themselves
in hock in order to pay for
a child’s wedding. An adult
bride and groom should pay
for their own nuptials when-
ever possible, even if that
means cake and punch in the
backyard. Tell your daughter
you love her very much, and
you will be happy to give her
$3,000 toward the cost of her
wedding. Period. You don’t
need to apologize or take out
a loan. If she wants some-
thing more elaborate, it’s her
problem, not yours.
Dear Annie: I read the
letter from “Not Romeo and
Juliet,” who said
that many years
ago, there was some
unspecified rift
between her family
and her boyfriend’s
family. Now that
she and the boy-
friend have recon-
nected and wish to
marry, the families
are angry and vehe-
mently against it.
The first thing
they should do is
have their DNA checked.
I’d bet there was an affair
between two of those par-
ents and the kids are related.
- First-Time Writer from
Iowa
Dear Iowa: You could be
right, although the rift extends
to every member of both fam-
ilies. While an affair seems a
likely basis for the animosity,
we would hope the parents
would inform the couple if
they shared DNA. Instead,
they are vague, saying only
that they won’t attend the
wedding. We think the couple
deserves to know why.
Annie’s Mailbox is writ-
ten by Kathy Mitchell and
Marcy Sugar, longtime edi-
tors of the Ann Landers
column. Please email your
questions to anniesmail-
box@comcast.net, or write
to: Annie’s Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254.
www.delphosherald.com
SATURDAY, APRIL 21, 2012
Certain circumstances that have
a bearing on your material success
in the year ahead might be difficult
to define, yet even if you don’t fully
understand them, they will still be
working in your favor. It behooves
you to go with the flow.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
-- Several situations that personally
affect you have been handled rather
poorly by others in the past, but will
now revert to your control. Try to
profit from others’ past mistakes.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) --
The possibility for fulfilling a secret
ambition of yours is starting to look
better than ever. Don’t lose faith and
switch objectives right now, because
victory has never been closer.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
-- You are about to enter a new
cycle that will have a multitude of
hopeful ramifications that you haven’t
yet explored attached to it. Take
ample time to investigate each one
thoroughly.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- This
is an excellent time to elevate your
sights and upgrade the quality of your
objectives and goals. You can do much
better than you think, if you’d merely
push yourself a bit harder.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) --
Any new knowledge you acquire
during this time frame can eventually
be put to very productive use. Don’t
be overly anxious about finding some
immediate applications for it.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Pay
particular attention to investment
suggestions offered by two people you
respect, trust and who have already
established successful track records
of their own.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- A legal agreement or partnership
arrangement into which you enter
should have good chances for success,
as long as it provides equal potential
benefits to all parties involved.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- There could be some interesting
developments occurring concerning
your work or career that could lead to a
raise, bonus or promotion. Recognize
these opportunities and make the most
of them.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
-- Heed all urges or inclinations you
get to reorganize your affairs along
more productive lines, both socially
and commercially. It’ll help you
benefit in more ways than one.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- Certain conditions that have caused
you more than a few frustrations will
be replaced by some new influences
that should be meaningful to you
financially.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
-- You could finally receive some
vital information, the lack of which
inhibited your progress over the
past few years. This discovery will
enhance your potential for success in
a new area.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) --
There are three advantageous trends
stirring within your chart, but the
most important one suggests that your
finances could markedly improve
when handled correctly.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Annie’s Mailbox
12 – The Herald Friday, April 20, 2012 www.delphosherald.com
Era of missing children on milk cartons recalled
By CRISTIAN SALAZAR
Associated Press
NEW YORK — He was America’s miss-
ing child, the little boy who went off to school
alone and vanished.
A renewed investigation into the 1979
disappearance of 6-year-old Etan Patz in New
York City recalled the years when printed
images of missing children appeared on milk
cartons.
On Thursday, investigators began searching
a basement in Manhattan for human remains
of the boy.
Etan’s disappearance on May 25, 1979,
drew national attention to child safety, ushered
in a generation of parents who became afraid
to send their kids out alone and helped fuel
a movement to publicize missing children’s
cases. President Ronald Reagan declared
the day of the boy’s disappearance National
Missing Children’s Day.
“The story really resonated and touched mil-
lions of moms and dads,” said Ernie Allen, the
president of the National Center for Exploited
and Missing Children, which helped push the
national milk carton campaign with Etan’s
image.
And Etan’s image on milk cartons, the
missing boy shown with thick blond locks and
goofy grin, caught the public’s imagination
like no other. “Etan’s photo became almost
iconic,” Allen said.
While Patz’s face was among the first to
appear on thousands of cartons across the
country, the practice began with local dairies
in the Midwest.
“What it did was raise the level of aware-
ness,” said Noreen Gosch, whose missing son,
Johnny, was among the first to have his face
appear on a milk carton. “It didn’t necessarily
bring us tips or leads we could actually use.”
Her son, who disappeared on his newspaper
route in West Des Moines, Iowa, in 1982, has
never been found. His image appeared on milk
cartons probably in 1983, Gosch said. The
milk carton campaigns faded away beginning
in the late 1980s after pediatricians, including
Dr. Benjamin Spock, criticized the images for
inducing unwarranted fear in children as they
ate breakfast.
Patz vanished after leaving his family’s
SoHo apartment for a short walk to catch a
school bus. It was the first time his parents had
let him go off to school alone.
“It was a case of enormous attention,” said
police spokesman Paul Browne on Thursday.
“It was something we hadn’t seen since the
Lindbergh kidnapping” — referring to the
1932 abduction of aviator Charles Lindbergh’s
20-month-old baby boy.
Browne said a forensic team planned to
dig up the concrete floor of the Manhattan
basement and remove drywall partitions in
an attempt to find blood, clothing or human
remains in the building, just down the street
from Etan’s home. The work was expected to
take up to five days.
FBI and police officials didn’t publicly
announce what led them to the site, but a
law enforcement official told The Associated
Press that investigators made the decision
to dig after an FBI dog detected the scent of
human remains at the building over the past
few weeks.
FBI spokesman Tim Flannelly said it was
“one lead of many.”
“We’re out here 33 years after his disap-
pearance, and we’re not going to stop,” he
said.
Investigators have long eyed the basement
with curiosity because it can be accessed from
the street on the boy’s route to school. At the
time, the space was being used as a workshop
by a neighborhood handyman who was thought
to have been friendly with Etan.
FBI investigators have interviewed the man
several times over the years. Investigators
questioned him again recently, and as a result
of those discussions decided to refocus their
attention on the building, according to the law
enforcement official.
The official spoke to the AP on condition of
anonymity because the investigation is ongo-
ing. Two other law enforcement officials also
confirmed that an FBI dog had indicated the
scent of human remains in the space.
Etan’s parents, Stanley and Julie Patz,
became outspoken advocates for missing chil-
dren. For years, they refused to change their
phone number, in the hope that Etan was
alive somewhere, and might call. They never
moved, although they obtained a court order in
2001 declaring the boy dead.
Stanley Patz didn’t respond to phone calls
and email messages Thursday. A man who
answered the buzzer at the family’s apartment
said they wouldn’t be speaking to the media.
No one has ever been prosecuted for Etan’s
disappearance, but Stanley Patz sued an incar-
cerated drifter and admitted child-molester,
Jose Ramos, who had been dating Etan’s baby
sitter around the time he disappeared.
Ramos, who is not the carpenter whose
workspace was being searched, denied killing
the child, but in 2004 a Manhattan civil judge
ruled him to be responsible for the death,
largely due to his refusal to contest the case.
Ramos is scheduled to be released from
prison in Pennsylvania in November, when he
finishes serving most of a 20-year-sentence for
abusing an 8-year-old boy.
His pending freedom is one of the factors
that has given new urgency to the case.
Investigators have looked at a long list of
possible suspects over the years, and have
excavated in other places before without suc-
cess.
The 13-foot by 62-foot basement space
being searched Thursday sits beneath sev-
eral clothing boutiques. Investigators began by
removing drywall partitions so they could get
to brick walls that were exposed back in 1979
when the boy disappeared, Browne said.
Browne said the excavation is part of a
review of the case, which was reopened by the
Manhattan district attorney two years ago.
“This was a shocking case at the time and it
hasn’t been resolved,” Browne said.
The law enforcement activity forced the
temporary closure of some businesses on the
block, including the fashion boutique Wink, on
the ground floor of the excavated building.
“It’s insignificant,” owner Stephen Werther
said of the lost business. “It’s retail. There’s
always another day for us to make a living.
This may be the family’s last chance to find out
what happened to their son.”
German Honda appeal seeks to
reverse hybrid owner’s award
(Continued from page 1)
bit forgetful and lazy but they
say it is almost OK. My favor-
ite food is pasta. Since I was a
young girl I love it.
In my leisure time I often
meet my best friends Alicia,
Paula, Isabel and Isabel or
my neighbors Mirjam and
Charlotte, who are also good
friends of mine. In summertime
I often go with them to the ice
cream parlor, do little trips to
a park or meet at the swim-
ming pool and in the winter-
time we do ice skating, make
sleepovers, movie nights or just
meet and talk. When I do not
meet my friends in my leisure
time I play volleyball in a club,
play flute in an orchestra or do
Yoga. The orchestra where I
am playing flute in made trips
to England a few years ago. As
I was younger my family and
I went with them to England.
I did not know much English
vocabulary and I did not remind
all but I know it was a really
exciting trip.
I learned a few new vocabu-
laries and a lot about their life.
For example that they have a
big breakfast there with bacon,
toast and eggs while we just eat
bread with butter and cheese
at home. I think that trip to
England was really good and
exciting and I hope I could
experience how you live in
America.
I heard that the Americans
are strict religious and go to
church every week. Is that
right? My whole family is
namely catholic and we also
go to church, but not every
week. My mother often sings in
a church, because she is a full
member of a gospel choir. And
so I am interesting to see how
it would be to go to church in
America.
In January 2012 our form
make internships in differ-
ent companies. I do mine in a
hospital in Gütersloh, a town
nearby, because I cogitate about
studying medicine after school.
I suppose English is really
needed for medicine and other
branches. So a stay in America
would be the best advantage for
good chances of success.
All in all I would gladly
like to visit you in Delphos and
join four month full of exciting
experience together.
I am looking forward to hear
from you.
Chiara Peine
Dear host family,
I would really like if you
granted me the chance to do
an exchange to the USA for
four months admit me to your
family. A big personal interest
of mine is to be granted the
chance to visit an American
high school and to get to know
life not only in lessons but
around the school, too.
I am totally amazed of the
American life and culture in
general. Moreover, I am really
fascinated of the fact that the
most famous people are from
America as the most popular
songs are, too.
I am from Bielefeld. My
city is located in North Rhine-
Westphalia and the amount of
the population is about 300,000
people. Near to Bielefeld there
is the small town Werther
where I go to school. I visit the
EGW since 2007.
Together with my father
Harald, my brother Julian and
my little dog Cherry I live an
usual German life. We are only
three people left at home since
my mother was diagnosed can-
cer in 2009. In the same year
she died.
Usually I am happy about
going to school because this
is the place where I regularly
see most of my friends. Many
of them I do not see often in
the afternoons because of my
whole extracurricular activities:
Two times a week I have bal-
let lessons, one time a week I
have a Jazz and modern dance
lesson and, finally, I play the
flute for seven years. Last year
I joined the orchestra of my
school. Besides, I love it to cut
short videos, which I upload to
YouTube later on. The topic of
my videos is mainly celebri-
ties like Ariana Grande, Selena
Gomez and Justin Bieber. I like
going out shopping with my
friends, reading some books.
The last big one of my personal
interests is nail polish and paint-
ing my nails. I think this under-
lines my creativity.
I hope I was successful giv-
ing you a short insight into my
life and myself. I would really
enjoy if you give me the chance
to do my exchange to Delphos.
Yours sincerely,
Jill Wille
Dear host family!
I would like to thank you
that you are considering to wel-
come an exchange student in
your family and in your home.
I would like to tell you about
myself, my family and about
my friends.
I was born in Egypt where
I lived and went to a German
school till I was 10 years old.
But then we had to travel to
Germany to the state capital
of North Rhine-Westphalia, to
Düsseldorf. Four years later we
had to move again, this time to
a small town called Werther
near Bielefeld in the west of
Germany, where my father was
offered the post of the head of
the thoracic surgery department
in the town hospital.
It is difficult to describe my
own character by myself, so I
asked my best friend Patrick
to describe it for you. He said:
“You are polite, sportive, you
are sociable, but you are rest-
less, too.” I like Patrick because
he is always there for me when
I need him and the other way
round also.
I go to the Evangelisches
Gymnasium Werther (EGW).
It’s a nice but also small school
and just recently a wonderful
building was added to it. The
computers of EGW are up to
date. I like mathematics and
informatics but my favorite
subject is sport. I do lots of
sports and I care very much for
a healthy diet. In the summer
2010 I got my sailing license in
a summer camp.
I love football. It is my favor-
ite sport and I will die for it. I
was also in the summer at the
World Youth Cup in Sweden,
the Gothia Cup, with my foot-
ball team (BV Werther). There
I met many people from differ-
ent countries. I found it great to
meet them and because of that
I also want to visit the USA for
meeting more people from a
different culture. In the winter
we also go skiing and snow-
boarding. At the weekends I go
jogging and at the end I bring
bread rolls from the bakery for
my family. I love jogging in the
morning, when nobody is on
the street and I can be free. It is
a nice feeling and I get my head
free from everything.
My day begins at 6:30 in the
morning. Then I have school
till 13:05 or 15:25. After school
I must do my homework and
learning. When I have finished,
I can meet my friends, do sports
or chill a little bit or hear music.
My father is Egyptian, so
our big family lives in Egypt
and I cannot see them so often. I
miss them really, especially my
cousins Laila and Youssef. She
is 14 and he is 13 years old. My
mother is German. Her family
isn’t as big as the family of my
dad. I love my parents and they
try to do everything to make
me happy. I love my smaller
sister. She is 13 years old. She
is a nice sister and we play
very often together. We have
many smaller kids in my fam-
ily. I like to play with them. We
haven’t got a pet but my sister
and I want one because we love
animals. My aunt in Egypt has
a dog called Leuco. When we
are there I play really often with
him. My other aunt in Germany
has also a dog.
I’m a happy boy with a won-
derful family but I have also a
lot of nice friends. When I meet
my friends we have lots of fun
and laugh together, hear music
or play video games. We never
think about school when we
meet. It is wonderful with my
friends! We talk about secrets
or about important things. If
someone has problems we dis-
cuss them till we find a solution.
It is every time a great feeling to
meet them. I miss them very
much during the holidays.
Jonas Boseila
By JAY REEVES
Associated Press
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — You can buy Fat Bastard wine in
Alabama, but you’ll have to go elsewhere for Dirty Bastard beer.
The state alcoholic beverage control agency said Thursday it
has banned the sale of that brand of beer in the state because of
the profanity on its label.
Beer and wine are commonly sold in grocery and convenience
stores and anyone can see the labels, so staff members rejected the
brand because parents may not want young people to see rough
language on the shelves, said Bob Martin, an attorney with the
Alabama Alcoholic Beverage Control Board.
“That’s the whole reason for the rule, to keep dirty pictures and
dirty words away from children,” he said. “Personally, I believe
the staff made the right call.”
Workers at the agency consulted sources including the Federal
Communications Commission and Wikipedia to develop a list
of objectionable words that should not appear on product labels,
Martin said, and the list includes “bastard.”
The state allows the sale of Fat Bastard wine and also approved
the sale of another brand of beer called Raging Bitch, Martin said,
but both of those decisions were made years ago.
“I have no idea how or why or exactly when that went
through,” he said.
He said the agency considered revoking those earlier approv-
als when it denied the application for Dirty Bastard, but officials
decided against such action.
The maker of Dirty Bastard, Grand Rapids, Mich.-based
Founders Brewing Co., can appeal the decision to the agency’s
board, which meets next month. A company spokesman did not
immediately return a message seeking comment.
Alabama gained notice a few years ago for banning a wine
brand that featured a nude nymph on its label. Its decision on the
beer is opposed by Free The Hops, a group that advocates for new
beer brands in Alabama.
More than one-third of Alabama’s 67 counties still prohibit the
sale of alcohol, and all but two counties in north Alabama are dry.
Beer banned over ‘dirty’ name
By LINDA DEUTSCH
AP Special Correspondent
TORRANCE, Calif. — Lawyers for American Honda Motor
Co. returned to court Thursday to try to overturn a highly publi-
cized small claims court award to a woman who sued over the fuel
economy of her hybrid Honda Civic.
Superior Court Judge Dudley W. Gray II was hearing wit-
nesses from both sides as Honda sought to reverse a court com-
missioner’s award of $9,867 to Heather Peters, who opted out of
a class-action settlement designed to give some 200,000 owners
between $100 and $200 each, plus a rebate if they buy a new
Honda.
Peters said she might never have brought the case if it wasn’t
for the puny amount offered in the class-action suit.
“$200 and a coupon? That was worth fighting,” she said.
Her success in small claims court has led some 1,700 other
hybrid owners to follow her example.
Honda called as a key witness Karen Takahashi, service man-
ager at Honda Hollywood, where Peters bought her car.
Takahashi testified she took a Honda hybrid out for a 115-mile
test drive on freeways and streets and was able to achieve 53 to
55 mpg. She said she is a conservative driver and did not try to
manipulate the car to achieve better mileage.
On cross-examination, Peters, who is a lawyer, showed photos
of the dashboard of the car that was tested and pointed out that its
battery was fully charged. Peters has said her battery failed early
on, received a software update and never again was fully charged,
leaving the car to run almost entirely on gasoline.
Peters called a former Honda analyst and technical writer,
Jeffrey Holliday of Baltimore, who said he was tasked with testing
Honda hybrids after repeated customer complaints about mileage.
He testified he was never able to duplicate the promised 50 mpg
listed in the brochure for the car.
“I’m an aggressive driver so I made an attempt to drive conser-
vatively. It’s a great car but I was not able to duplicate it,” he said.
Peters’ husband, Michael Cassadine, testified the car had
performed well when he first met Peters in 2008, but it quickly
deteriorated and a software update made it worse. He said that
when they left the house Thursday the dashboard showed the car
was getting 25 mpg.
Later in the day, Peters testified and presented figures she said
showed Honda knew it had problems with the hybrid cars but con-
tinued to advertise them as a perfect solution to gas price problems
and a way to help the environment.
She told a Honda lawyer that the situation with her car is get-
ting worse and she now has trouble accelerating up hills.
The lawyer, Roy Brisbois, accused Peters of causing the prob-
lems by the way she drove the car. He said she previously had
sportier cars and that when she bought her car to the dealer it had
extreme wear on the outside of the tires.
Peters said she had been driving very conservatively.
Outside court, Peters said she had never expected to spend this
much time on her small-claims action when she first went to court,
but she said she’s glad the entire issue is being aired.
“My purpose is to hold Honda accountable for false advertis-
ing and to raise awareness.”
She said she did not expect that Honda would fight her so
vigorously.
“This raises brand awareness with the public that instead
of trying to make things right, they will fight consumers to the
death,” she said.
Answers to Thursday’s questions:
In the Iditorod, the last person across the finish line is
presented with the Red Lantern Award. The first time it
was handed out it was a joke but it has since come to sym-
bolize perseverance.
Clyde Barrow’s shirt, bloodied and bullet-riddled in a
fatal ambush, sold for $85,000 at a 1997 auction — 63
years after his death.
Today’s questions:
Which of her signature phrases did TV cooking star
Rachael Ray use in naming her child-oriented healthy eat-
ing charity?
In what country was a search engine named Goojje
launched in 2010?
Answers in Saturday’s Herald
Today’s words:
Belomancy: fortunetelling with arrows
Spoucher: a utensil for bailing water
The Outstanding National Debt as of 6:30 a.m. today
was $15,667,975,895,452.
The estimated population of the United States is
312,613,525, so each citizen’s share of this debt is
$50,119.
The National Debt has continued to increase an aver-
age of $4 billion per day since Sept. 28, 2007.
Jaxon
(Continued from page 1)
Prine’s husband continued
to work while his wife and
newborn were in Columbus.
Their daughter, Noelle, was
in school. They would join
Prine in Columbus on week-
ends.
“Noelle wanted a sister
and she got a brother but she
loved him instantly,” Prine
said. “It was hard on Butch
and Noelle. They were in
Delphos during the week and
would come to Columbus on
the weekend.”
Prine was able to stay at
the Ronald McDonald House
so when the rest of the family
came, it was a home away
from home.
“Words can’t express
how grateful we were for the
Ronald McDonald House,”
Prine said. “It was wonder-
ful to have a private place we
could all be together and have
a meal.”
On Oct. 19, Jaxon had
surgery and was fitted with
a colostomy bag. Surgery to
remove the part of his colon
that had the deadened nerves
was scheduled for Feb. 21.
“Jaxon had a colostomy
bag from Oct. 19 to Feb. 21.
We had to take a lot of extra
precautions and his caregiv-
ers had to be taught how to
change it and watch to make
sure it wasn’t leaking or had
other problems,” Prine said.
Jaxon’s second surgery
was a success. He is now
a normal 6-month-old and
enjoys hanging out with his
big sister.
“Noelle loves holding him
and helping with his feedings;
she gets his bottle ready for
me,” Prine said. “He loves to
watch her. He listens to her
talk and laughs at her.”
Prine said without the sup-
port of her family and friends,
her situation could have been
much worse for her.
“Normally, you go into the
hospital and have a baby and
when you leave, you come
home with a baby,” Prine
said. “When you don’t, it’s
scary.”
Prine said her church, St.
Peter Lutheran in Delphos,
and both her and her hus-
band’s employers were also
wonderful throughout the try-
ing times.
In March, the fam-
ily actively participated in
a fundrasier for St. Jude’s
Children’s Hospital so fami-
lies like theirs would have
needed resources. They raised
$1,500 with a photo contest
featuring Jaxon and other
babies and the entire event
raised a total of $14,390.55.
Inf ormat i on on
Hirschsprung’s disease is
from www.lpch.org.

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