P. 1
en_CCNA1_IG_v31

en_CCNA1_IG_v31

|Views: 227|Likes:
Published by Tien H. Wong

More info:

Published by: Tien H. Wong on Apr 21, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

06/11/2013

pdf

text

original

Use analogies to illustrate encapsulation such as the shipment of a large package, which
represents data. United Parcel Service (UPS) or any global shipping company can be used. If
the package is too large or too heavy, UPS will require it be broken into smaller packages or
segmented. The packages need to be addressed, globally (IP) and locally (MAC) and then
need to be put on the truck (bits/data stream). A mnemonic in English for this process could be
“Drippy Sweet Pancakes For Breakfast”, representing Data, Segment, Packet, Frames, and
Bits. The lab, OSI Model Characteristics and Devices, is considered optional, though
beginning students may need to master this knowledge. It could be used as a homework
assignment. Consider a hands on or kinesthetic encapsulation activity such as stuffing and
addressing envelopes.
Consider the graphics that follow. Networking devices de-encapsulate and then re-
encapsulate at layers depending on the device in question. This concept is of huge importance
in networking. Consider having the students draw blank "OSI diagrams" and complete them
depending on the topology drawn on the board.

25 - 211

CCNA 1: Networking Basics v3.1 Instructor Guide – Module 2

Copyright 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc.

26 - 211

CCNA 1: Networking Basics v3.1 Instructor Guide – Module 2

Copyright 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc.

27 - 211

CCNA 1: Networking Basics v3.1 Instructor Guide – Module 2

Copyright 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc.

28 - 211

CCNA 1: Networking Basics v3.1 Instructor Guide – Module 2

Copyright 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc.

29 - 211

CCNA 1: Networking Basics v3.1 Instructor Guide – Module 2

Copyright 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc.

30 - 211

CCNA 1: Networking Basics v3.1 Instructor Guide – Module 2

Copyright 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc.

31 - 211

CCNA 1: Networking Basics v3.1 Instructor Guide – Module 2

Copyright 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc.

32 - 211

CCNA 1: Networking Basics v3.1 Instructor Guide – Module 2

Copyright 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Module 2 Summary

Before moving on to Module 3, the students must be proficient in explaining the concept of
bandwidth, drawing and labeling from memory the OSI and TCP/IP models, and explaining the
encapsulation process.
Online assessment options include the end-of-module online quiz in the curriculum and the
online Module 2 exam. Diagramming and sketching assessment options include informal and
formal evaluation of drawing network topologies, the OSI model, and simple bandwidth
conversion and data transfer calculations. Students should be able to fill in a chart from
memory, with headings "Device Name”, "Device Symbol”, "Device Physical Sketch”, "Device
OSI Layer”, and "Device Function" for workstations, repeaters, hubs, bridges, switches, and
routers. Give students the prompt "draw a typical topology and describe the function of a ___
network". This is one way to determine student recall of the terminology of LANs, MANs,
WANs, SANs, VPNs, and so on.
Students should understand the following main points:
• LANs and WANs developed in response to business and government computing

needs

• Fundamental networking devices are hubs, bridges, switches, and routers
• The physical topology layouts include the bus, ring, star, extended star, hierarchical,

and mesh
• A WAN consists of two or more LANs spanning a common geographic area
• A SAN provides enhanced system performance, is scalable, and has disaster
tolerance built in
• A VPN is a private network that is constructed within a public network infrastructure
• Three main types of VPNs are access, Intranet, and Extranet VPNs
• Intranets are designed to be available to users who have access privileges to the
internal network of an organization
• Extranets are designed to deliver applications and services that are Intranet-based,
using extended, secured access to external users or enterprises
• Understanding bandwidth is essential when studying networking
• Bandwidth is finite, costs money, and the demand for it increases daily
• Using analogies like the flow of water and flow of traffic can help explain bandwidth
• Bandwidth is measured in bits per second, kbps, Mbps, Gbps, or Tbps
• Limitations on bandwidth include type of media used, LAN and WAN technologies,
and network equipment
• Throughput refers to actual measured bandwidth, which is affected by factors that
include number of users on network, networking devices, type of data, the computer
and the server
• The formula T=S/BW, for transfer time = size of file/bandwidth, can be used to
calculate data transfer time
• Comparison of analog and digital bandwidth
• A layered approach is effective in analyzing problems

33 - 211

CCNA 1: Networking Basics v3.1 Instructor Guide – Module 2

Copyright 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc.

• Network communication is described by layered models
• The OSI and TCP/IP are the two most important models of network communication
• The International Organization for Standardization developed the OSI model to
address the problems of network incompatibility
• The seven layers of the OSI are application, presentation, session, transport, network,
data link, and physical
• The four layers of the TCP/IP are application, transport, Internet, and network access
• The TCP/IP application layer is equivalent to the OSI application, presentation, and
session layers

34 - 211

CCNA 1: Networking Basics v3.1 Instructor Guide – Module 3

Copyright 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Module 3: Networking Media

Overview

When teaching Module 3, emphasize to the students that they are learning all of the major
media used in communicating any information anywhere. The two "bounded media" of copper
and optical fiber, and the "unbounded" medium of wireless, are the physical basis for the world
revolution in communications systems. The challenge of learning more about the basic
properties and behavior of networking media can be justified as an interesting and important
part of joining the community of networking professionals. Also, the physical reality of the
materials and cables discussed is more easily understood than many other topics in
networking. This module can be fun for the students, with a variety of hands-on copper cabling
labs. Consider other school resources and perhaps call upon the physics department to give a
lecture on some of these topics.

Module 3 Caution

This module deals with a fair amount of physics and geometry, which may prove
challenging for many students. The many hands-on labs will require preparation by the
instructor to be successful. The hands-on labs must be customized to the local
learners and their classroom environment. The discussion of frame types in wireless is
somewhat premature since Ethernet frame details are not covered until Module 6. This
material is presented in more depth than is required for the CCNA certification exam.
Students completing this module should be able to perform the following tasks:
• Discuss the electrical properties of matter
• Define voltage, resistance, impedance, current, and circuits
• Describe the specifications and performances of different types of cable
• Describe coaxial cable and its advantages and disadvantages over other types of

cable
• Describe shielded twisted-pair (STP) cable and its uses
• Describe unshielded twisted-pair cable (UTP) and its uses
• Discuss the characteristics of straight-through, crossover, and rollover cables and
where each is used
• Explain the basics of fiber-optic cable
• Describe how fibers can guide light for long distances
• Describe multimode and single-mode fiber
• Describe how fiber is installed
• Describe the type of connectors and equipment used with fiber-optic cable
• Explain how fiber is tested to ensure that it will function properly
• Discuss safety issues dealing with fiber optics

35 - 211

CCNA 1: Networking Basics v3.1 Instructor Guide – Module 3

Copyright 2004, Cisco Systems, Inc.

3.1 Copper Media

Essential Labs:

3.1.5, 3.1.9a, 3.1.9b, 3.1.9c, 3.1.9d, and 3.1.9e

Optional labs:

3.1.1, 3.1.2, and 3.1.3

Core TIs:

All

Optional TIs:

none
Course-level claim: Describe the physical, electrical, and mechanical properties and the
standards associated with copper media used in networks.
Hands-on skills: Students can efficiently make and test Category 5 straight-through,
crossover, and rollover cables.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->