P. 1
2012-04-26 The County Times

2012-04-26 The County Times

|Views: 78|Likes:
The County Times newspaper. Serving St. Mary's County, Maryland. The online presence for The County Times is provided by Southern Maryland Online (www.somd.com).
The County Times newspaper. Serving St. Mary's County, Maryland. The online presence for The County Times is provided by Southern Maryland Online (www.somd.com).

More info:

Published by: Southern Maryland Online on Apr 26, 2012
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/17/2015

pdf

text

original

www.somd.

com

WAR OF 1812 REMEMBERED
LOCAL SIGNIFICANCE BATTLES IN FOCUS Summer Events Across State Mark Bicentennial
Details of PlanMaryland Decoded

Thursday, April 26, 2012

Price: Free

By Sarah Miller Staff Writer State and county officials visited Asbury Solomons to talk about PlanMaryland and the local implications it brings. The League of Women Voters of Calvert and St. Mary’s counties and the Concerned Black Women of Calvert County, among other groups, called together Director of Planning Services with Maryland Department of Planning Rich Josephson, St. Mary’s Director of Land Use and Growth Management Phil Shire and Calvert Director of Planning and Zoning Chuck Johnston to discuss PlanMaryland.

See Page 4

By Guy Leonard Staff Writer

JSF Test Flights Continue Despite Strike

Union members working on the Joint Strike Fighter project at Naval Air Station Patuxent River as well as Fort Worth, Texas and Edwards Air Force Base in California went on strike Monday to protest failed contract negotiations with their employer, Lockheed Martin. While government officials are still assessing the delays the strike could cause for the F-35 project, they said test flights would continue in the meantime. Labor representatives with the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers

y Photo B

a Frank M

rquart

See Page 5

Page: 16

What’s Inside
4 10 14 16 18 20 County News Education Crime Feature Story Letters Obituaries

The County Times

Thursday, April 26, 2012

2

Also Inside
21 22 22 24 25 26 Senior News Newsmakers Money Community Business Directory Games

“We’re throwing money at a problem that could be solved at a basic level…What are they going to do when we meet the milestones and the bay continues to deteriorate? We’re spending a lot of time on something that isn’t going to work.”
Columns Entertainment Ent. Calendar Comm. Calendar Fishing Sports

27 28 28 29 29 30

– Commissioner Larry Jarboe on costly environmental mandates to the county.

Weather

Watch

The law offices of P.a. Hotchkiss & associates
Providing Excellent Service For Over 20 Years
Auto Accidents Workers’ comp
• Divorce/Separation • Support/Custody • Domestic Violence • Criminal/Traffic • DWI/MVA Hearings Power of Attorney • Name Change • Adoption • Wills • Guardianship

Free InItIal ConsultatIon

Middle School Students across the county are preparing for a weekend on stage. While Esperanza Middle School students prepare for “Seussical” (pictured above) April 27 and 28 at 6:30 p.m., Spring Ridge Middle School students rehearse for “High School Musical, Jr.” April 27 and 28 at 7 p.m. and May 11 at 7 p.m.

county

Scan this “Times Code” with your smart phone
Accepting:
99 Smallwood Dr. Waldorf, MD • 206 Washignton Ave. LaPlata, MD

SERVING CHARLES • ST. MARY’S • PG • CALVERT

(301) 932-7700 (301) 870-7111

Stephanie Boyd and her daughter, Sydney, read together at Little Flower School’s Pre-K Book Swap. Each child brought a book to exchange at the fifth annual book swap for Kaitlin Allen’s class.

community

Do You Feel Crabby When You Get Your Insurance Bill in the Mail? Give Us A Call.

On T he Cover

You’ll Be Glad You Did.

Gary Simpson, Matt Laidley, Katie Facchina 7480 Crain Highway • La Plata, MD 20646 301-934-8437

An Independent Agent Representing: ERIE INSURANCE GROUP Standing: Dan Burris, Jake Kuntz, Seated: Lisa Squires, Susan Ennis, Donna Burris

April Hancock PO Box 407 Bryans Road, MD 20616 301-743-9000

Photo By Frank Marquart

Burris’ Olde Towne Insurance
Leonardtown, MD • Bus: (301) 475-3151 www.danburris.com

Auto - Home - Business - Life

Two hundred years ago, Southern Maryland was in the middle of a war between Great Britain and the newly founded United States. Now, St. Mary’s County is getting involved in a statewide commemoration of the War of 1812.

3

Thursday, April 26, 2012

The County Times

NOW ONLINE
Featuring: Weekly Circular, Shopping Lists, Recipes, eCoupons and much more.
www.mckayssupermarkets.com
Visit Us Online at

The County Times

Thursday, April 26, 2012

ews
The speakers took questions from the audience, which ranged from whether Johnston and Shire feel the state is trying to wrest control from individual jurisdictions to how the local Amish community will fare under new land use regulations. Shire said the county started out being very critical of PlanMaryland, but as they learned more they discovered it is not drastically different from the county’s goals, and the county will retain a measure of control over growth. He said St. Mary’s has been working to localize growth and keep some land untouched by using a TDR program. For areas developed, equal areas are preserved. He said PlanMaryland meshes somewhat with the growth the county has been

Continued From Page 1

Details of PlanMaryland Decoded
trying to control by funneling it into town centers. Calvert has implemented similar programs, Johnston said, keeping growth clustered to town centers instead of allowing strip development up and down Route 4. Josephson said the state is trying to make sure resources are preserved for the future, adding that once land is cleared for development, it cannot go back to the way it once was. As for the Amish, Shire said they’re taking care of themselves. “We’re finding the Amish community does have some lobby power in Annapolis,” Shire said, adding they got exemptions added to legislative bills for houses not on the power grid.

Rising Road Maintenance Costs Mean Making Do with Less
By Guy Leonard Staff Writer As spring and summer approach and temperatures rise, the time comes to begin resurfacing roads. But for the county’s Department of Public Works and Transportation a lack of funding resources and rising prices of materials means it becomes more challenging to maintain the county roads everybody uses. According to local government records, the county maintains 629 miles of roadway and the cost of road resurfacing nearly doubled in the past decade, mostly due to the cost spike in oil, a key ingredient in asphalt. This means the county has had to cut back on the amount of road it can resurface each year. County figures show that in 2002, the budget for asphalt overlay was just $1.5 million, but that could pay for treating eight to 10 miles of road. At that time, asphalt was $36 a ton and surface treatment, which is less intensive than a full overlay, could treat up to 80 miles of road with just $575,000. But this year the same overlay budget is $3 million and has treated just under 17 miles, county records show, at a cost of $71 a ton. The resurfacing budget now stands at $654,000, but will only treat 39 miles of road. Road resurfacing projects may become even harder to pursue, county officials said, since the current level of funding has been proposed to remain flat over the next six years because of tight economic conditions. Public works director George Erichsen said Tuesday his office does not receive significant reports of complaints about the conditions of county roads, but the short fall of funding means that keeping all the roads maintained is a constant shuffle. “Every year we prioritize,” Erichsen said. “You’ve got to base it on traffic volume and pavement conditions.” The situation is complicated by the fact that the state, which maintains perhaps a quarter of the roads in the county, sometimes asks the county to take over the maintenance duties. “They always try to give us roads. Why wouldn’t they?” Erichsen said. While resurfacing roads is increasingly expensive, the county must continue to try and do as much as possible, he said, since the costs of actually repairing a crumbling road is four to five times higher. At a recent informational retreat in Piney Point, the county’s Zoning Board of Appeals heard from Erichsen’s deputy, John Groeger, explained some county roads have never been overlaid and continue to age.

4

Photo by Sarah Miller Director of Planning Services with Maryland Department of Planning Rich Josephson, St. Mary’s Director of Land Use and Growth Management Phil Shire and Calvert Director of Planning and Zoning Chuck Johnston discuss PlanMaryland.

SEE THE WORLD’S LARGEST CIRCUS UNDER THE BIG TOP!

CIRCUS S TARS
ST. MARY’S CO. FAIRGROUNDS
BUY TICKETS IN ADVANCE AT TICKETS.COM & 1-888-332-5200

C

LEONARDTOWN
WED. MAY

9

&THUR. MAY

10

SHOWS AT 4:30 PM 7:30 PM

$5 SAVE ON

E ANC ADV ULT AD ETS TICK
ELEPHANT RIDES PONY RIDES FACE PAINTING 1 HOUR BEFORE SHOWS

FREETICKETS FOR KIDS AT GOTOTHECIRCUS.COM
INFO 1.800.796.5672 M-F 9-5 GOTOTHECIRCUS.COM

SE E BAB VALY !

5

Thursday, April 26, 2012

The County Times

ews
JSF Test Flights Continue Despite Strike
“What they were trying to do was take away our health plan and go with LM Healthworks,” said Joe Alviar of the machinists union, who joined picketers outside of Gate 3 on Hermanville Road Monday. “It’s a high deductible.” Alviar the proposed health care shift would have turned a $150 hospital visit into a $2,000 one. Alviar also said Lockheed Martin wanted to eliminate the defined pension plan for new hires as well as only give employees a 25 cent increase for cost of living instead of the $2.25 the union demanded. “It was the equivalent of giving them a pat on the head and sending them back to work,” Alviar said. Gilbert Torres, a day-shift steward who works on the F-35 project, said the cost of living Local machinists who work on the F-35 project at Pax River strike to show their increase was essential for many newer employees disapproval of a health care and cost of living deal offered by their employer, because of the expensive nature of living in SouthLockheed Martin, earlier this week. ern Maryland. He said he spent twice as much to pay for his local apartment with less living space than he did while working on the project in Fort Worth. District 776 told The County Times that about 150 employ“The only reason I have that apartment is ees here joined more than 3,500 who went on strike in Texas because of my [military] disability check,” Torres said. “[Emafter the union rejected a proposal from the corporation they ployees] go on detachment to prove these planes work, without said would have foisted increased health care deductibles onto what we do, that plane is a paper weight. workers as well as a much lower cost of living increase than “To offer us 25 cents, it’s an insult.” requested. Lockheed Martin’s official response to the strike stated: “We are disappointed that employees represented by the International Association of Machinists have rejected the company’s last, best and final offer and have decided to strike. The union and company had negotiated in good faith since March 26. We believe our offer included terms that constituted a fair and equitable contract for the IAM members, including wage increases of 3 percent annually in each of the three years, a $3,000 signing bonus, an annual cost of living supplement of $800, increased retirement income for current employees, and various other improvements.” The statement continued by saying the corporation would continue its operations during the strike. Joe Dellavedova, spokesman for the Pentagon’s main F-35 program office, confirmed test flights at Patuxent River and elsewhere were continuing. “We hope the corporation and the union will come to an agreement to ensure the progress that’s been made on the project for the past year,” Dellavedova said. “Impacts on the development process and testing are being assessed.” The Joint Strike Fighter has been billed as the next leap forward technologically for air superiority fighters, but has been subject to cost overruns and setbacks in testing. Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta, however, praised F-35 project workers earlier this year for the work they had done to make the fighter viable and lifted a probationary status on the plane’s development. guyleonard@countytimes.net

Continued From Page 1

Pax Partnership Invests $1 Million in SMCM Expansion
By Carrie Munn Staff Writer The Patuxent Partnership (TPP), a non-profit organization that focuses on science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) advancements to benefit Southern Maryland’s government, private industry and academia sectors, announced earlier this month that they plan to invest $1 million into expanding the physics department at St. Mary’s College of Maryland (SMCM). “STEM investments are important to maintain a solid foundational base in research and development, and the teaming between The Patuxent Partnership and the physics department of St. Mary’s College is a great example of the Southern Maryland commitment to that effort,” said Vice Admiral David Architzel, Commander, Naval Air Systems Command in a press release. Bonnie Green, TPP’s executive director, said the investment “dovetails with the Education Partnership Agreement we entered into with NAWC-AD and St. Mary’s College.” She explained while SMCM faculty and students have been working in the physics lab at NAS Patuxent River for several years, this expansion “will create additional opportunities for research, internships and post-graduation employment.” The $1 million will help expand the applied physics cirriculum and labs, as well as bolster the development of new cooperative programs at the the college over the next six to eight years. “It’s a win for the college, a win for the students and a win for the Navy,” Dr. Frank Narducci, Project Leader for the Atomic Physics Research group, said. carriemunn@countytimes.net

Compare Your Premium With This Program!
General Liability rates are based on a per employee rate rather than payroll or receipts. Estimate your own premium* by multiplying the rate below by the number of full-time employees. Part-time rates are also available.
*Premium is subject to a policy minimum which varies based on coverage amount selected. Eligibility requirements apply.
CONTRACTOR TYPE Air Conditioning and Heating Systems Carpentry – General Remodeling Carpet and Floor Covering Installation Drywall Installation Electrical Wiring Lawn Care Painting Plumbing – No Heating LIABILITY $500,000/Accident $1,000,000 Aggregate 669 482 334 236 369 219 448 1011 LIABILITY $1,000,000/Accident $2,000,000 Aggregate 850 613 425 300 469 278 569 1285

ur P k you to o olicyholders Than

Premium estimates based upon MD rates effective 3/1/2011

Home • Auto • Business • Life

The County Times

Thursday, April 26, 2012

6

Maryland tions Serving Southern 2 Loca
20865 Callaway Village Way

ews
Leah’s House Fights Foreclosure
By Guy Leonard Staff Writer The director of Leah’s House, the county’s shelter dedicated to housing homeless women and their children, said the shelter is fighting a notice from their lender calling for them to pay the balance of their mortgage or face foreclosure. The balance of the mortgage is over $300,000 and Marguerite Morris, the founder and director of Leah’s House in Callaway, said failure to pay could mean having to close their doors. “Whenever foreclosure is looming out there, it’s a possibility,” Morris told The County Times. “We believe in miracles, we’re operating as usual.” Morris said the financial institution that holds the mortgage on the shelter, Harbor Bank in Baltimore, had an agreement with Leah’s House that allowed the organization to make monthly payments on the mortgage but retained the right to foreclose on the property at any time. Morris said the bank exercised that right last week, but when news of the possible foreclosure was reported on the WJLA broadcast station in Baltimore, the bank reached out to Morris for talks. “They’ve asked us to come to Baltimore and talk about it,” Morris said. Morris was able to get enough donations and loans five years ago to purchase land in Callaway where the old Happy Land bar once was. It had been abandoned and had become dilapidated and Morris had it bulldozed to make room for the shelter facility. Morris has beseeched the county government each year for some level of funding assistance like that received by the Three Oaks Shelter in Lexington Park, but the county has not given any money to the shelter. Morris said she and some of her volunteers (paid staff experienced a lay off due to the lack of money) will still come to the upcoming public hearing on the county’s operating budget to seek help. “It’s been an uphill battle trying to get equal access to resources,” Morris said. guyleonard@countytimes.net

In Callaway:
301.994.1460
Monday - Saturday Closed Sundays

In Solomons:
13372 HG Trueman Rd

Now With Self-Serve Dog Wash
410.326.4006

Open 7 Days a Week

We Carry Wholesome Foods and Treats, Fun Toys, Leashes and Collars and so Much More!

www.pepperspetpantry.com
Limi te

No Criminal Charges for Trooper in Restaurant Rant
By Guy Leonard Staff Writer Maryland State Trooper Cpl. Paul Trossbach may not have shown the best behavior by engaging in a rant about his service following a meal at a Prince Frederick Ruby Tuesday’s last month, but the state found assault allegations made against him by waitress Amy Howes were unfounded, the Calvert Gazette has learned. Laura Martin, Calvert County State’s Attorney, said Monday that while she believed the March 22 events occurred as originally reported by several media outlets, there was simply not enough evidence to show that Trossbach had any intention to actually assault Howes with a check presenter, as she had alleged. “I have absolute confidence it happened,” Martin said. “There was no criminal intent.” In a letter to Trossbach’s commanding officer, Martin wrote Howes claimed the slapping of her arm was intentional, but Trossbach claimed it was not. There were also allegations that Trossbach threatened to have the restaurant shut down, turned on his car’s police lights in the parking lot and warned customers of being poisoned if they ate at the establishment. Trossbach denied accosting patrons in the parking lot. While there was no evidence of criminal intent, Martin said Trossbach’s behavior was not acceptable. “This in no way condones the behavior of Cpl. Trossbach or is meant to belittle the embarrassment and emotional stress to Ms. Howes,” Martin wrote. “As a community we expect and demand that our law enforcement professionals conduct themselves in an appropriate manner at all times, whether on duty or off duy. “Conduct such as that displayed by Cpl. Trossbach, while not criminal, should not — and I’m sure, will not — be tolerated by the Maryland State Police as it casts a blemish on the entire organization.” Trossbach, a veteran state trooper who currently serves at the Leonardtown Barrack in St. Mary’s County, still faces an internal investigation into his conduct during the incident. The incident started when Trossbach became dissatisfied over his and his family’s meals being undercooked and became irate after waiting nearly 10 minutes for the check, Martin’s office stated. Howes claimed, in initial interviews, that Trossbach went on a profanity-laced tirade about her service. Trossbach admitted he only remembered saying ‘What the hell is the matter with you?’ to Howes. When Howes walked past the table, she alleged, the trooper slapped her with the presenter and told her to ‘make it quick’, adding that while she was not hurt by the incident, it rattled her. One witness sitting nearby said they did not notice the altercation, nor did they hear the supposed slap. Trossbach admitted saying he would report the restaurant to the local health department, adding while his voice was not loud, he did use profanity, Martin’s letter read. One witness to that conversation told investigators Trossbach was “agitated” and “not innocent” in the affair. To counter the allegations he had turned on police lights in the parking lot and yelled at patrons, Trossbach said he had simply reacted instinctively to a speeding motorist who had entered the parking lot.

d

$

eO Tim nly!

150

Special In o v e Discounted M Cable
Playground Free on Site Storage with Every Apartment Walk to Shopping/ Restaurants
Amenity Package Available

301-862-5307

Call For More Information: Bella Bailey, Marketing & Leasing MGR.

Owned and Operated by

23314 Surrey Way • California, Maryland 20619 Fax: 301-737-0853 • leasing@apartmentsofwildewood.com

301-737-0737

7

Thursday, April 26, 2012

The County Times

QBH Gradview County Times Half Ad_Layout 1 9/6/11 4:41 PM Page 1

21541 Great Mills Road • Lexington Park, MD 20653

MHBR No. 103

The County Times

Thursday, April 26, 2012

8

HanGinG baskets

ews
County Frets Cost of Environmental Mandates as Deadlines Loom
By Guy Leonard Staff Writer In a little more than a month, the county leadership must approve a final plan to curb pollution going into the Chesapeake Bay watershed as part of tough state requirements. On top of that are demands from the state to update the local water and sewer plan as well as the local analysis of where new septic systems can and cannot go per a recent law passed in Annapolis. Some of the mandates are due by the end of the year and with the costs of implementing tough pollution controls expected to rise, the Board of County Commissioners is trying to think of what they can commit to with little to no money to expend. The Watershed Implementation Plan (WIP), which the county environmental staff has been building to meet strict state and federal guidelines to reduce nitrogen, phosphorous and sediment going into the watershed, could cost close to $200 million by some estimates just to reduce what septic systems produce. The addition of the deadlines for other plan updates and what Plan Maryland has in store for the county in dictating growth priorities only complicates matters. Commissioner Todd Morgan asked land use director Phil Shire if there were enough employees to plan for all the contingencies, as there seemed to be so many. “As well as we can be,” Shire answered. Morgan (R-Great Mills) said the county should not “commit any resources while playing the analysis game,” essentially cautioning that the county must count the costs of coming up with a plan without much funding to support it. County Administrator John Savich concurred, advising the county only make plans for what it can commit to fiscally. “What we may want is a plan that comes in pieces,” Savich said. Commissioner Larry Jarboe (R-Golden Beach) questioned the entire wisdom of all the environmental mandates being put on the county, since the bay’s fundamental health was more a product of natural pollutant filters like the oyster and menhaden fish. “We’re throwing money at a problem that could be solved at a basic level,” Jarboe said. “What are they going to do when we meet the milestones and the bay continues to deteriorate? We’re spending a lot of time on something that isn’t going to work.” guyleonard@countytimes.net

Select Group of Standard 10” Hanging Baskets

3 FOR $4500

SPECIAL

Choose from Impatiens, Petunias and more!

Geraniums

10 FOR 37
$
4” Pots

50

25% Off When You Buy 10 or More

Only

$ 75

3

ea.

Verbena ColleCtion

Restrictions Stay Despite Crab Population Increase
By Guy Leonard Staff Writer The state’s Department of Natural Resources (DNR) says the blue crab population is the highest it has been since 1993, but watermen will have still have some of the same restrictions on harvesting the iconic crustacean as they have when harvesting years were bad. The annual winter dredge survey of the Chesapeake Bay and surrounding waters showed there were an estimated 764 million crabs that spent the winter in local waters, an increase of about 66 percent over last year’s survey number. The number of juvenile crabs is estimated to be about 587 million, which state officials said is nearly three times what it was last year. The survey found, however, that the number of spawning females dropped from 190 million to just 97 million; officials said it was a cause for concern but the number of spawning females remains above the minimum safe threshold for the population. “The drop in abundance of spawningage females is neither unusual nor unprecedented – in fact, we expect this type of variation in populations from year to year,” said DNR Secretary John Griffin. “While last year’s severe storms and the warm winter may have had an impact, we are optimistic that our record recruitment will bode well for next year’s adults, both male and female. Meanwhile, it is our job to make sure that fishing occurs at an appropriate level, which we will continue to do.” Tommy Zinn, a Calvert County waterman and president of the local waterman’s association, said watermen worked with the state to come up with amicable conditions for both groups. He said watermen agreed to a limit on the daily harvest of female crabs to extend the length of the season and were also able to have two, two-week season closures eliminated. Still, there will be days that the fishery will be closed, Zinn said. Many of the restrictions revolve around female crabs, he said, which are important to the industry as they allow restaurants to stock up on crab meat which can be sold during the winter. Though DNR officials have said restrictions on harvesting will remain in place, they expect the final tally for the 2011 crab harvest to be strong. “As we have done in years past, we will work with our stakeholders and our advisory commissions to develop a sustainable harvest level equivalent to last year,” said DNR Fisheries Director Tom O’Connell. “The preliminary Bay-wide harvest for 2011 is estimated to be 67.3 million pounds, again confirming that a robust industry can coexist with regulations designed to rebuild a self-sustaining, healthy blue crab population.” Both Maryland and Virginia banded together to try and rebuild the crab population when its numbers suffered greatly in 2008 by restricting the harvest of female crabs as well as imposing other limits.

All Colors Buy 3 Get 4

th*

FREE *Lowest Priced Plant is FREE

espoma orGaniC plant Foods
• Helps prevent blossom end rot. • Specially formulated to produce consistently plump, juicy tomatoes. 4 lb. bag

Tomato-tone

• Preferred by professional rosarians. • Provides a safe, long-lasting reservoir of nutrients. 4 lb. bag

Rose-tone

$ 88

5

$ 88

ea.

5

• Originally developed for professional gardeners. • Provides safe, continuous feeding for all vegetables. 4 lb. bag

Garden-tone

ea.

$ 88

5

ea.

• Formulated for acid-loving plants: Hollies, Azaleas, Dogwoods, Evergreens, and Rhododendrons. • Used by professionals everywhere. 4 lb. bag

Holly-tone

$ 88

5

ea.

Wentworth Nursery
30315 Three Notch Rd, Charlotte Hall 20622
301-884-5292 800-558-5292

Sales good thru May 1st, 2012

Charlotte Hall

1700 Solomon’s Island Rd, Prince Frederick 20678
410-535-3664 1-866-535-3664

Prince Frederick

5 minutes North of Hollywood 41170 Oakville Road Mechanicsville 20659
301-373-9245 • 800-451-1427

Oakville

Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8-7, Sat. 8-6, Sun. 9-6

Hours: Mon.-Fri. 7:30-6, Sat. 7:30-5

9

Thursday, April 26, 2012

The County Times
Irene Parrish B. Realty
Irene Parrish
Broker
22188 Three Notch Rd. Suite A Lexington Park, MD 20653

Addie McBride
s, Inc. Franzen Realtor

Thank You for Your Business!

Cell: 301-481-6767 Home: 301-737-1669 www.addiemcbride.com addiemcbride@verizon.net

Helping Good People Find Good Homes.

301-863-7002 301-481-7244
CELL OFFICE

www.franzenrealtors.com

22316 Three Notch Rd. Lexington Park, MD 20653 Office: 1-800-848-6092 • Office: 301-862-2222 Fax Office: 301-862-1060

www.2hdb.com/IreneParrish

30320 Triangle Dr. Unit 4 Charlotte Hall, MD 20622

Farrell Auction Service provides auction services for a variety of events and purposes.
(301) 885-9145 • (240) 412-0215

www.farrellauctionservice.com

Call Today! (301) 884-8400

Edward Middleton
Commercial Agent
White Plains Corporate Center II 4475 Regency Place Suite 101 White Plains, Maryland 20695 301-632-6320 office • 301-632-6323 fax 240-925-0440 cell • 301-769-2177 home office edward.middleton1@verizon.net

visit us at:

Economyrvs.com

29020 Three Notch Road (Route 5) Mechanicsville, MD 20659

www.shasho.com

308 San Souci Plaza, California, MD

301-737-4241

(301) 884-8448 • (410) 535-9320

30320 Triangle Dr. Unit 4 Charlotte Hall, MD 20622
www.southernmarylandpools.com

(301) 862-3544
21779 Tulagi Pl Ste A Lexington Park, MD 20653
www.lindascafelpcity.com

21541 Great Mills Road Lexington Park, MD 20653 (301) 862-1000

Creative Custom Framing & Art

www.taylorgascompany.com

Tuesday ~ Friday: 10 a.m. ~ 5 p.m. Saturday: 10 a.m. ~ 2 p.m.

Hours:

301-904-2532
MD Antiques Center ~ Bldg. 2 ~ 26005 Point Lookout Rd ~Leonardtown, MD 20650

Spotlight On

The County Times

Thursday, April 26, 2012

10

Academy of Finance Celebrates Inaugural Completers
By Carrie Munn Staff Writer Administrators, staff and program advisory board members expressed how proud they were to celebrate the 17 students who will become the inaugural completers of the Academy of Finance. A special ceremony to acknowledge the accomplishment was held on Monday at the Dr. James A. Forrest Career and Technology Center. The group of seniors began the course three years ago and, in addition to diplomas, will receive a certificate of completion from the National Academy of Finance at graduation. Remarks from Superintendent of Schools Michael Martirano and keynote speaker Bob Schaller, who recently took an interim position as chair of the instrumental advisory board, summed up the pride felt in seeing the program come to fruition. “You blazed a trail,” Schaller told the seniors. He recognized Cynthia Baden, the Academy of Finance teacher, saying she “really made something out of nothing.” The Academy of Finance (AOF) administrators also recognized the work of many it required to get the special academy up and running, including advisory board members who offer continual support and lend their expertise in helping bring experiential learning into the classrooms. As they introduced each of the 17 completers and shared some comments from them, it became evident that students coming through the academy of finance not only learned a great deal about business, banking and investment, but also became more confident and comfortable with public speaking among several other life skills they will carry with them into their college and career paths. Many students had a plan for after graduation, with several mentioning obtaining an associate’s degree through College of Southern Maryland (CSM) before heading off to a four-year institution, and some, the military. Special awards were given to the top three students. Ashley Lynn Dorsey, who is currently dually enrolled in the Academy of Finance and CSM, earned the Award of Excellence with the class’ highest grade point average. The first $1,000 scholarship to an AOF student, courtesy of the St. Mary’s Business, Education and Community Alliance, Inc. (BECA), was awarded to Paul Grassinger. Advisory board member Colleen Blundell, of Cedar Point Federal Credit Union, said it was Grassinger’s poignant statement about overcoming an obstacle that really struck the selection committee: “I’m not a quitter,” he stated. Grassinger shared his plans to major in mathematics and economics at the University of Pittsburgh and his goal to become an actuary and eventually return to St. Mary’s County. On Tuesday morning, the AOF students were back in their classroom, where Baden said they had continued the celebration with leftover cake and gifts from long-time supporter, John Walters of Edward Jones Investments. “So many people have been involved with this since before we even had kids in a classroom,” Baden said, adding, “We all can’t wait to see what these students are doing after college.” Now fully underway, the Academy of Finance at Chopticon High School sees students transferring from their home schools to be part of this unique completer program, which Baden says utilizes a constantly-updating curriculum with no textbooks, and an abundance of guest speakers and trips that bring the finance and business element of every lesson to life in a very hands-on, applicable way. AOF Students have been working hard to make the most of their Blue Crabs Night themed ‘Experience St. Mary’s’ coming up on May 15, marketing and networking to make it a successful fundraiser for students that will follow in their footsteps. For more information about the event and the Academy of Finance call 301-475-0215 or email clbaden@smcps.org. carriemun@countytimes.net

Photo by Carrie Munn

CREATE YOUR

A & C Stone Makers uses a cutting edge process of creating durable hardscapes from solid monolithic concrete in a variety of applications including:

Perfect Staycation

AND SAVE THOUSANDS!

Retaining Walls • Landscape Edging • Hardscape Design • Patios & Walkways Water Features •Stairs & Steps • Pool Surrounds & More!
ON AS SEEN K WOR D IY N E T ! ON HGTV

Stone Makers Can Increase In Value By As Much As

&CStone Makers 301-884-6086 A aandcstonemakers.com
All Law Enforcement, Active Military & Public Safety Employees

140%

A & C Stone Makers can provide unique hardscape solutions that are more affordable than the traditional rock masonry. The process is not only longlasting, durable and cost-effective, it is also highly customizable. We can help create personalized designs that are beautiful, functional and responsive to any need.

Homes should be sanctuaries, and there is a unique kind of peace that is created when your surroundings perfectly complement your home. Stone Makers can calm you. Inspire you. Welcome you. A beautifully planned landscape with hardscape features increases the value of a home and adds warmth, color and structure.

$100 Over $1,000 OFF Any Project $1,000 OFF Any Project Over $10,000 10% OFF
OR OR

11

Thursday, April 26, 2012

The County Times

Addie McBride
s, Inc. Franzen Realtor

Thank You for Your Business!

Cell: 301-481-6767 Home: 301-737-1669 www.addiemcbride.com addiemcbride@verizon.net

Helping Good People Find Good Homes.

PRIDE IN THE PARK Inaugural Parade and Spring Fest May 4 - 6
Inaugural Parade - May 5th, 10:00 a.m. Spring Fest - May 4, 5 & 6 St. Mary’s Square
Parade Route: Bay District Volunteer Fire Department westward on South Shangri-La Drive; turning right onto South Essex Drive; turning right onto Great Mills Road and traveling all the way to Raley’s Home Furnishings.

Irene Parrish B. Realty
Irene Parrish
Broker
22188 Three Notch Rd. Suite A Lexington Park, MD 20653

301-863-7002 301-481-7244
CELL OFFICE

www.franzenrealtors.com

22316 Three Notch Rd. Lexington Park, MD 20653 Office: 1-800-848-6092 • Office: 301-862-2222 Fax Office: 301-862-1060

www.2hdb.com/IreneParrish

30320 Triangle Dr. Unit 4 Charlotte Hall, MD 20622

308 San Souci Plaza, California, MD

301-737-4241

(301) 885-9145 • (240) 412-0215
If you would like to promote an event in this fashion please contact: Matt Suite at SOMD Publishing

mattsuite@countytimes.net

301-399-6417

(301) 884-8448 • (410) 535-9320

30320 Triangle Dr. Unit 4 Charlotte Hall, MD 20622
www.southernmarylandpools.com

We Ship Anything, Anywhere.

301-863-9812 Fax 301-863-4859 21800 N. Shangri La Dr. Unit #3 Lexington, Park MD 20653

Great Mills High School Parade Band Miss St. Mary’s County Farm Bureau St. Mary’s Rod & Classic Cars Karmel Divaz MC of Southern Maryland St. Mary’s County Library Book Cart Drill Team 2 Wheel Suspects MC Girl Scouts of the Nation’s Capital Pop Scriber’s Choo-Choo Train Deuces Wild Racing Hogs & Heroes Foundation Lexington Park United Methodist Church Patuxent River Sail & Power Squadron St. Mary’s County Sheriff’s Office D.J. Dragonman - Knight’s Karaoke Southern Maryland Electric Cooperative Taylor Gas Company Liberty Tax Service Travel Leaders Mike’s Bikes Southern Maryland JobSource Care Net Pregnancy Center of Southern Maryland MedStar St. Mary’s Hospital - Health Connections Bay District Volunteer Fire Department Lexington Park Rescue Squad

- Parade Highlights -

Edward Middleton
Commercial Agent
White Plains Corporate Center II 4475 Regency Place Suite 101 White Plains, Maryland 20695 301-632-6320 office • 301-632-6323 fax 240-925-0440 cell • 301-769-2177 home office edward.middleton1@verizon.net

www.shasho.com

aleys R
SINCE 1958

Information: Spring Fest - 301-737-0700 Farm Market 301-863-7700 Parade - 11/2/2011 4:24 PM Page 1
CEDAR POINT FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
21541 Great Mills Road Lexington Park, MD 20653 (301) 862-1000
Membership is open to the Community!*
301-863-7071 • www.cpfcu.com
*Membership is open to those who live, work, worship, go to school, or regularly conduct business in St. Mary’s, Charles, or Calvert County and their immediate family. Federally Insured by NCUA

BEAUTIFUL FURNITURE FOR BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE

21716 Great Mills Road
www.raleyshomefurnishings.com

(301) 863-8181

www.taylorgascompany.com

The County Times

Thursday, April 26, 2012

12

RESTAURANT & MOTEL

SCHEIBLE’S

Spotlight On

Little Flower Pre-K Class Hosts Book Swap
By Sarah Miller Staff Writer Little Flower Pre-K student Alexis Damon was very excited when she got a new book during her class’s book swap. She took one look at the Disney princesses on the cover, hugged it to her chest and jumped up and down singing “book, book, book” before sitting down to read it with her prayer partner, middle school student Photo by Sarah Miller Shannon Even. Yesterday was the Nadine Chicoine reads to granddaughter Sarah Eaton and Isabel Deal. fifth time pre-K teacher children engaged in bedtime story reading by Kaitlin Allen hosted the book swap for her asking them what they think will happen next, class. She said she learned about The National to recap what they just read, draw pictures and Association for the Education of Young Chil- help them pick out words they recognize. dren’s Week of the Young Child when she was Principal James Moorhead said he thinks working on her master’s program and thought Allen does a great job with the book swap and the book swap would be a good way to cel- enjoys seeing parents in the school. ebrate reading. “It’s great to have parents see what’s hapParents, grandparents and prayer bud- ping in a school day,” Moorhead said. dies all came out to spend the morning with the class in the library. In addition to the book sarahmiller@countytimes.net swap, Allen encouraged parents to get their

Give a Book, Get a Book

Under New Ownership With New Hours!

Where the land meets the sea
NEW HOURS OF OPERATION:
Tuesday-Thursday: 11 am - 9 pm Friday 11 am to 12 Midnight (Karaoke 9-12 am) Saturday 6 am to 9 pm • Sunday 6 am to 6 pm

NOW OPEN FOR LUNCH SIX DAYS A WEEK
Daily and Weekly Special Contractor Rates for the Motel SUNDAY THROUGH THURSDAY IN APRIL Military lunch Special: BUY ONE GET ONE HALF OFF Kids Eat Free From the Children’s Menu EVERY TUESDAY IN APRIL Seniors Receive 20% Discount off Dinner EVERY WEDNESDAY IN APRIL Law Enforcement, Fire and Rescue Personnel Receive 20% Discount off Dinner EVERY THURSDAY IN APRIL

Homeschool Academy Welcomes Newcomers
By Sarah Miller Staff Writer Between young actors and singing scientists, it’s getting to be a busy time of year for the teachers and students at the Homeschool Christian Academy (HCA) as they prepare for their annual open house. HCA was started in 2005 and became a formal non-profit organization in 2007. Director Sallie Segesdy said the program began with art and physical education at Cornerstone Presbyterian Church. Since then, it has grown to include language arts, science, drama, music and other core curriculum classes such as social studies and history. “It’s like a school experience for one day a week,” Segesdy said. The drama classes will be showing off the culmination of a year of work during the open house. Drama is split into two age groups – Drama 1 with fifth through seventh grade students and Drama 2 with eighth through 12th grade students. Drama 1 will be performing “Ukrainiacs” by Patrick Rainville Dorn on April 27. Drama 2’s performance of “Fear Factory” by Pat Cook will be April 28 at 2 and 5:30 p.m. “It’s a very funny play,” Segesdy said. “Very clever and a little creepy.” There will also be performances by HCA’s music and band programs, as well as a demonstration by the singing scientists, said Open House Coordinator Fiona Randle. HCA student Carole Weller said she enjoys being involved in the academy and the performance of “Fear Factory.” Drama is something she enjoys being involved in, and would be difficult to do at home, she said. Students come out Thursday mornings and can either stay for specific courses or for the full day, with study halls and a lunch break to fill out the day. “It has filled a need in the home school community,” said history and high school government teacher Charlotte Long. Classes are generally smaller than those in public schools. In its first year, HCA had 35 students, in its second year there were 70 and Segesdy said in recent years, there has been 90 students at the school. She said while they lose several students every year, due to graduations, families moving out of the area or other reasons, the school also has a constant flow of new students. Teachers decide their class sizes, Segesdy said, and typically, band and drama classes are larger. Some of the classes also fill up quickly. Drama, writing and science courses often fill up and have a waiting list. Drama teacher Crystal Rapp said she enjoys working with HCA. “I love HCA. It has been such a blessing to so many families,” she said. The students also enjoy their time at HCA. High schooler Clay King said HCA gives home schooled kids a chance to socialize like they would at a public school. Freshman Paul Munday said another similarity between HCA and public school is the homework they get. Instead of getting it every night, students get a week’s worth of homework every Thursday, keeping them just as busy as any other student. As the school evolves and grows, so does the administrative staff. Segesdy said they have added a registrar and a webmaster to their ranks, and soon the school will be looking for a new director as Segesdy plans to step down from the position. HCA can be used to supplement the learning done at home, Segesdy said, and some parents also use the same curriculum as the school. It depends on the parents what role HCA will play in their children’s education. The open house will be April 27 at SAYSF Bible Church located at 46544 Rue Purchase Road in Lexington Park. Plays start April 27 at 5:30 p.m. with the Drama 1 production of “Ukrainiacs” and “Fear Factory” will be performed at April 28 at 2 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. sarahmiller@countytimes.net

APRIL SPECIALS

Call the Restaurant to Pre-Order!
LIVE MUSIC with the

Starting at 7 p.m.

Saturday Night HAPPY HOUR
3 pm to 6 pm, 7 days a week.

Great place to work – now accepting applications for part-time cook and servers, apply in person.

48342 Wynne Road • Ridge, MD 20680

301-872-0025

13

Thursday, April 26, 2012

The County Times

Spotlight On

Local Girl Hopes to Earn Gold With Successful Teen Volunteer Fair
By Carrie Munn Staff Writer When Tori White decided to go for the gold, she did so in a way that benefited her community and fellow teens. A Girl Scout since early elementary school, White, now a junior at Chopticon High School, decided to embark on a project in hopes of attaining the organization’s highest honor, the Gold Award. Having already obtained the Silver and Bronze awards, White told The County Times for her Gold Award project she decided to organize and host a volunteer fair for teens in Southern Maryland. Many, she explained, need volunteer hours for National Honor Society and have an interest in giving their time, but don’t know how to connect with organizations seeking teen volunteers. As the daughter of Chopticon’s College/ Career Specialist Christine White, she also understands how valuable volunteerism can be when it comes to scholarships, college applications and getting a job. “Any job experience is better than no job experience,” she said, adding, “Volunteering can be a resume builder.” White leads by example, having given her time to several organizations throughout St. Mary’s County like Christmas in April, SMAWL, St. Mary’s Hospital and Vacations for Vets. She currently also volunteers at St. Clements Island Museum, in addition to maintaining excellent grades, playing field hockey and lacrosse and helping with the Student 2 Student program among other happenings at her school. “I just like getting the satisfaction of helping people,” White said of her volunteerism. Five months ago, she began the daunting process of proposing a project worthy of the Girl Scout Gold Award, an achievement only about 5 percent of members obtain. After a nerve-wracking proposal and interview, then finally getting the green light, White began networking with area non-profits and organizations seeking volunteers, and specifically teen volunteers. The Southern Maryland Higher Education Center donated the space for her to host the event and she started to spread the word, reaching out to all the public high and middle schools as well as the private schools. White recruited s o m e friends to help run the prog r a m , which to her delight, was a substantial success. O n April 22, her hard work culminated in a volunteer Tori White fair featuring 29 different volunteer-seeking groups, many with sign-ups on the spot. White said 193 bags, donated by Pam’s Hallmark and full of relevant information about volunteering, were given out to teens in attendance. An additional couple hundred people visited the fair. As part of the Gold Award application, White conducted exit interviews of both attendees and exhibitors to get feedback, receiving overwhelmingly positive comments across the board. Teens from as far away as Huntigtown visited the fair, which White said, “gave those interested an easy way to conect with the groups that need volunteers.” Now that her project is complete, White still has more to do toward getting the “Gold” but remains determined to do so. Many asked and even encouraged her to hold a fair again next year, which she said she would consider, with hopes of making it even bigger. As a busy 16-year-old student, with ambitions to go to college and become an elementary school teacher, it took a lot of initiative and determination to not give up. “It’s hard to not get discouraged sometimes,” she said. When White reflected on all the work that went into the volunteer fair, its success and the stringent guidelines she still must meet to get the highest award a Girl Scout can earn, she told The County Times, “It was definitely worth it.” carriemunn@countytimes.net

You are cordially invited to attend an Saturday, May 5, 2012 from 12-5 pm Sunday, May 6, 2012 from 12-5 pm
Sunday, a Special Service will be held in the Chapel at 3 pm

Open House

Tony Tonic and Kim Briscoe-Tonic

Photo by Christine White Tori White and Chris Cullins talk with Robin Tyler of the Robin Tyler Foundation, one of 29 organizations participating in the Teen Volunteer Fair on Sunday.

of the new Briscoe-Tonic

GRAND OPENING

are pleased to announce the

Funeral Home, PA

38576 Brett Way • Mechanicsville, Maryland 20659

Crime&

The County Times

Thursday, April 26, 2012

14

Punishment
By Guy Leonard Staff Writer

Man Charged for Abuse Reward Increased for Murder of 3-Year-Old Case Leads
David Karl Clements

St. Mary’s detectives charged a Lexington Park man with abusing a 3-year-old child while she was in his care. Details about the allegations against David Karl Clements, 27, are limited because the case file has been sealed by order of a judge, The County Times learned. Detectives reported that on Monday patrol units went to a Lexington Park residence for a report of suspected child abuse and learned that Clements had been caring for the child during the day. They also found multiple bruises on the child’s body. When detectives assumed the investigation, they said they found evidence to suggest Clements had assaulted the child. They later found Clements at a residence in Leonardtown and charged him with second-degree child abuse and second-degree assault. Police initially reported that he was being held on a $25,000 cash bond. guyleonard@countytimes.net

By Guy Leonard Staff Writer On Aug. 24 of last year, Deandre Hawkins was shot to death in Lexington park, but police have yet to arrest or charge anyone in connection with his death. They have now raised the reward for information leading to his killer to $9,000 in the hopes of closing the case. Hawkins, 20, was found shot in the upper torso after his car crashed into a utility pole on Sell Drive a few minutes before midnight. The Bureau of Criminal Investigations is continuing its search for either a suspect or suspects in the homicide. Phyllis Clark, Hawkins’ mother, who has since moved outside St. Mary’s County in the wake of her son’s death, has blamed petty jealousies in the community against her son for contributing to his killing. She said her son was not involved in local criminal gangs or drugs, yet was able to make money while unemployed because he used his unemployment checks to buy cars and resell them. His ability to be prosperous without con-

nection to “territorial” groups here, she said, led to scrutiny from local criminal gangs and she believes her son was set up to die. She has contributed reward money in the past to help find information leading to her son’s killer. Clark said on Wednesday that she still believes there are many people who know the details of her son’s death, but they may be unwilling to talk because of their family ties here and the fact that her son was considered somewhat of an outsider. “Too many people are keeping the story in because everyone’s related,” Clark said. “In all reality, that’s the problem we have. “I understand that, but that doesn’t make it right.” Anyone with information is asked to call Det. McCoy at 301-475-4200, extension 9119 or callers can call Crime Solvers at 301-475-3333. Tips can also be texted to “TIP239” and your message to “CRIMES” 274637. guyleonard@countytimes.net

Philip H. Dorsey III Attorney at Law

Kevin J. McDevitt
Attorney At Law
Former Baltimore City Assist. State’s Attorney Former Baltimore City Assist. State’s Attorney Former St. Mary’s County Assist. State’s Attorney Former St. Mary’s County Assist. State’s Attorney

- SERIOUS ACCIDENT, INJURY • Personal Injury • Wrongful Death • Auto/Truck Crashes • Pharmacy & Drug Injuries • Workers’ Compensation • Medical Malpractice

CRIMINAL & DUI/DWI

LEONARDTOWN: 301-475-5000 TOLL FREE: 1-800-660-3493 EMAIL: phild@dorseylaw.net

Office: 301-475-0093 Cell: 410-925-8992
www.dorseylaw.net
Dorsey Professional Building 22835 Washington Street P.O. Box 952, Leonardtown, MD 20650

www.kjmcdevittlaw.com

15

Thursday, April 26, 2012

The County Times
Irene Parrish B. Realty
Irene Parrish
Broker
22188 Three Notch Rd. Suite A Lexington Park, MD 20653

Addie McBride
s, Inc. Franzen Realtor

Thank You for Your Business!

Cell: 301-481-6767 Home: 301-737-1669 www.addiemcbride.com addiemcbride@verizon.net

Helping Good People Find Good Homes.

301-863-7002 301-481-7244
CELL OFFICE

www.franzenrealtors.com

22316 Three Notch Rd. Lexington Park, MD 20653 Office: 1-800-848-6092 • Office: 301-862-2222 Fax Office: 301-862-1060

www.2hdb.com/IreneParrish

30320 Triangle Dr. Unit 4 Charlotte Hall, MD 20622
308 San Souci Plaza, California, MD

301-737-4241

(301) 885-9145 • (240) 412-0215

beach party 7/19/2011 2:59 PM Page 1

FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
301-863-7071 • www.cpfcu.com (301) 884-8448 • (410) 535-9320
If you live, work, worship, go to school, or regularly conduct business in St. Mary’s, Charles, or Calvert County, you and your family are invited to join Cedar Point Federal Credit Union.

CEDAR POINT

30320 Triangle Dr. Unit 4 Charlotte Hall, MD 20622
www.southernmarylandpools.com

Federally Insured by NCUA

Call Today! (301) 884-8400

Edward Middleton
Commercial Agent
White Plains Corporate Center II 4475 Regency Place Suite 101 White Plains, Maryland 20695 301-632-6320 office • 301-632-6323 fax 240-925-0440 cell • 301-769-2177 home office edward.middleton1@verizon.net

visit us at:

Economyrvs.com

29020 Three Notch Road (Route 5) Mechanicsville, MD 20659

www.shasho.com

If you would like to promote an event in this fashion please contact: Matt Suite at SOMD Publishing

ERIE INSURANCE GROUP
BURRIS’ OLDE TOWNE INSURANCE DANIEL W. BURRIS, CIC, PROPRIETOR Auto • Home • Business • Life

mattsuite@countytimes.net

301-399-6417

BURRIS’ 22720 WASHINGTON STREET • P.O. BOX OLDE TOWNE 707 LEONARDTOWN, MD 20650 INSURANCE danburris@danburris.com • danburris.com
(301) 475-3151 • Toll Free: (800) 872-8010 • Fax: (301) 475-9029

Robbie Loker
Reverse Mortgage

DANIEL W. BURRIS, CIC, PROPRIETOR

Auto • Home • Business • Life
Creative Custom Framing & Art
Reverse Mortgage

Tuesday ~ Friday: 10 a.m. ~ 5 p.m. Saturday: 10 a.m. ~ 2 p.m.

Hours:

22720 WASHINGTON ST. P.O. BOX 707 • LEONARDTOWN, MD 20650

301-904-2532
MD Antiques Center ~ Bldg. 2 ~ 26005 Point Lookout Rd ~Leonardtown, MD 20650

HECM Retirement Income Planning 23127 Three Notch Road, Suite 203 California, Maryland 20619 rloker@metlife.com Cell: 301-904-6634 • Fax: 855-273-4695 www.mlbreversemortgage.com/rloker NMLS ID 762574

(301) 475-3151 Fax: (301) 475-9029 danburris@danburris.com

danburris.com

The County Times
STORY

Thursday, April 26, 2012

16

Counties Celebrate Their Part in the War of 1812
By Guy Leonard Staff Writer Two centuries ago, the fledgling United States was embroiled in an obscure and often misunderstood war with Great Britain, and Southern Maryland was right in the middle of it. This year St. Mary’s and Calvert counties will take part in the National Park’s Services program commemorating the War of 1812, but local historians say the Chesapeake Bay area was the site of savage depredation wrought by the enemy that many are not aware of. The war began over the British practice of press-ganging sailors off of American vessels to aid in their war against Napoleon Bonaparte, who had conquered Europe and threatened it with a long reign of despotism. Americans, however, protested the blockade of Europe by the British, because France was a vital trade partner. The nation fought back against British actions, chiefly by attacking the British in their Canadian possessions. When the British brought the war to American shores, it invaded from Canada and also through the Chesapeake Bay. Here in Southern Maryland, British war ships and soldiers raided and burnt homes and farms, desecrated churches and turned sparsely populated rural areas into battlefields. “Marylanders don’t really know the significant roll they played in the role of 1812,” said Calvert County historian Ralph Eshelman, who has written two books on the war. “In the Chesapeake theatre, there were more raids and skirmishes and civil destruction than anywhere else during the war.” In St. Mary’s County, historians and county staff have worked for the past two years to make sure they were included in the park services plan; originally St. Mary’s was excluded from the history celebration, said Grace Mary Brady, of the Department of Land Use and Growth Management. She and others had to submit form after form to the federal agency showing the county qualified to be part of a scenic trail system that people can follow to learn the history behind the war. “We’re included in all these national trails now,” Brady said. “We’ve accomplished what we set out to accomplish, which was to be included. “We have a significant part of the story to tell, we’re telling the human side.” The tale of the war’s impact in St. Mary’s was one of pain and sorrow. At Christ Church in Chaptico, the British took over the church and used it as a stable, according to the historical record, and cooked their meals upon the tombstones in the cemetery. One piece of the historical record, provided by Charlotte Hallbased historian Linda Reno, showed that in July of 1813, the British landed near Point Lookout and raided homes for supplies. While one newspaper at the time reported the invaders took only what they paid for and treated civilians well, a letter to the National Intelligencer dated Oct. 5 of that same year said: “so far from treating the inhabitants with every of War of officers Thomas mark of civility and at- Print shows portraits Hull, Jacob 1812 American naval Charles Stewart, MacDonough, Isaac Jones, Joshua Barney, tention, and taking noth- and William Henry Allen surrounding a vignette of the battle of Lake ing without offering pay, Champlain. their homes. there was hardly a house “Our people fought back,” Brady said. they visited that was not robbed and plundered of all its furniture and a variety of “We have to be vigilant if we want our story told.” articles besides provisions.” In Calvert, the best-known engageThe letter stated that while higherment was between Joshua Barney’s Chesaranking officers treated civilians well, lower ranks were “under the direction of of- peake Flotilla against the superior British ficers plundering and behaving in the most naval force, coming up from the south and into local waters. outrageous manner.” When Barney realized he was outReno said it was important for residents to know about the war because of the gunned, instead of seeking battle he retreatlocal blood spilled in it, both from militia- ed to St. Leonard’s Creek and fought a defensive engagement. But his plan to raid the men and civilians. With few weapons to speak of and 400 British stronghold on Tangier Island would miles of shoreline to watch over, defending never come to fruition. Barney’s shallow draft gun barges against a powerful invasion was nearly imwere able to damage some of the British possible, she said. “That had to be so scary for people,” warships that bottled him up in the creek, Reno said. “They’re out there on their plan- but the engagement could not be counted as tations and here come the British to take ev- a victory. “Nobody wants to hear this, but Barerything they have. ney was never successful in anything he did “The civilians probably suffered more with the Chesapeake Flotilla,” Eshelman than the [militia] men.” Brady said this part of history was al- said. “It was the largest naval engagement most left out of plans to commemorate The in Maryland waters.” Two Maryland battles, the Battle of War of 1812, which the United States really did not win, but was fortunate enough to Baltimore, where the Star Spangled Banner was born, and the Battle of Bladensburg, survive without loss of its territory. Out of that war, came not only our na- which resulted in the destruction of the captional anthem, but a renewed confidence itol, were to be the most famous contributhat the country could defend itself against tions by the state. At the battle in Baltimore, the British a world power, though it could not claim an were turned back and in conjuncture with outright victory. Brady said it was important for the their being repulsed in the north, the war entire tale to be told, including skirmishes eventually came to an official end in 1814 here where ordinary citizens tried to protect with the Treaty of Ghent, though some hostilities continued into 1815.

Adult Community
2 bedroom apartment for the price of a 1 bedroom.

Lexington Park Active

$999

All utilities included. Must sign lease by May 31st 2012.

Make Your Old Cushions Look Brand New!
Inside Broad Creek Kitchens
27215 Three Notch Road • Mechanicsville, MD

301-290-1074

21895 Pegg Road • Lexington Park, MD 20653

(240) 725-0111

fabric
e

$

Any Fabric In Store, Including Sunbrella

39

95

each

th

store ...for home decor

17

Thursday, April 26, 2012

The County Times

Knit, Dye, Weave, Crochet, Bead, Felt

Make Leonardtown “Your Place” Every First Friday!

Located on the Square in Leonardtown
HOURS OF OPERATIONS: Monday – Friday: 7am – 3pm Saturday – Sunday: 8am – 3pm

Friday, May 4, 2012 5 to 8 PM
SCULPTURE - OILS WATERCOLORS - JEWELRY PHOTOGRAPHY AND MUCH MORE!
WATCH ARTISTS CREATE PURCHASE ART - TAKE A CLASS
22660 WASHINGTON ST. 2ND FLOOR. LEONARDTOWN, MD 20650

***Buffett served on Saturdays and Sundays***

This special First Friday we are pleased to have Fortune’s Turn performing live on the stage in the Square from 5:00 to 8:00 PM!
BIG LARRY’S COMIC BOOK CAFE- 22745 Washington Street. While relaxing in town, stop by Big Larry’s for your choice of 32 flavors of Hershey’s Premium Ice Cream or maybe a 100% Fruit Smoothie! Big Larry’s is also a full Service Comic Book and Game Store. See you in Leonardtown this coming First Friday and EAT, DRINK, AND BE SUPER! BREWING GROUNDS- 41658 Fenwick Street. Live music and 10% discount on food and beverage purchases. CAFE DES ARTISTES- 41655 Fenwick Street. Live Music and Dinner Specials. Leonardtown’s original neighborhood bistro with French Country Charm, a casual and friendly atmosphere, fine food and excellent service. Creative, comforting dishes are Classic French with an American flair and pair perfectly with the great variety of wines from Leonardtown to France, and al fresco dining available on our quaint patio sidewalk! CHEZ NOUS - Fenwick Street 240538-4571 Mon - Sat 10AM - 5:30PM. Chez Nous offers unique hand made one of a kind fine jewelry by Balbina Meyer (Art in Wire) Jewelry Designer. Artisan chocolates, handcrafted in Baltimore for German chocolatier Albert Kirchmayr. COLLEEN’S DREAM - Fenwick Street. Stop by this unique vintage clothing and accessory shop and enjoy their 20% off jewelry sale that kicks off on First Friday and runs throughout May. CRAFT GUILD SHOP- 26005 Point Lookout Road (next to Maryland Antiques Center) For May, our guest artist is Sandra Christensen of Clinton, MD. She specializes in colored pencil drawings of landmark structures in SOMD, including lighthouses of the Chesapeake Bay, places of worship and local schools. The Craft Guild Shop, CELEBRATING OUR 35th ANNIVERSARY, is a co-op of diverse and dedicated local artisans and handcrafters. We offer traditional and contemporary crafts. Many of these items are one-of-a-kind. Various classes offered. Call 301-997-1644 or visit our website, www.craftguildshop.com. Hope you join us for First Friday. FENWICK STREET USED BOOKS and MUSIC- 41655A Fenwick Street- Great reads and music! The Eds return! This dynamic duo will entertain like no others! Fantastic fun for all ages! FUZZY FARMERS MARKET – 22696 Washington Street. This month at Fuzzy Farmers Market, we’re showing off our May Flowers. Come by to see our hand-made flowers created from felt and fabric, as well as pretty flowers painted on flower pots and mailboxes. If you’re looking for unique, high quality and handmade items to give or to keep, you’ve come to the right place. Indulge yourself with goat’s milk soap, unique jewelry, and luxurious scarves and shawls. Then fill your home with hand painted accents as well as fabulous textiles and pottery. You’ll see how we upcycle discarded objects into fabulous and fun bags, jewelry and more. Visit us to find out what our cooperative of local women artists and farmers are dreaming up and creating next! GOOD EARTH NATURAL FOODS41675 Park Ave. On Friday, May 4th, Wynne of Forever Eden will offer Organic Mother’s Day Gift Set Collections. Stopy by between 5PM and 8PM for a personalized gift basket. Learn more about the Forever Eden Organic Collection that is made from 100% Organic Ingredients. Visit www. myforevereden.com. CREEKSIDE GALLERY- (in Maryland Antiques Center) “Local Treasures” will continue this month featuring the watercolor paintings of Sue Stevenson, who is well known for her capture of Southern Maryland’s local seascapes and landscapes. There is always a story with each painting that connects the piece with the history of the area. The gallery will also begin its “Historic Southern Maryland Show,” displaying the works of many other local artists in variety of mediums. Beautiful wood works will be displayed along with decorative gourds and hand crafted jewelry. LEONARDTOWN ARTS CENTERCourt Square BLDG, 2nd floor, 22660 Washington St. The art center is a lively addition to the Leonardtown arts scene. Come visit local artists in their studios working on their craft. Painters, sculptors, jewelers and more. LEONARDTOWN GALLERIA- (in Maryland Antiques Center) More than 80 fine arts creations, including paintings in oil, acrylic and watercolor, sculpture, woodwork, porcelain tile creations and jewelry. The Galleria is open 10:00 am – 5:00 pm seven days a week. The Leonardtown Galleria is managed by members of the Color & Light Society of southern Maryland. The gallery features art works by 15 members of the Color and Light group and one guest artist. In the coming months, the Galleria plans to have special guest shows, classes and workshops. For more information, call Carole Thieme at 410-394-0326. MONTPARNASSE GALLERY AND GIFTS - 22760 Washington Street. Montparnasse Gallery and Gifts is a venue that showcases contemporary works of art by regional, national, and international artists. The mission of Montparnasse is to display and promote artists, poets and musicians, meanwhile providing a comfortable environment where artists and visitors are free to dialogue. We are committed to building community bonds by celebrating cultural diversity, and encouraging creative expression. Montparnasse promises to provide affordable items, demonstrations and events. Regular business hours, ThursSunday 1-6 pm, open later on Fridays 301-247-1119 NORTH END GALLERY- 41652 Fenwick Street. The North End Gallery presents a new show during the month of May, “The Artist’s Perspective”. May is a beautiful month is our area. It is a time of color and flowers for all to enjoy. Come and join us at the Gallery and see the perspective our artists present. The show run from May 1 - May 27. Join us for our First Friday Reception from 5PM to 8PM. North End Gallery offers unique gifts from 32 of Southern Maryland’s best artists and artisans. Treat yourself or someone you love to a hand made treasure from your community.

Treat your Mom to First Friday!
OLDE TOWN PUB- Washington Street. Relax after work, meet with friends, or come watch the big game on our giant 60-inch plasma TV. We offer 14 beers on tap, your favorite mixed drinks using only premium spirits, and popular wines. In addition, we have tasty appetizers and great meals for the entire family. Our traditional décor offers a welcoming atmosphere whether you’re celebrating a big event or winding down after a day at work. We look forward to serving you at the most popular nightspot in Southern Maryland. PORT OF LEONARDTOWN WINERY- 23190 Newtowne Neck Road. Local wine, art and local music make for a great evening! Stop by between noon and 9PM on First Friday for samplings of our award winning wines and featured wine of the month deal. For more information and instant updates, see our website or like us on Facebook. Call 301-690-2191. QUALITY STREET KITCHENS41675 Fenwick Street. Tastings and specials! Tasty culinary classes and items for your kitchen. Hope to see you on the 6th. RUSTIC RIVER BAR AND GRILL40874 Merchant’s Lane (Route 5) Dinner and drink specials. Live music. ST. MARY’S MACARONI KID Join us in May to enjoy the gorgeous weather with fun colorful crafts with Nanny on Call and the Magic Macaroni Board. Moms can enter to win a special Mother’s Day gift. You’ll find us on the sidewalk infront of Ye Olde Towne Cafe. St. Mary’s Macaroni Kid is a free weekly e-newsletter and website offering all the kid and family friendly events in the county. www. stmarys.macaronikid.com THE FRONT PORCH- 22770 Washington Street. An intimate restaurant featuring creative American Cuisine. Set within the Sterling House, we offer casual dining in a cozy atmosphere. The menu includes a broad selection of starters, soups, sandwiches, salads, and entrees. We offer daily specials, feature seasonal ingredients, local produce, and boast an ever changing dessert menu. The “back room” at The Front Porch showcases over 40 varieties of wine, while our bar presents Specialty Drinks, Boutique Beer, along with traditional cocktails. YE OLDE TOWNE CAFE- 22865 Washington Street. Live music with The Three Amigos, family friendly tunes and dancing. Enjoy Home Cooking with a freshly made dessert at a reasonable price. Family friendly every day!

301-475-5151

T 301 475 5775

Breton House
Antiques
22795 Washington Street, Leonardtown
Open 10-5 Wed. - Sat. Sundays 11-4 Also by appointment, 301-690-2074 Open late for First Fridays of the month

Menu featuring classic southern dishes, seafood, steaks, brick oven pizzas & calzones and more by Chef Rick

Rt 5 Leonardtown • In The Breton Bay Shopping Center

(301) 997-1700

North End Gallery
in Historic Leonardtown, MD
Monday-Saturday 10-5 First Fridays 10-8, Sunday 12-4

SOMD Winner of • Best Restaurant • Best Fine Dining Restaurant • Best Dessert

Classic Country French Dining in a casual, relaxing atmosphere.
• Piano every Friday and Saturday night • Jazz cabaret/dancing on special evenings • 3-course prix-fixe dinner menu $23.95 available until 6 pm daily and all night on Wednesdays! • $8 lunch & beverage special daily • Sunday brunch á la carte items • “Le Salon” (private room) available

First Friday is made possible by these businesses and other LBA members:
Bella Music School Big Larry’s Comic Book Café Brewing Grounds Café des Artistes Craft Guild Shop Colleen’s Dream College of Southern Maryland Crazy for Ewe Fenwick Street Used Books and Music Fuzzy Farmer’s Market Good Earth Natural Foods The Shops of Maryland Antiques Center Creekside Gallery Kevin’s Corner Kafé Leonardtown Arts Center Leonardtown Galleria Leonardtown Grill Lynn’s Café and Catering Montparnasse Gallery and Gifts North End Gallery Oga’s Asian Cuisine Olde Town Pub Olde Towne Stitchery On A Roll Port of Leonardtown Winery Rustic River Bar and Grill Quality Street Kitchens Shelby’s Creative Framing St. Mary’s Macaroni Kid The Farmer’s Daughter Cupcakes The Front Porch Treadles Studio Ye Olde Towne Café

301.475.3130 www.northendgallery.org

Creative Custom Framing & Art

Tuesday ~ Friday: 10 a.m. ~ 5 p.m. Saturday: 10 a.m. ~ 2 p.m.

Hours:

MONDAY TO FRIDAY 9:30 TO 7 SAT. 9:30 TO 5 SUN. 12 TO 5

301-904-2532
MD Antiques Center ~ Bldg. 2 ~ 26005 Point Lookout Rd ~Leonardtown, MD 20650

leonardtownfirstfridays.com

301-475-8040
Fax: 301-475-8658

COMIC BOOKS, GAMES AND STUFF
Ice Cream Sundaes Smoothies Gamer Grub Hot/Cold Drinks Overstuffed Subs Hot Dogs and Sausages
22745 Washington St Leonardtown, MD 20650

41658 Fenwick St. Leonardtown, MD 20650

Open 7 Days A Week

To The Editor
Chipper Backs Dan Burris for Mayor

The County Times

Thursday, April 26, 2012

18

A Nod to Beloved Community, Unity, Bob Schaller
The sense of losing the place where everything that I believed was good and aspiring left me to wonder what sort of place my son, our children, would inherit. Who amongst us believes enough in the sacrifice Jesus made to become Christ, and like Him, set aside our selfish lives to bear the message of the cross and become the extension of the Creator’s everlasting goodness and agape love? Which ones of us truly have the measure of faith to join hands with another and connect the community dots to straddle the ever growing crater of our declining community? Who will establish the place where we begin to build the road that will lead us upward towards our destined state of UNITY? This standing of a common-union cannot be defined by geography, race, religion, greed, social economic class, political party or blood relation; rather it will have to be rooted spiritually upon the belief of the imperative that we are ultimately our brother’s keepers. Being born and raised in Leonardtown as a Catholic taught and inspired me to believe in the core principles of Christianity. This belief is predicated on accepting that mankind was made in the image and likeness of the Creator; and the greatest sacrifice one could make was to lay down one’s life for the sake of another. Because this profound sacrifice was made for all people, we were to love each other with the same degree and live to represent it. Believing in such an absolute gesture, is what compelled the first settlers of Maryland to quest for the freedom to worship such faith and escape the corruption and oppression of their day. This same faith gave me the courage to follow the light along my path of my spiritual awakening. In a recent article, Bob Schaller described our community of St. Mary’s as being at road’s end. I’ve learned that whenever you’ve come to an end of anything, you’re left with only two options. One is to die there; the other is to begin again with a new vision of life and pursue it. This, I believe, makes our election sure that we are the chosen ones that must accept this challenge as the prophetic opportunity to begin again with a greater vision than the one before, and become the beacon of hope that will lead our children towards the new and “Beloved Community”. As good fruits of the tree grown from the seed of unity sown on the fertile ground here in St. Mary’s, has placed upon us an inevitable responsibility. That is to embrace our history and the wisdom of our faith to prune the growth that’s defeating us and clear the way for the new and everlasting Unity. This is what we are experiencing currently with what I call “Losing Community”. We must do our part to eradicate the branches of evil; selfishness, greed, racism, hunger, suffering, sickness, deprivation and classism. There’s no reason to believe this task is too great. We simply must love with the deepest adoration and affection for the Creator and each other to establish the means by which we together can manifest this “Beloved Community”. Yes we will need leaders to carry the torches illuminating this vision and the way forward. However, I don’t believe they will be the ones running for elected office, but rather the ones that are rooted in the foundation of our local community and have learned to believe in the interdependence we have of each other. This, I believe is the process we must endeavor and endure, but we must imagine this vision to have it one day. We live in the greatest country on earth. What makes us great is our Constitution of the people, for the people, and by the people which give us the power to choose to amend the rules and laws that guide our growth. This, I believe, is the appointed time. With the knowledge gained through our experiences and the spirit of the Creator, the eyes of our understanding should be enlightened, and through our free will, declare a state of interdependence with all mankind, which would manifest everlasting UNITY. Can’t we agree by now only agape love eliminates the corruption and distortion that define us, and give the opportunity for all to live eternally in Unity with the Creator? Is there anyone else that sees the horizon that I see? Yes, we are losing our community, but only to begin to lay the foundation for the new one that will support our children’s hope and give them an opportunity to love each other as we should. They will become the asphalt that will bond the aggregate ideologies that will pave the new road that will carry us all to our destiny. This has to happen not just for our county, but our state, country, and world. We must stand and declare this interdependence, and be guided by the love of the Creator, and establish forever the Unity we long for. If there’s anything worth standing for, I believe true LOVE is. If this belief is persisted in until it becomes our dominant feeling; the realization of the idea is predestined. If we won’t hold up this lamp of Unity, then who will? Let us “Unify to UNITY”!!! Let me close with the words of the song, “Imagine”, written in 1971 by John Lennon. “Imagine there’s no heaven, it’s easy if you try; no hell below us, above us only sky… Imagine all the people living for today. Imagine there’s no countries, it’s easy if you try; nothing to kill or die for, and no religion too…Imagine all the people living life in peace. You may say I’m a dreamer, but I’m not the only one…I hope some day you will join us, and the world will be as one… Imagine no possessions, I wonder if you can; No need for greed or hunger, a brotherhood of man…Imagine all the people sharing all the world. You may say I’m a dreamer, but I’m not the only one… I hope someday you will join us, and the world will be as one. This article was written to inspire our community to respond to the extraordinary opportunity before us, and to applaud the efforts of Bob Schaller, Director of DECD. Thanks Brother Bob Schaller for your dedicated service to St. Mary’s County and helping to shine the light in the direction we need to go as a community. C. Aloysius Bowman, Founder, The Elijah International Foundation Leonardtown, MD

Leonardtown citizens have an important decision to make in the upcoming mayoral election on Tuesday, May 1st. The residents and businessmen alike have much at stake and the voters should consider experience, fiscal responsibility, commitment, vision and leadership when they vote. EXPERIENCE: Dan Burris has been involved in town policy making on many levels over the years. He has been a council member since 2008, but prior to that he was chairman of Leonardtown Recreation Inc. and later a member of the Town’s Planning and Zoning Board. FISCAL RESPONSIBILITY: Dan Burris realizes the need to operate within a strict budget. His voting record has proven his support of lowered taxes in the town for over five years. Additionally, he has operated a successful business and realizes the need for budgetary constraints (in fact he was elected president of the Leonardtown Business Association and served six years). COMMITMENT: Dan Burris has proven his love of, and dedication to, the town through hard work and community involvement. Dan is not seeking the office of mayor as a springboard for political advancement or appointment. VISION: Dan Burris was on the board for the past two Comprehensive Plan updates. Dan understands the need to grow, but also the need to control that growth. Dan’s vision reflects the town’s mission statement to manage growth while protecting the “small town” character of Leonardtown. LEADERSHIP: Dan Burris has proven his leadership qualities on the County Chamber of Commerce, County Library Board and the State Economic Development Commission. Dan Burris has my vote as the Mayor of Leonardtown for the next four years. Please vote on May 1st. J. Harry Norris III, current Mayor of Leonardtown Leonardtown, MD

19

Thursday, April 26, 2012

The County Times

The Only Real Leonardtown Mayor Candidate – Dan Burris
Although technically there are three candidates running for mayor of Leonardtown on May 1, there is only one suitable candidate. The County Times did the voters of Leonardtown a real service when they put in their April 5 issue a long section telling about the successes of Mayor Norris’ years in running Leonardtown and then provided ample space to let each candidate answer questions put to them. Mayor Norris, as the article points out, served years as a town council member and then became mayor, showing his success in helping turn Leonardtown around is based on experience, knowledge and effort. Henry Camaioni has none of these. He never served in any capacity in the town government and few can remember him being at any meetings to learn what is going on. In fact, his comments about the poor development of Tudor Hall and the Wharf area show how little he understands about town history and to say that issues have been forced on the community show his ignorance. He is not a viable candidate. Tom Mattingly has served well as a member of the county government. His answers show that perspective. But he has not served in any capacity in the town government and

To The Editor
Legal Notice
COMMISSIONERS OF LEONARDTOWN NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Leonardtown Mayor and Town Council will hold a public hearing on Monday, May 14, 2012 at 4:45 p.m., at the Town Office, 41660 Courthouse Drive, Leonardtown, MD for the Leonardtown Cable Television Franchise Renewal. The purpose of the public hearing will be to present for public review and to receive public comment regarding the request of Metrocast Communications for renewal of the Leonardtown Cable Television Franchise originally approved February 10, 1997 by Ordinance No. 81 of the Leonardtown Code. A copy of Ordinance No. 81 and the Metrocast letter of renewal request is available for public review at the Leonardtown Town Office. The public is invited to attend and/or send written comment to be received by May 14, 2012 at 4:00 p.m. to the Commissioners of Leonardtown, POB 1, 41660 Courthouse Drive, Leonardtown, MD 20650. Special accommodations will be made for persons with disabilities upon request. By Authority: Laschelle E. McKay, TownAdministrator 4-26-2012

therefore does not have the kind of experience that leads to Mayor Norris’ success. So he is not likely to make a successful mayor. Dan Burris has served for many years on the Planning and Zoning Board, the Town Council and has the kind of experience that leads to the success of Mayor Norris. The answers the three candidates gave show that Dan Burris is the only one that knows what is going on with the town government. Dan Burris has the potential to continue the legacy of Mayor Norris’ success. He is the only real candidate. Sincerely, Herbert Winnik Leonardtown

Another Vote for Burris
Dan Burris has my vote on May 1st for Mayor of Leonardtown. Mr. Burris has been active in town government for years and has a proven record. His opponent, Tom Mattingly has a proven record of increasing taxes while he was county commissioner. Mattingly has voted to increase property taxes, to increase income taxes, to increase phone taxes, to increase landfill taxes, and he voted against capping property taxes for our senior citizens. I personally want someone who would be careful with my tax dollars, and that would be Dan Burris. Charlie Hall Leonardtown, Md.

corner

c

ommissioners

Legal Notice
On April 16, 2012, K&T Dyson Trucking, LLC of PO Box 513, Great Mills, MD 20634 sells to Dakota Financial, LLC of 10100 Santa Monica Blvd, Suite 300, Los Angeles, CA 90067 one 2000 Peterbilt 379 Tri-axle Dump Truck VIN 1NP5LU0XXYN531134 for $33,000. This transfer of ownership is part of Equipment Lease Agreement #3452. 4/26/2012

Jones To Citizens: Let Your Voice Be Heard

By Cindy Jones St. Mary’s County Commissioner, District 1
The public hearings on the Constant Yield Tax Rate and the FY 2013 Recommended Budget will be held at Great Mills High School on Tuesday, May 1 beginning at 6:30 p.m. It might be helpful to clarify a few terms before the budget hearing to help us understand the ramifications of the budget items being discussed. • Cutting from a request Agencies can request any amount, including amounts substantially more than the prior year’s allocation. A more accurate way to make an assessment is to compare last year’s allocation to this year’s allocation. • Public investment Investment is an economic term that comes from the private sector. In the public realm, it is used analogously to support using taxpayer resources for public uses. In this analogous use, it loses much of its meaning. Taxpayers do not get to choose which of these public uses to invest in, nor do they receive a monetary return on these “public investments.” • Non-county agencies This is a budgetary term that the county has utilized for many years. It is used to designate agencies that receive county mini-grants. Recently some have taken issue with the use of this terminology. If the term “non-county agency” is now deemed inappropriate, perhaps citizens can suggest alternative language to replace it. The public hearings on May 1st are an opportunity for citizens to give feedback to their elected officials on the property tax rate and the county budget. Don’t miss this opportunity to make your voice heard.

Wildewood Resident Compares PUD to Spreading Cancer
I read with much interest the information that the county lifted the stop work order for Wildewood. I quote, “The Developer offered a wetland ‘buffer’ between the homes and the wetlands.” It reminded me of the day that I looked out of my back window and saw the entire forest area being clear cut between my property and the site for the Challenger Estates. Not one tree was left standing. The immediate neighbors and landowners surrounding the Wildewood area were totally shocked! They had never been notified of the plans for this action. When we questioned the action of the complete tree removal ([which]if left, some of the trees could have served as a buffer between the Challenger Estates), the residents and homeowners were told that the road behind the newly built housing would serve as a buffer. This has left the existing residents with a complete view of multi-story housing, some with lights shining all night long and absolutely no noise buffer. Will the EPA and the county agencies actually monitor the buffer being offered by these developers? So many rules have been broken over the years with absolutely no regard for the local residents (or indeed, some of their own tenants)! Many of us have questioned how out-of-state developers can acquire the PUD (Planned Unit Development) without following the requirements agreed to by the original applicants. The impact of Wildewood on county services (traffic, water supply, emergency services, etc.) has been almost overwhelming. Unfortunately, the county government and agencies seem completely helpless to question these people as to their disregard of local laws and common decency. When Wildewood was first started, it was a thoughtful and attractive development, staying true to the promise of keeping the rural character. When the project changes owners ‘all bets were off,’ as the saying goes. Now, the ‘so called’ Planned Unit Development is like a spreading cancer, building on every available plot of land and sacrificing quality for quantity. Thank you for letting me express my concerns, Eileen Hislop, California

P.O. Box 250 • Hollywood, Maryland 20636 News, Advertising, Circulation, Classifieds: 301-373-4125

James Manning McKay - Founder Eric McKay -Associate Publisher..................................ericmckay@countytimes.net Tobie Pulliam - Office Manager..............................tobiepulliam@countytimes.net Sean Rice - Editor....................................................................seanrice@countytimes.net Angie Stalcup - Graphic Artist.......................................angiestalcup@countytimes.net Sarah Miller- Reporter - Community..............................sarahmiller @countytimes.net Guy Leonard - Reporter - Government, Crime...............guyleonard@countytimes.net CarrieMunn-Reporter-Education, Entertainment.........carriemunn@countytimes.net Sales Representatives......................................................................sales@countytimes.net

The County Times

Thursday, April 26, 2012

20

David Anderson, 55
David Oliver Anderson, 55 of Coltons Point, MD passed away on April 20, 2012. Born on January 11, 1957, he was the son of the late Howard Waldermar Anderson and Jeannette Winifred Perrigo Anderson. David is survived by his brothers Bob and Tom Anderson. The family will receive friends on Thursday, April 26, 2012 from 10 a.m. until 11 a.m. in the Mattingley-Gardiner Funeral Home chapel. A Memorial Service will be held on Thursday, April 26, 2012 at 11 a.m. in the Mattingley-Gardiner Funeral Home chapel with Deacon Bill Nickerson Officiating. Interment will be private.

Clarence Carroll, 84
Clarence Edward Carroll, 84 of St. Inigoes, MD., affectionately known as E.D., peacefully passed away on April 23, 2012 at the Charlotte Hall Veterans Home. Clarence was born on March 20, 1928 to the late Anna Lucille and George Samuel Carroll of Saint Inigoes, MD. Clarence attended school in St Mary’s County Maryland until he joined the United States Army in 1948 and served until 1952. During his tour, he received the Svc medal w/3 B2 Svc star and the UN Svc medal - Combat Inf Badge and the Natl Petence Svc medal. After completing his tour of duty in the U.S, Army, he returned to Beachville where he met the love of his life Mary Estelle Johnson in 1954. They were married on October 21, 1956. Clarence worked at the Patuxent River Naval Air Station for 32 years until he retired in June 1992. He took great pride in his work and received numerous awards for his outstanding service. He was a lifelong member of St. Peter Claver Church and a member of the Knights of St. Jerome’s in St. Inigoes, Maryland. Clarence enjoyed boating, gardening, grooming his lawn, and polishing his au-

tomobiles. He took great pride in his appearance with his hats, silk socks, and favorite Stacy Adams shoes. Clarence leaves to cherish his memories: wife, Mary Estelle Carroll and two children, Shirley Johnson (Rubin) and George Holly (Darlene); three sisters, Bertille Bryan, Dorothy Barnes, and Geraldine Carroll; two brothers, George Bernard “Tony” and Gene Carroll; two granddaughters, Tameika and Tiffanie Holly; one great granddaughter, Laprea Bryant; one great grandson, Anthony Bryant, Jr. “AJ”; one granddaughter- in- law, Deidre Bryant and a host of nieces, nephews, relatives and friends. In addition to his mother and father, Clarence is preceded in death by his brother Grandville “Stick” Carroll, grandson Anthony Bryant, Sr., whom he raised, and greatgrandson Demario Bryant. Family and friends will unite on Friday, April 27, 2012 from 9:30 a.m. until Mass of Christian Burial at 10:30 a.m. at St. Peter Claver Church, 16922 St. Peter Claver Church Road, St. Inigoes, MD. Interment will follow at Maryland Veterans’ Cemetery, Cheltenham, MD. Arrangements by Briscoe-Tonic Funeral Home, Mechanicsville, MD

hours volunteering at the St. Mary's Nursing Center. He loved creating elaborate train layouts to display at home and at the Nursing Center. He also built model planes, enjoyed fixing cars and being an all around handy man. He will be remembered for his generosity in helping others, whit, and love of life. He was preceded in death by his wives Joan Victoria Cwynar and Christel Vogel Cwynar. Survivors include his wife Lediminda Cwynar of Lexington Park; his mother Veronica Cwynar and his sister and brother-inlaw Patricia and Thomas Chill and their children Thomas Jr., Kevin, Valerie and their families, all from Warren, Ohio. In addition, his son Thomas S. Cwynar and grandson Daniel Cwynar of New Hampshire; his stepson and daughter-in-law, Bill and Derly Miller and their children Brett and Lance of Great Mills, MD; and his stepsons Rene Tiotuyco of New York City and Roel Tiotuyco of Paranaque, Phillippines, and his family. A mass service will be held on Friday, April 27, 2012, at 10 a.m. at Immaculate Heart of Mary Church at Rte. 235, Lexington Park, followed by an inurnment at Charles Memorial Garden, Leonardtown, MD. Memorial contributions may be made to Immaculate Heart of Mary Church or St. Mary's Nursing Center. There will be a Celebration of Life at Immaculate Heart of Mary Church after the ceremony.

Stanley Cwynar, 72
Stanley Thomas Cwynar, 72, of Lexington Park, MD, died February 25, 2012, in the Philippines. He was born June 3, 1939, in New Castle, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Stanley and Veronica Orlowski Cwynar. He lived and attended school in New Castle, Pennsylvania. He was a Boy Scout and served as an altar boy from the time he was a young boy until he graduated from high school. In addition, he worked at a clothing store as a young teenager. He entered the US Navy after high school graduation. During his Navy career his duty stations included the Phillippines, Bermuda, Florida, California and Pax River where he retired. After he left the Navy, he worked as a civil servant for Strike Aircraft Test Directorate. He was a member of NARFE and Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church. He coached pigskin football in St. Mary's for many years. He also volunteered with the American Red Cross in Mississippi after Hurricane Katrina. In addition, he spent many

William Elder, 47
William “Bill/Billy” Joseph Elder, 47, of Point Lookout, MD, died April 9, 2012, at his beloved companion, Kathy Crawford’s residence, who took wonderful care of him during his disease progression of Lou Gehrig’s Disease. Billy was born November 1, 1964, in Washington, DC, to his beloved parents, Patricia Helen and Lee James Elder. He grew up in Country Club South, Waldorf, MD and graduated in 1982 from Thomas Stone High School. He was the wonderful brother of Guy Elder and of Leanne Elder Willett, whom he loved and was best friends with from birth. Leanne always wore a badge of honor knowing that she was “Billy's Little Sister". Billy pursued a career with C.J. Coakley for twenty plus years as one of their lead foremen performing acoustical ceiling work throughout the DC area. Of these jobs included the original renovation of the Pentagon and then, within a year, reconstruction of the terrorist damage caused on 9/11. He was personally awarded for his work during a ceremony at the Pentagon. Bill was married to Angie Murphy Elder for seventeen years and with this union brought two beautiful daughters, Patricia “Tricia” Michelle and Amanda “Mandy” Rene’ to their family. Billy loved animals, duck pin bowling, swimming, camping, crabbing, NASCAR racing, playing jokes and was an avid fisherman; he would rather be fishing, than doing anything else!!! Bill was one of the best fathers and human beings ever created!!! He loved to spend time with Kathy and her family, his family and his girls and new grandson. They were the apples of his eyes. He was a very sweet, hard working, caring, funny and all-around good person. He taught his girls how to fish, how to camp, how to make burnt barbeque chicken, and how to magically cure the hiccups. They always watched Survivor together and most of all, he helped show them how to be a good people. Tricia will tell you “I can tie a fishing knot better than any guy I know, lol”. Mandy will tell you how much her dad had her laughing hysterically. His girls admired him beyond measure and they always had a great time with their dad. They can both truly say "I had the best dad EVER", and that is the truth”!!! Billy leaves to mourn his beloved companion, Kathy Crawford, his daughter, Tricia Elder and grandson Cody Joseph, his daughter Mandy Elder, his father Lee James Elder, his sister Leanne Willett, his brother Guy Elder, his former wife Angie Murphy Elder and a host full of family, friends and co-workers. Billy was preceded in death by his loving mother, Patricia Helen Elder, on August 15, 2010. On Saturday, April 21, 2012, a Legacy and Celebration of Life was held at his daughter’s home. Condolences to the family may be made at www. brinsfieldfuneral.com. Arrangements by the Brinsfield Funeral Home, P.A., Leonardtown, MD.

days in the 80’s of playing hardball and being a member of what kids called “The Two-Spot Crew”. Ricky’s hobbies included hanging with his brothers, watching sports, attending softball games, and fixing bicycles for all of his grandchildren, nieces and nephews. In addition to his parents, Ricky was preceded in death by his brother Shawn Hewlett, nephew Tavaris Hewlett, and brother–in-law Horace McClane Sr. also known as “Redboy.” Ricky leaves to cherish his memory, his son Ricky Ray Hewlett Jr. (Trisica) of White Plains, MD; one step daughter, Yolanda Davis of Waldorf, MD; eight sisters, Donna Moore (Barry-deceased) of Lexington Park, MD, Linda McClane (Horace-deceased) of Great Mills, MD, Janice Hewlett of Lexington Park, MD, Rhonda James (Larry) of California, MD, Ava Maddox (Xavier) of California, MD, Ann Hewlett of California, MD, Cheryl Jones (Mike) of Mechanicsville, MD and Tracy Travers of Virginia; four brothers, Charles Hewlett of Lexington Park, MD, Mitchell Hewlett of New York, and Fitzgerald Hewlett of Lexington Park, MD, Brian Smith (Nancy) of Lexington Park, MD and a host of devoted nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends. Family and friends united for visitation on Friday, April 20, 2012 until time of Mass of Christian Burial at St. Peters Claver Catholic Church, 16922 Saint Peter Claver Rd., Saint Inigoes, MD 20684. Interment followed at St. Peters Claver Church cemetery. Repast immediately followed at St. Peters Claver Hall. Arrangements by Briscoe-Tonic Funeral Home, Mechanicsville, MD.

Alton Lee, 60
Alton Aloysius Lee, 60 of Lexington Park, MD passed away on April 12, 2012 in the Chesapeake Shores Nursing Center, Lexington Park, MD. Born on January 28, 1952 he was the son of Ruth Aberdeen Whalen Lee and the late James Richard Lee. Alton is survived by his brothers Joseph L. Dyson and James O. Lee both of Newark, NJ and his sister Nancy A. Bruner of Kathleen, GA. A Memorial Service was held on Saturday, April 21, 2012 in St. Mark's U. A.M.E. Church in Valley Lee, MD with the Rev. Joseph Statesman officiating

Irvin Lowdermilk, 58
Irvin Michael "Mike" Lowdermilk, 58 of Lexington Park, Md died April 16, 2012 at Civista Hospital. Born January 16th, 1954. He was the son of Myrna Lorraine (Corbett) Lowdermilk and James E. Lowdermilk. Mike grew up in Berwyn Heights, MD but lived most of his life in St Mary's county. He had a passion for life, was a friend to many and rarely met a person he didn't like. He loved his family and friends. If you were his friend, you were family. Mike enjoyed fishing, hunting and liked talking about history. . Although he had many jobs through out his life Mike was most happy driving a big truck. He was never more at home than when he was behind the wheel of an 18-wheeler, dump truck or a cement mixer. Mike is survived by his sister, Debbie (Lowdermilk) Pitts and brother-in -law David H.Pitts of Mechanicsville, Md.

Serving St. Mary's County Since 1978
Free eSTIMATeS / QuICk TurnArOunD
• High Speed Digital Black/White & Color Copy Service Compare our Prices & Time Line to Our Competitors • Posters • Flyers • Menus • Wedding Invitations, Programs and • Raffle & Admission Tickets Accessories • Announcements • Graphic Design • Invitations • Commercial Offset Printing • Composition & • Perfect Binding, Hard Back Layout Binding, GBC / Coil Binding, • Copy Service Saddle Stitching • Rubber Stamps • Free In-County Delivery • Letterheads 41690 Courthouse Drive Leonardtown, Maryland 20650 • Envelopes Phone: 301-475-5531 • Newsletters Fax: 301-475-9636 email: orders@printingpressinc.com • Business Cards www.printingpressinc.com • Business Forms HOurS: Mon - Thur 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. • NCR Forms Friday 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. • Envelope Inserting • Certificates • Contracts • Continuous Forms • Booklets • Brochures • Funeral Programs • Bumper Stickers • Magnetic Signs • Laminating • Labels • Bindery • Specialty Work • Color Work • Briefs • Easels

Sharon McMillan, 51
Sharon Elizabeth McMillan 51, of Great Mills, Md departed this life on April 16, 2012. Born March 3, 1961 in Leonardtown, MD, she was the daughter of Ethel Clarise Young and the late James Allen Dickerson. Sharon was a very special and loving person who also was loved by her extended family, The Greene's of Dameron, MD. Sharon graduated from Great Mills High School in 1979. In 1984, she received her degree in Accounting from Morgan State University. After graduation, she was employed by the Department of Navy for a number of years and later was employed by the Department of Transportation where she was currently employed until her death. Sharon enjoyed life and family. Her many hobbies included crafts, scrapbooking, knitting, playing cards and bingo and writing her short stories and poems. Sharon especially loved sitting at the kitchen table with her mother playing Yatzee and shopping on the internet. Christmas was her favorite time of the year; the family would see all of the Secret Packages coming in. Sharon leaves to cherish her memories her husband David McMillan; sisters Greta Thomas (Joseph), Catherine Bush, and Bernadette Day (Alvin); brothers Daniel Young, Alphonso Young (Lissette), Keith Young; father-in-law Al Smith McMillan; stepdaughter Dion McMillan; and a host of nieces, nephews, aunts, uncles, sister-in-laws, brother-in-laws, relatives and friends. She also leaves to cherish her precious memories two special friends Alice Jackson and Vickie Stinson. Sharon was preceded in death by her father, James Allen Dickerson; her foster parents, George and Blanche Greene; grandmother, Bernadine Fenwick; mother-in-law, Alberta McMillan

Ricky Ray Hewlett Sr., 60
Ricky Ray Hewlett Sr., 60, of Lexington, Park, Md peacefully departed us on April 15th, 2012 while he rest. Born on July 23rd, 1951 in Ridge Maryland, Ricky was the son of the late Charles Alfred Hewlett Sr. and Doris Hewlett. Ricky, better known as “Slick Rick With The Double Click”, was well known throughout the community. He worked at the PAX Naval Air Station commissary, before later becoming a chef in various local restaurants, most notably Pat’s Bar and Grill and The Roost. Ricky was a huge sports fan and loved his Cowboys and Lakers with a passion! Slick Rick was also a staple within the hardball and softball community, going way back to his

21

Thursday, April 26, 2012

The County Times
she will be buried next to her husband. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in her memory to St. Mary’s County Animal Welfare League, P.O. Box 1232, Leonardtown, MD 20650 and A.C.T.S. (A Community That Shares), P.O. Box 54, Bushwood, MD 20618. Condolences to the family may be made at www. brinsfieldfuneral.com. Arrangements by the Brinsfield Funeral Home, P.A., Leonardtown, MD.

and other loving relatives. Family and friends united on Monday, April 23, 2012 for visitation until time of service at Briscoe-Tonic Funeral Home Chapel, 38576 Brett Way, Mechanicsville, MD. Interment will follow at Charles Memorial Gardens, Leonardtown, MD. Arrangements provided by Briscoe-Tonic Funeral Home.

SENIOR LIVING

Mary Myers, 94
Mary Mildred Myers, 94, of Lusby, MD passed away on April 13, 2012 at Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC. She was born the 10th child of the late Louis and Nettie Washington Ball, on March 16, 1918, in St. Inigoes, St. Mary's County, MD. She attended the public schools of St. Mary's County. Even though she did not have advanced education; Mildred was blessed with a wealth of knowledge. At an early age, Mildred gave her life to the Lord; and accepted Jesus Christ as her personal Savior; and served and worshiped Him until her earthly life was over. Before her health declined, she was an active member of the Church choir, served as a layspeaker, and was involved in numerous Church activities and committees. Mildred was a dedicated and hard worker. Her employment included among various jobs, Solomons Pier, Pier I, Warren Denton Seafood, to name a few. Her final employment was with the Southern MD Tri-County Community Action Committee, Inc., as a Senior Companion. She enjoyed life and enjoyed spending time with her grandchildren and great-grandchildren. She married Levester Myers, and from this union they were blessed with 6 children. Mildred was predeceased by her husband, Levester; sons, Lawrence and Earl; daughter, Deloris, brothers and sisters, James, Archie, Joseph, Swope, Benjamin, John, Janie, Florence, Carrie and Reginald. She is survived by sons, Leon (Ida), James, Nathaniel (Mae), Jerome (Velma); daughters, Vivian and Cassandra; one brother, Richard Ball, sisters-in-law; Gladys Ball, Mamie Ball, Sarah Myers, 24 grandchildren, 9 greatgrandchildren and 16 great-great grandchildren and a host of nieces, nephews, and other relatives. Funeral service was held on Thursday, April 19, 2012 at St. John UM Church, Lusby, MD with Rev. Dr. Samson Y. Nortey officiating. The interment was at St. John UM Church Cemetery, Lusby, MD. The pallbearers were Andree Harrod, Curtis Commodore, Nathaniel Myers, J.Lee Myers, Jeffrey Childress and Scott Childress. The honorary pallbearers were James Myers and Sterling Myers. Funeral arrangements provided by Sewell Funeral Home, Prince Frederick, MD.

William Rodman, 68
William “Rod” Blount Rodman, 68 of California, MD died at his home on April 18, 2012. Born on August 6, 1943 in Portsmouth, Virginia, he was the son of the late William Blount Rodman IV and Susan Noble Rodman. William served in the Navy from 1972-1994, retiring as a Commander for the US Navy. He was a member of the Patuxent Naval Museum and Sotterley Plantation. William is survived by his wife, Kathleen A. Rodman, his children, Caryn Ann Snyder (Cole) Cle Elum, WA; Daniel B. Rodman (Jennifer) Effingham, IL; William B. Rodman VI, Everett, WA; and Sandra Jean Vaughan ( John), Wilmington, NC; his brothers Wright Rodman (Rosemary) Bonita, CA; John Rodman (Wilmington, NC) and Edward Rodman, Wilmington, NC; and Grandchildren, Carlie, Elijah, Nicolas, Joshua, Zachary and Benjamin Rodman, Tenor Summers, John Vaughan Jr., Rylie McDaniel, Noah and Caleb LaChance, Catlin, Madeline and JoJo Middlebrook. A Memorial Service honoring Rod’s life was held at the Sotterley Plantation, 44300 Sotterley Lane, Hollywood, Maryland 20636 on Tuesday April 24, 2012. Reverend John Ball from Trinity Episcopal Church in St. Mary’s City conducted the service. Family received friends. Interment services will be held at Arlington National Cemetery at date and time to be determined. In lieu of flowers, the family requests memorial contributions be made to the Wounded Warrior Project, P.O. Box 758517, Topeka, Kansas 66675 or got@woundedwarriorproject.org Condolences to the family may be made at www. brinsfieldfuneral.com. Arrangements by the Brinsfield Funeral Home, P.A., Leonardtown, MD.

St. Mary’s Dept of Aging
Programs and Activities
have the added distinction of being framed and displayed permanently at the Northern Senior Activity Center on the Center’s Wall of Fame. Call 301.475.4002, ext. 1002 for more information. The Basics of String Art A String Art class will be offered at the Garvey Senior Activity Center on Wednesday, May 9 at 10:00 a.m. String art is characterized by an arrangement of colored thread strung between points to form abstract geometric patterns or representational designs such as a ship’s sail. Though straight lines are formed by the string, the slightly different and metric positions at which strings intersect may give the image of curves. Sign up by Monday, May 7. Cost: $5.00. To sign up for this class, call 301.475.4200, ext. 1050. Line Dancing at Loffler Senior Activity Center Now on Fridays you can learn the latest in line dancing at 11 a.m. at Loffler Senior Activity Center. Our instructor has been teaching line dance for several years and will be offering this class at no charge. You do not need to sign up- just come to the center. For more information call 301.737.5670, ext. 1658. Steps to a Fit and Healthy You: Offered by Health Connections This program, offered at the Garvey Senior Activity Center on Fridays from May 4 - July 6 from 1011:30 a.m. combines proven weight loss strategies such as personalized goal setting, group support, food and exercise journaling, behavior modification techniques, weekly weighins with pre and post-body composition analysis, and nutrition/exercise education. The program promotes slow and permanent weight loss. An experienced health educator conducts the program with knowledge in exercise, nutrition, and behavior management. Sign up now and your enrollment is FREE. That is a $100.00 value! Attendance at all sessions is highly encouraged. To sign up, call 301.475.4200, ext. 1050. Mothers to be Honored at a Tea On Friday, May 11 at 10 a.m. the staff at the Loffler Senior Activity Center will host a tea for mothers. Gentle entertainment, a delicious assortment of goodies and teas in an elegant setting will be provided to honor you, the heart of the family. There is no cost for this event. To provide you the best service we ask that you make a reservation by calling 301.737.5670, ext. 1658 before 5 p.m. on Monday, May 7, or stop by the reception desk at Loffler. Tai Chi for Arthritis begins at the Loffler Senior Activity Center Tai Chi for Arthritis, a program developed by Dr. Paul Lam for the Arthritis Foundation will be taught at Loffler Senior Activity Center for eight consecutive Tuesdays from 9 -10 a.m. beginning May 9. This form of exercise uses gentle, Sun style Tai Chi routines that are safe, easy to learn and suitable for every fitness level. This class is being offered for FREE but preregistration is required. Participants are asked to attend all eight classes if they sign up. Only 20 students will be able to register and priority will be given to those who have not yet taken the Tai Chi for Arthritis class at Garvey Senior Activity Center. If you would like to commit to the eight sessions, you can sign up by calling 301.737.5670, ext. 1658 or by stopping in at the reception desk at Loffler. Call for Entries for Annual Photo Contest Entries are now being accepted for the photo contest celebrating Living, Love, and Laughter! Contact the Northern Senior Activity Center for a full description such as rules, categories, deadline and award dates. Awards will be given in each category as well as a best overall award. The Best Overall will

Loffler Senior Activity Center 301-737-5670, ext. 1652; Garvey Senior Activity Center, 301-475-4200, ext. 1050 Northern Senior Activity Center, 301-475-4002, ext. 1001; Ridge Nutrition Site, 301-475-4200, ext. 1050. Visit the Department of Aging’s website at www.stmarysmd.com/aging for the most up-to date information.

Clifford Spohn, 96
Clifford Adams “Bud” Spohn, 96 of Solomons, MD died on Wednesday, April 18, 2012 at Asbury Solomons Retirement Community in Solomons, MD. Born on December 21, 1915, in Reading, PA, he was the son of the late Clifford Spohn and Margaret Rankin. On May 23, 1942, Bud married his beloved wife of 69 years, Laura Ella Hoeltzel. He earned his doctorate degree in Meteorology from MIT. He was a career Officer in the United States Air Force. During his decorated career he was the Commander of the 6th Weather Wing at Andrews Air Force Base. In 1966, he retired from the Air Force as a Colonel. After retiring he went to work for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration as the Deputy Director of the National Environmental Satellite Service. Bud was a member of many clubs and organizations, which included the Military Officers Association of America, Retired Officers Association, National Association of Retired Federal Employees, American Meteorology Association, World Meteorology Association, and many international meteorological committees. He was a long time active member of Mount Zion United Methodist Church. He was also a long time active resident of Asbury Solomons Retirement Community. His hobbies included volunteering with the many organizations he belonged to, reading, singing and playing bridge. In addition to his wife, Bud is survived by his children, Clifford Spohn II (Sandra) of Albuquerque, NM, Katharine Kettler (Ronald) of Columbia, MO, Barbara Spohn of Bowie, MD, Sally Lowe (Fran Welsh) of Arnold, MD and Michael Spohn (Jill) of Reston VA; 12 grandchildren, and 8 great grandchildren. In addition to his parents he was preceded in death by his grandsons, Clifford Spohn III who died tragically while serving his country in Iraq and Brian Spohn; and his siblings, Katharine Miller and John Spohn. Family will receive friends for Bud’s Life Celebration on Monday, April 30, 2012 from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. with prayers recited at 11:00 a.m. at the Brinsfield Funeral Home, 22955 Hollywood Road, Leonardtown, MD and another life celebration service will be held at 2 p.m. at Asbury Solomon’s Retirement Community, 11601 Asbury Circle, Solomons, MD 20688 with Pastor Meredith Syler and Reverend Ann Strickler presiding. Memorial contributions may be made to Asbury Solomons Benevolent Fund, 1110 Asbury Circle, Solomons, MD 20688 or Mount Zion United Methodist Church, 27108 Mount Zion Church Road, Mechanicsville, MD 20659. Condolences to the family may be made at www. brinsfieldfuneral.com. Arrangements by the Brinsfield Funeral Home, P.A., Leonardtown, MD.

Jean Palmer, 96
Jean Hamilton Smith Palmer, age 96, passed away peacefully at her home on the family farm in Chaptico, MD on April 16, 2012. Born March 16, 1916 in Fort Williams, ME, she was the daughter of the late General Rodney Hamilton Smith, U.S. Army and Helen Florence Rogers Smith. Mrs. Palmer married Lt. Shelby Young Palmer, Jr., U.S. Army Air Corps on August 31, 1939 in Weld, ME. Her husband died in an air accident on January 29, 1941 near Puerto Rico where they were stationed at the time. Prior to her marriage, Mrs. Palmer traveled with her family as her father was stationed both in the United States and in several foreign countries consulting to improve their coastal defenses. She often told her family stories about living in Hawaii and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on Corregidor Island, Philippines, and back home when her father was posted to the United States Military Academy at West Point, NY to teach Portuguese and coach football. Mrs. Palmer’s favorite employment was as private secretary to the Head of School at Kent Place School, Summit, NJ. She worked for the school for 26 years prior to her retirement in 1978. She then moved to St. Mary’s County to be near her daughter and grandchildren. She worked for her son-in-law, Dr. Guazzo, as his private secretary for many years. She enjoyed living on the family farm, playing bridge with friends and supporting the Major Wm. Thomas Chapter of the D.A.R. Mrs. Palmer is survived by her daughter, Shelby Palmer Guazzo and her husband, Dr. Eugene Guazzo of Chaptico, MD, her grandchildren, Eugene Tai Guazzo (Cheri) of Los Angeles, CA, John Palmer Guazzo (Caroline) of Falls Church, VA, Dante Edward Guazzo, II (Emine) of San Francisco, CA, and Shelby Smith GuazzoMattis (David) of Dallas, TX. She is also survived by three great grandchildren. In addition to her parents and her husband, Mrs. Palmer was preceded in death by her sister, Helen Corinne Smith, her grandparents, General George Rodney Smith, U.S. Army and Corinne Barrett Smith and General Harry Lovejoy Rogers, U.S. Army and Harriet Maria Pray Rogers. Family received friends on Monday, April 23, 2012 at the Brinsfield Funeral Home, 22955 Hollywood Road, Leonardtown, MD 20650. Prayers were recited. Mrs. Palmer’s funeral will be scheduled at a later date at the United States Military Academy at West Point, NY where

The Northern Senior Activity Center Council and the St. Mary’s Department of Aging & Human Services are sponsoring a Dinner & Show Fundraiser which is open to the public.
Northern Senior Activity Center, Charlotte Hall, Maryland

Saturday, June 2, 2012 from 5-7:30 p.m.
There will be a catered meal from Cedarville Carryout consisting of fried chicken (choice of white or dark meat), pulled pork sandwich, baked beans, cole slaw, potato salad, strawberry shortcake and beverage.

Trish & Frank Curreri, Vintage Entertainment
Patsy’s Party -- classic male country artist songs & Patsy Cline songs.
Cost of the ticket is: $25 per person, tickets are now on sale at the Northern Senior Activity Center.

Entertainment by:

For additional information contact Council President Pat Myers 301-884-8714

By Keith McGuire Contributing Writer

Newsmakers

The County Times

Thursday, April 26, 2012

22

Heroism on the Bay
be possible to fish for a while. He worked his boat through a couple of drifts to avoid the roughest conditions. They hooked two decent fish before stopping to consider returning to Flag Harbor. As he assessed conditions Fleming saw Gladhill’s boat drift through the roughest area and noticed that the boat was listing to one side. Then, within seconds, the boat capsized with nothing but the bow sticking out of the water, putting Gladhill and his crew in the 38-degree drink. There was mayhem just 100 yards from Fleming and in the roughest part of the power plant outflow. Fleming, shaken by his own total fear of cold water, made a mayday call on his VHF. The Coast Guard responded immediately. They wanted GPS coordinates, but there was no time for that. Fleming reaffirmed that they were at the discharge of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant and immediately proceeded to the sinking boat to offer assistance. Risking that a similar condition could sink his boat, Fleming pulled alongside the sinking boat. Gladhill, Krall and Neff had managed to grab onto the bow of their boat bottom by standing on the bow rail that was now three feet under water. Fleming tried to keep his distance in the rough conditions so that the boats didn’t bang together over the men in the water. He encouraged them to swim to his boat, but they wouldn’t let go of their hold on the sinking boat. He pulled closer and encouraged them to reach over and grab his bow rail, which they did. Then he worked with each one to move them to the stern of his boat to board by way of the swim platform. With all their strength, Fleming and Warhurst pulled the three men aboard. Safely on Fleming’s boat, they huddled on the deck to retain what was left of their body heat. Fearing hypothermia in the victims, Fleming immediately motored to Flag Harbor Marina where they were met by an ambulance that transported the three rescued victims to Calvert Memorial Hospital for treatment of hypothermia. For their courage in this action, Fleming and Warhurst received an award from the Carnegie Hero Fund Commission in December. This commission is chartered to recognize civilian heroism in the United States and Canada. Kevin Gladhill said, “I told Dennis afterward, ‘You stepped up, sprang into action and performed flawlessly.” Fleming would like to think that he was just doing what a fellow boater might do for him if the situation were reversed. Captain Dennis Fleming is a licensed guide who operates the Fishamajig Guide Service (www.fishamajigguideservice.com) part time, while working fulltime as an environmental resources administrator for the Charles County government. Nothing in his years of boating experiences compares to the events that transpired on Feb. 10, 2011. Terry Warhurst is a supervisor at the Charles County landfill. riverdancekeith@gmail.com

You probably don’t remember what the weather was like on Feb. 10, 2011, but Dennis Fleming of Mechanicsville can tell you. At 7 a.m. the temperature was in the mid 30s and the winds were from the north northeast at a little over 15 knots. Kevin Gladhill and his friends, Michael Krall and Russell Neff, departed Boonsboro, Md. in the very early hours of the morning towing Gladhill’s 21-foot boat. They arrived at Chesapeake Beach at 5 a.m. and launched to run south to the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant outflow for catch and release striper fishing. All three wore life jackets for the long run to the power plant. By 6:30 a.m. they were drifting through the outflow jigging for big stripers. Conditions were good, but deteriorating with a light northwest wind becoming stronger and turning more to the northeast. They had made this trip several times before and Gladhill had every confidence in his boat in these conditions. By 7:30 a.m., Gladhill knew that conditions were getting worse and that he would soon have to head back to Chesapeake Beach. At about the same time, Fleming and his co-worker, Terry Warhurst of Upper Marlboro also decided to take a trip to the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant for some catch and release striper fishing. At the time, Fleming kept his 21 foot boat at a slip in Flag Harbor just three miles north of the power plant and, although he was skeptical about the northeast wind, decided to head south to give it a look. They broke skim ice as they left the harbor at 7:30 a.m., and Flem-

Dennis Fleming

ing promised his guest that if conditions were too sloppy then he would scuttle the trip and return to the harbor. As expected, they arrived to find an aggressive flow at the power plant discharge. The outflow normally creates moderately rough conditions, but the northeast wind amplified the conditions and created 5-foot standing waves. The best striper fishing is right in the rough water, and Fleming had seen worse. There were a couple of other small boats working the area, so he felt that it would

Money

for the love of

Gym Focuses on Patients with Medical Needs
By Corrin M. Howe Staff Writer A Medically Oriented Gym (MOG) looks like a regular fitness facility with treadmills, elliptical machines, free weights and weight machines; however, it services the needs of members with medical challenges, according to Bonnie Gateau, owner of the California MOG. Her manager, Ellie Sweum, said there is evidence to support that patients with medical challenges feel overwhelmed walking into a regular gym. “It’s not that they don’t want to exercise, but they aren’t comfortable in the setting or there is no supervision.” Potential members of the gym could be those diagnosed with high blood pressure, diabetes, recovering from cancer, injuries or obesity. “What sets an MOG apart is we have degreed professionals. We have physical therapists, physical therapy assistants, and exercise physiologists,” said Gateau. A new member receives a comprehensive assessment and a fitness program based upon their limitations and goals. They are reassessed every 90 days. “It’s not a cookbook program,” said Sweum. “All populations (medically challenged or not) benefit from exercise.” Members are set up on a program and have one-to-one support until they are comfortable with exercising on their own. Furthermore, Gateau said they offer “Red Flag Assessments”. If a member becomes sore or hurt during an exercise program, he can ask to see a physical therapist, who will see if there is something in the member’s routine that needs to be changed. The gym has an “elaborate print-out” which members Tai Chi, Will Power and Grace or monthly educational presentations. Likewise, anyone can come in and pay the daily fee of $12 to exercise, take a class or attend a presentation. On Saturdays, the community is welcome to come in from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. to receive a free blood pressure, BMI or body fat screening. Gateau is from Calvert County and opened her practice in Lusby 1987. She had a second clinic in Lexington Park, but decided to look for more space knowing she was interested in the Medically Oriented Gym concept. Physical Therapist Russell Certo came up with the concept in 2005 and began sharing it at the national conferences. Gateau heard his presentation and took Sweum to tour his Grand Island, NJ facility two years ago. The MOG is a co-op, and so far, GaPhoto by Corrin M. Howe teau is the only one to open one is MaryJustin Gittings and Keri Ramey demonstrate equipment at the Medically Oriented Gym. land. Her location opened November 2011. She and Sweum are marketing the gym can take to their physicians to provide nutritional and activto area physicians specializing in endocrinology, cardiolity guidelines. Gateau said the goal is not to have the members work- ogy and family practice. Business is picking up because of ing out so hard that they can’t get out of the bed the next day. word-of-mouth and her physical therapy patients. “Half the population can benefit from exercise,” said While connected to Gateau Physical Therapy and Sports Medicine clinic, the gym is not exclusively for pa- Sweum, who said exercise improves health across the board tients with medical conditions. Sweum said they want to to include bone density, BMI, weight and endurance. For more information call 301-866-5444 or email elhave a positive impact on the community. A person does not have to be a member to participate in some of the yoga, liesweum@gmail.com.

23

Thursday, April 26, 2012

The County Times

Irene Parrish B. Realty
Irene Parrish
Broker
22188 Three Notch Rd. Suite A Lexington Park, MD 20653

301-863-7002 301-481-7244
CELL OFFICE

A tradition of warmth, a commitment to value 301-373-2131

www.2hdb.com/IreneParrish

burchoil.com

ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY
Under New Management
Three Notch Rd • 301-884-4137

EFFICIENT

Barber Shop

Woody's
• Guys • Gals • Colors • Perms
ax.. .

Come in and Rel

Call Today! (301) 884-8400

ERIE INSURANCE GROUP
BURRIS’ OLDE TOWNE INSURANCE DANIEL W. BURRIS, CIC, PROPRIETOR Auto • Home • Business • Life

visit us at:

Economyrvs.com

29020 Three Notch Road (Route 5) Mechanicsville, MD 20659

If you would like to promote an event in this fashion please contact: Matt Suite at SOMD Publishing

BURRIS’ 22720 WASHINGTON STREET • P.O. BOX OLDE TOWNE 707 LEONARDTOWN, MD 20650 INSURANCE danburris@danburris.com • danburris.com
(301) 475-3151 • Toll Free: (800) 872-8010 • Fax: (301) 475-9029

DANIEL W. BURRIS, CIC, PROPRIETOR

Auto • Home • Business • Life
22720 WASHINGTON ST. P.O. BOX 707 • LEONARDTOWN, MD 20650

(301) 475-3151 Fax: (301) 475-9029 danburris@danburris.com
mattsuite@countytimes.net

301-399-6417

danburris.com

21541 Great Mills Road Lexington Park, MD 20653 (301) 862-1000

Edward Middleton
Commercial Agent
White Plains Corporate Center II 4475 Regency Place Suite 101 White Plains, Maryland 20695 301-632-6320 office • 301-632-6323 fax 240-925-0440 cell • 301-769-2177 home office edward.middleton1@verizon.net

The Epitome of Catholic Education in a Safe and Innovative Environment 38833 Chaptico Road Helen, Md. 20635 301-884-3165 PHONE 301-472-4469 FAX www.mothercatherine.org

Mother Catherine Spalding School

www.taylorgascompany.com

www.shasho.com

Find us on

Community
Library items
Libraries to be closed half day for training Leonardtown library will be closed until 1 p.m. on Apr. 27 and the Charlotte Hall branch until 1 p.m. on May 4 for staff training. Starting a Small Business Workshops to be offered The Small Business Administration will offer a free workshop on starting a small business at the Leonardtown library on May 4 and at Charlotte Hall library on May 9. They will present information on starting and financing a business as well as discuss the programs and services they offer. Both programs start at 9:30 a.m. and no registration is required. Reading activities and parachute games planned for children To celebrate Children’s Book Week, all three libraries will offer “Read-Learn-Grow” for children to enjoy fun interactive reading activities with their parents or caregivers. The programs will be held at Lexington Park branch at 10 a.m. on May 7, at the Charlotte Hall branch at 10 a.m. on May 8, and at the Leonardtown branch at 10:30 a.m. on May 12. No registration is required. A variety of games using a parachute are planned for children ages 3-6 years old at Parachute Play scheduled at both Charlotte Hall and Leonardtown libraries at 10 a.m. on May 7 and at Lexington Park branch at 10:30 a.m. on May 14. Poets can share poetry Poets of all ages are invited to share their original poems or favorite ones at the Poetry Open Mic scheduled May 9 at 6:30 p.m. at Leonardtown library. Opening Reception held for local artists The public is invited to meet local artists Tammy Vitale and Mary Ida Rolape and view their artwork at a reception to be held May 9 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Lexington Park Library Art Gallery. Their artwork will be on display starting May 1 through June 14. Artists interested in displaying their artwork at the gallery are asked to contact Candy Cummings at 301-863-6693. Applications for summer volunteers being accepted Teen summer volunteers are needed to help with the summer reading program at each branch from June 4 to August 11. Students entering the sixth grade this fall and older may apply. Applications are available online or at any branch and are due May 12. Training will be provided for those selected.

The County Times

Thursday, April 26, 2012

24

Part of the Solution… In Your Back Yard
By Carrie Munn Staff Writer The couple bid and won the rain garden installation during Volunteers, eaSMRWA’s annual “A ger to exercise their River Affair” brunch green thumbs and last year, raising the orlearn more about ganization over $1,000. “Bill and I have pollutant-f ighting been members of the St. rain gardens, came Mary's River Watershed out to install one at for some time. Since we a residence in St. are fortunate enough Inigoes on Saturday to live on the water, we morning. want to do what we can The workshop, to protect the watershed hosted by the St. so we keep oyster cages Mary’s River WaPhoto by Jackie Takacs and we decided to bid tershed Association (SMRWA), under the Many volunteers make light work of a rain garden installation in on the rain garden,” Green said. guidance of Univer- St. Inigoes on Saturday. “Having a group of similarly-minded people sity of Maryland’s Sea Grant Extension Specialist Jackie Takacs, demonstrated how to choose the best come out to install the rain garden made it even location, design and plant selection for an effective more meaningful,” she told The County Times. This year’s “A River Affair” will be held on rain garden. According to SMRWA literature, St. Mary’s May 20, from 1 to 4 p.m. at Woodlawn in Ridge and County is required to reduce its pollution load into will include a toast to well-known river advocate, the rivers by 20 percent, and this rain garden, and Bernie Fowler. On May 5, Jackie Takacs and fellow UM Exothers like it, trap and digest the pollutants from rain and runoff, and will earn the county credit toward tension Watershed Restoration Specialist Amanda Rockler will host a free, public conservation landthat goal. Takacs led the charge, directing a diverse scaping and native plants workshop at 9 a.m. in group of volunteers who dug, planted and mulched Goodpaster Hall, Room 186, of St. Mary’s College the project in a few hours’ time. By the early after- of Maryland. The indoor discussion will be followed noon, homeowners Bill Edgerton and Bonnie Green by an outdoor (rain or shine) planting. had a functional and attractive rain garden, which carriemunn@countytimes.net will grow in beauty as the young plants flourish.

Buy Your Mom A Block!

Buy Your Favorite Graduate A Graduation Day Block!
To be placed in the May 31st publication.

To be placed in the May 10th publication.

$25 With No Picture $35 With Picture
30 WORD MAX 2x2

$25 With No Picture $35 With Picture
Please Contact:
mattsuite@countytimes.net 301-399-6417

Katie Thompson,
Graduation is a time to celebrate your achievements, prepare for a future of opportunities and embrace a world of infinite possibilities.

Please Contact: Matt Suite
mattsuite@countytimes.net
2x3

-Love Mom & Dad

Matt Suite

jennifer@somdpublishing.net 301-247-7611

Jennifer Stotler

Katie Thompson,
Graduation is a time to celebrate your achievements, prepare for a future of opportunities and embrace a world of infinite possibilities.

301-399-6417 Jennifer Stotler
jennifer@somdpublishing.net

mickeyramos@countytimes.net 240-298-0937

Mickey Ramos

301-247-7611 Mickey Ramos
mickeyramos@countytimes.net

-Love Mom & Dad

240-298-0937

25

Thursday, April 26, 2012

The County Times
To Place a Classified Ad, please email your ad to: classifieds@countytimes.net or Call: 301-3734125 or Fax: 301-373-4128 for a price quote. Office hours are: Monday thru Friday 8am - 4pm. The County Times is published each Thursday.

DireCTory
Phone 301-884-5900 1-800 524-2381 Phone 301-934-4680 Fax 301-884-0398

Business
Cross & Wood

Deadlines for Classifieds are Tuesday at 12 pm.

Classifieds
Real Estate
Beautiful three year old Ranch style home for sale or rent. Features include two propane gas fireplaces, jacuzzi tub, walkin closets, attic, hard wood floors, two full baths, two outside storage buildings, gazebo, two car gargage, front porch, geothermal system, attic, easy on utilities on an very private one acre lot. Definately a must see! Please contact Patty on 301-904-9624. Price: $265,000.00/$1400 month. Spacious 3 bedroom, 3 ½ bath brick rambler with finished basement and 2 car attached garage. Also a two car detached garage with furnace and carport. Sits on 2.95 acres in quiet neighborhood on St. John’s Road in Hollywood. Includes eat in kitchen with plenty of oak cabinets and 3 ovens. Large master suite with sitting area that accesses the deck with pool. Large great room with hardwood floor also accesses the deck. Basement has large gathering room, office, game room, two storage rooms and a full bath with shower. Vaulted wood ceiling living room could also serve as formal dining room. Extras include three brick fireplaces, ceramic entry way, ceiling fans, large shed (with electric) , two bay pole shed (with electric) attached to detached garage and a large gazebo(with electric and ceiling fan with light). Plus much more. Call for appointment. 301-373-8462 or e-mail at jlaowens@aol.com. Price: $450,000.

AssoCiAtes, inC. Serving The Great Southern Maryland Counties since 1994
Employer/Employee Primary Resource Consultants Group & Individual Health, Dental, Vision, AFLAC, Life, Long Term Care, Short & Long Term Disability, Employer & Employee Benefits Planning

12685 Amberleigh Lane La Plata, MD 20646

28231 Three Notch Rd, #101 Mechanicsville, MD 20659

301-866-0777

Pub & Grill
23415 Three Notch Road California Maryland

Heating & Air Conditioning “THE HEAT PUMP PEOPLE”
30457 Potomac Way Charlotte Hall, MD 20622 Phone: 301-884-5011

325 Days Till St. Patrick’s Day
Entertainment All Day

www.dbmcmillans.com

Est. 1982
M.O.G.

snheatingac.com

Lic #12999

GPT Gateau Therapy Physical

Medically Oriented Gym

& Sports Medicine “Expect more from your gym” www.gateaupt.com

Real Estate Rentals
Beautiful 1 story spacious home, 3 bedrooms, 2 Baths, Kitchen (microwave, stove, dishwasher, refrigerator and washer & dryer), living room, family room, dinning room and large yard with front & rear deck. This home is located in Park Pines and is minutes from Pax River NAS Please call Kim Guy @ (301)475-6752 to preview. Rent: $1,250. 3 Bedroom 2 Bath Single Family Home. Large Wrap around Deck. Tenant will be responsible for Electric. Huge Yard. Call 301-643-1116. Rent: $1350.

“Professional Treatment with Personal Care”

Bonnie Gateau, PT, CSCS Owner, CEO

23123 Camden Way 11855 HG Trueman Rd Medically Oriented Gym Lusby, MD 20657 23123 Camden War, Ste 1-C California, MD 20619 Phone: 301-862-5177 California, MD 20619 Phone: 410-326-3432 Fax: 301-862-4959 Phone: 301-866-5444 Fax: 410-326-2493

301-737-0777
Monday - Friday: 10 am - 7 pm Saturday: 10 am - 4 pm • Sunday: 11 am - 4 pm

Employment
Plastic mfg in Hollywood has an immediate opening for an individual with woodworking and layout skills. Proficiency with woodshop power tools and the ability to read prints is a must. Responsibilities include assisting in the building of molds, patterns, prototype parts, and machine fixtures. Must be well organized with excellent math skills. Company offers excellent benefits pkg including 401k, med and dental ins, paid vac and holidays. Send resume and salary requirements to: rick@ssicustomplastics. com or FAX to 301-373-2734.

OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK

23415 Three Notch Rd. • Suite #2033A • California, MD 20619

Prime Rib • Seafood • Sunday Brunch Banquet & Meeting Facilities 23418 Three Notch Road • California, MD 20619 www.lennys.net

For All Your Real Estate Needs.

Addie McBride

www.franzenrealtors.com

22316 Three Notch Rd. Lexington Park, MD 20653 Office: 1-800-848-6092 • Office: 301-862-2222 • Fax Office: 301-862-1060

Franzen Realtors, Inc.

Helping Good People Find Good Homes.

Cell: 301-481-6767 Home: 301-737-1669 www.addiemcbride.com addiemcbride@verizon.net

The County Times will not be held responsible for any ads omitted for any reason. The County Times reserves the right to edit or reject any classified ad not meeting the standards of The County Times. It is your responsiblity to check the ad on its first publication and call us if a mistake is found. We will correct your ad only if notified after the first day the first publication ran.

Important

The County Times

Thursday, April 26, 2012

26

CLUES ACROSS

Last Week’s Puzzle Solutions

Over 250,000 Southern Marylanders can’t be wrong!
Your Online Community for Charles, Calvert, and St. Mary’s Counties

1. Milk producer 4. Am. Music Awards 8. Engaged in 10. Moved over the water 12. Deflects in fencing 14. Southwest or United 15. Elin’s ex 17. Signing 18. Macao’s monetary unit 19. 1st Korean pres. Syngman 20. The god of the sun 21. Old world, new 23. Metal food storage container 24. Dutch colonist 26. 2 source sound system 29. Prohibitions 30. Oh, God! 31. Poly and Octa are some 32. Clip 33. 1st, 2nd and home 35. Highest cards 36. Equals 1/100 afghani 37. One and only 39. Don’t know when yet 40. Ripped 41. Smallest whole number 43. White vestment worn

by priests 44. C.S. Forester officer Horatio 48. Made it forbidden 51. Monkshood or helmetflower 52. Director Spielberg 53. Palm tree fruits 54. Mild yellow Dutch cheese 55. In favor of

CLUES DOWN

1. Goods carried by ships 2. Shrek is one 3. Stream fence to catch fish 4. Air America Radio 5. 1/1000 of an inch 6. AKAs 7. Detector 8. Voluntarily set aside 9. Morning moisture 10. VI 11. A small wooded hollow 12. Parent Teacher Assoc. 13. Arranged according

to size 14. Gulf in the Arabian Sea 16. The Mississippi’s largest tributary 22. Comb-plate 24. Prohibits 25. The early stages 27. Breastplate 28. Popular spoken music 29. Cattle genus 31. 61036 IL 32. Crusted over a wound 33. US VP 1801 - 1805 34. More flamboyant 35. Remove an organ or bodily structure 36. Russin weight unit = 36 lbs 38. Siberian nomads 39. Makes lacework 40. At a specific prior time 42. Before 45. Binary coded decimal 46. Loiter 47. Upon 49. Egg cells 50. Original equipment manufacturer

Cat of the Week
My name is Scout. I was trapped in a feral colony and because I was crying to get out of the trap one of the volunteers at Feral Cat Rescue figured I was tame. Usually the feral are scared and quiet. I was yowling and saying, “let me out of here” I was vetted and they discovered I was already neutered so I was either lost or dumped. No one really knows. I loooovvvve to be petted. I am a sweet boy and am looking for an inside home. You can gill out an application at www.feralcatrescuemd.org and email it to my foster mom Diane at moonandhunt@hotmail.com. If you have questions about me, her number is 301-481-0171. Hope to meet you soon, Scout

New to the area? Lifelong resident?
• Stay abreast of local happenings • Check our highly popular classifieds • Speak your mind in the forums • Enter our contests and win terrific prizes

Stop by and see what Southern Maryland Online has to offer!

Pet of the Week
Hi my name is Harley and I am an adorable 12-week-old American bulldog/ lab puppy. I have a few siblings who are also looking for homes of their own. I am well socialized with other dogs and people, living in a foster home with children ages 11 to 18 years old. We are loving and affectionate pups that hope to be a part of your family. My siblings and I are identification microchipped, wormed, have age appropriate vaccinations and our adoption fee includes our spaying/ neutering. Please contact Cathy at cat-dan@secondhoperescue.org or call us 240-925-0628. Please Adopt, Don’t Shop!

www.somd.com

Wanderings of an
Aimless

27

Thursday, April 26, 2012

The County Times
By Linda Reno Contributing Writer

A Journey Through Time
The

Min

By Shelby Oppermann Contributing Writer

This Stage of Life

d

Chronicle

I’m so sorry Earth Day activities in Leonardtown were cancelled this past Sunday, but the Earth knew what we needed and responded. So much hard work was put into planning all the outdoor activities by Maria Fleming and lots of creative people. Of course it is always a risk with any outdoor festival. Believe me, the Strawberry Queen is well aware of this. Now we are rewarded with refreshed flowers and grass…and less pollen. The wind and rain did beat the last of the dogwood blooms up terribly. I miss them. Not all activities were cancelled. The Leonardtown Arts Center across from the Court House remained open with many of their artists displaying and demonstrating their art. Missy Bell was on hand to teach acting to some lucky kids, Laura Howard displayed and worked on her unique jewelry, and several painters were working on new projects. A nice mix of art and artisans are represented. Joe Orlando and others have worked hard to add this newest venue to the Leonardtown Arts scene. I decided to take my friend Wendy up on reading some poetry at the Arts Center. Maryland Poet laureate Michael Glaser (and a SMC professor of mine) read several of his beautiful poems to start us out and gave us a writing exercise to work on. My husband passed on that part, even though he has penned a few himself, he was there for support. I am one of those nervous people who start shaking when they get up in front of people, so anytime I have the opportunity to overcome this fear I try to take advantage of it. Up until my second year of Junior High I was fine, and then all of a sudden I froze on a chorus tour of elementary schools in Prince Georges County. I was the lead singer for one of the big songs, and had made it through several schools. One day I froze, lost my voice, and ran off the stage – cold sweat and all. Thus my stage fright began. I don’t know what happened or why. I never sang lead again in the chorus. I still stayed as involved as I could with school plays – well, they did have really cool wrap parties. After that I was always part of the crew, no longer on stage. It’s amazing how one moment can change your life forever – I’m sure most people have a moment, or maybe two like that. I’ve had my share of moments that changed the course of my life for good or bad. But I try to work on them; try to change. I’m fine in my comfort zones of work or church. I feel confidant and loved (I hope). The only other place it was a problem is when I was in PTA. It’s hard to be a PTA President at your child’s school, especially High School, when you are afraid of the stage. At Great Mills, the Principal worked with me. All the seats would be filled on the stage, except one – mine. I would stand in the back of the auditorium in shadow hopefully, and he would announce, “Now it’s time for the president to speak, and I believe she is just entering the auditorium.” I would run up to the stage, say what I had to say, and walk back to the back of the hall. Worked for me. So you can see, that this has been a problem for me, which is why I try to read poetry at fairly small places. It is good to step out of the fear zone and broaden my horizons. What is the worst that can happen? If I happen to read in a restaurant or café, then thrown food obviously. This year I will seek out more poetry readings to strengthen my public speaking skills, not for any future goals other than my own self-confidence. Now, about that poetry reading I hear is at the National Tomato Growers Association…you think I should sign up for that one? To each new day’s adventure, Shelby Please send your comments or ideas to: shelbys.wanderings@yahoo.com

For those of you who love St. Mary’s County history, there’s a new book you’re sure to enjoy. Called “Valor in a Border State, Confederate Soldiers of St. Mary’s County Maryland” it was written by Rob Long during his precious little “spare” time over the past 10 years. At one point, about five years ago, he approached me and asked me to take over the project. I declined, reminding him that it was his book, not mine. I did offer, however, to do a little butt kicking to keep it alive. The look of pure joy on his face as he gave me one of the first copies of the book last Thursday made it all worthwhile. Obtaining pictures of the soldiers was a daunting task and I recall many an email saying “I’m almost finished…..I just need to find this one more picture.” Sometimes, despite his best efforts, there was none to be had—at least not of the soldier, so he went to the cemeteries and got pictures of the tombstones. In some cases there are photographs of such items as the bugle used by Charles Sidney Evans and a copy of the signed Amnesty Oath of Joseph Forrest, etc. The book is chock full of beautiful pictures that you will surely enjoy. Brief biographical sketches, the men’s war experiences, and what happened to them after the war makes for very interesting reading. For instance, we have the letter from George Hayden (then 21 years of age) written while camped near Harrisonburg, Virginia to his mother in May 1863 in which he says

(in part) “My dearest mother, That I may not keep you waiting in suspense and anxiety concerning myself longer than possible, I have concluded to write again…We seldom see anyone here in the valley but our soldiers… except occasionally when we see an unfortunate Marylander exiled from his home by the ruthless intruders of Yankeedom.” On July 3, 1863 George Hayden was wounded at the battle of Gettysburg, captured and taken to a Union hospital where his leg was amputated. He died on September 23. “When word of his wound finally reached his mother she and her son-in-law Dr. John Reeves drove a buckboard 130 miles to Gettysburg. By the time they arrived at the hospital George had already died. They wrapped his body in a blanket and brought him back home.” George is buried at Christ Church in Chaptico. These were our men, born on our soil, who deeply resented the occupation of St. Mary’s County by Union soldiers for the duration of the war. Had that not happened, I’m not sure how many would have actually seen military service. But it did happen and they fled to Virginia where they enlisted, insisting they be in Maryland companies under the command of Marylanders. They made a choice. Aside from escaping slaves, our men who served in the Union army were most often drafted and weren’t given a choice. For those interested, you may obtain the book at https://www.createspace.com/3628541

Book Review
c.2012, Pegasus Books
By Terri Schlichenmeyer Contributing Writer Imagine yourself at age ten. Life then was relatively carefree. You spent your time riding bike, playing games, and being a kid. Your future stretched for miles; the possibilities were limitless. Now imagine that you’re 10 years old and the life you dreamed about is suddenly no longer possible. You’ll never have a “best friend.” You’ll never be allowed to make a happy fool of yourself in public. No more sloppy jeans, shopping sprees, or spontaneity. Would you chafe under the new rules? Elizabeth Alexandra Mary of York did not. She gracefully accepted the mantle of responsibility, and in the new book “Her Majesty” by Robert Hardman, you’ll see how she copes. Her full name is a mouthful. Her Majesty Elizabeth the Second, by the Grace of God, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and of Her other Realms and Territories, Queen, Head of the Commonwealth, Defender of the Faith is a name that explains her life for the past sixty years, ever since her father died and made her the British sovereign. The name tells you who she is, but not completely. While many think Her Majesty is traditional, impersonal, and rather humorless, she is, privately, quite the opposite. Queen Elizabeth loves the absurd, enjoys sharp wit, and she’s keenly interested in her subjects’ lives. She’s purposefully modernized protocol by including women on her staff and by changing some long-standing rules to include divorcees

“Her Majesty: Queen Elizabeth II and Her Court” by Robert Hardman
$27.95 U.S. and Canada

384 pages

and gay citizens. She reads most letters sent to her (but doesn’t send or receive email) and sometimes answers missives personally. She’s warm but then again, anyone who inappropriately tries “familiarity” with her may be on the receiving end of the “royal stare” that can reduce one to “jelly.” Yes, it’s good to be Queen but the job has its downsides. Hardman says that Her Majesty doesn’t have a “best friend” in which to confide and is, in fact, constitutionally barred from discussing certain matters with non-officials. She’s expected to embrace decorum and maintain a certain regal bearing at all times, and it’s her duty to “be nice” to even the most ill-behaved government visitor. In the past six decades, a lot of trees have died in order to chronicle the lives of the Royal Family. Most of those books seem basically the same. This one, though, stands out. Unlike those other books, “Her Majesty” gives readers a warts-and-all inside peek at the private face of Elizabeth the Enigma. Author Robert Hardman doesn’t allow any stuffiness here; his biography of the Queen is lively and, at times, sweetly amusing with a touch of respectful awe. Hardman dishes a bit of light scandal as he delights us with things we don’t know about his subject and her subjects. I liked the way he subtly includes other Royals and Royal matters in Her Majesty’s story, without bogging it down in hard history. Anglophiles will eat this book up, biography lovers will be charmed, and if you’re both, then you’ll feel quite regal. For you, “Her Majesty” is queen-sized enjoyment.

The County Times
The County Times is always looking for more local talent to feature! To submit art or band information for our entertainment section, e-mail carriemunn@countytimes.net.

oing On G
Live Music: “The Piranhas” The Blue Dog Saloon (7940 Port Tobacco Road, Port Tobacco) – 9 p.m.

Thursday, April 26, 2012

28

What’s

In Entertainment
Live Music: “Absinthe” Loveville Tavern (28275 Point Lookout Road, Leonardtown) – 9:30 p.m. Scarlet Plus Karaoke & DJ Russell’s Bar (Blake Creek Rd., Valley Lee) – 8 p.m.

Thursday, April 26
World Famous Hypnotist & Comedian Gary Conrad Rustic River Bar and Grill (40874 Merchants Lane, Leonardtown) – 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Dance Party w/ DJ Coach Scheible’s Restaurant (48342 Wynne Rd., Ridge) – 9 p.m. Live Music: “No Green JellyBeanz” Vera’s White Sands Beach Club (1200 White Sands Drive, Lusby) – 7 p.m. Live Music: “The Three Amigos” Home2 Suites by Hilton (46058 Valley Drive, Lexington Park) – 3:30 p.m. Live Music: “Eric Scott & Doug Segree” The Blue Dog Saloon (7940 Port Tobacco Road, Port Tobacco) – 8 p.m.

Saturday, April 28
Live Music: “The Piranhas” Rustic River Bar and Grill (40874 Merchants Lane, Leonardtown) – 8 p.m. Live Music: “Legend” Cryer’s Back Road Inn (22094 Newtowne Neck Road, Leonardtown) – 9 p.m. Live Music: “Synergy” Toot’s Bar (23971 Mervell Dean Road, Hollywood) – 8 p.m. Live Music: “The Three Amigos” Scheible’s Restaurant (48342 Wynne Rd., Ridge) – 7 p.m. Live Music: “Groove Span” Ruddy Duck Brewery (13200 Dowell Road, Dowell) – 8 p.m. Live Music: “Gretchen Richie- Jazz After Hours & Dancing” Cafe Des Artistes (41655 Fenwick Street, Leonardtown) – 7:30 p.m. Live Music: “One Louder” Vera’s White Sands Beach Club (1200 White Sands Drive, Lusby) – 9:30 p.m. Live Music: “R & R Train” Gridiron Grill (20855 Callaway Village Way, Callaway) – 9 p.m. Live Music: “HydraFX” Sea Breeze Restaurant & Crab House (27130 S. Sandgates Rd., Mechanicsville) – 8:30 p.m. Live Music: “Jim Ritter & the Creole Jazz Band The Westlawn Inn (9200 Chesapeake Avenue, North Beach) – 7:30 p.m.

Middle School Productions Offer Fun, Affordable Family Entertainment
By Carrie Munn Staff Writer While the local community theatre kicks off its production of “As Bees In Honey Drown” this Friday, two other troupes offer musicals to delight this weekend as well. Spring Ridge Middle School’s drama club presents Disney’s High School Musical Jr., featuring 74 middle-schoolers on stage and behind the scenes, bringing this musical teen drama to life. Director Kristy Wilhite, Assistant Director Amanada LePore, a theater major at St. Mary’s College of Maryland, and Music Director Michelle Bartsch have been working with the large student cast and crew for months to prepare for the big show. Spring Ridge Middle School presents “High School Musical Jr.” (19856 Three Notch Road, Lexington Park) Friday, April 27 and Saturday, April 28 at 7 p.m. A Relay for Life Benefit Show will be held May 11 at 7 p.m. Esperanza Middle School, led by Sherri Fenwick, producer and musical director, and Maria Wallace, director and choreographer, will bring the beloved Dr. Seuss characters to life in the comedic, musical romp “Seussical”. Fenwick said with so much talent they decided to do a show with a lot of leads, with the production involving 54 students. They too have spent months practicing for what Fenwick called “a fun and very uplifting show.” Esperanza Middle School presents “Seussical” (22790 Maple Road, Lexington Park) Friday, April 27 and Saturday, April 28 at 6:30 p.m. Admission for both shows is $5.
Photo By Frank Marquart Photo By Carrie Munn

Sunday, April 29
Live Music: “The Piranhas” Sea Breeze Restaurant & Crab House (27130 S. Sandgates Rd., Mechanicsville) – 3 p.m. Live Music: “The California Ramblers” Cryer’s Back Road Inn (22094 Newtowne Neck Road, Leonardtown) – 3 p.m. Live Music: “Snakebite” Emerald Cove (3800 Harbor Road, Chesapeake Beach) – 3 p.m.

Monday, April 30
Open Mic Night Rustic River Bar and Grill (40874 Merchants Lane, Leonardtown) – 5 p.m. Team Trivia Night DB McMillan’s (23415 Three Notch Road, California) – 6:30 p.m.

Photo By Frank Marquart

Live Music: “David & Joe Norris” Christ Church Parish Hall (37497 Zach Fowler Road, Chaptico) – 7 p.m.

Friday, April 27
The Newtowne Players Present: “As Bees In Honey Drown” (Showing through May 13) Three Notch Theatre (21744 South Coral Drive, Lexington Park) – 8 p.m. Live Music: “Synergy” Vera’s White Sands Beach Club (1200 White Sands Drive, Lusby) – 8:30 p.m. Live Music: “Car 54” Sea Breeze Restaurant & Crab House (27130 S. Sandgates Rd., Mechanicsville) – 8:30 p.m. Live Music: “Dominic, Benji & Fox” Ruddy Duck Brewery (13200 Dowell Road, Dowell) – 8 p.m.

Tuesday, May 1
Live Music: “Fair Warning” DB McMillan’s (23415 Three Notch Road, California) – 5 p.m. Open Mic Night Ruddy Duck Brewery (13200 Dowell Road, Dowell) – 6:30 p.m.

Wednesday, May 2
“Edge of Glory” Pop Music Concert by LHS Chorus Leonardtown High School Auditorium (23995 Point Lookout Rd., Leonardtown) – 7 p.m. “Wolf’s Open Blues Jam” Emerald Cove (3800 Harbor Road, Chesapeake Beach) - 8 p.m.

Photo By Frank Marquart

Celebrate your special event at the Ruddy Duck Brewery & Grill!
Large Private Dining Room for parties of any kind!
Cocktail Parties, Rehearsal Dinners, Business Events & More

Our private room will provide you with the perfect atmosphere for your event!

Call for booking details! 410-394-3825

410-FYI-DUCK

www.RuddyDuckBrewer y.com

SOLOMONS, MARYLAND

Dowell Rd and Route 4

29

Thursday, April 26, 2012

The County Times

The Ordinary
Friday, April 27
• Homespun Coffee House Christ Church Parish Hall (37497 Zach Fowler Road, Chaptico) – 7 p.m. The Southern Maryland Traditional Music and Dance Homespun Coffee House will present our friends, local legends and local favorites David and Joe Norris for a CD release party and concert. Each brother will do a complete set featuring selections from their thousands of songs, followed by a third set with them performing together. Doors open at 7 p.m. and the music starts at 7:30 p.m., so get there early to get a good seat. Admission is $10 for members, $12 for all others. Light refreshments will be served. Plan to join us for this special event. For more information or directions go to www.smtmd.org or for info on David, go to davidnorrismusic.com. • Minute to Win It St. John’s School (43900 St. John’s Road, Hollywood) – 5 p.m. St. John’s School will be hosting a Mother/Son Event called Minute To Win It on Friday. Enjoy an evening of fun and fast paced mini games for each mother and son to participate. Come out and have fun quality time with your son! There will be prizes for each game and a bigger prize for best overall time. Mothers and sons of all ages are welcome! Cost is $15 per mother/son team and $5 for each additional son. Dinner begins at 5 p.m. and Games begin at 6 p.m. To register online or for more information contact Emily Dobson at mombeep@ gmail.com or visit www.sjshollywood.org/AboutSJS/Minute-To-WinIt.aspx • LHS Band Boosters Present SuperMagicMan’s Illusion Show Leonardtown High School (23995 Point Lookout Road, Leonardtown) – 6 p.m. Doors open at 6 p.m. show starts at 7 p.m. Admission is $10 for adults and $8 for kids. • Spring Ridge Middle School Presents “High School Musical, Jr.” Spring Ridge Middle School (19856 Three Notch Road, Lexington Park) – 7 p.m. Spring Ridge Middles School is thrilled to be putting on it’s 11th production this weekend, High School Musical Jr. The shows will be Friday and Saturday at 7 p.m. at Spring Ridge Middle School. Tickets are just $5 so bring your family and come on out for a night of fun laughter! An additional performance will be on May 11 to benefit Relay for Life. porary comedy that involves the staff of the Fear Factory run by Annie Grimm, played by Abi Albers. Between scuffles with Percy Roth, played by Daniel Long, the stuffy lawyer next door, and a secret job including a romance between a policeman, actor Paul Munday, and the factory’s newly hired bookkeeper, actress Kristina Sproul, things begin to spin a little out of control. Creative Nilla, played by Emily Morris, and her gang of fellow Fear Factory employees begin to suspect something is going on when mysterious Pinky, actor Daniel Mehaffey, appears to be working with Roth. As the story unfolds, accusations are made and the goofy landlady, Mrs. Lafferty, played by Sarah Morris, begins to learn from her tenants, adding an additional layer of confusion and fear into the mix. Homeschool Christian Academy is a cooperative that offers support and resources to home schooling families in St. Mary’s County. Admission is free. Donations for the Homeschool Christian Academy will be accepted. This play is produced by special arrangement with Pioneer Drama Service, Inc., Englewood, Colorado. For more information, contact Fear Factory HCA at fearfactoryhca@gmail. com. • 500 Years of Music for Guitar Christ Episcopal Church (25390 Maddox Road, Chaptico) – 7 p.m. The Christ Episcopal Church is pleased to present a Spring Concert, “500 Years of Music for Guitar” with Peter Griggs. Griggs will present guitar music from Renaissance to Contemporary at this exciting event beginning at 7 p.m. A free-will offering will be accepted, and light refreshments will be served. For more information on Peter Griggs, go to www.myspace. com/petergriggsnyc; for information on Christ Church, and directions to the parish hall go to www. christepiscopalchaptico.org. • Women at Work: Lowe’s Teaches Building Basics for Women Volunteers Lowe’s (45075 Worth Avenue in California) Women volunteers, many representing “The Build Generation” of young women ages 18 to 24, will raise their hammers at Habitat for Humanity construction sites across the country in recognition of National Women Build Week, May 5-13. This event is a nationwide initiative of Habitat for Humanity’s Women Build program developed in partnership with Lowe’s. To help volunteers get a jump-start on their building skills, Lowe’s is hosting “how-to” clinics at its California store. Women Build how-to clinics are open to women interested in volunteering at any local Women Build site. There is no cost to enroll and Lowe’s provides all supplies. Each of the two clinics led by Lowe’s store employees will teach home construction basics to volunteers and offer opportunities to practice new skills. Women will also learn tool safety tips. The free clinics will take place at Lowe’s, 45075 Worth Avenue in California on April 28 How to Safely Use Hand and Power Tools: 9:00 – 11:00 a.m. How to Install Insulation and Drywall: 1:00 – 3:30 p.m. To sign up for the clinics, volunteers should contact Kristy Slusser, the Patuxent Habitat for Humanity volunteer coordinator, at 301863-6227. Each clinic is limited to 25 participants. Registered volunteers should wear comfortable clothing and come ready to learn. All supplies will be provided on-site. day! The popularity of this event has grown significantly over the years and the dedicated Sotterley Garden Guild has just announced that they will be open for business on both Saturday and Sunday of that weekend. We invite you to revel in the wonders of springtime! The Plant Sale, sponsored by the Sotterley Garden Guild, will run on Saturday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. and on Sunday from 12-3 p.m. Because of their dedication to this National Historic Landmark, these nurturing volunteers have not only raised thousands of dollars in support of Sotterley Plantation, but they are also responsible for the maintenance of the exquisite Colonial Revival Garden. Their passion for beauty is evident in the smallest of details, so take the opportunity to appreciate their horticultural artistry! The Free Plant Exchange will run on Saturday only from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.. Your plants in exchange for other annuals, perennials, herbs, vegetables, shrubs, trees, bulbs and seeds! For more information on upcoming Sotterley Plantation events, visit our website at www. sotterley.org. • Spring Fling XXVII Classic Car Show Leonardtown Square – 8 a.m. The Spring Fling XXVII Classic Car Show will be held from 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. in historic Leonardtown Square. Classic and antique cars and trucks will be on display. There will also be awards, family entertainment, music, a kids’ tractor pull, food and more! $2 Donation Admission fee to benefit Hospice of St. Mary’s. Sponsored by the St. Mary’s Rod & Classic Car Club. For more information call 301-994-9666. The rain date is May 6.

Angler

Opening Day
By Keith McGuire Contributing Writer The Saturday forecast was for 10 – 15 knot winds in advance of a front headed our way that was predicted to produce storms and rain. A lot of small boat anglers decided that conditions were borderline for a successful excursion into striper territory for the opening day of the Trophy Season. David Novak’s 19 foot boat needed better conditions than that, so on Friday evening he decided to give it a few days and wait for better weather. He was disappointed. In spite of his scrubbed plans, Novak awoke at 4:30 a.m. Saturday morning and checked the weather. He couldn’t believe the great conditions and he had to give it a shot. He hooked up the boat, collected the appropriate tackle, and headed to the ramp on the Potomac River. He launched and motored toward the main channel. When he got to an area where the water was 30’ deep, he began to deploy four trolling rods – optimistic that he would catch his first striper on his new boat. At 7:40 a.m. one of the rods hooked up. It was a big fish! He fought it to the boat and landed it by himself. The fish measured 40 ½ inches and weighed 25 lbs. Good job David! The opening day of the Trophy Rockfish Season started this way for a lot of anglers. The fish seemed to be everywhere and many folks finished their days early, well in advance of the nasty weather. Many of the anglers who finished early stopped by The Tackle Box with their catch. Fifty or so fish were seen at the shop, including one trophy that was caught from the beach at Hog Point! Most of the fish brought to The Tackle Box were in the 32 – 37 inch range, and only two were in excess of 40 inches. Terms like “wide open,” “jumping in the boat” and “plenty of fish” were used to describe the action. Mike and Christy Henderson posted pictures on their website (www.buzzsmarina.com) of over 80 trophy stripers on Saturday, and they continue to post pictures of big fish caught since then. Opposite stories were told by those plying the waters for croaker last week. The guess is that the different weather conditions last week caused the croaker to move on. They simply couldn’t be found last week near the beaches or in deeper waters. Don’t worry, it is only April! You can bet that the hardhead will return. Steve Helmrich picked a day last week to head over to the Honga River on the Eastern Shore where he caught speckled sea trout for his dinner table. I think he’s got the knack! Other anglers are beginning to find good catches of white perch in the Patuxent and Potomac Rivers along the shoreline, and deeper on oyster bars and structure. Local freshwater ponds are producing good catches of crappie, bluegill and largemouth bass. Saturday was the new moon. This means that the first molt for crabs is beginning to wane and crabbing should become more productive this week. I hope your boats are ready because it is time to supplement your diet with some good seafood! The fishing season has certainly gotten off to a great start as we look forward to May’s arrival next week! Remember to take a picture of your catch and send me your story at riverdancekeith@gmail.com. Keith has been a recreational angler on the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries for over 50 years; he fishes weekly from his small boat during the season, and spends his free time supporting local conservation organizations.

Monday, April 30
• Ask-A-Lawyer Lexington Park Library, Meeting Room B (21677 F.D.R. Boulevard, Lexington Park) – 6:30 p.m. The topic of the St. Mary’s County Bar Association’s first AskA-Lawyer night is: “What are my constitutional rights?” Have you ever wondered if the police are allowed to search your car when they pull you over? Or when you have the right to remain silent? If you and your friend can be charged with the same crime? If so, join us to learn about your Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendment rights. Bring your questions!

Tuesday, May 1
• North End Gallery Show – “The Artist’s Perspective” North End Gallery (41652 Fenwick Street, Leonardtown) – 10 a.m. The North End Gallery will be presenting a new show during the month of May titled “The Artist’s Perspective.” May is a beautiful month in our Southern Maryland area. It is a time of color and flowers for all to enjoy. Come and join us at the North End and see the perspective our artists present. The show runs from May 1 until May 27. There will be a first Friday reception at the Gallery on May 4 from 5-8 p.m. The gallery can be reached at 301-475-3130 or www.northendgallery.org.

Saturday, April 28
• Walk Up Football Registration Wal-Mart (45485 Miramar Way, California) 10 a.m. Sports Paradise (21600 Great Mills Road, Lexington Park) – 10 a.m. Walk Up registrations for the Pax River Raiders. • Craft and Vendor Fair Country Inn and Suites (44941 Worth Lane, California) – 10 a.m. The Young Professional Initiative is holding a Craft/Vendor Fair to raise money for Relay for Life. Come out and Shop for a good cause! A Silent Auction will be held from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Proceeds from the Silent Auction will be going to support the American Cancer Society. If you are a vendor or crafter and would like to rent a table please contact Amanda Ellington at president@ypi-smc.com. • Fear Factory SAYSF Bible Church (46544 Rue Purchase Road, Lexington Park) – 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Homeschool Christian Academy’s high school drama class will be performing Fear Factory at SAYSF Bible Church. Fear Factory, written by Pat Cook and directed by Crystal Rapp, is a family-friendly, contem-

Wednesday, May 2
• “Edge of Glory” Pop Music Concert Leonardtown High School (23995 Point Lookout Road, Leonardtown) – 7 p.m. Leonardtown High School Chorus presents their Spring Concert, entitled “Edge of Glory,” a celebration of today’s popular music. The concert features students performing selections from today’s hit artists such as Lady Gaga, Bruno Mars, Taylor Swift, Black Eyed Peas, and more! This concert will be fun for the whole family! Admission fee is a requested donation to LHS Relay for Life team.

Sunday, April 29
• Plant Sale and Free Plant Exchange at Sotterley Sotterley Plantation (44300 Sotterley Lane, Hollywood) – 12 p.m. Celebrating the 14th Annual Plant Sale and Free Plant Exchange with something NEW - an extra

Opening Day Trophy!

Sp rts
By Leah Loflin Contributing Writer Racing fans come to Potomac Speedway on Friday nights to see the green flag wave and watch the always-eventful races. Sometimes what we forget about is the people inside that car who are wearing the helmet. They get in their racecar ready to win and the fans get to enjoy an action-packed night of racing. A regular at Potomac Speedway, Derick Quade, who races the no. 23 Limited Late Model, took home his first win of the season out of many more to come. The 2007 Potomac Speedway Limited Late Model Champion said, “It takes a lot of hard work and long nights in the garage with people helping and backing you up.” He has been watching racing since he was six years old, and now is achieving everything and more. He hopes to get wins at different tracks like Virginia Motor Speedway and Winchester Speedway. He says he owes it all to the car owners, Joe Adams and Wayne Quade. An inspiration to all girls out there, Brittany Wenk, who drives the no. 26 in Hobby Stock, knows how far hard work and determination will get you. She started out racing Go Karts, which she said is a lot easier than racing in the Hobby Stock class at Potomac. Her first race gave everyone a

The County Times

Thursday, April 26, 2012

30

Drivers of Potomac Speedway
scare when she hit the wall. But putting fear aside, she got back in the car after a lot of encouragement from friends and family. Her step-dad reminded her of her first race when she started Go Karts. “I hit the wall, then I got back out and was undefeated in Go Karts. My step-dad said I would do the same thing here so I have to think about it that way,” she said. Now, Wenk is a big competitor among the men out on the track. “Guys don’t like getting beat by girls. They hate it no matter what.” Even though she doesn’t have any wins yet in dirt racing, they are sure to be coming in the near future. Ryan Hackett, who drives car no. 76, has been coming to Potomac since he was 14 years old. Hackett started racing motocross when he was seven, then worked up the ranks to Go Karts, then to dirt late model racing, then to asphalt and then to the Nationwide truck series. “Now we are here at dirt racing and having a blast,” he said. He runs Super Late Model as well as Limited Late Model and the Nationwide Truck series. “Dirt racing is really fun for us, we enjoy it and it is a lot less stress.” He is looking for some wins this year with no luck yet. Along with everyone else, Hackett enjoys Potomac’s facility. When asked who his strongest competitors are, he said that there are about five or six cars that could win any weekend. Another regular who is used to picking up wins is Ed Pope Sr., driving car no. 56. He only started racing about 5 years ago, but looks like he’s been doing it for much longer. “Potomac Speedway is my home track… I definitely like this one better.” His main goal, like many other racers, is achieving the points championship. “I started in Street Stocks but then I decided to step back into Strickly Stocks and now I’m having a blast so I’m not going anywhere,” Hackett said enthusiastically. Mike Latham who drives the no. 78 Street Stock finished in third place, a leap from his twelfth starting spot. He has been coming to Potomac Speedway since he was a kid with his father and has already scored two wins this year. “The track itself is a fun track to drive and I think everyone agrees that it is. My objective is to keep winning.” John Burch has been racing at Potomac since 1986. He said nowhere else has as good of side-by-side racing as Potomac does. “The track is always in good shape. It is funny because I’m old…Now I see all these kids that I have known since they were little and tiny and now it’s fun racing with them. We definitely have fun.” A strong competitor, Jonathan Raley, who

Photos By Frank Marquart

races with Burch in the Hobby Stock class, has raced with him before when they did Four Cylinders. Several years later, they are still battling for wins and racing side by side having fun. To find out what it is like riding around in a racecar, kids got to choose their favorite car and driver before the feature races started and ride at a safe speed. A driver with a superior past of winning, David Williams, announced what it is like as you are coming around the turns and what the drivers are thinking as he rode in the no. 66 of Matt Tarbox. Coming around turn four at a slow speed Williams declares, “Now we are coming around turn four ready to capitalize on that victory,” exciting all the young fans riding in the cars. Without the racers of Potomac, we would be unable to watch this side-by-side racing that takes place on Friday nights. We owe it to them for their dedication and love of the sport to keep providing for us.

Antique and Collectible
Friday, April 27th - 6 p.m.

Saturday, May 5th 4 p.m.

Grocery Auction

Saturday, May 12th 4 p.m.

Nursery Stock

St. Leonard, MD 20685 • 410-586-1161 • chesapeakeauctionhouse.com

Chesapeake Auction House

31

Thursday, April 26, 2012

The County Times

The County Times

Thursday, April 26, 2012

32

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->