P. 1
en_CCNA1_IG_v31

en_CCNA1_IG_v31

|Views: 227|Likes:
Published by Tien H. Wong

More info:

Published by: Tien H. Wong on Apr 21, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

06/11/2013

pdf

text

original

Figure 1: Cluster Diagram

194 - 211 CCNA 1: Networking Basics v3.1 Instructor Guide – Appendix D

Copyright 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Figure 2: Problem-Solving Matrix

Figure 3: Flowchart

195 - 211 CCNA 1: Networking Basics v3.1 Instructor Guide – Appendix D

Copyright 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Figure 4: Block Diagrams

Figure 5: Extended Star Topology in a Multi-Building Campus

196 - 211 CCNA 1: Networking Basics v3.1 Instructor Guide – Appendix D

Copyright 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Figure 6: Main Building First Floor

Figure 7: Digital Signal

197 - 211 CCNA 1: Networking Basics v3.1 Instructor Guide – Appendix D

Copyright 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Figure 8: Voltage Versus Frequency Graph (Spectrum Diagram)

Figure 9: Data Encapsulation

198 - 211 CCNA 1: Networking Basics v3.1 Instructor Guide – Appendix D

Copyright 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Figure 10: Ethernet and IEEE 802.3 Frame Format

Figure 11: Local Area Networks and Devices

199 - 211 CCNA 1: Networking Basics v3.1 Instructor Guide – Appendix D

Copyright 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Figure 12: Wide Area Networks and Devices

The use of an advance organizer is another way of determining what prior knowledge a
student may have. - This method was first made well known by David Ausubel, a
psychologist in the late 1960s. This technique helps students make connections between their
current understandings and the information they need to reach a more complete
understanding of a learning objective. There are many forms of advance organizers, which
include exposition, narrative, or illustration. The graphic organizer allows students to represent
their knowledge through shapes, charts, diagrams, and sometimes images. It is a
metacognitive tool in visual form. Graphic organizers allow students to arrange a large portion
of new information into smaller portion of information. These smaller pieces are easier to learn
and when tied together, they will evolve into more comprehensive understandings.
Cluster diagrams are known to be very beneficial in generating and organizing thought. During
brainstorming sessions, a prompt is put in the central cluster. The ideas that result from
brainstorming are added as more bubbles. These are the wildest possible ideas, with no
censorship, as many ideas as possible, and ideas built on those of others. Similar ideas are
clustered. This diagram is also used as a concept map, or a way of presenting material to
students. It can also be used as way of assessing their understanding of a concept.
Problem-solving matrices are a standard part of design documentation. In their simplest form,
a variety of design options, such as network media, network architecture, or protocol, are listed
vertically. The specifications against which choices will be rated are listed horizontally.
Simplistically, whichever option earns the highest score against the specification rubric is
chosen. Realistically, design is a repetitious process and many layers of matrices are typically
created with increasingly refined specifications, weighted rubrics, and significant brainstorming
and research.
Flowcharts are a standard part of computer programming. Flowcharts and process flow
diagrams are generally used to graphically represent various branching processes. Flowcharts
are used throughout the curriculum to describe configuration, troubleshooting, and
communications processes.
Block diagrams are standard throughout electronics. A few simple symbols, or pictorials, are
used along with arrows to indicate the flow of information. Also, simple descriptions of the
functions of the various "black box" blocks are shown. Block diagrams represent an
intermediate level of detail for electrical systems. They are not circuit-level schematic

200 - 211 CCNA 1: Networking Basics v3.1 Instructor Guide – Appendix D

Copyright 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc.

diagrams. A block diagram of the following components makes a good accompaniment to
flowcharts that explain the processes taking place among the blocks:
• Internal components of a PC
• The internal components of a router
• The devices make up the LAN or a WAN
In networking there are logical topological diagrams and physical topological diagrams. Logical
topologies refer to the devices, logical interconnections, and flow of information in a network.
Physical topologies refer to the actual devices, logical interconnections, and flow of information
in a network. Physical topologies refer to actual devices, ports, interconnections, and physical
layout of a network. Both of these diagrams are used extensively.
Electrical engineers refer to voltage versus time graphs of signals as the "time domain". A
device called an oscilloscope would measure this type of graph. These graphs summarize
many concepts important in networking, particularly in the first semester curriculum. This
would include bits, bytes, analog signals, digital signals, noise, attenuation, reflection, collision,
AC, DC, RFI, EMI, encoding, and transmission errors.

Web Links

David Ausubel: Advance Organizers Overview
http://chd.gse.gmu.edu/immersion/knowledgebase/strategies/cognitivism/AdvancedOrganizers
.htm

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->