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The Real Story, Volume 1 Issue 11
The Real Story, Volume 1 Issue 11

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EDITORIAL
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
J.B. ST. JOHN
stjohnjb@realstorypublishing.com
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JEREMIAH SHORT
jshort@realstorypublishing.com
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THE REAL STORY
P. O. Box 403
Columbus, MS 39703
Editorial 662.497.2914
Advertising 662.574.3893
Check for daily updates online:
http://realstorypublishing.com
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address information to:
P.O. Box 403
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__________
by Joseph B. St. John
Editor-in-Chief
Editor’sNote
Pssst...Do You
Wanna Know a Secret?
In what was one of the most bizarre
twists in local politics, this week, the
Columbus Police Department saw ft to
shoot an individual and not notify the
community or the media. at's right,
campers - someone just got shot by the po-
lice, but “move along folks; nothing to see
here. Just a little shooting! Just keep mov-
ing and it will all go away. And, hey, don't
worry about the other guy, who fed the
scene, surely he will show up, sometime.”
Regardless of whether the shooting was
justifed - and e Real Story hopes that it
was - why keep it a secret? It is not accept-
able to say, "Hey media dudes, call us and
we will tell you if something happened."
is was not the usual penny-ante minutia
that normally passes as news in our com-
munity. is was not the regular parade
of petty crime that is presented and docu-
mented as major events. is was a police-
involved shooting!
And, does anyone take the time to notify
the community? No! But wait, just when
you think the insanity cannot get any
worse - you guessed it, boys and girls - it
does!
e next morning, your humble reporter
took it upon his weary self to drag his car-
cass to the Columbus Police Department
(CPD), to get the official word. is
seemed more appropriate than making a
telephone call to the CPD’s Public Infor-
mation Officer, Glenda Buckhalter, and
asking, "Hey, I work for a local newspaper
and can you advise me if any of your per-
sonnel shot anyone in the a@@, last
night?"
Knowing that would be inappropriate, I
just asked her what happened. And, what
happened next is not and was not Ms.
Burkholder's fault. She read a brief state-
ment from a hand-written note. Yes, for a
moment, I was transported back to the
fabulous fies, when Eisenhower was
President and the police didn't tell the
community anything about what was hap-
pening, because it was not the people's
business.
It would have been funny, if not for these
facts: 1. a person had been shot and, ac-
cording to WCBI, the family is saying he
may suffer paralysis; 2. a police officer is
sitting at home, awaiting the outcome of
an investigation; and 3. no one is saying
anything to offer any comfort except to
say, “he shot someone for not obeying an
order from a police officer”. ose are not
e Real Story's words. ey came from
the police department.
Quicker that you can say Gardner vs.
Tennessee, the red fags should be popping
up for everyone in the community. You
see, Gardner vs. Tennessee, says something
about not shooting feeing felons. How-
ever, we really know very few details and
have been told very little; no one had the
decency to say, right aer the shooting
took place, "A police shooting occurred
and we must complete an investigation."
Nope. e media had to ferret out the in-
formation, themselves and, from what can
be gleaned from published accounts, each
media outlet seems to have received a
slightly different story.
e government is always "whining" that
the media is unfair - that they only report
bad news. But, here is a suggestion, "gov-
ernment man", stop doing goofy stuff and
the media will stop calling you goofy. It is
as simple as A-B-C.
When talking to Chief McQueen, he was
contrite in his apology about the delay in
providing information, and did say that he
had been very sick and had to go home,
that day. at is understandable - some-
thing happened beyond your control;
however, whoever he le in command did
not do him or the community any favors
by not alerting the media. Period.
And, unfortunately for McQueen, even
though he may have delegated his author-
ity, he cannot delegate his responsibility.
He shirked his responsibility to the media
when he le someone with no training
and no police experience in control of the
press release. She failed, not because she
is a bad person, but because she was not
trained and equipped for the job. To the
best of our knowledge, she is a great em-
ployee, but was set up to fail by not being
trained or prepared. at failure lies at the
feet of McQueen, even though it was not
his choice to be sick.
In the end, the police owe it to the com-
munity, to be transparent. And, like it or
not, part of that is dealing with the media.
If you cannot fgure this out or deal with
the problem, then get out of the business.
at is cold, but it is true.
e media, especially those who have no
police training, are at the mercy of the po-
lice department. e authorities can tell
people they seized 88 “bazillion” dollars in
drugs and, unless you have police training
or you have sold "dope" before, you have
no clue as to whether they are telling you
the truth.
However, all of that pales in comparison
to not notifying all of the media and,
therefore, the community to the fact that
there had been a police shooting. To be
blunt, it is plain wrong. In the meantime,
I guess we have to call the police depart-
ment every day and ask, "Hey, did you
guys shoot anyone last night?"
Joseph B. St. John
Mr. MoJo Rising
We can all rest safely now -
Steve Wallace has been charged
one more time in the “Great
Caledonia Aer-Prom Caper of
2012”. Finally, the Alcohol Bev-
erage Control (ABC) agents have
solved the greatest crime since
the Lindbergh Baby Kidnapping
and the JFK Assassination. Add
to this the arrests of Colt Wallace,
James Underhill and Joshua
Hauerwas, and you can sleep at
night knowing that the “Missis-
sippi 4” have been brought to jus-
tice.
What a tragedy that these in-
nocent young people, many of
whom were barely old enough to
vote for President and volunteer
to die for their country, were
“kidnapped” and forced, against
their will, to go to an aer-prom
party. Yes, sleep well and in
peace. Justice is served.
Meanwhile, since the “OJ Case
of Caledonia” has been solved,
let's move forward and look at
another case the ABC can tackle:
e 500,000 other places in
Lowndes County where people
sell or serve beer illegally, in their
home. If you think this is an iso-
lated occurrence, you are nuts.
at's right campers – this hap-
pens every weekend and, yes,
young people are involved.
e problem with being so ag-
gressive with the Wallace case is
that the community can only
hope the ABC agents are ready to
tackle this issue all over the re-
gion. If they do not show the
same vigor every time they get a
citizen complaint, this case be-
gins to look a "little" political. If
another situation occurs and it
doesn't receive the "Full Monte"
of enforcement that Wallace's
case has, it will have to make you
wonder why not.
As summer approaches, and
about 6,000-7,000 alcohol viola-
tions occur, you have to ask your-
self, "Why Steve?" If you are
scratching your head and think-
ing this is the only aer-prom
party that happened in Lowndes
County, you’re fooling yourself.
It happens all the time.
By the way, if Wallace is guilty,
he deserves whatever punish-
ment he gets. However, you have
to wonder where this additional
count magically appeared from;
maybe it was akin to the board
The Great Caledonia After-Prom Caper
See “CALEDONIA” Pg. 3
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Where That?!
Original tile of Bell Cafe in front entrance of
Coffee House on 5th, 1115th St. N., Columbus
game, Clue, with Wallace in the den with a candlestick.
Whatever the case may be, it seems odd, that, all of a
sudden, one additional violation surfaced.
In America, you should not be “guilty until proven in-
nocent”. Consequently, there are no mug shots accom-
panying this article, nor will you ever see mug shots in
e Real Story, unless the person in question is a media-
type who makes their living off mug shots. (Just kidding
- I think.) We have printed a few in the past, but that
practice is over. It is unethical, unless you also print the
pictures of everyone who have been found not guilty!
MoJo
Note: In a prime example of irony, you can’t have a
beer until you are twenty-one, but you can have your
mug shot plastered all over the paper.
“CALEDONIA” cont. from pg. 2
Columbus Police Officer on Leave,
After Shooting Suspect;
Columbus Police Department Tight-Lipped
Editor’s Note: Since this article was
frst published on our website, on
April 10, it has been reported that the
office who shot Harris has been iden-
tifed as James Hanson.
A Columbus Police officer, who has
not yet been identifed, has been placed
on administrative leave with pay, aer an
incident, early Monday morning, in
which a suspect was shot.
e incident, which took place in the
1700 block of Wheat Street, was the cul-
mination of a search for a green Honda
Accord, which may have been connected
to an earlier burglary.
As officers approached the Accord,
both occupants exited the vehicle. When
ordered to get back in the vehicle, the
passenger fed on foot. e driver, 22-
year-old Jequanta Harris was shot for
failure to comply with the officers’ in-
structions. During a subsequent search
of the Accord, a gun was found inside of
the vehicle.
Harris was taken to Baptist Memorial
Hospital-Golden Triangle, and then later
transferred to University Hospital, in
Jackson.
As shocking as the incident itself, is the
fact that CPD did not release this infor-
mation to all media outlets until they
were contacted by representatives of
these publications.
Yes, that’s correct – an officer with the
Columbus Police Department shot a
man within the Columbus city limits,
and another suspect is still at-large, but
the CPD apparently concluded that
there was no need to alert the commu-
nity to this serious public safety issue.
Why is the Columbus Police Depart-
ment withholding information from the
community – information that citizens
could use to help protect themselves?
Perhaps we should ask Chief Selvain Mc-
Queen. e telephone number for the
Columbus Police Department is 662-
244-3500.
We will update this story, when addi-
tional details become available.
Reader Comments:
Jeff Conwill
Submitted on 2012/04/10 at 3:32 pm
Starting to sound like folks better watch
out for the police, too!! Shot because
your buddy ran and you don’t do what
the officer told you to do; sounds like
this one won’t be good for the CPD. I
hope they tell the whole story soon, as
the rumors are fying, already, and don’t
sound good...
Charles Divel
Submitted on 2012/04/10 at 4:34 pm
Take their time on comment, so they
have time to fabricate a good story.
Coverup.
Raider
Submitted on 2012/04/10 at 9:56 pm
From the phrasing you used, sounds
like the CPD released the information
to the press but they did not call you? Is
that correct? Which press organizations
were contacted and which were not?
As far as what happened, from the
minute I read the story, I wondered,
what did the driver do to deserve to be
shot? Sounds like a trigger-happy offi-
cer, to me. I hope there is more to the
story to justify shooting the guy, other
than his partner ran.
Randy Putnam
Submitted on 2012/04/11 at 7:28 am
I think this police action is long over-
due. In Columbus, there is little respect
for law & order. Police are trained, and
paid, to be POLICE. If you’re a law-
abiding citizen, there’s no reason to run
from law enforcement.
Jeff Conwill
Submitted on 2012/04/11 at 8:29 am |
In reply to Randy Putnam
Randy, I am a law-abiding citizen, with
no criminal record and was harassed by
an officer of the Sheriff’s Department
for 3 years, that ended aer I took them
to Federal Court, all because he claims i
was seen in a high drug area, all the
time. It’s hard not to, when that’s where
your home is, that’s been paid for for 15
years. e sad part is that I had to move
from there to another home, just to have
peace in my life. I have never lived there
again and wont…
e Real Story Staff Report
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The April 11, 2012 Specially-Called
Meeting CCVB Board Meeting
In what had to be a Columbus Con-
vention & Visitors Bureau (CCVB)
record, the Board met for 13 minutes to
approve additional funding for the up-
coming festival season. Over $26,000
was added to the grant program, which
benefts special events that are held in the
city. e additional windfall was moved
from the stalled "Bridge to Nowhere"
Project. With that project having been
delayed, the CCVB saw ft to add the
money earmarked for the bridge restora-
tion to cover line-items that will be spent
on special events.
Unfortunately for everyone in the
community, Bernard Buckhalter saw this
as a great time to show he has no idea
what time of day it is at the CCVB.
Bernard, who is a giant proponent of
funding every festival that comes before
the board, somehow got confused and
argued against adding the money, be-
cause he wanted to look over the entire
budget. Here is a clue Bernard. e
CCVB just won the $26,000 "failed
bridge" lottery, so take the money and
run. Festival until you can't festival any
more.
In what was a cross between a flibuster
and the confused rambling of someone
who accidentally walked in on a meeting
he knew nothing about, Buckhalter
stalled the meeting with endless chatter.
It mercifully came to an end, aer 13
minutes, with him still talking to himself.
Yes, the festivals and special events will
get their money - even, the ones that look
like political rallies. And, even as
Bernard Buckhalter was trying to com-
plete his flibuster, in his car, on his way
back home.
MoJo
“I May Make You Feel,
but I Can’t
Make You Think”
Jethro Tull
When 13 Minutes is Too Long
e past week was recognized as Telecommunicator Week.
e E911 Board celebrated with a special dinner for its dispatchers, at the Jackie O House. On Friday, e Real Story visited the center and saw the ladies in action!
Let's give a round of applause to the men and women who keep us safe everyday by answering the phones at 911!
MoJo
911 Telecommunicators - Melody Profet; Terrica Rondle; LaTonya Malone-Wilburn; and 911 Supervisor Shalonda Singleton
E911 Board Observes
Telecommunicator Week
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What was supposed to be a pleasant
fundraiser for burn victims, somehow
turned political, last month. Rebecca
Palmer, co-owner of Station 7, reported
that the charity event, which was held on
March 31st, was sideswiped by the City
of Columbus and the Mississippi Burn
Camp Foundation.
e Mississippi Burn Camp Founda-
tion, an independent group of citizen
and fre service volunteers, provide a free
summer camp for young burn survivors,
ages 7 through 15. e camp begun in
1996, is funded entirely by donations and
is staffed by volunteers, including teach-
ers, healthcare workers, nurses, frefght-
ers and others. e camp is offered at no
charge to the participants and includes
food, lodging, activity supplies, a camp
T-shirt and a week of fun and entertain-
ment. (from http://www.mffa.com)
During an interview, Ms. Palmer ex-
pressed her concerns, "We were working
closely with the Mississippi Burn Camp
and, suddenly, I received an email from
the organization basically saying that
they could not support the charity
event." is development, along with the
City's unwillingness to help, almost de-
railed the entire endeavor.
e email in question - which was
apologetic in nature - still was damaging
to the success of the program. In it, Ms.
Tammy Moore wrote:
The Executive Committee of the Mis-
sissippi Burn Camp Foundation has
met, due to the situation involving the
Columbus Fire Department Chief and
your establishment and has arrived at
a decision, and want to make you
aware of it. Because Caroll Summerall
and other Columbus frefghters sup-
port us and are a part of our camp
staff and that this beneft is going to
have a negative impact on them, the
Executive Committee has decided
against becoming officially involved
with this event. If you decide to hold
the beneft on the 31st and send us a
portion of the proceeds, we would
more than gladly accept it for our
campers; however, we are un-
able to attend the event, as
an organization.
Ms. Palmer continued,
"I talked to Mayor Smith
and he seemed like he
was positive about the
event. He said he was
going to talk to Chief
Moore about it. How-
ever, the Mayor never
called me back and
would not return my
other phone calls."
e event went on as
planned, but only raised
$441.00. is number
was far below what Ms.
Palmer had expected.
"Without the support of
the Burn Camp and the
City it was difficult to be
successful. Chief Moore
would not even
allow department
personnel who
were working to
stop by and say hello.
It was like the City was against us."
Ms Moore's e-mail continued and ad-
dressed this issue:
We are very upset with the circum-
stances that have developed, con-
cerning this event, and with the
situation in Columbus, right now. Our
Executive Board is so very appreciative
of your willingness to help us in this
way and, if you decide, based on this
decision, not to support the camp
with any funds from the event on the
31st, we will un-
derstand. This
was a very difficult
decision by our
Board - with no good
outcome on any side. We
all felt that we had to choose
what would be best for the
camp and, especially, our
camp staff members, many
of whom are connected
with the Columbus Fire
Department and are a key
to our camp session.
Those of us who deal di-
rectly with the kids at
camp are truly heart-
sick over this situation,
especially for the
campers who will be
directly impacted by the
lack of funding for camp. I apologize
for the inconvenience this causes you
- after all the time, effort and hard
work you have personally put into this
beneft.
When asked why the Columbus Fire
Department did not participate in the
fundraiser by sending over one of their
fre trucks, Columbus Fire Department
Chief Ken Moore replied, "I did not send
the truck because I felt that it was a con-
fict of interest, since Station 7 is a private
business and sells alcohol." In regards to
the e-mail sent by Tammy Moore of the
Burn Foundation, Chief Moore would
only say "I don't feel comfortable dis-
cussing the e-mail, because I was not part
of their decision."
In the end, it was the Columbus Air
Force Base and the County District 3
Volunteer Fire Department that saved
the day. Ms. Palmer said, "Without their
support, there would have been no fre
truck or Sparky the Fire Dog." Without
their participation, she assured me that
the event would have been canceled.
"My grandmother was a burn victim,
so it was close and dear to my heart. I
know the suffering she felt," said Palmer
Unfortunately, not everyone feels suf-
fering the same.
Joseph B. St. John
Mr. MoJo Rising
It Was Only for Burn Victims, So Who Cares?
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Molly Murphree
molly@realstorypublishing.com
Molly is a resident of Columbus, who enjoys reading, cooking,
cake decorating, and spending time with her family.
She is a member of Lighthouse Baptist Church.
Trooper Beckum and Acting Master Sergeant Marcus Hobbs. Trooper and Mrs. Beckum.
Derrick Beckum Named Trooper of the Year
Aer some wonderful hospitality on the part of e
Columbus Country Club, including a true southern buffet
of fried chicken, mashed potatoes, and chocolate pie, Cap-
tain Randy C. Ginn of the Mississippi Highway Patrol in-
troduced the recipient of the 2012 Troop G Trooper of the
Year award, on behalf of the Exchange Club of Columbus.
A standing ovation, on the part of the audience, rang in the
ears of Trooper FC Derrick Beckum, as he rose to receive
his honor. Beckum was selected by a group of his Troop G
peers to receive the award. He will now be competing
for the State Trooper of the Year award, to be held
in Jackson, Mississippi, later this month.
Troop G, headquartered in Starkville,
is responsible for patrolling in
Calhoun, Chickasaw, Choctaw,
Clay, Lowndes, Monroe, Oktib-
beha, Noxubee, Webster, and Winston Counties.
Upon graduating from trooper school, in 2003, Beckum
was automatically stationed in Lowndes County. "I couldn't
think of a better area to serve," said Beckum. Acting Master
Sergeant Marcus Hobbs stated "Derrick is an all-around
good guy. I've seen him grow as an officer, father, husband,
and in his church. He's a God-fearing man and a good
friend."
7
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If you're like me, then you are probably
pretty sick of hearing about the Trayvon
Martin and George Zimmerman situa-
tion. From day one, that fasco seemed to
be destined for a national debate, ending
in a frothy bubbling of lynch mob-style
distraction and preoccupation by the air
waves. Now, I'm not here to debate the
rights and wrongs of either side of this
story. I'm not here to defend one point or
side in any sort of way, form, or fashion.
But a couple of things aren't terribly diffi-
cult or unreasonable to expect. One,
Zimmerman is going to get some prison
time; and two, Florida's “Stand Your
Ground” law will probably come under
review, with the likely result being its nul-
lifcation, in some respect. I'm always
skeptical when media frenzies arise. I
can't help it; it's my nature. But, let's con-
sider, for a moment, that this sort of thing
may have been hatched before anyone
ever heard of Trayvon Martin or George
Zimmerman. In doing this, let us rumi-
nate, if only for a moment, on the reper-
cussions of such a national storm.
Fact: little gets the American people be-
hind the idea of change like a racially
charged instance of injustice, whether or
not it is actually justifed. Acknowledge,
if you will, the following examples: the
anti-Muslim backlash, aer the Twin
Towers fell; the detention of Japanese
Americans, aer the attacks on Pearl
Harbor; and the 1992 Los Angeles riots.
Kick over the top of the anthill, and every
ant in the mound is more than willing to
pour out against both the tangible and in-
tangible enemies. All it takes, aer the ini-
tial act, is for one entity or a small group
of people to identify the enemy or ene-
mies, and the crowd will do the rest of the
work. is is both the strength and the
weakness of the one voice. is is because
the unifed voice contains the proclivity
that it should bear the burden of an ad
populumargument, while suffering the
burdens of conservatives and liberals
equally. In other words, the belief in an
idea by a multitude of people does not
necessarily make that idea true, but, if we
want it bad enough, we
can make it happen.
Now, recall this past
New Year's Eve. On De-
cember 31, 2011, while
we were all toasting the
end of the year and
watching the ball drop
in New York, our "won-
derful" leaders signed
into law the National
Defense Authorization
Act (NDAA). is law
provides the tools for certain individuals
and entities to indefnitely detain Amer-
ican citizens, without a civilian lawyer or
traditional judicial review. is means
that the government can make you dis-
appear, without warning, and at any time
they choose, under the alleged pretense
of terrorism. Headlining the support for
this bill was the infamous quote by South
Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham,
"...and when they say 'I want my lawyer',
you tell them 'Shut up. You don't get a
lawyer' "
At this point, we return to Florida's
“Stand Your Ground” law. A misconcep-
tion is that Florida is the only state to have
this sort of law. In fact, seventeen states
have similar laws, collectively referred to
as “Stand Your Ground laws”. is set of
laws is derived from an older principle
that dates back to Medieval England,
which was introduced as law by Sir Ed-
ward Coke in 1628, and known as e In-
stitutes of the Laws of England.
Twenty-seven states have some form of
law relating to this idea that has been
called the “Castle Doctrine”. (is is the
type of law found in Mississippi. Alabama
has a “Stand Your Ground” law.) In a nut-
shell, the original meaning is derived
from the idea that you have a right to pro-
tect yourself, the lives of your family, and
your welfare (i.e. your castle) from a per-
son or persons who wish to kill you or do
you harm. It was in 1895 that the US
Supreme Court ruled, in Beard v. U.S.,
that a person has the right to stand
against an assailant, in this manner, and
was echoed again in State [of Minnesota]
v. Gardner (1905) and Brown v. United
States (1921). e states have since em-
ployed their own interpretations of this,
in either creating or abstaining from
these types of edicts.
Ok, let's bring this roller coaster to some
sort of resolution. First, the entire point
of all this is in the idea of vigilance. is
mindset is not about activism. is idea
is about being wary and ready to pounce,
when the time is right. Vigilance is not
uprising. Vigilance is about arming us
against the storm, looking at the facts and
putting the pieces together, and educating
us to identify and
distinguish between
illusion and reality.
It was omas Jef-
ferson who said, "All
tyranny needs to
gain a foothold is for
the people of good
conscience to re-
main silent", but
perhaps the part
that is forgotten is
the idea of timing.
Secondly, this is why I fully expect not
just Florida's “Stand Your Ground’ law to
come under attack, but all such laws to
come under attack. e last thing a con-
trolling entity or entities want the people
to be able to do is defend themselves,
whether by force, legislation, or judiciary
proceeding. e Trayvon Martin incident
is a perfect medium for under-the-table
agendas to ride the coattails of civil unrest
towards the removal of oppositions such
as “Castle Doctrine” and “Stand Your
Ground” laws. In the continual face of
tyranny, we mustn’t let our voices get the
best of us. Stand proud, stand loud, but
make sure that the ones at whom we
shout include the guilty who gave that
young man the justifcation, as well as the
desire, to kick over that anthill.
Actions Have Consequences
Invino Veritas
iveritas@realstorypublishing.com
Attempting to make sense of his universe,
Invino Veritas bubbles outward from the chaos,
sometimes submitting to its infnite whirl, and
other times raging against its disregard for its own
elements. His writings incorporate multiple styles
and energies which can be found on his own blog
of random things at
http://musingsfortheinsane.blogspot.com/
States with
“Castle” Laws
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Get Out and Get
Your Culture On!
Butternut Squash with
Browned Butter and Thyme
Serves 4
Ingredients:
1 1/2 pounds butternut squash,
peeled, seeds removed, fesh
diced into 1/2-inch pieces
(about 4 cups)
3 Tbsp butter
1 Tbsp chopped fresh thyme
(or 1 teaspoon of dried)
Salt and freshly ground
black pepper
Preparation:
Heat a large skillet on medium heat.
Add the butter, whisking frequently.
Continue to cook the butter. Once
melted it will foam up a bit, then subside.
Honey-colored browned milk solids will
begin to form. e butter should have a
wonderful nutty aroma. Remove from
heat. Add the thyme, whisking continu-
ously. If using fresh thyme, the mixture
will foam up a bit.
Add the cubed butternut squash
pieces to the pan and return the pan to
the burner, heating to medium high. Use
a wooden or metal spoon to stir the
squash pieces so they are all well coated
with the butter thyme mixture. Sprinkle
generously with salt and pepper. Spread
the squash pieces out in an even layer
and let cook, without stirring, so that
they brown a bit on one side (several
minutes). Stir and spread the pieces out
again and let cook without stirring so
more sides get browned.
Reduce the heat to low, cover the pan,
and let cook until the squash is tender,
10 to 20 minutes, depending on how big
you cut the pieces.
Add more salt and pepper to taste,
sprinkle with a bit more chopped fresh
thyme before serving.
3rd Street &
4th Avenue South
While I was doing some yard work, a
man I had never met before pulled into
my driveway. He exited the car and in-
troduced himself as Pastor Robert
Brown of the Miracle Temple Church
on Hwy 45 North.
While visiting Kroger, earlier that af-
ternoon, Pastor Brown noticed an enve-
lope on the parking lot that had been
rolled over by several vehicles, turning it
the color of the rubber tires and asphalt.
Curious to fnd out if it was important,
he opened the envelope and discovered
a check for payment of a utility bill.
Knowing that Columbus Light & Water
is not forgiving of a late payment, and
may not believe that a payment was
“lost”, he followed the address on the
face of the check to my home.
As it happens, this check belonged to
the individual from whom I lease my
home and still listed my address. (I have
not purchased new checks since I
moved, either). Pastor Brown’s interest
in setting things straight, no matter how
small, enabled me to contact my land-
lord to inform her of the situation, al-
lowing her to arrange for timely
payment of her bill.
At a time when it seems that everyone
is taking care of themselves, oen to the
exclusion of others, Pastor Brown took
a few minutes of his time to go out of his
way to meet someone he did not know,
and “right a wrong” that had no impact
on himself. As he drove away aer-
wards, he le me with a smile on my
heart. If we happen to meet again, and
have the opportunity for further conver-
sation, I believe that we could begin to
consider each other as friends, over
time.
Oh - by the way - did I mention that
Pastor Brown is a black man, and that I
am not? In this age where contentious
race relations seem to dominate the
news, this gentleman ignored what
some may perceive as a risk, to do the
right thing.
ank you, Pastor Brown, for your ex-
ample to all of us.
“e Moving Finger writes, and,
having writ, moves on”
CRB
LettertotheEditor
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WWW. SUDOKUPUZZLES. NET • SEE SUDOKU ANSWERS ON PG 22
e 1st Congressional District Art
Competition was held on the MUW
campus, last month. Columbus High
School Senior, Sarah Harmon, was
presented the 2nd Place award by
Congressman Alan Nunnelee, who
now has her artwork hanging in his
Washington DC Office.
e Artistic Discovery Contest of-
fers an opportunity to recognize and
encourage the artistic talent through-
out the nation, as well as in the First
Congressional District of Mississippi.
Sarah’s artwork, titled "Kolam Blue"
is a mixed-media piece, which incor-
porates layered plexiglass and Indian-
inspired custom Kolam designs cut
from paper and displayed in a hand-
craed wooden box.
Sarah's Art Instructor at Columbus
High is Sarah Oswalt.
Please join me in congratulating
both Sarah Harmon and Ms. Oswalt.
e public will have an opportunity
to see more of Sarah's amazing art-
work during her IB Art Exhibit. Her
one-day-only show will be ursday,
April 19th, from 6:00 - 8:00 PM at the
Columbus Convention & Visitors
Bureau office (behind the Tennessee
Williams Horne). Sarah will be show-
ing her body of work from the two-
year TB art program. is is the work
she will be judged on by an interna-
tional moderator
Congratulations, Sarah!
Columbus High School Senior
Wins Arts Competition
Courtesy Photo
e Real Story Staff Report
Pet Parade at First United
Methodist Church
Sam Chessnutt, Becky Cunningham, and Brenda Comer.
Beverly Montgomery poses with her
German Shepherd, Beast.
First United Methodist Church
held a Pet Parade this past
Sunday, April 15th,
to raise funds for the
Columbus-Lowndes
Humane Society.
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by Mo & No-Mo
Since moving to this wonderful
sleepy town, several years ago, there
has been one place that I continue to
hear of over and over again. "Oh, you
are looking for what? I know just the
place to fnd it." is seems to be the
theme song for this magical place of
wonderment and longing.
Driving up in front of Military
Hardware, I notice the cars lined up
across the front, so I move to the side
parking lot, which is almost full. is
is defnitely piquing my interest. is
small, unpretentious little corner store
seems to be very popular, with cus-
tomers buzzing around like bees.
Walking up to the front of the store,
I am enchanted by the small planter
between the two inviting open doors,
with some sort of plants lined up in
neat little rows. My heart wants to be-
lieve these will grow to be some sort
of vegetable, but my mind tells me
they will become beautiful fowers, to
entice and invite.
As I walk in the store, I am greeted
with a warm and friendly, "Come on
in; is there something I can help you
with?” e center counter serves as a
base for this gentleman, as he oversees
the comings and goings of the cus-
tomers, keeps track of where they are
in the store, and is available to help at
any given time; all the while, he is
working on some kind of object that
seems to be giving him some resist-
ance.
Looking around, I am overwhelmed
wi t h
all the
merchandi se.
Where on earth did they fnd all of
those nuts, bolts, screws, nails and as-
sorted washers? en there are the
hundreds and hundreds of tools. Just
how many hammers does a person
need, anyway? Looking up, I see Radio
Flyer wagons and a tricycle. I have to
stop and close my mouth, which is
open in amazement. ey have ropes,
wheels, axes, plungers, mail
boxes, and hummingbird
feeders - the list goes on and
on. I have no idea what most
of the items in the store are, or
what their function is. Some
large, some small - but all have a
purpose, I have been assured.
Oh my, a section flled with culinary
delights. No, not food - grills, fryers,
and utensils of every size and imagi-
nation. is has to be the largest col-
lection of cast iron cookware I have
ever seen, featuring sizes and shapes
only wished for. I suddenly noticed
the biggest cooking pots that I have
ever seen, and cooking utensils big
enough to hide small children in.
Aer spending a good bit of time
browsing around, with several offers
of help, I decided it was time for me to
leave this little mecca of imagination
and desire. A person could get into
trouble in there, because the mind
starts conjuring up things that one can
make, and what is needed to build,
construct or concoct. So, if there is
one item that you need to replace or
repair, and you can't fnd the part, run
on down to Military Hardware, at
1002 13th Street North (at Military),
and tell the gentleman behind the
counter that we sent you. Let your
imagination run wild, and oohhhhh
and aahhhhhh till your heart's con-
tent.
If you have a local business or establishment you would like us to consider for review, please e-mail us at:
consumercorner@realstorypublishing.com.
You will get our honest opinion of the business, their personal customer service, and the services offered.
We strive for fair, unbiased reporting, so we hope to hear from you.
11
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ANSWERS FROM THE APRI L 11, 2012 CROSSWORD PUZZLE
Addie Adkins Talley fnds beauty in
people, places and circumstances that
others do not. Addie shared with me
that, during her teen years, she realized
she was never going to be like everyone
else. She had to learn to appreciate who
she was. Around the age of 18, she
started to embrace her uniqueness.
From this epiphany, her creativity and
“out of the box” thinking were born.
Addie decided it was all right to be differ-
ent from everyone else, because she was
(and is). Addie is 4’8”, but every inch of
her is energetic, spirited and full of life.
She is just like the caterpillar that meta-
morphosed into a beautiful butterfy.
Welcome to Talley Images.
Addie has always been creative. She
tried drawing and painting, but eventu-
ally moved on to photography. She did
not like to wait on the art she was creat-
ing. Addie wanted quick results. e dig-
ital camera gave her the perfect outlet for
her creative quirkiness. She could fnally
have the instant gratifcation she was
longing for in her art; not the exact fn-
ished product, but affirmation that she
was pleased with what was on her cam-
era.
Addie is “one of those people” that take
some getting used to, because they are al-
ways taking pictures. You cannot hide
from them, because they are always
there, especially if you hate having your
picture taken. ey have a knack for
catching you at one of those awkward
moments, like when you are eating or
have your eyes closed. She admits to
being “one of those people”. She laughs,
and says her family just goes with it now;
she is going to take their pictures anyway,
so they might as well get used to it.
Luckily for Addie, she is very good at
what she does. From the beginning, peo-
ple liked her photographs and started
asking her to take pictures for special
events in their lives. Starting in 2006,
Addie photographed two weddings. In
2007, she was averaging 1-2 family ses-
sions a month and a wedding or two per
month. Each year, her business has
grown steadily. With the exception of
January and February, she is booked
continually, throughout the year. Addie
hopes that one day that photography will
be her full-time job.
Addie has put together a series of pho-
tographs themed around fairy tales (this
series is not yet complete), and one of
circus performers. She depicts an ex-
traordinary view of them. ey are very
creative and edgy. ese are not “pretty”
pictures, but they are beautiful. Addie is
moving toward non-traditional expres-
sions in her art. She has begun work on
a series de-
picting the
7 Deadly
Sins. She
says they
will be
“gritty, ex-
treme and
fairly raw
(but no
nudi t y)”.
Her goal,
with her
artwork, is
to surprise
and shock
people.
Some of
Ad d i e ’ s
photographs are currently on display in
the “Emergence” art exhibit at the Renee
Reedy Studio, along with the work of 17
other local artists, in Columbus. e
April edition of Unique Modeling Maga-
zine has an interview with Addie, along
with some of her photographs. People
are starting to notice Addie Talley as a
gied photographer. You can become a
fan on Facebook at Addie Talley, Photog-
rapher and check out her blog at
www.talleyimages. blogspot.com
Addie hopes that she can be a role
model to young women by showing
them, through her lens, that they are
beautiful. Using this approach, she hopes
to help them learn to feel amazing just as
they are. She wants them to celebrate
what is different about themselves and,
as a result, feel beautiful. is is especially
important in today’s society, because TV,
movies and magazines dictate the idea of
beauty. Addie wants to help women fnd
freedom and joy in being true to them-
selves.
If you want formal, traditional poised
portraits, then Addie Talley is not the
photographer for you. Addie’s goal is to
catch people as they really are. She wants
to capture her clients’ personalities, in-
stead of a pose. To her, this is the true
value of photographs - when you capture
the essence of who someone is, you have
created a memory that will be cherished.
It is tangible piece of life preserved in a
picture, which can never be recreated.
ose people, that emotion, that exact
moment in time – they will never exist
again. is is Addie’s art.
Candi Vezina
Candi is involved with several community
groups. She enjoys doing things for others and
spending time with her family.
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Religion for Atheists
Alain de Botton has written an inter-
esting new book, entitled Religion for
Atheists, which discusses how the prior
role of religion – imparting wisdom,
moral and ethical principles, and provid-
ing guidelines for a civil life – has been
lost in our increasingly secular society.
David Brooks, of the New York Times, re-
viewed the book:
De Botton sees a secular society, de-
nuded of high spiritual aspiration
and practical moral guidance. Cen-
turies ago, religions advised on how
to live with others, how to tolerate
other people’s faults, how to assuage
anger, and endure pain. ese days,
teachers, artists and philosophers no
longer even try to offer such practi-
cal wisdom.
is cohesive force has not been lost
because we have become less religious;
America is one of the most religious
countries in the world.
It is a loss in understanding about
how to transmit wisdom. Older re-
ligious authorities had a low but re-
alistic view of human nature - we are
fragile, sinful and vulnerable, and
unable to create moral universes on
our own, and in need of self-conf-
dent institutions that will un-
abashedly transmit God’s guidance
and love.
Today’s secular institutions have a
high and unrealistic view of human
nature. We are asked to develop our
own philosophy and moral laws,
and to put these ideas into practice.
Where did this arrogance come from?
“We are too accepting of the Modernist
doctrine that great art should have no
moral content or desire to change its au-
dience”, states de Botton, referring to the
revolutionary changes of the Sixties,
when all certainties of the world were
challenged. In the conservative Fiies,
the Church was always right, art was art,
and e Ten Commandments were ab-
solutely true. In the Sixties, it was exhil-
arating to live in a world without this
confning absolutism. Religion was
available if we wanted it.
However, in this anarchic freedom,
moral and ethical compasses were lost:
While universities have achieved
unparalleled expertise in imparting
factual information about culture,
they remain wholly uninterested in
training students to use it as a reper-
toire of wisdom.
We have lost a sense of purpose in
knowledge. “Wisdom” is considered
passé because it implies a codifed set of
beliefs and principles, anathema in a
world of cultural relativism and diversity.
I have never pursued knowledge for
knowledge’s sake and have always read
history, literature, economics and politi-
cal science to help explain my world. I
read Shakespeare’s Histories not to get a
fctionalized view of England, Rome,
Venice, and Greece; but to try to deci-
pher why history repeats itself. Accord-
ing to Shakespeare, human nature,
however gross, is behind the continuous
series of imperial expansion and palace
coups. He understood that man is an ag-
gressive, acquisitive animal always in-
creasing his chances for survival, and
however much we create laws, institu-
tions, and traditions to rein in these an-
tisocial impulses, they reign and will
reign forever. De Botton says that on the
contrary “today’s secular institutions
have an absurdly high and unrealistic
view of human nature”. We have come
to believe that human nature is not im-
mutable, and that life, as Hobbes fa-
mously said, is not “solitary, poor, nasty,
brutish and short". It is external forces
which shape us, and by changing them,
we can change our behavior, our society,
and even our nature.
De Botton states that, in our attempt to
reform human nature and to make the
world a better place, we are convinced
that having thrown off our intellectual
chains, we can translate facts into wis-
dom on our own. In his view, we cannot.
Facts alone are nothing but bits of infor-
mation which need to be collected with
a purpose to have meaning. Reconstruc-
tion, for example, is fascinating not only
because of the period itself, but because
of the lessons to be learned from it.
America’s international politics, today,
are as presumptive about the universal
rightness of American-style democracy
as the Radical Republican’s views of
Southern reformation. Had Lincoln,
with his canny understanding of politics
and human nature, lived, the South
would not have suffered through Recon-
struction and we would not still be
hostage to that history’s legacy. Had the
Neo-Cons listened to Lincoln, we might
not have had the Iraq war.
Museums were once temples for the
contemplation of the profound.
Today, de Botton says, they offer
pallid cultural smorgasbords:
“While exposing us to objects of
genuine importance, they neverthe-
less seem incapable of adequately
linking these to the needs of our
souls.” Visitors “appear to want to be
transformed by art,” de Botton ob-
serves, “but the lightning bolts they
are waiting for seem never to strike.
ey resemble the disappointed
participants in a failed séance.”
Museums, today, are proscribed from
making value judgments, or even sug-
gesting interpretations. Although the ex-
hibition on the art of Papua New Guinea
at the de Young Museum in San Fran-
cisco is a spectacular display of powerful
totems, lighted to convey their spiritual
presence, there was nothing written
about this – no spiritual guideposts sug-
gesting that this was far more than an art
exhibit.
De Botton has proposed that muse-
ums be organized by theme instead
of by historical epoch. He suggests
there could be a Gallery of Compas-
sion, a Gallery of Fear and so on.
And colleges should defnitely teach
courses on such practical issues [on
marriage], bringing together the re-
sources of literature, psychology and
neuroscience on such questions.
Brooks, James Q. Wilson, Charles
Murray, and others have written oen on
character, values, and the importance of
restoring moral and ethical compasses in
society, and the issue is now more openly
discussed. We are increasingly acknowl-
edging the perils of relativism and post-
Modernist reductionism, and are now
less afraid to assert that there are, in fact,
some absolute truths – truths that not
only come from religion but from his-
tory, secular truths no different from re-
ligious ones. at is, all civilizations have
been characterized by the same perse-
vering values of honesty, respect, civility,
and honor. Of course, these same civi-
lizations have been known for their pil-
laging, plundering, and massacres; but,
Greece, Rome, India, Persia, China, and
Europe all had that civil glue which coa-
lesced divergent views, made them
strong and imperial. We should learn
from that history.
Ron Parlato
rparlato@realstorypublishing.com
Ron Parlato is a writer
living in Washington, DC.
He has close ties with
Columbus which he visits
frequently. His writings on
literature, politics and
culture, travel, and cooking
can be found on his own
blog, uncleguidosfacts.com.
Check out our website
@realstorypublishing.com
or facebook.com/rspublishing
for additional articles and information!
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Everywhere you turn, right
now, local organizations are is-
suing a call for artists, for vari-
ous art exhibits, public art
projects, and contests.
First up is a call for artists for
‘Postcards to Columbus”, an ex-
hibit of postcard-sized works
that will open with a reception
on ursday, May 3, 2012.
Entry packets may be obtained
at Renee Reedy Studio (101 5th
Street South; below Café on
Main); gallery hours vary, so it
is recommended that you call
to verify when the gallery will
be open. A gallery representa-
tive can be reached by calling
662.368.8181; other arrange-
ments are possible. e deadline for
submissions is ursday, April 26th.
ere is no entry fee. Additional de-
tails, including submission guidelines
can be found by visiting www.rando-
mactsofculture.biz.
“Postcards to Columbus” is just one
of the upcoming exhibits in the Art in
Columbus series of monthly art shows
at Renee Reedy Studio. Other upcom-
ing events include “Light & Glass”
(June), “7 Deadly Sins” (July), and
“Lost & Found” (August); visit their
website, for a complete list.
Main Street Columbus is sponsoring
a “Painted Privies” Contest, in which
local artists can paint portable toilet
units, which will be prominently dis-
played at the corner of 5th & Main,
during this year’s Market Street Festi-
val, as well as at other events. Interested
artists must submit their information,
including a rendering of their painting,
by April 23rd. Painting may be done
between April 28th and May 4th (must
be completely dry by noon on the 4th).
For more information, contact Main
Street Columbus at 662.328.6305 or the
Columbus Arts Council at
662.328.2787.
e Columbus Arts Council is con-
ducting a Holiday Card Decorating
Contest, with entries due by June 29th.
ere are three different categories: 10
years & younger, 11-17 years, and 18
years and older). Winners of frst place
in each category will have their card re-
produced, and will receive 70% of all
sales of their design. For more informa-
tion, call 662.328.2787 or e-mail
columbus.ms.arts@gmail.com.
Organizations can also have their
events listed on e Real Story’s website
calendar, by visiting realstorypublish-
ing.com and, under “Do662”, click
‘Submit an Event”.
As always………..
“Get out and get your culture on!”
Calling
All Artists
e Real Story Staff Report
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Haven’t you always taken for granted
that there is just one way to do your car-
dio exercise? Or, maybe you just keep
doing the same thing that you have al-
ways done, due to routine? is routine
usually involves doing something like
walking or running on the treadmill or
outside, and using a stationary bike or an
elliptical for a sustained period of time,
at the same speed. is can promote
boredom and stymie progress. Maybe it
is time that you get “outside the box”!
Let’s take a look at interval training.
is is a method of exercise that uses al-
ternating periods of work and rest. It is
also referred to as HIIT (High Intensity
Interval Training). Low intensity inter-
val training can be utilized as well. In-
terval training has been around for
decades, but has only recently gained in
popularity. It has been used, most com-
monly, in the fat loss and conditioning
arena. A recent study, done at McMaster
University in Canada, compared 20 min-
utes of high intensity interval training -
consisting of a 30-second sprint, fol-
lowed by a four minute rest - to 90 to 120
minutes of sustained cardio in the target
heart rate zone. Subjects got the same
improvement in oxygen utilization from
both programs. e amazing fact is that
the 20-minute program only requires
about two minutes and 30 seconds of ac-
tual work.
One of the most famous studies of
HIIT is known as the Tabata study. In
this study, subjects performed rowing in-
tervals: 20 seconds of ultra-fast rowing,
alternated with 10 seconds of relaxed re-
covery rowing, for a total of 8 intervals,
or 4 minutes. e results of this study
showed that participants had an increase
of 28% in cardio respiratory endurance
and a 14% increase in aerobic ftness -
again, showing the benefts of interval
over sustained cardio training regimens.
You get the ftness benefts and a routine
that breaks up the monotony and keeps
your interest level high.
Here are the basic modes of training
that you can utilize for interval training:
• Running on a treadmill, track
or outside
• Walking on a treadmill
• Elliptical
• Stationary Bike
• Weighted circuits
e main thing to remember about
this type of training is to alternate short
bursts of high intensity with periods of
recovery or low intensity. For example,
the high intensity intervals can last any-
where from 10 to 60 seconds and the
low intensity recovery periods can
last anywhere from 10 seconds to
a minute or more. e total du-
ration of intervals can last up to
15 minutes. If you are a begin-
ner to HIIT, start with shorter
high intensity periods and
longer low intensity periods.
Remember that “high intensity”
means “high intensity for YOU”. So
if you are a beginner, a fast walk for
10 seconds is a better start than trying to
handle a sprint workout.
Benefts of interval training include:
• Losing body fat, while
maintaining lean muscle mass
• Strengthening the cardiovascular
system
• Efficient utilization of fats
and carbohydrates
Always remember that the goal of any
cardio exercise program is to get the
maximum result for the time you spend.
What Kind of Cardio Exercise Are You Doing?
Melinda
Duffie is
a
certifed
personal
trainer, with
additional
expertise in
nutrition
counseling and life
coaching, as well as
a B.A. in Business.
Melinda Duffie
mvpft@yahoo.com
Governor Phil Bryant of Mississippi re-
cently named Bobby Harper of Columbus,
Mississippi to the Tennessee- Tombigbee Wa-
terway Development Authority Board of Di-
rectors. Mr. Harper, a Columbus banking
veteran, currently represents Renasant Bank
as a Senior Vice President and Development
Officer. Prior to joining Renasant, Harper
served over 40 years as an executive banker
in the Golden Triangle region. He received his
bachelor’s degree in business administration
from Delta State University and attended the
Graduate School of Banking at LSU.
Harper contributes to the Golden Triangle
community, serving as a trustee of the Frank
Phillips YMCA, as a Rotarian and
Paul Harris Fellow and as a board
member of the Golden Triangle Re-
gional Airport. He is also past presi-
dent of the Columbus Air Force Base
Community Council, a recipient of
the Mississippi University for Women
Medal of Excellence and the Ex-
change Club Book of Golden Deeds
Award.
Harper and his wife, Jo, have a son,
Lane, and a daughter, Neely Hudnall,
as well as three grandchildren. ey
are members of St. Paul’s Episcopal
Church, where Harper has served as
Junior and Senior Warden, and cur-
rently serves as a member of the
Vestry.
e Tenn-Tom Authority is a four-
state compact comprised of the states
of Alabama, Kentucky, Mississippi,
and Tennessee. e U.S. Congress au-
thorized the interstate compact to
promote and market the waterway
and its economic and trade potential
to the region and the nation. e four
state governors serve as members of
the Authority, along with fve other
appointed members from each state.
“Serving on this board will be a new
experience. ere will be a learning
curve, but I look forward to being in-
volved and working with the mem-
bers of the four-states making up the
compact,” said Mr. Harper. “e wa-
terway is one of our most important
assets for stimulating much-needed
economic growth. is year alone,
the waterway’s lower cost and more
energy-efficient transportation serv-
ices will help bring nearly $1 billion
of new industrial development to
Mississippi. Its unique water-related
recreation facilities attract nearly 3
million visitor-days annually, gener-
ating nearly $150 million of addi-
tional spending each year. As a result
of the four states working together,
the Tenn-Tom Authority has played an im-
portant role in helping to bring these regional
benefts to fruition”, he said.
Other members representing Mississippi on
this board are Nick Ardillo and T. L. “Bud”
Phillips of Columbus, Mrs. Martha Segars of
Iuka; Bill Cleveland of Tupelo and Dale Pierce
of Aberdeen.
e Tenn-Tom Waterway celebrates its 27th
anniversary, this year. Since opening to com-
mercial navigation in January 1985, it has be-
come an important connecting link to 17
states, 14 river systems and over half of the
nation’s population. Since 1996, the Tenn-
Tom has realized an economic impact of $43
billion for the region Approximately 6 million
tons of commerce are transported on the wa-
terway, saving shippers an estimated $60-90
million in transportation costs, each year. e
waterway has also helped attract over $5 bil-
lion of new and expanded industrial develop-
ment, creating over 70,000 new jobs in the
waterway region.
Inland waterways, such as the Tenn-Tom,
are the most energy-efficient, environmen-
tally-friendly, and safest mode of transporta-
tion.
No Coolers or
Pets Please
For complete details contact Main Street Columbus at
662-328-6305 or visit www.marketstreetfestival.com
Another great production of
Market Street After Dark
Friday, May 4
Mingo Fishtrap
7:30-9:00 p.m.
Lukas Nelson & The Promise of the Real
$10 Tickets can be purchased in advance at the
harket Street ofñ ce at 107 5th Street North or at
www.marketstreetfestival.com or at the gate.
Food & Beverages will be available for purchase.
Ticket required for admission to gated area.
Above: Lukas
Nelson & The
Promise of the Real;
to left:
Mingo Fishtrap
Lounging with the Locals
Saturday, May 5
Columbus Riverwalk 5:00-11:30 p.m.
Free Admission
Deacon Jones &
The Late Night
5:00 p.m.
Mark “Muleman”
Massey Blues Band
7:00 p.m.
Eden Brent
8:30 p.m
Jimbo Mathus &
The Tri State Coalition
10:00 p.m.
Market Street Festival
Free & Open to Public
Saturday, May 5
- 5 entertaInment stages wIth over 20 musIcaI acts
- ChIIdren's Stage and ActIvItIes area wIth 10 acts
- Dver 225 Arts û Crafts Vendors
- Food Court wIth over 20 vendors û a pancake breakfast
- Ice CoId ßeverages
- Car û hotorcycIe Show, Tractor 0IspIay û 5 K Pun
- Zumba In the Streets wIth the Y
- ChIIdren's ActIvItIes û Performances, Inñ atabIes, ßungee
TrampoIIne, WaIk Dn Water ßaIIoons, Pony PIdes û Characters
- JunIor FIreñ ghter Cames
- Ice Cream EatIng Contest
- Tractor 0IspIay
- VIdeo Came TraIIer
- 5K Pun
- WCßI Car CIveaway
- Hands on harketpIace
- CIveaways û huch hore!!
9:30-11:00 p.m.


















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Main St etails contact lete d For comp
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Massey Blues Band
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.m. 5:00 p
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Deacon Jones &
5:00 lk Columbus Riverwa
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lition
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on
Special to e Real Story
Impacted States
Existing River System
Tenn-Tom Waterway
Harper Named to Tenn-Tom Board
17
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SAINTÊ LEOÊ UNIVERSITYÊ -Ê COLUMBUSÊ AFB
Your local top-ranked
university
(662) 434-8844
dew.white@saintleo.edu
www.saintleo.edu
Founded 1889
Why Choose a Degree from
Saint Leo University?
Ê EveningÊ andÊ OnlineÊ Programs
Ê CareerÊ FocusedÊ Education
Ê RespectedÊ byÊ Employers
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Ê RegionallyÊ Accredited
Degree Programs
Bachelor of Arts
Business Administration with
specializations in:
– Management
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Criminal Justice with specializations in:
– Homeland Security
– Criminalistics
Psychology
Master’s Degree Programs Online –
(800) 707-8846
e mission
of the National
Day of Prayer Christian Community Or-
ganization is to mobilize prayer in
Columbus, MS and the surrounding
area, as well as to encourage personal re-
pentance and righteousness in the cul-
ture.
is local event will be flled with
praise and with prayer for our nation,
government leaders, churches, schools,
and families. Please join us on ursday,
May 3rd, as Columbus and Lowndes
County area citizens and government of-
fcials come together in prayer. Music
will begin the observance at Noon, with
the actual prayer service beginning at
12:15 PM, and ending at 12:45, so that
people can participate during their lunch
break, if working that day.
e National Day of Prayer is an an-
nual observance held on the frst urs-
day of May, inviting people of all faiths
to pray for the nation. It was created in
1952 by a joint resolution of the United
States Congress, and signed into law by
President Harry S. Truman. In 1988
Ronald Reagan signed Public Law 100-
307, designating the frst ursday in
May as the annual observance for the
National Day of Prayer.
is Christian Community Organiza-
tion is a privately funded organization,
whose purpose is to encourage partici-
pation on the National Day of Prayer. It
exists to communicate with every indi-
vidual the need for personal repentance
and prayer, to create appropriate materi-
als, and to mobilize the Christian com-
munity to intercede for America’s leaders
and its families. e local organization
represents a Judeo-Christian expression
of the national observance, based on our
understanding that this country was
birthed in prayer and in reverence for
the God of the Bible.
e National Day of Prayer has great
signifcance for us, as a nation. It enables
us to recall and to teach the way in which
our founding fathers sought the wisdom
of God, when faced with critical deci-
sions. It stands as a call to us to humbly
come before God, seeking His guidance
for our leaders and His grace upon us as
a people. e unanimous passage of the
bill establishing the National Day of
Prayer as an annual event signifes that
prayer is as important to our nation
today as it was in the beginning.
National
Day of
Prayer
Special to e Real Story
18
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I’m sure that everyone knows that
pigs will eat almost anything. Pork-
chop is no exception, although he
does not like raw squash or zucchini.
A few weeks ago, I bought some veg-
etable chips (trying to eat healthier),
but they were pretty much tasteless.
However, Porkchop loved them, and
just has a little piggy panic attack if I
don’t get them in his bowl fast enough.
ey are a little expensive, though, to
feed to a pig, so I decided I’d buy a
food dehydrator to make my own.
e frst batch was perfectly crispy,
and Porkchop thoroughly enjoyed
them. BUT, I took the next batch out
too early, they weren’t quite crisp
enough, and he did not like them! I’ll
have to be careful, in the future, to get
the crispness just right for him!
I have to order his pot-bellied pig
feed off the Internet, and had pur-
chased a new bag last week. My hus-
band asked if I wanted him to pour it
in the old chicken feed bin, and I de-
cided that would be a great place to
keep it. Apparently I didn’t remember
which bin was the old chicken-feed
one, and I, once again, unknowingly
contributed to Porkchop gaining even
more weight... I poured him some of
the “new” feed, and mentioned, later,
to my husband that I didn’t realize it
was a new kind of food, because it
looked different. e following morn-
ing, as I was pouring Porkchop his
breakfast, I noticed that the feed
looked like the original. So, I asked
my husband where he got that food
from, and he laughed and said that I
had been feeding Porkchop high-pro-
tein catfsh food! Which, of course,
they use to make catfsh gain weight!
I can’t win, for losing!!
We have the best time, on our bath-
room outings, during the day. Pork-
chop gets a little exercise to work off
that extra weight I keep putting on
him, and we have fun playing hide-
and-seek. Pot-bellied pigs don’t have
great eyesight, but they do have an ex-
ceptional sense of smell - better than
most dogs! On a recent aernoon, as
Porkchop was rooting around in the
dirt, I decided I’d go on up ahead and
hide. Aer a while, I heard him run-
ning, grunting, and he few past me,
headed back to the office. I jumped
out and said, “Boogie-woogie!” and
scared that little pig! Haha! He
grunted and jumped around - it was
too funny. en he wiggled his fat lit-
tle body like he was saying, “You got
me, that time, Mommy!”
Pot-bellies communicate with
squeaks, sneezes, grunts and gurgles,
and I never get tired of hearing him
“talk” to us or the dogs. When we go
out for our bathroom breaks, during
the day, he’ll inevitably stop to explore
and root in the grass or gravel, so I’ll
go on ahead and in a little bit I’ll hear
this whiny grunt, squeal type noise
and hear his fat self running behind
me. I always tell him, “I’m not leaving
you!” When he decides he doesn’t
want to come back in, I’ll say, “Ok,
Porkchop, I’ll see ya’ later!” Before
long, he comes running to the door
and waddles to his food bowl for a
treat.
I love that little pig! And, I am glad
to hear that most of you do, too!!
Safety Tips
from the NCPC
How Parents Can
Encourage Volunteering
Tips for parents on getting kids
to volunteer in the community
Helping out in the community can make your
neighborhood safer, and it can be fun and benefcial
to the people who do the work, especially children.
Volunteering can help children develop positive re-
lationships with adults and other children, and help
them to develop such skills as cooperation, empathy, and empowerment. And it
can show them that they have the power to make positive change. All of these traits
will help children positively handle the tough situations they face growing up.
You can help your children get involved in the community. Here are a few ideas
to get you started:
• With your child, arrange to clean up a local park or school ground. Pick up
trash (don't forget to wear gloves!) and plant bushes, trees, and other plants.
• Help your children to create a mural recognizing the contributions of every
one in your community. Include people of all ages, professions, ethnicities,
religions, and physical and mental abilities. Find a public place that will let
you display it or donate a wall to the project.
• Arrange for your child to create an exhibit at his or her school or your local
library. It could be about a different culture, a current problem at school, such
as bullying, or anything that your child is interested in.
• Accompany children to a retirement home to spend time with the elderly,
doing what they like. Some possibilities are playing board games with
residents, singing or performing for them, or handing out baked goodies or
artwork.
• Have your children think of ideas about how they can help. Ask them what
issues most concern them, and who they would most like to help. Brainstorm,
with them, on ideas they would most enjoy.
If you work with groups of children as a teacher, coach, scout troop leader, or in
any other way, consider leading a service-learning project. ese projects get chil-
dren involved in improving the community, as a group, and offer great ways to
learn outside the classroom.
Special to e Real Story
Aimee Shaw
ashaw@realstorypublishing.com
Aimee is the Office Manager at Malone
Electric Company, Inc. and also has her own
freelance graphic design business.
She is married to Kenneth Shaw of Columbus.
Porkchop, 4 weeks old.
Porkchop, 11 weeks old.
19
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Walking down the streets of Columbus
and noticing all the new shops that are
blooming up like tiny buds in our garden
of enchantment, I catch a scent that is so
enticing it is not to be ignored. Letting
my nose lead the way, I end up on 5th
Street North. Looking up, I notice a cute
little sign stating “Coffee House on 5th”.
Opening the door and going in is like en-
tering another world.
Coffee – good, smooth aromatic coffee
- is the predominant feature of this inter-
esting little coffee shop. A nice young
man walks up, extending his hand for a
shake, and welcomes me in. He intro-
duces himself as Brent Davidson, and
thus begins a friendship that I plan to
nurture and cherish for years to come.
As we sit down to chat, I have a cup of
this well-done coffee. I am interested in
getting to know this lively, intelligent and
ambitious gentleman.
Settling in, the frst thing I want to
know is how he came up with the idea
for the coffee house and the interesting
decor. He states that he has always en-
joyed visiting coffee houses, and wanted
to share his love of good coffee and the
unique atmosphere that is a coffee house
with the community that he grew up in.
e coffee bean bags on some of the
walls, as well as the unique designs on
another wall, as you walk in the door, are
enough to grab your interest.
"A coffee shop is a place where you can
make it your own, create the atmosphere
you want it to have and also bring to it
something different, at the same time, so
it holds the interest of the customer." I
learned from Brent that he enjoys shar-
ing his love of different coffees and the
processes used to prepare these potions
of delight and comfort. Creating a relax-
ing, peaceful, and welcoming atmos-
phere has proven to be a diamond in the
rough for Brent; he has made e Coffee
House on 5th his own, and it is apparent
as soon as you walk in the door.
Finding the perfect coffees for his shop
was an adventure in itself for Brent. He
traveled around, going to different roast-
ers, coffee shops and companies, tasting
and trying different blends, roasts and
types of coffee. Aer sampling hundreds
of coffees, he settled on a unique blend
to carry at e Coffee House on 5th. In
order to learn how to properly prepare
coffee, Brent traveled to Tuscaloosa,
where he found the Premier Coffee
Shop. Befriending Gail Faulkner, the
owner, he offered to work for her, on a
pro-bono basis, two days a week for sev-
eral months, in an effort to acquire the
skills necessary to make top-rate coffee.
For those not familiar with the process,
making the perfect cup of coffee is an
exact science, and not for the faint of
heart.
Staff from the roasting company that
Brent selected drove to Columbus to
personally instruct the baristas on the
proper technique. As a result, you are
now assured of receiving a perfect cup of
coffee, to go along with the fresh baked
goodies that are temptingly offered.
Each morning, fresh items, savory and
sweet, are made for the customers’ indul-
gence. e sweet potato muffins seem to
be a local favorite, although my personal
favorite is the chocolate sugar cookie.
Don't forget the chocolate chip scones,
as they appear to be holding their own in
the race to see which one is the best. Be
sure and try some of these goodies; I
know you will be hooked.
When we talked about the future,
Brent shared some of the exciting things
to come at e Coffee House on 5th. He
speaks of having an open mic night, on
ursdays, where musicians can come in
and perform a song or two, then have
someone else present their poems, the-
atrics or music. Brent is excited about the
opportunity to present local musicians
and talent to our community, in his com-
fortable and trendy coffee shop.
Brent is considering having a cultural
evening of coffee, alternating ursdays
with the open mic nights. ese “culture
of coffee” events would involve present-
ing a different country’s coffee, each
time, with a demonstration of the actual
brewing ceremony for that coffee; two
weeks later, they would feature a different
coffee, with the corresponding brewing
method. How exciting it will be, to expe-
rience these traditions of foreign lands
and sample their delicate coffees.
All in all, e Coffee House on 5th is a
little coffee shop that could well become
known for promoting this community,
promoting young artists, and offering
the best coffee downtown.
Coffee House on 5th: Inviting
in More Ways Than One
Fran Andresen
fandresen@realstorypublishing.com
Fran is a homemaker who enjoys experimenting
and creating tasteful diabetic and kidney-
disease-friendly recipes. She is married to John
Andresen and likes to crochet in her free time.
Local volunteer Pauline Redmond has been selected to
receive a 2012 Governor’s Initiative for Volunteer Excel-
lence (GIVE) Award for Outstanding Service in Disaster
Relief.
Redmond, along with thirteen other individuals and
organizations, were honored at the annual GIVE Awards
Luncheon Ceremony on Monday, April 16, at the Mis-
sissippi Museum of Art, in Jackson.
Redmond served with the American Red Cross for
many years, until she formed own non-proft disaster re-
covery and readiness organization.
Local Volunteer Receives Award
from Governor’s Office
Courtesy Photo
20
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Across
1 Tiny bite
4 ___ race
7 Old phone feature
11 Mine extract
12 Showery mos.
14 Actress Baxter
15 Moocher
17 Romantic outing
18 Free (of )
19 Shaft
21 Pouted
24 egyptians’
“paper”
28 OT book
29 Coin factory
30 Employment
31 Young woman
32 Dover’s locale
(abbr.)
33 Mucilage
34 Common article
35 Picket fence part
36 Shakespearean
king
37 Makes sorrowful
39 Rolls up
40 Like the Addams
Family
41 Morsel
42 Short sleeps
45 Diplomatic agent
50 Psychic’s phrase
(2 wds.)
51 Rage
52 Compete
53 Ordinances
54 Asner & McMahon
55 FBI employee
(abbr.)
Down
1 Agree silently
2 Anger
3 ___ jacket
4 Fanatical
5 Was a copycat
6 Melodic syllable
7 “My Heart Belongs
to ____”
8 Actress Balin
9 Tiny insect
10 Confederate
leader
13 Unaccustomed
16 Put clothes on
20 Make a selection
21 Fountain favorites
22 Nebraska city
23 Sat for a picture
24 Milk cartons
25 Emperor
26 Ordinary
27 Clairvoyant ones
29 Wander
33 Satiates
35 H.S. diploma
alternative
(abbr.)
38 Prescribed por-
tions
39 Pugilists’
weapons
41 Predicament
42 None whatso-
ever
43 Light __ ___
feather
(2 wds.)
44 Sunday bench
46 West of
Hollywood
47 Gardner of “The
Killers”
48 Tractor-trailer
49 Thus far
CROSSWORD 04.18.2012
SEE ANSWERS TO THI S CROSSWORD
PUZZLE I N OUR NEXT I SSUE
Part I of II
On April 20, 1912, Boston’s Fenway
Park officially opened with a 7-6, 11-in-
ning Boston win over the New York
Highlanders. e Highlanders would
become the New York Yankees in 1913,
but, even then, there was something spe-
cial about the Boston-New York rivalry.
e home-opener was a one-game ap-
pearance by the Highlanders, followed
by Washington’s scheduled appearance
on April 23.
e Sox had opened the season with a
three-game sweep of the Highlanders at
New York, on April 11, followed by a two
game set at Philadelphia. On Patriot’s
Day, the eve of the official start of Fen-
way history, the Sox record stood at 4
wins and 1 loss. As the season opened,
the Boston papers were full of the stories
of the anticipated opening of the new
park. e old Huntington Avenue
Grounds, the site of the 1903 World Se-
ries that was won by the Boston “Pil-
grims”, or the Boston “Americans”, over
the Pittsburgh Pirates, passed into his-
tory. e Huntington Avenue site today
is marked only with a statue of Denton
True “Cy” Young on the spot of the orig-
inal pitcher’s mound, at what is now the
campus of Northeastern University. e
new ballpark, owned by John Taylor,
who also had renamed the team the Red
Sox in 1908, was built in a marshy area
of Boston that had been reclaimed from
the “Back Bay” in the nineteenth century.
Called the “Fenway District” aer the
English term “Fens”, or marshy ground,
the name Fenway Park has been thought
to be aptly named. However, another
theory has been advanced, since John
Taylor’s family also owned the “Fenway
Realty Company”, and the naming of the
park may have been good for the family
real estate business.
However, between April 11 and April
20, a tragic event would occur that effec-
tively pushed the hype of the scheduled
inaugural game off the front pages, rele-
gating it to the sports pages deep within
the Boston papers. at tragedy, of
course, was the sinking of the Titanic in
the early hours of April 15, 1912.
e Red Sox would go on to win the
1912 World Series over the New York
Giants, and three more aer that, until
1918. In 1915, the Sox beat the Phillies,
followed in 1916 by a win over the
Brooklyn “Robins” (later the Trolley
Dodgers, or just the Dodgers), and in
1918 over the Chicago Cubs. In 1919,
the team that had been the American
League “fagship” in the early years of
“modern baseball” would be decimated
by Harry Frazee, a name that lives in in-
famy in the annals of Bosox history.
1918 would represent the last Series win
for 86 years, until 2004.
e copy of the letter featured in this article,
(see next page) written in 1946 by Yankee exec-
utive Ed Barrow, was found in a trunk at an
estate sale in Columbus, MS. Ed Barrow was
the feld manager of that 1918 Championship
team. Until Terry Francona’s 2004 team com-
pleted the most improbable of World Series ap-
pearances, no other manager since Barrow
could claim a Red Sox World Series win. Four
Red Sox AL championship wins during my
lifetime (1946, 1967, 1975, and 1986) had all
ended in 7 game defeats in the Series.
by Dick “Big Mo” Mahoney #46 on your scorecard
TheOnDeckCircle
Courtesy Photo
The “Green Monster” - left feld wall at Fenway Park.
Fenway Park Celebrates 100 Years
See “FENWAY” Pg. 21
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21
How many curves
are there in a
standard paper clip?
Look for the answer on page 23!
Although the sale of Babe Ruth to the
New York Yankees is considered the rea-
son for the collapse of the team for the
next two decades, one must look at the
other stars that were traded or sold out-
right, almost without exception to the
Yankees. From 1919 to 1923, Frazee
dealt all of the Sox stars to New York. “If
Yankee Stadium has been called the
‘House at Ruth Built’, it might be ar-
gued that the Yankees, by and large, could
be called the ‘Team at Frazee Built’.”
Be that as it may, the Sox fortunes col-
lapsed and from 1925-1932 the team lost
over 100 games each year. In 1933, dur-
ing the depths of the Depression,
omas A.Yawkey purchased the Sox
and dumped over a million dollars into
refurbishing the park for the 1934 sea-
son. Among the features was the 37-foot
wall, topped by a 23 foot screen, extend-
ing from the le feld foul pole to center
feld. e wall also accommodated the
scoreboard that had electronic lighting
to indicate the ball/strike counts. e
rest of the scoreboard remains hand-op-
erated up to the present. Covered by ad-
vertising, the wall would not become the
“Green Monster” until 1947, when the
signs were removed and the wall painted
a “grassy-colored” green. is was the
same year that lights were installed, mak-
ing Fenway the third-to-last of the orig-
inal sixteen parks to host night games.
e Yawkey name would be a presence
in Boston for the rest of the 20th century,
for while Tom Yawkey died in July of
1976, his widow Jean Yawkey, through
the JRY Corporation and then the
Yawkey Trust, when she died in 1992,
continued the ownership. Over those
years, many changes would be instituted
in the physical structure. e right feld
bullpens were constructed in 1940 to ac-
commodate Ted Williams’ le-handed
power, bringing home run territory 23
feet closer to home plate. is area,
called “Williamsburg”, ironically only af-
fected approximately 35 of the “Splendid
Splinter’s” 521 career home runs.
Some other changes, over the years, in-
cluded a few rows of upper deck seats
added in 1946; the frst message board,
installed in 1976; and the relocation of
the press box on top of the roof boxes, in
1999. From a personal standpoint, I
much preferred the older press box, located
just above the screen behind home plate,
lower to the playing feld, and the rever-
beration throughout the box, whenever
the fans would bang their seats during a
Sox rally.
e feld itself has always had its’ odd-
ities, based on the boundary restrictions
imposed by the surrounding neighbor-
hood streets. Oen the case with the old
classic ball parks, Fenway was no excep-
tion. e asymmetrical layout of the
feld gave rise to many interesting angles,
none more so than the “triangle”, where
the outfeld bleachers converge with the
Green Monster, and the bullpen fences
also come into play. Triples and inside-
the-park home runs are born there.
Pesky’s pole (so named because Johnny
Pesky had hit a few homers that sliced
around the foul pole), down the right
feld line, is the shortest home run dis-
tance in the major leagues at 302 feet, but
then the fence goes very deep in the spa-
cious right feld area. e box seats are
so close to the feld that fans have little
problem hearing the ballplayers in the
on-deck circles. is also means very lit-
tle foul territory, and some ballplayers
have made a career of spoiling pitches,
until they got the pitch that was ideal for
them to launch over or off the le feld
wall. Wade Boggs, for example, a le-
handed hitter who had seven straight
200-plus-hit seasons at the start of his ca-
reer, was noted for using the wall in le
feld for many of his hits.
Editor’s Note: Part II will appear in the
April 25, 2012 print edition of e Real
Story.
“FENWAY” cont. from pg. 20
Courtesy Photo
Fenway Park - Post Season 1989
Courtesy Photo
Ed Barrow Letter, 1946.
Dick “Big Mo” Mahoney
dmahoney@realstorypublishing.com
#46 on your scorecard.
by Jeremiah Short SportsTalk
In 2009, e Mississippi State Bulldogs were blessed
to have one of the best linebacker corps in their history.
e unit was led by Jamar Chaney—while being fanked
by K.J. Wright and Chris White. Chaney got draed
aer that season, by the Philadelphia Eagles. Aer the
next season, Wright and White were both draed, in the
4th and 6th rounds, respectively.
Wright was draed by the Seahawks in the fourth
round of the 2011 NFL Dra. He talked about the feel-
ing of getting picked by an NFL team.
“It’s something every college football player wants to
experience. I put a lot of hard work into it, through col-
lege and going to the combine - a dream come true,” said
Wright.
e process leading up to get draed was a tough one
for Wright.
“It’s a lot of hard work, because you are trying to sell
yourself to the teams. You have to train and make sure
you perform well at the combine. You got to go out and
do good interviews, “Wright said.
e NFL was in the midst of a lockout, aer the dra,
but the NFLPA and the owners eventually reached an
agreement. Wright talked about coming into his frst
training camp, while having to learn a new position.
“It was hard, at frst, because I had to play a position I
wasn’t familiar with—as far as middle linebacker. I had
to get the defense lined up and learn the playbook.
When I frst got there it was a real struggle. As time went
on, I got more reps and I got more comfortable,” Wright
said.
Wright had been an outside linebacker, his whole ca-
reer, but he wasn’t surprised by the move to the middle.
“I wasn’t shocked, because it’s something me and
coaches talked about. ey asked me if I wanted to be
on the ball or behind the ball; I said behind. With the
defense the Seahawks run, the Mike (Middle Line-
backer) is backing the Sam (Strong Side Linebacker) on
the line of scrimmage,” said Wright.
Wright garnered a lot of praise from the coaching staff,
K.J. Wright: I’m Just Trying
to Perfect My Craft
See “WRIGHT” Pg. 22
22
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prior to the 2011 season, with Pete Car-
roll, the Seahawks coach comparing him
to Pittsburg Steeler great Jack Lambert. It
was a bit of a reversal for Wright, who got
overshadowed at times, by Chaney and
White, during his Bulldog career. He was
never fazed by not being the center of at-
tention.
“Oh, nah, man, I’ve always been good;
I have never looked for my name to be
the center of attention. I’m a guy that
comes to work and wants to get the job
done,” stated Wright, speaking on not re-
ceiving recognition.
e coaching staff continued to show
faith in Wright, starting him in the frst
regular season game, aer an injury to
starting middle linebacker David
Hawthorne. He responded with fve tack-
les.
“at was big. Coming into the season,
I wasn’t expecting that. e guy in front
of me had an injury. I started three pre-
season games and the frst NFL game. I
did really well. It’s something that just
happened and I took advantage of it,” said
Wright, talking about start-
ing his frst game as a
rookie.
He settled into a special
teams role for a few games
aer that - until Aaron
Curry, a former frst-round
pick, was traded in favor of
him. e decision was
widely criticized - with
many citing Wright’s inex-
perience.
“I was honored by it - that
they think that much of
me,” said Wright.
e critics had plenty to
talk about, as Wright strug-
gled to adjust to being a
starting linebacker in the
NFL.
“It was real hard. ere
was a lot of stuff about an
NFL game that I knew
something about, just
watching on TV. Toward
the end of the season, you
see how I improved. It’s something most
players go through. ey get better as
time goes on,” said Wright.
e former Bulldog eventually started
to live up to his potential, late in the sea-
son - making 37 tackles and two sacks in
the last seven games.
“I believe it started the frst time we
played the (St. Louis) Rams. at’s the
frst time I knew I’m a good football
player, I know I can beat you and can play.
I’m a big-time guy, so I need to keep this
going,” stated Wright, talking about hit-
ting his stride in 2011.
Wright ended with a solid season—fn-
ishing with 65 tackles and two sacks. He
is already hard at work to take that next
step in 2012.
“I need to just keep doing what I have
been doing - working out and training.
I’m working out with my new strength
coach this year. Get with him and see
what I need to improve on and getting
with my linebacker coach and do posi-
tion work. I’m just trying to master my
cra. So, I can be good by the time mini-
camp starts, “Wright said.
Wright is enjoying early success in the
NFL, but he does still talk to Chaney and
White about their unit in 2009.
“Oh yea, we talk about that all the time.
It started off with Chaney. I believe it’s
going to keep on going, with Cam
Lawrence and some of those other line-
backers coming up. I believe they are
going to be pretty good, “said Wright.
ere is also a current Bulldog,
Bernardrick McKinney, which many are
comparing to Wright.
“I don’t know. I haven’t really seen him
play. I haven’t talked to him, but I know
they got him at middle linebacker. I know
he is in good hands; I know Coach
(Geoff) Collins is going to get him right.
He got all the tools to play but he has to
put them together, on Saturdays, to make
plays,” indicated Wright, in sharing his
opinion on McKinney.
K.J. Wright might not have gotten the
praise due him, during his Bulldog career,
but he is headed toward becoming an
NFL superstar. People will fnally get a
chance to see Wright’s ability on the
biggest stage.
WWW. SUDOKUPUZZLES. NET • SEE SUDOKU PUZZLE ON PG 9
“WRIGHT” cont. from pg. 21
Courtesy Photo
K.J. Wright.
Jeremiah Short
jshort@realstorypublishing.com
Jeremiah Short covers Mississippi State University
football and basketball. Follow him on Twitter,
@JeremiahShort26; or join his Facebook blog,
Real Story Sports: J.Short’s Blog.
Initial Spring Game Outlook
e Mississippi State Bulldogs went into their 4th
spring under Dan Mullen looking to answer a few ques-
tions and fll some holes. ey have shown steady im-
provement, during that time. ere were steps made
toward accomplishing their goals, over the past few
weeks. Several positions are still up for grabs, and kinks
still need to be ironed out; the Maroon-White game,
which is scheduled for Saturday, April 21st at 5pm, will
go a long way toward settling those issues.
5 ings to Watch
1. Quarterback Competition: Before spring practice
began, I stressed the importance of the quarterback bat-
tle. Junior quarterback Tyler Russell has had a good
spring, but competitor Dak Prescott has performed
well, too. Mullen hasn’t named Russell the starter; so,
Prescott will have an opportunity to impress in the
spring game. It will be interesting to see who steps up,
in front of a big crowd.
2. Running Back Battle: Replacing Vick Ballard is truly
a tough task and his shoes won’t be easy to fll. e
coaching staff has had to fnd that guy, though, during
spring practice. Perkins got the frst crack at the feature-
back role, but Josh Robinson and Nick Griffin have
each had a good spring. e backs will likely rotate once
the season starts, but everyone wants to be number one.
e spring game could give one back a leg up in gaining
that top spot.
3. O-Line Play: e offensive line, to be honest, was less
than stellar in 2011. Offensive Line Coach John Hevesy
was charged with building depth and preventing a re-
peat of the disaster that was the 2011 season. He has de-
veloped good depth during the spring, with Damien
Robinson, Charles Siddoway, Dillon Day, and Blaine
Clausell stepping up to stabilize the unit. e group
should continue to trend upward and could get a boost
if Tobias Smith returns healthy.
See “PREVIEW” Pg. 23
Maroon-White Game Preview
Courtesy Photo
Dan Mullen
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ANNOUNCEMENTS
P HI L ADE L P HI A
GUN SHOW! April
14 & 15, 2012.
Neshoba County
Coliseum, Hwy. 15
North, Philadelphia,
Ms. Sat, 9am-5pm;
Sun 10am-5pm. Ex-
hibits include guns,
military, hutning,
knives, gun enthusi-
asts, dealers, collec-
tors, appraisals. Free
parking and conces-
sions available!
Hourly door prizes.
Buy - Sell - Trade -
Appraise. All federal,
state and local laws
must be observed.
No loaded guns. Tie
downs required and
no loose ammo. Ad-
mission: $7 Adults;
$1 Children 6-10. For
more info, contact
David Chancellor,
601-498-4235, big-
popfreworks@gmai
l.com
AUTOMOTIVE
2001 BMW Z3 Road-
ster 2.5i, automatic,
71.7k miles, $9,500.
662-327-3191
1929 Mercedes Benz
Roadster, Convert-
ible w/ removable
canvas top; Tan &
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w/ 3 speed auto-
matic transmission,
good tires, recent
tuneup; $9,000. -a
must see. 251-7691
Three rims w/tires to
ft 2001 Dodge Ram
1500 Quad Cab.
$50/ea., obo. 889-
3732
4 tires with rims - al-
most new tires,
came off Pontiac
Sports RAV, $300.
662-7295
BOATS, RV’s, ATV’s
MOTORCYCLES
2007 Honda Rincon
(680 cc). Excellent
condition, Warn
winch w/front or
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gun boot, 2wd/4wd
switchable, auto or
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$5,000. 662-386-
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2007 Tiffin Allegro
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RV, 13k miles, 35.5 ft,
3 slides, 2 AC's, 2 TVs,
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V-10 engine, glass
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showroom condi-
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386-3467
2005 5th Wheel
Crossroads Cruiser,
32’x8’model 29RE, in
great condition! For
sale or rent. On the
Luxapalila River. Call
Dennis, 242-0786.
EMPLOYMENT
Asst. Property
Ma na ge r / Mi ni
Storage Operator,
PT. Looking for a
people person with
strong technical
skills. Experience
desired: mini stor-
age/U-Haul opera-
tions, customer
service, profcient in
Microsoft Office.
Columbus, MS. Send
resume to:
cara@gatewaycen-
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MISCELLANEOUS
Wooden dinette set
with 6 chairs, great
shape, $120; large
gray/beige love seat,
like new, used very
little, two large cush-
ions, $60. 329-3216
or 549-3006.
Cherry wood ar-
moire; large fle cab-
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and chairs (black).
Peggy, 662-329-
0146
Whirlpool natural
gas dryer, white, $50.
328-2851
Need a Free Roof Es-
timate? Call (662)
364-7202 or (662)
242-2825
14” roof ventilator
$65; food warmer
with 16 trays $375;
commercial duty
Riter Saw 2 1/4 hp
w/bottom cabin
$375; tiller for Club
Cadet tractor 3ft
wide $275; 1 pair
tree climbers w/ belt
$225, obo for each.
CASH ONLY. 662-
570-9279
Corner shower kit,
pan, 39” white fber-
glass walls, 2 glass
panels, glass door,
grab bar. $100. 241-
6595.
JACKET SALE: Kids
NASCAR and Cartoon
Jackets - Buy one at
regular price and get
second one at half
price. LADIES JACK-
ETS - Betty Boop,
Tweety, Diva, M&M,
others, $75. OVER
200 JACKETS IN
STOCK. Come see:
Sibley’s Collectibles,
362 Waverley Ferry
Road, Ph: 329-1420.
Open 6 days, 12-5.
PETS & ANIMALS
Staffordshire Terrier
Puppies - Blue Fawn
with White mark-
ings, 2 females, 1
male. Sire and Dam
UKC reg. Ready for
pickup. $800. Daniel
901-461-5324 or
662-386-5157.
REAL ESTATE
Downtown apart-
ments for rent - Stu-
dioThe purpose of
this group is to pro-
vide learning and
mentoring opportu-
nities as well as net-
working and
association with
state and national
organizations. As a
community partner,
our plan is to host an
Annual Showcase of
Storytellers and
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ing is open to any-
one who is
interested. 2 BR
available. Furnished
and unfurnished
available. All appli-
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on site. Priced from
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574-7176 for more
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HOUSE FOR RENT:
3BR/2 BA, 2413 3rd
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accepted. 425-9071
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courtyard, secure
neighborhood. Plan-
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porch and double
garage. Call for an
appointment! 241-
6595.
FOR ALL YOUR REAL
ESTATE NEEDS - call
Sheri Lipsey, ReMax
Real Estate 327-7750
or 662-549-1354
SERVICES
PROVIDED
For your best deals
on topsoil, sand,
gravel, clay, and
crushed concrete for
driveways, parking
pads, etc. Call D&D
Materials for a free
estimate! 662-549-
3431. Pickup or de-
livery!
Need spring clean-
ing all year long? Call
Shelia, 240-8979.
References available.
FREE
CLASSIFIEDS!!
GOT SOMETHING
YOU WANT TO SELL?
4. Linebacker Battle: I promised that the third
linebacker spot would be the most intense battle,
and it has been, most of the spring. Virtually
every linebacker has been frst on the depth chart,
at some point, but freshman Bernardrick McK-
inney seems to have the advantage, right now. My
favorite to win the job, Chris Hughes, has had a
good spring, aer returning from on and off-the-
feld problems during the 2011 season. Christian
Holmes, Matt Wells, and Ferlando Bohanna are
slightly behind, but they could vault ahead with
solid spring game performances.
5. Safety Play: e safety position, to put it
bluntly, is the eyesore of a promising Bulldog de-
fense. Dee Arrington, Louis Watson, and Jay
Hughes are the primary guys, with star Safety
Nickoe Whitley limited for the spring, due to re-
covering from an Achilles injury. Arrington is the
most talented of that group, and looks like the fa-
vorite to be the strong safety, aer a solid spring.
e rest of the group has had so-so springs. I
cringe, thinking about the lack of depth at safety,
if Nickoe Whitley isn’t healthy. ey could sur-
prise me and have a monster spring game, but I
have a feeling fans might want to get familiar with
incoming freshmen Quadry Antoine, Kivon
Coman, and Deonte Evans.
5 Players to Watch
1. Joe Morrow: e vertical game has been non-
existent since O’Neal Wilder le the team during
the spring of 2010. Michael Carr was expected to
fll that role, but he never lived up to expectations
and has now le the team. Enter Joe Morrow, the
6’4”, 205-pound redshirt freshman wide receiver,
who wowed on the scout team, this past season.
He has had a solid spring and is expected to be
the Bulldogs’ deep threat in 2012. Saturday’s
spring game will be fans’ frst chance to see the
player many think can help take the Bulldog’s of-
fense to the next level.
2. Blaine Clausell: Clausell got beat out for the
starting le tackle job, last year. He got a chance
to open this spring as the top guy. e Alabama
native has held onto the job all spring. If the ath-
letic lineman lives up to his potential, then the
Bulldogs offensive line should have better balance
than in 2011; the position would also be solidifed
for the next three years.
3. Denico Autry: e pass-rush for Mississippi
State, the past four seasons, has been more putrid
than “Big 12” defenses. e coaching staff looked
to solve that problem by bringing in fve-star de-
fensive end Denico Autry. e freakishly athletic
player has battled Shane McCardell all spring for
the starting job. Autry still has a learning curve
to overcome, but he should be causing problems
for SEC quarterbacks next season.
4. Bernardrick McKinney: Several players have
had good practices, but McKinney has been the
talk of the spring. e K.J. Wright clone looks to
be the likely starter at middle linebacker. Fans
should get a chance to see the next Bulldog star
linebacker and player, at the Maroon-White
game.
5. Darius Slay: Slay came along slowly in 2011,
but started to become a key player toward the end
of the season. He has had a good spring, and very
well could supplant Corey Broomfeld to start
alongside Jonathan Banks. e explosive athlete
could earn that starting job with a strong spring
game.
Final Spring Game Outlook
I have a feeling that this will be one of the more
competitive spring games and worth the $25 ad-
mission. If you can’t make the game, it will be
shown live on ESPN3.com and will be televised
on CSS at 7 p.m., on April 22nd.
Jeremiah Short
jshort@realstorypublishing.com
Jeremiah Short covers Mississippi State University football
and basketball. Follow him on Twitter, @JeremiahShort26;
or join his Facebook blog, Real Story Sports: J.Short’s Blog.
“PREVIEW” cont. from pg. 22
Courtesy Photo
Tyler Russell
TRiVIA ANsWEr: Three
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