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Rebuild Springfield Plan

Rebuild Springfield Plan

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r e b u i l d S p r i n g f i e l d p l A n | S p r i n g f i e l d M A S S A C H u S e T T S

Springfield
Redevelopment
Authority
Citywide Plan
Presented by:
Concordia
Goody Clancy
BNIM
Project for Public Spaces
February 2012
iii
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Overview & Introduction
introduction
City-wide Overview
Recovery Initiatives & Recommendations
Major Moves
educational domain recommendations
physical domain recommendations
Cultural domain recommendations
Social domain recommendations
economic domain recommendations
Organizational domain recommendations
Overall recommendations
Philanthropic Opportunities
Funding Opportunities
Implementation Challenges, Opportunities
and Financing
Acknowledgements
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2
8
11
12
15
29
51
65
89
107
113
123
128
132
143
Table of Contents
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Overview & Introduction
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Introduction
The rebuild Springfield initiative was created
in response to the June 1st tornado that struck
the City of Springfield. However, the scope of
the initiative goes far beyond simple rebuilding.
Citizens, city government, private businesses
and other stakeholders rallied together to use
the June tornado as a catalyst for rethinking
Springfield’s future.
The rebuild Springfield initiative integrated
community input with planning expertise to
develop a realistic action plan for realizing the
vision of neighborhoods and the city as a whole.
“The rebuild Springfield citywide meeting presented an opportunity to hear people
thinking mostly futuristically and optimistically about the city. it is good to look
forward by thinking about our assets – not just dwelling on problems.”
-- participant, Citywide Meeting round 1
rebui l d Spri ngfi el d was commi ssi oned by
devel opSpr i ngf i el d and t he Spr i ngf i el d
redevelopment Authority. These entities,
formed in 2008 and 1960, respectively, are tasked
with restoring vitality to Springfield.
The rebuild Springfield process takes place
on two parallel levels with a strong emphasis
towards action. At the citywide level, residents,
business leaders, and stakeholders have crafted
a vision and action plan for improving the quality
of life in Springfield.
At the same time, residents of the tornado
impacted areas (districts 1, 2, & 3) engaged
in addressing the needs and visions of their
respecti ve nei ghborhoods. by gatheri ng
together i n “pl anni ng di stri ct” meeti ngs,
residents focused on issues specific to the
activities and experiences of their day-to-day
lives. They outlined realistic actions for achieving
their vision.
included in the plan on page 132 is a broad
outline of challenges and opportunities for
implementing the plan’s recommendations. it is
important to note that the scope of Springfield’s
rebuilding needs exceeds the availability of
current funding opportunities. it is likely that
a dedicated federal appropriation will be
necessary to closed various financing gaps
presented in or as a result of the plan.
fi nal l y, i n pl anni ng and i mpl ement i ng
Springfield’s future, no group or individual
can act alone. businesses, organizations, the
government, and individual citizens must work
together in a collaborative and cooperative way
to build a revitalized Springfield and start taking
the first concrete steps toward that vision.
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4
Approach
What is the concept behind the Rebuild Springfield initiative?
The Citywide planning process is organized
according to the six nexus domains of a healthy
and vibrant community. These domains include
the physical, cultural, social, organizational,
educational, and economic components of a
community.
usi ng the nexus model as an organi zi ng
framework ensures the creation of a systemic
and holistic plan for Springfield’s future. Assets
and needs of the community are analyzed and
sometimes mapped according to their respective
“domain” or category. While items sometimes
fall into more than one category, working in
this way ensures that each aspect of Springfield
garners equal consideration during the planning
and community engagement process.
The Citywide process used the nexus framework.
The planning district process also used the
nexus framework, but dug more deeply into
issues and ideas taking shape in Springfield’s
tornado-impacted neighborhoods.
Most importantly, public engagement has
been key to developing the most appropriate
recommendations for Springfield.
Communi ty members; organi zati onal and
busi ness l eaders; muni ci pal , regi onal and
state agencies; and elected officials must
recognize that ownership and participation
in implementation of this plan is the key to
realizing the hopes and dreams of the many
communi ty members who parti ci pated i n
creating the plan. The public meetings at both
the Citywide and district levels addressed three
core phases of developing the plan:
phase 1 | review and analysis of
existing conditions, vision
phase 2 | develop and synthesize
opportunities, consider financial
implications
phase 3 | Confirm and
prioritize recommendations and
implementation steps
in addition to this project framework and to the
work of goody Clancy, bniM, and project for
public Spaces, obtaining additional expertise was
important.
dan Hodge of Hdr provided economic analyses
and forecasting, and played a very significant
role in the development and shaping of the
Citywide recommendations in the economic
domain. His intimate knowledge of the City of
Springfield and the pioneer Valley was crucial in
the eventual development of recommendations
that respond well to the climate and stakeholders
of the City and region and provide for concise
and tailored direction.

pam McKinney of byrne McKinney & Associates
provided real estate consulting services to the
entire project team, including significant work
tailored to the conditions and needs of the
districts of the rebuild Springfield plan. Her
work included in-depth real estate market
analyses as well as supplemental information
related to the types of funding resources
necessary for implementing the many and varied
recommendations in the plan pertaining to real
estate and development.
5
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Process
Schedule, Phases and Community Participation
The rebuild Springfield planning process began
in October of 2011 and was completed in
february of 2012.
The Citywide and planning district meetings took
place as iterative and parallel processes with
issues and solutions developed in the districts
informing the Citywide process. The rebuild
Springfield plan works to assure that the city and
its neighborhoods can function harmoniously.
There were three Citywide Meetings and 9
planning district Meetings - three meetings in
each planning district.
The f i rst round of meeti ngs f ocused on
Visioning, the second on Opportunities and
recommendations, and the final round on
priorities and implementation.
O
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District Meetings
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District Meetings District Meetings
1 1 1 2 2 2 3 3 3
CITY-WIDE CONGRESS
DISTRICT 1
Metro Center
(Downtown)
South End
DISTRICT 3
Sixteen Acres
East Forest Park
DISTRICT 2
Six Corners
Upper Hill
Old Hill
Forest Park
Rebuild Springfield Planning Process
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Recommendation Structure
How to read a Rebuild Springfield recommendation
i n t h e r e b u i l d S p r i n g f i e l d p l a n ,
recommendations will follow a uniform structure
to ensure conti nui ty and cl ari ty. Typi cal
categories include:
Breadcrumbs
• “breadcrumbs” are intended to show the
source of an idea or recommendation.
Throughout the community meeting process,
ideas were cataloged and analyzed to
develop a diverse plan that addressed all
of the community’s needs. breadcrumbs
allow readers and community members to
understand where recommendations were
conceived.
General Description
• The “gener al descr i pt i on” of f er s a
perspective on the existing conditions in
Springfield that the recommendation will
address.
• This section also contains brief explanations
of the recommendation’s approach.
Partnerships/Stakeholders
• The “partnerships/Stakeholders” section
is a list of actors that might be well-suited
to participate in the implementation of the
recommendation.
• importantly, the partnership lists readers
will see are by no means exclusive, and any
individual, group, or organization who is
interested in participating or being included
in moving forward are encouraged to do so.
Priority
• The priority of a recommendation is often
determi ned by the l evel of support i t
received during the community meeting
process.
• funding opportunities, time, feasibility, and
impact were also considered in judging the
priority of the recommendation.
Action Steps
• The “Action Steps” section is a simplified
checklist that can act as a starting point for
implementation.
• These steps are subject to change at the
di screti on of i mpl ementati on leaders
as dictated by on-the-ground reality of
implementation once the recommendation is
put into action.
Project Location
• The “project location” of a recommendation
is often “Citywide”, as many of the following
recommendations affect the entirety of
Springfield.
• When the recommendation affects a more
specific location, it is expressed here to focus
efforts on that site.
Resource Needs
• This section provides a brief description of
some of the resources needed for successful
implementation of the recommendation.
• “resour ce needs” can r ange f r om
financing and grant funding to leadership,
management, and communication.
Potential Resource Opportunities
• The “potential resource Opportunities”
s e c t i on l i s t s e x i s t i n g pr ogr a ms ,
collaborations, projects, and funding sources
that might contribute to the successful
implementation of the recommendation.
• This list is not exclusive: additional resources
should always be explored and included
in the rebuild Springfield implementation
process.
• More resource opportunities are expanded
upon in sections at the end of this document
which were prepared in conjunction with
philanthropic, real estate, and economic
development consultants.
Precedents/Best Practices
• The precedents and best practices described
in this section offer examples of projects or
programs that can provide insight into similar
ideas that have workd in other places and
cities.
• implementation leaders are encouraged to
reach out to their peers involved in those
best practices to seek advice on challenges,
tactics, and strategies on how to successfully
implement the recommendation.
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To Our Mother Tornado, Teatro V!da
Emmy Cepeda, Jasmine Jimenez, Keila Matos, and Zoe April Martinez
(Facilitated by Magdalena Gomez)
Our Mother came to clean up a disaster:
Isolation.
To join our hands
and create the city we all want:
security, connection, cleanliness, beauty
fresh-feeling parks
where we enjoy freedom.
City of equality.
to let go of egos
and begin at the bottom.
Our Mother came to clean up a disaster:
Ignorance.
“They’re just kids”
you say we don’t know what we want
but when we talk
we are ignored;
now it’s our turn to speak.
You had your chance.
empty streets scream fear.
people feel insecure
in their own homes.
Our Mother came to clean up a disaster.
good people
the city wants our well-being
her family engaged in daily change
from neighborhood to neighborhood
When i hear “impossible”
i say, “i’m possible”
everything is possible.
We are possible.
let us destroy deception and hypocrisy.
name is of no value here-
We need
Action, Voice, Conviction.
An impossible vision
placed perhaps
above monetary gain
but never above
the people’s desire for justice.
Our Mother came to clean up a disaster:
Fear.
Our Mother, helping her children
the north and the South make peace,
work together like they should
to help our city be reborn.
She gave us a blank page
so we can draw colorful streets
full of lights,
clean and beautiful.
Our Mother came to clean up a disaster:
Domination.
This is not a game,
no more fighting for trophies on the wall.
We stand for our home, our city;
we see her
She wants change;
productive change.
now i stand for my home, my city.
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Citywide Overview
A Brief on the History and Character of Springfield
Springfield was established in 1636, when William
pynchon laid claim to land on the Connecticut
river. located between the major ports of
new York City, boston, Albany, and Montreal,
Springfield grew and prospered, first through
industries like printing and manufacturing, and
later when insurance and finance took hold and
flourished in its economy. Today, Springfield is
the largest city in Western Massachusetts.
Since its founding, Springfield has been a center
of invention and entrepreneurship. residents
today recogni ze and respect thi s hi story,
talking about it with much pride. inventions
and firsts include the first American armory,
the invention of the game of basketball, and
firsts in transportation – including marketable
automobiles, motorcycles, and fire engines.
Springfield is home to Smith & Wesson, and
local factories manufactured nearly all of the
union Army’s weapons during the American
Civil War. Springfield’s involvement and efforts
during the Civil War embody the spirit of the city.
Accomplishments like this brought great wealth
to the city into the middle of the 20th century.
As a result of this boon, Springfield’s housing
stock became increasingly prominent and ornate
among all of its classes.

The dense concentration of Victorian “painted
lady”, Queen Anne, and Tudor style architecture
led to the local nickname of “The City of
Homes”. To this day, Springfield’s housing stock
consists of many elaborate historic houses.
The appreci ati on and preservati on of the
community’s historic structures is reflected in the
overwhelming attention to preservation activities
in the community.
in 1936, at the height of the great depression,
the City of Springfield suffered one of its
most devastating natural disasters prior to
the tornado of 2011. The Connecticut river
flooded, inundating the South end and north
end neighborhoods where some of Springfield’s
f i nest mansi ons stood. Two years l ater,
during the 1938 new england Hurricane, high
floodwaters ravaged Springfield once again.
large portions of the north end and South end
neighborhoods were devastated because of
these two great floods.
Other, man-made events have also affected
Springfield’s urban fabric. during the 1960s,
interstate 91 was constructed on the land that
once belonged to the citizens of the South end
and north end neighborhoods. The highway
divided and dispersed most of Springfield’s
inhabitants, including sects of english, irish,
italian, french Canadian, and polish residents.
for generations before, this land provided
economic value and recreational access to the
Connecticut river.
presently, the city’s demographics are evenly
split between Caucasians, African Americans,
and lati nos ( who are pri mari l y of puerto
rican descent). participation by all citizens
of Spri ngfi el d through cul tural acti vi ti es,
homeownership, and economic contributions will
set the stage for Springfield’s resurgence in the
first decade of the 21st century.
The Spr i ngf i el d fi nance Cont r ol boar d
(SfCb) was established on June 30, 2004 to
restore financial stability in the Springfield city
government. Since then, the SfCb has dissolved
and local government’s fiscal capacities have
been restored. With the formation of the SfbC,
Springfield’s Metro Center saw significant overall
improvement, including a dramatic citywide
drop in crime and a viable course for the city’s
continued renaissance.
Springfield has also been designated as a
“gateway City”. This designation is given
to formerly thriving industrial cities that show
promise as the cultural and economic centers of
their regions.
Springfield, like its many peer cities, has faced
many economic troubles following the worst
economic crisis since the great depression.
Still, optimism of economic renaissance remains.
Major employers like MassMutual financial and
bayState Health remain economic engines along
with companies like peter pan bus lines, big Y,
and Merriam-Webster. These major employers
and education institutions have played an
important role in retaining momentum and
innovation in the local economy.
from early trading post, to manufacturing center
and invention capital, Springfield’s unique history
is still in motion.
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Recovery Initiatives
& Recommendations
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Major Moves
The six primary Nexus Domains and their recommendations are listed below.
Each recommendation appears in the order in which it was prioritized by meeting
participants.
1 | put schools and libraries at the center of
creating a nexus of places, programs,
and access to technology to meet
community needs
2 | better engage the public in the process
and importance of education reform
3 | Create a system of connected and
integrated partnerships for a continuum
of education
1 | develop a process for transforming
vacant lots and structures into
community assets
2 | focus transportation resources to better
serve and connect Springfield residents
3 | build on existing physical assets to
celebrate Springfield’s unique and
diverse aesthetic character
4 | plan for and take advantage of lessons
learned from recent disasters by creating
a comprehensive disaster preparedness
plan
5 | design, develop, and operate places and
spaces that are efficient and respectful of
natural and human resources
1 | better connect the community to its
cultural amenities and assets through
coordinated outreach and diverse
events and arts programming
2 | Support and grow the Arts and Culture
Sector through a Series of “lighter,
Quicker Cheaper” Cultural events
3 | Celebrate the old and new cultural
diversity of Springfield
Educational
Domain
Physical
Domain
Cultural
Domain
Page: 15 Page: 29 Page: 51
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1 | Strengthen developSpringfield as the
Organization to partner with the City
and the SrA to take a leadership role in
guiding Springfield’s future
2 | establish a body that coalesces
community organizations to achieve
efficiency and efficacy through
collaboration and cooperation
Organizational
Domain
1 | improve the reality and perception of
public safety in Springfield
2 | Attract a vibrant and youthful population
to be stewards of Springfield
3 | improve land owner and landlord
oversight
4 | increase Access to Health and Wellness
Services
5 | provide equitable access to a variety of
housing options
Social
Domain
1 | develop and harness Springfield’s role as
the economic heart of the pioneer Valley
2 | Streamline the investment process and
provide creative incentives and policies
to encourage economic development
and entrepreneurship
3 | expand career/workforce development
and educational partnerships to provide
all residents with an opportunity to
meaningfully contribute to Springfield’s
economy and meet the needs of
employers
Economic
Domain
Page: 65 Page: 89 Page: 107
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Educational Domain
Description
educ at i onal r es our c es ar e
defined as encompassing all of
the community’s assets that are
allocated to lifelong learning.
i ncl uded i n thi s category are
functional spaces, curricula and
instructional programs for all pre-K
to 12, community college and
university programs, as well as
more informal public and private
learning spaces and activities such
as civil service training or individual
skills development programs.
Recommendations
1. put schools and libraries at the center of creating a nexus of places,
programs, and access to technology to meet community needs
2. better engage the public in the process and importance of education
reform
3. Create a system of connected and integrated partnerships for a
continuum of education
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Put schools and libraries at the center of creating a nexus of places,
programs, and access to technology to meet community needs

Breadcrumbs
• Citywide Meeting round 1
• bniM education group
• district 3 Meeting round 1
• district 2 Meeting round 1
• education Stakeholders meeting
• latino Meeting
• Citywide Meeting round 2
General Description
greater access to educati onal servi ces i s
one of Springfield’s greatest public needs. A
novel approach must be adopted for current
city assets to be fleshed out into far-reaching
institutions that do more than provide learning
opportunities. Citizens of Springfield should
count on schools and libraries for community
support in its multitude of iterations. These
physical spaces can do more than provide an
education; they can stand for the advancement
towards a better quality of life and provide the
means for achieving it.
in light of the tornado of last June, and in an
effort to address long-standing educational and
community challenges, community institutions
must galvanize social services to cultivate
success from the bottom-up. by serving the
young people of Springfield and their families,
the Springfield public School (SpS) system, as
well as parochial and private schools, can apply
educational capacities to serve the community
at large. With a change in SpS leadership on
the horizon, citizens must contribute to the
process of finding a new superintendent who is
and develop partnerships. The wide-reaching
SpS, parochial, and private school networks
shoul d be arena for these functi ons. Thi s
approach i s model ed i n the Communi ty
Schools initiative (communityschools.org), and
can transform a school from being simply a
schoolhouse into a facility that serves people of
all backgrounds, ages, and abilities.

committed to extending the system’s function
beyond just the classroom, school facilities, and
school boundaries. These goals can be reached
by enabling school facilities to do more than
teach children for eight hours a day.
This social support does more than educate, it
provides a place for the whole community to
solve issues, improve health, build capacities,
Educational #1
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Key steps include: increasing facility hours,
offering services to all ages, providing workforce
readi ness trai ni ng, adul t l i teracy cl asses,
technological competency classes, developing
community partnerships, and utilizing creative
thinking in implementation. Certain institutions in
Springfield already offer some of these services.
by fulfilling these capacities, SpS will firmly
establish its role in the Springfield community
and garner more support from neighborhoods
that harbor its facilities. in all cases, increased
communi ty parti ci pati on and cooperati ve
communication in these facilities is paramount in
ensuring success for students and families.
The Springfield City library recently completed
a strategi c pl an that l ai d out achi evabl e
recommendations to improve its service to the
city. There have been serious shortcomings in
enacting this plan because of budgetary issues.
if the city’s libraries are to provide the services
that would make them one of the pillars of the
community, they will have to look for creative
mechanisms to achieve their goals, especially in
the short term. it is imperative for the community
to rally in support of the library system that does
far more than just house books. libraries are the
local stewards of knowledge, both analog and
digital.
One strategy for catalyzing progress is through
the partnership of some public library branches
with educational institutions. This approach
would enable the consolidation of resources
to allow for increased hours of operation,
improved language and literacy services, and
more opportuni ti es to access technol ogy
and technological education. Obviously, this
implementation item has different action steps in
the short- and long-term.
planning for a joint library venture is a difficult
process, but SpS and Springfield’s library
leadership already possess the forethought
necessary to accommodate these methods. not
only will library services improve the educational
experience of Springfield residents, but these
joint facilities will also be able to provide a
wide range of social services and act as a
community center for health, literacy, community
organization, capacity building, and access to
technology. it is important to note that partners
that share facilities also share expenses in order
to provide greater services with the most efficient
use of resources.
Partnerships/Stakeholders
• American international College
• bay path College
• board of library Commissioners
• Community Music School
• Community Schools initiative
• davis foundation
• elms College
• futureworks
• Holyoke Chicopee Springfield Head Start
• Homework Center
• Mayor
• O.W.l. Adult education Center
• private business Sector
• public, parochial, private School leaders
• puerto rican Cultural Center
• residents and neighborhood Councils
• School Superintendent
• Springfield City library
• Springfield College
• Spri ngfi el d department of Heal th and
Human Services
• Springfield Health and fitness Stakeholders
• Spr i ngf i el d Of f i ce of i nf or mat i on,
Technology, and Accountability
• Springfield parent Advisory Council
• Springfield parks and recreation division
• Springfield public forum
• Springfield public Schools
• Springfield School Committee
• Springfield School Volunteers
• Springfield Technical Community College
• State delegation
• uMass
The city-wide planning process is organized according to the six domains of a healthy and vibrant community.
domains that are positively impacted by the initiative described on this page are indicated above.
Cultural physical economic Organizational educational Social
Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social
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• Vietnamese American Civic Association
• Western new england university
• Westfield State university

Resource Needs
1. The next Superintendent of Springfield
public Schools (SpS) system needs to be
commi tted to extendi ng the system’ s
functions, benefits, and presence beyond the
classroom.
2. The rebuilding of brookings and dryden
will be funded by at least in part feMA.
This presents an opportunity to design
and construct these schools as full service
Community Schools.
3. The new SpS Superintendent, as well as
leaders of parochial and private schools,
need to expl ore communi ty outreach
techni ques that embody a Communi ty
School.
4. The li brary Master pl an needs to be
Community Schools
William R. Peck Full Service Community School
(Holyoke, MA)
The William r. peck School, just up the road from
Springfield, is a full Service Community School
(fSCS) that cultivates thoughtful and strategic
partnerships in order to support the academic
and non-academic aspirations and needs of
the students and families it serves. The school
provides: After School, Case Management,
CHArlA services, College Awareness, family
Assistance Team, family resource room, Health
Center, On Site registrations, parents in the
Classroom, and peck parents united in Action
(ppuA). There is a wealth of community partners
governed by a Central Coordinating Committee
and working in organized workgroups.
The fSCS initiative operates from the following
guiding philosophies:
• Commitment to family-School-Community
partnership – We believe that peck students
wi l l be most successf ul when f ami l y,
school and the community are working in
collaboration.
• Strengths based Assumptions – We believe
that all peck families want the best for their
children, that there is a role for every family
member in fSCS work, and that every parent
can contribute meaningfully to their child’s
education.
• Commi tment to Consi stent Academi c
improvement-Our commitment is to finding
strategies that contribute to improved
student achievement.
• parent leadershi p – We val ue parent
partnership in all aspects of programming
and governance and we will continue to work
towards parent leadership in the initiative.
• Account abi l i t y t hr ough par t i ci pat or y
eval uati on-We are commi tted to the
conti nuous strengtheni ng of the fSCS
implemented with additional consideration
being given to co-location of community
libraries with community schools.
5. Creative thinking about joint-use facilities in
general and their potential for more efficient
use of resources, greater i mpact, and
expanded services.
6. li t er acy , nei ghbor hood acces s t o
t echnol ogy, and l i br ar y and school
accessibility need to be core principles of
future programming and planning across the
educational sector.
7. library services need to engage and support
the di verse communi ty of Spri ngfi el d;
helping those who don’t speak english, are
unemployed, or wish to continue academic
enrichment.
Potential Resource Opportunities
1. The Springfield City library Strategic plan
for 2011-2016 was completed in 2011. This
plan offers several suggestions that would
improve and modernize the system and
prepare City library facilities for the 21st
Century. This plan has won several awards
and could provide a step-by-step process for
helping the library system in Springfield.
2. feMA funds for rebuilding brookings and
dryden
3. Massachusetts School building Assistance
Authority
4. The City of Springfield parks and recreation
division is one of the largest providers of
after school enrichment in the city. This
division has already collaborated with
the department of parks, recreati on,
and building Management (dpbrM) and
Springfield public Schools to develop a
series of learning and recreation programs.
Thi s partnershi p coul d be val uabl e i n
implementing this recommendation.
5. gates foundation (library funding)
Precedents/Best Practices
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initiative through ongoing formative and
summative evaluation grounded in the
experi ences of our partners i ncl udi ng
students, families, faculty and community
partners.
• family Voice- programming and partnerships
are determined in response to the articulated
needs and aspirations of peck students and
families rather than either perceived student/
family needs on the part of the school, or
stated needs and desires of community
partners.
• Multiple forms of parent engagement - We
understand that parent participation in their
child’s education can take many forms, some
more visible in the school building than
others, and that this participation happens at
peck, in the home and in the community.
( ht t p: / / www. hps . hol y ok e. ma . us / pec k /
community_partners.html).
Francis Scott Key School (Philadelphia, PA)
The francis Scott Key School has served its South
philadelphia neighborhood for over 100 years.
The school works with students and families
that have recently entered the country and
focuses on language arts and literacy training
curriculum. using the Success for All program
developed at Johns Hopkins university, the Key
school has made priorities of having small class
sizes and personalized reading instruction. The
school provides adult literacy workshops and
other adult education programs that promote
family learning and healthy development. Health
is a key component in the curriculum. A school
counselor communicates regularly with families
and works with an on-site school-community
coordinator to provide family support services,
career and educational guidance, and referrals
and assistance with obtaining other services.
The school’s focus on academics and family
support has lead to improvements in all metrics:
better school climate, increased attendance, and
improved test scores.
Countee Cullen Community Center (New York,
NY)
Located at public School 194, the Center is open
from 9 a.m. to sometimes well past midnight,
and operates on weekends and in the summer as
well. The community center is a beacon program
operated by the rheedlen Centers for Children
and families, and it provides positive alternatives
for young people who are growing up in one of
the poorest neighborhoods in new York City.
during school hours, the Center provides on-site
social services, such as attendance improvement,
chi l d wel f ar e, and dr opout pr event i on
interventions. After class, a variety of different
activities attract varied local residents. for
parents and children there are support groups,
parenting workshops, and family recreational
activities. for teens, the Center offers homework
help as well as a drug awareness programs,
late-night basketball, and a movie series. The
Center’s teens are active in the community,
producing public service videos, organizing
street cleanups, publishing a newspaper, and
operating a nighttime teen lounge. The Center
has also worked hard to gain an identity within
the community through activities that include
voter registration booths, Center t-shirts, and a
neighborhood tree-planting project. in addition
to focusing on youth and family development,
the Countee Cullen beacon offers support
to underserved families: family preservation
services, emergency help, clinical services, home
visits, counseling, and practical help in finding
housing, jobs, or child care.
Joint-use Libraries
The f ol l owi ng two exampl es have been
resounding successes in their communities,
despite public/university distrust on the outset.
The resulting libraries have been able to offer
far more services at the same or less cost than
before because of consolidation of resources.
These practices are on the larger scale and show
the success that a large university (enrolling
more than 20,000 students), can partner with a
large library clientele (over 750,000 people in the
library catchment).
• San Jose State university/San Jose public
library: After much deliberation and debate,
these two institutions combined to form a
“super library” that is able to offer far more
technological access, language services, and
multicultural programming, etc. to the entire
San Jose community.
• nova State university/broward County public
library: The library is now open 100 hrs/week
rather than 70 hours. 50 new staff members
were hired and trained in the year that the
library was opened. expanded programming
and language services were offered because
of the available funds freed up by the
consolidation of costs in the library.
The next four best practices are examples of
libraries that partner with smaller institutions for
service on the community-scale. in these cases,
the catchment area of the library service is less
source: http://www.philasd.org/schools/key/
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than 20,000 people. in studies, this scale of
service has proven to be extremely successful in
starting a joint-use school library.
Emmetsburg Public Library (Emmetsburg, IA)
Smith Wellness Center, run by cooperative
partnership between iowa lakes CC, the City
of emmetsburg, and the citizens of palo Alto
County
• The library has its own board of Trustees
• The library also acts as a community center.
• partnership has allowed for more space,
increased handicap accessibility, expanded
services, more study and leisure reading
space, additional workspace for staff, and
more programming opportunities.
• eliminated duplicative services and work
• excel l ent communi cat i on has sol ved
logistical issues
• The computer lab available to both the
general public and students
• electronic resources
• geneal ogy room i s mai nt ai ned by
genealogical society and contains archives
of the area
http: //www. emmetsburg. com/Communi ty/
libraries.htm
Franklin Community Library (Elk Grove, CA)
• partnership between franklin High School,
Toby Johnson Middle School, and the
Sacramento public library
• Opened in 2002
• library was able to offer extended hours, free
Wi-fi, more services and programming, and
computers for public use
http://www.saclibrary.org/?pageid=643
Jeremiah E. Burke High School (Boston, MA)
• Combination high school and public library.
• developed as a collaborative effort by
top floor, and the high school and library
are sandwiched between. The floor plan is
flexible to enable extensive use of the facility
after hours.
http://www.bostonpublicschools.org/school/
burke-high-school
http://boston.k12.ma.us/burke/Site/Home.html
http://archrecord.construction.com/schools/09_
burke_high.asp
Earl Warren Middle School Library (Solana
Beach, CA)
• funded through a partnership between the
City of Solana beach, the County of San
diego, California’s School facilities program,
the friends of the Solana beach library, and
the San dieguito union High School district
(SduHSd)
• The campus of the middle school was
reoriented slightly to accommodate the
library (relocated entry to campus, improved
traffic management and bus pick up)
• Tripled the size of the previous facilities at
the school and community library
• The SduHSd owns the facility, the county is
the tenant, and the city is an equity partner
with diminishing interest over time
http://www.sdcl.org/locations_Sb.html
School-Centered Neighborhood Revitalization
educat i on, housi ng and nei ghbor hood
revitalization go hand in hand. new education
and housing partnerships can stabilize families
and boost student achievement.
Over t he l ast decade, school - cent er ed
nei ghborhood revi tal i zati on has been an
experimental tactic used in several uS cities.
This approach is carried out through replacing
bl i ghted housi ng wi th an attracti ve new
school. The school is then used as a means of
retaining and drawing-in a revitalization-minded
boston Centers for Youth & families, boston
public Schools, and the boston public library
to promote education and literacy across the
city
• l oc at ed i n one of t he t oughes t
neighborhoods in the city
• Transparent design
• There is a community center on ground
floor, regulation basketball court on the
Source: http://archrecord.construction.com/schools/09_
burke_high.asp
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community.
The scale and complexity of this approach often
requires significant public funding. Most school-
centered neighborhood revitalization projects
have been driven by large federal investments,
such as those from the HOpe Vi program.
Massachusetts’ new education reform law is also
providing communities with the opportunity to
integrate a new school with local neighborhood
revitalization plans.
Springfield has already adopted this approach
with Veritas preparatory, which is set to open in
2012. Veritas will be central to the South end’s
revitalization, but to be successful it will need
the community and local businesses to rally in
support. According to MASSinc., “Success [of
school-centered neighborhood revitalization
is] often contingent on a strong partner (e.g.,
a large employer, university, or foundation)
operating outside of the school system with
a long-term interest in the well-being of the
community.”
http://www.massinc.org/~/media/files/Mass%20
inc/research/full%20report%20pdf%20files/
growth_brief.ashx
Project Location
Citywide, although brookings and dryden
schools could set a precedent for Community
Centered School s throughout the Ci ty of
Springfield
Priority
urgent
Action Steps
1. Select a new SpS Superintendent that is
committed to expanding the functions and
benefits of the system beyond the classroom.
2. The SpS and its Superintendent, parochial
and private schools will seek a partnership
with the Community Schools initiative (http://
www. communi tyschool s. org/) to assi st
in transforming local public schools into
facilities that serve citizens before, during,
and after school hours.
3. SpS will further explore design opportunities
for creating 21st Century Community Schools
in the rebuilding of brookings and dryden
schools.
4. The Ci ty wi l l expl ore the potenti al of
enacting the policies described in the library
Master plan.
5. On a community level, branch libraries and
community schools will meet and discuss
the opportunity to combine library services
with the focus on providing accommodations
and neighborhood-specific services to the
community at large and at the neighborhood
level.
6. Schools and libraries alike will engage the
greater Springfield community, expand
their hours of operation beyond the school
day and maximize the benefit they provide
to citizens: enhanced language services,
i ncreased access to technol ogy, and
improved social service programming will all
be included.
7. Space programming decisions will take
i nto account the wi shes and needs of
nei ghbor hoods, l i ke pr i or i t i zi ng t he
implementation of after-school programs.
8. With the construction of two new schools
in the future, plans will be made to build
or renovate two community-scale joint-use
libraries.
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22
better engage the public in the process and
importance of education reform
Breadcrumbs
• education Stakeholders meeting
• Citywide Meeting round 2
General Description
enacting education reform is one of the most
pressing issues in the improvement of the
Springfield public Schools (SpS) system. if schools
are expected to take on a larger role in the
community, political, institutional, and policy-related
changes must have the support of residents to
achieve their desired impact. presently, the SpS
is not receiving sufficient backing from citizens
because it does not have the resources to engage
them.
it is vital that public opinion becomes an asset for
school reform rather than an obstacle. According
to independent research, parental and community
engagement is the most important factor in
enacting ambitious education reform strategies .
Shackled with budgetary issues, the SpS is unable
to allocate sufficient funds to developing a more
robust means of public engagement around reform-
related issues. Therefore, a local education fund
(lef) or some equivalent advocacy and funding
organization should be established.
lefs are non-profit organizations that work to
enhance local engagement in public education.
These entities are commonly funded by foundation
or government grants. lefs are not solely
dedicated to school reform; they also serve as
conduits between citizens and schools for shaping
curriculum and monitoring progress.
• Springfield School Volunteers
• Springfield business leaders for education
• Springfield Technical Community College
• Springfield Vietnamese American Civic
Association
• Stand for Children
• uMass
• Western new england university
Resource Needs
1. establishment of a local education fund (lef)
or equivalent organization
2. An organization to assume the role of engaging
the public in interacting with the Springfield
public School (SpS) system
3. The public needs to have more transparent
access to information and statistics regarding
school performance
4. The public needs to be more engaged in
advocating for higher quality schools, better
access to technology, and improved english as
a Second language (eSl) services.
Potential Resource Opportunities
1. davis foundation
2. public and Community engagement (pACe)
• Springfield School Volunteers
• parent information Center
in 2009, a feasibility study was commissioned by
the greater Springfield business foundation to
activate the existing 501 (c)3, Springfield education
partnership, established over 20 years ago, as an
lef. This effort was led by a steering committee
of key business and education leaders from
Springfield. While not successfully instituted in
2009, the groundwork for moving forward exists and
a renewed effort is recommended.
Partnerships/Stakeholders
• American international College
• bay path College
• business Community
• davis foundation
• dunbar Community Center
• elms College
• faith-based Organizations
• local education fund
• Martin luther King, Jr. family Services
• parent information Center
• puerto rican Cultural Center
• Springfield City Council
• Springfield College
• Springfield department of Health and Human
Services
• Springfield education Association
• Springfield family education department
• Springfield Office of information, Technology,
and Accountability
• Springfield parent Academy
• Springfield public forum
• Springfield public Schools
• Springfield School Committee
Educational #2
EDUCATION
REFORM
EDUCATION
STAKEHOLDERS
COMMUNITY
ADVOCACY AND INVOLVEMENT
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• family education department
3. public education network
4. Support from local businesses
5. See greater Springfield business foundation
feasibility Study: Springfield education
partnership, March 10, 2009 (available via the
davis foundation)
Precedents/Best Practices
The Paterson Education Fund (Paterson, NJ)
The paterson education fund (pef), is a not-for-
profit organization whose mission is to stimulate
community action for change so that the paterson
public Schools ensure that all paterson children
achieve high standards. http://www.paterson-
education.org/
pef’s goals are:
• To build our community’s civic capacity to
support, monitor and advocate education
reform.
• To educate and enable community leadership
to understand and act on changing education
needs.
• To provide a forum for the community to
effectively participate in the decision-making
processes concerning education.
founded in 1983, pef’s activities build and nourish
a constituency for systematic school reform by
educating the community on the importance of
high standards and expectations in providing
quality education for all children. pef convenes and
brokers relationships between the paterson school
district and private sector entities interested in
public education in paterson.
paterson education fund is a founding member
of the public education network (pen), a national
organization of local education funds (lefs) and
individuals working to improve public schools and
build citizen support for quality public education in
low-income communities across the nation.
Ysleta Elementary School (El Paso, TX)
Ysleta elementary School has worked with an
interfaith education fund (ief) since 1992 to
develop a discourse with the local community.
Together, parents, teachers, administrators, and
community leaders form a leadership team that
tackles issues such as traffic safety, the design of
a new school, and the lack of medical care in the
school. When the school was designing a system for
assessing the students, parents were trained about
the new processes and were invited to comment on
changes.
Mobile Area Education Foundation (Mobile, AL)
The Mobile Area education foundation is a
nonprofit organization dedicated to improving local
public schools. Their mission is to build community
responsibility for improving public education
outcomes in Mobile County. They work with, but are
independent of, the Mobile County public School
System. http://www.maef.net/
Priority
High
Action Steps
1. The “educational domain” working group will
establish a set of short- and mid-term goals for
the implementation for this recommendation.
2. An organization will obtain grant funding
and work to establish a network of citizens,
stakeholders, and school administrators
throughout Springfield for the expressed
purpose of creating a public engagement
strategy for education reform. This organization
could be part of the rebuild Springfield
implementation process, a local education
fund, or an organization with a similar mission.
3. This implementation organization will take on
the role of engaging the public in interacting
with the Springfield public School (SpS)
system and the wider education spectrum in
Springfield.
4. The public will have more transparent access
to information and statistics regarding school
performance.
5. The public will be more engaged in advocating
for higher quality schools, better access to
technology, and improved english as a Second
language (eSl) services.
6. The public will be more engaged in advocating
for higher quality schools, better access to
technology, and improved english as a Second
language (eSl) services.
Project Location
Citywide
The city-wide planning process is organized according to the six domains of a healthy and vibrant community.
domains that are positively impacted by the initiative described on this page are indicated above.
Cultural physical economic Organizational educational Social
Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social
r e b u i l d S p r i n g f i e l d p l A n | S p r i n g f i e l d M A S S A C H u S e T T S
24
Create a system of connected and integrated partnerships for a
continuum of education
Breadcrumbs
• Citywide Meeting round 1
• business forum
• City of Springfield Workforce development
Study
• City of Springfield economic development
Study
• interview: education group
• i ntervi ew: Mass Career devel opment
institute
• Citywide Meeting round 2
• education Stakeholder Meeting
General Description
The capaci ty for Spri ngfi el d’s ci ti zen’s to
contribute to and more fully participate in the
workforce has not been adequately engaged.
Starti ng wi th earl y-chi l dhood educati on,
Springfield’s children are at a disadvantage to
compete in the modern economy. The davis
foundation and other partners recognize the
importance of early Childhood education and
are increasing their efforts to raise the profile
of this critical initiative as the starting point of
the continuum. in addition, these groups are
enhancing their efforts to support universal
pre-K across the city is key. from the outset,
this continuum impacts Springfield’s ability to
create local employment and employees, and
the education system needs to be equipped with
a coordinated capacity to help Springfield and its
businesses revitalize.
Although there are programs to assist in job
readiness, these offerings need to be supported
and small. Job training, internships, and other
educational outreach and participation strategies
are al l opti ons for better connecti ng the
educational and economic domains. Together,
these partnerships can ensure a pipeline for
Springfield residents to meaningfully contribute
to the local, regional, state, and national
economy.
Currentl y, there are organi zati ons doi ng
i mpor t ant wor k r el at ed t o wor kf or ce
development and job training. These include
the regional employment board (reb) and
Massachusetts Career development institute
(MCdi). One of the most important elements
of implementing this recommendation will be
bringing all parties and stakeholders to the
table to ensure continuity and cooperation in
addressing this issue.
Partnerships/Stakeholders
• ACCeSS
• American Career institute
• American international College
• bay path College
• Commonwealth Academy
• Cooperating Colleges of greater Springfield
• diocese of Springfield (parochial Schools)
• elms College
• local daycare providers
• Mass latino Chamber of Commerce
• Massachusetts Career development institute
• private schools (Academy Hill, pioneer Valley
Christian, Montessori etc.)
• regional employment board of Hampden
and coordinated to make a significant impact.
Starting at the beginning of a young person’s
education, the schools in Springfield must focus
on creating continuity and integration among
the various actors in the educational continuum.
literacy, critical thinking, and creativity should
be at the center of a coordinated curriculum.
Moreover, the pursuit of knowledge and job
readiness should not halt once a child leaves
the school system; opportunities to acquire
vocational skills should be accessible for all
residents.
finding a job as a young person is a daunting
process. Attracting and retaining younger
resi dents shoul d be a pri ori ty f or both
educational institutions and local businesses.
The educational sector must work strategically
to create connections to and relationships with
the economic drivers of the city, both large
Educational #3
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County
• representati ves from al l stakehol ders
along the education continuum from early
childhood to workforce development
• Springfield Chamber of Commerce
• Springfield College
• Springfield O.W.l. Adult education Center
• Springfield Office of information
• Springfield parent Academy
• Springfield public forum
• Springfield public Schools
• Springfield School Committee & The Mayor
• Springfield School Volunteer Organization
• Springfield School Volunteers
• Springfield Technical Community College
• Square One
• Stand for Children
• State delegation
• Technology, and Accountability
• Western new england university
Resource Needs
1. The City needs to hire a SpS superintendent
who is committed to creating an integrated
system of education that reinvigorates the
innovation that once made Springfield
prosperous; this process starts in early
childhood, ends with prepared students
entering college and the workforce, and
conti nues wi th persi stent communi ty
educational enrichment.
2. universal pre-K: as recommended by nearly
every educational stakeholder during the
rebui l d Spri ngfi el d pl anni ng process.
universal pre-K was acknowledged as a
crucial missing link in the educational sphere
of Springfield. The earlier that Springfield’s
students are introduced into the educational
pipeline, the better their chance to lead a
productive and happy life. This resource is
needed because of its wide-ranging trickle-
down effects on every aspect of the city’s
future.
3. The earl y Chi l dhood, pre-K and earl y
elementary programs need to think creatively
and employ novel techniques in developing
critical thinking and language development.
4. SpS, parochial, and private schools need
to i nvesti gate proj ect-based l earni ng
approaches and construct creatively-charged
physical spaces for their students.
5. SpS, parochial, private schools and the
Cooperating Colleges of greater Springfield
(CCgS) need to work in a coordinated effort
to understand each other’s needs, provide
mutual support, articulate a consistent
curriculum, and strive to solve problems
multi-laterally.
6. The CCgS consortium can better coalesce
around the coordination of educational
services.
7. The CCgS can better focus on preparing
students to contribute meaningfully to the
workforce.
8. The public, parochial and private secondary-
education and Cooperating College of
greater Spri ngf i el d ( CCgS) needs to
develop a stronger connection with the
local economy by integrating both large and
small business interests into the workforce
development curriculum.
9. legislative buy-in and support for reform.
10. A Child development Account program
Potential Resource Opportunities
1. All public high schools have specific focuses
that will prepare students for whatever path
they choose; whether that choice is college
or immediate entry into the workforce.
• Central High School: College preparatory
• roger l. putnam Vocational Technical
Academy: Vocational training
• The High School of Commerce: finance,
law, government, and entrepreneurship
• Springfield High School of Science
and Technology: Science, technology,
engineering, mathematics
• The Springfield renaissance School
( gr ades 6- 12) : Ar t s, cul t ur e, and
expeditionary learning
2. Springfield parent Academy
3. important work has begun. A group of
community leaders met in June of 2011 to
launch a new community wide initiative to
address early Childhood education – Cherish
every Child: A blueprint for Springfield’s
future. As well, the davis foundation has
made a commitment to the improvement
The city-wide planning process is organized according to the six domains of a healthy and vibrant community.
domains that are positively impacted by the initiative described on this page are indicated above.
Cultural physical economic Organizational educational Social
Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social
r e b u i l d S p r i n g f i e l d p l A n | S p r i n g f i e l d M A S S A C H u S e T T S
26
and enhanc ement of educ at i onal
opportunities and achievements for the
children and youth of Hampden County
through their education grantmaking.
http://cherishspringfield.org/page/pdf/45/d.
asp4.pdf
4. The Cooperati ng Col l eges of greater
Spri ngf i el d ( CCgS) i s an educati onal
consortium composed of the eight public
and pr i vat e col l eges i n t he gr eat er
Springfield area: American international
College, bay path College, elms College,
Holyoke Community College, Springfield
College, Springfield Technical Community
College, Western new england College,
and Westfield State College. The CCgS is
an established organization, but it could
become more active in the local collegiate
landscape.
which cultivates a sense of ownership and
confi dence among students. http: //www.
hightechhigh.org/

Strive (Cincinnati, OH)
S t r i v e , a n o n - pr o f i t s u bs i di a r y o f
KnowledgeWorks foundation, Cincinnati, OH,
has brought together local leaders to tackle
the student achievement crisis and improve
education throughout greater Cincinnati and
northern Kentucky. in the four years since
the group was launched, Strive partners have
improved student success in dozens of key areas
across three large public school districts. See
Stanford social innovation review, Collective
impact, 2011, John Kania & Mark Kramer.
Stand for Children (Massachusetts)
Stand for Children’s mission is to ensure that
all children, regardless of their background,
graduate from high school prepared for, and
with the access to, a college education. With
members in more than 100 communities across
Massachusetts who prioritize child advocacy
in school reform efforts, out ultimate goal is to
ensure that every child has access to a quality
education and an equitable chance to succeed in
life. Stand is now working in Springfield and can
be an active partner in the education continuum.
Middle College National Consortium
in addition, education stakeholders expressed
i nterest i n the Mi ddl e Col l ege concept.
The Mi ddl e Col l ege nati onal Consorti um
believes that authentic school reform grows
out of sustained collaboration among master
practitioners, structured communication, and
support for perpetual growth of leadership skills
for all constituents. Centered on six design
principles, MCnC schools bridge the high school
and college experience for underserved youth
Precedents/Best Practices
High Tech High (San Diego County, CA)
High Tech High is a charter school system
consisting of 11 schools, spanning K-12. its
curriculum is centered on project-based learning
and innovation. by constructing environments
that are safe, transparent, flexible, and creative,
students are encouraged to put their work on
display and it with their peers. This level of peer
interaction is unrivaled in normal school settings,
and it develops a superior grasp of critical
thinking in students. Students and teachers are
in constant conversations about the direction of
their courses, and learning is tailored to engage
subjects that students are genuinely interested
in. With most coursework culminating in a project
deliverable, students are conditioned to a setting
similar to that of an adult work environment,
Credit: Jim brady (for Architecture Magazine)
Source: http://www.architectmagazine.com/articles/awards/aia-cote-2011-top-ten-green-projects--high-tech-high-chula-vista.aspx?playlist=playlist____20_734540&plitem=1#
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leading to increased access to and success in
college. for more information please visit www.
mcnc.us.
The Boston Opportunity Agenda (Boston, MA)
The boston Opportunity Agenda is a citywide
program that “sets a national standard for
collaboration around a shared set of goals,
driven by data, accountable through regular
reports to the community—and supported by
new resources.” partners, including boston
public Schools, the united Way, and several
private foundations have formed a public-private
partnership and committed “$27 million to the
comprehensive education pipeline that spans
early childhood care and education through
post-secondary achievement. The partners have
pledged to ensure that the initiatives being
supported will have the resources they need to
succeed and hold themselves accountable for
the results.”
http://www.bostonopportuni tyagenda.org/
About-us.aspx
Priority
urgent
Action Steps
1. The City will hire a SpS superintendent that is
committed to creating an integrated system
of education stresses literacy, creativity,
critical thinking, and innovation.
2. The new superintendent will work with
the rest of the school system to created
a coordinated curriculum that starts in
early childhood, continues with prepared
students entering college, workforce training,
and extends to community educational
enrichment.
3. SpS, parochial, and private schools will think
creatively about novel techniques in teaching
critical thinking and literacy.
4. SpS, par ochi al , and pr i vat e school s
will investigate project-based learning
approaches and constructing creatively-
charged physical spaces for its students.
There is a chance to set new precedents
for 21st Century education environments
as schools damaged by the June 1 tornado
rebuild.
5. The SpS and the cooperating Colleges of
greater Springfield (CCgS) will create a more
robust and consistent dialog to understand
each other’s needs, develop curriculum, and
work to solve problems multi-laterally.
6. The CCgS will work to share and coordinate
their educational services.
7. The CCgS will focus on preparing students
to contribute meaningfully to the workforce.
8. The CCgS will work to develop a stronger
connection with the local economy by
integrating both large and small business
interests into the workforce development
curriculum.
9. develop a Child development Account
program and encourage parents to commit
small amounts of money to the account every
quarter. This contribution could be matched
by a donation. These programs are proven to
increase levels of college matriculation and
diminish the cost of going to college for low-
income families.
http://csd.wustl.edu/publications/documents/
rpb09-29.pdf
Project Location
Citywide
WORK
FORCE
EARLY
CHILDHOOD
EDUCATION
ELEM-
ENTARY &
MIDDLE
SCHOOL
HIGH
SCHOOL
HIGH
SCHOOL
DIPLOMA
GED
2-YEAR
COLLEGE
4-YEAR
COLLEGE
BACHELOR’S
DEGREE
ASSOCIATE
DEGREE
TRAINING
GRADUATE
DEGREE
CERTIFICATE
VOCA-
TIONAL or
COLLEGE
APPREN-
TICESHIP or
INTERNSHIP
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Description
This category is defined by the
physical resources that encompass
the sum of the communi ty’ s
built and natural assets. These
r esour ces i ncl ude bui l di ngs,
br i dges, hi ghways and even
telecommunications infrastructure
as well as natural resources like
parks and other outdoor recreation
areas.
Recommendations
1. develop a process for transforming vacant lots and structures into
community assets
2. focus transportation resources to better serve and connect
Springfield residents
3. build on existing physical assets to celebrate and improve
Springfield’s aesthetic character and infrastructure
4. plan for and take advantage of lessons learned from recent disasters
by creating and publicizing a comprehensive disaster preparedness
plan
5. design, develop, and operate places and spaces that are efficient
and respectful of natural and human resources
Physical Domain
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Develop a process for transforming vacant lots and structures into
community assets
Breadcrumbs
• district 2 Meeting round 1
• district 1 Meeting round 2
• district 3 Meeting round 1
• Citywide Meeting rounds 1 & 2
• interviews with Housing Stakeholders
• Springfield business improvement district
General Description
decades of urban sprawl and dis-investment
have resulted in pockets of blight in areas of
Springfield, and the June 2011 tornado worsened
the matter. Through the rebuild Springfield
planning process, residents voiced their concerns
about vacant and abandoned properties in the
city. Shortening the path to cleaner and more
stable neighborhoods would mean that current
and future residents could have attractive and
healthy communities in which to live.
blighted structures and parcels also contribute
to lowering property values and increased
criminal activity. At the same time, residents
who have been impacted by the tornado and
other disasters need to be given a fair chance
to rebuild, and forgiven for short-term blight
issues. in short, a clear and effective strategy for
addressing these issues needs to be a priority.
encouraging infill development, expanding
green space, building community gardens,
merging lots together, selling land with a
disposition to abutters, and providing residents
and developers with meaningful redevelopment
tools are all ways to turn vacant properties into
• non-profit Housing developers
• pioneer Valley planning Commission
• Springfield neighborhood Councils
• Springfield neighborhood Housing Services
• Springfield partners for Community Action
• Springfield preservation Trust (SpT)
• Springfield redevelopment Authority (SrA)
• uS department of Housing and urban
development (Hud)
Resource Needs:
1. funding
2. grassroots action
3. process for monitoring and management
4. neighborhood Councils Collaboration
5. Concentrated redevelopment efforts
Potential Resource Opportunities
1. Hud grants
2. feMA grants
3. MeMA grants
4. SrA funding
5. private donations
6. Community fundraising
7. The organizations Keep Springfield beautiful
(KSb) and Springfield preservation Trust (SpT)
have partnered to fight blight and transform
downtrodden historic structures into suitable
housing. The work and programs that KSb
and SpT do is discussed further in physical
recommendation #3, where citywide and
neighborhood beautification practices are
examined in detail.
more viable community assets. Some programs
require more public funds, while others just
r equi r e nei ghbor hood engagement and
community groups to make change. At its root,
this process must be executed at the grassroots
level, as it is the residents of the adjoining
properties and nearby blocks that feel most
passionate about enacting positive change in
their communities.
Organizations such as Keep Springfield beautiful
(KSb), the Springfield preservation Trust (SpT),
and Concerned Citizens for Springfield have
partnered together to curb and fight against
blight and restore historic structures into suitable
housing. Their efforts should be supported
and can be strengthened by including new
stakeholders into the rebuilding process.
Springfield is not alone. There are numerous
ci ti es across the uni ted States that have
experienced urban blight and have several
vacant lots, many at a significantly higher level
than Springfield. Springfield can learn from these
cities.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
• City of Springfield
• Commonwealth of Massachusetts
• Concerned Citizens of Springfield
• developSpringfield in partnership with Office
of planning and economic development
• HAp Housing
• institute for Community economics
• Keep Springfield beautiful
Physical #1
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Precedents / Best Practices
The Lot Next Door Program (New Orleans, LA)
The lot next door program, instituted by the
new Orleans redevelopment Agency (nOrA),
gives residents abutting the first chance to
purchase and redevelop nOrA properties. The
program was created through a new Orleans
City Council Ordinance following Hurricane
Katrina. A program like this is already in place
in Springfield, however it only allows for the
provision that, “properties included in [the]
auction cannot be built upon and may be used
solely for open space and/or accessory parking
to an immediately adjacent property under
common ownership.” expanding the scope
of the program in Springfield to allow for more
flexibility and incentivize creative uses, paired
with marketing and outreach efforts, might
encourage residents and neighborhood groups
to explore such a unique opportunity.
ht t p: / / www. nor a wor k s . or g/ r es i dent s /
lot-next-door
Neighborhoods in Bloom Program (Richmond,
VA)
richmond’s neighborhoods in bloom program
(nib) program was created to allow citizens
to actively decide how and where community
development funds are allocated. The goal of
this program is to restore physical livability and
improve neighborhood stability. neighborhoods
are consi dered wi th establ i shed cri teri a
and “revitalization potential [is] evaluated
upon the strength of civic associations in the
neighborhoods, the existence of redevelopment
plans, and market trends.” Once in the nib
program, the City works with neighborhood
groups, non-profits, and residents to:
• buy vacant houses, rehabilitate them, and
sell them for home ownership.
• buy vacant lots, build houses, and sell them
for home ownership.
• provide homebuyer education classes and
counsel potential buyers in determining
affordability and purchase power.
• provide down payment assistance.
• Assist owner occupants with house repairs
and renovations.
in addition to removing blight and increasing
home ownership in the city, the program seeks to
instill private sector confidence to invest in rental
and for sale assets. The program also provides
accessible homeownership education documents
to help first-time homebuyers.
http://www.richmondgov.com/neighborhoods/
index.aspx
The city-wide planning process is organized according to the six domains of a healthy and vibrant community.
domains that are positively impacted by the initiative described on this page are indicated above.
Cultural physical economic Organizational educational Social
Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social
source: http://www.richmondgov.com/neighborhoods/
documents/neighborhoodimprovement.pdf
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Fulton County/City of Atlanta Land Bank
Authority (Atlanta, GA)
ful ton County/Ci ty of Atl anta land bank
Authority (lbA) is a non-profit corporation that
oversees the process of putting the regions
abandoned property back into productive use.
The lbA was formed in cooperation between the
County and the City, and was given the power
to forgive delinquent City and County property
taxes. Thi s process makes the si tes more
marketable to future buyers, for both non-profit
and for-profit development entities.
http://www.fccalandbank.org/
regulations and responsibilities for land banks
vary from city to city, but all have a common goal:
to turn underutilized and abandoned properties
into more viable and community uses. The City
of Springfield has several organizations—namely
the SrA, HAp, SnHS and Habitat for Humanity—
that operate as de facto land banks (i.e. holding
lots awaiting housing development). However,
increasing coordination and attracting more
funds would help for make these institutions
more effective.
Stalled Spaces Program, (Glasgow, Scotland)
glasgow, Scotland suffers from some of the
worst rates of vacant land and property. The City
had more vacant land than the rest of Scotland
combined. To reactivate these spaces, the city
launched Stalled Spaces in 2008, a program that
offers small loans to neighbors of vacant land
with the intention that they create temporary
landscaping interventions that can serve the
greater community. Stalled Spaces gets its
name because it uses pots of land in which
development is literally ‘stalled’. Some project
examples include:
• Creating temporary growing spaces
• Creating city market gardens.
• interim sustainable urban drainage sites.
• Tree planting as part of carbon offsetting,
biodiversity or other initiatives.
• public art space.
• non-organic waste recycling schemes.
• growing short rotation energy crops.
• installing approved landscape design prior to
development.
• Child’s play area.
• Wildflower meadows
• leveling and turfing over the site with
continued maintenance.
ht t p: //www. gl asgow. gov. uk/en/busi ness/
environment/Clyde_Kelvingreenspace/Stalled+S
paces++++Temporary+landscapes.htm
Priority
High
Action Steps
1. Compile an electronic inventory of vacant
land and derelict structures and make this
information publicly available.
• While a database is being created,
temporarily address ‘stalled’ lands.
• Allocate a small fund to support a
program similar to the Stalled Spaces
pr ogr am i n gl asgow; pr ovi di ng
communi ty groups wi th money to
develop ‘stalled’ land. This program
would temporarily fill in the ‘missing
teeth’ in neighborhoods until adequate
development funds can be secured.
• partner with neighborhood Councils and
property Maintenance Organizations
(such as the property Maintenance Task
force) to identify priority parcels and
problems
• i nhabi t these spaces wi th li ghter,
Quicker, Cheaper cultural amenities (see:
Cultural recommendation #2)
2. devel op a st r at egy f or per manent l y
redevel oping vacant land and dereli ct
structures.
• Keep community organizations involved
i n devel opment conversati ons wi th
private developers early in the process to
convey community needs.
• research and implement ways to finance
the redevelopment of vacant properties,
such as Tax increment financing (Tifs),
other incentive opportunities and bonds.
• expl ore other central i zed methods
for cataloging and organizing vacant
and tax-foreclosed and/or city-owned
properties
• Think creatively about low-cost programs
and activities that publicize available
assets (see: economic recommendation
#3)
• faci l i tate frequent communi cati on,
transparency, and outreach to real
estate developers, non-profit groups,
businesses and residents.
• Suppor t cur r ent ef f or t s by Keep
Springfield beautiful and the Springfield
preservation Trust.
Project Location
Citywide
source: http://www.glasgowsouthandeastwoodextra.co.uk/
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34
Focus transportation resources to better serve and connect
Springfield residents
Breadcrumbs
• Stakeholder Meeting with pioneer Valley
Transit Authority
• Citywide Meeting round 1
• Citywide Meeting round 2
• district 3 Meeting round 1
• interview: Classical Condo Association
• Springfield Museums
General Description
The health of many cities often depends on
healthy and functional transportation systems.
Springfield residents overwhelmingly support
improvements to local transportation to shift
the way the city has been growing. Suggested
improvements range from adding or moving
bus stops and shelters, building transit centers,
commuter rai l , and addi ng bi keways and
pedestrian pathways.
improvements to alternative modes of transit that
were suggested during the community meetings
and project interviews included improving
places for pedestrians to walk, adding bikeways,
and investing in rail transit. Although most of
these tasks require significant funding, a lot can
be done at the grassroots level, and there are
funding and grant opportunities that could also
be leveraged.
Common concerns from residents included a lack
of efficiency and ease-of-use concerns. Adding
information kiosks, maps at bus stops, extending
hours of service, new bus routes, and creating
partnerships were all suggestions from residents.
• new Haven- Har t f or d- Spr i ngf i el d rai l
program
• peter pan bus lines
• pioneer Valley planning Commission
• pioneer Valley Transit Authority
• Springfield College
• Springfield Technical Community College
• State delegation
• Teatro V!da
• uMass Amherst landscape Architecture and
regional planning
• uni ted States government; Of f i ce of
Congressman richard e. neal
• uS department of Transportation
• Western new england university

Resource Needs
1. An organized transportation advocacy group
that collaborates with public entities
2. public-private partnerships
3. federal grants
Potential Resource Opportunities
1. Area institutions can make an impact by
investing in the transit infrastructure used
by their patrons. perhaps in the form of
public-private partnerships, institutions
such as the pioneer Valley Transit Authority,
baystate Health, and area universities (such
as Springfield College and Western new
england university) can provide or augment
funding for new bus stops, information
kiosks, transit centers, bike lanes.
2. The federal Highway Administration has
sever al Tr anspor t at i on enhancement
Considering modification of bus routes, including
a system of looping routes, might also result in
better service. Simply consulting with residents
who depend on transit could better inform how
the system could be improved.
public transportation generally suffers from
a negati ve i mage; however, i t i s an al l -
encompassing transportation provision that can
be a practical alternative for many residents in
the community. Some cities have taken great
strides in reinventing their transit systems to
reach out to the general public to improve their
service and subsequently repair their image.

Partnerships / Stakeholders:
• American international College
• Amtrak
• baystate Health
• board of public Works
• City of Springfield
• Commonwealth of Massachusetts
• greyhound bus lines
Physical #2
flickr user: trevonhaywood2012
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(Te) funds available related to surface
transportation projects. The pVTA would
be el i gi bl e for many of these grants.
These projects include, but are not limited
to, pedestri an and bi cycl e f aci l i ti es,
rehabilitation and operation of historic
transportation buildings, structures, or
facilities, and conversion of abandoned
railway corridors to trails.
3. union Station rehabilitation as a regional
intermodal transportation center
4. uS department of Transportation grants
f aci l i t at ed t hr ough t he Sust ai nabl e
Communities initiative
5. proj ect for publ i c Spaces can provi de
consultation about creating safe and inviting
bus shelters, stations, or waiting areas.
Precedents / Best Practices
Greater St. Louis Transit Alliance (St. Louis, MO)
The greater St. louis Transit Alliance is a
consortium of governments, non-profit groups,
businesses, private institutions, and citizens
who have taken on the mission of advocating
for improved transit throughout the St. louis
Metropolitan region. formed by the non-
profit Citizens for Modern Transit, the Alliance
consists of nearly 50 members, all of whom
believe that Missouri has not allocated enough
money for transportation. The diverse group of
stakeholders achieved victory in november 2011,
when Missouri passed proposition A, which will
allocate generous state funds to transportation
diversification and improvements.
http://moremetrolink.com/index.html
Transit 2020 Plan (Providence, RI)
The Ci ty of provi dence j ust unvei l ed i ts
new Transi t 2020 pl an, whi ch i s i ntended
to expand the scope and efficiency of the
city’s transportation system. After a rigorous
feasibility study by the rhode island public
Transit Authority (ripTA) and the city, a plan
was devised to extend system reach, maximize
available funds, incorporate cultural amenities,
and improve user interaction. Specific measures
include:
• using social media to interact with customers
• developing an interactive map with system
updates, tools for mobile devices, and real
time bus arrival displays
• Constructing 12 new community designed
bus shelters
• reinventing Kennedy plaza, the major ripTA
hub
• increase park-and-ride capacities
• developing new transit hubs
• initiating rapid bus service
• Strengthening intermodal service
• expanded programs for commuters
• Capi t al i z i ng on Tr ans i t Or i ent ed
development
ht t p: / / pr ov i denc ec or ec onnec t or . c om/
other-transit-2020-projects/
Priority
High
Action Steps
1. Spr i ngf i el d communi t y gr oups must
col l abor at e t o es t abl i s h a uni f i ed
ci ti zen transportati on advocacy group
that promotes and i mpl ements better
transportation opportunities such as:
• di rect bus servi ce to respond to
community needs
• bui l d new bi ke pat hs/pedest r i an
connectors to amenities
• improve sidewalks
• Attract passengers
The city-wide planning process is organized according to the six domains of a healthy and vibrant community.
domains that are positively impacted by the initiative described on this page are indicated above.
Cultural physical economic Organizational educational Social
Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social
flickr user: Wampa-One
flickr user: mindfrieze
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• The main objective of this organization
should be to collaborate with public and
private transportation stakeholders and
search for creative ways to bring diverse
transit opportunities to Springfield
i n a ddi t i o n t o s e r v i c e - o r i e n t e d
transportation issues, this organization can
also advocate to local, state, and federal
lawmakers for increased implementation
and capacity funding for the pVTA. To meet
high community expectations for service,
expanded pVTA capacity may be necessary
in the short- or long-term.
2. The Ci ty of Spri ngfi el d wi l l work wi th
the pVpC i n a compl ementary manner
to understand the goals, timelines, and
priorities in the regional Transportation plan
(rTp). The City must work in concert with the
pVTA to understand the current picture of
transportation resources in Springfield as laid
out by the rTp and to identify and engage
stakeholders and partnerships who can
prioritize and work towards implementing
recommendations in the rTp that affect
Springfield.
3. invest in minor infrastructure, such as kiosks,
maps, extending hours, new bus routes, and
creating partnerships to improve the user
experience of the transit system were all
resident suggestions.
4. The City should work with the pVTA to
develop sustainable strategies for adding
signage, cleaning bus stops, and working
with universities to find inexpensive ways to
add bus maps to more locations, bike arrows
on streets, etc.
5. Applying for grants or state and federal
funds are potential funding options for future
projects. Coordination and cooperation
with the pVTA can help Springfield prioritize
short-, mid-, and long-term projects such as
quickly implementing low cost, high impact
investments and deferring larger projects
to the l ong-term. long-term proj ects
might require more expenditure, such as
formal bike lanes, improved sidewalks and
crosswalks, more buses, and passenger rail
service.
6. Create bi keways/wal kways throughout
the city that connect to local and regional
recreation assets.
7. reach out to area colleges to research
and begin a free fare or reduced fare bus
program for current students.
8. Study current bus routes to determine if they
can be made more efficient through the
introduction of loops in the bus routes.
Project Location
Citywide
PVTA NETWORK CONNECTIVITY
CURRENT:
Compartmentalized isolation
based around Downtown hub
PROPOSED:
Neighborhood hubs improve
citywide connectivity
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Build on existing physical assets to celebrate Springfield’s unique
and diverse aesthetic character
Breadcrumbs:
• district 3 Meeting round 1
• district 2 Meeting round 1
• district 1 Meeting rounds 1 & 2
• Citywide Meeting round 1
• Mindmixer
• Community Center Meeting
• Housing group
• greater Springfield Convention and Visitors
bureau
• Armory Quadrangle Civic Association
• Springfield Chamber of Commerce
• Classical Condominium Association
• Wes t er n Mas s ac hus et t s ec onomi c
development Council
• Springfield Museums
• South end 8
• Springfield business improvement district
• Valley real estate
General Description
Spri ngf i el d i s host to many uni que and
i mpressi ve physi cal assets. resi dents and
visitors agree that history, architecture, an urban
core, extensive tree canopy, and exceptional
waterways are major strengths of the city.
despite having great urban character, current
i nfrastructure doesn’t al ways compl ement
physical appeal. Some of these problems are
due to the destruction caused by the tornado;
however, Springfield was in need of many of
these improvements well before June 1, 2011.
loss of tree canopy, decaying sidewalks and
streets, inadequate signage, and disconnected
consi der thi nki ng i n more depth about a
coordi nated housi ng strategy ( much l i ke
the strategy suggested in the district 2 plan
recommendation entitled “Coordinated Housing
Strategy”). While some neighborhoods have
greater need for such a strategy than other
neighborhoods, a comprehensive citywide
perspecti ve mi ght be most benefi ci al for
ensuring challenges and needs related to
housing are equitable and successfully met.
lastly, the City has recently finished a complete
modernization of the zoning ordinance. if
adopted, it will provide the City with meaningful
methods for directing and shaping development
and neighborhood character for many years
neighborhoods all contribute to the need for
more aesthetic and infrastructure improvements.
Such improvements would polish and enhance
current strengths and result in improved public
spaces, streetscapes, and overall quality-of-
life. Adding new signage, crosswalks, flower
gardens, planting trees, and new lighting can
make the physical environment more inviting and
enjoyable for people to live and visit.
Some of these i mprovements are al ready
being planned. elements of the City’s Capital
improvements plan must be more accessible
at the neighborhood level, and the community
needs to play a more active role in setting
priorities. perhaps even letting neighborhood
groups vote on prioritization of these efforts
mi ght go a l ong way toward sol i di f yi ng
the relationship between the City and its
neighborhoods and beautifying the city.
Historic structures in Springfield are community
assets well worth preserving. in addition to the
structures themselves, parks, schools, and the
urban fabric that tie them all together must be
considered when beautifying neighborhoods.
The connecti ons and transi ti ons between
neighborhoods and other physical assets, such
as rivers, parks, cultural amenities and colleges
must be enhanced. Creating gateways that
welcome everyone bring about a sense of place
and identity for those who reside in and visit
Springfield.
related to historic structures, the City might
Physical #3
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to come. it is important for the City to quickly
adopt the proposed new ordinance and to
publ i ci ze i mportant changes and benefi ts
for both neighborhoods and development
professionals.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
• Center for ecotechnology
• City of Springfield
• City of Springfield department of parks and
recreation
• HAp Housing
• Keep Springfield beautiful (KSb)
• MassdOT
• Office of Housing & Homeless Services
• Of f i ce of pl anni ng and economi c
development
• rebuilding Together Springfield
• Springfield department of public Works
• Springfield Housing Authority
• Springfield neighborhood Housing Services
• Springfield preservation Trust (SpT)
• uMass Amherst design Center
Resource Needs
1. private, State, and federal grants
2. expanded partnerships between community
organizations, the City, and real estate
developers to work towards building small,
meaningful aesthetic and infrastructure
improvements.
Potential Resource Opportunities
1. Cont i nue f or gi ng par t ner shi ps wi t h
Keep Springfield beautiful (KSb) and the
Springfield preservation Trust (SpT). These
organizations already have an active role
in the community, and the work being
accompl i shed must be i ntegrated and
made stronger for a more comprehensive
beautification process.
2. The epA urban Waters program recently
issued an rfp for grants that will fund
urban water restoration and community
revitalization. The current rfp due date will
pass by the time this plan is finished, but this
program is ongoing, and Springfield can
soon capitalize on available grant money.
http://www.epa.gov/urbanwaters/funding/
index.html
3. Massachusetts State grants: department of
Conservation and recreation and MassWorks
www.mass.gov/dcr/grants.htm
http://www.massworks.org/
4. funds for neighborhood beautification
can also be found through the federal
Highway Administration’s Transportation
enhancement Acti vi ti es. Thi s program
provides grants that pay for projects such
as surface transportation improvements,
streetscape beautification, and landscaping.
Other eligible activities include acquiring
scenic or historic easements and sites,
improving scenic or historic highways,
bui l di ng touri st wel come centers, and
conducting historic preservation.
Precedents / Best Practices
Streetscape and Sustainable Design Program
(Chicago, IL)
Chicago’s Streetscape and Sustainable design
program i s a muni ci pal program—funded
by tax-dollars—that is directed by the City’s
department of Transportation. The project’s goal
is to activate Chicago’s public spaces into areas
that encourage and benefit social interaction.
The project focuses on road diets, storm water
best management practices, green alleys, rails to
trails, and developing river walks.
Troy Architecture Program (Troy, NY)
Troy, new York created a system for selling
of tax-foreclosed properties that requires the
review of a “purchase proposal”. instead of the
property being sold to the highest bidder at the
auction, they sell based on the intended use.
This ensures that the property is integrated and
complimentary to neighborhood needs. The city
hired Troy Architecture program, a nonprofit
community design center, which worked with
the community to ensure qualified bidders.
properties are placed on a website before review
enabling easy access to acquire these properties.
in some ways, this process reflects the way
Spri ngfi el d currentl y eval uates proposal s
(based on a variety of factors, not simply price).
The city-wide planning process is organized according to the six domains of a healthy and vibrant community.
domains that are positively impacted by the initiative described on this page are indicated above.
Cultural physical economic Organizational educational Social
Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social
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Continuing to use a publicly open and inclusive
process, like the inclusion of neighborhood
stakeholders, will result in development better
suited to neighborhoods. in addition, by
publicly stating priorities for projects (such
as the clustering neighborhood commercial
establishments), the City can better direct public
and private investment.
Priority
Moderate
Action Steps
1. engage Keep Springfield beautiful and the
Springfield preservation Trust as leaders in
citywide beautification.
2. push for adoption of the proposed zoning
modernization project. in addition to many
other zoning and development benefits,
this will provide specific design standards,
i ncl udi ng standards for nei ghborhood
commercial development and other forward-
thinking development standards.
3. Tie use of grant funding to established
community priorities.
4. Consult with organizations with expertise
or resources to advise on wayfinding and
signage strategies for Springfield, such as
the pioneer Valley planning Commission.
5. identify local resources, both government
and private, for advice and expertise in
specific topic areas: tree canopy restoration,
effi ci ent and i mpactful street l i ghti ng
strategies, neighborhood connections, and
traffic-calming techniques.
6. Add new si gnage, crosswal ks, f l ower
gardens, planting trees, and new lighting
in targeted locations to make the physical
environment more inviting and enjoyable for
people to live. Some of these improvements
may already be planned.
7. Create steps for addressing appropriate
landscaping and tree planting. Mass re-leaf
is a potential source for modest matching
grants for tree planting and landscaping
(application available on www.mass.gov/dcr/
stewardship/forestry/urban/index.htm
8. publicize planned improvement projects.
gather feedback from neighborhoods about
prioritization of improvements.
Project Location
Targeted locations Citywide
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Take advantage of lessons learned from recent disasters by
emphasizing Disaster Preparedness in Springfield
Breadcrumbs
• Of f i ce of pl anni ng and economi c
development
• Springfield Museums
• district 1 Meeting round 2
• Citywide Meeting round 1
• Citywide Meeting round 2
• Office of emergency preparedness
General Description
during the community meetings following the
June 2011 tornado, many residents voiced a
need for better preparation for future disasters.
despite an excellent response to the tornado by
city departments and first responders, residents
voi ced the need for strong post-di saster
strategies that enable the city to better respond
to disasters and to communicate to residents
the processes they can expect during a disaster
recovery effort.
Springfield is lucky to have a very effective
and active Office of emergency preparedness.
ensuring safety during and immediately following
a disaster, such as knowing what residents should
plan on bringing to an emergency shelter or the
importance of safely operating backup power
generators. There are resources available
that can help individuals and families properly
prepare for a disaster.
Corporate preparedness is often best manifest as
a business Continuity plan. businesses can plan
and exercise how they can continue to operate,
even after a catastrophic event. rapid recovery
for local businesses ensures a continuance of
local revenues and helps the local community
recover faster to a strong economy.
in addition, residents, business and government
need to plan and practice to make Springfield
more disaster resistant. planning for more
open space use, i ntel l i gent pl anti ng and
trimming of trees along evacuation routes
and critical structures, careful development
and maintenance within the floodplain and
However, preparedness of City government is
only half of the disaster preparedness equation.
Just as important is ensuring that residents and
businesses are prepared for disasters at their
homes and places of business. This type of
preparedness can be broken into two categories:
1) personal preparedness and 2) Corporate
preparedness.
personal preparedness is of primary importance
for the future of Springfield. residents should
be aware of how to “shelter-in-place” and
evacuate if necessary to the nearest, designated,
safe shelter. (note: The practice of assigning
neighborhood shelters is flawed, because people
may arrive at a shelter only to find that it is closed
due to it being in the” footprint” of the disaster.
evacuees shoul d moni tor the l ocal medi a
and Springfield’s blackboard call notification
system for evacuation instructions. Contact the
Springfield office of emergency preparedness to
be placed on the instant notification link list).
being educated before disaster strikes is vital for
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The city-wide planning process is organized according to the six domains of a healthy and vibrant community.
domains that are positively impacted by the initiative described on this page are indicated above.
Cultural physical economic Organizational educational Social
Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social
purchasing insurance for structures, contents and
flooding are all examples of examples to make
Springfield and its infrastructure more disaster
resilient.
The good news is that efforts to make Springfield
better prepared are already underway. A local
emergency planning Committee (lepC) already
meets regularly in Springfield. This group is
compri sed of government representati ves
(like fire and police), but also light and heavy
industry, area hospitals, faith-based groups,
members representing accessibility interests,
and public health representatives. The group
covers disaster preparedness and response best
practices, resource needs, other educational
education, and even disaster exercise (such as
hospital evacuation procedures). They meet at
least six times per year.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
• American red Cross pioneer Valley Chapter
• baystate Health Center
• City of Springfield
• Commonwealth of Massachusetts
• Communi t y foundat i on of West er n
Massachusetts
• faith-based Organizations
• federal emergency Management Agency
(feMA)
• fire department
• Massachusetts emergency Management
Agency (MeMA)
• MassMutual
• Of f i ce of pl anni ng and economi c
development
• police department
• radio Stations
• rebuild Western Massachusetts
• Salvation Army
• Serrafix
• Spr i ngf i el d Of f i c e of emer genc y
preparedness
• united Way of the pioneer Valley
• uS department of Homeland Security (dHS)
• Western Massachusetts Homeland Security
Advisory Council
Resource Needs
1. The Spri ngf i el d Of f i ce of emergency
preparedness needs to continue to exercise
vigilance in coordinating, educating, and
i mpl ementi ng the Spri ngfi el d di saster
preparedness plan.
2. Continued commitment to the disaster
preparedness plan by city government
depar t ment s , and wi l l i ngnes s f or
participating organizations to contribute
when called upon.
3. Outreach strategi es and educati on of
residents about the important of personal
and corporate preparedness.
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Potential Resource Opportunities
1. feMA/dHS/red Cross grants
2. Outreach campaigns tied to other rebuild
Springfield plan recommendations. Other
outreach efforts can be used to publicize
di sast er r eadi ness f or f ami l i es and
businesses.
3. national disaster recovery framework
(feMA program)
4. Western Mass reAdY project. “ready”
i s nati onal publ i c servi ce adverti si ng
campaign created in 2003 to help educate
and empower citizens. it is also available
in Spanish (“listo”). it asks people to do
three things: 1) build an emergency supply
kit, 2) make a family emergency plan and
3) be informed about the different types
of emergencies that could occur and their
appropriate responses. The Western Mass
reAdY project is on local television, radio,
and even on the sides of pioneer Valley
Transit Authority buses. Springfield holds
three seats on the council, emergency
Management, Transportation and Health
Car e. The Counci l r epr esent s 101
Massachusetts cities and towns in Western
Massachusetts). http://www.ready.gov/
5. Seminars and lectures provided by the Office
of emergency preparedness to community
groups and organizations about all-hazards
preparedness.
6. A r ef er ence websi t e whi ch changes
seasonal l y to adapt to current natural
hazards:
http://www.springfieldcityhall.com/COS/
index.php?id=dept_emergency
Precedents / Best Practices
The Seattle Disaster Readiness and Responsive
Plan (Seattle, WA)
The Seattle disaster readiness and responsive
plan is a collaborative plan put together by all
citywide departments in an effort to address
disaster preparedness and recovery prior to
the disaster itself. The plan, based on State
mandate, is updated every four years to make
sure it can be used most effectively. The plan
lists the responsibilities of local government
and authorities, geography and climate patterns
that Seattle experiences, and lists services
and programs that ought to be considered by
residents in the city.
Priority
High
Action Steps
1. The Spri ngf i el d Of f i ce of emergency
preparedness should continue to use the
local emergency planning Committee (lepC)
as the primary disaster preparedness body in
the City. The lepC should be included as a
partner in the rebuild Springfield process.
2. The Office of emergency preparedness
shoul d reach out to organi zati ons i n
Spri ngf i el d to extend awareness and
educat i on of di sast er pr epar edness
resources and the importance of personal
disaster preparedness.
3. The Oep will continue to coordinate with
other city agencies and stakeholder entities
to implement the disaster preparedness plan
for the city of Springfield.
• The Tornado rebuild guide that the
City created after the June tornado
should include educational material
about disaster preparedness and other
pertinent information from the Office
of emergency preparedness. Thi s
information could be sourced from
existing resources, such as the united
Way.
• The di sast er pr epar edness pl an
should include an energy-efficiency
rebuilding checklist, perhaps created
in conjunction with Serrafix and rebuild
Western MA. The Commonwealth of
Massachusetts also has a recent program
to help disaster victims rebuild or restore
structures with energy efficient practices.
4. The Odp and to-be-i denti fi ed partner
organizations will work on formulating
an outreach strategy that will encourage
residents to read the plan and make personal
preparations for a disaster. This outreach
plan could also include communications
plans and procedures coordinated with
local media so residents are aware of how to
access information during an emergency.
5. Work with Office of planning and economic
development to formulate a recovery plan
specific to the needs of that department.
6. lastly, the Western Massachusetts and
Central region Homeland Security Advisory
Councils is currently creating an After Action
report to follow up on disaster efforts post-
disaster. This document will be available in
March of 2012, and should be taken seriously
by the Office of emergency preparedness
(which has participated extensively in the
report efforts) and the City and community
to better understand recovery efforts and
prepare for future disasters.
7. Create digital infrastructure for residents
to access immediately such as Twitter,
facebook, or smart phone application
that can communicate the nature of an
emergency and provide instruction to those
impacted.
Project Location
Citywide
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Design, develop, and operate places and spaces that are efficient
and respectful of natural and human resources
Breadcrumbs
• Mindmixer
• Of f i ce of pl anni ng and economi c
development
• district 3 Meeting round 1
• district 2 Meeting round 1
• district 1 Meeting round 1
• Citywide Meeting round 1
• Citywide Meeting round 2
General Description
Today, cities are investing in infrastructure
and technology to become more efficient in
their use of funds, energy, and human capital.
With available resources and creative thinking,
Springfield has the opportunity to reinvest in its
urban fabric—from energy efficient buildings to
improved public transportation—in a way that
will pay dividends for generations.
The City of Springfield completed an energy
Service Company (eSCO) review of all of its
properties in 2008. utility companies and the
City worked hand-in-hand and completed over
$15 million in energy upgrades saving over $1.2
million in annual energy costs in both gas and oil.
upgrades completed reduced oil consumption
from 1.4 million gallons to 450,000 gallons. This
greatly reduced the city’s carbon footprint. The
city must take action to implement the second
phase of the eSCO project which will reduce an
additional $1.0 million dollars in energy costs on
an annual basis.
The City has adopted green building practices
will involve more actively engaging business
owners in learning about existing funding and
opportunities for energy efficiency investment.
This effort will be linked with the newly minted,
“building Stretch Code” that mandates for
hi gher l evel s of energy effi ci ency i n new
construction.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
• barr foundation
• Center for ecoTechnology
• Columbia gas of Massachusetts
• Commonwealth of Massachusetts
• HAp Housing
• Of f i ce of pl anni ng and economi c
development
• partnership for Sustainable Communities
• Serrafix
• Springfield building Code enforcement
Office
• Western Massachusetts electric Company
and currently approaches all projects with the
goal of leed Silver certification. The city is
celebrating its first leed project, the White
Street fire station, which has been announced
as a recipient of leed gold Certification. The
City must do more to encourage green building
practices with among residents and businesses.
At the heart of this effort, the City must focus on
making new and existing buildings more energy
efficient and comfortable while leveraging this
process as an economic driver. This means
providing citizens with opportunities to invest
and rebuild in an energy efficient manner.
These goals serve to improve the quality of life
for all Springfield residents and make the local
economy more resilient.
residents of Springfield agree that now is the
time to rethink the way the City influences the
design of the built environment. This guidance
starts with incentivizing green practices in home
and commercial building construction and
renovation and must continue to permeate all
principles of planning the future of Springfield.
Ser r af i x—an ener gy st r at egy consul t i ng
firm that advises on smart-growth, energy
efficiency, and transportation—is working in a
foundation-supported effort with cities around
Massachusetts and, in collaboration with the
cities, utilities, and local partner organizations,
has developed a series of energy efficiency
strategies that could be adopted by Springfield
and provide realistic steps for transforming
Springfield’s built fabric. part of this work
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The city-wide planning process is organized according to the six domains of a healthy and vibrant community.
domains that are positively impacted by the initiative described on this page are indicated above.
Cultural physical economic Organizational educational Social
Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social
and northeast utilities foundation
Resource Needs
1. A leader driving the effort to reduce energy
waste.
2. energy efficiency needs to be a central
principle in reconstruction as well citywide
planning.
3. Marketing to inform business owners and
residents about energy efficiency programs
and the advantages of energy efficiency.
4. facilitation to help businesses and residents
use existing incentives; funding or financing
support in addressing currently unmet needs
5. A partnership between the City, utility
companies, and local organizations that is
focused on expanding the use of energy
efficiency incentives.
6. improved accessibility and outreach to
existing energy efficiency programs with
information available in Spanish, Vietnamese
and other languages.
Potential Resource Opportunities
1. energy efficiency strategies developed by
Serrafix.
2. The Center for ecoTechnology ecobuilding
bargains store, which sells energy-efficient
products and showcases green building
practices. The CeT building has classroom
and office space and could become a center
for businesses and residents to access
energy efficiency and clean energy services.
3. Serrafix has started to compile a list of
opportuni ti es i n Spri ngf i el d that are
currently being underutilized, such as high
levels of support from local utilities, several
local energy efficiency non-governmental
organizations, and department of energy
resources (dOer) initiatives.
4. The Spri ngfi el d Stretch energy Code
mandates new and exi sti ng structures
are built beyond State energy efficiency
requirements. When implemented, this
resource will enable the City to enforce
higher energy efficiency standards.
5. Massachusetts has the nation’s highest
level of utility company contributions to
energy efficiency funding (Columbia gas of
Massachusetts and Western Massachusetts
electric Company). These resources provide
for residential and commercial building
energy efficiency improvements.
6. Current and future local companies who
specialize in renewable energy and energy
efficient products.
7. efficiency rebate program from rebuild
Western Massachusetts: funds are available
to enable homeowners, neighbors, and
muni ci pal i ti es to do gut renovati ons,
repairs and rebuilds on the condition that
the projects use energy efficient practices
resulting in a minimum of 5% improvement.
The availability of funds is dependent on
storm damage. The program ends on the
30th of April 2012.
Mass.gov/energy/rebuildwesternma
8. ‘partnership for Sustainable Communities’
grants: Thi s program i s a j oi nt effort
by the uS department of Housing and
urban development, uS department of
Transportati on, and uS envi ronmental
protection Agency. grants are awarded
to projects that strive to reduce energy
consumption in cities and neighborhoods.
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Precedents / Best Practices
LA Commer ci al Bui l di ng Per f or mance
Partnership (Los Angeles, CA)
los Angeles, a participant in the uS department
of energy “better bui l di ngs Chal l enge, ”
has created the lA Commerci al bui l di ng
performance partnership. in coordination
with California utilities, the lACbpp assists
building owners with every aspect of the energy
upgrade process, including benchmarking
(scoring baseline energy performance), building
assessments, i ncenti ves, fi nanci ng, tenant
engagement, and measuring and verifying the
impact of energy upgrades. financing is made
available in the form of property-assessed clean
energy or “pACe” finance, which uses the
traditional betterment or special assessment
mechanism and enables building owners to
finance their share of project costs on a cashflow-
positive basis. Since June 2011, lACbpp has
initiated audits of over 25 million square feet
of commercial building space, from small
neighborhood retail establishments to downtown
skyscrapers. A similar program could be applied
across a large spectrum of businesses and
residential property owners in Springfield.
Renew Boston (Boston, MA)
renew boston is a city-led program—created
i n partnershi p wi th nati onal gri d, dOer,
Mass energy, nSTAr, next Step li vi ng,
and bostonAbCd—to l ocal i ze, enhance,
and maximize participation in utility energy
efficiency programs. in partnership with gas and
electric utilities, the City of boston has created
arrangements to serve businesses of all sizes,
landlords and homeowners. for businesses,
the green ribbon Commission engages the
largest energy users; the business organization A
better City provides one-stop service through its
Challenge for Sustainability; and the department
of neighborhood development works with small
businesses. for homeowners, the City’s website
provides an accessible portal to energy efficiency
services and additional support and incentives
are available. The City has a full-time landlord
coordinator to work with landlords. Marketing
includes use of the mayor’s “bully pulpit” and
reliance on trusted business and neighborhood
organizations to reach businesses and help them
through the energy upgrade process.

Priority
Moderate/High
Action Steps
1. The Offi ce of pl anni ng and economi c
development (Oped) and the Springfield
building Code enforcement Office should
collaborate with Serrafix, Columbia gas,
WMeCo and community stakeholders to
begin implementing the action steps listed
below. This will establish a roadmap for
Springfield to become more energy efficient
by setting goals and objectives, identifying
opportunities, recognizing potential barriers
and developing steps for action long-term.
2. establ i sh energy ef f i ci ency goal s f or
Springfield
• An achievable energy reduction Target.
• develop a system for reviewing energy
use data.
• i denti fy stakehol ders ( i nsti tuti ons,
busi nesses, and resi dents) i n the
community who are willing to take
exempl ary acti on i n reduci ng thei r
energy use.
3. develop an energy efficiency marketing/
outreach strategy
• Create a section on the Oped website
that serves as an energy efficiency
‘ cl ear i nghous e’ , whi ch i ncl udes
fact sheets, reports, best practices,
t ec hni ques , c as e s t udi es , and
underutilized funding sources.
• put together a vol unteer “green
Commission” of local business leaders to
champion green practices and enhance
public leadership.
• Offer specific consulting for business
owners who are not taking advantage
of the resources that would make their
companies more efficient and save them
money.
Source: http://www.ecobuildingbargains.org/
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• Offer or encourage training lectures,
clinics, or forums that help residents and
business owners improve their homes
and businesses. Training experiences
should be hosted in neighborhood
centers and should be publicized on the
Oped website.
• find funding and financing sources to
address gaps faced by businesses and
residents seeking to implement energy
efficiency measures.
• implement and enforce the Springfield
Stretch energy Code, and amend any
other necessary code enforcement and
programs into the citywide sustainability
roadmap.
• City should lead by example
• Work with utilities to identify energy-
savi ng opportuni ti es i n the Ci ty’ s
building portfolio.
• develop implementation plan for City-
owned buildings.
• Showcase work as part of pr program.
4. Through Oped, coordinate and collaborate
as needed with the department of energy
resources
5. develop a strategic implementation plan
with roles, coordination and communication
arrangements, and solutions to resource
needs.
6. encourage l ocal commerci al bui l di ng
owners and residents to utilize the ‘energy
Star’ monitoring program. This will system
wi l l easi l y demonstrate the success of
implementation by auditing and measuring
energy efficiency and renewable energy
investments. it is important to make sure that
the programs and practices are operating
properl y and cost-effecti vel y from the
perspective of residents and businesses, gas
and electric utilities, and other participants.
Project Location
Citywide
Source: http://www.ecobuildingbargains.org/
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Description
T h i s c o mmu n i t y s y s t e m
encompasses all of Springfield’s
cul tural assets and resources.
i ncl uded i n thi s category are
a br oad r ange of cul t ur al
spaces, artifacts, programs, and
organi zati ons rel ated to the
expressi on of i ndi vi dual and
communal values and aesthetics.
Recommendations
1. better connect the community to its cultural amenities and
assets through coordinated outreach and diverse events and arts
programming
2. Support and grow the Arts and Culture Sector through a Series of
“lighter, Quicker Cheaper” Cultural events
3. Celebrate the old and new cultural diversity of Springfield
Cultural Domain
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better connect the community to its cultural amenities and
assets through coordinated outreach and diverse events and arts
programming
Breadcrumbs
• Citywide Meeting round 1
• interview with Springfield Museums
• interview with Art for the Soul gallery
• interview with pan African Historical Museum
• Teatro Vida recommendations document
• interview with City Stage
• interview with Springfield Symphony
• interview with Springfield library
• pulse Art Space
• The Hill Art Center
• Spirit of Springfield
• Springfield business improvement district
• Citywide Meeting round 2
General Description
Springfield needs to better connect existing
and future cultural assets in Springfield with
residents and visitors. even with a rich history
and strong current cultural and arts assets, too
many residents and potential visitors are not
experiencing these assets, in part because of
a lack of awareness. Arts and culture plays a
significant role in community development,
regional attitudes, and local community pride.
Social and economic goals can also be achieved
by linking and leveraging the City’s cultural
assets.
Creating a better connection to the arts falls
on residents and the arts community. it takes
both groups to make a local arts scene thrive.
cultural and historic information and a singular
marketing vehicle. Whether all of the existing
web sites and organizational newsletters are
linked to one site, or a one-stop online website
is created to consolidate the information and
schedules of various organizations, creating
a coordi nated, acti vel y managed onl i ne
publication of arts and culture will make it easier
for residents to become aware of the offerings
in Springfield and will eliminate the need for
duplicative sources of information, thereby
saving institutional resources and streamlining
access to the arts for residents and visitors alike.
paired with better outreach, new, innovative,
and community-focused events would bridge
the perception gap between the arts and
residents. for example, neighborhood tours
of historic homes and sites that highlight
the history and culture of Springfield, as well
as art walks, history walks and food festivals
can help residents and visitors enjoy the city
and its unique story. existing tours led by the
preservation Trust, Springfield Museums, and
the Armory Quadrangle Civic Association might
be better publicized, particularly to hotel guests
and conventioneers. residents can play a role in
creating new and unique cultural offerings with
support from and in partnership with local arts
organizations.
establishing an Arts and Culture Alliance,
where local museums and theaters (and other
i nsti tuti ons) partner together to engage
residents, especially youth and ethnic groups,
might help bridge the gap between residents
and the arts.
enhancing this recommendation, we suggest
the creation of a centralized online arts and
culture-gathering place, where museums, local
cultural organizations, and artists would share
information with residents. it would also act as
a central calendar for community events and
Cultural #1
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To lead this comprehensive effort, a Cultural
Coordinating Committee comprised of arts
leaders could meet regularly with the goal of
increasing the profile of the arts in Springfield.
This group could include the Spirit of Springfield,
the Springfield business improvement district,
City Stage/Symphony Hall, the Springfield
Symphony Orchestra, Springfield Museums, and
others. The CCC would take their work a step
further and agree to partner together to engage
residents, especially youth and ethnic groups, in
current programs and create community-specific
exhibitions, concerts, and performances.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
• American international College Arts program
• bing Arts Center
• Community Music School of Springfield
• Convention Center bureau
• CreativeSpringfield
• Springfield business improvement district
• dunbar Cultural Center
• forest park Zoo
• greater Springfield Convention and Visitors
bureau
• greater Springfield Council of Churches
• HOpe (Hispanic Office of planning and
evaluation, inc.)
• indian Orchard Mills
• latino Chamber of Commerce
• latino leadership Council
• local gallerists
• Mattoon Street Historic Association
• Multicultural Community Services of the
pioneer Valley
• naismith Memorial basketball Hall of fame
• naismith Memorial basketball Hall of fame
• nehemiah Springfield
• neighborhood Councils
• puerto rican Cultural Center
• roland T. Hancock Center for Cultural
enrichment
• Spirit of Springfield
• Springfield Armor basketball Team
• Springfield boys and girls Club, inc.
• Springfield falcons Hockey Team
• Springfield partners for Community Action
• Springfield performing Arts development
Corporation
• Springfield preservation Trust
• Springfield public forum
• Springfield pulse
• Springfield School Volunteers
• Springfield Symphony Orchestra
• drama Club
• YMCA of greater Springfield
• uMass Amherst
• WgbH educational foundation

Resource Needs
1. Ti me and ef f or t commi t ment s f r om
organizations willing to participate in the
implementation of the recommendation.
2. Capitalize on local creativity as being a key
engine of defining neighborhood identity.
3. City tours to celebrate and educate people
about Springfield’s rich history, culture, and
amenities.
4. increased publicity and acknowledgment of
museum and school partnerships.
5. Additional events and festivals in downtown
and ot her nei ghbor hoods t hr ough
community support, partnering with cultural
organizations and communication with City
officials.
6. fundi ng or vol unteers to create the
messaging vehicle targeting locals and
visitors for information on cultural events,
places, news, and partnerships. This could
be a news bulletin, a local arts and culture
publication, or online source for local arts
and culture.
7. Suppor t and r ecogni t i on f r om Ci t y
government.
8. inventory of cultural and arts programs and
venues.
Potential Resource Opportunities
1. The greater Springfield Convention and
Visitors bureau’s knowledge and connections
leveraged to focus on Springfield as a
cultural hub.
2. The Make it Happen website: The Make it
Happen campaign is a positive first step
for the City of Springfield. in the works for
around two years now, the MiH effort is
The city-wide planning process is organized according to the six domains of a healthy and vibrant community.
domains that are positively impacted by the initiative described on this page are indicated above.
Cultural physical economic Organizational educational Social
Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social
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focused on collecting and actively sharing
stories and perspectives about Springfield
that publicize the many positive goings-on
in the City. users of the website can submits
media, photos, videos and stories directly to
the website. MiH could have easy and very
impactful tie-ins to arts and culture through
marketing efforts in Springfield. http://www.
makeithappencity.com
3. local residents, neighborhood councils and
civic organizations should partner with the
City and larger cultural stakeholders, such
as the Springfield Museums and Springfield
Cultural Council, to plan events and festivals.
4. Wi t h i nc r eas ed v ol unt eer i s m and
partnershi ps, the Spri ngfi el d Cul tural
Coordinating Committee can play a more
active role in the local arts community.
Appl yi ng f or gr ant s and f unds, and
connecting with sponsors can allow the
Committee to make the arts and cultural
community in Springfield more vibrant.
5. Knowledge of local museums, the naismith
Memorial basketball Hall of fame, and other
large cultural organizations of community
affairs and sponsorship opportunities.
6. national endowment for the Arts
7. Massachusetts Council on the Arts
8. private foundations
9. ensure that donations are tax deductible to
encourage corporate sponsorship
Precedents / Best Practices
WOO Card (Worcester, MA)
The Worcester Cultural Coalition’s WOO Card is
a marketing tool designed to open the door to
Worcester County’s vibrant creative community.
Cardholders receive discounts and special offers
for concerts, theater, museums, concerts, street
festivals, and outdoor adventures throughout
Worcester County, throughout the year. There
are two WOO Cards - a new card for the general
public and an ongoing program exclusive for
Worcester area college students. The WOO
card is accepted at more than fifty area arts and
culture destinations, restaurants, hotels, retailers,
transportation providers and other hospitality
oriented creative businesses. if you – register
the card you also can receive discount offers and
email notifications of additional exclusive WOO
Card specials. The WOO Card can be used to
earn WOO points which makes people eligible to
win prizes each month. WOO Cards never expire.
The cost is twenty dollars
The Worcester Cultural Coalition is the unified
voice of Worcester’s cultural community whose
members are the leaders of the City’s sixty-plus
arts and cultural institutions and organizations.
The Cultural Coalition was formed in 1999 in
partnership with the City of Worcester, Worcester
Cul tural Commi ssi on, Worcester regi onal
Chamber of Commerce, Colleges of Worcester
Consortium, and Worcester County Convention
& Visitors bureau, to ensure that arts and culture
play a vital role in Worcester’s planning and
development efforts.
The Cultural Coalition’s mission is to “draw on
Worcester’s rich and diverse cultural assets to
foster economic revitalization and create a strong
cultural identity for the City of Worcester.” The
goals are to:
• establish culture as a highly visible element
of the region’s identity.
• foster live/work/retail space, studios and
new arts facilities in available properties
throughout Worcester.
• build a strong, diverse base of support
f or cul t ur al economi c devel opment
among community, political, cultural, and
educational and leaders.
• build a strong, vibrant Cultural Coalition that
contributes to the success of its member
organizations.
h t t p : / / w w w . w o r c e s t e r m a s s . o r g /
arts-culture-entertainment/woo-card
The Chicago Cultural Alliance
The Chicago Cultural Alliance was founded in
2006 as a 501(c) 3 nonprofit organization and
consortium that links Chicago’s ethnic museums,
cultural centers, and historical societies in
an effort to build social change http://www.
chicagoculturalalliance.org/
Culture Works (Dayton, OH)
Culture Works in dayton, Ohio acts as the city
and regional organization for arts related news,
events, and community support services. They
offer a jumpstArT program to engage young
professionals, offer capacity building workshops,
and publish a quarterly magazine that highlights
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local arts organizations, art news and a calendar
of events. http://www.cultureworks.org/
The Creative Capital/WaterFire (Providence, RI)
downtown providence had a reputation of being
a dangerous place. people would even avoid
driving through that part of town at all costs.
This perception led to extreme disinvestment
from the city and many building vacancies. The
City has since rebranded itself as “The Creative
Capital” and has used its close connection to
art schools and its thriving local arts scene to
create an environment that encourages artistic
expression. Trash cans, bus stops, bike racks,
light posts, and other small infrastructure are
designed and built by local artists and arts
groups, and housing has been zoned to promote
live/work spaces and studios.
The culmination of this effort is the “Waterfire”
festival; a weekly event during the summer in
which small fires are erected on the providence
river that runs through the middle of the city.
initiated by a former student of a local university,
this program features work by local artists, food
from local restaurants, and music of local theater
companies and musicians. This event is attended
by thousands of people from around the region
and activates the entire downtown area. Through
this experience, visitors and locals alike are given
an opportunity to see the wonderful amenities
downtown providence has to offer.
http://www.providenceri.com/ArtCultureTourism
Priority:
High
Action Steps
1. leading Cultural Organizations should
contribute to the creation of the Springfield
Cultural Coordinating Committee.
2. neighborhood Councils should appoint an
Arts and Culture volunteer liaison to work
with the CCC and ensure that neighborhood
desires are heard and acted upon.
3. The gr eat er Spr i ngf i el d Counci l , i n
collaboration with other arts organizations
and media groups such as Masslive or the
Springfield republican, need to create
a one-stop-shop for cul tural and arts
information
• T h e S p r i n g f i e l d b u s i n e s s
improvement district can play a role in
communications outreach around the
arts by contacting all arts and cultural
entities in the city as it develops its new
arts calendar to help populate it with
content and make it as comprehensive as
possible.
4. The Spri ngfi el d Cul tural Coordi nati ng
Committee should establish partnerships
between l ocal busi nesses, educati onal
institutions, and art organizations to invest in
art and culture as an economic engine.
5. All Springfield arts organizations, lead by the
CCC, should engage community members,
schools, and other local groups in embracing
Springfield’s cultural assets.
• The Springfield CCC should work to
strengthen rel ati onshi ps between
cul tural organi zati ons to catal yze
engagement wi t h s c hool s and
neighborhoods.
6. residents or organizations with ideas for new
events and festivals should collaborate and
partner with larger organization for funding
and the City of Springfield for location and
permit procedures.
7. The greater Springfield Convention and
Visitors bureau should work with local tourist
organizations groups to enhance marketing
and funding efforts.
8. Act i v el y pur s ue how t he Mus eum
Quadrangle and other cultural pillars can
spread influence and awareness of culture
into the community through way finding,
community engagement, philanthropy, and
events.
9. local arts organizations should recruit
speci al i zed di r ect or s, ar t st udent s,
professional artists, and volunteers to work
with and expand the capacity of existing
missions.
Project Location
Citywide
Source: http://as220.org/~arleyrose/ladyfingers/ladiesinlove/
wp-content/uploads/2011/03/waterfire1.jpg
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Support and Grow the Arts and Culture Sector through a Series of
“Lighter, Quicker Cheaper” Cultural Events
Cultural #2
Breadcrumbs
• Springfield business improvement district
newsletter
• Make it Happen City web site
• public Space focus group Meetings and
interviews
• Citywide Meeting round 2
General Description
One of the most effective methods for attracting
new residents, businesses, and employers
to a city is by developing, supporting, and
showcasi ng a hi ghl y capabl e and robust
arts and cultural sector. in truth, Springfield
has an enormously rich collection of cultural
assets, on par with other regional centers like
Hartford and Worcester. However, the impact
of these institutions beyond their front doors,
their ability to attract new audiences and to
encourage suburban patrons to venture into City
neighborhoods, and their ability to leverage each
other’s assets (facilities, mailing lists, volunteers
etc.) is limited.
part of the probl em i s the Ci ty’ s l i mi ted
recognition of the fact that arts and culture can
turn a city around. According the to national
endowment for the Arts ( neA) , “Arts and
culture-related industries, collectively known as
“creative industries,” provide direct economic
benefits to states and communities by creating
jobs, attracting new investments, generating
tax revenues and stimulating tourism and
examples of such opportunities will be outlined
below.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
• American international College
• Art for the Soul gallery
• Artists
• business leaders
• Cambridge College
• City Stage/Symphony Hall
consumer purchases.” northampton is often
cited as an example of what can be achieved by
championing policy that values the arts as a vital
element of a community development strategy.
Currently, most local cultural organizations are
either small and struggling or well established
and worki ng hard to sustai n themsel ves.
proactive steps must be taken to foster more
cultural exposure to Springfield’s visitors and
residents. MassinC, a statewide research group,
has identified Springfield as a ‘gateway City’ -
the cultural and economic hub of its region. in a
gateway Cities report, MassinC recognizes the
strong correlation between a city’s creativity and
its economic dynamism.
City leaders need to recognize the economic
draw of a thriving local creative community. The
Chamber and other entities need to respect
and enhance the synergy among complimentary
commercial and business operations and cultural
organizations by recruiting and supporting local
businesses that serve art patrons and artists. The
Springfield CCC needs to be funded at level
that allows it to service existing cultural entities,
support new ones, and attract even more.
first and foremost, however, opportunities need
to be identified for City arts organizations to
showcase their offerings to wide audiences in
publicly accessible venues proximate to transit.
Source: http://parkingday.org/
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The city-wide planning process is organized according to the six domains of a healthy and vibrant community.
domains that are positively impacted by the initiative described on this page are indicated above.
Cultural physical economic Organizational educational Social
Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social
• developSpringfield
• downtown Arts Organizations
• Springfield business improvement district
• dunbar Culture Center
• greater Springfield Council of Churches
• HOpe (Hispanic Office of planning and
evaluation, inc.)
• latino Chamber of Commerce
• latino leadership Council
• local gallerists
• lQC Subcommittee
• Multicultural Community Services of the
pioneer Valley
• naismith Memorial basketball Hall of fame
• neighborhood Councils
• pan African Historical Museum
• partners for Community, inc.
• puerto rican Cultural Center
• pulse Art Space
• rebuild Springfield
• Spirit of Springfield
• Springfield Armor basketball Team
• Springfield boys and girls Club, inc.
• Springfield College
• Springfield falcons Hockey Team
• Springfield library
• Springfield partners for Community Action
• Springfield public forum
• Springfield School Volunteers
• Springfield Symphony
• Springfield Technical Community College
• Teatro V!da,
• The Hill Art Center
• The Springfield Museums
• The X Main Street Corporation
• The YMCA of greater Springfield
• uMass Amherst
• Western new england univeristy
• WgbH educational foundation
• YWCA of Western Massachusetts

Resource Needs
1. dedicated members of the arts and cultural
community and expanded volunteer efforts
2. federal grants: Americans for the Arts,
Communi ty devel opment bl ock grant,
national endowment for the Arts, etc.
3. lQC revolving fund: seed with corporate
sponsorship; use to collect revenue from
lQC events; and finance other lQC events
throughout the city
4. i denti f i cati on of exi sti ng sources f or
infrastructure resources (stages, lighting,
sound equipment, seating, tents, etc.)
5. Advertising and marketing of the events
through web media (revamped Springfield
business improvement district cultural
calendar)
6. On site volunteers to help out during events
Potential Resource Opportunities
1. Corporate Sponsors
2. in-kind labor and equipment donated by the
participating organizations
3. Ci ty Counci l members coul d serve as
cheerleaders for lQC events in their districts
4. Sales from concessions and admissions
(where applicable—most events are held
outdoors and are free to the public)
Precedents / Best Practices
Lighter, Quicker, Cheaper
“lighter, Quicker, Cheaper” (lQC) describes a
local development strategy that has produced
some of the world’s most successful public
spaces — a strategy that is low risk and low
cost, capitalizing on the creative energy of the
community to efficiently generate new uses and
revenue for places in transition. it’s a phrase
borrowed from eric reynolds at urban Space
Management.
lQC can take many forms, requiring varying
degrees of time, money, and effort, and the
spectrum of interventions should be seen as an
iterative means to build lasting change. Often
it starts start with Amenities and public Art
projects, followed by event and intervention
projects, which lead to light development
strategies for long-term change. by championing
use over desi gn and capi t al - i nt ensi ve
construction, lQC interventions strike a balance
between providing comfortable spaces for
people to enjoy while generating the revenue
necessary for maintenance and management.
Outcomes of lighter, Quicker Cheaper projects:
• Transformation of underused spaces into
exciting laboratories that citizens can start
using immediately and provide evidence of
real change.
• An “action planning process” that builds a
shared understanding of a place that goes
far beyond the short-term changes that are
made.
• local partnershi ps that have greater
involvement by a community and results in
more authentic places.
• encourage an iterative approach and an
opportunity to experiment, assess, and
evolve a community’s vision before launching
into major construction and a long-term
process.
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• employ a place-by-place strategy that,
over time, can transform an entire city. With
community buy-in, the lQC approach can
be implemented across multiple scales
to transform under-performi ng spaces
throughout an entire city.
eric reynolds coined the phrase “lighter,
Quicker, Cheaper” (lQC) over 40 years ago in
his work revitalizing urban spaces. A london
and new York based organization, urban Space
Management’s projects show how multi-use
public destinations can emerge out of a series of
small-scale, inexpensive improvements that occur
incrementally and encourage entrepreneurial
activity and bring out the best of a community’s
creativity.
Gabriel’s Wharf (London)
gabriel’s Wharf is an urban Space Management
intervention. by partnering with a local set
design company to create colorful facades for
the concrete garages already present on the site,
this lQC face-lift created a thriving destination
for shopping, dining and gathering in a former
parking lot.
gabriel’s Wharf was just another parking lot
until uSM embarked on a development strategy
that centered on using existing buildings (in
this case, concrete garages), employing a set
design company to create colorful facades on
the garages and then working with local artisans
and craftsmen to transform them into studios
where they could display and sell their work.
Most of what you can buy at this market is made
by the person who sells it to you. for many years,
newcastle was just another rusting steel town.
After decades of disinvestment, the downtown
was riddled with vacancies. Storefronts stood
empty, there was no life on the street and people
had few reasons to go there. There were many
legal and financial structures that provided little
incentives for landlords to rent an empty retail
space, making it hard for local entrepreneurs to
get started.
Renew Newcastle (Newcastle, UK)
One newcastle resident, Marcus Westbury,
sought to change all of that. He began a non-
profit called “renew newcastle,” which is
responsible for catalyzing the transformation of
his city’s downtown.” Westbury would be the first
to tell you he has no formal planning experience.
A self-described troublemaker, producer, geek,
and writer, he learned by doing and what he did
was light, quick and cheap. He was a festival
director and a TV producer, and uses terms like
“staging,” and “working behind the scenes”
to describe how spaces “behaved,” and what it
would take to change that condition, in order to
make it easier for creative people, who he calls
“initiativists,” to take a risk in a project.
His interventions did not alter infrastructure.
instead, changing the building’s use, not its
design, came first. renew newcastle, the
non-profit Westbury started, worked behind
the scenes to create a new legal framework
that simplified and reduced risk. in many ways,
renew newcastle “hacked the retail real estate
industry” by alleviating the liability concerns
of l andl ords. Westbury’s organi zati on got
around what Westbury called “badly designed
incentives” with “clever but legal contracts and
risk management processes.” He got to know
the intricacies of the law in his city and found
creative ways to alter the incentive structure to
encourage people to invest their own time and
talents to re-invigorate their city’s downtown. He
calls the organization “a permanent structure for
temporary things.”
To get renew newcastl e off the ground,
Westbury financed everything with his personal
credit card. by avoiding costly alterations to a
building’s structure, Westbury’s scheme was able
to cheaply and effectively incubate and kick start
many local artists and businesses.
Parking Day
pArK(ing) day is an annual, worldwide event that
invites citizens everywhere to transform metered
parking spots into temporary parks for the public
good.
Source: http://parkingday.org/
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Paris Plage
paris plage displays movable and temporary
amenities of outstanding quality and ingenious
design, ranging from floating pools to movable
hammocks. All of these amenities take 5 days
to install and 1 day to uninstall. paris plage is
intensely programmed around an annual theme,
which dictates diverse events ranging from large
concerts to small dance classes. Collectively
these programs draw over 4 million visitors to
the site annually. Shipping containers, shade
structures, and other flexible components are
used to create temporary shelters for commerce
and culture.
Cannery Row (San Francisco, CA)
San francisco’s Cannery row combines flexible,
adaptive reuse with in-depth management
and programming to become a great public
destination. Temporary public art creates a
changing identity for a space that compels return
visits.
Bryant Park (New York, NY)
lastly, the redesign of bryant park, one of ppS’s
first projects, has resulted in one of the most-
used urban parks in the world. it is the flexible
amenities that allow the space to evolve and
draw visitors again and again.
LQC Events and Interventions
Streets and sidewalks compose approximately
80% of a city’s public space. Temporary street
closures enable communities to envision new
possibilities for these often overlooked assets.
reclaimed materials can be used in reclaimed
spaces: Shipping pallets create a potluck dinner
table under a raised freeway in brooklyn, n.Y.
Creative partnerships can make a big impact.
for instance, working with a local landscape
store, a temporary park can be created in the
middle of the street at no cost.
Priority
High
Action Steps
1. Cultural organizations participating in the
public Space focus groups continue to
meet to develop the program for a february
18th Winter fest in partnership with the
Springfield business improvement district.
identify sources for additional equipment to
support this and other events.
2. A smaller subcommittee of the arts and
cultural community focus group needs
to commit to meet on a monthly basis
to continue to develop lighter, Quicker
Cheaper art programs for the city’s public
spaces.
3. The draft layout of activities and programs
developed in partnership with ppS needs
to be reviewed, revised, and shared with
potential funders and event producers.
4. The final program of events, activities,
performance and food vendors is developed
5. post evaluation of the event, revision of the
layout
6. introduction of a program of daily ongoing
events (wi-fi, vending trucks, exercise classes
etc.)
7. focus on activities for families (indoor and
outdoor)
8. Have events on the communi ty scal e:
neighborhood councils and community
groups can bring to the table their ideas
for how lQC events can take place in their
neighborhoods
9. The lQC subcommittee outlines a 6-month
or one-year schedule of meetings and events
to ensure ongoing success.
Project Location
public spaces across the City
0 1 2
Note: The locations demarcated on
this map are intended to express the
extent of LQC activities throughout
the city. Events will be chosen by
the community.
Miles
LQC ACTIVITIES IN THE
SPRINGFIELD COMMUNITY
Source: http://www.wayfaring.info
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Celebrate the old and new cultural diversity of Springfield
Cultural #3
Breadcrumbs
• latino community
• district 1 Meeting round 2
• Citywide Meeting round 1
• interview with Springfield Museums
• business forum
• Teatro Vida
• Citywide Meeting round 2
General Description
The cultural traditions of the city’s varied
ethnicities, including African American, latino/
Hispanic, Vietnamese, irish, greek, and italian,
combined with their rich cultural and innovative
history and connections to Springfield, can both
be leveraged to celebrate both the old and new
cultural diversity that Springfield has to offer.
better acknowledging the city’s historic cultural
assets while celebrating Springfield’s newer
diversity can play a critical role in injecting
fused and widely experienced by residents and
visitors alike.
part of implementing this recommendation
might include a wider and more thorough public
art effort. for example, a City mural program,
which could possibly be funded by Cdbg
monies, could not only change perception of
the community, but could celebrate the many
cultures that make up the fabric of Springfield
whi l e publ i ci zi ng Spri ngfi el d’ s hi story of
innovation and entrepreneurship in others.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
• baystate Health
• Creative Springfield
• dream Studio, inc.
• dunbar Culture Center
• forest park Zoo
• Hoop City Jazz festival
life into the cultural landscape of the region.
beginning with a strong foundation of cultural
events and services and incorporating awareness
through targeted outreach programs wi l l
allow Springfield’s cultural institutions and
organizations to reach deeper into the daily lives
of residents, young, old and from all walks of life.
by making a more conscious effort to publicize
existing events and celebrate the city’s unique
history and creating new cultural offerings that
respond to Springfield’s new ethnic landscape,
residents of the city will become not only more
culturally active and aware, but better connected
to one another as understanding and engaged
neighbors. At its core, this recommendation
is focused not only on connecting cultural
stakeholders from different walks of life, but
helping them to realize that arts and culture
in Springfield is not a zero-sum game, that
Springfield’s history and new culture can be
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• HOpe (Hispanic Office of planning and
evaluation, inc.)
• italian Cultural Center
• JelupA productions, inc.
• John boyle O’reilly Club
• latino Chamber of Commerce
• latino leadership Council
• naismith Memorial basketball Hall of fame
• neighborhood Councils
• puerto rican Cultural Center
• Spirit of Springfield
• Spr i ngf i el d Counci l f or Cul t ur al and
Community Affairs
• Springfield Cultural Coordinating Committee
• Springfield Museums
• Springfield public forum
• Springfield Technical Community College
diversity Council
• Stone Soul festival
• Vietnamese-American Civic Association
• Wor l d Af f ai r s Counci l of Wes t er n
Massachusetts, inc.
• YMCA of greater Springfield
• YWCA of Western Massachusetts
Resource Needs
1. St r ong i mpl ement at i on l eader or
organization to develop new relationships
and lines of communications across ethnic
boundaries A percentage of the arts rOi
from new events could be used help fund
this work.
2. Creation of an effective outreach program
for cultural events and festivals.
3. Monitoring of coordinated efforts to increase
multicultural participation and education in
the arts.
4. enable use of public spaces.
5. free or low cost retail storefronts and space
in cooperation with property owners.
Potential Resource Opportunities
1. City Councilors
2. neighborhood Councils
3. existing and new cultural leaders
4. Schools and Colleges
5. business owners
6. Spr i ngf i el d Counci l f or Cul t ur al and
Community Affairs
The city-wide planning process is organized according to the six domains of a healthy and vibrant community.
domains that are positively impacted by the initiative described on this page are indicated above.
Cultural physical economic Organizational educational Social
Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social
Source: http://www.teatrovida.com/photo-gallery.html
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Precedents / Best Practices
Two Islands Festival (Holyoke, MA)
This was an event that used to be held in the past
by Holyoke dedicated to bringing together irish
and puerto rican food, music, dance, and crafts.
Multi-Cultural Tourism (Worcester, MA)
nearby Worcester plays host to a number of
varied arts and cultural events, including first
night Worcester, Worcester County St. patrick’s
day parade, a latino film festival, an irish Music
festival, the African American and Juneteenth
festival, the latin American festival, the Asian
festival, an Albanian festival, a greek festival,
and a gay pride festival.
El Museo del Barrio (New York, NY)
el Museo’s annual Cultural Celebrations are
colorful expressions of their commitment to
celebrating latino culture. Throughout the year,
these unique events offer fun and meaningful
latino cultural experiences for people of all ages.
Jacobs Center for Neighborhood Innovation
(San Diego, CA)
every month, beginning in April and running
through September, a di fferent cul ture i s
celebrated in The Village with traditions, music,
food, and art. in October, all the cultures come
together in a culminating extravaganza called
The Arts & Culture fest. This exciting event
includes cross-cultural education and sharing,
cultural workshops, fine art displays and art
workshops, entertainment, and an international
Market alongside a children’s activity zone and
community resource booths. Activities are spread
from the Market Creek plaza Amphitheater to
festival park with its eight authentic cultural
houses and across Chollas Creek to the indoor
and outdoor venues of the new Joe & Vi Jacobs
Center. Visit www.ArtsandCulturefest.com to
learn more.
LEAF (Asheville, NC)
The program’s objective is to build community
and enrich lives through the Arts with festivals,
community events, and arts education programs.
Priority
Moderate
Action Steps
1. Highlight and promote existing cultural
programs, f esti val s, and/or events i n
Springfield through multiple channels,
i ncl udi ng newer di gi tal channel s l i ke
facebook and the web, and make special
efforts to advertise through all Springfield
publications, such as the Advocate, business
West, and the many other Spri ngfi el d
publications.
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2. Connect and coordinate cultural groups.
3. establish/recognize bilingual services for
promotion and marketing of lQC events.
4. Make a speci al effort to i nvol ve and
encourage the support and involvement of
diverse Springfield residents and stakeholder
to creatively brainstorm new cultural events
and promotions that respond to the myriad
cultures and ethnicities of the city.
5. find funders and other partners to help
spread effectiveness of lighter, Quicker
Cheaper events.
6. Think creatively, beyond festivals, via unique
business / educational lQC partnerships.
Project Location
Citywide
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Description
This category encompasses the
Spri ngfi el d’s soci al resources,
wh e r e s oc i a l s pa c e s a n d
programs developed largely by
governmental and not-for-profit
entities support the variety of the
health and human assets needed
to maintain a healthy community
infrastructure. included in this
domain are programs involving
a wide range of social services,
housing, justice, and healthcare.
Recommendations
1. improve the reality and perception of public Safety in Springfield
2. Attract a vibrant and youthful population to be stewards of
Springfield
3. improve landowner, landlord oversight
4. provide health and wellness services on a community scale
5. provide equal access to a variety of housing options
Social Domain
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Improve the reality and perception of public safety in Springfield
Breadcrumbs
• district 3 Meeting round 1
• district 2 Meeting round 1
• district 1 Meeting round 2
• Citywide Meeting round 1
• Citywide Meeting round 2
• interview with Armory Quadrangle Civic
Association
• interview with Convention and Visitors
bureau
• interview with American international College
General Description
There is a direct and intrinsic link between the
health of the City’s cultural, economic and social
development and public safety. This relationship
is often adversely influenced not only by the
reality of crime, but by the perception of crime.
Since 1990, the Springfield police department
has relied on the tenets of “Community policing”
as an effective public safety model. Community
pol i ci ng i s a phi l osophy t hat pr omot es
organizational strategies. Community policing
encourages the systematic use of partnerships
and problem-solving techniques to proactively
address the immediate conditions that give
rise to public safety issues such as crime, social
disorder, and fear of crime.
Over the past decade, national studies in law
enforcement engagement techniques have
Moder n- day Communi t y pol i ci ng must
coordinate and synchronize strategies with the
expertise and the resources of other community
and government agencies to be effective and
resolve neighborhood problems. fundamental
causes and conditions that create community
problems are many and complex; therefore,
sustainable results are only achieved through
effective communication, collaboration at all
levels and a unwavering resolve to effect change.
C³ policing is focused on denying, disrupting,
and degrading the operational capabilities
of gangs and cri mi nal acti vi ty associ ated
to or linked with gangs and violent crime.
undermining the capability of gangs to operate
freely and openly within the community is a large
part of the strategy. The goal of C³ policing is
to provide effective governance through local
government agencies to the community and a
safe and secure environment through the rule of
law.
As a result of the initiative’s initial success,
t he Spr i ngf i el d pol i ce depar t ment and
Massachusetts State police will replicate this
proven strategy in neighborhoods across the City
that demonstrate the most need and are most
affected by the presence of violent crime and
disorder.
evolved beyond the original tenets of community
policing to respond to new law enforcement
chal l enges , ever evol vi ng communi t y
expectations, and declining resources.
The Springfield police department has met this
challenge as evidenced by the development
and implementation of the brightwood C³
community policing model. C³ stands for
“Counter Criminal Continuum (C³) policing, also
referred to as the (COin) policing model. C³ is
a collaborative effort between the Springfield
police department, and the Massachusetts State
police to use the weight and resources of the
entire criminal justice system to address elevated
incidents of crime and disorder. A significant
component of this strategy includes community
organization, partnership and ownership in
problem identification, program plan strategy
and measurement of success.
law enforcement officials involved in C³ indicate
that whi l e there are both si mi l ari ti es and
differences between the community-oriented
policing, C³ policing is designed to complement
the methodologies of community-oriented
and intelligence-led policing (ilp). C³ is most
effective in addressing gang and criminal activity
in specific geographical areas of high crime
activity. The C³ strategy is viewed as the “sweet
spot” where community policing, intelligence-led
policing, and COin intersect.
Social #1
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On-going Effort
The Spr i ngf i el d pol i ce depar t ment has
organized and administered beat Management
neighborhood Meetings since the inception of
Community policing. As resources in support
of Communi ty pol i ci ng dwi ndl ed, Sector
Community policing offices were closed across
the city. Officers assigned to those offices
were reintroduced into the uniform ranks as the
number of funded officer positions decreased
from one fiscal year to the next. eventually,
Community policing as originally instituted
as a specialty response gradually became a
department-wide philosophy.
The Springfield police department has retained
one of the principle tenants of Community
policing, beat Management neighborhood
meetings, despite a sharp decline in funding.
Sector beat Management Team meetings will
continue in every city neighborhood throughout
the City. Through this important partnership, the
Springfield police department maintains a critical
link to committed, savvy neighborhood groups,
who constructively communicate their needs and
concerns to the police. The need to build upon
these long-standing relationships is critical. The
C-3 policing strategy supports this need.
As demonstrated l ocal l y and across the
country, by linking modern policing practices
to economic, social and cultural development,
communities have been able to take a holistic
approach to nei ghborhood revi tal i zati on,
building homes and neighborhood hubs where
problematic properties had once been. Success
can only be achieved if police/community
relations include co-ownership of the issues and
a meaningful collaboration to address crime and
disorder.
Partnerships/Stakeholders
• City Council
• Community Safety initiative
• department of Health and Human Services
• developSpringfield
• faith-based Organizations
• Hampden County district Attorney
• Hampden County Sheriff
• Homeowners
• Massachusetts executive Office of public
Safety and Security
• Mayor
• Media Organizations
• neighborhood Councils
• Springfield Chamber of Commerce
• Springfield police Commissioner
• Springfield police department
• Springfield public Schools
• S p r i n g f i e l d Y o u t h Co mmi s s i o n
(reestablished)
• u.S. Attorney’s Office
• uS department of Justice
Resource Needs
1. A “Safe Community Consortium”, comprised
of law enforcement, community leaders,
property owners, developers and other
identified stakeholders. This should also
include the creation of a steering committee
with independent representatives.
2. i ncr eased resour ces f or cr i me dat a
collection, analysis, and distribution.
• data Mapping
• Community-based data distribution
3. resources for enhanced, directed police
distribution.
4. greater interaction between police and
neighborhoods on broader quality of life
issues.
5. increased resources and training for police –
Community relations.
Potential Resource Opportunities
1. uni ted States department of Justi ce
Community Oriented policing Strategies
(COpS)
2. national network for Safe Communities
(nnSC)
Precedents/Best Practices
Over-the-Rhi ne Chamber of Commerce:
Community Safety Sector Meetings
1. Over-the-rhine Chamber of Commerce:
Community Safety Sector Meetings
• Over-the-rhine is divided into Safety
Sectors that have been organized to
reach out and engage residents and
business in the safety and cleanliness of
their neighborhood. With monthly sector
The city-wide planning process is organized according to the six domains of a healthy and vibrant community.
domains that are positively impacted by the initiative described on this page are indicated above.
Cultural physical economic Organizational educational Social
Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social
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meetings that are convened by the OTr
Chamber and attended by Cincinnati
police, residents and businesses, all
members of the community can stay
informed and involved.
2. Several diversified initiatives of the Over-
the-rhine Chamber Clean and Safe program
encourage a Safe and Clean community:
• OTr Community Safe and Clean Sector
Meetings (Outreach):
• Washington park/Art Academy,
brewery district & findlay
Market, Main, Mulberry &
McMicken, pendleton Sectors
• Safe and Clean grants in coordination
with Keep Cincinnati beautiful, Anderson
foundation, private grants and more.
• Safe and Clean Marketing initiatives
• Weed and Seed initiatives
• no Trespass Sign program
• Hot Spots program
• drug and gun elimination program
3. Over-the-rhine Community Safety Sector
Meetings (Outreach)
• Monthly Safety Sector Meetings for each
safety sector (four)
• Mini Seminars such as Court Watch
program, litter prevention, Terrorist
Awareness, blight index, Community
police partnering, and projects within
Sectors
• An active partnership with the Cincinnati
police department (law enforcement)
• partnership with business, residents,
property owners
• par t ner shi p wi t h Keep Ci nci nnat i
beautiful/City Services
• A channel of communications among
stakeholders
• builds trust between community and law
enforcement
• Community working together
• Community Court Watch
• Civic involvement
• City of Cincinnati Clean and Safe grant
implementation
• Supports great American Clean up
• Support Community problem-Oriented
policing (CpOp)
• Support Citizens on patrol (COp)
• enhances and coordinates clean-up
efforts
• raise the level of citizen and community
involvement in crime prevention
• increase level of citizen and community
involvement in intervention activities
• enhance the level of community security.
Operation Ceasefire (Boston, MA; 1995)
Operation Ceasefire was aimed at preventing
and cont r ol l i ng ser i ous yout h vi ol ence
by i mpl ement i ng a f ocused- det er r ence
strategy. The Ceasefire Working group was a
collaborative effort between the boston police
department (bpd), federal and state prosecutors,
academic research partners, social service
providers, street outreach workers attached to
the boston Community Centers program, and
members of the Ten point Coalition, a group of
activist black clergy.
The program was centered on a direct outreach
with gangs; telling members that violence
would no longer be tolerated and backing that
message with every available legal hindrance
to gang members in response to shootings. To
reinforce the message, Youth Violence Strike
force (YVSf) officers, probation officers, and
street outreach workers told gang members
directly why they had attracted law enforcement
attention and what it would take to make it stop.
in the Operation’s first trial, their actions reduced
the target neighborhood’s street drug trade by
close to 80 percent. probationers were closely
monitored day and night, and, as a new tactic,
probation officers visited the gang-member’s
parents. Meanwhile, YVSf and probation officers
persistently communicated to gang members
that it was their violence that had drawn the
attention. Within a few months, territory was
quiet.
When a gang appeared to be on the brink
of t r oubl e or vi ol ence occur r ed, YVSf
and probati on of f i cers vi si ted key gang
representatives and warned them that law
enforcement focus was firmly on them. in every
instance, the trouble stopped.
Wi th more troubl esome gangs, the bpd
arrested key members on any charge they could
conjure, and this crackdown would followed
up with various direct and indirect forms of
communication to ensure that other street
groups understood exactly what had happened.
Once a particular gang feud was calmed, gang
members were told that enforcement would be
reduced but would return if violence resurged.
eventually, Operation Ceasefire was being
implemented throughout boston.
A u.S. department of Justice study of the
program found that youth violence in boston
fell by two-thirds citywide in the 2 years after
the strategy was first implemented. Crime data
indicate that boston maintained this low level
for 5 years until the strategy was dismantled with
the appointment of a new police chief. Crime
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rates climbed once again and the program was
reinstituted.
Olneyville (Providence, RI; 2000s)
Olneyville was suffering from the issues that have
plagued many northeastern cities. in the mid-
19th Century, Olneyville was a manufacturing
powerhouse: the Woonasquatucket ri ver
was lined with factories, and neighboring
providence was home to some of the country’s
richest entrepreneurs. Since World War ii ,
the manufacturing industry in the city steadily
declined, and the Olneyville was struck with
divestment, unemployment, and blight. Modern,
inner-city problems surfaced in the mid-1980s.
Olneyville’s housing stock was “overcrowded”;
there was a language barrier brought on by
demographic changes; there was concentrated
violent crime and illicit activity. More specifically,
three properties stood out as being detrimental
to the neighborhood as epicenters of drug use,
prostitution, and violence.
Through the rhode island local initiatives
Support Corporation’s coordination, community
groups, housing corporations, and the police
department were able to attack these issues
collaboratively.
The providence police department and the
Olneyville Housing Corporation (OHC) worked
together to pinpoint the areas where urban
revitalization would have the greatest benefit
to public safety. in this case, the OHC acquired
the three “menace” properties, as well as other
vacant land in “troubled” areas and replaced
these detracting parcels with quality, affordable
housing. Simultaneously, the institute for Study
& practice for nonviolence teamed up with
the ppd to create a “Streetworkers” program.
These “Streetworkers”, who included former
gang members, engaged youth, mediated gang
disputes, taught nonviolence, and reconnected
youth to their families and schools.
This program resulted in 51 new homes and a
70% reduction in crime in the target area.
Priority
urgent
Action Steps
1. The Springfield police department (Spd)
will participate in the creation of a “Safe
neighborhood Consortium” (SnC), which
wi l l have contri buti ng members from
neighborhood councils, community groups,
business and property owners, residents, and
developers. All members will be volunteers.
2. The SnC will reach out to law enforcement
officials in boston and providence to discuss
the successful strategies in their cities.
3. The Spd wi l l eval uate the vi abi l i ty of
instituting similar programs in Springfield
with cooperation from local community
groups and developers.
4. The SnC will work to obtain grant funding for
data collection and analysis.
5. Appr oved dat a wi l l be di st r i but ed
with a media and marketing campaign
demonstrating the city’s safety.
6. The SnC will help coordinate ongoing
strategies of the beat and Sector meetings
and neighborhood Watch. The SnC will host
outreach events in community to educate
concerned citizens as to the existence
and worthiness of the beat Management
neighborhood Meetings. Historically, beat
Management neighborhood meetings have
been the venue for residents to personally
voice their concerns to law enforcement,
meet the policemen and officials in charge
of their neighborhood, and petition for
new strategies and targeted development
projects to curb concentrated criminal
activity. SnC will assist in evaluating the
effectiveness of the beat Management
neighborhood Meetings to foster effective,
effi ci ent and meani ngful col l aborati on
between the police department and the
community.
7. The SnC wi l l wor k wi t h communi t y
stakeholders to expand evidence based
programming rooted in the philosophy of
community-policing. SnC will coordinate
community support for those neighborhoods
selected for the C3 policing initiative.
These efforts must have robust links and
communication with the Spd, which will offer
assistance in training and strategy.
8. The SnC will collaborate with non-profits
and service providers who specialize in drug
addiction to develop a coordinated effort to
combat drug use. Coordination will include
participation from the Springfield police
department in the development of strategy
that concentrates on reducing demand for
drugs as well as reducing supply.
par t i ci pat i on by t he Spr i ngf i el d pol i ce
department is contingent upon the ability to
meet core service delivery needs. This includes,
but is not limited to, increased call volume, surge
events, and availability of financial resources and
staffing.

Project Location
Citywide
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Attract a vibrant and youthful population to be stewards of
Springfield
Breadcrumbs:
• district 1 Meeting round 1
• district 2 Meeting round 1
• district 3 Meeting round 1
• Citywide Meeting rounds 1 & 2
• YpS (Young professionals Society of greater
Springfield)
• business forum
General Description
Springfield needs to work at drawing in new and
retaining current young residents and families.
These younger professionals infuse the city with
vitality and energy. They also possess a sense
of ownership in Springfield’s future and work to
make it a better place to live; they are the City’s
future homeowners and community leaders. each
young and enthusiastic homeowner who chooses
to move to or stay in Springfield is making an
investment in the city.
Whi l e contri buti ng a revi tal i zi ng energy
to the city, youthful citizens can also add
economic dynamism. As champions of the
“Knowledge economy”, young people are
using their creativity in social entrepreneurship,
e-commerce, and collaborative partnerships.
increasing this population—and bringing into the
fold existing younger residents—in Springfield
would increase the number of new businesses,
cultivate innovation, provide existing businesses
with talented workers, and attract interest from
encour agi ng young peopl e t o move t o
Spri ngfi el d i s a matter of enhanci ng and
publicizing characteristics that the city already
has: affordability, historic and attractive building
stock ( especi al l y i n the downtown area) ,
walkability, abundant cultural amenities, and
other magnets for younger residents.
investors who want to tap into the city’s energy.
The City must also provide reciprocal economic
opportunities, encouraging younger residents
to move to Springfield or to stay in town after
graduating college.
Social #2
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Cities across the country have tried to harness
the power and vitality of young people through
marketing and branding efforts funneled through
social media networks. These efforts are often
tied to incentives that make moving to or staying
in the city financially beneficial. With similar
programs, Springfield could be more successful
at attracting and retaining a vibrant young
community that would act as stewards of the city.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
• Art galleries
• Community Music School of Springfield
• developSpringfield
• drama Studio
• ethnic restaurants
• JelupA productions
• Marketing partnership
• Mass Mentoring partnership
• Multicultural Community Services of the
pioneer Valley, inc.
• naismith Memorial basketball Hall of fame
• partners for a Healthier Community, inc.
• partners for Community, inc.
• performance project, inc.,
• public forums
• puerto rican Cultural Center
• roland T. Hancock Center for Cultural
enrichment
• Springfield Chamber of Commerce
• Springfield Colleges group
• Springfield performing Arts development
Corp.
• Springfield Symphony Orchestra
• Springfield Young professional Society
• S p r i n g f i e l d Y o u t h Co mmi s s i o n
(reestablished)
• Stone Soul, inc.
• united Way of pioneer Valley
• Visitor and Convention bureau
• Young leaders
Resource Needs
1. expand awareness and networking onto
Springfield’s college campuses
2. A dynamic and eye-catching branding effort
for the city that will appeal to creative,
younger audiences.
3. Yout h par t ner s hi ps wi t h Cul t ur al
organizations (hold fundraisers and group
meetings on college campuses, etc.)
4. A pipeline between colleges and local
business; give recent graduates a reason to
stay in town
5. Spri ngf i el d Youth Commi ssi on needs
to be reestablished to act as a conduit
between City government and the younger
populations of Springfield
6. Housing incentives for young professionals
7. improved transportation network
The city-wide planning process is organized according to the six domains of a healthy and vibrant community.
domains that are positively impacted by the initiative described on this page are indicated above.
Cultural physical economic Organizational educational Social
Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social
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Potential Resource Opportunities
1. Historic Tax Credit: housing built from
rehabi l i tated hi stori c bui l di ngs i s very
attractive to creative you professionals.
2. Housing incentives for Young professionals
3. neA grants
4. Hud/epA/doT grants: to build Sustainable
Communities, which have characteristics that
are attractive to younger people
5. private foundation grants
Precedents / Best Practices
PlayhouseSquare (Cleveland, OH)
nine young men and women with a desire
to support playhouseSquare and its historic
theaters formed one of the longest-standing
young professionals organizations in northeast
Ohio, playhouseSquare partners in 1991. The
only young professionals group of its kind in
the performing arts industry, partners members
experience theater events and more – social and
fundraising events, networking opportunities and
leadership development. each year, the partners
host one of Cleveland’s biggest and best parties,
the Jump back ball. in addition, partners make it
possible for school children to take field trips to
playhouseSquare by raising transportation dollars
for the bus Subsidy fund.
The Young Professi onal s Associ ati on of
Louisville (Louisville, KY)
The Young professionals Association of louisville
(YpAl) has continued to connect, develop,
and engage louisville’s growing population of
young professionals. from networking events
to happy hours to meet and greet sessions with
major louisville decision-makers, YpAl is an
ideal place for young professionals to develop
themselves professionally, socially, and civically.
With committees in Community Outreach,
professional development, Communications,
Technology, recruitment, public issues, diversity,
entertainment, and more, there are countless
ways to use your strengths and interests to
help YpAl achieve its mission and to help
make louisville a better place for the leaders of
tomorrow.
AS220 (Providence, RI)
Art Space 220 (AS220) is the organization
emblematic of providence’s push to become
“Creati ve Capi tal ” of the northeast. The
organization, which is both grant-funded and
generates its own revenue, provides local
artists with studios, gallery space, performance
venues, and holds several community outreach
events that are intended to retain the creative
members of the city and center their activities
on the city’s downtown. With significant support
from the city, AS220 has been able to enrich a
thriving art scene and provide a focal point for
art-related activities in providence. The city’s
“Creative Capital” initiative has been led by a
robust marketing campaign as well as a series
of zoning amendments that have enabled artists
to move into the downtown as well as adjoining
neighborhoods. AS220 serves as a physical
manifestation of this effort.
http://as220.org/front/
Priority
High
Action Steps
1. The “Social domain” working group will
establish a set of short- and mid-term
goal s for the i mpl ementati on for thi s
recommendation.
2. leaders of the implementation of thi s
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recommendation should look to the example
of providence, ri to see which policies have
been especially effective in attracting and
maintaining a young and vibrant population.
3. Springfield should allow for mixed-use and
live-work zoning to diversify housing portfolio
• publicize the current MA State Historic
rehabilitation Tax Credit in the city,
which provides 20% of the historic
rehabilitation cost.
• http://www.sec.state.ma.us/mhc/mhctax/
taxidx.htm
• This incentive will encourage developers
to take the beautiful historic building
stock of Springfield and revitalize it
into lofts, live-work spaces, and other
devel opments that attract young,
creative-minded people.
• The Commonwealth of Massachusetts
offers several first-Time Homebuyer
Assistance programs that help with
down payments, i nterest, and l oan
procurement.
http://www.massbuyeragents.com/buyer_
broker/1st_ti me_massachusetts_home_
buyers.htm
4. Hold a competition with local designers to
develop a branding effort for the city
• Create a new logo
• redesign the city’s website
5. revive the Springfield Youth Commission
and expand its focus to act as an outreach
system for fielding the needs of the youth in
Springfield and lobby for those needs within
the City government.
Project Location
Citywide
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Improve land owner and landlord oversight
General Description
Spri ngfi el d’s core nei ghborhoods i ncl ude
an aged housing stock, and a great deal of
this stock is subject to deferred maintenance
and is used for rental housing. The decline
in real estate values in the past few years has
exacerbated problems with these properties
as the costs of rehabilitation exceed property
val ues. Si mi l ar l y, r ent s ar e unl i kel y t o
cover ongoing property management and
maintenance costs. A combination of incentives
(including funding) and enforcement are needed
to spur improved conditions in these properties.
in addition, tenants need to be aware of the fact
that there are safeguards in place to make sure
that their residence is up to basic standards
of habitability. The City must think creatively
and collaboratively about interpreting and
distributing the established tenant’s rights in
layman’s terms and in other languages, such as
Spanish and Vietnamese. in addition, a shorter
document more tailored to Springfield might be
more helpful.
in conjunction with educational outreach, a
comprehensive structure must be established
to maintain accountability among landlords
and landowners. landlords might be required
to register with a database that is held by the
City, and landlords who are not in compliance
with standards will face repercussions. The City
to their properties for the benefit of renters
and neighborhoods, but lack the necessary
resources to make improvements. As part of this
recommendation, the City should identify and
seek out available financing and other creative
resources, perhaps by starting with conversations
with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
• HAp Housing
• City of Springfield building Commissioner
• Community groups
• Hampden County Housing Court
• Major multi-family housing owners
• Massachusetts department of Housing and
Community development
• Massachusetts real estate and Apartment
Owners Association
• Office of procurement
• rental Housing Association of greater
Springfield
• Springfield Housing Authority
• Springfield neighborhood Housing Services,
inc.
• Springfield Office of Housing
• Springfield partners for Community Action
Resource Needs
1. More resources to enforce the bl i ght
ordi nance, sani tary code, and zoni ng
ordinance either through new income or the
reassessment of City allocations.
Council has attempted several times to enact
a program of this type in the past, to no avail.
There were not sufficient resources to make
it possible. A partnership between the City
government and local volunteers could help
mitigate the expenses of such a program.
Many of the current problems in the city, such as
blight, abandoned housing, overgrowth, debris,
illegal junkyards or illegal use of properties, are
amply covered by city ordinances or state-wide
codes. However, after inspection, shortfalls in city
resources can cause case backlogs. This backlog
has not been caused by the tornado, but it was
certainly made worse by the tornado and the
resulting need to bring hundreds of new cases
and the need to spread resources even thinner
to interface with the State, feMA, an other
agencies.
not only can property neglect be detrimental
to the lives of tenants, but it also can severely
impact the value of surrounding homes and
property and the perception of residents and
visitors and even become a drain on public
resources. led by or in conjunction with the
community, property oversight efforts can
empower residents to improve the value of their
own home and neighborhood.
from the other perspective, some landlords may
be very willing to make upgrades and changes
Social #3
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2. Transl ati on and di ssemi nati on of the
Attorney general’s guide to landlord/
Tenant rights in a format that is clearer and
understandable. This task can be taken on
through the collaboration of HAp Housing,
local law students, local graphic design
students, and a Hispanic/latino community
group, as well as any other community group
who wishes to translate this work into their
native tongue.
3. A mandatory landlord registration program
that requi res al l l andl ords to provi de
emergency contact, property manager
i nformati on, i nsurance, and any other
information necessary to enforce tenant’s
rights.
4. A neighborhood-scale property-owner-
reporting program that requires complaints
to be filtered at the neighborhood level.
This step will concentrate City enforcement
ef f or t s on pr obl ems of t he hi ghest
neighborhood priority.
5. landlords need to have access to a grant
program that will assist in the rehabilitation
of their properties. At the moment it is
financially infeasible and often impossible
f or l andl ords to make the necessary
improvements to bring their properties up to
code.
Potential Resource Opportunities
1. Hud grants
2. local law and design schools
3. Multi-cultural neighborhood groups
4. The City currently has a blight ordinance,
sanitary code, and zoning ordinance, as well
as a new foreclosure ordinance, which is
being challenged in court.

Precedents / Best Practices
Landlord Registry (Troy, NY)
Troy City Council of new York passed the
landlord registry law that requires absentee
landlords - anyone that does not live in the
bui l di ng they own - to submi t a l andl ord
registration form. This form contains all data
pertinent to both the owner and the property,
including the owner’s full contact information.
The landlord registry is the first phase of a multi-
phase project to combat negligent absentee
landlords and neighborhood blight.
The city-wide planning process is organized according to the six domains of a healthy and vibrant community.
domains that are positively impacted by the initiative described on this page are indicated above.
Cultural physical economic Organizational educational Social
Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social
Source: http://troyny.gov/landlordregistration.html
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Code Enforcement Program (County of Santa
Barbara, CA)
The County of Santa barbara, CA has a
“reactive, complaint-driven program” that
empowers the citizens of the city to report
code violations. residents are responsible for
providing their name and address along with a
complaint. Should a violation be an immanent
threat to health or habitat, immediate action is
taken, otherwise, a code enforcement officer
investigates the complaint and then decides
the course of action. This program increases
responsiveness to neighborhood needs and
improves efficiency in City resource allocation.
http://www.sbcountyplanning.org/enforcement/
index.cfm
Tenant’s Rights Flash Cards (New York)
new Orleans-based design firm Civic Center
[civiccenter.cc] worked in collaboration with the
new York-based non-profit organization Tenants
& neighbors to develop a series of “Tenant’s
rights flash Cards” for the State of new York.
These flash cards provide tenants with an
understandable series of graphics and language
that make the State’s bill of Tenant’s rights
more accessible. unfortunately, these flash cards
are only available for purchase online for $10. A
similar program in Springfield should consider
making this information free.
Priority
High
Action Steps
1. Communicate with landlords and building
owners to better understand their needs
and challenges for property improvement.
research and solicit grants for property
improvement.
2. The City Council will draft legislation that
establishes mandatory landlord registration.
• landlords will be required to submit and
keep up to date all information needed
to enforce tenant’s rights
• The ordinance will include regulations
and penalties for absentee landlords.
3. Simultaneously, neighborhood groups will be
enlisted with the task of reporting landowner
negligence. This process will be facilitated
by HAp inc., which will appoint volunteer
neighborhood Captains.
• neighborhood participants will form a
volunteer property Owner Compliance
board, l ed by the nei ghborhood
Captain, to field complaints from their
area and communicate priorities to the
Springfield Office of Housing.
4. HAp Housing will collaborate with local law
students, local graphic design students,
and a Hispanic/latino community group to
develop a means of conveying tenant’s rights
simply in english as well as in Spanish.
• The result of this project will then be
distributed through community centers
throughout the city.
Project Location
Citywide
Source: http://candychang.com/tenants-rights-flash-cards/
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Increase Access to Health and Wellness Services
breadcrumbs:
• Citywide Meeting round 1
• district 2 Meeting round 1
• Hdr report
• Mindmixer
• interview: baystate Health
• interview: food bank of Western Mass
• interview: education group
• i ntervi ew: Mass Career devel opment
institute
General Description
Health and Wellness:
Springfield is in a very fortunate situation
when it comes to healthcare. Massachusetts
provides universal healthcare to all residents,
and Springfield is home to baystate Health, the
region’s largest healthcare provider, employing
10,000 people in the area, as well as other
quality healthcare providers including Mercy
Medical Center and Caring Health Center. These
organizations are committed to offering all
citizens of the city opportunities to receive access
to medical treatment. from the perspective of
the medical community, Springfield does not
suffer from the lack of access to healthcare;
the health care community is making strides in
providing every citizen access to treatment for
medical ailments.
Springfield needs to strive to be “well”. unlike
the medical connotation of the word “health”,
Springfield-based non-profit that is focused
on uniting stakeholders from various health
organizations to build a “measurably healthier
Springfield.” The organization has already
carried out two successful initiatives, one to
improve oral health and another, Live Well
Springfield – Eat Smart. Stay Fit aims to increase
awareness about the benefits of healthy eating
and exercise. pHC’s mission and coalition-based
approaches can provide the “backbone support”
for most of the health and wellness needs in
Springfield. expanding the capacity and reach
of this organization would have considerable
benefits for the city.
To activate the pHC mission on a citywide,
community-based scale, multi-faceted actions
and a broad repertoire of methods are needed
wellness is not simply the absence of disease.
it is the presence of all types of wellbeing. The
wellness of Springfield’s residents is rooted in
social, economic, and cultural determinants
of heal th. There i s not a comprehensi ve
public health and wellness strategy to address
root causes, one that ensure all communities
participate in and benefit from decisions that
affect their families, their neighborhoods,
and their city. The City must take matters
into its own hands and focus on a positive,
proactive approach to creating healthy, vibrant,
neighborhoods and communities of opportunity.
i t i s through creati ng opportuni ti es f or
developing health (versus correcting health
disparities) that the City can effectively address
the social determinates of health and build
capacity for significant community prevention
and community wellness services — general
medicine, nutrition, and sexual education .
in this regard, the City must turn its focus to
developing community based programs and
collective actions devised at a grassroots level
and directed by local stakeholders to improve
access to healthcare, increase health education
and increase wellness services. fortunately, the
City can support already existing efforts to solve
these issues, as there is a local organization
that has taken on this mission - partners for a
Healthier Community (pHC).
partners for a Heal thi er Communi ty i s a
Social #4
Source: http://tulane.edu/som/tuchc/
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to generate practical solutions to major public
health challenges. Consequently, multiple
networked and i nterconnected li ve Wel l
Springfield (lWS) “community wellness spaces”
located in or around community centers are
needed.
Community wellness spaces are resident-led
and resident–designed actions, which occur at
neighborhood level and in existing community
centers and gathering places (faith-based and
civic associations). A deliberate or intentional
network of 20-to-30 lWS “community wellness
spaces”, at least one per neighborhood, would
connect residents and other stakeholders to a
host of health and wellness options across the
city so that residents would have multiple choices
(fitness, nutrition, food access, health access
disease self-management, an so on), making it
easy to access resources for keeping people well
rather than fixing problems once they get sick.
This program could also catalyze and support
various other public health initiatives that are
being carried out in the city at present.
pHC would work through the lWS network to
engage residents and other stakeholders at a
local or neighborhood or school or faith-based
site to provide health-related data and help
them conduct “needs assessments” and “map
assets”, to offer a more complete picture as to
what approaches could be taken to improve
citywide health and wellness. Consequently,
lWS “communi t y wel l ness spaces” and
programs they offer are devised at a grassroots
level and directed by local stakeholders. When
taken together, the whole network has the
capacity to provide health messages, health
choices, and work together to deliver health
and wellness actions at a community-wide scale
and need less hard-infrastructure and capital
investment than traditional “brick and mortar”
programs. The City, local foundations, and
philanthropic investments would cover the cost
for the “backbone support ” for developing and
supporting a network of 20 – 30 separate lWS
“community wellness spaces”. federal, State,
and foundation grants would provide sufficient
funds for direct services and help to make an
impact at this scale.
Food Access:
A large component of public heath is the
provision of healthy food to all residents. This
is an important obstacle in attracting young
residents to Springfield. This issue has particular
significance to inner city low-income people
and communities of color, where residents feel
as if nutritious food is impossible to find. These
perceptions are valid: rates of food insecurity and
hunger in Springfield are well above the national
average. ni neteen-percent of Spri ngfi el d
households are “food insecure”, and nine-
percent of households experience moderate
to severe hunger. The inequity of food access
throughout the city is zip code/neighborhood
specific in its disparities: some neighborhoods
have a cornucopia of healthy eating options
while other areas are desolate except for some
fast-food providers.
This trend is taking a toll on the youngest
members of the communi ty: the rates of
childhood obesity and Type-2 diabetes are some
of the worst in the country. nearly sixty-percent
of Springfield’s K-12 population is overweight
or obese, and the city’s diabetes mortality rate
is nearly fifty-percent higher than the MA state
average.
The Mason Square food Justice group has
worked tirelessly to get a grocery store in its
neighborhood, and the group’s model for
bringing healthy food to its residents seems
sustainable.
Measures in education, activity, and access
must be taken to improve these troubling
statistics. This effort must be carried out on a
citywide scale to help the children of Springfield.
individual-level and behavior change efforts are
not enough: there is junk food masquerading
as lunch; a lack of physical activity in school
and in the community due to safety concerns;
and a lack of youth development funding
for after-school time, weekend, and summer
programs. Kids are left to sit in front of the TV
or computer. Massachusetts just mandated that
schools remove caffeinated drinks and sweets
from schools. This is a positive step in the
right direction. Children who know how to eat
healthfully and have the ability to do so will be
able to make an impact on the culture of food in
the city as a whole.
The city-wide planning process is organized according to the six domains of a healthy and vibrant community.
domains that are positively impacted by the initiative described on this page are indicated above.
Cultural physical economic Organizational educational Social
Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social
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Partnerships/Stakeholders
• partners for a Healthier Community (pHC)
• baystate Health
• Caring Health Center
• Community Centers
• Community groups
• food bank of Western Massachusetts
• growing power
• Mason Square food Justice group
• Mason Square Health Task force
• Massachusetts department of public Health
• Mercy Medical Center
• Mercy Medical Center
• neighborhood Councils
• north east Organic farming Association
• public Health Council, Springfield public
Schools
• Spri ngfi el d department of Heal th and
Human Services
• Springfield food policy Council
• Springfield Health disparities project
• Springfield partners for Community Action
• Springfield public Schools
• Springfield public Schools
• Tufts university
• uS department of Heal th and Human
Services
Resource Needs
1. The City and its residents need to recognize
that making Springfield healthier starts at
wellness rather than treatment and support
this mission.
2. Space to operate pHC “community wellness
centers”
3. grant funding
4. More doctors who practice general medicine
to provide primary preventative care to
residents. This approach will keep residents
of Springfield healthier and keep them from
spending money on medical care that could
have been avoided.
5. Cooperation with Tufts Medical School to
staff community centers and incorporate
medical teaching in the community wellness
centers. This will provide community health
centers with much-needed staff as well as
a crop of eager young doctors who want to
help the community.
6. Community action behind the call for more
grocery stores, as demonstrated by the effort
carried out by the Mason Square Health Task
force.
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Potential Resource Opportunities
1. grants
2. Mason Square Health Task force
3. partners for a Healthier Community
4. baystate Health:
• Scholarships
• Tufts Medical School (West Campus)
• bay s t at e- Spr i ngf i el d educ at i on
partnership (bSep)
• Career exploration programs: High
School and baystate lunch buddies in
elementary school
5. Jamie Oliver’s food revolution foundation:
offers free support to school systems that
wish to reform their food service. This
organization provides a series of toolkits
that create step-by-step directions for
changing school food programs and extend
healthy eating beyond the schoolhouse.
http://www.jamieoliver.com/us/foundation/
jamies-food-revolution/school-food
6. Springfield has a group called gardening
the Community, which is a “youth-led food
j usti ce organi zati on engaged i n urban
agriculture, sustainable living, and organizing
for healthy and equitable communities.”
http://gardeningthecommunity.blogspot.
com/
7. The Center for ecoliteracy provides a vast
array of resources in both policy and action
initiatives to improve schools lunches
http://www.ecol i teracy.org/downl oads/
rethinking-school-lunch-guide
Precedents/Best Practices
Tul ane Communi ty Heal th Centers (New
Orleans, LA)
Serve populations within new Orleans that
have limited access to primary care. The centers
accept Medicaid, Medicare and most private
insurance, but also accept all patients regardless
of insurance status, and care can be had with a
nominal fee, which is based on patient income
level and household size.
The catastrophic flooding associated with
Hurricane Katrina had decimated the healthcare
infrastructure of the new Orleans area. from
this devastation, a new model for care delivery
was born where the old had been destroyed. in
this extreme environment, a group of Tulane
physicians came together to deliver care in new
Orleans to first responders and the citizens of
the city who remained behind or returned early.
They practiced in tents, in shelters, in police
precincts and in mobile vans – wherever they
were needed.
The new focus was on team-based primary care
located conveniently to patients in “medical
homes”. previously, many patients had received
primary care through hospitals and emergency
departments, often located far from their homes.
under the new model, health conditions are
managed continually in a neighborhood health
facility, preventing acute health episodes and
costly hospitalizations.
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One of the 6 sites created during the immediate
crisis that followed Katrina was at Covenant
House. it began simply as a willing doctor, a
card table, a box of supplies, and an ice chest to
keep the tetanus vaccines cold. patients served
represent a broad demographic of low-income
wage earners, chronically ill, disabled and
homeless.

The Mobile Medical unit was purchased in March
2008 to address the health needs of communities
where there was not yet a brick and mortar clinic.
Tulane Community Health Center new Orleans
east was founded in 2008 in order to provide
access to healthcare to one of the most medically
underserved areas of the city.
The founders of the health center continue their
vision of delivering healthcare that focuses on
patients’ needs outside of the confines that
come with typical paradigms of medical care
offering comprehensive primary care, including
sick and well visits, women’s health and chronic
disease management in a neighborhood-based
medical home. All patient care is coordinated
through an electronic Health record.
goals of the Tulane program:
• deliver highly accessible health services
using the team-based approach of a Medical
Home.
• use Health information Technology to
improve the access, quality and acceptability
of care,
• develop innovative and replicable models
of care applicable to the health needs of
underserved populations in all areas.
• Collaborate with educational institutions
and non-profit partners to provide health
professional training opportunities.
The Coalition of Camden Healthcare Providers
(Camden, NJ)
Camden, nJ is one of the most dangerous
cities in America as well as one of the poorest;
however, The Coalition of Camden Healthcare
providers is on the forefront in the development
of a producti ve rel ati onshi p between the
communi ty and heal thcare provi ders. The
Coalition analyzed the hospital billing data for
the entire city over a five-year period and then
used this data to identify healthcare “hotspots”.
The Coalition discovered that 1% of all patients
accounted for 30% of all hospital billings in
the city. This information led to the belief that
the current form of healthcare in Camden was
deficient when it came to treating the chronically
ill. To combat systemic issues, the Coalition
focused care on this group of patients through
personalized one-on-one interactions with
nurses who create strategies to reduce costs and
improve quality of life. in the last three years,
there has been a 40-50% overall reduction in
visits and billing for these patients. Though this
strategy may not be lucrative for hospitals, it
reduces stress on emergency services, provides
a much-needed reduction in healthcare costs
for patients, and allows insurance companies to
lower their prices. This method could provide a
disruptive change to the healthcare industry;
baystate Health, being as forward thinking as it
is, could play an integral part in the changing role
of hospitals.
http://www.camdenhealth.org/
Springfield Food Policy Council (Springfield,
MA)
presented with the problem of lack of food
access in 2007, The food bank of Western
Massachusetts (fbWM), Springfield partners
for Community Action (SpCA), and partners
for a Healthier Community (pHC) established
the Springfield food policy Council (SfpC)
with support from the Office of Mayor Sarno.
unfortunately, the SfpC has not achieved as
much as an impact as its developing partners
would have hoped, due to the organization’s
inability to translate novel policy into widespread
action.
Growing Power (Milwaukee, WI)
urban agri cul ture provi des an i nteresti ng
sol ut i on t o t he heal t hy f ood pr obl em.
Momentum in recent years has gathered behind
this movement, and pioneers in the field are
constantly making advancements in growing
techniques and community activation. A legend
of urban agriculture, Will Allen, developed a
program that specializes in establishing year-
round community gardens in the harshest
environments. These gardens serve as sites
for community engagement, education, and
economic empowerment. instituting a growing
power program in Springfield would greatly
improve the health of the city and its residents.
www.growingpower.org
Priority
High
Action Steps
1. bui l d upon successf ul wor k of t he
pHC, who have devel oped a model
for provi di ng wel l ness servi ces to the
community. pCH includes lots of partners.
The program is currently only in a few
neighborhoods in the city. http://www.
partnersforahealthiercommunity.org/
• pHC shoul d work wi th communi ty
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centers (educational recommendation
#1) to establish “community wellness
centers”, or if space cannot be allocated,
then pHC should look for space near
community centers, schools, or libraries
to provide a nexus of services.
• The pHC shoul d partner wi th the
gardening the Community Springfield
(gTC), the Spri ngfi el d food pol i cy
Counci l ( SfpC) , the Mason Square
food Justice group, and The Jamie
Oliver foundation to direct an effort at
providing healthy food to all Springfield
residents through a proliferation of more
grocery stores and a specific focus on
Springfield schools.
• The pHC and gTC should reach out
to growing power, inc. to develop
a growing power affiliated program
i n Spri ngf i el d i n partnershi p wi th
gardening the Community. growing
power’s toolbox could help expand the
capacities of gardening the Community.
This program could transform vacant
l ots i nto communi ty gardens and
provide citizens with capacity building
experiences as well as healthy food.
• The pHC could work with baystate
Health and Mercy Hospital to understand
wher e “Heal t h Hot spot s” ar e i n
Springfield. This measure would allow
pHC and hospitals to focus health and
wellness efforts to the areas and patients
with the greatest need, taking stress off
the entire healthcare system.
2. Connect local leaders and citizens to efforts
the outlined in district plans centered on
walkability, hiking, & biking in specific
neighborhoods.
3. As part of the overall public relations and
communi cati ons pl an for the rebui l d
Springfield plan, a specific focus should
be directed towards the importance of
community health and wellness.
4. The Ci ty i s l eadi ng Mass i n Moti on’ s
“Community Transformation plan”. The
Springfield department of Health & Human
Services oversees the Springfield Wellness
leadership Council. Their agenda includes:
Safe routes to School, School nutrition,
Heal thy Corner Stores, and i ncreased
Spaces for physical Activity. both of these
efforts need to be incorporated in the
rebuild Springfield implementation process
wi th augmented fundi ng and ci tywi de
participation
Project Location
Citywide
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Provide equitable access to a variety of housing options
Breadcrumbs
• district 2 Meeting round 1
• Citywide Meeting round 1
• district 3 Meeting round 1
• district 1 Meeting round 2
• bniM interview with Housing group
• interview with Valley real estate
• interview with new Hope pentecostal Church
• interview with religious leaders group
• South end Community Center Meeting
• Springfield business improvement district
General Description
Throughout the rebuild Springfield community
meeting process, a priority among residents
was to support the healthy residential stock in
some neighborhoods and to re-establish the
once-vital housing stock that lifted Springfield’s
status to the “City of Homes”. The City’s efforts
to attract and maintain a vibrant population
hinges on the city’s ability to house a diverse
community. This goal requires an equally diverse
housing stock. property vacancies, affordability,
homeownership, and variety of residential
housing types are essential to making this vision
a reality for all Springfield residents, regardless of
age, race or disability
first and foremost, the rehabilitation and
rejuvenation of tornado-damaged and vacant
property must be addressed in the post-tornado
city. Citywide, Springfield has a wealth of quality
residencies having five or more units. (See
graphic on p. 90) There are several types of
housing that revitalize communities and provide
residences for a diverse and vibrant population
such as lofts, townhouses, and live-work spaces.
Creative incentives must be explored to call
for the construction of senior housing, loft
apartments, mixed-use infill, historic adaptive
reuse, townhouses, multi-generational housing,
disabled access housing, and live-work spaces.
best practices will be presented as examples
for how these types of developments can be
activated.
improving accessibility to homeownership is
already a city priority. The process of attaining
a home might be improved to attract more and
younger residents; however, the real issue is the
capacity of residents to purchase and stay in their
home. A Homeownership Training program at
the community scale would provide residents
the information they need to work through the
steps required for investing in a home. programs
devel oped by Spri ngfi el d nei ghborhood
Housi ng Servi ces (SnHS) coul d serve thi s
purpose and be more effective with increased
outreach and i ncenti ves. MassMutual , for
example, requires employees to obtain a SnHS
certificate if they are applying for homebuyer
incentives. These types of programs would
increase the rates in which residents keep their
homes, cultivating stronger neighborhoods.
residential structures that are in desperate need
of repair. progress has been made in restoring
houses after the tornado, but there are still
many homes that are in a state of disrepair,
stemming from before storm. The City can
supply residents and developers with incentives
to initiate and ease restoration projects as well
as new infill development of a variety of different
types. by tying this assistance to a demand for
affordability, Springfield can supply refreshed
housing to all who need it.
Another problem facing Springfield at the
moment is lack of diversity in the city’s housing
portfolio. Currently, the overwhelming majority
of residential structures in the city are either
single-family homes or subsidized multi-family
housing. nearly half of all residential structures
are single-family homes and a quarter of all
Social #5
flickr user: roger4336
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Partnerships / Stakeholders
• Council on Aging
• faith based Organization
• Habitat for Humanity
• HAp Housing
• Office of Community development
• Of f i ce of pl anni ng and economi c
development
• rebuilding Together Springfield, inc.
• rental Housing Association of greater
Springfield
• Springfield department of elder Affairs
• Springfield Historic Commission
• Springfield Homeowners Association
• Springfield Housing Associates inc.
• Springfield neighborhood Housing Services,
inc.
• Springfield Office of Housing
• Springfield preservation Trust, inc.
Resource Needs
1. Homeownership Training program
2. expand housing options, whether for buying
or renting, for all incomes and lifestyles.
Often, the population that Springfield most
needs to attract – younger residents – are
not able to purchase a home or simply don’t
consider it a need.
3. Creative incentives for developers to expand
housing portfolio
4. Housing enterprise Zones identified in
neighborhoods that have low levels of home
ownership to encourage people to invest
in areas that were hit hardest by economic
circumstances or foreclosure.
Potential Resource Opportunities
1. Springfield neighborhood Housing Services
has an educati onal program to assi st
homebuyers with the process of buying and
keeping a home (Homeownership Training
program).
2. Market rate home-ownershi p housi ng
incentives to cover the gap between the
costs of construction and market prices
3. incentives and grants for home upgrades
4. The rebuilding guide for Homeowners,
available on the city’s website and here:
ht t p: / / www. spr i ngf i el d- ma. gov/ COS/
fileadmin/tornado/rebuilding_guide.pdf
Precedents / Best Practices
Backyard Cottage Program (Seattle, WA)
Seattle’s backyard Cottage (bYC) program
was i nst i t ut ed t o i ncr ease t he st ock of
multigenerational housing units in the city.
The ordinance allows for the construction or
conversion of an existing shed or garage into
a backyard cottage, or a detached accessory
dwelling unit (dAdu). The units are built for
aging parents, college graduates, or simply
rented out to strangers. Whatever the case is
the result of small housing design standards can
have an impact on income and urban density.
ht t p: / / www. s eat t l e. gov / dpd/ pl anni ng/
Alternative_Housing_Choices/detachedAdus/
default.asp
Homeowner Assistance Program (County of San
Bernardino, CA)
The Housing Authority of the County of San
bernardino has established a Homeowner
assi stance program that hel ps i nterested
participants buy homes. City Housing Authority
staff work with citizens to find an appropriate
mortgage lender and assist the resident in the
home buying process. participants can qualify by
meeting particular requirements provided by the
Housing Authority. Home purchasers must then
The city-wide planning process is organized according to the six domains of a healthy and vibrant community.
domains that are positively impacted by the initiative described on this page are indicated above.
Cultural physical economic Organizational educational Social
Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social
Source: http://necoyote.com/historic.html
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complete a minimum of 8 hours of homebuyer’s
education from a Hud-approved counseling
program.
h t t p : / / w w w . h a c s b . c o m/ r e s i d e n t s /
homeownership-assistance-program
Make it Right NOLA (New Orleans, LA)
The aftermath of Hurricane Katrina led to the
creation of Make it right nOlA. The program
has helped with the redevelopment of the lower
ninth Ward after floods decimated it. Make
it right nOlA helps qualified homeowners
apply for a new self-sustainable home. To
qualify for a home, an individual must be able
to: contribute to the cost of their home (either
through savings or financing), afford to maintain
the house, pay property taxes, and hold home
insurance. All costs are capped to being no
more than one third of the individual’s income.
Simultaneously, the program offers homeowner
education for residents who do not financially
qualify. This education effort is intended to build
homeownership capacities.
http://www.makeitrightnola.org/
Rhode Island Historic Homeowner Tax Credit
The rhode island Historic Homeowner Tax
Credit has been in effect for two decades to
glowing results. Since the inception of the
program, 1,409 projects have been approved
to restore historic housing, totaling in $24.8
million in private investments. The project
recently ran out of funding because of the
economic downturn, resulting in its suspension,
but it proved to be wildly successful when the
resources were available.
http://www.rihphc.state.ri.us/credits/homeowner.
php
in 2002, rhode island also strove to reactivate
and repurpose the vast number of historic mills
and other large buildings in the state. This led
to the creation of the Historic preservation
investment Tax Credit, which helped developers
recuperate 30% of the cost of the rehabilitation
effort. Several types of parties were eligible
to qualify for this tax credit, such as property
owners, developers, and non-profits. This project
was so successful in spurring development that
its allocated state funds were dispersed well
before the intended completion of the program.
http://www.rihphc.state.ri.us/credits/commstate.
php, http://www.rihphc.state.ri.us/credits/
1 UNIT
48.8%
2-4 UNITS
25.1%
5+ UNITS
25.2%
SPRINGFIELD PROVIDENCE, RI*
22.3%
51.8%
25.4%
LOWELL, MA
31.4%
30.1%
38.4%
NEW HAVEN, CT*
25%
43.2%
31%
BREAKDOWN OF HOUSING BY
UNITS PER STRUCTURE
Source: US Census Data
*Identified as “Resurgent Cities” in the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston’s 2009 report,
Reinvigorating Springfield’s Economy: Lessons from Resurgent Cities
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Housing Enterprise Zones Program (Iowa)
A Housi ng ent er pr i se Zones pr ogr am
was established in iowa to encourage the
construction of single- and multi-family housing
i n areas where f i nanci al i ncenti ves were
needed to make projects feasible. To qualify,
construction needed to be completed within two
years of project initiation, and structures must
fulfill Hud and State housing codes. up to 10%
of the cost of construction can be recuperated,
and all State sales, service, and use taxes paid
during construction will be refunded if a project
is eligible.
http://www.iowaeconomicdevelopment.com/
community/housing/ez.aspx
Priority
High
Action Steps
1. Support Springfield neighborhood Housing
Services’ Homeownership Training program
• Set up programs on the community level.
• publicize these programs to encourage
attendance.
• Monitor participation
2. establ i sh “Housi ng enterpri se Zones”
throughout Springfield to encourage repairs,
construction, and homeownership in areas
that are blighted and have low levels of
homeownership.
• A specific set of metrics should be
adhered to for an area to qualify as
a Housing enterprise Zone, and the
demarcation of these zones should be
done methodically with the use of data
analysis.
3. provide creative incentives to generate
developer interest in neglected housing
types. Make a database for these incentives
so that citizens and developers have equal
access. Ti e devel oper assi stance to a
demand for a range of affordability.
• infill development
• Historic rehabilitation
• Vacant restoration
• energy efficiency
• Multi-generational
• Senior
4. The Tornado rebuild guide that the City
created after the June tornado should be
better distributed and even updated if
necessary to address concerns raised by
residents following the response to the June
tornado.
Project Location
Citywide
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Economic Domain
Description
T h i s c a t e g o r y a d d r e s s e s
t he economi c envi r onment .
represented here are economic
spaces, programs and activities
related to business and commerce
assets and opportunities. included
are activities ranging from regional
and local economic development
programs to i nnovati ons and
initiatives developed by private
interests - from goods to financial
capi tal , from formal trade to
exchange and donations.
Recommendations
1. develop and harness Springfield’s role as the economic heart of the
pioneer Valley
2. Streaml i ne the i nvestment process and provi de creati ve
incentives and policies to encourage economic development and
entrepreneurship
3. expand career/workforce development and educational partnerships
to provide all residents with an opportunity to meaningfully
contribute to Springfield’s economy and meet the needs of
employers
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Develop and harness Springfield’s role as the economic heart of the
Pioneer Valley
Breadcrumbs
• Wes t er n Mas s ac hus et t s ec onomi c
development Council
• Citywide Meeting round 1
• Mindmixer
• district 1 Meeting round 2
• Citywide Meeting round 2
• interviews with economic development
stakeholders
Objective
restore Springfield’s role as the economic
heart of the pioneer Valley by: strengthening
the city’s downtown area to be the region’s
downtown; completing a series of high priority
development projects; improving coordination
and collaborative development efforts between
Springfield and regional leaders; and improving
Springfield’s participation as a leader in critical
regional initiatives.
General Description
Historically, Springfield has been the center of
the pioneer Valley and Western Massachusetts
both economically and symbolically. More
r ecent l y, Spr i ngf i el d’ s posi t i on as t he
center of the region has been weakened, as
economic players have been more attracted to
communities outside of Springfield and the city’s
economic and fiscal conditions have been under
pressure. in addition, collaboration between
City and regional leaders is noticeably weak and
multiple stakeholders have expressed concern
about the relationship between the city and its
surrounding region. economic success for all
Springfield and the region must recognize the
importance of mutually beneficial economic
initiatives – what helps Springfield, helps the
region and vice versa. The City of Springfield
is by far the largest city in the focus area of the
economic development Council of Western
Massachusetts (Western Mass edC) and home to
multiple state and regional development offices
and chambers of commerce. understanding
that there are important roles for both local and
regional organizations will help work toward
achieving common goals.
To start, the City of Springfield must work to
solidify its role as the “downtown” of Western
Massachusetts. bolstering a strong physical and
economic presence in Springfield’s downtown
with regular safe and attractive social and
cul tural events can move the Ci ty toward
regaining its stature as the symbolic and physical
focal point of the region. Simultaneously,
developSpringfield and regional entities such
as the Western Mass edC and the pioneer
Valley planning Commission must work to foster
a relationship that is mutually beneficial for
both parties through cooperative initiatives,
marketing, advocacy and communication of
Springfield’s success stories.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
• Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of greater
Springfield
• Colleges/universities
• Common Capital
• developSpringfield
is best achieved when the city and region work
together to foster economic investment.
As the global economic landscape changes,
diverse, dynamic, and entrepreneurial cities
with mutually supportive regional relationships
have experienced more economic success. To
stay competitive, Springfield and its region
must strive for a relationship predicated on
cooperation, balance, and communication.
Economic #1
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• Of f i ce of pl anni ng and economi c
development
• pioneer Valley planning Commission
• pioneer Valley Transit Authority
• regional director of Massachusetts Office of
business development
• Spirit of Springfield
• Springfield business improvement district
• Springfield redevelopment Authority
• Western Mass edC
Resource Needs
1. Commercial loans
2. new Markets Tax Credits
3. positive publicity about Springfield
Potential Resource Opportunities
1. Common Capital (Western Massachusetts
enterprise fund)
2. new Market Tax Credits
3. Historic Tax Credits
4. Historic buildings
5. fiber network
6. Tax increment financing
Precedents / Best Practices
New England Cities
Hartford, providence, Worcester, portland, Me,
and burlington, VT are new england cities similar
to Springfield that have seen benefits from
consistent marketing efforts and positioning as
the center of their respective metropolitan areas.
for example, the Metro Hartford Alliance is the
public-private regional economic development
organization for that region.
Growth Al l i ance for Greater Evansvi l l e
(Evansville, IN)
evansville is a resurgent peer city to Springfield,
and in 2007, a public-private partnership was
founded, along with an expressed downtown
arm, to encourage development and youth
retention, as well as recognize industry priorities
to support sustainable business growth. The
partnership is committed to supporting both
regional economic development and the City
of evansville’s redevelopment plan. (resurgent
Cities packet)
Nashville, TN
nashville is the leading city of Tennessee and
known as the Music City but it also has an
impressive portfolio of corporate headquarters
and a medical industries cluster. The greater
nashville Chamber of Commerce is the widely
recogni zed l eader i n regi onal economi c
development and explicitly communicates
publicly and in marketing documents about the
importance of nashville for the entire region.
during nashville’s flood recovery efforts, the
regional Chamber led the business response
and identified the impacted businesses. Acting
on their recognition of the importance of a
vibrant lead city, they played a central role in
the formulation of the economic development
projects prioritized in the long-term recovery
plan for nashville, working closely with the
Mayor’s office and the nashville downtown
partnership (among others).
Fort Wayne, IN
fort Wayne i s the second l argest ci ty i n
i ndi ana whose economy was si gni fi cantl y
limited when, in the early 80’s, international
Harvester Co.’s plant closed. At its peak,
international Harvester Co. employed more
than 10,000 people. by the end of 1986, the
city encouraged large companies to invest in
the city and commissioned a study on how to
diversify its economy. A local/regional economic
development alliance was created to focus on
specific economic development sectors.
• introduction of corporate-style performance
and accountability standards: Six-Sigma
accountability measurement standard
• Workforce development program based on
bridging the digital divide and fostering a
culture of learning.
Winston-Salem Alliance (Winston-Salem, NC)
based on 2010 Census data, residential growth in
the downtown has increased nearly 37 percent.
Approximately 20 residential developments have
been built since 2000 to respond to this increase.
Winston-Salem Alliance:
• first proposed in 1999 by a chief executive of
Wachovia;
• Created to respond to slow employment
growth, decline in average wages, slow
growth of minority businesses, and loss of 18-
34 year-old population.
• Millennium fund initiative established by the
Alliance – raised $45 million dollars primarily
from corporations, a loan from the City-
County utility Commission, and donations
from foundati ons and i ndi vi dual s – to
stimulate economic development in growth
by investing in the downtown. projects to be
The city-wide planning process is organized according to the six domains of a healthy and vibrant community.
domains that are positively impacted by the initiative described on this page are indicated above.
Cultural physical economic Organizational educational Social
Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social
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funded by these resources: expansion of the
piedmont Triad research park, purchasing
and developing of downtown land and real
estate.
Priority
urgent
Action Steps
1. Achieve short-term development progress
by completing a series of high priority
development projects. focus on continuous
status updates and political urgency to finish
these projects. Work with regional and
state leaders and private sector partners
to fund and implement these projects.
Completion of these projects is essential to
build momentum, enhance credibility, and
communicate success stories.
Uni on St a t i on Regi ona l I nt er moda l
Transportation Center and Transit-Oriented
Development (TOD) Planning around station
• SrA is leading this regionally significant
project that is critical to fully leverage
anticipated bus and rail improvements,
namel y t he new Haven- Har t f or d-
Springfield commuter rail service.
• The Hartf ord regi on and pi oneer
Valley planning Commission (pVpC)
are currently conducting a Knowledge
Corridor Market Analysis study that
includes a TOd market assessment and
station area planning for each rail station,
including Springfield – the City must
participate fully in this initiative to inform
and benefit from this study and best
leverage the development opportunities
of passenger rail enhancements.
State Street Corridor
• devel opSpr i ngf i el d and t he Ci t y
are leading a series of revitalization
ef f orts to strengthen thi s cri ti cal
east-west corridor that connects the
downtown area to Springfield Technical
Community College and MassMutual.
Continued progress (in particular the
planned supermarket) and increased
communication of completed projects is
needed.
31 Elm Street (Court Square)
• The Ci t y i s wor ki ng wi t h a l ocal
developer to redevelop this prominent,
historic building in Court Square as a
mixed use building with first floor retail
and upper floor office and residential
with environmental and design activities
underway.
Medical District
• The Medi cal di stri ct l ocated north
of downtown, along the Main Street
corridor is one of the City’s success
stori es and a current study bei ng
completed by uMass is highlighting
the economic impact of businesses in
this area with ideas to expand activity
(e.g., new mixed use development with
residential, retail, hotel) and better
connect to the rest of the city.
• The pi oneer Val l ey li f e Sci ences
institute (pVlSi) is a partnership between
uMass and baystate Health and the
region’s most significant life sciences
organization. The City and the Western
Massachusetts edC should make the
success of this organization a high
pri ori ty for Spri ngfi el d by creati ng
a process to realize private spin-off
development projects within the City of
Springfield.
Springfield State Data Center
• This facility located near the State Street
Corridor and downtown is currently
under construction and scheduled to
be completed in 2012. This will be a
world-class data storage facility, a leed-
certified green building, and employ
75 skilled workers. This facility is part
of the region’s efforts to enhance a
digital technology/iT industry cluster by
leveraging the green High performance
Computing Center in Holyoke and an
interconnection facility in greenfield. it
is a key opportunity for a success story.
Civic Center Parking Garage
• This rundown parking garage across
from the Convention Center is in critical
need of replacement and/or reimagining
its use. The Springfield parking Authority,
Massdevelopment, and Massachusetts
Convention Center Authority are working
together on this project. it has potential
to be l everage greater downtown
redevelopment.
Industrial Park with Titeflex, Smith and Wesson,
FW Webb, etc.
• The interstate-291 corridor remains
the Ci ty’s most promi si ng area for
manuf act ur i ng and di s t r i but i on
busi nesses and a f ew pr omi nent
businesses have recently expanded
or located in the area. There are still
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some key, large sites available and
a high priority for the City should be
filling these spaces with new/expanding
businesses.
Watershops / 1 Allen Street
• This area provides a unique opportunity
near lake Massasoit and Springfield
College to build on the current private
sector-led informal business incubator
activity to explore mid-longer term
redevelopment opportunities that might
include residential, office and retail uses.
South End Main Street (e.g., market rate
housing, possible non-profit owner with first
floor retail in vacant space/fill in ”missing teeth”
on Main Street)
• implementing a number of long-studied
i mprovements, consi stent wi th the
recent urban land institute study – this
would include a mix of market rate
housing, possible non-profit ownership
of vacant buildings with first floor retail
in vacant space to fill in ”missing teeth”
on Main Street (which has already seen
various streetscape improvements).
Thi s i ncl udes devel opment of key
parcels such as housing at 195 State
Street, a new enhanced community
center, and products of the State Street
redevelopment program.
Alden Street as a gateway to Springfield
College
• Consistent with a recent uMass urban
planning project, the City should work
to complete a number of improvements
on Alden Street to make it a welcoming
entry to/from Springfield College with
opportunity for spillover retail from the
college along this corridor.
• To a c h i e v e t h i s a c t i on s t e p,
devel opSpr i ngf i el d and t he Ci t y
need to push to finish these in-the-
works projects. Whether from a policy
standpoint—by pushing projects to
the front of the line—or some other
strategies, demonstrating solid progress
on the development front will have a
powerful impact. progress and funding
needs shoul d be communi cated i n
a transparent fashion to strategically
deliver messages to the public and
development community in Springfield
and beyond.
2. Tell Springfield’s success stories. Too often,
municipalities do not excel at marketing
themselves. This is especially important for
cities like Springfield that have experienced
years of negative press and perceptions.
for example a recent boston globe article
on Springfield indicated that the city has
the lowest median household income in
the state but provided zero information
about current initiatives or interviews with
the City’s leadership. The completion of
these and other big-ticket projects might
be “Qui ck Wi ns” to check off as fi rst
steps down the path to implementing the
rebuild Springfield plan, demonstrating
momentum to local residents and regional
stakeholders. Completion of some of these
crucial developments will give both residents
and non-residents reason to believe in the
promise that Springfield holds as a city.
developSpringfield and the SrA should
collaborate with the Western Mass edC and
other economic development entities on this
initiative, leveraging combined resources for
marketing, distribution lists, web sites, and so
forth.
3. Make downtown a focus of economi c
development efforts
• Wi t h i t s cor e i nf r ast r uct ur e and
i nsti tuti ons, Spri ngfi el d shoul d be
reclaimed and promoted as the region’s
downtown. This should include a focus
on:
• Safety – increased and visible policing
and emphasis on safety is critical to the
success of downtown and must be a
priority
• Cultural activities that utilize public
spaces such as Court Square and attract
people from a wide regional catchment
area
• encouraging a mix of uses including
residential development (especially near
union Station) and live/work space for
artists
• reducing the office vacancy rate – the
City offers quality office space downtown
with strong broadband/fiber optic assets,
and a new strategy should focus on
attracting a range of small to medium
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94
sized office users for iT, finance, and
professional services
• filling the city’s vacant buildings with for-
profit businesses is an important goal,
while recognizing that non-profits may
be willing and able to “fill in the missing
teeth” on Main Street as the South end
is truly an extension of the downtown.
• Over time, increase the involvement of
colleges and universities in economic
development efforts, with emphasis on a
more substantial presence from uMass in
downtown Springfield.
4. i mprove access to and acti vi ty at the
riverfront. A key underutilized asset for the
City is the riverfront and the Hall of fame.
existing rail and i-91 corridors do present
challenging obstacles to improving the
integration of the riverfront with downtown.
ideas to better leverage this asset so that
existing naismith Memorial basketball Hall
of fame-related restaurants, hotel, and other
businesses are less of an isolated island of
activity include:
• improved pedestrian access and visible
sight lines to the riverfront via State
Street and South end corridors
• Conducting a pilot program to run
pVTA’s existing traditional trolley-style
buses in a circulator/loop with Main
Street and the riverfront area (including
Hall of fame, hotels, restaurants)
• exploring increased boating-related
activities on the Connecticut river near
downtown, including canoe/kayak rental
and events
5. improve Springfield’s participation and
leadership in key regional initiatives. build on
regional success stories and strengths.
• As the l argest ci ty i n the regi on,
Spr i ngf i el d shoul d t ake gr eat er
leadership in initiatives related to key
issues like transportation, energy, fiber
optic, and workforce that are inherently
regional issues. it must be a two-way
street; to be the region’s economic
heart, Springfield must participate,
advocate and take leadership on matters
of regional importance.
• gr owt h i n t he r egi on means t he
opportunity for more residents and
visitors to Springfield.
• Consi stent wi th recommendati ons
from the innovation-based economic
development Strategy for Holyoke and
the pioneer Valley, Springfield should
play a central role in the municipal
economic development partners to
improve collaboration with Western
Mass edC.
• Springfield and Western Mass edC
should consider drawing up parameters
for an improved and more productive
col l abor at i v e r el at i ons hi p wi t h
measurable results that defines roles and
protocols for economic development.
• Western Mass edC shoul d commi t
greater emphasis on the region’s largest
city, and Springfield should work with
Western Mass edC on marketing its
assets and sites, including stronger
l i nkages to the state’ s l eaders for
marketing and business development
as laid out in the Commonwealth’s
economic development policy plan.
Project Location
Citywide with emphasis on downtown (Metro
Center/South end)
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Streamline the investment process and provide creative incentives
and policies to encourage economic development and
entrepreneurship
Breadcrumbs
• business forum
• interviews with economic development
leaders
• Housing group
• interviews with economic development
stakeholders
• business forum
• Mindmixer
• Citywide Meeting round 1
• Citywide Meeting round 2
Objective
Streaml i ne, i ncenti vi ze, and communi cate
business and residential development efforts
in Springfield. Springfield should leverage its
competitive strengths, while candidly recognizing
its weaknesses and developing strategies to
address them. This initiative is focused on the
specific strategies to support business start-
up, retention, expansion and attraction while
increasing opportunities for a full-range of
Springfield residents to successfully participate in
the economy.
General Description
Accordi ng to the Commonweal th’ s 2011
economic development policy and Strategic
plan: “The foundation of the Massachusetts
economy is the innovative and entrepreneurial
capability of its residents to transform existing
technologies and industries and create new
ones.” Springfield has a history of this kind of
According to the brookings institute’s urban
Mar ket s i ni t i at i ve—whi ch expl or ed t he
opportunities and strategies for investing in
urban markets—better access to economic
devel opment data can be a catal yst f or
investment. relevant data might include the
availability of low-cost property, the existence
of Springfield’s extensive fiber network, and the
presence of qualified labor. This perspective
helps demonstrate that inner-city urban markets
are often untapped for their citizens’ buying
power and plentiful existing resources.
economi c devel opment i nf ormati on and
services have to be accessible on both large
and small scales, pertinent for large businesses
and outside investors, as well as small, local
entrepreneurs. by empowering all residents with
information about starting a business: available
locations, tax incentives, market potential,
and market demand; local entrepreneurs can
be more successful in serving the community
and providing opportunity for owners and
employees. This process must also be linked
with community-based business training and
consultation outreach, providing local business-
people with resources to grow their businesses.
information alone cannot turn into action; the
City must also focus on creating a symbiotic
relationship with local businesses by offering
creati ve i ncenti ves, decreasi ng regul atory
innovation from Smith & Wesson to Milton-
bradl ey to the i nventi on of basketbal l at
Springfield College and the creativity of dr.
Seuss. Springfield’s economic distress in recent
decades, however, has led to lower levels of
private investment, negative perceptions, and a
challenging business development environment.
And, Springfield has a wealth of built assets that
remain idle: vacant storefronts, industrial sites,
infill parcels, and former commercial buildings.
To address these challenges, Springfield needs
to embrace a series of bold, creative and
transparent policies to encourage business
start-up, retention, expansion, and attraction.
in parallel, the City needs to place emphasis
on increasing opportunities for all residents
and policies that incentivize residential growth
taki ng advantage of i ts l ow-cost housi ng
and a voluminous housing stock. Many of
the region’s designated small business and
entrepreneuri al support organi zati ons are
clustered at the STCC Technology park in
Springfield, including Scibelli, SCOre, and the
uMass Small business development Center
(SbCd). These are resources that can and
should be used by Springfield businesses and
entrepreneurs. The recent appointment of new
Chief development Officer Kevin Kennedy
presents a golden opportunity to enhance the
economic environment system concurrently with
the focused completion of high priority projects.
Economic #2
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roadbl ocks, and i mprovi ng avai l abl e si tes
for eventual occupation. part of this action
necessitates gaining a clear picture of current
challenges and roadblocks in the Springfield
investment process as they stand today.
regarding the development process, the City
can address concerns about the cost of doing
business within Springfield, such as permits,
fees, taxes, licenses, regulatory burdens, etc. to
move projects forward in a timely manner. for
example, the City uses tax increment financing
(Tif) for certain development projects to mitigate
high commercial property tax rates but this is
applied on case-by-case basis subject to City
Council approval and is not typically available to
smaller businesses. in terms of site availability
and preparation, time to market is increasingly
one of the most important factors for business
location decisions, so establishing a portfolio
of multiple, varied sites for office, commercial
and industrial uses that are “pre-permitted” and
ready for the market is critical.
As mentioned in the Cultural recommendations,
arts and culture can play a role in economic
revitalization. from the Mayor of pittsfield,
a sister gateway City to Springfield: “Our
experience here in pittsfield demonstrates that
the creative sector truly can play a key role in
revitalizing gateway Cities, not only making
them fun places to live, work, and play, but
contributing to the prosperity and quality of life
of the entire region,” said James M. ruberto,
Mayor of pittsfield.

part of implementing this recommendation
will include identifying obstacles to Springfield
competing with other municipalities in the
region, state and beyond. for example, the
effecti ve property tax burden per square
foot in Springfield is higher than the regional
average for most business types, based on
data collected by the Affiliated Chambers of
Commerce of greater Springfield. They estimate
that Springfield’s effective property tax for
manufacturing is $1.37 per square foot compared
to a regional average of $1.05, and $3.43 per
square foot for office complexes versus $1.91
for the regional average. The disparity between
property tax burden varies, however, depending
on the community and the type of business
being taxed and Springfield is lower than some
communities. better understanding this effective
tax burden will be critical when moving from
identification of Springfield’s shortfalls to taking
action to address any obstacles. A stronger
marketing effort, led by developSpringfield
and supported by the Western Mass edC, and
a stronger online presence publicizing positive
stories about Springfield is also crucial to turn the
tide of negative perception and catalyze private
investment.

Partnerships / Stakeholders
• Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of greater
Springfield
• Common Capital
• developSpringfield
• institutions of Higher education
• Massachusetts Small business development
Center
• Massdevelopment
• regional employment board
• regional Office of Massachusetts Office of
business development
• Scibelli enterprise Center
• Springfield business improvement district
• Springfield Office of planning and economic
development
• Springfield redevelopment Authority
• Springfield Technical Community College
• Western Massachusetts edC
The city-wide planning process is organized according to the six domains of a healthy and vibrant community.
domains that are positively impacted by the initiative described on this page are indicated above.
Cultural physical economic Organizational educational Social
Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social
Source: http://www.innovateholyoke.com/wp-content/
uploads/2011/11/final-innov-econ-dev-Holyoke-and-pV-
report1.pdf
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Resource Needs
1. Collaboration with existing local and regional
organizations
2. Sus t a i ned c ommi t ment t o pol i c y
enhancements
3. dedicated staff and time for fostering
relationships and compiling and publicizing
information to allow regional and local
stakeholders to make better informed and
more strategic decisions.
4. incentives to attract residents/homeowners
and businesses would likely mean foregoing
some near-term tax revenue to achieve
growth
Potential Resource Opportunities
1. idle historic building stock
2. Springfield redevelopment Authority
3. federal and State grants
4. Commonwealth energy efficiency grants

Precedents / Best Practices
KC Source Link (Kansas City, MO)
resources useful for small businesses and
entrepreneurs to grow and succeed. The Kansas
City’s business resource Website (http://www.
kcsourcelink.com/) is a good example of the
type of resource that could benefit businesses in
Springfield.
Westfi el d Busi ness Improvement Di stri ct
(Westfield, MA)
The City Council of Westfield, MA created
the Westfield business improvement district
in June of 2006 after the conclusion of a two-
year feasibility study carried out by the City’s
Chamber of Commerce. One of the program’s
most successful efforts has been the best retail
practices program. This program provides
local small retailers, restaurants, and storefront
businesses with training courses, professional
advice, and access to grants that would help
wi th i mprovi ng storefronts. Thi s program
i s si mi l ar to Spri ngfi el d’ s nei ghborhood
Storefront improvement program, as well as
developSpringfield’s Storefront improvement
program; however, Spri ngfi el d’ s program
does not offer the consultant support that the
Westfield program provides.
Innovation – Mass Economic Development
Policy and Strategic Plan (Massachusetts)
The mai n f ocus of t he Mass economi c
development policy and Strategic plan is to
support the Commonwealth’s already robust
i nnovat i on and ent r epr eneur i al sect or s.
Over $1 billion has been committed to the
life Sciences initiative, despite the fact that
in 2010 the Kaufmann foundation already
ranked Massachusetts as the number one
state for innovation. This program “has led to
unprecedented collaboration among industry,
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academia and government in the research,
development and manufacture of new drugs,
medi cal devi ces and di agnost i c t ool s. ”
Simultaneously, the Commonwealth’s dynamic
“clean energy and energy efficiency policies have
created new and expanded markets for local
innovations and dramatically accelerated their
adoption.” Massachusetts is also committed to
developing new small businesses by focusing
on strengthening business incubator programs
throughout the state. by pushing an agenda of
collaboration and innovation, Massachusetts
has developed an economy that is dynamic,
conscientious, sustainable, and prosperous.
These pri nci pl es can be both uti l i zed by
and translated into Springfield’s economic
development efforts.
ht t p: / / www. mas s . gov/ hed/ docs / eohed/
economicdevpolicystrategy.pdf
Innovate Holyoke (Holyoke, MA)
The innovation-based economic development
St r at egy f or Hol yoke and t he pi oneer
Valley centered its approach on supporting
entrepreneurship, cultivating an environment
that is site ready/policy ready for an infusion of
new investment, and providing optimal customer
relations for economic development delivery.
The specific strategies for this plan can be
reviewed at length and are extremely applicable
to Springfield and the entire pioneer Valley.
http://www.innovateholyoke.com/wp-content/
uploads/2011/11/final-innov-econ-dev-Holyoke-
and-pV-report1.pdf
Nashville, TN
part of nashville’s long-Term recovery plan
included recommendations for small business
and entrepreneurial support. This included
targeted strategies for helping small businesses
get l oans ( l i ke a revol vi ng l oan program
that would provide gap financing for small
businesses), better support for the nashville
business incubation Center, and expanded
col l abor at i on bet ween hi gher - l ear ni ng
institutions and the business community.
Tour de Fronts (Cincinnati, OH)

The Over-the-rhine Chamber of Commerce
in Cincinnati was looking for creative ways to
catalyze the reanimation of Over-the-rhine
streets during the day, create small businesses,
and strengthen the inflow of residents and
commerce to the neighborhood. The result
was an annual event named the Tour d fronts.
This single afternoon event in 2009 showcased
available retail space on Main Street. The
two-hour long walking tour was led by local
celebrities and traveled through more than
a dozen vacant spaces. readi l y avai l abl e
information packets highlighted rental prices and
square-footage for each space, and landlords
offered packages attractive to entrepreneurs of
all kinds. in combination with the open-house
tours, existing small business owners were
able to interact with participants interested
in renting spaces or starting businesses. in
combination with small capital improvement
grants for new business owners, the event
successfully connected hopeful entrepreneurs
and neighborhood businesspeople.
Priority
urgent
Action Steps
1. raise the profile of developSpringfield as
the strong, local, public-private leader for
economic development.
• As organized, developSpringfield will
work closely with the SrA to focus on
implementing high priority projects, but
should also help the City provide strong
communications and online presence
about its initiatives, Springfield’s assets,
and a variety of success stories.
• developSpringfield can act as a liaison
with regional leaders and organizations
such as Western Mass edC and the
Affi l i ated Chambers of Commerce
of Springfield on external marketing,
promotion and ensuring strong private
sector support and participation in
Springfield’s key initiatives.
2. Measure barri ers and roadbl ocks f or
investment and development and develop
near-term and l ong-term strategi es to
mi ti gate these barri ers and create a
stronger environment for business retention,
expansion and attraction.
• identify barriers to investment and
development in Springfield.
• gather feedback from development
professionals and other stakeholders to
shed light on possibilities for addressing
barriers.
• Centralize information about brownfield
remedi ati on and si te readi ness as
well as underutilized economic assets,
such as manuf act ur i ng, i ndust r y,
communications, education, etc.
• identify and prioritize at least 4 industrial
sites, 4 office sites, and 4 mixed use
sites to be “market ready”, listed and
promoted by a range of organizations
( Massecon, West er n Mass edC,
Massdevelopment, etc.) to regional and
national developers and site selectors.
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• explore the possibility of more standard
and predi ctabl e Tif program. for
example, the City of Holyoke is in the
process of trying to extend standard
Tifs from 5 years to 15-20 years for
development projects in the downtown
area (further information can be found
in the Holyoke/pioneer Valley economic
development Strategy). in Springfield,
a similar strategy could be explored for
development projects in the downtown
area and in industrial areas along i-291.
3. Small business Support
• evaluate current and implement new
small funding programs to assist with
facade i mprovement, smal l capi tal
expendi tures, and other smal l -but-
meaningful strategies. These efforts
will both encourage new business and
support existing businesses.
• Create a centralized information center
to offer technical assistance to help
small businesses through the process
of starting and owning a business in
Springfield. Work with the small business
development services (Scibelli, SCOre,
& SbdC) at the STCC Technology park
to inventory, organize and communicate
these services available to Springfield’s
businesses.
• proactively seek opportunities to work
with Common Capital: explore financial
resources for existing small and mid-
si zed busi nesses and non-prof i ts.
Common Capital is focused on working
with regional businesses to identify
funding needs for business retention
and expansion. A number of different
financing programs are available through
Common Capital and they are experts
at understanding the relevant funding
opportunities for each business situation.
• Conduct a series of roundtables with
small business owners to understand
their needs, network, and introduce
them to new and existing resources.
• increase coordination and outreach
to connect l ocal lati no / Hi spani c
entrepreneurs to these small business
resources to achieve business growth
while providing needed employment
a nd ec onomi c oppor t uni t y t o
underrepresented resi dents. Those
outreach efforts should include bilingual
communications and resources.
• based on the success and positive
feedback from the recent next Street
small business capacity program funded
by baystate Heal th, i n partnershi p
with the Western Mass edC and The
Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of
greater Springfield, conduct additional
programs for identified Springfield small
businesses with the potential to scale
up their capacity to become suppliers or
vendors to the City’s larger businesses
(e.g., MassMutual, colleges).
• This program was very well received and
similar programs could help a greater
number of Spri ngf i el d busi nesses
become vendor s f or t he l ar ger
businesses and educational institutions
in Springfield and the region. new
funding commitments would be required
to run addi ti onal i terati ons of thi s
program.
focus economi c devel opment i ni ti ati ves
on a set of target industries that represent
Springfield’s existing and emerging industry
growth opportunities. for each target industry,
Springfield should inventory relevant factors
and assets for business location and expansion
and develop strategies to ensure that obstacles
are addressed. factors and policies should
include sites for development, workforce and
infrastructure needs, and taxes and financial
incentives. Springfield’s relevant businesses
and development officials should participate in
the region’s existing industry cluster initiatives
(precision manufacturing) and new industry
cl uster i ni ti ati ve for di gi tal technol ogy/iT
companies as any regional industry cluster
should include vibrant businesses in the region’s
largest city. A preliminary set of target industries
should include:

1. finance and insurance – Springfield has long
had a cluster of businesses in the financial
and i nsurance i ndustri es, represented
today by a center for regional banking,
MassMutual, and the more recent liberty
Mutual success story with 350 employees
at the STCC Technology park. potential
strategies for this target industry include: a)
working with state leaders to pursue other
call center and support centers given the
success of liberty Mutual; b) working with
the reb to focus on developing a pipeline
of skilled, trained workers from Springfield
to be prepared for available jobs; and c)
exploring innovative opportunities to link
the City’s various assets such as bilingual
residents, to business growth, for example;
financial call centers staffed by area residents
with proficient english/Spanish language
skills supplemented by appropriate financial
training.
2. Medical and life Sciences – Springfield is a
regional center for health care services and
hospitals including baystate Health, Mercy
Hospital, and a medical district along Main
Street near i-91. The medical district also
includes the high priority pioneer Valley life
Sciences institute, a partnership between
baystate and uMass that represents the
region’s most prominent institution focused
on life sciences research and development.
3. Manufacturing and distribution – Springfield
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has a strong history of manufacturing and is
still a regional leader in precision/advance
manufacturing. distribution facilities, such
as the fW Webb expansion near i-291,
represent a related industry opportunity
that can leverage Springfield’s remaining
large industrial sites that possess strong
transportation access with proximity to i-90,
i-91, and i-291, and freight rail assets such
as the CSX east-west mainline (with double-
stacked clearance to Westborough), and the
West Springfield intermodal truck-rail facility.
led by the reb, precision manufacturing
is one of the state’s most successful and
engaged industry clusters. Their emphasis
has been on retaining/expanding current
businesses and addressing workforce needs
for the skilled labor required to serve these
companies. relatively high commercial
property taxes (even when considering lower
property values) is a frequently cited obstacle
for expanding this industry in Springfield.
updating and refining the Chamber’s tax
comparison analysis can provide a grounded
estimate of this effect.
4. Colleges and universities – Many of the
largest employers in Springfield are colleges
and uni versi ti es i ncl udi ng Spri ngfi el d
Technical Community College, Springfield
College, Western new england university,
and American international College. unlike
the 5 Colleges, many of the students are
originally from the region and have interest
in staying if job opportunities are present.
While these colleges are engaged in the
Springfield community in a number of ways,
even more collaboration and participation
i n economi c devel opment coul d make
a substanti al i mpact: a) worki ng wi th
the regional employment board, other
workforce agencies and private employers
to expand internships and awareness of
job opportunities in Springfield; b) active
engagement of executive leadership in
busi ness recrui tment to demonstrate
commitment to talent delivery; c) programs
to target al umni busi ness l eaders for
expansion opportunities in Springfield; and
d) working with uMass and other colleges for
a commitment to a substantial presence in
Springfield’s downtown.
5. digital Technology/iT and professional
Services – industry employment data shows
that Spri ngfi el d i s si gni fi cantl y under-
represented in these industries compared
to state and uS averages, and yet presence
of these industries is indicative of higher-
wage employees, innovative businesses,
and a range of research and development.
regi onal asset s l i ke t he new Hi gh-
performance Computing Center in Holyoke,
improved fiber optic network, and computer
sci ence program at uMass combi ned
with Springfield’s new data Center and
successful iT firms like Court Square group
demonstrate potential for this industry in
Springfield. in partnership with the Western
Mass edC, the City should develop new
strategies to promote existing downtown
office space that already has strong fiber/
broadband, available Class A and b space,
and good transportati on connecti ons
(highway and passenger rail) that caters to
emerging sectors like digital technology,
graphic design and other professional
services.
6. reach out to other gateway Cities in the
regi on to better understand possi bl e
techniques for leveraging arts and culture as
economic drivers.
7. Conduct a market gap analysis of retail /
service demand in Springfield compared
to the supply of existing businesses. Small,
targeted studies that shed light on economic
sector needs can be very influential when
publicized and placed into the hands of
investment decision-makers.
8. rebuild Western Mass funds are available for
renewable energy rebuilding in residential,
municipal, and commercial sectors.
9. improve user friendliness and knowledgeable
staff within relevant City departments.
Project Location
Citywide
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Expand career/workforce devel opment and educati onal
partnerships to provide all residents with an opportunity to
meaningfully contribute to Springfield’s economy and meet the
needs of employers
Breadcrumbs
• Massachusetts Career development institute
• district 3 Meeting round 1
• Wes t er n Mas s ac hus et t s ec onomi c
development Council
• interviews with economic development
stakeholders
• district 2 Meeting round 1
• Citywide Meeting round 2
Objective
enhanced workforce development, and talent
del i very ( l i nki ng workforce ski l l s and j ob
readiness to employer needs) must be one
of Springfield’s top priorities for economic
development and the recovery plan. This
strategy should result in a visible and strongly
supported system to focus on workforce
development, from preK-12 education to adult
literacy to creating a pipeline of skilled workers
linked to Springfield’s target industries.
General Description
economi c devel opment and growth are
intrinsically linked to an area’s educational
attainment and the quality of its workforce.
rankings of site selection factors for business
location decisions almost always cite workforce
as the most important factor and leading
economic development research, like richard
continue through high school. The improvement
of K-12 education is a priority in Springfield
for several reasons (discussed in detail in a
corresponding education strategy), and it plays a
vital role in successful workforce development.
programs to i mprove basi c j ob readi ness
must happen at a scale that is accessible to all
residents. libraries, community centers, and
schools are best positioned and equipped to
fulfill this capacity. Job training services will build
upon technology and language literacy services,
florida’s Creative Class work, highlights the
importance of attracting talented, skilled workers
as a major asset for successful and competitive
urban areas. in addition, preK-12 education
and the increasingly available data on education
performance directly influence both business
and residential location decisions. As edward
glaeser points out in Triumph of the Cities,
quality public education (or the lack thereof) is
one of the most important public services that
cities influence for economic development.
To accomplish meaningful improvement in
Springfield requires an holistic approach to
workforce development that covers: a) preK-12
education; b) basic job readiness and literacy
for a wider range of residents; c) job training
that meets the needs and skill requirements of
current and new businesses; and d) retaining and
attracting highly skilled and educated workers to
help attract and retain innovative businesses.
Workforce development needs to start at the
moment a child begins his or her education.
Math, science, and language proficiencies are
critical in today’s working environment and
ensuring that the education system provides
its students with these capabilities must be a
priority. language and technological literacy
are of paramount importance when entering the
workforce for all jobs, and learning these skills
should start in early childhood education and
Economic #3
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with added depth to provide more specific skills.
This directive will engage residents that have
had difficulty participating in the economy in the
past, such as minorities, the under-educated, and
recent immigrants.
As a city, Springfield needs to work at attracting
and retaining younger residents (see Social
recommendation 2). A goal should be to
develop a clear pipeline of educated/skilled
workers to the existing and emerging business
sectors in Springfield. This process can be
carried out through collaborative internship
programs, school recruiting, and apprenticeships
and shoul d di rectl y bui l d on the recent
Springfield Technical Community College/
Holyoke Community College partnership with
the regi onal empl oyment board (reb) to
improve the connection between employers,
workforce training and employees. because
Springfield’s colleges possess many students
originally from the region, improving this
connection will help students recognize the
concrete benefits of staying in Springfield after
school. in addition to assuring students that
jobs are available, other strengths should also
be emphasized, particularly to students who do
not have personal ties to the region. Springfield’s
affordable cost of living, proximity to larger
metropolitan areas, easy access to outdoor
recreation, and cultural amenities are a few of
the city’s attributes that may appeal to a recent
college graduate.
it is extremely important that local employers
and educati on stakehol ders communi cate
regarding their needs. The workforce must be
prepared to contribute to target industries (see
economic recommendation 2) within Springfield
that are already established with sustained
workforce needs in the region. education and
job readiness programs must focus on cultivating
skills for industries like finance/insurance, health
care, and manufacturing. by initiating this
communication, direct hiring will become more
pervasive, leading to more students remaining in
Springfield after graduation.
This notion is consistent with the december
2011 Massachusetts economic development
pol i cy and Strategi c pl an where the fi rst
strategic initiative is to “Advance education and
Workforce development for Middle-Skill Jobs
Through Coordination of education, economic
development, and Workforce development
programs.” detailed strategies are focused
on: a) designing and developing a cohesive,
coordinated workforce development system with
clear leadership; b) improving responsiveness of
workforce programs to meet the demands of the
marketplace (employers); and c) prioritizing goals
of the State Science Technology, engineering
& Math (STeM) plan that align with middle-skill
jobs. This clearly laid-out state-level strategy
emphasizes that many of the skilled jobs of
today and tomorrow require tailored training
and technologically advanced skills but not a
bachelor’s degree.
An important theme throughout the rebuild
Spr i ngf i el d pl an i s t he r eact i vat i on of
“innovation” in Springfield. linking the vibrant
college/university environment to industry
and business can affordably foster innovative
thi nki ng. by worki ng i n partnershi p, both
educational and business actors could work
in a mutually beneficent manner. for students
and educators, this could mean augmented
f undi ng and i nf usi on of entrepreneuri al
enthusiasm that would create a more enriching
learning environment that prepares students
for participating in the local economy. for
businesses, a relationship with educational
institutions can play a part in developing new
products, solving organizational deficiencies, and
producing a crop of skilled local workers.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
• Affi l i ated Chambers of Commerce for
greater Springfield
• developSpringfield
• future Works
• future Works
• Holyoke Community College
• Massachusetts Career development institute
• Of f i ce of pl anni ng and economi c
development
• regional employment board
• Springfield colleges and universities
• Springfield public Schools
• Springfield Technical Community College
• Vocational High Schools (putnam & Science
and Tech)
• Western Mass edC
The city-wide planning process is organized according to the six domains of a healthy and vibrant community.
domains that are positively impacted by the initiative described on this page are indicated above.
Cultural physical economic Organizational educational Social
Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social
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Resource Needs
1. Collaboration between educational and
business communities
2. increased hours at libraries and school
facilities
3. After school training programs
4. businesses making a sustained commitment
to be part of the Springfield community,
and prioritizing/supporting public education
improvements
Potential Resource Opportunities
1. STCC/HCC partnershi p wi th regi onal
employment board
2. Wellspring initiative
3. future Works
4. School organized internships in collaboration
with local businesses
5. Apprenticeship programs
6. new engl and bus i nes s As s oci at es
(Springfield, MA)
7. uS department of education Office of
Vocational and Adult education programs,
resources, and grant opportunities
Precedents / Best Practices
Future Works (Springfield, MA)
future Works is a local program that connects
j ob-seekers wi th empl oyers i n Hampden
County. This centralized job database allows for
users to search for jobs online that are posted
by employers on the organization’s website.
located in the STCC Technology park, future
Works maintains a healthy physical presence that
is complemented by its website and Twitter.
http://getajob.cc
ROCA (Massachusetts)
rOCA is a Statewide program with offices in
Springfield that focuses on empowering at-risk
youth through job training, informal education,
and changing systems that are structured against
these less fortunate youths. A majority of rOCA’s
work is performed through interventions directed
at the most “difficult, challenging young people
- the young people who are unwilling or unable
to attend traditional programming, work, or
school.”
http://rocainc.org
Workforce Florida
The florida Workforce innovation Act called
for the creation of the “Workforce florida”
program in 2000. Workforce florida, along
with its workforce system partners, the florida
department of economic Opportunity and
the State’s 24 regional Workforce boards is a
business-led workforce policy board that has
become a catalyst for creating and nurturing
a capabl e and qual i f i ed workf orce. The
programs’s key policy initiatives are focused on
“restructuring florida’s ‘labor’ system to increase
flexibility and provide for greater local control
of workforce programs and services, making the
system nimble enough to respond to both local
and statewide demands, economic shifts and
strategic priorities.” examples include: business
incentive programs for training and “world class
service to florida’s target industry clusters”.
http://www.workforceflorida.com/
Priority: urgent
Action Steps
Workforce development: education System
1. Addr ess ear l y Chi l dhood educat i on
deficiencies and prepare children to be
linguistically and technologically literate
2. Vo/Tech programs at hi gh school s i n
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Springfield are some of the better programs
in the education system and critical to
expanding internships and training for
middle-skill jobs. learn from these schools,
such as the roger l. putnam Vocational
Training High School, what works and why.
3. develop internship/co-op programs for
college and high school students linked to
successful local companies
4. Create a prize for student innovation to spark
creative discussion, product innovation,
and entrepreneurial thought in the high
school and university systems. by getting
young people excited about these types of
ventures, the economy for Springfield can
be centered on a partnership for problem
solving and generating mutual prosperity.
The synergy of education and business
presents an opportunity to nourish this
innovation for the benefit of Springfield and
its residents.
5. Co n s i s t e n t wi t h t h e e d u c a t i o n
recommendations, develop a partnership
of public, private and non-profit leaders
to elevate the importance of pre-K to 12
education for all aspects of Springfield’s
present and future success. Springfield’s
col l eges must be acti ve parti ci pants,
significantly raising their contributions to the
solutions beyond having student teachers in
public schools.
6. Si mi l ar t o pr ogr ams i n geor gi a and
Michigan, develop a program to provide free
or significantly reduced tuition for Springfield
public high school graduates to attend
Springfield’s colleges. This could be a high-
profile and effective way to demonstrate
Springfield’s commitment to transforming
education with direct benefits to its current
residents with potential to attract new
residents.
Workforce development: post-education
1. fut ur e Wor ks i n Spr i ngf i el d as t he
designated one-stop shop for workforce
pl acement and support i n Spri ngfi el d
(located at STCC Technology park). it is
widely subscribed to, but would likely benefit
from additional funding/resources, and clear
coordination with efforts by the reb and
STCC.
2. Offer community-based workforce training
classes through community centers, libraries,
and school (educational recommendation 1)
3. determine the most pressing adult literacy
needs to improve the job readiness of
Springfield’s under-educated and immigrant
adult populations
Talent delivery: Connect workers with businesses
1. improve the connection between employers,
workforce training and employees –this
effort should build on the current STCC/HCC
partnership with close coordination with the
reb
2. Technical colleges and local businesses must
work together to understand needs and form
a mutually beneficial relationship. STCC and
HCC must follow-through on their current
initiative and partnership to develop closer
relationships with the business community
to better tailor curriculum and training
programs to business needs. This will likely
require regular reviews of curriculum with
the business community to understand what
training needs are not being met and ensure
a commitment to flexibility that meets the
needs of new, emerging businesses.
3. explicitly link target industries and job
opportunities to workforce training for
Springfield residents to have a supply chain
(pipeline) of talent for a full-range of jobs at
existing and new businesses. One idea to
explore is attracting bilingual call centers and
training Springfield’s bilingual residents with
the appropriate technical skills for these jobs.
4. devel op creati ve i ncenti ves to attract
businesses and skilled workers: a) Similar to
florida’s Quick response Training program ,
work with Western Mass edC, the regional
employment board of Hampden Country
and other state leaders to offer competitive,
tailored training programs to provide skilled
workers for new/expanded busi nesses
i n target i ndustri es that meet certai n
requirements; and b) offer incentives to live
in Springfield – this could apply for teachers,
emergency service providers (fire, police) and
perhaps other skilled professions.
5. Senior leadership from Springfield’s colleges
should have quarterly (or similar) meetings
wi th the ci ty’s economi c devel opment
l eader s t o i dent i f y key economi c
opportunities for the city and the role/
contributions that colleges can play
6. Working with the reb, analyze gaps between
supply and demand of qualified workers
7. identify potential linkages of local/regional
workforce to business opportunities (e.g.,
training bilingual residents for financial call
centers)
8. Co-op programs, internships, awareness for
graduating seniors
Project Location
Citywide
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Description
This category encompasses all of
Springfield’s organizational needs
and resources. included in this
category are organizational spaces
and programs that address the
various components of community
governance, including the school
committee, city elected officials,
various clubs, and myriad other
civic organizations. This category
also identifies how decisions made
on behalf of the community-at-
large are developed, deliberated
and implemented.
Recommendations
1. Strengthen developSpringfield as the Organization to partner with
the City to take a leadership role in guiding Springfield’s future
2. establish a body that coalesces community organizations to achieve
efficiency and efficacy through collaboration and cooperation
Organizational Domain
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Strengthen DevelopSpringfield as the Organization to Partner with
the City to take a Leadership Role in Guiding Springfield’s Future.
Breadcrumbs
• Citywide Meeting round 2
General Description
The key t o successf ul r evi t al i zat i on f or
cities, in large part, resides in leadership
and collaboration. Such leadership is not
one-dimensional but instead multi-faceted.
leadershi p at a hi gher l evel needs to be
sust ai ned, i nvol vi ng publ i c and pr i vat e
partnerships. it is also important that another
facet of leadership take place at the community/
nei ghborhood l evel . We further di scuss
neighborhood-level forms of leadership in
Organizational recommendation 2.
The rebuild Springfield plan is a systemic
approach to revitalization for Springfield that
goes well beyond traditional urban plans that
focus on development projects, streetscapes
and physical urban design. This plan addresses
a nexus of recommendations, each addressing
a part of the whole including the physical,
Cultural, Social, educational, economic and
Organizational domains of a healthy and thriving
city. given these recommendations are as much
programmatic as they are tangible projects,
leadership should be comprised of a diverse
group that is representative of the nexus.
devel opSpr i ngf i el d, wi t h t he s uppor t
of i ts di verse board and the Spri ngfi el d
redevel opment Authori ty, has provi ded
leadership in the rebuild Springfield planning
process. because of its commitment, resources,
organization will play a key role in developing
and promoting partnerships, which is equally
important to the successful revitalization of the
city.
devel opSpr i ngf i el d and t he Spr i ngf i el d
redevelopment Authority will take the lead
i n i mpl ement i ng t hi s r ecommendat i on.
developSpringfield needs to expand its scope to
treat each nexus domain with equal importance
in building the future of Springfield.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
• City businesses and organizations across the
nexus domains
• developSpringfield
• Municipal departments and agencies
Resource Needs
1. Sustaining funding over at least the next
three years
2. Substantial staff capacity
3. Stronger community capacity
4. Media deployment
5. A communications strategy
6. Strong collaboration with neighborhood
Councils
7. Advisory Committee members
Potential Resource Opportunities
1. grants
2. private Sector
3. Commonwealth of Massachusetts
diversity and experience, developSpringfield
i s the best candi date to work wi th the
Ci ty of Spri ngfi el d to create the rebui l d
Springfield leadership team that will drive the
implementation of the plan. This leadership
Organizational #1
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The city-wide planning process is organized according to the six domains of a healthy and vibrant community.
domains that are positively impacted by the initiative described on this page are indicated above.
Cultural physical economic Organizational educational Social
Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social
Precedents / Best Practices
Winston-Salem and Grand Rapids
• Two similar sized city’s that are doing just this
• public/private partnership
• review how they are organizing their groups
through Ci ty-to-Ci ty rel ati onshi p wi th
Springfield and learn from people who made
site visits.
• built around the nexus model so that all
recommendations are accounted for.
Priority
urgent
Action Steps
1. implementation of the rebuild Springfield
plan.
2. H i r e e x e c u t i v e d i r e c t o r f o r
developSpringfield and clearly define staff
job descriptions for support of the nexus
domain committee efforts to implement
recommendations.
3. establish leadership for all nexus domains
and be programmatically, representationally,
organizationally diverse.
4. Create 6-month calendar of implementation
steps for this organization.
5. Create communications path and plan for
connecting with the community.
6. update rebuild Springfield website with link
to developSpringfield for ongoing robust
communication.
7. develop collaboration between community
leaders and groups to improve organization
and to work together toward one common
vision for the city.
8. This must be a public/private partnership
to guarantee neither public nor private
dominance.
Project Location
developSpringfield
Rebuild Springfield Plan
Domain Implementation Leaders
Public & Private
Leader
ORGANIZATIONAL
Public & Private
Leader
SOCIAL
Public & Private
Leader
EDUCATIONAL
Public & Private
Leader
DISTRICT 1
Public & Private
Leader
DISTRICT 2
Public & Private
Leader
DISTRICT 3
Public & Private
Leader
ECONOMIC
Public & Private
Leader
OVERALL
Public & Private
Leader
CULTURAL
Public & Private
Leader
PHYSICAL
Springeld
Redevelopment
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establish a body that coalesces community organizations to achieve
efficiency and efficacy through collaboration and cooperation
Breadcrumbs:
• Citywide Meeting round 1
• Community policing
• food bank of Western Mass
• district Meeting round 1
• latino meeting
• religious leaders group
General Description
Many ci ti es throughout the nati on have
created formalized citizen organizations that
support a more intentional participation in
planning and development. in some places
this is known as Citizen participation project
or program (Cpp). A Cpp is a tool to establish
a continuing dialogue between communities,
neighborhoods and city government. in simple
terms, this organization, project or program is
the grassroots manifestation of implementation
leadership whose purpose is to communicate
and encourage engagement with citizens across
all constituencies.
A strong, organized, knowledgeable organization
is crucial for catalyzing neighborhood and
col l aborati on, i ncreasi ng the communi ty’s
access to Spri ngfi el d government affai rs,
and most of al l empoweri ng resi dents of
Springfield in a meaningful and constructive
way. neighborhood organizations, including
faith-based organizations, are vital to a strong
community. The partnership created through this
Citizens have been in the lead in the creation of
the rebuild Springfield plan, and citizens across
the Springfield have an important role to play in
its implementation and the future of the City.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
• Community Organizations
• faith based groups
• neighborhood Councils
• rSAC with support from developSpringfield
• Youth organizations
Resource Needs
1. developSpringfield should support this
organi zati on unti l they are suffi ci entl y
organized.
Potential Resource Opportunities
1. Third Sector new england does nonprofit
capacity building.
2. grants

Precedents / Best Practices
The Neighborhood Partnership Network (New
Orleans, LA)
The neighborhood partnership network (npn) is
a non-profit organization created in post-Katrina
new Orleans that facilitates neighborhood
collaboration, increases access to government
and information, and strengthens the voices of
individuals and communities in a constructive
recommendation will focus on more intentional
efforts for facilitating cooperation between all
such organizations in Springfield.
disasters reveal the importance of community
and illustrate how neighbors become their
own “first responders” – from rescuing their
neighbors to rescuing their neighborhoods.
recogni zi ng thi s hel ps us understand the
importance of multi-faceted opportunities
for participating in the revitalization of a city,
neighborhood by neighborhood. it never works
to assume that the solutions to problems and
development of new opportunities lie with one
institution, be that government (national, state or
local) or citizens understand this and are aware of
a place where they can make a contribution.
This recommendation stems from a need for
increased collaboration as well as bolstered
capaci ty – the capaci ty to f oster acti ve
citizenship. This means having the structure,
the skill, and the community will to create real
change inside of and outside City government.
in addition to concrete changes stemming from
less competitive and territorial neighborhood
councils and better-focused organizations, a
central structure for community engagement
will encourage university and non-profits to
collaborate with one another, and encourage
better political accountability and transparency.
Organizational #2
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and organized fashion. ultimately, npn’s
goal is to improve quality of life for residents
by engaging them in revitalization and civic
processes. www.npn.org
Though it started small, npn today has grown
to 5 staff members, a ten-member board of
directors, and over 200 member organizations.
Thos e member or gani z at i ons i ncl ude
neighborhood councils, corporate members, and
other community groups of interest.
especi al l y i mportant to Spri ngfi el d, npn
grew out of the realization of a need for a
citywide framework for assisting communities in
maximizing the use of limited resources while
providing connections to other neighborhoods
with similar obstacles.
Citizen Participation Program (New Orleans, LA)
Currently in its infancy in new Orleans, a Citizen
participation program allows residents to have a
stronger voice in municipal priority- and decision-
making. The City of birmingham, Alabama also
has a Cpp, instituted as far back as 1975 for the
purpose of encouraging better communication
between city government and residents.
Neighbors Building Neighborhoods (Norfolk,
VA)
no r f o l k ’ s n e w ne i gh bo r s bu i l di n g
nei ghborhoods program i s a communi ty
owner shi p i ni t i at i ve ai med at cr eat i ng
communities of choice. it is based on Healthy
neighborhoods and Asset-based Community
devel opment (AbCd) communi ty bui l di ng
principles and strives to create environments
where all community members collaborate
t hr ough s t r ong connect i ons , as s ume
ownership, focus on positive attributes of their
neighborhoods, look out for each other as good
neighbors, and invest through improvements to
their homes and neighborhood blocks.
Heal thy New Orl eans Nei ghborhoods &
Hartford Info
On a longer-term timeline, Springfield is in
need of better access to the kind of information
that will empower residents and community
organizations to make informed decisions and
give accurate feedback to city government.
Two models for such info-commons are Healthy
new Orleans neighborhoods (HnOn) and
Hartfordinfo. both resources are primarily
web-based information providers. HnOn is
perhaps more user-friendly and more polished,
while Hartfordinfo includes more map-based
information in a wider array of categories.
Priority
High
Action Steps
1. developSpringfield convene the rebuild
Springfield Advisory Committee (rSAC) and
have them expand membership to include
representation from every neighborhood in
the city and from other key constituencies
(e.g. organized labor, etc.).
2. Members familiarize themselves with details
of the rebuild Springfield plan and focus on
how they can support implementation.
3. Consistently focus on building community
capacity at the neighborhood level in order
for citizens to fully participate in the ongoing
development of their neighborhood and the
city overall.
4. Work towards creation of a 501c3 not-for-
profit organization to formalize a grass roots
citizen based organization.
5. pursue training for organizational board
development and funding.
Project Location
Citywide
The city-wide planning process is organized according to the six domains of a healthy and vibrant community.
domains that are positively impacted by the initiative described on this page are indicated above.
Cultural physical economic Organizational educational Social
Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social
COALESCE
COMMUNITY
ORG’S
Expanded
RSAC
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Description
This domain addresses overarching
citywide recommendations that
impact all other recommendations
is some way.
Recommendations
1. Make a conscious effort to improve the image and perception of
Springfield
2. implement the rebuild Springfield plan. Monitor and champion
measurable progress
Overall
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Make a conscious effort to improve the image and perception of
Springfield
Breadcrumbs
• Citywide Meeting round 1
• district 1 Meeting round 2
• Springfield Museums
• pbS documentary about Springfield
• new Hope pentecostal Church
• food bank of Western Mass
• Citywide Meeting round 2
General Descriptions
Of the myriad needs and issues the City of
Springfield faces today, perhaps the most
elusive and hard-to-address is the image and
perception of Springfield in the eyes of residents,
visitors, and regional neighbors. The path to
actively implementing this recommendation
and changi ng thi s percepti on i s through
comprehensive, incremental, and impactful
tactics and solutions.
like many cities of its size, Springfield suffers
from poor publicity in the local and regional
press. However, it is local residents who can
help to shape and mold Springfield’s image by
their reactions to daily life in the city. Citizen-
generated content through interactive media
like Twitter, blogs, facebook, and other web-
based publications provides a candid view
of life in Springfield, and this information can
be very influential in dictating the direction of
established media campaigns. Therefore, this
recommendation sets three primary goals:
resident participation in the rebuild Springfield
process has highlighted the issue of perception
as a challenge in making the city better. The
process has engaged a wide variety of citizens
who care very much about the city and its image.
Communication tools created for fostering
engagement such as the rebuild Springfield
websi te (www.rebui l dspri ngfi el d.com), the
rebuild Springfield facebook page, and project
database for sending email blasts continue to be
available and should be maintained and utilized
to the fullest degree for ongoing communication
of progress and positive news about the city.
perception can’t be changed simply through
conversati on; deeper, more wi despread
resident engagement in community affairs will
make residents more mindful of community
challenges and simultaneously make them
aware of Springfield’s triumphs and victories.
engagement can have many forms: participating
in neighborhood organizations, coaching little
league sports teams, frequenting more local
cultural events, or literally getting involved in
the rebuild Springfield effort at the Citywide or
district levels. engagement can also come in
the form of enlisting in a campaign to improve
Springfield’s image.
it is also vital for the business community to be
engaged in improving Springfield’s image, as
the “selling” of Springfield is central to the
1. Help the public think more positively about
Springfield,
2. improve the daily life of all citizens, and
3. engage citizens in both internal and external
communication efforts.
Overall #1
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turnaround of the city. by engaging partners
such as banks, colleges, major employers,
the Springfield Chamber of Commerce, the
Springfield business improvement district,
the greater Spri ngf i el d Conventi on and
Visitors bureau and the realtor Association of
pioneer Valley, a comprehensive reformation
of the perception of Springfield is feasible.
The opinions and recommendations of these
influential organizations play a large part in
molding Springfield, and a more concerted effort
to leverage the assistance of these stakeholders
will be elemental in spreading a positive image
of the city.
finally, the City must take on a proactive
relationship with the media. Too often, the
news that is being published about Springfield
reflects the city in a negative light, with stories of
crime, dishonesty, and shortcomings occupying
the headlines. efforts must be made to ensure
success stories are getting their fair share of
coverage as well. Obviously, success stories must
exist in order to be told, and that factor hinges
on implementing the recommendations from the
rebuild Springfield plan.
Of cour se, a successf ul r ef or mat i on of
Spri ngfi el d’s i mage i s dependent on real
progress on a variety of fronts—many of which
are represented in the rebuild Springfield
plan. for instance, embracing and transforming
downtown and other neighborhoods into more
inviting (and even eventful) places for workers
and students who commute into the city can
break through negative perception barriers.
This is why actively implementing the rebuild
Springfield plan is so vitally important.

Partnerships / Stakeholders
• Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of greater
Springfield
• banks
• City of Springfield
• Community groups
• CreativeSpringfield
• developSpringfield
• local arts and culture organizations
The city-wide planning process is organized according to the six domains of a healthy and vibrant community.
domains that are positively impacted by the initiative described on this page are indicated above.
Cultural physical economic Organizational educational Social
Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social
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• local news outlets
• Major economic institutions
• Make it Happen Springfield
• neighborhood Councils and Organizations
• pioneer Valley realtor Association
• rebuild Springfield implementation leaders
• residents
• Springfield business improvement district
• Springfield Convention and Visitors bureau
• Springfield high schools, colleges, and
universities
• Wes t er n Mas s ac hus et t s ec onomi c
development Council
Resource Needs
1. leadership in promoting a positive image of
Springfield
2. p r o a c t i v e r e l a t i o n s h i p b e t we e n
developSpringfield, the City of Springfield,
and the local media
3. Volunteerism
4. buy-in of the rebuild Springfield plan by
the residents, public and private institutions,
business owners, the City government, and
other stakeholders
Potential Resource Opportunities
1. Make it Happen Springfield “is gathering
and shari ng the stori es of the many
individuals who are contributing toward the
recovery effort and promoting ideas on how
others can help out as well. Together these
stories form a new narrative about the city,
comprised of hundreds of voices, describing
the positives and potential of Springfield,
MA.” in the works for around two years
now, the MiH effort is focused on actively
changing perspectives about Springfield by
publicizing many positive goings-on in the
City. www.makeithappencity.com
2. local media outlets
3. CreativeSpringfield, an online directory
of artists in the greater Springfield area,
has a goal of unifying the Springfield arts
community, fostering collaboration, and
creating relationships with businesses and
institutions. Arts can play a special role in
changing perception and attitudes.
4. implementation of the rebuild Springfield
plan
Precedents / Best Practices
Cities that are using “success stories” to market
themselves:
“The live music capital of the world” (Austin, TX)
The whole city’s focus is around the performing
arts and entertainment.
“The Creative Capital” (Providence, RI)
providence champions local artists, new living
spaces, universities, and cultural organizations.
504ward (New Orleans, LA)
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504ward, the col l aborati ve movement of
organi zati ons i n new Orl eans dedi cated
to retaining young talent in new Orleans.
www.504ward.com
Priority
urgent
Action Steps
1. implement the rebuild Springfield plan.
The energy behind the plan should garner a
positive reaction from the media and citizens
alike. if the recommendations in this plan
are successful, the subsequent turnaround in
Springfield will make a measurable impact in
the overall perception of the city.
2. Support the efforts of an organization or
group dedicated to marketing and outreach
in the City. Make it Happen Springfield
could be a partner in this effort. develop a
collaborative partnership between develop
Springfield and this marketing group to push
the agenda of the rebuild Springfield plan
on social media networks and conventional
media outlets.
3. develop Springfield and a marketing group
(such as Make it Happen Springfield) must
work with the local media to insure the
success stories of the rebuild Springfield
plan are told and an objective view on
progress is portrayed.
4. The partnership will encourage residents
to participate in expressing their views of
Springfield. They might consider providing
a public arena on which to display these
comments. This could end up being a
scaling-up of the effort already taking place
on makeithappencity.com, where short local
testimonial videos are displayed.
5. developSpringfield should create a network
of support for the rebuild Springfield plan
among the large economic stakeholders in
the city. A unified marketing effort should
be developed so these groups to have a
consistent message when selling the city to
large-scale economic actors.
6. devel opSpri ngfi el d shoul d make sure
that the conventional media outlets in
Springfield have complete access to the
progress information explained in Citywide
recommendation #2.
Project Location
Citywide
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Implement the Rebuild Springfield Plan. Monitor and champion
measurable progress
Breadcrumbs
• Springfield business improvement district
• Community foundation of Western Mass
General Description
Thi s i s per haps t he mos t i mpor t ant
recommendation in the rebuild Springfield
plan. The residents of Springfield first proposed
nearly every recommendation contained in this
plan at both the Citywide and district levels.
for successful implementation, this plan needs
to be adopted by all stakeholders in the City
of Springfield: municipal bodies, private firms,
non-profits, and local residents from all walks
of life. Though this recommendation seems
simple at face value, it is crucial that the plan be
implemented in a manner that allows residents
and stakeholders to track its progress, measure
successes, identify areas for improvement,
demand accountability, and find inroads to
participate in its execution.
Of crucial importance in implementing this
r ecommendat i on i s st eady, meani ngf ul
l eader s hi p t hr ough a par t ner s hi p of
devel opSpr i ngf i el d and t he Spr i ngf i el d
redevel opment Aut hor i t y dedi cat ed t o
strategically acting on the rebuild Springfield
plan. Additionally, successful implementation
of the plan will only be possible with support
from City leadership. ideally, the City would
assign coordination of plan activities with
communication is a driving principal of the plan;
it is crucial for keeping residents engaged and
for informing local and regional stakeholders of
concrete progress that is being made. This can
be achieved through the use of various digital
media. lastly, this effort should encourage
transparency in monitoring the city, state, and
federal funds related to both disaster rebuilding
(like the Tornado relief fund) and overall rebuild
Springfield efforts.
While we understand that Springfield’s CitiStat
program has been eliminated for the next
fiscal year because of budgetary constraints,
there may be other si mpl e methods f or
tracking and communicating progress of the
rebuild Springfield effort in the short- and
medium-term. An important action item for
the developSpringfield team will be to work
with implementation leaders across the nexus
domains to develop milestones for tracking and
measurement.
The action steps for this recommendation are
intended to develop a sustainable method for
communication and accountability; essential
characteri sti cs of rel i abl e l eadershi p, and
healthy collaboration. part of implementing
this recommendation will necessarily involve
bolstering the capacity of developSpringfield
with communications and outreach. This could
happen in-house, through developSpringfield
developSpringfield and the SrA to a specific
person or position within City. According
to a report by the federal reserve bank of
boston, reinvigorating Springfield’s economy:
lessons from resurgent Cities, “industry mix,
demographic composition, and geographic
location are not key factors distinguishing the
resurgent cities from Springfield…The most
important lessons from the resurgent cities
concern leadership and collaboration.”
efficient and objective monitoring of the rebuild
Springfield effort is a vitally important piece
of the implementation process. Transparent
Overall #2
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training, or out-of-house, through collaboration
with the Springfield Young professional Society
(YpS) or area colleges.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
• City of Springfield
• City-to-City group
• developSpringfield
• domain leaders
• pioneer Valley planning Commission
• Springfield high schools, colleges, and
universities
• Springfield public library
• Springfield Technical Community College

Resource Needs
1. buy-in and participation from the City of
Springfield and domain leaders
2. Web design and support for the rebuild
Springfield website
3. graphic design for creation of “report cards”
4. grant funding for electronic progress and
data monitoring
Potential Resource Opportunities
1. google Applications to meet the needs of
government
ht t p: //www. googl e. com/apps/i nt l /en/
government/trust.html
2. government Accounting Standards board,
Servi ce ef f orts and Accompl i shments
reporting
http://www.gasb.org/cs/ContentServer?
c=gASbContent_C&pagename=gASb
%2fgASbContent_C%2fproj ectpage&c
id=1176156646053
3. Web hosting and design students from area
high schools, colleges, and universities.
4. Hartfordinfo.org (a program of the Hartford
public library)
5. Springfield public library
Precedents / Best Practices
The Central City Renaissance Alliance (New
Orleans, LA)
The Central City renaissance Alliance (CCrA)
plan, a community driven neighborhood plan,
resulted in a systemic set of recommendations
that empowered this community to launch their
post Katrina recovery immediately.
The CCrA pl an and Or gani zat i on has
attracted a consortium of local, regional and
national funders who recognize the power of
an organized and focused community. not
only is CCrA helping to keep the eye on
implementation of the recommendations, but
has helped the funders be more strategic about
their investment.
CCrA was formed as a result of the year-
long planning process and continues to be
a lead convener, communicator and project
implementation leader in this strategically
located neighborhood. www.myccra.org
Community Social Data Strategy (Toronto)
This program is intended to provide citizens
and community groups with low-cost access to
research data that covers the physical, social,
and economic health of the city. Toronto
recognizes the importance of research data and
its ability to help discover social and economic
trends. The program started in July 2008. The
City of Toronto worked with the Canadian
Council on Social development to provide
access to Statistics Canada data at a cost of
$200 per year. participants have access to
neighborhood-level data, as well as that from the
other 14 municipalities involved in the initiative
and support for analysis of the data and the
dissemination of results.
The goal of the Community Social data Strategy
(CSdS) is to raise awareness within the municipal
and non-profit sectors about the potential uses
of research data to better understand the social
and economic trends within their communities.
Specific objectives are to:
The city-wide planning process is organized according to the six domains of a healthy and vibrant community.
domains that are positively impacted by the initiative described on this page are indicated above. v
Cultural physical economic Organizational educational Social
Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social
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• purchase, facilitate, and streamline access to
Statistics Canada data
• Train organizations to analyze and process
this data
• Communicate and disseminate the results as
widely as possible
http://www.toronto.ca/demographics/csds.htm
Managing for Results (Portland, OR
The main principal behind the “Managing for
results” program is the idea that “What gets
measured gets done.” The program is grounded
in a 4-step cycle: plan, budget, manage, and
report. each revolution of the cycle offers an
opportunity to insure that results are being
achieved in an efficient and timely manner.
Accumulated experience and data allow for
improved methods to fulfill goals. in portland,
the official Managing for results program started
in 2002, with the intention of making the city’s
government more efficient.
performance is gauged through workload,
efficiency, and effectiveness, metrics that are
gleaned from measuring the inputs (staff,
budget, equipment, etc.), outputs (amount of
services, number of classes taught, products,
etc.), and results (quality of service, citizen
satisfaction, etc.) of the program.
Priority
urgent
Action Steps
This recommendation has a two-tiered strategy
to ensure efficacy in the short-term and provide
the opportunity for data-driven research and
accountability measures in the long-term. To
begin, developSpringfield must implement
the rebuilding Springfield plan and enact this
recommendation to monitor the plan’s progress.
The first tier of this recommendation will be
spearheaded by developSpringfield to set up
an inexpensive and feasible process for tracking
implementation of the rebuild Springfield plan.
it will insure a higher level of transparency in the
implementation of the plan and would increase
time and resource efficiency.
1. developSpringfield first must task each
domain’s “implementation leader” with
developing an “Action Step Checklist” that
will establish short and long-term goals
for their domain. The timeframe for each
domain will vary; however, for the initiation
of the rebuild Springfield plan, 6-month and
12-month goals should be established in
each domain.
2. each domai n wi l l be responsi bl e f or
r epor t i ng t hei r pr ogr es s on each
of t he r ecommendat i ons r egul ar l y
(developSpringfield will supply a report
cards template and domain committees will
fill them out appropriately).
http://www.toronto.ca/demographics/csds.htm
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3. report card must be avai l abl e on the
website.
4. progress will be championed when complete
to garner more support from the community;
conversely, underperformance will call for
the reevaluation of approach, resources, and
personnel.
5. domain report cards must continually be
updated with results as well as new goals to
make sure individual recommendations stay
on course.
6. identifying and reaching out to capable
i ndi vi dual s and groups to assi st wi th
graphics, communications, and other digital
media is an efficient way to both involve
more residents in the process and to bolster
the capacity of developSpringfield. for
example, developSpringfield might reach
out to the Springfield Young professionals
Society to create the report cards or work
with a local college class to participate in
other ways.
The second ti er of thi s recommendati on
is longer-term and more capital intensive.
devel opSpri ngfi el d wi l l be charged wi th
developing an electronic system for monitoring
the rebuild Springfield plan in more depth. This
system will also contribute to the benchmarking
and measurement of other citywide efforts. This
stage would be funded by a grant (like the ibM
Smarter Cities program).
1. developSpringfield would seek a grant to
develop a method for data-driven analysis
to understand the effects of the rebuild
Springfield plan and track indicators for other
city initiatives.
2. The City will participate in collecting and
providing raw social, physical, and economic
data.
3. This data would be accessible to community
groups, residents, business owners, and
potential investors through in online format
that is well designed and easily accessible.
4. Thi s tool wi l l pl ay an i ntegral part i n
measuring the progress of the rebuild
Springfield effort as well as other City
benchmarking necessities.
5. Thi s tool shoul d be used by the Ci ty,
devel opSpri ngf i el d, domai n l eaders,
and communi t y gr oups t o i dent i f y
problems, develop solutions, and measure
implementation results and progress.
Project Location
Citywide
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Philanthropic Opportunities
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Philanthropic Opportunities
The rebui l d Spri ngfi el d consul tant team
i ncl uded the experti se of a phi l anthropi c
f und devel opment exper t , Jul i et page.
Her pr of es s i onal obs er v at i on i s t hat
developSpringfield has positive ambitions for the
city and for the region that Springfield serves and
supports. The organization has clearly emerged
to provide leadership for issues far beyond
economic development.
developSpringfield’s mission, and efforts it will
facilitate in support of the plan’s implementation,
are fundable if presented to the foundation
communi t y t hr ough appr opr i at e means.
developSpringfield should be the first entity to
note that an economically thriving Springfield is
good for everyone—from the region’s wealthiest
to the neediest who are often the primary
constituents of foundation grant making.
philanthropic dollars are few compared to
public funds. for this reason, foundation officers
look for “leverage” opportunities for their
grants. This is particularly true in a recovery
setting—be it recovery from a catastrophe
or from a weak economy— when federal
funding can be comparatively large. in order
to secure foundation support, it is critical that
developSpringfield and Springfield citizens
promote and accentuate the programming and
activities that influence government policy or
direct public dollars.
We have identified a few immediate and near-
term opportunities around which the citizens of
Springfield, through developSpringfield might
launch conversations with local and national
foundations and have outlined what such a
launch might look like. Also included are some
thoughts on launching work with foundations
and a short list of easy practices that develop
Springfield, might adopt or reinforce in the
process of developing new relationships within
the philanthropic sector.
Immediate Fundraising Opportunities
Several of develop Springfield’s current projects
are consummately fundable. The process of
hiring an executive director, including expenses
associated with retaining a search firm, could
be appealing to local foundations. The position
should be marketed as one that will be hugely
influential over a $120 million rebuilding project
with unprecedented opportunities for urban
revitalization in a storied older industrial city.
Additionally, the retention of a feMA advocate
to ensure that Springfield gets its fair share
of disaster dollars may be of interest to a
local foundation that has invested in cultural
institutions or housing in the area.
As developSpringfield oversees and otherwise
participates in the rebuild Springfield plan
i mpl ementati on, devel op Spri ngfi el d wi l l
gather extensive data. This will provide a terrific
opportunity to promote civic pride by “asset
mapping” all that Springfield has to offer in
terms of resources. like Milton glaser’s iconic
“i love new York” logo, which was in fact
commissioned by new York State’s Commerce
department i n the i nterest of attracti ng
tourism despite staggering crime rates, a visual
representation of the region’s assets could be
transformative in the public sphere.
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Potential Funding Opportunities for Near-Term
Programming
planning for Stellar Schools. developSpringfield
might host a forum to explore 21st Century
education design and programming options
around replacement facilities at the current sites
of the dryden and brookings schools. new,
first-rate institutions at the sites of schools
that did not previously meet Commonwealth
of Massachusetts standards could be game
changers for the city and the region.
rebuilding from the June 1 tornado presents a
singular opportunity for long-term community
and economic development. developSpringfield
might easily secure philanthropic funding to
explore legal and planning options to create one
or two 21st Century schools in the Six Corners/
Old Hill and east forest park neighborhoods.
Opportunities at Westover
The “Air reserve base” just north of Springfield
is the largest of its kind in the country and is
slated to absorb other military units over the
course of the coming decade. it has a purported
annual economic impact of one quarter-billion
dollars. developSpringfield could raise money
to explore ways in which economic, cultural and
social stakeholders in the region might better
incorporate military service personnel into their
planning. indeed, there may be funding streams
from the military itself.
Smart Growth: Adaptation and Equity
norman francis, the director of the louisiana
recovery Authority and president of Xavier
university, the preeminent historically black
college in new Orleans, sagely noted that a
“disaster is a terrible thing to waste.” entrenched
poverty and institutionalized racism can be
addressed in the rebuilding of Springfield.
developSpringfield could lead a discussion
around ways that rebuilding could promote
economic opportunity for all, steady funding
streams would follow.
Foundation Fundraising Launch
by participating in and leading post-disaster
r ebui l di ng, and bei ng ambi t i ous about
t he oppor t uni t y t o “r ebui l d st r onger , ”
developSpringfield—perhaps unwittingly—has
already composed a coherent and compelling
pitch to the philanthropic sector, and should
now develop an outreach effort to local funders,
in particular those that funded the planning
process. doi ng so wi l l hel p phi l anthropi c
thought leaders understand the broad impact
of developSpringfield’s role. This is the arena
in which developSpringfield must be overt
regarding the fact that a truly healthy economy
includes all people in wealth creation.
There may need to be a change in language
addressing wealth creation to the lingo of
funders, such as “workforce development,”
“environment” and “smart growth” even if that
is not how developSpringfield has thought
of their work internally. An excellent model
for outreach to local funders could be casual
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briefings. no matter the format, the message
would be that developSpringfield has exciting,
insider information on activities relevant to their
grant making portfolios. developSpringfield can
take advantage of their leadership’s social and
political cachet by asking individual stakeholders
to host these events. foundation trustees and
program officers would likely appreciate the
success and celebrity of the rebuild Springfield
plan.
A few preliminary, exploratory conversations
with candid program officers would benefit and
inform their planning for fund development.
Such conversations would help identify “external
champions,” which we strongly believe is a key
element to any successful foundation campaign.
A plan of action might include:
1. identifying potential funders by looking
to what entities fund the major cultural
institutions of the region;
2. developing a two-page document that
outlines the project to be funded and the
theory as to how this will effect change in the
region; (it would be advisable to develop a
rough budget and budget narrative.)
3. S u bmi t t i n g pe r mu t a t i on s of t h e
aforementioned two-pager as e-mails and
“letters of inquiry” to target foundations;
4. Securing meetings at foundations; (This will
certainly require travel for key city leaders,
and possibly an engaged board member or
elected official such as the Mayor.)
5. responding quickly to any solicitations for
additional materials upon conclusion of any
of the above meetings;
6. Hosting site visits if proposals advance.
General Good Practi ces for Foundati on
Fundraising
The best tool for foundation fundraising is
great programming communicated effectively.
And although that statement seems simple,
management of f oundat i on gr ant s can
destabilize any organization. indeed, it is often
recommended that individual and corporate
giving programs are developed instead of
engagi ng i n foundati on fundrai si ng. Any
fundrai si ng efforts must be supported by
appropriate staffing.
Some other important strategies include:
1. Mai ntai ni ng excel l ence i n wri tten and
or al communi cat i on—and nomi nat e
spokespeople within the organization to
manage foundation contacts;
2. protecti ng schedul es from i mpromptu
interviews and queries;
3. establishing systems for timely submission of
proposals and reports.
Conclusion
begin looking carefully for instances in which
the plan implementation work is bringing about
broader social change—and to be immodest in
accentuating it to the right people at the right
time. developSpringfield is operating in a realm
with very real metrics and that unto itself is an
attractive conversation starter at any foundation.
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Funding Opportunities for Economic Development
While the June tornado in Springfield affected
the city’s economy, it also offered a unique
opportunity to reassess economic development,
provided momentum to accelerate projects
that are already “in the works”, and prioritized
new economic development efforts. A number
of the recommendations outlined in the plan
wi l l requi re si gni fi cant fi nanci al resources
for implementation. federal, state, regional
and local funding is available to government
entities, private businesses and individuals to
support recovery efforts and overall economic
growth in Springfield. These resources include
weatherization funding available to low income
families for housing improvements, foundation
grants for specific community development
projects, microloans and Common Capital
financing for businesses, and Hud funding for
sustainability initiatives. These are just a few of
the recommendations offered in the plan and
only a sampling of the funding options available.
While significant funding sources exist to
support recovery plan initiatives, it is important
to note that federal grants often require state
or local matching funds. public and private
organizations interested in taking advantage of
the funding available through federal agencies
must work together to best l everage the
resources available. Springfield must galvanize
its private, non-profit/institutional, and public
organizations to pursue funding resources. even
for non-federal funding applications, articulating
a broad level of support for specific projects
will enhance the competitiveness of the funding
request. A coordinated effort between public
and private organizations is critical to ensure that
all funding opportunities are identified, and that
the limited funding available to support recovery
plan initiatives is most efficiently and effectively
utilized.
Housi ng, Economi c Devel opment and
Communities
U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)
• Weatherization Assistance program: enables
low-income families to permanently reduce
their energy bills by making their homes more
energy efficient. dOe provides funding to
states, which manage the day-to-day details of
the program. http://www1.eere.energy.gov/
wip/wap.html
• State energy program: provides financial/
technical assistance to states through formula
and competitive grants. States use their
formula grants to develop state strategies
and goals to address their energy priorities.
Competi ti ve grant sol i ci tati ons f or the
adoption of energy efficiency/renewable
energy products and technologies are issued
annually based on available funding. States
provide a 20% match. http://www1.eere.
energy.gov/wip/sep.html
• energy efficiency and Conservation block
grant program: uses both formula and
competitive grants to help u.S. cities, counties,
states, territories, and indian tribes develop,
promote, implement, and manage energy
efficiency and conservation projects. http://
www1.eere.energy.gov/wip/eecbg.html
U. S. Department of Housi ng and Urban
Development (HUD)
• Ch o i c e ne i g h b o r h o o d s i n i t i a t i v e
implementation grants: $110 million available
in fY2012. Communities must have in place a
comprehensive neighborhood revitalization
strategy, or Transformation plan. funds are
i ntended to transform di stressed publ i c
and assisted housing into energy efficient,
mixed-income housing that is physically and
financially viable over the long-term. They may
also be used for other activities designed to
improve neighborhoods. http://portal.hud.
gov/hudportal/Hud?src=/program_offices/
public_indian_housing/programs/ph/cn
U.S. Economic Development Administration
(EDA)
• provides grants to economically distressed
communities to generate new employment,
hel p retai n exi sti ng j obs and sti mul ate
industrial and commercial growth. http://www.
eda.gov/
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Massachusetts Executive Office of Housing and
Economic Development
• Communi ty devel opment bl ock grant -
recovery Act program (Cdbg-r): Hud has
allocated $9.1 million from the American
recovery and reinvestment Act (ArrA) to
Massachusetts for distribution through the
Massachusetts Community development block
grant (Cdbg) program. The money will be
granted to non-entitlement cities and towns.
http://www.mass.gov/hed/community/funding/
community-development-block-grant-cdbg.
html
• Community Services block grant (CSbg): A
federally funded, poverty reduction program
that was created to promote and provide an
array of services and activities to encourage
sel f-suffi ci ency and to make permanent
improvements in the lives of low-income
families and individuals. http://www.mass.
gov/hed/communi ty/fundi ng/communi ty-
development-block-grant-cdbg.html
• economic development fund (edf): provides
funding for projects that create and/or retain
jobs, improve the local and/or regional tax
base, or otherwise enhance the quality of
life in the community. edf gives priority to
assistance for physical improvements and
mixed-use projects supporting downtown and
commercial center development. http://www.
mass.gov/hed/community/funding/economic-
development-fund-edf.html
• gateway plus Action grant: funding to 18
gateway Cities to support local strategic
planning efforts to increase diversity of housing
options, increase economic opportunities,
foster and strengthen civic engagement, and
revitalize neighborhoods. http://www.mass.
gov/hed/community/funding/gatweay.html
• individual development Account (idA): State
funded pilot program that provides funds
for low to moderate income wage earners to
reach self sufficiency and ultimately achieve
homeownership. http://www.mass.gov/hed/
community/funding/individual-development-
account-ida.html
• Massachusetts downtown initiative (Mdi):
The primary mission of the Massachusetts
downtown initiative is to make downtown
revitalization an integral part of community
development in cities and towns across the
Commonwealth. http://www.mass.gov/hed/
community/funding/massachusetts-downtown-
initiative-mdi.html
• nei ghborhood Housi ng Servi ces ( nHS) :
neighborhood Housing Services program
assists residents and public/private entities to
reinvest in urban neighborhoods (including
Springfield) by rehabilitating housing and
making it affordable for low and moderate-
income families. http://www.mass.gov/hed/
community/funding/neighborhood-housing-
services-nhs.html
• neighborhood Stabilization program (nSp):
nSp1 is a $54.8 million grant program awarded
by Hud to Massachusetts and four of its cities,
including Springfield. funds are to be used
primarily for the acquisition and rehabilitation
of abandoned and foreclosed properties.
http://www.mass.gov/hed/community/funding/
nsp.html
Common Capital (Western Massachusetts
Enterprise Fund)
• A number of different financing programs are
available to businesses through Common
Capital, which helps match relevant funding
opportunities for each business situation.
New Market Tax Credits
• provides tax credit incentives to investors for
equity investments in certified Community
development entities, which invest in low-
income communities.
The MassWorks Infrastructure Program
• provides public infrastructure grants that
support a number of di fferent types of
projects, including housing development at
density of at least 4 units to the acre (both
market and affordable units) and community
revitalization and sustainable development.
http://www.mass.gov/hed/economic/eohed/
pro/the-massworks-infrastructure-program.html
Habitat for Humanity
• Through volunteer labor and donations of
money and materials, the organization builds
and rehabilitates simple, decent houses
al ongsi de homeowner partner fami l i es.
http://www.habi tat.org/cd/l ocal /affi l i ate.
aspx?place=66
Massachusetts Housing Partnership Fund
• Statewide public non-profit affordable housing
organization that works in concert with the
governor and the state department of
Housing and Community development to help
increase the supply of affordable housing in
Massachusetts. http://www.mhp.net/
Ford Foundation
• Makes grants for general /core support,
projects, planning, competition, matching,
r ecover abl e, i ndi vi dual , endowment ,
f ou n da t i on - a dmi n i s t e r e d pr oj e c t s ,
program-related investments. http://www.
fordfoundation.org/regions/united-states
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Home Depot Foundation
• Seeks to improve the homes and lives of
deserving families through a combination of
volunteerism, grants and product donations.
http://homedepotfoundation.org/how-we-
help/grants.html
The Lowe’ s Chari tabl e and Educati onal
Foundation
• provides organizational grants from $5,000 to
$25,000 for community improvement projects
and public education (priority given to public
K-12 schools). http://www.lowes.com/cd_The+
lowes+Charitable+and+educational+foundati
on_474741445_
Johnson Controls
• provides assistance to programs in the areas of
justice and law, community and neighborhood
improvements, the environment, civic activities
and equal opportunity, citizenship and safety.
http://www.johnsoncontrols.com/publish/us/
en/about/our_community_focus/johnson_
controls_foundation.html
Textron
• giving primarily for community funds, higher
education, including scholarship programs,
and hospitals and health agencies; support
al so f or youth cl ubs, urban programs,
minorities, and cultural programs. http://www.
textron.com/about/commitment/corp-giving/
Enterprise Green Communities
• provides resources and expertise to enable
developers to build and rehabilitate affordable
homes that are heal thi er, more energy
efficient and better for the environment. grant
are awarded for charrettes, sustainability
training, and other projects. http://www.
enterpri secommuni ty.com/sol uti ons-and-
innovation/enterprise-green-communities/
resources
Urban Land Institute (ULI)
• urban innovation fund provides venture
capital/seed money for innovative community
outreach projects led by uli members and
district Councils.
Private Equity/Private Financing
Tax Increment Financing (TIF)
Corporate giving
Private developers
Sustainable Development
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
Assessment Grant Program
• These grants provide funding to inventory,
characterize, assess, and conduct planning
and communi ty i nvol vement rel ated to
brownfield sites. grants are for up to $200,000
to address sites contaminated by hazardous
substances, and up to $200,000 to address
sites contaminated by petroleum. Applicants
can also apply as an Assessment Coalition (a
group of three or more eligible entities) for up
to $1 million. http://www.epa.gov/brownfields/
assessment_grants.htm
Cleanup Grant Program
• provide funding for a recipient to carry out
cleanup activities at brownfields sites that it
owns. Sites may be contaminated by hazardous
substances and/or petroleum. grants are up
to $200,000 per site and require a 20 percent
cost share. http://www.epa.gov/brownfields/
cleanup_grants.htm
U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT)
• Tr anspor t at i on i nvest ment gener at i ng
economic recovery (Tiger) discretionary
grant program: included in the American
recovery and rei nvestment Act to spur
a nati onal competi ti on f or i nnovati ve,
mul t i modal , and mul t i - j ur i s di ct i onal
transportation projects that promise significant
economic and environmental benefits to an
entire metropolitan area, a region, or the
nation. Tiger iV was announced in february
and will award approximately $500 million
toward projects that meet the criteria. http://
www.dot.gov/recovery/
American Planning Association (APA)
• Offers some grant opportunities for a variety of
projects. http://www.planning.org/divisions/
housing/grants/
Corporate giving
Small Business and Entrepreneur Support
Economic Development Administration (EDA)
• provides grants to economically distressed
communities to generate new employment,
hel p retai n exi sti ng j obs and sti mul ate
industrial and commercial growth. http://www.
eda.gov/
Massachusetts Executive Office of Labor and
Workforce Development
• Workforce Training fund: provides resources
to Massachusetts businesses and workers
to train current and newly hired employees.
ht t p: //www. mass. gov/l wd/empl oyment -
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s er v i c es / bus i nes s - t r a i ni ng- s uppor t /
wtfp/
• On-the-Job Training: Assists employers with
the cost of hiring and training a new employee.
ht t p: //www. mass. gov/l wd/empl oyment -
s er v i c es / bus i nes s - t r a i ni ng- s uppor t /
ojt/
• Workforce Training fund express program:
provides training grants targeted to small
employers with a maximum of 50 employees
in Massachusetts and labor organizations.
ht t p: //www. mass. gov/l wd/empl oyment -
services/business-training-support/trainingpro/
workforce-training-fund-express.html
Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of greater
Springfield
• Members have access to networking and
i nformati onal programs, marketi ng and
sponsorship opportunities, and other benefits.
Kiva
• Connects people through lending to alleviate
poverty. leveragi ng the i nternet and a
worldwide network of microfinance institutions,
Kiva lets individuals lend as little as $25 to help
create opportunity around the world. http://
www.kiva.org/
Grameen America
• provides loans, savings programs, financial
educati on, and credi t establ i shment to
low-income entrepreneurs. All loans are
for income-generating purposes and help
individuals to start or expand a small business.
http://www.grameenamerica.com/
Private Investors
Local or regional universities and colleges
Workforce Training
US Department of Labor
• The employment and Training Administration
(eTA), u.S. department of labor (dOl), has
avai l abl e approxi matel y $98.5 mi l l i on i n
Workforce innovation fund grants authorized
by the full-Year Continuing Appropriations
Act, 2011 (p.l. 112-10). These funds support
innovative approaches to the design and
delivery of employment and training services
that generate long-term improvements in the
performance of the public workforce system,
both in terms of outcomes for job seeker and
employer customers and cost-effectiveness.
http://www.doleta.gov/grants/find_grants.cfm0
U.S. Department of Educati on Offi ce of
Vocational and Adult Education
• programs, resources, and grant opportunities.
http://www2.ed.gov/programs/gtep/index.html
Massachusetts Executive Office of Labor and
Workforce Development
• Workforce Training fund: provides resources
to Massachusetts businesses and workers
to train current and newly hired employees.
ht t p: //www. mass. gov/l wd/empl oyment -
s er v i c es / bus i nes s - t r a i ni ng- s uppor t /
wtfp/
• On-the-Job Training: Assists employers with
the cost of hiring and training a new employee.
ht t p: //www. mass. gov/l wd/empl oyment -
s er v i c es / bus i nes s - t r a i ni ng- s uppor t /
ojt/
• Workforce Training fund express program:
provides training grants targeted to small
employers with a maximum of 50 employees
in Massachusetts and labor organizations.
ht t p: //www. mass. gov/l wd/empl oyment -
services/business-training-support/trainingpro/
workforce-training-fund-express.html
Kresge Foundation
• provides operating support grants, project
support grants, program-related investments
to arts and culture, community development,
education, the environment, health and human
services, other causes.
FedEx
• Cor por at e r esour ces i ncl ude f i nanci al
contributions, in-kind charitable shipping
services and employee volunteer services.
Textron
• School-to-work and welfare-to-work programs,
job training for underserved audiences, literacy
and eSl (english as a Second language)
pr ogr ams; enr i chment and ment or i ng
programs for youth; college/university Support
- including scholarships and internships for
women and minorities (with emphasis on
technology, manufacturing and engineering).
http://www.textron.com/about/commitment/
corp-giving/
Corporate giving
Local or regional universities and colleges
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Implementation of the Citywide and District Plans:
Challenges, Opportunities, and Financing in Real Estate
On June 1, 2011, a devastating tornado ripped
through Springfield, laying waste in a matter
of seconds to everything in its path – homes,
businesses, and property gone in an instant. for
a city struggling to recover from a deep national
recession and long decades of disinvestment
– it was unbelievable – heartbreaking. but
instead of surrendering to the circumstances,
the City of Springfield and developSpringfield
have rallied to the cause and set in motion
a bold plan to make the best of a very bad
situation. Opportunity often comes disguised as
a challenge. The City and developSpringfield
have a chance to overcome market forces long
at work in Springfield by leveraging financial
resources that would not be available were it
not for the disastrous events of that day. Oddly,
like the weather after a tornado, the clouds over
Springfield may in fact have a silver lining if the
tornado can serve as a catalyst for transformative
investments in the City’s future. The aspirations
must go beyond simply rebuilding what was
destroyed that day.
The nature and extent of the Chal l enges
created by the tornado are such that the State
and federal resources typically available to a
community like Springfield will be insufficient
to finance the implementation of the rebuild
Springfield plan. basically, Springfield has a
sudden urgent need to undertake rebuilding
multiple projects in a short period of time; critical
projects that are expected to involve substantial
financing gaps.
Accordingly, we recommend that the City
and developSpringfield aggressively pursue
a dedicated federal appropriation. There is
ample precedent for such an appropriation in the
aftermath of other natural disasters throughout
the united States and Springfield can make a
compelling case that its circumstances warrant a
similar appropriation. This appropriation should
be flexible in nature so that financing gaps of
various types can be effectively closed.
The following discussion sets forth a broad outline
for implementation that highlights the Challenges
and Opportunities for funding the execution of
the rebuild Springfield plan. This section of the
plan will focus primarily, but not exclusively, on
the ambitious plans for district 1 (Metro Center
and South end) and district 2 (Maple-High, Six
Corners). The demographics and economics
of district 3 (east forest park and Sixteen Acres)
are substantially more favorable and the level of
public intervention required to rebuild in these
neighborhoods will not be as extensive.
Challenges: Market
Springfield is the dominant urban center of the
pioneer Valley – the third point in a triangle of
economic activity connected via i-90 to boston
in the east and via i-91 to Hartford, CT in the
south. The City enjoys tremendous regional
accessibility, strong public and private sector
institutions, a concentration of businesses and
service amenities, lovely historic building stock
(both commercial and residential), and a loyal and
committed citizenry that cares about the City’s
future.
in spite of these positive attributes, however,
the Springfield markets have a long history of
underperforming relative to other competitive
cities in Massachusetts. resident incomes
remain very modest, population and household
counts have been static for a decade, vacancy
in both commercial and residential property
is consistently high, existing home values
are generally below replacement cost and
commercial rents are insufficient to support the
cost of new construction. in light of these factors,
it should come as no surprise that absorption of
both residential and commercial product, which
was modest even in the most recent boom years
(2005-2007), has been slow to negative since the
onset of the 2008 recession.
(See real estate Appendix A for market reports
and data compiled for this study)
• Home Ownership Units. by way of example,
the average Springfield single-family home sells
for approximately $150,000; and home prices
in districts 1 and 2 generally are well below the
average - estimated at $125,000 for new single
family product and up to $75,000 per unit for
two-four family stock. even at these affordable
prices and in the most robust recent market
time frames, ownership housing absorption for
the City as a whole was less than 40 units per
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sources to make investments in the districts
1 and 2. At the same time, public dollars are
increasingly scarce and sought after by the
many worthy causes that have a need. And the
competition for these resources is growing as
budgetary constraints reduce available funds
at both the State and federal levels and the
stresses of a slow economic recovery drive the
need for public supports of all sorts even higher.
• Cost of Capital. Capital is available today at
historically low rates, but underwriting standards
remain stringent as investors and lenders seek
to avoid risk in these volatile economic times
- and Springfield has been a historically risky
market for investment. The overall cost of
capital can only be reduced to acceptable levels
if low or zero cost public sources and creative,
non-profit funders can participate at levels
or in ways that drive down the cost and risk of
investment to the private marketplace.
• Financing and Development Complexity.
As described above, most projects of scale
contemplated by the district 1 and 2 plans will
require a complex layering of public and private
financing sources – each with its own eligibility
criteria, underwriting standards, application
procedures and competitive landscape. Most
private developers will not have the expertise
(or the inclination) required to sort through
this complexity - lacking either the technical
sophistication or local knowledge - to package
specific projects that take full advantage of
the financial resources available to close the
financing gaps referenced earlier.
• Technical Assistance Capability. providing
pot ent i al r edevel oper s and pr oper t y
owners with pre-development services (e.g.
si te assembl y, permi tti ng i ncenti ve and
conventional financing, etc.) to mitigate this
complexity and facilitate development will be
year – with only a small fraction of this activity in
districts 1 and 2.
• Rental Apartments. in part, the lack of
ownership activity has been driven by the small
size of the ownership market overall. fully half
of housing units citywide and an even higher
proportion (nearly 75%) in districts 1 and 2, are
occupied by renters rather than owners. like
pricing in homeownership markets, rents are
also relatively affordable both in Springfield and
those neighborhoods with a large proportion of
existing tenants paying so-called market rents
at or near parity with defined affordable, low to
moderate income standards.
• Retail Space. As for the commercial markets, it
is clear that the amount of existing retail space
in districts 1 and 2 far exceeds the level of
demand required to support it. This, coupled
with changes in the neighborhood demography
and shopping habits over the last several
decades, has rendered many of the existing
spaces a poor fit to tenant requirements in
the modern age. As a result, vacancy is high –
consistently in the 20% to 30% range in recent
years and rents are very low at under $10
to $12 per square foot per year for existing,
independently owned and managed spaces.
• Office Space. finally, to the office markets
where best-in-class downtown office building
vacancies have remained stubbornly in the 10%
and 15% range for a decade despite a history
of affordable rents hovering in the teens to low
$20 per square foot per year. upper floor office
space is reportedly less than 50% occupied;
much of it uninhabitable without significant
renovation and code compliance work.
These conditions prevailed long before the
tornado wreaked havoc in the district 1, 2
and 3 neighborhoods on June 11, 2011. The
question is: How can the tornado recovery
effort - including the financial resources that
come with it - be deployed to overcome these
ambient market forces and create a more vibrant,
more sustainable long term future for the City of
Springfield?
Challenges: Financing
While insurance proceeds will go a long way
to addressing the capital needs for many
property owners victimized by the tornado, the
implementation of most major renovation or
redevelopment projects in the tornado impacted
areas will also require some combination of debt
and equity investment (several potential sources
are described in the discussion of Opportunities
that follows).
• Financing Gap. As shown by our market
investigations and the illustrative project
proformas prepared for this study (see real
estate Appendix b for the detailed proformas
analyses), there is a substantial gap between the
cost required to build or rehabilitate buildings
in districts 1 and 2 and the investment of
debt and equity that can be justified by these
activities. This gap between project cost and
the economic value to a prospective investor
is not directly attributable to the tornado but
reflects the market realities in Springfield and
constitutes a financing risk that will be difficult
for private capital to overcome absent the
public incentives and technical assistance made
possible by the tornado relief and recovery
effort.
• Capital Availability. While private capital is
generally available today (lenders are anxious to
lend and equity investors have money to invest),
public capital will be required to entice private
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spillover impacts on surrounding corridors and
residential areas in terms of perception, interest,
and investment.
• Parking. parking is an essential resource for
market success. While the visual character
of open, street-facing parking lots is often
less than appealing, well designed, interim
parking on vacant and abandoned lots offers an
effective strategy for addressing the needs of
local businesses and shoppers, while improving
the visual character of the districts 1 and 2.
• Sustainable Community. A more livable,
sustainable, inclusive community is also more
marketable – to businesses and residents
alike. plans that strike a balance between retail
and business uses, civic and community uses,
recreation and entertainment uses, affordable
and market rate and rental and ownership
housing options promote a highly desirable
quality of life and enhance the opportunity to
attract new residents and visitors to the market.
Opportunities: Legal and Regulatory Tools
• Abandoned Property. Acquiring vacant,
abandoned, and tax delinquent property,
holding it, and reintroducing it to private
ownership and development are tried and
true public revitalization strategies. These
methods along with other code enforcement
and taxation strategies can encourage owners
of vacant properties to actively reuse and
redevelop vacant sites for a variety of uses
and will help alleviate the perception of
disinvestment in the districts.
• Code Compl i ance. Whi l e not uni que,
Springfield has a comparatively large number
of vacant and abandoned structures and lots
in the study areas, which reduces the value of
adjoining properties and creates a concentrated
• Supporting market growth with economic
development initiatives
All have the potential to improve Springfield’s
market positioning and competitive advantages,
reducing perceived investment risks and helping
to make the dollars – both public and private - go
further.
Opportunities: Physical and Environmental
Quality
• Historic preservation. The existing historic
building stock is one of Springfield’s greatest
competitive market advantages. Adaptive
reuse of historic buildings and sites will enhance
the visual appeal of the districts 1 and 2 as
well as the market appeal for residents and
businesses alike.
• public realm. An attractive streetscape with
a thoughtful system of public spaces helps to
create a real market destination and mobilizes
community partners to ensure long term
stewardship of these important public assets. in
the public realm, investments in infrastructure
upgrades such as streetscape improvements,
street lighting, sidewalk repairs, well designed
bus shelters, public art installations all help to
create an impression of momentum, investment
and care.
• Acti vi ty nodes. Cl usteri ng new uses,
investment, and development around existing
activity centers is important to focus energy
and resources, and create a critical mass of
interest and activity which will draw surrounding
residents and visitors to the districts. When
markets are small as they are in Springfield,
strategies that concentrate activity will be more
successful. established, healthy, pedestrian-
scale activity centers can also create positive
an essential ingredient in implementing the
district 1 and 2 plans. This could be a logical
role for developSpringfield.
• A Strategic Development and Financing Plan.
The tornado destroyed multiple properties in an
underperforming market in a matter of seconds.
investment in rebuilding, redeveloping or
replacing these properties will need to be
phased over a period of several years to allow
the market to absorb these new assets and
avoid short-term overbuilding. The district
plans contain many excellent ideas for how to
proceed with this effort. given the scarcity of
public incentives and the level of resources
needed for full implementation of these
ideas, an overarching strategic financing plan
should be devised that prioritizes projects and
handicaps their odds of success in the highly
competitive public funding world.
Opportunities: Market
Whi l e Spri ngfi el d market condi ti ons have
been weak for a number of years, part of that
weakness arises from both real and perceived
conditions that the district plans are taking
pains to address. Again, in the spirit of turning a
negative into a positive, a number of actions and
recommendations precipitated by the events of
June 11, 2011 stand to improve the competitive
appeal of the Springfield markets if they can
be successfully implemented. These market
enhancements fall into four broad categories:
• improving the physical and environmental
quality of the districts
• using available legal and regulatory tools to
incent reinvestment
• encouraging area institutions to participate in
the implementation of the plans
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picture of disinvestment, decline and poor
maintenance. Addressing these issues as part
of a comprehensive disaster recovery plan
will improve market conditions and reduce
perceived investment risks.
• Public Safety. enhancing public safety - both
real and perceived - for residents and visitors
–is an essential element of a successful plan
and will require the cooperative effort of city
officials, local law enforcement and community
groups.
• Zoning. Zoning is an important tool that can
help focus activity around key neighborhood
centers, encouraging interesting, eclectic
mixed-use corridors, while managing impacts
on residential uses. elevating design quality
within the districts should also be a goal,
however, care must be taken to avoid chilling
the market response by burdeni ng new
development with costly or overly prescriptive
and onerous design requirements. As we
understand, Spri ngfi el d has been l ong
considering adopting new zoning that will
modernize the code for the first time since 1973.
We would recommend moving forward with the
approval process.
Opportuni ti es: Ci vi c Engagement and
Leadership
• Institutional Leadership. Sustained leadership
of the recovery and revitalization effort will
be essential to successful implementation of
the district plans. City officials, non-profits
and communi ty organi zati ons, can and
must provide leadership and continuity for
what will be a long-term revitalization effort.
developSpringfield should take the lead on the
private side of the partnership.
• Civic Anchors. Successful retail districts draw
demand from every available source. Health
centers, senior centers, fitness centers, child
care providers, libraries, social service agencies,
schools and college branches, city offices and
other civic institutions can play an important
anchoring role in the district commercial
areas by drawing customers and clients to the
districts and by supporting an employment
base that will patronize local restaurants and
stores. These employees will also generate
substantial demand for the great residential
options to be found in the highly walkable
district neighborhoods.
• Communi ty Partnershi ps. These same
institutions can also provide direct leverage to
the overall revitalization effort by partnering
with the City and one another on specific
initiatives recommended by the district plans.
leadership is important but, cooperating to get
the day-to-day work done is equally essential
and will take all hands on the oars.
Opportunities: Economic Development
• Economi c Devel opment Coordi nati on.
Community development Corporations and
non-profits such as developSpringfield can
provide valuable coordination of day-to-day
revitalization activities, taking on the work of
the government to identify priority sites and
assemble land, selectively remediate and
prepare the sites, identify zoning incentives
to attract reuse, provide technical assistance
for mixed-financing and maintain lists of pre-
permitted sites. They can also help to facilitate
community partnerships to leverage political
and financial capital to create programs – small
business revolving loan funds, assistance in
creating business plans, workforce programs,
and organizing block groups or merchant
associations.
• Business-Merchant Coordination. A merchants
association or chamber of commerce can
provide a way for businesses to network
and share information, giving businesses a
collective voice in providing input to City
planning and development initiatives, providing
representation for businesses owners at city hall
and offering a conduit for technical information
about loans and successful business strategies.
Such organizations can also help consolidate
in-line retail spaces and create coordinated
marketing for district retail space.
• Marketing Diversity. Celebrating Springfield’s
multi-cultural identity has the potential to serve
as a market draw for the districts. ethnic
entrepreneurs can be a valuable part of a larger
revitalization effort, many willing to take risks
that bring vitality back to neighborhood retail
districts. This activity may also draw others to
the districts in search of ethnic foods and an
authentic cultural experience.
• Downtown Revitalization. Successful 21st
century cities have appealing downtowns that
attract people and talent—especially young
people and entrepreneurs. As the preeminent
urban center of the pioneer Valley with unique
historic character, a revitalized downtown
Springfield has the opportunity to become a
marketable draw for new residents and new
economic activity in the City.
• Nei ghborhood Housi ng. The tornado
rebuilding process presents an opportunity
to develop a coordinated housing strategy
for districts 1 and 2 that addresses existing
residential needs while expanding housing
options for Springfield residents – opportunities
for infill ownership, mixed income rental,
historic rehab, and mixed use potentials are
all present in these districts. growing this
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residential base has the power to transform the
downtown area and nearby neighborhoods into
a vibrant 24-hour environment, enhancing the
health of residential and commercial markets
alike.
• Smal l Busi ness and Start-Up Supports.
Startups and small businesses should be an
essential focus of the economic development
plans for districts 1 and 2. Technical assistance
supports that hel p entrepreneurs and
established businesses to access financing,
identify procurement opportunities, attract
skilled employees, and develop successful
business plans are all important to attracting
new business and growing existing businesses
in districts 1 and 2.
• Workforce Training. A more skilled and
marketabl e workforce wi l l enhance the
marketability of the districts while improving
economic opportunity for area residents.
identifying and developing programs that offer
workforce training and improve the connection
between employers and potential employees
should be an essential part of the district plans.
All of the issues discussed in this section
offer an opportunity for enhancing the market
competitiveness of the districts in particular
and of Springfield in general. The next section
discusses how and where the resources for
implementing these improvements may be found.
Financing
implementing the district plans will all require a
coordinated financing approach that leverages
private investments with public incentives and
other resources. beyond insurance proceeds, the
plans call for aggressive pursuit of gap financing,
from creation of local lending pools to allocations
of disaster-related funding, similar in type to
the kinds of resources made available for other
disasters, as well as use of existing federal, state,
and local incentive programs. The discussion that
follows, presents an array of potential resources
organized by use type and provider. (See real
estate Appendix C for more detailed program
information and web-links to the applications and
eligibility criteria)
Financing: General Disaster Relief
• Proceeds of Insurance Claims. Virtually every
property damaged by the tornado has some
level of insurance. This gives owners of those
properties a head-start in terms resources to
repair or replace those properties.
• Federal Appropriation. The recovery from many
other natural disasters has been facilitated by
a special federal appropriation. These funds,
often channeled through the Community
development block grant (Cdbg) program
provide funds for gap financing and needed
public improvements (see discussion above).
• U. S. Department of Housi ng & Urban
Development. in addition to supplemental
fundi ng through Hud as noted above,
Hud provides entitlement communities like
Springfield an annual allocation of Community
development block grant funds as well as
access to the Section 108 loan program.
Through the annual allocation the city creates
programs such as the Small business loan pool
and the neighborhood Storefront improvement
program.
• U.S. Small Business Administration. property
owners impacted by the tornado are eligible
for special disaster recovery loans from the
Small business Administration (SbA). The SbA
offers low interest disaster loans to disaster
survivors for physical losses up to its loan limits.
Approved loans can be increased for protective
measures to lessen similar future damages.
Additionally, small businesses and most private
nonprofit organizations can obtain loans for
unmet working capital needs.
• U.S. Economic Development Administration.
Municipalities are eligible for economic
development Administration (edA) grants for
public infrastructure that is required to leverage
private investment.
• U.S. Envi ronmental Protecti on Agency.
The epA offers funding to municipalities for
assessment and cleanup. Springfield has been
successful in recent years in accessing these
funds, including an ongoing cleanup activity at
union Station. These funds can be important
to get major development projects started by
removing the stigma of contamination.
• MassMutual Grant. Massachusetts Mutual
life insurance Company has committed $1.6
million to the implementation of the rebuild
Springfield Master plan. The exact use of these
funds has not yet been determined, but they
could be part of a mortgage pool or some other
financing vehicles.
• Miller Development Enterprise, Inc. Miller
development enterprise is offering free and
discounted estimating services for commercial
buildings damaged by the Tornado. They are
also offering reduced rates short-term and
long-term office space at 74 Market Street in
Springfield. Miller development enterprise just
recently moved to 933 east Columbus Avenue,
Springfield, MA.
Financing: Economic Development
• Local Mortgage Pool. There is precedent
in Springfield for local banks to pool their
resources to provide debt financing for priority
projects. These “participation loans” are a way
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to share the risk and provide financing at better
than market terms.
• New Markets Tax Credi ts. The nMTC
program was created specifically to stimulate
investment in businesses and commercial
projects in eligible low-income communities.
Most types of businesses serving low-income
communities, such as small technology firms,
retail stores, restaurants, manufacturing, and
small business centers, could qualify if they are
active or located in low-income communities.
• Section 108 Loan Program. Section 108 is a
loan guarantee provision of the Community
development block grant (Cdbg) program that
provides communities with a source of financing
for physical and economic revitalization
projects. Section 108 allows cities to access a
federal loan pool, secured by the cities Cdbg
entitlement, that can provide resources and
confidence for private investment. Springfield
has an existing Section 108 loan that has been
repaid by the borrower, but not repaid to the
federal government. These funds could be
recycled as loans in connection with projects in
the tornado impact area. in addition, Springfield
has additional Section 108 borrowing capacity.
• MHIC Debt and Equity Financing. The
Massachusetts Housing investment Corporation
provides financing to nonprofit and for-profit
sponsors of affordable housing and commercial
real estate (in low-income communities).
While MHiC works on many different types of
transactions, its specialty is providing financing
that might not otherwise be available. MHiC
finances both large and small developments
-- including rental, SrO, ownership, assisted
living, cooperative, commercial, and senior-
housing units. A wide variety of properties in
communities throughout the Commonwealth
are eligible for financing.gateway Cities
loans. This State sponsored program helps
complete improvements of designated projects,
including electrical work, masonry, roofing, and
equipment in designated gateway cities.
• Gateway Plus Action Grants. This State
sponsored program for gateway cities provides
$1.35 million in funding to cities for planning
activities that expand housing opportunities
and support the revitalization of neighborhoods
to enhance economic vitality and the quality of
life for all residents.
• Curb Appeal Program. Thi s program
sponsored by Massachusetts Mutual life
insurance Company (MassMutual) provides
funding to improve the exterior appearances
of homes in neighborhoods along Springfield’s
State Street corridor including a broad range
of home improvements, including landscaping,
roofing, siding, painting, lighting, or upgrades
to fencing, porches or entry doors.
• Mass Historic Commission. This organization
supports historic preservation planning activities
in communities throughout the State through
federally funded, reimbursable, 50/50 matching
grant program for planning and survey work.
• Massachusetts Preservation Projects Fund.
This State sponsored program supports the
preservation of properties, landscapes and sites
(cultural resources) listed in the State register
of Historic places through a State-funded 50%
reimbursable matching grant program.
• MassDevel opment. Massdevel opment
provides real estate and equipment financing
with higher advance rates and low interest rates
to help for-profit and nonprofit organizations
grow thei r busi nesses. Wi th extensi ve
experience and a wide range of financing tools,
including development funds, tax-exempt
bonds, loans, and guarantees, they can provide
financing at any stage of a project – from
predevelopment to permanent financing.
• Economic Development Incentive Program.
This State sponsored program provides tax
incentive to foster job creation and stimulate
business growth within defined economic
Target Areas (eTAs).
• MassWorks Infrastructure Program. provides
a one-stop shop for muni ci pal i ti es and
other eligible public entities seeking public
infrastructure funding to support economic
development and job creation. The MassWorks
i nfrastructure program provi des publ i c
infrastructure grants that support housing
development, transportation improvements,
communi ty revi tal i zati on and economi c
development.
• Community Development Partnership Act.
establishes a community investment tax credit
for individual and corporate taxpayers designed
to encourage private donations that support
community development. The credit is equal to
50% of “a qualified investment” in a CdC.
• Land Cost Write-Down. To the extent that
land is owned by the City of Springfield or the
Springfield redevelopment Authority, the
upfront land cost could be written down to
facilitate development.
• Mass Offi ce of Busi ness Devel opment.
Thi s State run agency i s a gateway to
many resources for the business interest in
Massachusetts. They provide assistance to
companies striving for expansion, financial
incentives, human resources, and many other
business needs.
• Tax Increment Financing. local real estate
taxes could be phased in over a period of time
to enhance a project’s feasibility, particularly
i n i ts earl y years. The Commonweal th’s
economic development incentive program
(edip) combines local Tif financing and
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property tax abatement with a suite of state
incentives including 5% state investment
tax credit and 10% abandoned building tax
credit district improvement financing. A dif
enables municipalities to fund public works,
infrastructure and development projects by
allocating future, incremental tax revenues
collected from a predefined district to pay
project costs.
• Corridor Façade Program. A storefront façade
grant program managed by developSpringfield
is available to assist in the financing of façade
improvements along Main Street in the South
end.
• Historic Investment Tax Credits (Federal
and State). for repairing damaged historic
properti es used f or mul ti f ami l y rental ,
commercial, and mixed-use adaptive reuse
projects, these are among the most important
financing sources for important older buildings.
• I-Cubed. i-Cubed (infrastructure investment
incentive program) a State program that
pr omot es j ob gr owt h and economi c
development by providing funding for the
public infrastructure improvements necessary
to support major new private development.
legislation authorizes up to $250 million to be
invested in public infrastructure improvements
to support certified economic development
projects to be financed with bonds issued by
Massdevelopment.
• Massworks. The MassWorks infrastructure
program provi des a one-stop shop for
municipalities and other eligible public entities
seeking public infrastructure funding to support
economic development and job creation.
Massworks serves as a consolidation of six
former grant programs. The program provides
public infrastructure grants that support four
project types: 1) Housing development at
density of at least 4 units to the acre (both
market and affordable units), 2) Transportation
improvements to enhance safety in small, rural
communities, 3) Community revitalization and
sustainable development, and 4) economic
development and job creation and retention.
Springfield was awarded a program grant
in late 2011, and the program remains a
significant opportunity for rebuild Springfield
implementation funding.
• Springfield Chamber of Commerce TAP
Program. A Technical Assistance program that
provides grants of up to $5,000 for a variety of
business services, and has expressed interest
in offering expanded technical assistance (such
as accounting or banking services) to small
businesses.
• Western Massachusetts Enterprise Fund,
Inc. The Western Massachusetts enterprise
fund (WMef) helps individuals and small
businesses finance their business needs through
loan programs and also provides technical
assistance through collaboration with regional
organizations.
• Financial Literacy Trust Fund. This State
sponsored program promotes fi nanci al
literacy, education and training for residents,
businesses, educational institutions, community
organizations, and other entities throughout the
Commonwealth on issues such as household
budgeting, saving more, consumer protection,
and the power of compound interest in long-
term financial planning.
Financing: Neighborhood Housing
• HOME funds. This is a federally funded
program that assists in the production and
preservation of affordable housing for low and
moderate-income families and individuals.
The program funds a broad range of activities
including new construction, acquisition and
rehabilitation of rental properties.American
dream downpayment initiative. HAp Housing
administers an Addi program for up to $10,000,
and a “downpayment Assistance program”
available through the Springfield Office of
Housing provides assistance for up to $2,500.
• American Dream Downpayment Initiative.
(Addi) through HAp Housing for up to $10,000,
and the “downpayment Assistance program”
through Springfield Office of Housing for up to
$2,500.
• Rebuilding Together Springfield: A nonprofit
agency that provides free rehabilitation and
critical repairs to the homes of low-income
homeowners, by using volunteer labor and
donated materials. The local agency is one of
200 affiliates nation-wide.
• City of Springfield Emergency Homeowner
Repair Program. provides technical assistance,
interest bearing and non-interest bearing loans,
as well as deferred payment loans to assist
eligible low and moderate-income households
within the City of Springfield.
• Springfield Housing Rehabilitation Loan
Program. Springfield’s Hrlp program provides
technical assistance; interest bearing and
non-interest bearing loans, as well as deferred
payment loans to help meet the financing
needs of Springfield homeowners interested
in making needed repairs to their homes, in
particular, those who may fall short of meeting
the requi red gui del i nes establ i shed by
traditional lending sources.
• Buy Springfield Now. incentives and special
retail offers for new homeownership residents in
Springfield.
• Urban Center Housi ng Tax I ncrement
Financing (UCH-TIF) Program. This statutory
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program authorizes cities and towns to promote
housi ng and commerci al devel opment,
including affordable housing, in commercial
centers through tax increment financing.
The uCH-Tif program provides real estate
exemptions on all or part of the increased value
(the “increment”) of improved real estate.
• Housing Stabilization Fund. A state funded
bond program that assists in the production
and preservation of affordable housing for
low-income families and individuals. HSf
monies may be used for the acquisition and/
or rehabilitation of existing structures for sale
to income-eligible first-time homebuyers,
including distressed or failed properties, or the
new construction of homeownership projects.
• The Soft Second Loan Program. A joint
initiative of the public and private sectors to
increase affordable housing opportunities
for low- and moderate-income homebuyers
combining a conventional first mortgage with a
subsidized second mortgage to help low- and
moderate-income households to qualify for a
mortgage and purchase a home for the first
time.
• Housing Development Incentive Program.
The Hdip is designed to increase residential
growth, expand diversity of housing stock,
support economic development, and promote
neighborhood stabilization in designated
Housing development Zones within gateway
municipalities. it provides tax incentives to
developers to rehabilitate multi-unit properties
for sale or lease as market rate units: a local-
option property tax exemption and a new state
tax credit for qualified rehabilitation expenses.
• Federal Home Loan Bank’s Affordable Housing
Program. This program provides grants to
support specific development projects serving
a wide range of neighborhood needs including
seniors, the disabled, homeless families, first-
time homeowners and others with limited
resources. The federal Home loan bank
System is the largest single funding provider to
Habitat for Humanity.
• Mass Save Major Renovations Program.
provides homeowners who are renovating,
r emodel i ng or maki ng ot her home
improvements the opportunity to increase the
energy performance of the home, including
technical support, financial incentives, and other
offerings
• MassHousing. This State agency provides low
cost financing for housing development and
rehabilitation as well as home improvement,
septic system repair, and lead paint removal
loans
• Springfield Neighborhood Housing Services
(NHS). provides emergency repair grants and
home improvement loans. nHS also provides
financial fitness education for clients who are
not ready to purchase for various reasons such
as: credit issues, bankruptcy or high debts.
• Green Affordable Housing Development
Program. i s a fund, establ i shed by the
renewable energy Trust (“reT”), acting by
and through the Massachusetts Technology
Collaborative (“MTC”), and administered by
the Massachusetts Housing finance Agency
(“MassHousing”), to promote the construction
of eligible renewable energy generation
systems (“re Systems”) in affordable housing
developments financed by MassHousing or the
Affordable Housing Trust fund (“AHTf”).
• El derCHOI CE. Thi s i s a MassHousi ng
program designed to provide construction
and permanent financing for assisted living
developments serving the frail elderly.
• Massachusetts Affordable Housing Trust Fund.
The AHTf was created to provide resources
to create or preserve affordable housing
throughout the state for households whose
incomes are not more than 110% of median
income.
• Housing Starts. This MassHousing’s program
promotes the construction of new for-sale
housing under the Commonwealth’s Chapter
40b. Through Housing Starts, developers can
apply for site approval, the first step toward
obtaining a comprehensive permit.
• Capital Improvement and Preservation Fund.
A State bond funded program that seeks to
preserve and improve existing privately owned,
state or federally assisted affordable rental
developments.
• Community-Based Housing. The State’s CbH
program provides funding for the development
of i ntegrated housi ng f or peopl e wi th
disabilities, including elders, with priority for
individuals who are in institutions or nursing
facilities or at risk of institutionalization.
• Housing Innovation Fund. Hif provides
funding for the creation and preservation of
alternative forms of affordable housing. These
forms include, but are not limited to, single
room occupancy (SrO) units; limited equity
cooperative housing; transitional housing for
the homeless; battered women’s shelters;
mutual housing; employer assisted housing; and
lease to purchase housing.
• Housing Stabilization Fund. HSf is a state
funded bond program that assists in the
production and preservation of affordable
housing for low and moderate-income families
and individuals.
• Federal Housing Tax Credits. This is a
federally authorized program that assists in
the production and preservation of affordable
rental housing for low-income families and
individuals. The program supports a broad
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range of activities including acquisition, new
construction, and rehabilitation of existing
rental properties consistent with the State’s
Qualified Allocation plan.
• CEDAC Home Funders. The Hf collaborative
was created to address the unprecedented
crisis in affordable housing for very low income
families in Massachusetts. This partnership of
private funders came together based on the
belief that without adequate housing, all other
social investments are at risk.
• Neighborhood Stabilization Program. nSp
was developed by the u.S. department of
Housing and urban development (Hud) to
provide emergency assistance to state and
local governments to acquire and redevelop
foreclosed properties in areas of greatest
need that might otherwise become sources
of abandonment and blight within their
communities
Financing: Energy and Sustainability
• Energy Incentives. grants and low-interest
loans from utilities and government agencies for
replacing or installing energy-efficient building
components, heating systems, weatherization,
energy saving appliances, etc.
• Rebuild Western Massachusetts Program.
Sponsored through the Massachusetts
department of energy resources; promotes
energy efficient building practices for new
construction and repairs of residential and
commercial structures, including grant and zero
interest construction loan funds.
• State Income Tax Credit for Renewable
Energy. 15% up to $1,000 for installation of a
renewable energy system in a home, including
solar, photovoltaic, solar space heating, solar
water heating, or wind
• Federal Tax Credits for Weatherization and
Renewable Energy. 30% with no upper limit
for geothermal heat pumps, solar energy
systems, solar hot water heating, and small wind
turbines. particularly in larger redevelopment
areas, a district geothermal system would be
particularly attractive as a cost effective solution.
federal tax credits for residential insulation,
windows, heating and cooling systems and
water heaters.
• Energy Efficient Mortgage (EEM). This is
a mortgage that credits a home’s energy
efficiency in the mortgage itself. eeMs give
borrowers the opportunity to finance cost-
effective, energy-saving measures as part of a
single mortgage and stretch debt-to-income
qualifying ratios on loans thereby allowing
borrowers to qualify for a larger loan amount
and a better, more energy-efficient home.
eeM’s are now more easily available through
fannie Mae and freddie Mac, and available
through fHA.
• Enterprise Community Partners. The green
Communities group provides capital solutions
and pol i cy advocacy for l ocal housi ng,
community development and greening efforts
• Full Spectrum of NY, LLC. The national market
leader in the development of mixed use and
mixed income green buildings in emerging
urban markets.
• EnviRenew. This is a program supported by The
Salvation Army that seeks to address the glaring
discrepancy between good quality, sustainable
homes and thei r hi gh purchasi ng and
occupancy costs. envirenew aims to establish a
replicable model for affordable housing while at
the same time establishing community capacity
so that communities can grow even stronger
than before.
• Make It Right. builds safe, sustainable and
affordable homes for working families. Make
it right emphasizes high quality design, while
preserving the spirit of the community’s culture.
• Weatherization Assistance Program. funded
by the u. S. department of energy, the
Weatherization Assistance program (WAp)
enables low-income families to permanently
reduce their energy bills by making their
homes more energy efficient. in Springfield, the
program is administered through Springfield
partners for Community Action.
• New England Farm Workers’ Council. This
organization offers the Heating emergency
Assistance retrofit Tasks Weatherization
As s i s t ance pr ogr am ( HeArTWAp) t o
income-eligible homeowners. HeArTWAp
is administered by the Springfield Office of
Housing and is designed to provide emergency
heating system repair; pay for the cost of an
annual inspection of a fuel burning system;
or pay for the replacement of the system, if
needed.
• Mass Save Energy Assessments. Mass
Save works with certified energy Specialists,
Home performance Contractors (HpCs) and
independent installation Contractors (iiCs) to
provide high-quality Home energy Assessments
and weatherization installations.
• Springfield Partners for Community Action.
This organization works closely with Western
Massachusetts electric Company (WMeCO) and
Columbia gas to offer free programs including
home weatherization services, light bulbs, and
resources that can save a up to $350 annually in
energy bills.
• Center for Ecological Technology (CET).
from offices in pittsfield, northampton and
Springfield, CeT finds sustainable solutions
to complex issues in order to benefit our
environment, health, economy, and community.
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programs include topics such as: renewable
energy access for residents, businesses,
farms and organizations; energy-efficiency for
residents and businesses; Waste management
(reuse, recycling, composting and toxics use
reduction); and environmental education for
students and teachers.
• Enterprise Green Communities. enterprise
green Communities provides funds and
expertise to enable developers to build and
rehabilitate affordable homes that are healthier,
more energy efficient and better for the
environment.
• Gateway City Parks Program. This State
sponsored program supports significant park
projects for underserved urban populations.
• Barr Foundation. The barr foundation is
committed to helping Massachusetts meet or
exceed their 2020 and 2050 targets for reducing
greenhouse gas (gHg) emissions. They support
projects promote health and the quality of life
that flow from new green jobs, more efficient
buildings, and a highly efficient transportation
network.
Resources: Economic Development
Several entities in Springfield might function as
technical assistance/economic development
resource entities for implementation of the
rebuild Springfield plan. These include:
• Latino Chamber of Commerce. This Statewide
organization supports education and business
oppor t uni t i es, par t i cul ar l y i n West er n
Massachusetts. it has setup a network of
partnerships with businesses and organizations
throughout the region to best achieve their goal
of assisting businesses, especially within the
latino communities.
• Affiliated Chamber of Commerce of Greater
Springfield. This organization has been a tool
for enhancing business development and
viability for over 115 years. The Chamber’s
dynamic role of promoting, supporting, and
educating the business community makes it a
key resource for the region.
• Massachusetts Small Business Development
Center. This organization provides links to
various resources for Massachusetts businesses
and works with entrepreneurs in developing
their business plan, evaluating proper financial
strategies, and formulating a successful
business structure. The center is located at
Scibelli enterprise Center, which is at 1 federal
Street in Springfield.
• Wes t er n Ma s s a c hus et t s Ec onomi c
Development Council. The council’s main
interest is to provide expertise and guidance
to resources that include business retention,
business attraction, tourism, technology
devel opment, government af f ai rs, and
infrastructure.
• Springfield Business Improvement District.
Moving Springfield forward in entertainment,
beautification, and marketing is the Sbid’s
busi ness. The Sbid offers a venue for
advertising and business promotion to the
greater Springfield community.
• Westmass Area Development Corporation.
Westmass i s an experi enced regi onal ,
private not-for-profit industrial and business
development corporation created to promote
and assi st busi ness growth i n western
Massachusetts. The organization is actively
offering development expertise and immediate
access to storage and warehouse space on a
temporary basis to businesses affected by the
tornado.
• Regional Employment Board of Hamden
County, Inc. This company’s main goal is
to help develop workforce skills to meet the
changing demand for labor. The regional
employment board of Hamden County also
provides information that connects job seekers
with openings throughout the region.
• Springfield Technical Community College
(STCC) and Holyoke Community College
Workforce Training. A recently revitalized
effort by to reach out to area businesses
and better tailor curriculum and training
programs to business needs. STCC has
also been proactively forming workforce
trai ni ng partnershi ps wi th regi onal and
nati onal compani es, parti cul arl y i n the
telecommunications sector.
• MassGREEN. initiative through STCC provides
energy efficiency workforce training programs
to help ensure that the state has the workers
and businesses necessary to achieve ambitious
energy efficiency goals.
• FutureWorks. This is a career center operated
in support of regional employment board
of Hampden County (reb) efforts to address
workforce development for the entire region.
located at the STCC Technol ogy park,
futureWorks is well located to serve district
2 residents, and provides a variety of classes,
workshops, advisory services, and employment
resources.
• Massachusetts Career Development Institute.
MCdi offers training to out of school youth
and adults who want to learn a skill for job
placement, with the capability to train up to
1800 students per year. MCdi provides career
counseling services, job seeking skills and
services, and internship programs. MCdi
also provides a youth program to re-engage
disconnected youth through vocational training,
work experience, and life skill workshops.
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Thanks to
developSpringfield
Mayor Sarno
nick fyntrilakis
Jerry Hayes
Maureen Hayes
Chris Moskal
gerry McCafferty
brian Connors
pat Sullivan
Kevin Kennedy
Springfield redevelopment Authority
Chris Caputo
Alicia Zoeller
Carlos gonzalez
david Jarnes
don Courtemanche
ethel griffin
Hector Toledo
Jill russell
leo florian
Mattie lacewell
Jim langone photography
peter gagliardi
raymond Jordan
rev. bruce Shaw
Shalimar Colon
Armando feliciano
Jeanne bein
Kate Mein
diane flemmings
The republican
We would like to thank the following individuals
who personally contributed countless hours
towards successfully engaging the Springfield
community and sheparded so many meaningful
recommendations. They all worked tirelessly to
ensure that the rebuild Springfield plan will be as
impactful as possible.
devel opSpr i ngf i el d woul d al so l i ke t o
acknowledge the many generous sponsors
for their support of such an important part of
Springfield’s future.
Major funding for the rebuild Springfield plan
was provided in part by a grant from the united
States department of Commerce, economic
development Administration.
funds for the rebuild Springfield plan were
provided to the City of Springfield by the
Commonweal th of Massachusetts through
the department of Housing and Community
development.
finally, community members and stakeholders
from all over Springfield and the pioneer Valley
participated in the rebuild Springfield planning
process. in addition to the Citywide and district
public meetings, many other individual and
group meetings were held during the process.
developSpringfield would like to thank all of
those people.
Acknowledgements
Sponsors
balise
baystate Health
berkshirebank
C&W realty Company
Constellation energy
Columbia gas of Massachusetts
Comcast
Community foundation of Western
Massachusetts
department of Housing and Community
development
developSpringfield
The irene e. & george A. davis foundation
economic development Administration
freedom Credit union
gene rosenberg Associates
global Spectrum
Hampden bank
Johnson & Hill
MACrS
MassMutual
MassMutual Center
nuV bank & Trust Company
regional employment board
Springfield redevelopment Authority
Tb bank Charitable foundation
united bank foundation
united Way of pioneer Valley
Western Massachusetts electric Company
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Consultant Team
Concordia
• bobbie Hill
• Ximena SanVicente
• philip denning
• John fisher
• eastman Johnson
• Justin rex
Goody Clancy
• david dixon
• ron Mallis
• larissa brown
• Jeff Sauser
BNIM
• bob berkebile
• laura lesniewski
• Thomas Morefield
• Amanda Wilson
Project for Public Spaces
• Cynthia nikitin
• elena Madison
• Steve davies
HDR
• dan Hodge
• pamela Yonkin
Byrne McKinney & Associates
• pam McKinney
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D I S T R I C T O N E : M E T R O C E N T E R A N D S O U T H E N D
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D I S T R I C T O N E : M E T R O C E N T E R A N D S O U T H E N D
1
District One Rebuilding Plan
The Ci ty of Spri ngf i el d desi gnated Rebui l d Spri ngf i el d, an ef f ort of
DevelopSpringfield and the Springfield Redevelopment Authority, to lead a rapid
planning effort to provide an implementable framework to guide the rebuilding
process in the aftermath of the June 1, 2011 tornado. As part of a consultant
team led by Concordia LLC, Goody Clancy was asked to develop a community-
based rebuilding framework and plan for the South End and Metro Center. These
two neighborhoods were designated “District One” for planning purposes. The
Project for Public Spaces contributed analysis, evaluation and recommendations for
activating public spaces in District One. Byrne McKinney & Associates provided real
estate analysis and HDR provided economic development recommendations.
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
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D I S T R I C T O N E : M E T R O C E N T E R A N D S O U T H E N D
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Table of Contents
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
I. THE TORNADO IN DISTRICT ONE
II. DISTRICT PORTRAIT
III. OUTREACH AND PUBLIC WORKSHOPS
IV. WHAT WE HEARD
V DISTRICT ONE VISION
VI. THE CONTEXT FOR REBUILDING: STRENGTHENING COMMUNITY
A. Enforcement and public safety strategy
B. Partnership and coordination strategy
C. Economic development strategy
VII. THE RESOURCES FOR REBUILDING: FINANCING THE PLAN
A. Financing strategy
VIII. THE FRAMEWORK FOR REBUILDING: MAJOR MOVES TO REBUILD BETTER
A. Planning framework
B. Housing strategy
C. Commercial and retail strategy
D. Community institutions strategy
E. Urban character and historic preservation strategy
F. Public spaces strategy
IX. THE FRAMEWORK FOR SPECIFIC SITES
X. PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER: REBUILD BETTER
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
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Executive Summary
The June 1, 2011 tornado damaged
buildings and trees in the South End and,
to a lesser degree, in Metro Center. Based
on a community process, this plan offers
a holistic framework of initiatives that
will strengthen the community through
partnerships, coordination, enforcement,
and cr i me r educt i on; suppor t new
approaches to financing; and integrate
strategies for housing, commercial and retail
development, community institutions, public
spaces, historic preservation, and urban
design.
The rebuilding process after a disaster
offers the potential for a fresh look at
affected areas and the opportunity to
rebuild better. Metro Center and the South
End have a shared destiny along Main
Street, which is why they were grouped
together in District One. Rebuilding and
revitalization efforts must be interrelated
and mutually supportive. This is also an
economic imperative. Successful 21st
century cities have appealing downtown and
near-downtown neighborhoods that attract
people and talent—especially young people
and entrepreneurs. As the preeminent
urban center of the Pioneer Valley with
unique historic character, Springfield has
the opportunity to create and sustain a
desirable, walkable, urban environment for
living, working, playing and learning.
THE PLAN BUILDS ON PREVIOUS PLANS
FOR METRO CENTER AND THE SOUTH
END. Implementation of these plans was
underway before the tornado. In addition,
in early 2012 the City was awarded a major
federal grant for the South End—a Choice
Neighborhoods Initiative planning grant—
that will help implement and accelerate the
rebuilding process and position the City for
additional federal funding.
THE PLAN IS BASED ON A COMMUNITY
PARTI CI PATI ON PROCESS. Thr ee
public workshops were held in October,
November, and December 2011 at the
Genti l e Apartments Communi ty Room
and the South End Mi ddl e School to
devel op a vi si on for the Di stri ct One
plan, discuss potential alternatives, and
review and comment on the proposed
recommendati ons. Spani sh l anguage
outreach materials were provided and
translation was available at the meetings.
Dozens of i ntervi ews and smal l -group
meeti ngs al so i nformed the pl anni ng
process.
A plan to rebuild in Metro Center and the South End - District One
District 1
South End
Metro Center
The Howard Street Armory, home of the South End
Community Center, was significantly damaged by the
tornado.
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THE VISION
The Vision for District One encompasses the
themes of LIVABILITY + SUSTAINABILITY +
INCLUSION + OPPORTUNITY:
Partner together to rebuild a more livable,
sustainable, inclusive community with the
resources to offer expanded opportunities
for everyone. District One will encompass
two vi brant, wal kabl e, hi stori c urban
communities linked by Main Street—Metro
Center and the South End, with robust and
attractive connections to the riverfront. With
more destinations of all kinds—retail and
business, civic, community, recreation, and
entertainment—better connections among
them, and a variety of housing options, the
South End and Metro Center will offer a high
quality of life and attract new residents and
visitors.
THE CONTEXT FOR REBUI LDI NG:
STRENGTHENING COMMUNITY
ENFORCEMENT AND PUBLIC SAFETY
STRATEGY: St r engt hen par t ner shi ps
among community stakeholders, police and
enforcement staff. Key initiatives include
devel opment of Nei ghborhood Cri me
Watch or similar programs, particularly in
the South End, along with enhanced police
engagement.
PARTNERSHI P AND COORDI NATI ON
STRATEGY: Retain Rebuild Springfield
l eadershi p to coordi nate partnershi ps
and implement the rebuilding plan. Key
initiatives include ensuring that there is
a downtown redevelopment leadership
organization with staff, building on the
existing Business Improvement District
(BID); engaging an organizer to enhance
communication among all groups in the
South End; reviving the South End business
organization; and holding a volunteer
summit of all organizations, agencies and
city departments to identify and coordinate
priority activities for Americorps/VISTA
volunteers assigned to Springfield, as well as
college student service activities.
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY:
Attract people and talent to Springfield
through creating and sustaining a desirable,
walkable urban environment for live, work,
play, and learning. Key initiatives include
identifying and preparing sites ready for
investment, as well as exploring extended
incentives. Court Square and adjacent historic buildings such as
13-31 Elm Street are valuable District One assets.
THE RESOURCES FOR REBUI LDI NG:
FINANCING THE PLAN
FI NANCI NG STRATEGY: Pursue and
package a variety of financing incentives
and resources for rebuilding. The Plan
i ncl udes feasi bi l i ty testi ng for sampl e
development types. Under current market
conditions, incentives will be needed in the
redevelopment and rebuilding process,
with complex and layered financing in many
cases. The Plan calls for aggressive pursuit
of special resources, from a local lending
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
6
Key initiatives include rebuilding the Main
and Union intersection to be a South End
gateway and activity center; reinforcing the
cluster of eateries in the South End to form a
“restaurant row;” and exploring options for
a grocery store or pharmacy.
COMMUNITY INSTITUTIONS STRATEGY:
Enhance the anchor role of community
i nsti tuti ons, especi al l y by assi sti ng i n
rel ocati on of those damaged by the
tornado. Key initiatives include assisting the
South End Community Center in relocating,
possibly to the Gemini site, and Square One
in developing new space on Main Street.
URBAN CHARACTER AND HI STORI C
PRESERVATI ON STRATEGY: Pur sue
adaptive reuse of historic buildings and
sites and establish urban design guidelines
and a regulatory framework to enhance
walkability. Key initiatives include adopting
ur ban desi gn gui del i nes t o pr ot ect
and enhance the public realm and the
pedestrian environment; enacting a historic
preservation “demolition delay” ordinance;
adopting the pending zoning ordinance
and potential refinements to reflect this
Plan; extending urban renewal district
boundaries in order to ensure design review
for Main Street and other major streets in
District One; and enhancing connections
to the riverfront with public art and special
treatments for Union Street as a “festival
street.”
PUBLIC SPACES STRATEGY: Acti vate
and program publ i c spaces to create
destinations, mobilize community partners
for stewardship, and connect important
publ i c spaces. Key i ni ti ati ves i ncl ude
potential programs and activities led by
community arts and culture groups to attract
people to Court Square and other locations;
organizing temporary uses, programs and
events for empty storefronts; and focusing
on maintenance and programming for
existing parks and open spaces, including
the newly redesigned Emerson Wight Park.
pool to allocations of special disaster-related
funding, similar in type to the kinds of state
and federal resources made available for
other disasters, as well as use of existing
federal, state, and local incentive programs.
THE FRAMEWORK FOR REBUI LDI NG:
STRATEGIES TO REBUILD BETTER
HOUSING STRATEGY: Provide a variety of
housing options appropriate to different
locations in Metro Center and the South End
that enhance downtown and neighborhood
character, add market rate housing, and
raise the median household income. Key
initiatives include a focus on adaptive reuse
of existing buildings for rental and condo
housing in Metro Center and in larger
buildings in the South End; and one- to
three-family owner-occupied housing at or
near market rate for infill on the side streets
of the South End.
COMMERCIAL AND RETAIL STRATEGY:
Create centers of vi tal i ty and acti vi ty
al ong Mai n Street by recrui ti ng retai l
and restaurants to ground floor spaces,
office users to upper story space, and
neighborhood-serving retail, as well as
assisting in the rebuilding of key sites.
D I S T R I C T O N E : M E T R O C E N T E R A N D S O U T H E N D
7
I. The Tornado in District One
On June 1, 2011, a tornado hit the City of
Springfield, crossing the Connecticut River
to cut a swath of destruction southeast
across the southern edge of downtown, into
the South End neighborhood and continuing
across neighborhoods and communities
to the east. In Metro Center, the city’s
downtown district, the tornado destroyed
trees along the riverfront, did minor damage
to buildings, and significant damage to trees
in historic Court Square along Main Street.
In the South End, located adjacent to Metro
Center to the south, tornado damage was
more severe, affecting institutional, retail,
and residential buildings.
Major neighborhood institutions such as
the South End Community Center and
the Square One child care center were
heavily damaged, and some residential
buildings, mostly multi-family, were made
uninhabitable. A major mixed-use property
at 979 Main Street (“South Commons,”
developed by Peter Zorzi) was destroyed
and a number of retail buildings along Main
Street also suffered damage. Some tornado
victims have been making repairs and
returning to their former locations (such as
An Initiative of Develop Springfield and
the Springfield Redevelopment Authority
DISTRICT 1
METRO CENTER + SOUTH END
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.05
Miles
[ Data Source: City of Springfield
Study Area
U
n
i
o
n

S
t
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e
t
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o
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d

S
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W
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M
ain Street
M
a
in
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S
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N
0 1/4 mile 1/8
100% Destroyed
70-100% Damaged
30-70% Damaged
10-30% Damaged
Damaged Riverfront Trees
Tornado Property Damage
Source: City of Springfield
the Main Street retailers Milano Importing,
Dave’s Furniture, and Meche’s Beauty Shop),
but other properties were totally destroyed
or condemned. The rebuilding process after
a disaster offers the potential for a fresh look
at the affected area and the opportunity to
rebuild better.
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
8
II. District Portrait
Springfield entered the twentieth century
as a flourishing industrial city, home of the
first gasoline-powered car, the game of
basketball, and myriad other world-shaping
inventions, gaining the nickname of “City
of Firsts.” Metro Center and the South End
were at the core of this early success story.
At midcentury, downtown Springfield was
the Pioneer Valley’s cultural center where
everyone shopped and socialized. The South
End was known for its tight-knit community
of Italian-Americans along the residential
streets, with restaurants and neighborhood
businesses along Main Street. Cross streets
led down to the riverfront, where the railroad
line was the only barrier to the water. Like
in many industrial cities during the second
half of the twentieth century, the effects
of deindustrialization and suburban sprawl
resulted in job losses and disinvestment in
the downtown and city neighborhoods. The
construction of I-91 as an elevated highway
created a visual as well as a physical barrier
to the river, dislocated residents of the
South End, and exacerbated destabilization.
Spri ngfi el d became a desti nati on for
Hispanics/Latinos in Massachusetts and a
concentration of subsidized housing in the
South End attracted low-income renters.
By 2011, Metro Center still contained the
City of Springfield’s downtown office,
entertainment and cultural districts, many
of the city’s historic sites and districts,
Springfield Technical Community College,
and a few multifamily residential buildings.
Before the tornado, the City, with various
partners, had already begun implementing
plans developed in recent years for Metro
Center, the Ri verfront, and the South
End. In early 2012, when this rebuilding
plan was being finalized, the City was
awarded a major federal grant—a Choice
Neighborhoods Initiative planning grant—
to plan for possible demolition of the
Marble Street Apartments public housing
development, introduction of mixed income
housing, rehabilitation of Hollywood area
buildings, and construction of a new South
End Community Center.
LOCATION. Metro Center is bounded on
the north by I-291, on the east by Federal
and School Street, on the south by State,
Union and Howard Streets, and to the west
by the Connecticut River. South of Howard
and Union Streets, the South End contains
a steeply rising hill to its eastern boundary
Main Street at Union Street after the tornado (source: USA Today).
D I S T R I C T O N E : M E T R O C E N T E R A N D S O U T H E N D
9
at Maple Street, extends to Mill Street
in the south, and to the river at the west.
Although separated by the I-91 barrier, the
riverfront development around the Naismith
Basketball Hall of Fame is located in the
South End.
POPULATION AND INCOME
POPULATION WAS STABLE BETWEEN 2000
AND 2010. At the time of the 2010 census,
the residential population of District One
was approximately 10,773, with 65% of that
population in Metro Center. District One’s
population accounts for 7% of the City of
Springfield’s total population. The number
of people living in Metro Center and in the
South End was stable between 2000 and
2010, with a very slight increase in Metro
Center population and a slight decline in the
South End. In both areas the population was
approximately two-thirds Hispanic/Latino in
2010. (Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.)
About 20% of Metro Center’s population
was African-American and 17% of South
End’s population was African-American.
THE MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN
METRO CENTER AND THE SOUTH END
IS VERY LOW. Both neighborhoods have
a very low estimated median household
income: between $16,000 and $17,000
dollars a year. The median means that half
of the households have incomes below that
number and half have incomes above that
number. Poverty rates in Metro Center and
the South End are 40–45%. In contrast, the
estimated median household income for the
entire City of Springfield is $34,113, and the
overall poverty rate is 27%. The city’s median
income is a little more than half the median
income of the entire state of Massachusetts
($64,057). The median household income in
the nearby City of Hartford is $29,190, with
an overall poverty rate of 32%.
MORE THAN HALF OF METRO CENTER
HOUSEHOLDS HAVE ONE PERSON,
WHILE THE SOUTH END HAS LARGER
HOUSEHOLDS AND MORE CHILDREN. In
Metro Center, 56% of the households are
composed of one person, and 23% of the
households include children. The average
household size is 1.76 persons. The South
End is somewhat more family-oriented
but still has a high proportion of single
person households, as is common in all
urban locations. Single person households
make up 43% of all households and 36% of
households include children. The average
2010 Demographi c Summary: Metro
Center and South End
South End M e t r o
Center
Population 3,725 7,048
Hispanic 2,384 4,296
% Hispanic 64.0% 61.0%
Households 1,558 3,774
Avg. household
size
2.27 1.76
Housing units 1,731 4,100
Occupied 1,558 (90%) 3,774 (92%)
Owner-occupied 9.8% 5.4%
Renter-occupied 90.2% 94.6%
Vacancy rate 10.0% 8.0%
Median household
income *
$16,291 $16,598
Poverty rate 45.5% 41.1%
Source: 2010 Census, except: * - 2006-2009 ACS Estimate
household size is 2.27 persons. The city’s
overall average household size is 2.61.
LAND USE
Metro Center remai ns domi nated by
nonresidential uses, although a residential
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
10
presence is emerging at the edges of
downtown where adaptive reuse renovations
have been completed or are underway for
older buildings such as schools (Classical
Condos), factories (Stockbridge Court), and
office buildings (195 State Street - former
School Department Headquarters). The
central section of Metro Center is dominated
by Court Square and the city hall, state
and federal facilities, cultural and historic
buildings, as well as other government-
owned properties (shown in blue on the
land use map). Large parking garages and
surface parking lots characterize many of
the interior streets downtown. Nonprofit
and soci al servi ce uses are scattered
throughout the downtown and prominent
in some locations. Industrial and a variety
of commercial or potentially commercial
uses cluster at the north of the Metro Center
district around Gridiron Street, while Union
Station anchors Frank B. Murray Street near
Main Street.

An Initiative of Develop Springfield and
the Springfield Redevelopment Authroity
DISTRICT 1
METRO CENTER + SOUTH END
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.05
Miles
[
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I- 2
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Main St
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Maple St Maple St
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Florida St Florida St
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Kendall St
Kendall St
Byers St
Byers St
A
s
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Bowdoin St
Bowdoin St
N007
N007
Thompson St Thompson St
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B
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B
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School St School St
Elliot St
Elliot St
H
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S
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Eastern Ave
Eastern Ave
C
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S
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C
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S
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Magazine St
Magazine St
Willow St
Willow St
L
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H
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Longhill St Longhill St
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Clantoy St
Clantoy St
Dale St
Dale St
N
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N
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Cass St Cass St
Belm
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Belm
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M
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W
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Cherrelyn St
Glen Rd
Glen Rd
M
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Jam
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Jam
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Fort Pleasant Ave
Fort Pleasant Ave
M
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N009 N009
Myrtle St Myrtle St
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Terrence St
Terrence St
Nursery St
Nursery St
Tracy St
Tracy St
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Webster St Webster St
C
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t
C
h
a
p
in
S
t
C
lin
to
n
S
t
C
lin
to
n
S
t
L
illia
n
S
t
L
illia
n
S
t
E
C
o
u
rt S
t
E
C
o
u
rt S
t
C
o
llin
s
S
t
C
o
llin
s
S
t
C
h
e
s
te
r S
t
C
h
e
s
te
r S
t
M
o
n
ro
e
S
t
M
o
n
ro
e
S
t
W
B
ro
a
d
W
B
ro
a
d
Beech St
Beech St
M
a
tto
o
n
S
t
M
a
tto
o
n
S
t
M
e
lro
s
e
S
t
M
e
lro
s
e
S
t
Leslie St
Leslie St
A
rlin
g
to
n
C
t
A
rlin
g
to
n
C
t
L
a
d
d
S
t
L
a
d
d
S
t
R
u
tle
d
g
e
S
t
R
u
tle
d
g
e
S
t
B
rig
h
a
m
S
t
B
rig
h
a
m
S
t
P
o
rts
m
o
u
th
S
t
P
o
rts
m
o
u
th
S
t
Railroad St
Railroad St
H
a
w
th
o
rn
e
S
t
H
a
w
th
o
rn
e
S
t
G
a
rd
n
e
r S
t
G
a
rd
n
e
r S
t
H
a
ls
e
y
S
t
H
a
ls
e
y
S
t
S
u
lliv
a
n
S
t
S
u
lliv
a
n
S
t
G
rid
iro
n
S
t
G
rid
iro
n
S
t
E
lm
S
t
E
lm
S
t
W
a
lk
e
r S
t
W
a
lk
e
r S
t
George St
George St
Longview St
Longview St
S
a
le
m
S
t
S
a
le
m
S
t
O
rle
a
n
s
C
t
O
rle
a
n
s
C
t
W
e
n
d
e
ll P
l
W
e
n
d
e
ll P
l
Forest P
ark A
ve
Forest P
ark A
ve
Richelieu St Richelieu St
C
ro
s
s
S
t
C
ro
s
s
S
t
Iv
y
C
t
Iv
y
C
t
G
lobe S
t
G
lobe S
t
Murray Hill Ave Murray Hill Ave
W
o
lco
tt S
t
W
o
lco
tt S
t
Ridgewood Pl
Ridgewood Pl
B
o
w
d
o
in
T
e
r
B
o
w
d
o
in
T
e
r
N
o
rw
o
o
d
S
t
N
o
rw
o
o
d
S
t
H
a
m
p
d
e
n
S
t
H
a
m
p
d
e
n
S
t
E
lm
w
o
o
d
S
t
E
lm
w
o
o
d
S
t
W
a
rrin
e
r A
v
e
W
a
rrin
e
r A
v
e
S
u
m
m
it S
t
S
u
m
m
it S
t
Pleasant St
Pleasant St
R
enee C
ir
R
enee C
ir
B
e
lle
A
v
e
B
e
lle
A
v
e
S
to
c
k
b
rid
g
e
S
t
S
to
c
k
b
rid
g
e
S
t
Sterns Ter
Sterns Ter
W
Y
o
rk
S
t
W
Y
o
rk
S
t
Ashmun St Ashmun St
Chandler St
Chandler St
Leonard St Leonard St
E
S
c
h
o
o
l S
t
E
S
c
h
o
o
l S
t
Madison Ave
Madison Ave
N
C
h
u
rc
h
A
v
e
N
C
h
u
rc
h
A
v
e
P
y
n
c
h
o
n
S
t
P
y
n
c
h
o
n
S
t
B
ru
n
o
S
t
B
ru
n
o
S
t
M
ill L
n
M
ill L
n
Alert St
Alert St
Fairbank Pl
Fairbank Pl
P
ine S
treet C
t
P
ine S
treet C
t
W
G
a
rd
n
e
r S
t
W
G
a
rd
n
e
r S
t
Niagara St
Niagara St
C
ro
s
s
e
tt L
n
C
ro
s
s
e
tt L
n
B
la
k
e
H
ill S
t
B
la
k
e
H
ill S
t
H
u
b
b
a
rd
A
v
e
H
u
b
b
a
rd
A
v
e
E
P
a
rk
S
t
E
P
a
rk
S
t
W
N
o
rw
ic
h
W
N
o
rw
ic
h
Heywood St
Heywood St
Century Way
Century Way
Kaynor St
Kaynor St
Darwell St
Darwell St
Lebanon Pl
Lebanon Pl
Stetson St
Stetson St
A
tw
o
o
d
P
l
A
tw
o
o
d
P
l
N
a
is
m
ith
S
t
N
a
is
m
ith
S
t
M
errick Ave
M
errick Ave
Sackett Pl
Sackett Pl
Kibbe Ave
Kibbe Ave
A
rio
n
P
l
A
rio
n
P
l
A
m
e
s
H
i l l D
r
A
m
e
s
H
i l l D
r
Federal Ct
Federal Ct
C
a
rp
e
n
te
r C
t
C
a
rp
e
n
te
r C
t
Ingraham Ter
Ingraham Ter
G
e
rris
h
C
t
G
e
rris
h
C
t
S
e
a
rle
P
l
S
e
a
rle
P
l
W
E
lm
w
o
o
d
W
E
lm
w
o
o
d
Amboy Ct Amboy Ct
Underwood St Underwood St
H
e
m
lo
c
k
C
t
H
e
m
lo
c
k
C
t
W
a
ln
u
t C
t
W
a
ln
u
t C
t
G
reene P
l
G
reene P
l
Saab C
t
Saab C
t
M
ill R
iv
e
r L
n
M
ill R
iv
e
r L
n
N016
N016
Greenacre Sq
Greenacre Sq
M
onson Ave
M
onson Ave
W Columbus Ave
W Columbus Ave
Lib
e
rty S
t
Lib
e
rty S
t
S
E
n
d
B
rg
S
E
n
d
B
rg
W
olcott St
W
olcott St
M
ain St
M
ain St
I- 91
I- 91
Locust St
Locust St
US Hwy 5
US Hwy 5
P
e
a
rl S
t
P
e
a
rl S
t
B
rid
g
e
S
t
B
rid
g
e
S
t
I- 2
9
1
I- 2
9
1
U
S
H
w
y
2
0
U
S
H
w
y
2
0
Nursery St
Nursery St
Old Hill
Six Corners
McKnight
Liberty Heights
Forest Park
Brightwood
Memorial Square
Data Source: City of Springfield
Land Use
Neighborhood Boundaries
Park
Government - City
Other Government
Non-profit
Mixed Use
Other Commercial
Neighborhood Restaurants/Retail
Supermarket (over 10K sf)
Office
Other Residential
Residential Single Family
Residential 2-3 Family
Residential 4+ Units
Residential Condo
Storage/Warehouse/Distribution Facility
Industrial
Transportation Facility
Parking Garage
Parking Lot
Vacant Land
Unknown
An Initiative of Develop Springfield and
the Springfield Redevelopment Authroity
DISTRICT 1
METRO CENTER + SOUTH END
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.05
Miles
[
I- 91 I- 91
I
-

2
9
1
I
-

2
9
1
Main St
Main St
U
n
io
n

S
t
U
n
io
n

S
t
U
S

H
w
y

2
0
U
S

H
w
y

2
0
U
S
H
w
y
5
U
S
H
w
y
5
M
ill S
t
M
ill S
t
E Columbus Ave
E Columbus Ave
T
a
y
lo
r

S
t
T
a
y
lo
r

S
t
S
t
a
t
e

S
t
S
t
a
t
e

S
t
P
in
e
S
t
P
in
e
S
t
Maple St Maple St
C
entral S
t
C
entral S
t
W
o
r
t
h
in
g
t
o
n

S
t
W
o
r
t
h
in
g
t
o
n

S
t
Walnut St
Walnut St
H
a
n
c
o
c
k
S
t
H
a
n
c
o
c
k
S
t
W Columbus Ave
W Columbus Ave
Armory St
Armory St
Dwight St
Dwight St
S
t
a
f
f
o
r
d

S
t
S
t
a
f
f
o
r
d

S
t
K
in
g
S
t
K
in
g
S
t
T
y
le
r
S
t
T
y
le
r
S
t
L
ib
e
r
t
y

S
t
L
ib
e
r
t
y

S
t
Spring St
Spring St
L
o
c
u
s
t
S
t
L
o
c
u
s
t
S
t
A
ld
e
n
S
t
A
ld
e
n
S
t
Q
u
in
c
y
S
t
Q
u
in
c
y
S
t
Chestnut St Chestnut St
Florida St
Florida St
F
r
a
n
k
lin

S
t
F
r
a
n
k
lin

S
t
L
y
m
a
n

S
t
L
y
m
a
n

S
t
Federal St
Federal St
B
a
y

S
t
B
a
y

S
t
F
lo
re
n
c
e
S
t
F
lo
re
n
c
e
S
t
P
e
a
r
l S
t
P
e
a
r
l S
t C
e
d
a
r

S
t
C
e
d
a
r

S
t
L
e
y
fr
e
d
T
e
r
L
e
y
fr
e
d
T
e
r
B
r
id
g
e

S
t
B
r
id
g
e

S
t
A
lb
a
n
y

S
t
A
lb
a
n
y

S
t
P
e
n
d
le
to
n
A
v
e
P
e
n
d
le
to
n
A
v
e
L
e
b
a
n
o
n
S
t
L
e
b
a
n
o
n
S
t
Kendall St
Kendall St
Byers St
Byers St
A
s
h
le
y
S
t
A
s
h
le
y
S
t
Bowdoin St
Bowdoin St
N007
N007
Thompson St Thompson St
S
E
n
d
B
r
g
S
E
n
d
B
r
g
W
illia
m

S
t
W
illia
m
S
t
O
a
k
S
t
O
a
k
S
t
G
re
e
n
e
S
t
G
re
e
n
e
S
t
School St School St
Elliot St
Elliot St
H
ig
h

S
t
H
ig
h

S
t
L
in
c
o
ln
S
t
L
in
c
o
ln
S
t
M
u
lb
e
r
r
y

S
t
M
u
lb
e
r
r
y

S
t
E
a
s
te
rn
A
v
e
E
a
s
te
rn
A
v
e
C
h
e
r
r
y

S
t
C
h
e
r
r
y

S
t
Magazine St
Magazine St
Willow St
Willow St
L
e
e
te
S
t
L
e
e
te
S
t
S
t
a
t
e

H
w
y

1
4
7
S
t
a
t
e

H
w
y

1
4
7
B
lis
s

S
t
B
lis
s

S
t
O
rle
a
n
s
S
t
O
rle
a
n
s
S
t
C
o
n
g
r
e
s
s

S
t
C
o
n
g
r
e
s
s

S
t
C
ro
s
b
y
S
t
C
ro
s
b
y
S
t
K
n
o
x
S
t
K
n
o
x
S
t
Longhill St Longhill St
S
t
J
a
m
e
s
A
v
e
S
t
J
a
m
e
s
A
v
e
Clantoy St
Clantoy St
Dale St
Dale St
N
a
p
ie
r

S
t
N
a
p
ie
r

S
t
Cass St Cass St
B
e
lm
o
n
t A
v
e
B
e
lm
o
n
t A
v
e
M
a
r
b
l e

S
t
M
a
r
b
l e

S
t
W
a
r
w
ic
k

S
t
W
a
r
w
ic
k

S
t
Cherrelyn St
Cherrelyn St
G
len R
d
G
len R
d
M
e
m
o
r
ia
l
B
r
g
M
e
m
o
r
ia
l
B
r
g
A
d
a
m
s

S
t
A
d
a
m
s

S
t
G
e
n
e
s
e
e
S
t
G
e
n
e
s
e
e
S
t
W
o
o
d
s
id
e
T
e
r
W
o
o
d
s
id
e
T
e
r
E
d
g
e
la
n
d
S
t
E
d
g
e
la
n
d
S
t
P
a
r
k

S
t
P
a
r
k

S
t
H
illm
a
n

S
t
H
illm
a
n

S
t
M
o
r
r
is

S
t
M
o
r
r
is

S
t
W
in
t
e
r

S
t
W
in
t
e
r

S
t
W
ilc
o
x

S
t
W
ilc
o
x

S
t
C
lif
to
n
A
v
e
C
lif
to
n
A
v
e
H
ic
k
o
r
y
S
t
H
ic
k
o
r
y
S
t
T
e
m
p
le

S
t
T
e
m
p
le

S
t
Ingersoll Grv
Ingersoll Grv
E
v
e
r
e
t
t

S
t
E
v
e
r
e
t
t

S
t
C
la
rk
S
t
C
la
rk
S
t
A
v
o
n

P
l
A
v
o
n

P
l
Boylston St
Boylston St
M
a
n
h
a
tta
n
S
t
M
a
n
h
a
tta
n
S
t
H
o
w
a
r
d

S
t
H
o
w
a
r
d

S
t
M
a
rs
h
a
ll S
t
M
a
rs
h
a
ll S
t
B
r
o
a
d
S
t
B
r
o
a
d
S
t
D
e
x
te
r S
t
D
e
x
te
r S
t
A
c
u
s
h
n
e
t
A
v
e
A
c
u
s
h
n
e
t
A
v
e
Q
u
e
e
n
S
t
Q
u
e
e
n
S
t
L
o
r
in
g

S
t
L
o
r
in
g

S
t
M
a
p
le
C
t
M
a
p
le
C
t
C
le
v
e
la
n
d

S
t
C
le
v
e
la
n
d

S
t
P
a
lm
e
r
A
v
e
P
a
lm
e
r
A
v
e
G
r
a
n
t S
t
G
r
a
n
t S
t
F
r
a
n
k

B

M
u
r
r
a
y

S
t
F
r
a
n
k

B

M
u
r
r
a
y

S
t
F
r
e
m
o
n
t
S
t
F
r
e
m
o
n
t
S
t
L
S
t
L
S
t
N
010
N
010
S
a
r
a
t
o
g
a

S
t
S
a
r
a
t
o
g
a

S
t
A
g
a
w
a
m
A
v
e
A
g
a
w
a
m
A
v
e
Ja
m
e
s S
t
Ja
m
e
s S
t
Fort Pleasant Ave
Fort Pleasant Ave
M
a
r
g
a
r
e
t

S
t
M
a
r
g
a
r
e
t

S
t
C
o
u
r
t

S
t
C
o
u
r
t

S
t
S
tebbins S
t
S
tebbins S
t
H
a
r
r
is
o
n
A
v
e
H
a
r
r
is
o
n
A
v
e
O
s
w
e
g
o

S
t
O
s
w
e
g
o

S
t
W
in
d
s
o
r S
t
W
in
d
s
o
r S
t
Vinton St Vinton St
Y
o
r
k

S
t
Y
o
r
k

S
t
F
o
r
t

S
t
F
o
r
t

S
t
F
o
s
te
r
S
t
F
o
s
te
r
S
t
E
m
e
r
y

S
t
E
m
e
r
y

S
t
L
e
d
y
a
rd
S
t
L
e
d
y
a
rd
S
t
N
e
w
B
r
id
g
e
S
t
N
e
w
B
r
id
g
e
S
t
B
e
lle

S
t
B
e
lle

S
t
C
e
m
e
t
e
r
y
A
v
e
C
e
m
e
t
e
r
y
A
v
e
S
m
ith
S
t
S
m
ith
S
t
S
p
r
u
c
e

S
t
S
p
r
u
c
e

S
t
Dorne St
Dorne St
N009 N009
Myrtle St
Myrtle St
M
e
m
o
r
ia
l A
v
e
M
e
m
o
r
ia
l A
v
e
E
d
w
a
r
d
s

S
t
E
d
w
a
r
d
s

S
t
A
g
n
e
w
S
t
A
g
n
e
w
S
t
W
in
t
h
r
o
p

S
t
W
in
t
h
r
o
p

S
t
Terrence S
t
Terrence S
t
Nursery St
Nursery St
Tracy S
t
Tracy S
t
P
h
o
e
n
ix

S
t
P
h
o
e
n
ix

S
t
B
o
la
n
d

W
a
y
B
o
la
n
d

W
a
y L
o
m
b
a
r
d
S
t
L
o
m
b
a
r
d
S
t
H
a
n
n
o
n

S
t
H
a
n
n
o
n

S
t
Webster St Webster St
C
h
a
p
in

S
t
C
h
a
p
in

S
t
C
lin
t
o
n

S
t
C
lin
t
o
n

S
t
L
illia
n
S
t
L
illia
n
S
t
E

C
o
u
r
t

S
t
E

C
o
u
r
t

S
t
C
o
llin
s
S
t
C
o
llin
s
S
t
C
h
e
s
te
r
S
t
C
h
e
s
te
r
S
t
M
o
n
r
o
e
S
t
M
o
n
r
o
e
S
t
W

B
r
o
a
d
W

B
r
o
a
d
B
e
e
ch
S
t
B
e
e
ch
S
t
M
a
t
t
o
o
n

S
t
M
a
t
t
o
o
n

S
t
M
e
lro
s
e
S
t
M
e
lro
s
e
S
t
L
e
s
lie
S
t
L
e
s
lie
S
t
A
r
lin
g
to
n
C
t
A
r
lin
g
to
n
C
t
L
a
d
d
S
t
L
a
d
d
S
t
R
u
tle
d
g
e
S
t
R
u
tle
d
g
e
S
t
B
r
ig
h
a
m

S
t
B
r
ig
h
a
m

S
t
P
o
rts
m
o
u
th
S
t
P
o
rts
m
o
u
th
S
t
Railroad St
Railroad St
H
a
w
th
o
rn
e
S
t
H
a
w
th
o
rn
e
S
t
G
a
r
d
n
e
r

S
t
G
a
r
d
n
e
r

S
t
H
a
ls
e
y

S
t
H
a
ls
e
y

S
t
S
u
lliv
a
n

S
t
S
u
lliv
a
n

S
t
G
r
id
ir
o
n

S
t
G
r
id
ir
o
n

S
t
E
lm

S
t
E
lm

S
t
W
a
lk
e
r
S
t
W
a
lk
e
r
S
t
George St
George St
Longview St
Longview St
S
a
le
m

S
t
S
a
le
m

S
t
O
rle
a
n
s
C
t
O
rle
a
n
s
C
t
W
e
n
d
e
ll P
l
W
e
n
d
e
ll P
l
F
o
re
s
t P
a
rk
A
v
e
F
o
re
s
t P
a
rk
A
v
e
Richelieu St Richelieu St
C
r
o
s
s

S
t
C
r
o
s
s

S
t
I
v
y

C
t
I
v
y

C
t
G
lo
b
e
S
t
G
lo
b
e
S
t
Murray Hill Ave
Murray Hill Ave
W
o
lc
o
tt S
t
W
o
lc
o
tt S
t
R
idgew
ood P
l
R
idgew
ood P
l
B
o
w
d
o
in
T
e
r
B
o
w
d
o
in
T
e
r
N
o
r
w
o
o
d
S
t
N
o
r
w
o
o
d
S
t
H
a
m
p
d
e
n

S
t
H
a
m
p
d
e
n

S
t
E
lm
w
o
o
d
S
t
E
lm
w
o
o
d
S
t
W
a
r
r
in
e
r
A
v
e
W
a
r
r
in
e
r
A
v
e
S
u
m
m
it S
t
S
u
m
m
it S
t
Pleasant St
Pleasant St
R
e
n
e
e
C
ir
R
e
n
e
e
C
ir
B
e
lle
A
v
e
B
e
lle
A
v
e
S
t
o
c
k
b
r
id
g
e

S
t
S
t
o
c
k
b
r
id
g
e

S
t
Sterns Ter
Sterns Ter
W
Y
o
r
k

S
t
W
Y
o
r
k

S
t
Ashmun St Ashmun St
Chandler St
Chandler St
Leonard St Leonard St
E
S
c
h
o
o
l S
t
E
S
c
h
o
o
l S
t
M
adison Ave
M
adison Ave
N

C
h
u
r
c
h
A
v
e
N

C
h
u
r
c
h
A
v
e
P
y
n
c
h
o
n

S
t
P
y
n
c
h
o
n

S
t
B
r
u
n
o

S
t
B
r
u
n
o

S
t
M
ill
L
n
M
ill
L
n
Alert St
Alert St
Fairbank Pl
Fairbank Pl
P
in
e
S
tre
e
t C
t
P
in
e
S
tre
e
t C
t
W

G
a
r
d
n
e
r
S
t
W

G
a
r
d
n
e
r
S
t
Niagara St
Niagara St
C
r
o
s
s
e
t
t

L
n
C
r
o
s
s
e
t
t

L
n
B
la
k
e

H
ill
S
t
B
la
k
e

H
ill
S
t
H
u
b
b
a
r
d
A
v
e
H
u
b
b
a
r
d
A
v
e
E

P
a
r
k

S
t
E

P
a
r
k

S
t
W

N
o
r
w
ic
h
W

N
o
r
w
ic
h
Heywood St
Heywood St
Century Way
Century Way
Kaynor St
Kaynor St
Darwell St
Darwell St
L
e
b
a
n
o
n
P
l
L
e
b
a
n
o
n
P
l
S
te
tso
n
S
t
S
te
tso
n
S
t
A
t
w
o
o
d

P
l
A
t
w
o
o
d

P
l
N
a
is
m
ith

S
t
N
a
is
m
ith

S
t
M
e
rric
k
A
v
e
M
e
rric
k
A
v
e
Sackett Pl
Sackett Pl
Kibbe Ave
Kibbe Ave
A
r
io
n

P
l
A
r
io
n

P
l
A
m
e
s

H
i l l
D
r
A
m
e
s

H
i l l
D
r
Federal C
t
Federal C
t
C
a
r
p
e
n
te
r C
t
C
a
r
p
e
n
te
r C
t
Ingraham Ter
Ingraham Ter
G
e
rris
h
C
t
G
e
rris
h
C
t
S
e
a
r
le

P
l
S
e
a
r
le

P
l
W

E
lm
w
o
o
d
W

E
lm
w
o
o
d
Amboy Ct
Amboy Ct
Underwood St Underwood St
H
e
m
lo
c
k
C
t
H
e
m
lo
c
k
C
t
W
a
ln
u
t

C
t
W
a
ln
u
t

C
t
G
re
e
n
e
P
l
G
re
e
n
e
P
l
S
a
a
b
C
t
S
a
a
b
C
t
M
ill R
iv
e
r
L
n
M
ill R
iv
e
r
L
n
N
01
6
N
01
6
G
reenacre S
q
G
reenacre S
q
M
o
n
s
o
n
A
v
e
M
o
n
s
o
n
A
v
e
W Columbus Ave
W Columbus Ave
L
ib
e
rty
S
t
L
ib
e
rty
S
t
S
E
n
d
B
r
g
S
E
n
d
B
r
g
W
o
lc
o
tt S
t
W
o
lc
o
tt S
t
M
ain S
t
M
ain S
t
I- 91
I- 91
Locust St
Locust St
U
S H
w
y 5
U
S H
w
y 5
P
e
a
r
l
S
t
P
e
a
r
l
S
t
B
rid
g
e
S
t
B
rid
g
e
S
t
I-

2
9
1
I-

2
9
1
U
S

H
w
y

2
0
U
S

H
w
y

2
0
Nursery St
Nursery St
Old Hill
Six Corners
McKnight
Liberty Heights
Forest Park
Brightwood
Memorial Square
Data Source: City of Springfield
Land Use
Neighborhood Boundaries
Park
Government - City
Other Government
Non-profit
Mixed Use
Other Commercial
Neighborhood Restaurants/Retail
Supermarket (over 10K sf)
Office
Other Residential
Residential Single Family
Residential 2-3 Family
Residential 4+ Units
Residential Condo
Storage/Warehouse/Distribution Facility
Industrial
Transportation Facility
Parking Garage
Parking Lot
Vacant Land
Unknown
Land Use
Source: City of Springfield
N
D I S T R I C T O N E : M E T R O C E N T E R A N D S O U T H E N D
11
The majority of housing units in both
Metro Center and the South End are
renter-occupied. Ninety percent of the
housing units in the South End are rental.
The exceptions are several condominium
buildings and the Matoon Street area in
Metro Center and some of the one- to three-
family buildings on the side streets in the
southern two-thirds of the South End.
Three hundred sixty-four below market-
rate rental uni ts of federal l y-assi sted
housing that include the Marble Street
Apartments (public housing development),
Concor d Hei ght s Apar t ment s, and
Hollywood Apartments, are concentrated
in the center of the South End east of
Mai n Street. Addi ti onal bel ow-market
units include Northern Heights, with 149
units on Main and Central Streets, and
the Gentile Apartments, a public housing
development for seniors. According to the
city’s housing office, 42 residential structures
with approximately 200 housing units in the
South End were damaged in the tornado.
No residential buildings were damaged by
the tornado in Metro Center.
CRIME
The percepti on and real i ty of cri me
discourages visitors and new residents. In
Metro Center, social service offices and
shelters, including the Springfield Rescue
Hollywood-Area Street Hollywood-Area Street
Extentions/Reconfigurations Extentions/Reconfigurations
Main Street Streetscape Improvements Main Street Streetscape Improvements
An Initiative of Develop Springfield and
the Springfield Redevelopment Authroity
DISTRICT 1
METRO CENTER + SOUTH END
% Units Homeowner and Renter
Occupied by Census Block
Neighborhood Boundaries
90% - 100% Homeowner-Occupied
73% - 89% Homeowner-Occupied
50% - 72% Homeowner-Occupied
51% - 68% Renter-Occupied
69% - 87% Renter-Occupied
88% - 100% Renter-Occupied
Unoccupied Blocks
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.05
Miles
[
I- 91 I- 91
I- 2
9
1
I- 2
9
1
Main St
Main St
U
n
io
n
S
t
U
n
io
n
S
t
U
S
H
w
y
2
0
U
S
H
w
y
2
0
T
a
y
lo
r S
t
T
a
y
lo
r S
t
S
ta
te
S
t
S
ta
te
S
t
E Columbus Ave
E Columbus Ave
P
in
e
S
t
P
in
e
S
t
Maple St
Maple St
US Hwy 5
US Hwy 5
M
ill S
t
M
ill S
t
W
o
rth
in
g
to
n
S
t
W
o
rth
in
g
to
n
S
t
Walnut St
Walnut St
Central St
Central St
Armory St
Armory St
Dwight St
Dwight St
W Columbus Ave
W Columbus Ave
S
ta
ffo
rd
S
t
S
ta
ffo
rd
S
t
L
ib
e
rty
S
t
L
ib
e
rty
S
t
Spring St
Spring St
Chestnut St Chestnut St
T
y
le
r S
t
T
y
le
r S
t
Hancock St
Hancock St
K
in
g
S
t
K
in
g
S
t
F
ra
n
k
lin
S
t
F
ra
n
k
lin
S
t
L
y
m
a
n
S
t
L
y
m
a
n
S
t
Federal St
Federal St
F
lo
re
n
ce
S
t
F
lo
re
n
ce
S
t
P
e
a
rl S
t
P
e
a
rl S
t C
e
d
a
r S
t
C
e
d
a
r S
t
B
rid
g
e
S
t
B
rid
g
e
S
t
Q
u
in
cy S
t
Q
u
in
cy S
t
Byers St
Byers St
A
sh
le
y S
t
A
sh
le
y S
t
Bowdoin St Bowdoin St
W
illia
m
S
t
W
illia
m
S
t
O
ak St
O
ak St
School St School St
Elliot St
Elliot St
H
ig
h
S
t
H
ig
h
S
t
L
in
c
o
ln
S
t
L
in
c
o
ln
S
t
M
u
lb
e
rry
S
t
M
u
lb
e
rry
S
t
Magazine St
Magazine St
Willow St
Willow St
P
e
n
d
le
to
n
A
ve
P
e
n
d
le
to
n
A
ve L
e
b
a
n
o
n
S
t
L
e
b
a
n
o
n
S
t
A
lb
a
n
y
S
t
A
lb
a
n
y
S
t
S
ta
te
H
w
y
1
4
7
S
ta
te
H
w
y
1
4
7
B
lis
s
S
t
B
lis
s
S
t
O
rleans St
O
rleans St
C
o
n
g
re
s
s
S
t
C
o
n
g
re
s
s
S
t
A
ld
e
n
S
t
A
ld
e
n
S
t
B
a
y
S
t
B
a
y
S
t
Dale St
Dale St
N
a
p
ie
r S
t
N
a
p
ie
r S
t
Cass St Cass St
M
a
rb
le
S
t
M
a
rb
le
S
t
G
re
e
n
e
S
t
G
re
e
n
e
S
t
W
a
rw
ic
k
S
t
W
a
rw
ic
k
S
t
M
e
m
o
ria
l B
rg
M
e
m
o
ria
l B
rg
A
d
a
m
s
S
t
A
d
a
m
s
S
t
G
enesee St
G
enesee St
P
a
rk
S
t
P
a
rk
S
t
H
illm
a
n
S
t
H
illm
a
n
S
t
M
o
rris
S
t
M
o
rris
S
t
W
in
te
r S
t
W
in
te
r S
t
W
ilc
o
x
S
t
W
ilc
o
x
S
t
T
e
m
p
le
S
t
T
e
m
p
le
S
t
C
ro
sb
y S
t
C
ro
sb
y S
t
A
v
o
n
P
l
A
v
o
n
P
l
Boylston St
Boylston St
H
o
w
a
rd
S
t
H
o
w
a
rd
S
t
B
ro
a
d
S
t
B
ro
a
d
S
t
D
exter S
t
D
exter S
t
A
c
u
s
h
n
e
t A
v
e
A
c
u
s
h
n
e
t A
v
e
Q
u
e
e
n
S
t
Q
u
e
e
n
S
t
L
o
rin
g
S
t
L
o
rin
g
S
t
M
a
p
le
C
t
M
a
p
le
C
t
Locust St
Locust St
P
a
lm
e
r A
v
e
P
a
lm
e
r A
v
e
C
le
v
e
la
n
d
S
t
C
le
v
e
la
n
d
S
t
G
ra
n
t S
t
G
ra
n
t S
t
F
ra
n
k
B
M
u
rra
y
S
t
F
ra
n
k
B
M
u
rra
y
S
t F
re
m
o
n
t S
t
F
re
m
o
n
t S
t
L
S
t
L
S
t
N010
N010
S
a
ra
to
g
a
S
t
S
a
ra
to
g
a
S
t
Jam
es St
Jam
es St
M
a
rg
a
re
t S
t
M
a
rg
a
re
t S
t
C
o
u
rt S
t
C
o
u
rt S
t
Stebbins St
Stebbins St
H
a
rris
o
n
A
v
e
H
a
rris
o
n
A
v
e
Knox St
Knox St
O
s
w
e
g
o
S
t
O
s
w
e
g
o
S
t
S
t J
a
m
e
s
A
v
e
S
t J
a
m
e
s
A
v
e
W
indsor S
t
W
indsor S
t
Vinton St Vinton St
C
la
rk S
t
C
la
rk S
t
Y
o
rk
S
t
Y
o
rk
S
t
F
o
rt S
t
F
o
rt S
t
Foster St
Foster St
E
m
e
ry
S
t
E
m
e
ry
S
t
Ledyard St
Ledyard St
B
e
lle
S
t
B
e
lle
S
t
C
e
m
e
te
ry
A
v
e
C
e
m
e
te
ry
A
v
e
S
p
ru
c
e
S
t
S
p
ru
c
e
S
t
Dorne St
Dorne St
N009 N009
Myrtle St Myrtle St
E
d
w
a
rd
s
S
t
E
d
w
a
rd
s
S
t
A
g
n
e
w
S
t
A
g
n
e
w
S
t
W
in
th
ro
p
S
t
W
in
th
ro
p
S
t
Nursery St
Nursery St
Tracy St
Tracy St
B
o
la
n
d
W
a
y
B
o
la
n
d
W
a
y
L
o
m
b
a
rd
S
t
L
o
m
b
a
rd
S
t
H
a
n
n
o
n
S
t
H
a
n
n
o
n
S
t
Webster St Webster St
Dwight St Exd
Dwight St Exd
C
lin
to
n
S
t
C
lin
to
n
S
t
L
illia
n
S
t
L
illia
n
S
t
E
C
o
u
rt S
t
E
C
o
u
rt S
t
W
B
ro
a
d
W
B
ro
a
d
B
e
e
c
h
S
t
B
e
e
c
h
S
t
M
a
tto
o
n
S
t
M
a
tto
o
n
S
t
S
m
ith
S
t
S
m
ith
S
t
Leslie St
Leslie St
A
rlin
g
to
n
C
t
A
rlin
g
to
n
C
t
R
u
tle
d
g
e
S
t
R
u
tle
d
g
e
S
t
B
rig
h
a
m
S
t
B
rig
h
a
m
S
t
H
a
w
th
o
rn
e
S
t
H
a
w
th
o
rn
e
S
t
G
a
rd
n
e
r S
t
G
a
rd
n
e
r S
t
H
a
ls
e
y
S
t
H
a
ls
e
y
S
t
S
u
lliv
a
n
S
t
S
u
lliv
a
n
S
t
L
e
e
te
S
t
L
e
e
te
S
t
G
rid
iro
n
S
t
G
rid
iro
n
S
t
E
lm
S
t
E
lm
S
t
W
a
lk
e
r S
t
W
a
lk
e
r S
t
George St
George St
S
a
le
m
S
t
S
a
le
m
S
t
O
rle
a
n
s C
t
O
rle
a
n
s C
t
W
e
n
d
e
ll P
l
W
e
n
d
e
ll P
l
Richelieu St Richelieu St
C
ro
s
s
S
t
C
ro
s
s
S
t
Iv
y
C
t
Iv
y
C
t
Railroad St
Railroad St
Murray Hill Ave Murray Hill Ave
C
lifto
n
A
v
e
C
lifto
n
A
v
e
W
olcott St
W
olcott St
Ridgewood Pl
Ridgewood Pl
B
o
w
d
o
in
T
e
r
B
o
w
d
o
in
T
e
r
N
o
rw
o
o
d
S
t
N
o
rw
o
o
d
S
t
H
a
m
p
d
e
n
S
t
H
a
m
p
d
e
n
S
t
E
lm
w
o
o
d
S
t
E
lm
w
o
o
d
S
t
N007
N007
Crescent Hl
Crescent Hl
W
a
rrin
e
r A
v
e
W
a
rrin
e
r A
v
e
S
u
m
m
it S
t
S
u
m
m
it S
t
Pleasant St
Pleasant St
R
enee C
ir
R
enee C
ir
S
to
c
k
b
rid
g
e
S
t
S
to
c
k
b
rid
g
e
S
t
Sterns Ter
Sterns Ter
W
Y
o
rk
S
t
W
Y
o
rk
S
t
N
e
w
m
a
n
S
t
N
e
w
m
a
n
S
t
Ashmun St Ashmun St
Terrence St
Terrence St
Chandler St
Chandler St
Leonard St Leonard St
Madison Ave
Madison Ave
N
C
h
u
rc
h
A
v
e
N
C
h
u
rc
h
A
v
e
P
y
n
c
h
o
n
S
t
P
y
n
c
h
o
n
S
t
M
ill L
n
M
ill L
n
Alert St
Alert St
Hanover St
Hanover St
Fairbank Pl
Fairbank Pl
P
ine S
treet C
t
P
ine S
treet C
t
Niagara St
Niagara St
C
ro
s
s
e
tt L
n
C
ro
s
s
e
tt L
n
H
u
b
b
a
rd
A
v
e
H
u
b
b
a
rd
A
v
e
E
P
a
rk
S
t
E
P
a
rk
S
t
Heywood St
Heywood St
Kaynor St
Kaynor St
Stetson St
Stetson St
N
e
w
B
rid
g
e
S
t
N
e
w
B
rid
g
e
S
t
A
tw
o
o
d
P
l
A
tw
o
o
d
P
l
N
a
is
m
ith
S
t
N
a
is
m
ith
S
t
M
a
n
h
a
tta
n
S
t
M
a
n
h
a
tta
n
S
t
Sackett Pl
Sackett Pl
Kibbe Ave
Kibbe Ave
A
m
e
s
H
i l l D
r
A
m
e
s
H
i l l D
r
Crane St
Crane St
Federal Ct
Federal Ct
C
a
rp
e
n
te
r C
t
C
a
rp
e
n
te
r C
t
Ingraham Ter
Ingraham Ter
Barnes St
Barnes St
G
e
rrish
C
t
G
e
rrish
C
t
W
E
lm
w
o
o
d
W
E
lm
w
o
o
d
Amboy Ct Amboy Ct
Underwood St Underwood St
W
a
ln
u
t C
t
W
a
ln
u
t C
t
Gardner Pl
Gardner Pl
Saab Ct
Saab Ct
Columbia Ter
Columbia Ter
M
ill R
iv
e
r L
n
M
ill R
iv
e
r L
n
N016
N016
P
e
a
rl S
t
P
e
a
rl S
t
Liberty S
t
Liberty S
t
Nursery St
Nursery St
I- 91 I- 91
W Columbus Ave
W Columbus Ave
U
S
H
w
y
2
0
U
S
H
w
y
2
0
B
rid
g
e
S
t
B
rid
g
e
S
t
I- 2
9
1
I- 2
9
1
US Hwy 5
US Hwy 5
L
o
cu
st S
t
L
o
cu
st S
t
Six Corners
Old Hill
Liberty Heights
McKnight
Forest Park
Brightwood
Memorial Square
Metro Center Metro Center
South End South End
Data Source: ESRI
Hollywood-Area Street Hollywood-Area Street
Extentions/Reconfigurations Extentions/Reconfigurations
Main Street Streetscape Improvements Main Street Streetscape Improvements
An Initiative of Develop Springfield and
the Springfield Redevelopment Authroity
DISTRICT 1
METRO CENTER + SOUTH END
% Units Homeowner and Renter
Occupied by Census Block
Neighborhood Boundaries
90% - 100% Homeowner-Occupied
73% - 89% Homeowner-Occupied
50% - 72% Homeowner-Occupied
51% - 68% Renter-Occupied
69% - 87% Renter-Occupied
88% - 100% Renter-Occupied
Unoccupied Blocks
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.05
Miles
[
I- 91 I- 91
I
-

2
9
1
I
-

2
9
1
Main St
Main St
U
n
io
n
S
t
U
n
io
n
S
t
U
S

H
w
y

2
0
U
S

H
w
y

2
0
T
a
y
lo
r

S
t
T
a
y
lo
r

S
t
S
t
a
t
e

S
t
S
t
a
t
e

S
t
E Columbus Ave
E Columbus Ave
P
in
e
S
t
P
in
e
S
t
Maple St
Maple St
US Hwy 5
US Hwy 5
M
ill S
t
M
ill S
t
W
o
r
t
h
in
g
t
o
n

S
t
W
o
r
t
h
in
g
t
o
n

S
t
Walnut St
Walnut St
C
entral S
t
C
entral S
t
Armory St
Armory St
Dwight St
Dwight St
W Columbus Ave
W Columbus Ave
S
t
a
f
f
o
r
d

S
t
S
t
a
f
f
o
r
d

S
t
L
ib
e
r
t
y

S
t
L
ib
e
r
t
y

S
t
Spring St
Spring St
Chestnut St Chestnut St
T
y
le
r
S
t
T
y
le
r
S
t
H
a
n
c
o
c
k
S
t
H
a
n
c
o
c
k
S
t
K
in
g
S
t
K
in
g
S
t
F
r
a
n
k
lin

S
t
F
r
a
n
k
lin

S
t
L
y
m
a
n

S
t
L
y
m
a
n

S
t
Federal St
Federal St
F
lo
re
n
c
e
S
t
F
lo
re
n
c
e
S
t
P
e
a
r
l S
t
P
e
a
r
l S
t
C
e
d
a
r

S
t
C
e
d
a
r

S
t
B
r
id
g
e

S
t
B
r
id
g
e

S
t
Q
u
in
c
y
S
t
Q
u
in
c
y
S
t
Byers St
Byers St
A
s
h
le
y
S
t
A
s
h
le
y
S
t
Bowdoin St
Bowdoin St
W
illia
m

S
t
W
illia
m

S
t
O
a
k
S
t
O
a
k
S
t
School St School St
Elliot St
Elliot St
H
ig
h

S
t
H
ig
h

S
t
L
in
c
o
ln
S
t
L
in
c
o
ln
S
t
M
u
lb
e
r
r
y

S
t
M
u
lb
e
r
r
y

S
t
Magazine St
Magazine St
Willow St
Willow St
P
e
n
d
le
to
n
A
v
e
P
e
n
d
le
to
n
A
v
e L
e
b
a
n
o
n
S
t
L
e
b
a
n
o
n
S
t
A
lb
a
n
y
S
t
A
lb
a
n
y
S
t
S
ta
t
e
H
w
y
1
4
7
S
ta
t
e
H
w
y
1
4
7
B
lis
s

S
t
B
lis
s

S
t
O
rle
a
n
s
S
t
O
rle
a
n
s
S
t
C
o
n
g
r
e
s
s

S
t
C
o
n
g
r
e
s
s

S
t
A
ld
e
n
S
t
A
ld
e
n
S
t
B
a
y

S
t
B
a
y

S
t
Dale St
Dale St
N
a
p
ie
r

S
t
N
a
p
ie
r

S
t
Cass St Cass St
M
a
r
b
le

S
t
M
a
r
b
le

S
t
G
re
e
n
e
S
t
G
re
e
n
e
S
t
W
a
r
w
ic
k

S
t
W
a
r
w
ic
k

S
t
M
e
m
o
r
ia
l
B
r
g
M
e
m
o
r
ia
l
B
r
g
A
d
a
m
s

S
t
A
d
a
m
s

S
t
G
e
n
e
s
e
e
S
t
G
e
n
e
s
e
e
S
t
P
a
r
k

S
t
P
a
r
k

S
t
H
illm
a
n

S
t
H
illm
a
n

S
t
M
o
r
r
is

S
t
M
o
r
r
is

S
t
W
in
t
e
r

S
t
W
in
t
e
r

S
t
W
ilc
o
x

S
t
W
ilc
o
x

S
t
T
e
m
p
le

S
t
T
e
m
p
le

S
t
C
ro
s
b
y
S
t
C
ro
s
b
y
S
t
A
v
o
n

P
l
A
v
o
n

P
l
Boylston St
Boylston St
H
o
w
a
r
d

S
t
H
o
w
a
r
d

S
t
B
r
o
a
d
S
t
B
r
o
a
d
S
t
D
e
x
te
r S
t
D
e
x
te
r S
t
A
c
u
s
h
n
e
t A
v
e
A
c
u
s
h
n
e
t A
v
e
Q
u
e
e
n
S
t
Q
u
e
e
n
S
t
L
o
r
in
g

S
t
L
o
r
in
g

S
t
M
a
p
le
C
t
M
a
p
le
C
t
Locust St
Locust St
P
a
lm
e
r
A
v
e
P
a
lm
e
r
A
v
e
C
le
v
e
la
n
d

S
t
C
le
v
e
la
n
d

S
t
G
r
a
n
t S
t
G
r
a
n
t S
t
F
r
a
n
k

B

M
u
r
r
a
y

S
t
F
r
a
n
k

B

M
u
r
r
a
y

S
t F
r
e
m
o
n
t
S
t
F
r
e
m
o
n
t
S
t
L
S
t
L
S
t
N
010
N
010
S
a
r
a
to
g
a

S
t
S
a
r
a
to
g
a

S
t
Ja
m
e
s S
t
Ja
m
e
s S
t
M
a
r
g
a
r
e
t

S
t
M
a
r
g
a
r
e
t

S
t
C
o
u
r
t

S
t
C
o
u
r
t

S
t
S
tebbins S
t
S
tebbins S
t
H
a
r
r
is
o
n
A
v
e
H
a
r
r
is
o
n
A
v
e
K
n
o
x
S
t
K
n
o
x
S
t
O
s
w
e
g
o

S
t
O
s
w
e
g
o

S
t
S
t
J
a
m
e
s
A
v
e
S
t
J
a
m
e
s
A
v
e
W
in
d
s
o
r S
t
W
in
d
s
o
r S
t
Vinton St Vinton St
C
la
rk
S
t
C
la
rk
S
t
Y
o
r
k

S
t
Y
o
r
k

S
t
F
o
r
t

S
t
F
o
r
t

S
t
F
o
ste
r S
t
F
o
ste
r S
t
E
m
e
r
y

S
t
E
m
e
r
y

S
t
L
e
d
y
a
rd
S
t
L
e
d
y
a
rd
S
t
B
e
lle

S
t
B
e
lle

S
t
C
e
m
e
t
e
r
y
A
v
e
C
e
m
e
t
e
r
y
A
v
e
S
p
r
u
c
e
S
t
S
p
r
u
c
e
S
t
Dorne St
Dorne St
N009 N009
Myrtle St
Myrtle St
E
d
w
a
r
d
s

S
t
E
d
w
a
r
d
s

S
t
A
g
n
e
w
S
t
A
g
n
e
w
S
t
W
in
t
h
r
o
p

S
t
W
in
t
h
r
o
p

S
t
Nursery St
Nursery St
Tracy St
Tracy St
B
o
la
n
d

W
a
y
B
o
la
n
d

W
a
y
L
o
m
b
a
r
d
S
t
L
o
m
b
a
r
d
S
t
H
a
n
n
o
n

S
t
H
a
n
n
o
n

S
t
Webster St Webster St
Dwight St Exd
Dwight St Exd
C
lin
to
n
S
t
C
lin
to
n
S
t
L
illia
n
S
t
L
illia
n
S
t
E

C
o
u
r
t

S
t
E

C
o
u
r
t

S
t
W

B
r
o
a
d
W

B
r
o
a
d
B
e
e
c
h

S
t
B
e
e
c
h

S
t
M
a
t
t
o
o
n

S
t
M
a
t
t
o
o
n

S
t
S
m
ith
S
t
S
m
ith
S
t
L
e
s
lie
S
t
L
e
s
lie
S
t
A
r
lin
g
to
n
C
t
A
r
lin
g
to
n
C
t
R
u
tle
d
g
e
S
t
R
u
tle
d
g
e
S
t
B
r
ig
h
a
m

S
t
B
r
ig
h
a
m

S
t
H
a
w
th
o
rn
e
S
t
H
a
w
th
o
rn
e
S
t
G
a
r
d
n
e
r

S
t
G
a
r
d
n
e
r

S
t
H
a
ls
e
y

S
t
H
a
ls
e
y

S
t
S
u
lliv
a
n

S
t
S
u
lliv
a
n

S
t
L
e
e
te
S
t
L
e
e
te
S
t
G
r
id
ir
o
n

S
t
G
r
id
ir
o
n

S
t
E
lm

S
t
E
lm

S
t
W
a
lk
e
r
S
t
W
a
lk
e
r
S
t
George St
George St
S
a
le
m

S
t
S
a
le
m

S
t
O
rle
a
n
s
C
t
O
rle
a
n
s
C
t
W
e
n
d
e
ll P
l
W
e
n
d
e
ll P
l
Richelieu St Richelieu St
C
r
o
s
s

S
t
C
r
o
s
s

S
t
I
v
y

C
t
I
v
y

C
t
Railroad St
Railroad St
Murray Hill Ave
Murray Hill Ave
C
lif
to
n
A
v
e
C
lif
to
n
A
v
e
W
o
lc
o
tt S
t
W
o
lc
o
tt S
t
R
idgew
ood P
l
R
idgew
ood P
l
B
o
w
d
o
in
T
e
r
B
o
w
d
o
in
T
e
r
N
o
r
w
o
o
d
S
t
N
o
r
w
o
o
d
S
t
H
a
m
p
d
e
n

S
t
H
a
m
p
d
e
n

S
t
E
lm
w
o
o
d
S
t
E
lm
w
o
o
d
S
t
N
007
N
007
Crescent Hl
Crescent Hl
W
a
r
r
in
e
r
A
v
e
W
a
r
r
in
e
r
A
v
e
S
u
m
m
it S
t
S
u
m
m
it S
t
P
leasant S
t
P
leasant S
t
R
e
n
e
e
C
ir
R
e
n
e
e
C
ir
S
t
o
c
k
b
r
id
g
e

S
t
S
t
o
c
k
b
r
id
g
e

S
t
Sterns Ter
Sterns Ter
W
Y
o
r
k

S
t
W
Y
o
r
k

S
t
N
e
w
m
a
n
S
t
N
e
w
m
a
n
S
t
Ashmun St Ashmun St
Terrence S
t
Terrence S
t
Chandler St
Chandler St
Leonard St Leonard St
M
adison Ave
M
adison Ave
N

C
h
u
r
c
h
A
v
e
N

C
h
u
r
c
h
A
v
e
P
y
n
c
h
o
n

S
t
P
y
n
c
h
o
n

S
t
M
ill
L
n
M
ill
L
n
Alert St
Alert St
Hanover St
Hanover St
Fairbank Pl
Fairbank Pl
P
in
e
S
tre
e
t C
t
P
in
e
S
tre
e
t C
t
Niagara St
Niagara St
C
r
o
s
s
e
t
t

L
n
C
r
o
s
s
e
t
t

L
n
H
u
b
b
a
r
d
A
v
e
H
u
b
b
a
r
d
A
v
e
E

P
a
r
k

S
t
E

P
a
r
k

S
t
Heywood St
Heywood St
Kaynor St
Kaynor St
S
te
tso
n
S
t
S
te
tso
n
S
t
N
e
w
B
r
id
g
e
S
t
N
e
w
B
r
id
g
e
S
t
A
t
w
o
o
d

P
l
A
t
w
o
o
d

P
l
N
a
is
m
ith
S
t
N
a
is
m
ith
S
t
M
a
n
h
a
t
t
a
n

S
t
M
a
n
h
a
t
t
a
n

S
t
Sackett Pl
Sackett Pl
Kibbe Ave
Kibbe Ave
A
m
e
s

H
i l l
D
r
A
m
e
s

H
i l l
D
r
Crane St
Crane St
Federal C
t
Federal C
t
C
a
r
p
e
n
te
r C
t
C
a
r
p
e
n
te
r C
t
Ingraham Ter
Ingraham Ter
Barnes St
Barnes St
G
e
rris
h
C
t
G
e
rris
h
C
t
W

E
lm
w
o
o
d
W

E
lm
w
o
o
d
Amboy Ct
Amboy Ct
Underwood St Underwood St
W
a
ln
u
t

C
t
W
a
ln
u
t

C
t
Gardner Pl
Gardner Pl
S
a
a
b
C
t
S
a
a
b
C
t
C
olum
bia Ter
C
olum
bia Ter
M
ill R
iv
e
r
L
n
M
ill R
iv
e
r
L
n
N
016
N
016
P
e
a
r
l
S
t
P
e
a
r
l
S
t
L
ib
e
rty
S
t
L
ib
e
rty
S
t
Nursery St
Nursery St
I- 91 I- 91
W Columbus Ave
W Columbus Ave
U
S

H
w
y

2
0
U
S

H
w
y

2
0
B
rid
g
e
S
t
B
rid
g
e
S
t
I-

2
9
1
I-

2
9
1
US Hwy 5
US Hwy 5
L
o
c
u
s
t S
t
L
o
c
u
s
t S
t
Six Corners
Old Hill
Liberty Heights
McKnight
Forest Park
Brightwood
Memorial Square
Metro Center Metro Center
South End South End
Data Source: ESRI
% Uni ts Homeowner
and Renter Occupied by
Census Block
Non-residential
Source: 2010 Census
N
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
12
Mission on Bliss Street near the South End,
serve homeless people, who are perceived
as being more prominent than their numbers
may really justify because there is insufficient
street life downtown. Perception of crime is
the issue for Metro Center. The South End
in recent years has had a significantly higher
crime rate than the city as a whole.
POVERTY
Poverty-level households are especially
concentrated in the southeastern part of
the South End. Although poverty rates
in Metro Center and the South End are
similar, the South End is smaller and more
residential in character. Poor households are
particularly concentrated in the Hollywood
area. In early 2012, the City was awarded
a Choice Neighborhoods Initiative grant
from the US Department of Housing and
Vi ol ent Cri me Rate (cri mes per 1000
persons)
2008 2009 2010
South End
*
37.8 42.4 46.4
Springfield 12.5 12.6 13.5
Hartford 12.1 12.9 12.9
Boston 11.0 9.92 9.03
Massachusetts 4.49 4.57 4.67
United States 4.59 4.32 4.04
Source: Federal Bureau of Investigation; except * Springfield Police Department
South End Neighborhood Incomes
Total Households by Income
Census (ACS Estimate) Percent
Total Households 1,949 100%
Extremely Low (30% AMI—below $20K) 1,071 55.0%
Very Low (50% AMI—$20-$35K) 355 18.2%
Low (80% AMI or $35-$50K) 155 8.0%
Total Households Below 80% AMI 1581 81.1%
Market Rate (Above 80% AMI—above $50K) 368 18.9%
Source: US Census, ACS. 2009
Hollywood-Area Street Hollywood-Area Street
Extentions/Reconfigurations Extentions/Reconfigurations
Main Street Streetscape Improvements Main Street Streetscape Improvements
An Initiative of Develop Springfield and
the Springfield Redevelopment Authroity
DISTRICT 1
METRO CENTER + SOUTH END
Household Poverty Rate
by Census Block Group
Neighborhood Boundaries
0% - 8%
9% - 17%
18% - 29%
30% - 37%
38% - 51%
52% - 69%
Unoccupied Blocks
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.05
Miles
[
I- 91 I- 91
I- 2
9
1
I- 2
9
1
Main St
Main St
U
nion S
t
U
nion S
t
U
S
H
w
y
2
0
U
S
H
w
y
2
0
T
a
y
lo
r S
t
T
a
y
lo
r S
t
S
ta
te
S
t
S
ta
te
S
t
E Columbus Ave
E Columbus Ave
P
in
e
S
t
P
in
e
S
t
Maple St
Maple St
US Hwy 5 US Hwy 5
M
ill S
t
M
ill S
t
W
o
rth
in
g
to
n
S
t
W
o
rth
in
g
to
n
S
t
Walnut St
Walnut St
Central St
Central St
Armory St
Armory St
Dwight St
Dwight St
W Columbus Ave
W Columbus Ave
S
ta
ffo
rd
S
t
S
ta
ffo
rd
S
t
L
ib
e
rty
S
t
L
ib
e
rty
S
t
Spring St
Spring St
Chestnut St Chestnut St
Tyler S
t
Tyler S
t
Hancock St
Hancock St
K
ing S
t
K
ing S
t
F
ra
n
k
lin
S
t
F
ra
n
k
lin
S
t
L
y
m
a
n
S
t
L
y
m
a
n
S
t
Federal St
Federal St
F
lorence S
t
F
lorence S
t
P
e
a
rl S
t
P
e
a
rl S
t C
e
d
a
r S
t
C
e
d
a
r S
t
B
rid
g
e
S
t
B
rid
g
e
S
t
Q
uincy S
t
Q
uincy S
t
Byers St
Byers St
A
shley S
t
A
shley S
t
Bowdoin St Bowdoin St
W
illia
m
S
t
W
illia
m
S
t
Oak St
Oak St
School St School St
Elliot St
Elliot St
H
ig
h
S
t
H
ig
h
S
t
L
in
c
o
ln
S
t
L
in
c
o
ln
S
t
M
u
lb
e
rry
S
t
M
u
lb
e
rry
S
t
Magazine St
Magazine St
Willow St
Willow St
P
endleton A
ve
P
endleton A
ve Lebanon S
t
Lebanon S
t
A
lb
a
n
y
S
t
A
lb
a
n
y
S
t
S
ta
te
H
w
y
1
4
7
S
ta
te
H
w
y
1
4
7
B
lis
s
S
t
B
lis
s
S
t
Orleans St
Orleans St
C
o
n
g
re
s
s
S
t
C
o
n
g
re
s
s
S
t
A
lden S
t
A
lden S
t
B
a
y
S
t
B
a
y
S
t
Dale St
Dale St
N
a
p
ie
r S
t
N
a
p
ie
r S
t
Cass St Cass St
M
a
rb
le
S
t
M
a
rb
le
S
t
G
reene S
t
G
reene S
t
W
a
rw
ic
k
S
t
W
a
rw
ic
k
S
t
M
e
m
o
ria
l B
rg
M
e
m
o
ria
l B
rg
A
d
a
m
s
S
t
A
d
a
m
s
S
t
Genesee St
Genesee St
P
a
rk
S
t
P
a
rk
S
t
H
illm
a
n
S
t
H
illm
a
n
S
t
M
o
rris
S
t
M
o
rris
S
t
W
in
te
r S
t
W
in
te
r S
t
W
ilc
o
x
S
t
W
ilc
o
x
S
t
T
e
m
p
le
S
t
T
e
m
p
le
S
t
C
rosby S
t
C
rosby S
t
A
v
o
n
P
l
A
v
o
n
P
l
Boylston St
Boylston St
H
o
w
a
rd
S
t
H
o
w
a
rd
S
t
B
ro
a
d
S
t
B
ro
a
d
S
t
D
exter S
t
D
exter S
t
A
c
u
s
h
n
e
t A
v
e
A
c
u
s
h
n
e
t A
v
e
Q
ueen S
t
Q
ueen S
t
L
o
rin
g
S
t
L
o
rin
g
S
t
M
a
p
le
C
t
M
a
p
le
C
t
Locust St
Locust St
P
a
lm
e
r A
v
e
P
a
lm
e
r A
v
e
C
le
v
e
la
n
d
S
t
C
le
v
e
la
n
d
S
t
G
ra
n
t S
t
G
ra
n
t S
t
F
ra
n
k
B
M
u
rra
y
S
t
F
ra
n
k
B
M
u
rra
y
S
t F
re
m
o
n
t S
t
F
re
m
o
n
t S
t
L S
t
L S
t
N010
N010
S
a
ra
to
g
a
S
t
S
a
ra
to
g
a
S
t
James St
James St
M
a
rg
a
re
t S
t
M
a
rg
a
re
t S
t
C
o
u
rt S
t
C
o
u
rt S
t
Stebbins St
Stebbins St
H
a
rris
o
n
A
v
e
H
a
rris
o
n
A
v
e
Knox St
Knox St
O
s
w
e
g
o
S
t
O
s
w
e
g
o
S
t
S
t J
a
m
e
s
A
v
e
S
t J
a
m
e
s
A
v
e
W
indsor S
t
W
indsor S
t
Vinton St Vinton St
C
lark S
t
C
lark S
t
Y
o
rk
S
t
Y
o
rk
S
t
F
o
rt S
t
F
o
rt S
t
Foster St
Foster St
E
m
e
ry
S
t
E
m
e
ry
S
t
Ledyard St
Ledyard St
B
e
lle
S
t
B
e
lle
S
t
C
e
m
e
te
ry
A
v
e
C
e
m
e
te
ry
A
v
e
S
p
ru
c
e
S
t
S
p
ru
c
e
S
t
Dorne St
Dorne St
N009 N009
Myrtle St Myrtle St
E
d
w
a
rd
s
S
t
E
d
w
a
rd
s
S
t
A
g
n
e
w
S
t
A
g
n
e
w
S
t
W
in
th
ro
p
S
t
W
in
th
ro
p
S
t
Nursery St
Nursery St
Tracy St
Tracy St
B
o
la
n
d
W
a
y
B
o
la
n
d
W
a
y
L
o
m
b
a
rd
S
t
L
o
m
b
a
rd
S
t
H
a
n
n
o
n
S
t
H
a
n
n
o
n
S
t
Webster St Webster St
Dwight St Exd
Dwight St Exd
C
lin
to
n
S
t
C
lin
to
n
S
t
Lillia
n
S
t
Lillia
n
S
t
E
C
o
u
rt S
t
E
C
o
u
rt S
t
W
B
ro
a
d
W
B
ro
a
d
B
e
e
c
h
S
t
B
e
e
c
h
S
t
M
a
tto
o
n
S
t
M
a
tto
o
n
S
t
S
m
ith
S
t
S
m
ith
S
t
Leslie St
Leslie St
A
rlin
g
to
n
C
t
A
rlin
g
to
n
C
t
R
u
tle
d
g
e
S
t
R
u
tle
d
g
e
S
t
B
rig
h
a
m
S
t
B
rig
h
a
m
S
t
H
aw
thorne S
t
H
aw
thorne S
t
G
a
rd
n
e
r S
t
G
a
rd
n
e
r S
t
H
a
ls
e
y
S
t
H
a
ls
e
y
S
t
S
u
lliv
a
n
S
t
S
u
lliv
a
n
S
t
L
e
e
te
S
t
L
e
e
te
S
t
G
rid
iro
n
S
t
G
rid
iro
n
S
t
E
lm
S
t
E
lm
S
t
W
a
lk
e
r S
t
W
a
lk
e
r S
t
George St
George St
S
a
le
m
S
t
S
a
le
m
S
t
O
rleans C
t
O
rleans C
t
W
e
n
d
e
ll P
l
W
e
n
d
e
ll P
l
Richelieu St Richelieu St
C
ro
s
s
S
t
C
ro
s
s
S
t
Iv
y
C
t
Iv
y
C
t
Railroad St
Railroad St
Murray Hill Ave Murray Hill Ave
C
lifto
n
A
v
e
C
lifto
n
A
v
e
W
olcott St
W
olcott St
Ridgewood Pl
Ridgewood Pl
B
o
w
d
o
in
T
e
r
B
o
w
d
o
in
T
e
r
N
o
rw
o
o
d
S
t
N
o
rw
o
o
d
S
t
H
a
m
p
d
e
n
S
t
H
a
m
p
d
e
n
S
t
E
lm
w
o
o
d
S
t
E
lm
w
o
o
d
S
t
N007
N007
Crescent Hl
Crescent Hl
W
a
rrin
e
r A
v
e
W
a
rrin
e
r A
v
e
S
u
m
m
it S
t
S
u
m
m
it S
t
Pleasant St
Pleasant St
Renee Cir
Renee Cir
S
to
c
k
b
rid
g
e
S
t
S
to
c
k
b
rid
g
e
S
t
Sterns Ter
Sterns Ter
W
Y
o
rk
S
t
W
Y
o
rk
S
t
N
ew
m
an S
t
N
ew
m
an S
t
Ashmun St Ashmun St
Terrence St
Terrence St
Chandler St
Chandler St
Leonard St Leonard St
Madison Ave
Madison Ave
N
C
h
u
rc
h
A
v
e
N
C
h
u
rc
h
A
v
e
P
y
n
c
h
o
n
S
t
P
y
n
c
h
o
n
S
t
M
ill L
n
M
ill L
n
Alert St
Alert St
Hanover St
Hanover St
Fairbank Pl
Fairbank Pl
Pine Street Ct
Pine Street Ct
Niagara St
Niagara St
C
ro
s
s
e
tt L
n
C
ro
s
s
e
tt L
n
H
u
b
b
a
rd
A
v
e
H
u
b
b
a
rd
A
v
e
E
P
a
rk
S
t
E
P
a
rk
S
t
Heywood St
Heywood St
Kaynor St
Kaynor St
Stetson St
Stetson St
N
e
w
B
rid
g
e
S
t
N
e
w
B
rid
g
e
S
t
A
tw
o
o
d
P
l
A
tw
o
o
d
P
l
N
a
is
m
ith
S
t
N
a
is
m
ith
S
t
M
a
n
h
a
tta
n
S
t
M
a
n
h
a
tta
n
S
t
Sackett Pl
Sackett Pl
Kibbe Ave
Kibbe Ave
A
m
e
s
H
i l l D
r
A
m
e
s
H
i l l D
r
Crane St Crane St
Federal Ct
Federal Ct
C
arpenter C
t
C
arpenter C
t
Ingraham Ter
Ingraham Ter
Barnes St
Barnes St
G
errish C
t
G
errish C
t
W
E
lm
w
o
o
d
W
E
lm
w
o
o
d
Amboy Ct Amboy Ct
Underwood St Underwood St
W
a
ln
u
t C
t
W
a
ln
u
t C
t
Gardner Pl
Gardner Pl
Saab Ct
Saab Ct
Columbia Ter
Columbia Ter
M
ill R
iv
e
r L
n
M
ill R
iv
e
r L
n
N016
N016
P
e
a
rl S
t
P
e
a
rl S
t
Liberty St
Liberty St
Nursery St
Nursery St
I- 91 I- 91
W Columbus Ave
W Columbus Ave
U
S
H
w
y
2
0
U
S
H
w
y
2
0
B
ridge S
t
B
ridge S
t
I- 2
9
1
I- 2
9
1
US Hwy 5 US Hwy 5
Locust S
t
Locust S
t
Six Corners
Old Hill
Liberty Heights
McKnight
Forest Park
Brightwood
Memorial Square
Metro Center Metro Center
South End South End
Data Source: ESRI
Hollywood-Area Street Hollywood-Area Street
Extentions/Reconfigurations Extentions/Reconfigurations
Main Street Streetscape Improvements Main Street Streetscape Improvements
An Initiative of Develop Springfield and
the Springfield Redevelopment Authroity
DISTRICT 1
METRO CENTER + SOUTH END
Household Poverty Rate
by Census Block Group
Neighborhood Boundaries
0% - 8%
9% - 17%
18% - 29%
30% - 37%
38% - 51%
52% - 69%
Unoccupied Blocks
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.05
Miles
[
I- 91 I- 91
I- 2
9
1
I- 2
9
1
Main St
Main St
U
n
io
n
S
t
U
n
io
n
S
t
U
S
H
w
y
2
0
U
S
H
w
y
2
0
T
a
y
lo
r S
t
T
a
y
lo
r S
t
S
ta
te
S
t
S
ta
te
S
t
E Columbus Ave
E Columbus Ave
P
in
e
S
t
P
in
e
S
t
Maple St
Maple St
US Hwy 5
US Hwy 5
M
ill S
t
M
ill S
t
W
o
rth
in
g
to
n
S
t
W
o
rth
in
g
to
n
S
t
Walnut St
Walnut St
Central St
Central St
Armory St
Armory St
Dwight St
Dwight St
W Columbus Ave
W Columbus Ave
S
ta
ffo
rd
S
t
S
ta
ffo
rd
S
t
L
ib
e
rty
S
t
L
ib
e
rty
S
t
Spring St
Spring St
Chestnut St Chestnut St
T
y
le
r S
t
T
y
le
r S
t
H
ancock S
t
H
ancock S
t
K
in
g
S
t
K
in
g
S
t
F
ra
n
k
lin
S
t
F
ra
n
k
lin
S
t
L
y
m
a
n
S
t
L
y
m
a
n
S
t
Federal St
Federal St
F
lo
re
n
c
e
S
t
F
lo
re
n
c
e
S
t
P
e
a
rl S
t
P
e
a
rl S
t C
e
d
a
r S
t
C
e
d
a
r S
t
B
rid
g
e
S
t
B
rid
g
e
S
t
Q
u
in
c
y
S
t
Q
u
in
c
y
S
t
Byers St
Byers St
A
s
h
le
y
S
t
A
s
h
le
y
S
t
Bowdoin St
Bowdoin St
W
illia
m
S
t
W
illia
m
S
t
O
ak S
t
O
ak S
t
School St School St
Elliot St
Elliot St
H
ig
h
S
t
H
ig
h
S
t
L
in
c
o
ln
S
t
L
in
c
o
ln
S
t
M
u
lb
e
rry
S
t
M
u
lb
e
rry
S
t
Magazine St
Magazine St
Willow St
Willow St
P
e
n
d
le
to
n
A
v
e
P
e
n
d
le
to
n
A
v
e L
e
b
a
n
o
n
S
t
L
e
b
a
n
o
n
S
t
A
lb
a
n
y
S
t
A
lb
a
n
y
S
t
S
ta
te
H
w
y
1
4
7
S
ta
te
H
w
y
1
4
7
B
lis
s
S
t
B
lis
s
S
t
O
rleans S
t
O
rleans S
t
C
o
n
g
re
s
s
S
t
C
o
n
g
re
s
s
S
t
A
ld
e
n
S
t
A
ld
e
n
S
t
B
a
y
S
t
B
a
y
S
t
Dale St
Dale St
N
a
p
ie
r S
t
N
a
p
ie
r S
t
Cass St Cass St
M
a
rb
le
S
t
M
a
rb
le
S
t
G
re
e
n
e
S
t
G
re
e
n
e
S
t
W
a
rw
ic
k
S
t
W
a
rw
ic
k
S
t
M
e
m
o
ria
l B
rg
M
e
m
o
ria
l B
rg
A
d
a
m
s
S
t
A
d
a
m
s
S
t
G
enesee S
t
G
enesee S
t
P
a
rk
S
t
P
a
rk
S
t
H
illm
a
n
S
t
H
illm
a
n
S
t
M
o
rris
S
t
M
o
rris
S
t
W
in
te
r S
t
W
in
te
r S
t
W
ilc
o
x
S
t
W
ilc
o
x
S
t
T
e
m
p
le
S
t
T
e
m
p
le
S
t
C
ro
s
b
y
S
t
C
ro
s
b
y
S
t
A
v
o
n
P
l
A
v
o
n
P
l
Boylston St
Boylston St
H
o
w
a
rd
S
t
H
o
w
a
rd
S
t
B
ro
a
d
S
t
B
ro
a
d
S
t
D
e
x
te
r S
t
D
e
x
te
r S
t
A
c
u
s
h
n
e
t A
v
e
A
c
u
s
h
n
e
t A
v
e
Q
u
e
e
n
S
t
Q
u
e
e
n
S
t
L
o
rin
g
S
t
L
o
rin
g
S
t
M
a
p
le
C
t
M
a
p
le
C
t
Locust St
Locust St
P
a
lm
e
r A
v
e
P
a
lm
e
r A
v
e
C
le
v
e
la
n
d
S
t
C
le
v
e
la
n
d
S
t
G
ra
n
t S
t
G
ra
n
t S
t
F
ra
n
k
B
M
u
rra
y
S
t
F
ra
n
k
B
M
u
rra
y
S
t F
re
m
o
n
t S
t
F
re
m
o
n
t S
t
L
S
t
L
S
t
N010
N010
S
a
ra
to
g
a
S
t
S
a
ra
to
g
a
S
t
Jam
es St
Jam
es St
M
a
rg
a
re
t S
t
M
a
rg
a
re
t S
t
C
o
u
rt S
t
C
o
u
rt S
t
Stebbins St
Stebbins St
H
a
rris
o
n
A
v
e
H
a
rris
o
n
A
v
e
K
nox S
t
K
nox S
t
O
s
w
e
g
o
S
t
O
s
w
e
g
o
S
t
S
t J
a
m
e
s
A
v
e
S
t J
a
m
e
s
A
v
e
W
in
d
so
r S
t
W
in
d
so
r S
t
Vinton St Vinton St
C
la
rk
S
t
C
la
rk
S
t
Y
o
rk
S
t
Y
o
rk
S
t
F
o
rt S
t
F
o
rt S
t
Foster St
Foster St
E
m
e
ry
S
t
E
m
e
ry
S
t
Ledyard S
t
Ledyard S
t
B
e
lle
S
t
B
e
lle
S
t
C
e
m
e
te
ry
A
v
e
C
e
m
e
te
ry
A
v
e
S
p
ru
c
e
S
t
S
p
ru
c
e
S
t
Dorne St
Dorne St
N009 N009
Myrtle St Myrtle St
E
d
w
a
rd
s
S
t
E
d
w
a
rd
s
S
t
A
g
n
e
w
S
t
A
g
n
e
w
S
t
W
in
th
ro
p
S
t
W
in
th
ro
p
S
t
Nursery St
Nursery St
Tracy St
Tracy St
B
o
la
n
d
W
a
y
B
o
la
n
d
W
a
y
L
o
m
b
a
rd
S
t
L
o
m
b
a
rd
S
t
H
a
n
n
o
n
S
t
H
a
n
n
o
n
S
t
Webster St Webster St
Dwight St Exd
Dwight St Exd
C
lin
to
n
S
t
C
lin
to
n
S
t
L
illia
n
S
t
L
illia
n
S
t
E
C
o
u
rt S
t
E
C
o
u
rt S
t
W
B
ro
a
d
W
B
ro
a
d
B
e
e
c
h
S
t
B
e
e
c
h
S
t
M
a
tto
o
n
S
t
M
a
tto
o
n
S
t
S
m
ith
S
t
S
m
ith
S
t
Leslie S
t
Leslie S
t
A
rlin
g
to
n
C
t
A
rlin
g
to
n
C
t
R
u
tle
d
g
e
S
t
R
u
tle
d
g
e
S
t
B
rig
h
a
m
S
t
B
rig
h
a
m
S
t
H
a
w
th
o
rn
e
S
t
H
a
w
th
o
rn
e
S
t
G
a
rd
n
e
r S
t
G
a
rd
n
e
r S
t
H
a
ls
e
y
S
t
H
a
ls
e
y
S
t
S
u
lliv
a
n
S
t
S
u
lliv
a
n
S
t
L
e
e
te
S
t
L
e
e
te
S
t
G
rid
iro
n
S
t
G
rid
iro
n
S
t
E
lm
S
t
E
lm
S
t
W
a
lk
e
r S
t
W
a
lk
e
r S
t
George St
George St
S
a
le
m
S
t
S
a
le
m
S
t
O
rle
a
n
s
C
t
O
rle
a
n
s
C
t
W
e
n
d
e
ll P
l
W
e
n
d
e
ll P
l
Richelieu St Richelieu St
C
ro
s
s
S
t
C
ro
s
s
S
t
Iv
y
C
t
Iv
y
C
t
Railroad St
Railroad St
Murray Hill Ave Murray Hill Ave
C
lifto
n
A
v
e
C
lifto
n
A
v
e
W
olcott S
t
W
olcott S
t
Ridgewood Pl
Ridgewood Pl
B
o
w
d
o
in
T
e
r
B
o
w
d
o
in
T
e
r
N
o
rw
o
o
d
S
t
N
o
rw
o
o
d
S
t
H
a
m
p
d
e
n
S
t
H
a
m
p
d
e
n
S
t
E
lm
w
o
o
d
S
t
E
lm
w
o
o
d
S
t
N007
N007
Crescent Hl
Crescent Hl
W
a
rrin
e
r A
v
e
W
a
rrin
e
r A
v
e
S
u
m
m
it S
t
S
u
m
m
it S
t
Pleasant St
Pleasant St
R
enee C
ir
R
enee C
ir
S
to
c
k
b
rid
g
e
S
t
S
to
c
k
b
rid
g
e
S
t
Sterns Ter
Sterns Ter
W
Y
o
rk
S
t
W
Y
o
rk
S
t
N
e
w
m
a
n
S
t
N
e
w
m
a
n
S
t
Ashmun St Ashmun St
Terrence St
Terrence St
Chandler St
Chandler St
Leonard St Leonard St
Madison Ave
Madison Ave
N
C
h
u
rc
h
A
v
e
N
C
h
u
rc
h
A
v
e
P
y
n
c
h
o
n
S
t
P
y
n
c
h
o
n
S
t
M
ill L
n
M
ill L
n
Alert St
Alert St
Hanover St
Hanover St
Fairbank Pl
Fairbank Pl
P
ine S
treet C
t
P
ine S
treet C
t
Niagara St
Niagara St
C
ro
s
s
e
tt L
n
C
ro
s
s
e
tt L
n
H
u
b
b
a
rd
A
v
e
H
u
b
b
a
rd
A
v
e
E
P
a
rk
S
t
E
P
a
rk
S
t
Heywood St
Heywood St
Kaynor St
Kaynor St
Stetson St
Stetson St
N
e
w
B
rid
g
e
S
t
N
e
w
B
rid
g
e
S
t
A
tw
o
o
d
P
l
A
tw
o
o
d
P
l
N
a
is
m
ith
S
t
N
a
is
m
ith
S
t
M
a
n
h
a
tta
n
S
t
M
a
n
h
a
tta
n
S
t
Sackett Pl
Sackett Pl
Kibbe Ave
Kibbe Ave
A
m
e
s
H
i l l D
r
A
m
e
s
H
i l l D
r
Crane St
Crane St
Federal Ct
Federal Ct
C
a
rp
e
n
te
r C
t
C
a
rp
e
n
te
r C
t
Ingraham Ter
Ingraham Ter
Barnes St
Barnes St
G
e
rris
h
C
t
G
e
rris
h
C
t
W
E
lm
w
o
o
d
W
E
lm
w
o
o
d
Amboy Ct Amboy Ct
Underwood St Underwood St
W
a
ln
u
t C
t
W
a
ln
u
t C
t
Gardner Pl
Gardner Pl
Saab C
t
Saab C
t
Columbia Ter
Columbia Ter
M
ill R
iv
e
r L
n
M
ill R
iv
e
r L
n
N016
N016
P
e
a
rl S
t
P
e
a
rl S
t
L
ib
e
rty S
t
L
ib
e
rty S
t
Nursery St
Nursery St
I- 91 I- 91
W Columbus Ave
W Columbus Ave
U
S
H
w
y
2
0
U
S
H
w
y
2
0
B
rid
g
e
S
t
B
rid
g
e
S
t
I- 2
9
1
I- 2
9
1
US Hwy 5
US Hwy 5
L
o
c
u
s
t S
t
L
o
c
u
s
t S
t
Six Corners
Old Hill
Liberty Heights
McKnight
Forest Park
Brightwood
Memorial Square
Metro Center Metro Center
South End South End
Data Source: ESRI
Household Poverty Rate
by Census Block Group
Source: ESRI
N
D I S T R I C T O N E : M E T R O C E N T E R A N D S O U T H E N D
13
Urban Development (HUD) for this area,
including the Marble Street Apartments
public housing development. This initiative
wi l l i ncl ude physi cal i mprovements as
well as social supports. A recent change
of ownership and management for the
Hol l ywood and Concord Apartments
is expected to result in renovation, site
improvements, on-site management, and
tenant amenities. The developer’s track
record in a similar situation at Worthington
Commons provi des much ground for
optimism that overall conditions in the
Hollywood area will improve significantly.
The area will be renamed Outing Park, after
the name of the historic district that covers
these buildings.
Analysis of household incomes within the
South End shows that 74% of household
incomes are less than half the Springfield
region’s median income (AMI or Area
Medi an I ncome used by the f ederal
government). Federal housing funds could
be used to target households earning 50%
to 80% of the regional AMI, which would
bring some much-needed income diversity
to the South End. (See the Appendix for
details on the data.)
URBAN CHARACTER
MAI N STREET I S THE COMMERCI AL
SPINE of District One, stretching from
Union Station to Mill Street in the South
End. Thi s corri dor has retai ned many
significant historic structures, and recently
was improved by a streetscape project.
In addition to storefronts, there are major
business and government buildings along
the street in Metro Center, not all of which
contribute as much as might be desired
to activity on the street. Many ground floor
storefront spaces are poorly occupied
or vacant and upper-story office space
is reportedly about 50% empty in older
buildings. A transitional area between
State Street and Howard/Union Streets
is characterized by larger scale buildings,
street level and upper-story vacancies, and
several historically significant buildings.
The former Milton Bradley factory has
been transformed into Stockbridge Court,
a successful rental complex. West of Main
Street there is a concentration of social
service and institutional uses, including the
Sheriff Department’s Alcohol Treatment
program, a homeless shelter, and a large
amount of surface parking. In the South
End, the cluster of Italian-American eateries
and specialty shops on Main Street is a well-
known destination for Springfield residents.

THE SOUTH END begins at Howard Street
with a transition to neighborhood retail and
residential character on Main Street and
cross streets south of Union Street. While
the neighborhood technically includes the
western side of Maple Street, the larger
properties at the top of the hill have a
completely different character from the rest
of the South End and will not be treated in
this report as part of the South End. Because
of the steep, wooded escarpment on the
west side of Maple Street, many South End
streets are dead ends east of Main Street,
or are connected to the few through streets
that link the South End with the rest of the
city to the east. The South End contains a
mixture of land uses and building types. East
of Main Street, the area known as Hollywood
is centered on a group of approximately 20
historic 4-story masonry buildings between
Saratoga, Oswego, Richelieu, and Main
Street. Elsewhere in the South End, a small
public housing development is at the end
of Marble Street, the former school at 11
Acushnet Avenue has become an apartment
house, and senior housing is located at
the Gentile Apartments on William Street.
Smaller scale single, two-family, and three-
family houses line the streets east of Main
Street from Marble south, and between
Margaret and Lombard Streets to the west
of Main Street.
THE RIVERFRONT is separated from the
rest of the area by an elevated highway,
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
14
Square is the most iconic. In the South
End, 7.3- acre Emerson Wight Park, now
being redeveloped with new recreational
amenities, has been invisible to people
outside the South End. Riverfront Park is
attractive but difficult to access. Open space
opportunities can be considered as part
of redevelopment projects for the Gemini
site. Tornado damage to trees along the
river opened views and vistas that many
would like to preserve through better
I - 91, and cont ai ns a subur ban- st yl e
development that includes the Naismith
Basketball Hall of Fame, a fitness center,
restaurants and entertainment businesses,
as well as large expanses of surface parking.
A rail line along the river separates this
development from the water and the only
access is by a pedestrian tower and bridge
stretching over the tracks just south of
the Union Street intersection with West
Columbus Avenue. On the other side of the
tracks is Riverfront Park, a linear park that
contains the Connecticut River bicycle and
pedestrian path. Access to the riverfront
from Metro Center and the South End is by
underpasses on State, Union, and Broad
Streets. The demolition of the York Street
Jail has opened up a development site south
of the Hall of Fame activity center. The
Springfield Water and Sewer Commission,
which is under an EPA consent decree to
eliminate stormwater and sewer overflows
into the Connecticut River, will be using the
York Street site for a staging area during
infrastructure improvements in the South
End to be completed in the next decade
and wishes to use part of the site for a
permanent new facility.
PARKS AND OPEN SPACE RANGE
FROM HI STORI C SQUARES TO THE
RIVERFRONT. Metro Center has several
downtown parks and plazas, of which Court
management of the landscape along the
river in downtown. The greenway bike path
along the Connecticut River is an important
resource but difficult to access. Its southern
end terminates near the pedestrian bridge.
ZONING. The Springfield City Council
has been considering for several years a
new zoning ordinance recommended by
the Planning Board. This new ordinance
An Initiative of Develop Springfield and
the Springfield Redevelopment Authority
DISTRICT 1
METRO CENTER + SOUTH END
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.05
Miles
[ Data Source: City of Springfield
Zoning
Vacant Parcels
Undesignated
Business A
Business B
Business C
Commercial A
Commercial P
Office A
Industrial A
Residence A
Residence B
Residence C
Residence C-2
Conn Riverfront
West Columbus
An Initiative of Develop Springfield and
the Springfield Redevelopment Authority
DISTRICT 1
METRO CENTER + SOUTH END
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.05
Miles
[ Data Source: City of Springfield
Zoning
Vacant Parcels
Undesignated
Business A
Business B
Business C
Commercial A
Commercial P
Office A
Industrial A
Residence A
Residence B
Residence C
Residence C-2
Conn Riverfront
West Columbus
Zoning
Source: City of Springfield
N
D I S T R I C T O N E : M E T R O C E N T E R A N D S O U T H E N D
15
was designed to update the city’s current
ordinance to modernize it and make it
more user-friendly while enhancing the
city’s urban form and character (which is
one of its principal assets) and providing for
neighborhood and economic development.
URBAN RENEWAL DISTRICTS. Since the
mid-1970s, sections of the South End and
Metro Center have been designated urban
renewal districts to support improvements
intended to enhance downtown, eliminate
blight, and concentrate commercial activity
on Main Street. Developments within urban
renewal districts must be approved by
the Springfield Redevelopment Authority,
including design review.
NEI GHBORHOOD STABI L I ZATI ON
PROGRAM AREA. Part of the South End
has also been included in the target area
for Springfield’s Neighborhood Stabilization
Program, which provides federal funding for
the City to acquire and redevelop foreclosed
properties.
PREVIOUS PLANS AND IMPLEMENTATION
A number of planning efforts have focused
on Springfield’s Metro Center and South
End in recent years. These efforts and
initiatives for Metro Center and the South
End share many common objectives and
An Initiative of Develop Springfield and
the Springfield Redevelopment Authority
DISTRICT 1
METRO CENTER + SOUTH END
0 0.09 0.18 0.27 0.36 0.045
Miles
[ Data Source: City of Springfield
Historic Assets
Urban Plan Zone DISTRICT
URBPLAN
U10 - Mattoon
U14 - Winchester (King/Hickory)
U15 - South End (William-Arlington)
U16 - Union/Howard
U20 - Walnut/Union
U21 - Spring/Pearl
U23 - West Columbus
U25 - Federal Square
U26 - South End (Union/Marble)
U3 - Court Square
U33 - Central Street
U4 - North End
U-3: Court Square
U-4: North End
U-10: Mattoon
U-15: South End
(William-Arlington)
U-16: Union/Howard
U-21: Spring/Pearl
U-32: West Columbus
U-26: South End
(Union-Marble)
Urban Renewal Districts
U-10
U-3
U-21
U-4
U-23
U-16
U-15
U-26
Source: City of Springfield
Source: City of Springfield
South
End
Oak Hill
Six
Corners
Forest
Park
Neighborhood
St abi l i zat i on
Program Area
N
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
16
South End Plans
South End Neighborhood Revitalization Project (ongoing)
Outing Park Historic District Housing Rehabilitation Plan (2011)
South End Choice Neighborhoods Proposal (2011)
ULI Report: The Riverfront (2010)
South End Urban Renewal Plan Amendment (2009)
Springfield’s South End Neighborhood: Recommendations and
Action Agenda (2008)
ULI Boston Report: South End Neighborhood—Hollywood Area
and Gemini Site (2007)
South End Neighborhood Plan (1995)
South End Common Vision Elements
Livable neighborhood with a mixture of incomes, housing types,
and renter and owner households
Safe, clean and diverse neighborhood
Green neighborhood with access to recreation and green spaces
Anchored on the Main Street spine with retail and services
Easy to get around safely by foot and by car
Connected to Metro Center/Downtown and to the Riverfront with
safe and attractive streets
South End Common Goals
Improve vehicle and pedestrian circulation in the neighborhood
Enhance Main Street to retain and attract retail
Intensify code enforcement efforts; improve perceptions
Where feasible, provide technical, legal and financial assistance to
small businesses
Improve, expand and provide better connections to Emerson
Wight Park
Redevelop key sites, such as the Gemini site
Promote i ncome and housi ng di versi ty through housi ng
renovation, new development, and public realm improvement
Metro Center Plans
ULI Report: The Riverfront (2010)
Court Square Urban Renewal Plan—Update (2008)
State Street Corridor Redevelopment Program (2008)
2008–2013 Open Space Plan (2008)
UMass Donahue Institute Report: Economic Assessment Project
(2008)
ULI Report: Downtown Technical Assistance Panel Report (2007)
STCC Campus Master Plan (2007)
ULI Report: Strategies for a Sustainable City (2006)
Metro Center Master Plan (2001)
Metro Center Common Vision Elements
Reclaim status as the downtown of the region
Create 24-hour vitality
Become a mixed-use center for work live, play, study, and visit
Foster innovation in support of economic development
Attract and retai n a ski l l ed workforce and empl oyment
opportunities
Connect to the riverfront
Metro Center Common Goals
Strengthen the heart of the city—Court Square to the Quadrangle
Develop infill/downtown housing
Redevelop key sites
Create new destinations—and better connections between them
Provide high quality maintenance, code enforcement and public
safety services
Make Main Street a lively, safe and attractive pedestrian street
Preserve historic buildings and historic character
Reshape public perceptions of downtown
Leverage presence of higher education institutions
Use transportation infrastructure to enhance activity
Promote downtown identity and branding.
Connect to the regional bikeway system
PREVIOUS PLANNING FOR METRO CENTER AND THE SOUTH END
D I S T R I C T O N E : M E T R O C E N T E R A N D S O U T H E N D
17
goals. Over the last ten years, the City of
Springfield and its partners have been
i mpl ementi ng many recommendati ons
of these pl ans. More i nformati on on
implementation activities can be found in
the Appendix.
NEW INVESTMENTS IN THE PIPELINE
New and recent developments identified
on the map below reflect implementation
of previous plans, independent private
development, and initial tornado rebuilding.
Notable developments include the State
Data Center at 53 Elliot Street, former School
Department Headquarters at 195 State
Street, 13-31 Elm Street, redevelopment
of 1592 Main Street (former Asylum club),
the expansion across Main Street of Caring
Health Center to 1049 Main Street, which
will bring an additional 150 employees to the
South End, and the addition of LUXE Burger
restaurant to the city-owned former visitor
center site at the river end of Union Street.
1. EcoBuildings Bargains
2. Pearl Street Condos
3. Prospective Supermarket
4. Technical High School Re-Use
5. Federal Courthouse
6. 273 State St.
7. 281 State St.
8. La Quinta Inn & Suites
9. Union Station
10. Paramount Theatre
11. Fort/Student Prince Building Redevelopment
12. 1592 Main St. Redevelopment
13. Federal Building Redevelopment
14. 195 State St.
15. Holiday Inn Express
16. State Streetscape Improvements
17. Thing5 Office Expansion
18. 13–31 Elm Street
19. Main Streetscape Improvements
20. Caring Health Center
21. Red Rose Pizzeria
22. Milano’s Importing
23. New Middle School
24. Gemini Site
25. Arlington Court
26. Dwight St. Extension Streetscape
27. Outing Park Apartments
28. Marble St. Apartments
29. Emerson Wight Park
30. LUXE Burger
31. River’s Landing
32. York St. Site
An Initiative of Develop Springfield and
the Springfield Redevelopment Authority
DISTRICT 1
METRO CENTER + SOUTH END
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.05
Miles
[ Data Source: City of Springfield
Study Area
U
n
i
o
n

S
t
r
e
e
t
B
r
o
a
d

S
t
r
e
e
t
B
o
l
a
n
d


W
a
y
C
e
n
t
r
a
l

S
t
r
e
e
t
M
ain S
treet M
a
in
S
tre
e
t
I-91
S
t
r
e
e
t
S
t
a
t
e
W
o
r
t
h
i
n
g
t
o
n

S
t
r
e
e
t
N
0 1/4 mile 1/8
NEW INVESTMENTS
IN THE PIPELINE
Recently Completed
Recently Completed
Streetscape
Under Construction
Approved Streetscape
Early Phases
Approved
Awaiting Plan
Source: City of Springfield
22
13
12
1
11
21
31
5
15
25
3
23
17
27
29
2
32
16
26
4
14
24
8
18
28
10
20
30
6
7
9
19
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
18
III. Outreach and Public Workshops
District One encompasses a diverse cross-
section of the Springfield community, just as
the District itself includes both Metro Center
and the South End. From the outset of the
planning process, therefore, the Planning
Team worked to i denti f y—and meet
with—as broad a variety of stakeholders as
possible, and used both formal and informal
networks to gain access to the variety of
ideas, attitudes, and history represented
in the District. Dozens of interviews and
small-group meetings included institutional
directors, City agency heads, community
leaders, and major property owners and
developers, as well as individual residents—
bot h r ent er s and homeowner s—and
business owners. (See the Appendix for a list
of interviewees.)
This intense degree of “retail” outreach
not only informed the ongoing work of
the planning team, but also illuminated
the chal l enges i n reachi ng the l arge
Hispanic/Latino segment of the South
End neighborhood, particularly those who
are renters. Unlike other neighborhoods
in Springfield, such as the North End, the
Hispanic/Latino residents in the South
End do not have organized community
leadership or recognized spokespersons, nor
is there the same level of Hispanic/Latino
business presence in the neighborhood.
Participants in the District One meetings
included long-time residents, business
owners, representatives of institutional
interests, and representatives of downtown
interests. The team employed local outreach
staff to get the word out about the planning
process and public meetings. To encourage
broad participation, the planning team
provided Spanish versions of print and
web-based outreach materials, and offered
translation support at the public meeting.
Management of rental apartment complexes
encouraged participation with Spanish-
language flyers.
In addition to the distribution of bilingual
f l yer s t o r ent al bui l di ng manager s,
businesses and other locations, the team
worked with the principal of the South End
Middle School to promote the project. He
encouraged participation in the District
meetings through robocalls to students’
families, as well as through faculty members
D I S T R I C T O N E : M E T R O C E N T E R A N D S O U T H E N D
19
I n preparati on f or the three di stri ct
workshops, and combined with the focused
outreach efforts, the team relied on press
coverage in The Republican as well as the
overall project website, which included an
interactive social media section, MindMixer,
which allowed residents to give feedback
and exchange ideas.
With attendance at the meetings ranging
from 50 to 80 participants, the discussion
moved from (1) creating an overall vision, to
(2) an analysis and evaluation of rebuilding
opportunities in service to the vision, to (3)
a discussion of the planning team’s draft
recommended framework, strategy, and
action for rebuilding. Spanish language
transl ati on was avai l abl e at al l three
meetings and, in response to a request at
the first meeting, the team provided sign
language interpretation at the second
meeting.
who in turn contacted some of those same
families. In addition, the arts organization
Teatro V!da—both its director and its
student members—helped to distribute
information, including identification of radio
disc jockeys whose programming reaches
much of the Hispanic/Latino community. As
has reportedly been the case in previous
South End pl anni ng efforts, however,
drawi ng l ow-i ncome and non-Engl i sh
speaking residents to the meeting proved
a challenge. Renters and Hispanic/Latino
residents were underrepresented at the
meetings.
DISTRICT WORKSHOPS
Three public workshops were held in District
One at the Gentile Apartments Community
Room and the South End Middle School:
October 23, 2011: Vision, needs, goals and
priorities
November 17, 2011—Alternatives
December 15, 2011—Recommendations
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
20
IV. What We Heard
THEMES THAT EMERGED REPEATEDLY
I N THE PARTI CI PANT DI SCUSSI ONS
INCLUDED:
•Lively,safe,MainStreetwithmoreactive
uses on Main Street
•Moreneighborhood-servingretail
•Add market rate and owner-occupied
housing, preferably single family
•Connectinstitutionsservingchildrenwith
locations where children live
•Address the perceptions and reality of
crime
•Strengthencodeenforcementefforts
•Rebui l d communi ty i nsti tuti ons i n
the South End, like the South End
Community Center and Square One
•Preserve the Armory and other historic
buildings
•Improve the physical appearance of
District One
•Improvewalkabilityandthepedestrian
experience
•Add mor e and mor e connect ed
desti nati ons encompassi ng retai l ,
commerci al , ci vi c, recreati on and
entertainment uses
•Bring back a real community policing
program to the South End
•Locate a grocery store and drugstore/
pharmacy for easy access by South End
residents
•Make improvements to the Hollywood
area
•Increasethenumberofwell-payingjobs
for residents
•Celebrate international identity and
heritage in the South End
COMMENTS RELEVANT TO DISTRICT ONE
FROM THE MINDMIXER INTERACTIVE
WEBSITE INCLUDED:
•“Createatrulygreenplan...”
•“MakeSpringfieldattractiveforbusiness
and families.”
•“Fostercollaboration.”
•“The area has to feel safe…more foot
traffic.”
•“Encourage Downtown and South End
real estate owners to invest in their
properties…”
•“Renovate,don’tdemolish.”
•“Diversityisourgreateststrength.”
•“Crime rates have fallen…. We have
four good colleges in the city that could
task the students with coming up with a
campaign to change the city’s image.”
•“Springfield should reach out to all
world cultures and continue to expand
the diversity of its business institutions,
building around the success in its current
institutional residents.”
D I S T R I C T O N E : M E T R O C E N T E R A N D S O U T H E N D
21
Enforcement and publ i c safety:
Develop a community-managed anti-crime
organization and engage with the police
department.
• 93% support (7% might support).
• “Camer as i n new par k. ” “Coul d
Springfield bring in the state’s attorney
gener al and hel p coor di nat e a
targeted approach to address specific
crime problems.” “Critical—must be
addressed for the rest of the ‘plans’ to
be successful.” “#1 priority—address
public safety if you want anything else
to succeed!” “Very important.” “Most
important.”
Historic preservation: Give a high priority
to saving remaining historic buildings and
historic character by pursuing and recruiting
adaptive reuse options and enacting a
“demolition delay” ordinance.
• 64% support (14% might support, 21%
do not support).
• “Depends on the amount of building
saved.”
At the third District One meeting, the
planning team for the district presented a
summary version of the plan that appears in
this document.
After the presentation, residents discussed
the plan in small groups and completed
questionnaires to determine their support
for proposed elements of the rebuilding
pl an. The f ol l owi ng outl i ne l i sts the
plan’s elements as they appeared on the
questionnaire, indicates the participants’
l evel of support, and i ncl udes other
comments.
Vi si on: Make Mai n Street a vi brant,
walkable street with historic character.
• 100% of participating residents support
this element of the rebuilding plan.
Framework: Establish centers of activity at
key locations on Main Street, for example,
making the Main Street blocks around the
Union Street intersection an area with more
mixed use density and more eateries.
• 93% support (7% might support)
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
22
Commercial/retail strategy: Recruit
retail and restaurants for vacancies on Main
Street and demonstrate market viability to
potential urban grocery store and pharmacy
businesses.
• 83% support (17% might support).
• “Whole Foods.”
Zoning: Adopt the new zoning code and
consider additional changes consistent with
the rebuilding plan.
• 62% support (31% might support, 7% do
not support).
• “Pattern book.”
Public Space: Emphasize maintenance,
activation and programming of existing
open spaces.
• 92% support (8% might support).
• “Enforce code laws”
Publ i c Space: Program Mai n Street
vacancies with art and short-term uses.
• 62% support (31% might support, 7% do
not support)
Partnerships: Keep Rebuild Springfield
i nvol ved i n i mpl ementati on, worki ng
with downtown and South End partners,
including pursuing new partnerships.
• 79% support (14% might support, 7% do
not support)
• “We have a South End Citizens Council
to do this!” “Need strong development
arm.”
Coordi nati on: Create a downtown
redevel opment l eadershi p group wi th
professional staff.
• 54% support (38% might support, 8% do
not support).
• “A must.” “Must be inclusive.”
Coordination: Engage an organizer to
enhance communication and coordination
among the different groups in the South
End.
• 54% support (15% might support, 31%
do not support).
• “A must.” “Send Citizens Council in
place.”
Urban design: Promote urban design that
activates Main Street through pedestrian-
friendly principles, and by making parking
available but unobtrusive.
• 85% support (15% might support)
Urban design: Connect Main Street with
the riverfront by making Union Street a
“festival street” and programming art in the
underpass.
• 71% support (29% might support).
• “We have f est i val s i n t he I t al i an
community already but they can be
expanded.” “Too busy a thoroughfare.”

Housing strategy: Build on the success
of Stockbridge Court by pursuing condo,
rental, and mixed-use rehab of larger-scale,
multi-story buildings.
• 77% support (8% might support, 15% do
not support)
Housing strategy: Pursue infill of one-
to three-fami l y houses on resi denti al
cross-streets.
• 50% support (14% might support, 36%
do not support).
• “One-family.” “Retail stores [with] mixed
housing.” “Two [-family] max.” “House
on Broad Street [for] example.”
D I S T R I C T O N E : M E T R O C E N T E R A N D S O U T H E N D
23
V. District One Vision
LIVABILITY + SUSTAINABILITY + INCLUSION + OPPORTUNITY
Partner together to rebuild a more livable, sustainable, inclusive community with the resources
to offer expanded opportunities for everyone. District One will encompass two vibrant,
walkable, historic urban communities linked by Main Street—Metro Center and the South End,
with robust and attractive connections to the riverfront. With more destinations of all kinds—
retail and business, civic, community, recreation, and entertainment—better connections
among them, and a variety of housing options, the South End and Metro Center will attract new
residents and visitors.
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
24
Major Moves
A. Enforcement and public safety strategy: Strengthen partnerships among
community stakeholders, police and enforcement staff.
B. Partnership and coordination strategy: Retain Rebuild Springfield
leadership to coordinate partnerships and implement the rebuilding plan.
C. Economic development strategy: Attract people and talent to Springfield
through creating and sustaining a desirable, walkable urban environment
for living, working, playing, and learning.
VI. The Context for Rebuilding: Strengthening Community
The physical rebuilding and further revitalization of District One will require a strengthened and supportive
community context. Concerns about how the reality and perception of crime can undermine implementation,
lack of coordination among public and private actors, and positioning the rebuilding process within a broader
understanding of how an effective process and result will advance economic development for Springfield
residents and the region must be integrated with strategies for physical improvements.
D I S T R I C T O N E : M E T R O C E N T E R A N D S O U T H E N D
25
Strengthen partnerships among community stakeholders, police and enforcement
staff.
Key Initiatives
• Develop a plan to manage the appearance
of insecurity in Metro Center working with
the BID, social services organizations, and
groups that can help activate public spaces.
• Enhance the South End Beat Management
Team and create a community-managed
anti-crime organization to engage with the
police department and participate in the
proposed citywide “Safe Neighborhood
Consortium.”
• Promote targeted code enforcement
sweeps and publicize bad landlords, and
consider establishing a rental property
registration system.
Reduction in crime, publicity for crime
r educt i on successes, and enhanced
code enf or cement ar e essent i al t o
the revitalization process. The City of
Springfield Police Department has accepted
the tenets of “communi ty pol i ci ng”
since 1990, but declining resources have
affected the department’s programs and
services. The department continues to
use Sector Beat Management Teams
as the mechanism to partner with local
neighborhood groups. It is also working
with the Massachusetts State Police to
implement C3 Policing (Counter Criminal
Continuum), whose components include
communi ty organi zati on, partnershi p
and ownership in problem identification,
program plan strategy, and measurement
of success. More information is available in
the Citywide Rebuilding Plan on a proposed
citywide “Safe Neighborhood Consortium”
bringing together the police department
with volunteers from neighborhood councils,
community groups, business and property
owners, residents, and developers. The
initiatives below highlight issues specific to
District One.
Strengthening Community—Major Move
A. Enforcement and Public Safety Strategy
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
26
Develop a plan to manage the
appearance of insecurity in Metro
Center working with the BID, social
services organizations, and groups that
can help activate public spaces.
Physical Educational Organizational Cultural Economic Social
INITIATIVE
In Metro Center, the crime problem is more
one of perception than reality and is linked
to the presence of social service agency
clients on the streets, particularly homeless
persons. Their presence is magnified
when there is relatively little other street
life. As the Urban Land Institute (ULI) 2007
Technical Assistance Program (TAP) report
on downtown noted, the objective crime
numbers in downtown are not more serious
than found in many downtowns; increased
acti vi ty and “eyes on the street” by
themselves have a positive effect on crime
reduction; and the geographic location
of facilities that serve homeless and other
social services clients—which are necessary
in any city--calls attention to their presence.
An integrated effort that includes a regular
program of events to activate public spaces,
bri ngi ng more peopl e downtown and
making them comfortable with downtown,
as well as coordination with social services
agencies and retail recruitment, should be
undertaken. When crime rates drop, it is
important that the improvement be well-
publicized. The reality of relatively low crime
in downtown also should be publicized,
along with the existence of programs to
reduce it further.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
Springfield Police Department; Springfield BID;
social services agencies; Office of Planning and
Economic Development (OPED); business and
property owners; arts and culture agencies;
Armoury-Quadrangle Civic Association; other
downtown resident groups.
Resource Needs and Opportunities
Staff time; possible relocation assistance for
social service programs. Criminal justice funding;
foundation grants. See Section VIII.F. on public
space activation.
Action Steps
Create a worki ng group wi th partner and
stakeholder representatives to focus on reducing
the perception of crime in Metro Center.
Priority
High
ENFORCEMENT AND PUBLIC SAFETY STRATEGY
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Enhance the South End Beat
Management Team and create a
community-managed anti-crime
organization to engage with the police
department and participate in the
proposed citywide “Safe Neighborhood
Consortium.”
INITIATIVE
In the South End, crime is a more serious
problem than in Metro Center. Both
residents and business owners see crime as
the top issue confronting the neighborhood.
Previous community policing programs
were reportedly effective but the decline
of funding reduced their impact. The lack
of organizational representation that is
currently characteristic of the Hispanic/Latino
and renter population in the South End has
also affected the effectiveness of community
engagement with the police department.
The neighborhood’s Beat Management
Team needs to meet more regularly, with
better publicity and communication between
the police department and community on
scheduling and activities. As part of new
approaches to organizing the South End
discussed later in this report, it will be
important to recruit representatives of the
Hispanic/Latino and renter population for
a more active Beat Management Team.
The Choice Neighborhoods Initiative (CNI)
process and the new property management
team in the Outing Park district may be
helpful in this regard. In addition, creation
of community-managed anti-crime activities,
which exist in other parts of Springfield,
can also make a difference. Community-
managed opt i ons i ncl ude Nat i onal
Night Out (nationaltownwatch.org) and
Neighborhood Crime Watch (usaonwatch.
org).
Partnerships / Stakeholders
Springfield Police Department; South End
Citizens Council; South End Revitalization
Coalition; CNI Advisory Group; First Resources
Development Company and other property
managers; South End Middle School; South
End Community Center; social service agencies
and institutions; business and property owners,
residents.
Resource Needs
Organizational staff and supports.
Resource Opportunities
Federal, state, and foundation grants.
Action Steps
Bring all stakeholders together in a working
group to promote the Beat Management
Team, connect wi t h t he emer gent Saf e
Neighborhood Consortium and identify options
for neighborhood watch activities.
Priority
Very High
ENFORCEMENT AND PUBLIC SAFETY STRATEGY
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Promote targeted code
enforcement sweeps and publicize
bad landlords, and consider
establishing a rental property
registration system.
INITIATIVE
Code enforcement is part of creating clean
and safe neighborhoods for residents and
visitors. Often, because of limited funds and
staff, the approach to code enforcement is to
wait for a citizen complaint before initiating a
code enforcement action. Residents can assist
the city by organizing a code enforcement
inventory by volunteers. This can also be a
way to enhance community organization, since
the initial group of volunteers will approach
tenants who otherwise might not see
participation in a neighborhood organization
as beneficial to them. After a neighborhood-
initiated inventory, the City can then schedule
efficient targeted enforcement actions using
this information. Many cities have instituted
regular cycles of targeted code enforcement
sweeps. In some communities, there is
regular publication in the media of a “Hall
of Shame” or a “top 10,” “dirty dozen” or
similar group of the worst examples of poor
landlords. Because it is not uncommon that
these landlords are absentees, living outside
the city, some communities or groups have
publicized their poor stewardship of rental
properties in the landlords’ hometown media.
Another option worth exploring is an
ordinance requiring registration and regular
inspection of rental properties, with a
per-unit fee. This would provide the City
with a database of information on rental
properties and their owners, as well as a
source of revenue for inspections and code
enforcement.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
Department of Building Code Enforcement;
City Housing Department; South End Citizens
Council; South End Revitalization Coalition;
Armoury-Quadrangle Civic Association;
Middle School, institutions; business and
property owners; managers of multifamily
rental buildings; residents.
Resource Needs
Staff and volunteer time.
Physical Educational Organizational Cultural Economic Social
ENFORCEMENT AND PUBLIC SAFETY STRATEGY
Resource Opportunities
Registration fees to support enhanced
enforcement.
Action Steps
Organize a volunteer code enforcement
inventory. Explore rental property registration.
Precedents
In Massachusetts, at least one community,
the Town of Amherst, has a rental property
registration ordinance. Many cities around
the country that are challenged by abandoned
properties, absentee landlords, and code
enforcement issues, have also instituted rental
property registration, ranging from Baltimore
and Raleigh (NC) to smaller communities in
the Midwest and the West.
Priority
High
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Key Initiatives
• Keep the Rebuild Springfield partnership
involved in implementation, working with
downtown and South End partners,
including pursuing new partnerships.
• Create a downtown redevel opment
leadership group with professional staff.
• Engage an organi zer to enhance
communication and coordination among
the different groups in the South End.
• Revive the South End Business Association
and create a Metro Center Business
Association.
• Prioritize volunteer resources through a
volunteer summit of all organizations,
agencies and city departments.
Strengthening Community—Major Move
B. Partnerships and Coordination Strategy
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
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PARTNERSHIPS AND COORDINATION INITIATIVE
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INITIATIVE
As noted in the 2007 ULI TAP report for
downtown, the city needs an organization
to take charge of the implementation
process that has the capacity to orchestrate
devel opment , i dent i f y as s et s and
opportunities, brand projects, negotiate
and acquire land, assemble capital, recruit
devel opers, i ssue RFP packages, and
generate project revenues. This could
be an enhanced and professi onal i zed
redevelopment authority, a public-private
group, or a nonprofit working closely with
the City. The TAP report provides a listing
Create a downtown redevelopment leadership group with professional staff.
of pros and cons of different organizational
opti ons. The exi sti ng downtown BI D
has a very important role in downtown
revitalization, but it has a somewhat different
mission from the type of organization
described in the TAP report.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
Springfield BID; DevelopSpringfield; OPED;
SRA; downtown cultural institutions; downtown
educational institutions.
Resource Needs
Operational funding and staff.
Resource Opportunities
Seed funding donations from private and
foundation sources; income-producing property
or projects.
Action Steps
Identify preferred structure; organize the entity
and the financing structure.
Precedents
See the discussion in the TAP report. Downtown
development authorities in numerous cities have
taken on this role successfully.
Priority
Medium
INITIATIVE
As a partnership of DevelopSpringfield and
the Springfield Redevelopment Authority
(SRA), Rebuild Springfield has already brought
together the public and private sectors in this
planning project. This partnership is therefore
best positioned to continue leadership of the
implementation process.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
SRA; OPED; City Housing Department; Police
Department; South End Revitalization Coalition;
South End Citizens’ Council; Armoury-Quadrangle
Keep the Rebuild Springfield partnership involved in implementation, working with
downtown and South End partners, including pursuing new partnerships.
Civic Association; CNI Advisory Group; Springfield
Business Improvement District (BID); a revived
South End Business Association; potential
new Metro Center Business Association; rental
community ownership and management; South
End Community Center; Square One; Caring
Health; other community institutions, nonprofit,
higher education institutions, city agencies, and
private sector developers.
Resource Needs
Operational funding; executive director for
DevelopSpringfield.
Resource Opportunities
Private sector and public sector funding.
Action Steps
Install an interim executive director for
DevelopSpringfield; hire a permanent executive
director; convene appropriate partners in an
organizational structure to pursue implementation.
Priority
High
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Engage an organizer to enhance
communication and coordination
among the different groups in the
South End.
INITIATIVE
Engage a neighborhood organizer for
the South End to work with residents,
businesses, nonprofits, rental managers,
citizen groups, police, city agencies, and
others. The tradi ti onal nei ghborhood
organizations and leaders in the South
End have worked hard for many years to
improve the neighborhood and will continue
to be key participants in implementation.
The CNI planning process may be able to
provide funding to get this or a similar effort
underway.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
CNI Advisory Group; Rebuild Springfield; South
End Revitalization Coalition; South End Citizens
Council; First Resource Development Company;
United Way; Puerto Rican—Latino Leadership
Council; Teatro V!da; South End Middle School;
South End businesses.
Resource Needs
Two year’s funding for an organizer and a neutral
institution or organization willing to host the
organizer; bilingual organizer from outside of the
South End.
Resource Opportunities
PARTNERSHIPS AND COORDINATION STRATEGIES
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Ameri Corps/Vi sta; possi bl e CNI fundi ng;
foundation.
Action Steps
Identify host organization; prepare funding
requests; hire organizer.
Priority
High
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Revive the South End Business
Association and create a Metro
Center Business Association
INITIATIVE
Business organizations that represent the
interests of retailers and service providers
act as the organized voice for businesses in
working with the city and redevelopment
organizations on business assistance and
retention. Some have suggested that the
downtown BID be expanded to the South
End Main Street, but there is a danger in
making the BID too big. In addition, the
precarious resources of some South End
merchants may make it difficult for them to
contribute the BID tax.
It is also important to understand that the
BID is primarily an organization for property-
owners rather than business owners. A
business or merchants’ association for Metro
Center, as well as the revival of the South End
Business Association, would be beneficial.
Of the two, the South End Busi ness
Association should be the priority in the
short term. The association can work with
the city and neighborhood representatives
on neighborhood improvement initiatives
such as the CNI, with the police department
PARTNERSHIPS AND COORDINATION STRATEGIES
Physical Educational Organizational Cultural Economic Social
on anti-crime efforts, and can create joint
marketing campaigns for the business district.
An ideal solution would be a staffed Main
Streets Program that includes nonprofits and
is funded by one or two corporate “angels.”
Resource Needs
Organizer to support the start up activities of the
association; funding for marketing efforts.
Resource Opportunities
Association dues; program-based fund raising;
corporate support.
Action Steps
Visit businesses to discuss the benefits of an
association; ideally find a business owner willing
to take the lead in reviving the association, and/
or call an organizational meeting.
Precedents
Boston Main Streets Program. Boston pioneered
the urban Main Streets program, providing some
city resources, such as a façade improvement
program, and helping individual programs find
corporate partners to help fund activities in the
initial years of the program.
Priority
Medium
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Prioritize volunteer resources
through a volunteer summit of all
organizations, agencies and city
departments.
INITIATIVE
Ther e ar e many Amer i cor ps/ VI STA
volunteers already assigned to Springfield
institutions and groups. Identifying priority
activities for them and for college student
academic or community service credits
would focus resources where most needed.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
City of Springfield; Springfield College; other
higher education institutions; Massachusetts
Service Alliance; DevelopSpringfield; SRA;
neighborhood representatives.
Resource Needs
Support for organization and holding of a
summit; grant writing.
PARTNERSHIPS AND COORDINATION STRATEGY
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Resource Opportunities
Foundation grant; business donations.
Action Steps
Contact Massachusetts Service Alliance to
identify existing and future opportunities;
contact local institutions; use the Rebuild
Springfield plan, domain structure, and district
plans as the structure for the summit to develop
priorities for volunteer action.
Priority
High
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Attract people and talent to Springfield through
creating and sustaining a desirable, walkable urban
environment for live, work, play, and learning.
The citywide plan’s first economic development
goal is to “develop and harness Springfield’s role
as the economic heart of the Pioneer Valley.”
For the purposes of this District One plan, the
economic development focus is on attracting
people and talent to Springfield through creating
and sustaining a desirable, walkable, urban
environment for live, work, play and learning.
Consistent with citywide recommendations,
Springfield needs to complete a number of
high priority projects in District One to restore
its central role in the region. In this framework,
the South End has a supporting role in making
downtown successful again. Low-cost, flexible,
multi-use space for startups, such as in the most
southerly parts of the South End, as well as live/
work space should be identified and marketed.
This is what supports urban center economic
development in the 21st century. There is only
one downtown of the region’s largest city—
changes that promote a more low-density
and suburban character will limit revitalization
opportunities.
The overarching economic development goals
for the city as a whole are relevant to District
One, particularly since it includes Metro Center,
the downtown of the region as well as the city:
• Increase and improve job opportunities
• Attract private investment
• Create an opti mum envi ronment f or
entrepreneurship
• Support smal l busi ness retenti on and
attraction, especially innovative startups
Important catalyst sites and locations in District
One include 13-31 Elm Street, 979 Main Street,
and Howard Street west of Main Street. In order
to make Metro Center and adjacent areas like
the South End attractive to expanding and new
businesses, the City or a leadership group, such
as DevelopSpringfield or the SRA, needs to
enhance their capability to identify priority sites
and assemble land, selectively remediate and
prepare the sites, provide proper zoning plus
incentives to attract reuse, and establish a list of
pre-permitted sites.
I n addi ti on, the Ci ty must be an acti ve
presence in regional discussions, such as the
Knowledge Corridor and transportation and
other planning efforts of the Pioneer Valley
Planning Commission, in order to advance the
city’s interests within a regional and statewide
context. Specifically, Springfield needs to retain
focus on Union Station as a revitalized intermodal
facility and participate in station area planning to
maximize the economic and residential benefits
of planned commuter rail.
The rebuilding process is expected to bring
new employees to the South End, including
150 employees of Caring Health and potentially
60 administrative employees of the Springfield
Housing Authority. The return of Square One
and other employers to Main Street in the
South End may open up additional employment
opportunities.
The Citywide Rebuilding Plan contains an overall
economic development and workforce strategy
for Springfield that includes District One.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
Mayor’s office; OPED; Springfield Business
Improvement District (BID); downtown business
and property owners; DevelopSpringfield; SRA;
resident and neighborhood groups; downtown
cultural institutions.
Strengthening Community—Major Move
C. Economic Development Strategy
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Pursue and package a variety of financing incentives and
resources for rebuilding.
Details on incentives and resource programs can be found in the Appendix to the Citywide Rebuilding Plan.
VII. The Resources for Rebuilding: Financing the Plan
Because the tornado resulted in a natural
di saster decl ared by the Presi dent of
the United States, Springfield will have
access to unconventi onal sources of
funding to support the rebuilding and
revitalization process. Communities in
similar circumstances have received special
federal allocations, such as Disaster-CDBG
funds. The State of Massachusetts also has
potential funding sources, and innovative
financing opportunities may be available
from other sources, such as foundations,
because of the tornado disaster.
IMPLEMENTATION OF THE DISTRICT ONE
REBUILDING PLAN FACES A NUMBER OF
CHALLENGES:
FINANCING GAP. The market realities show
that there is a substantial gap between costs
of new or rehabilitated buildings and the
investment capital (equity and debt) that is
justified by the economic value that would
be created (rent or sales price).
CAPITAL AVAILABILITY. This financing
gap must be filled by some combination of
private and public capital (potential sources
of capital are listed below).
• PRIVATE CAPITAL. Although private
capital is available at historically low
interest rates, underwriting standards are
very high because investors and lenders
are seeking to avoid risk.
DevelopSpringfield will need to attract
substantial private capital that overcomes
these constraints.
• PUBLIC CAPITAL. Public resources are
limited by budgetary pressures. Moreover,
the impact of the tornado has created a
need for capital which is far in excess of the
level of public resources that would
typically be available to Springfield. The
City of Springfield will need to attract
substantial public capital that may be
available precisely because of the tornado.
PACKAGING CAPACITY. Most private
developers, particularly local developers,
wi l l not have the techni cal experti se
required to package specific projects taking
full advantage of the financial resources
available to close gaps. DevelopSpringfield
should provide this expertise as an essential
ingredient in implementing the Master Plan.
ABSORPTION. The tornado destroyed
multiple properties in an under-performing
market in a matter of seconds. Investment
in replacing these properties will need to be
phased in to allow the market to absorb the
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
36
new assets without over-building in the short
term.
ADDI TI ONAL POTENTI AL FI NANCI AL
RESOURCES INCLUDE:
PROCEEDS OF I NSURANCE CLAI MS.
Virtually every property damaged by the
tornado has some level of insurance. This
gives owners of those properties a headstart
in terms of resources to repair or replace
those properties.
FEDERAL APPROPRIATION. The recovery
from many other natural disasters has been
facilitated by a special federal appropriation.
These funds, often channeled through the
Communi ty Devel opment Bl ock Grant
(CDBG) program provide funds for gap
financing and needed public improvements.
This is a very high priority because the
resources typically available are insufficient
to address the financing gaps in the multiple
projects that must be undertaken in the
aftermath of the tornado.
U.S. SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION.
Property owners impacted by the tornado
Development Category Development Type Incentives
Residential Infill 1-3 Family HOME Funds
Rental Apts—New/Rehab Tax Credits
Condominium—Rehab Tax Credits
Mixed-Use Residential/Retail Tax Credits
Commercial/Retail HUD Sect. 108 Loan; Local Lending
Pool
Build to Suit Retail or Office None needed
Community Institutions Recreation; mixture of
uses
Land write down; state funds; federal
funds; foundations; private donations
are eligible for special disaster recovery
loans from the Small Business Administration
(SBA).
U. S. ECONOMI C DEVEL OPMENT
ADMINISTRATION. Municipalities are
el i gi bl e f or Economi c Devel opment
Administration (EDA) grants for public
infrastructure that is required to leverage
private investment.
MASSDEVELOPMENT. State funds for
financing key projects may be available.
HOME FUNDS. Federal housing funds from
the HOME program can assist in residential
rebuilding programs for owner-occupants.
LOCAL MORTGAGE POOL. There i s
precedent in Springfield for local banks
to pool their resources to provide debt
fi nanci ng for pri ori ty proj ects. These
“participation loans” are a way to share the
risk and provide financing at better than
market terms.
MASSMUTUAL GRANT. Massachusetts
Mu t u a l L i f e I n s u r a n c e Compa n y
has commi t t ed $1. 6 mi l l i on t o t he
implementation of the Rebuild Springfield
Master Plan. The exact use of these funds
has not yet been determined, but they could
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be part of a mortgage pool or some other
financing vehicle.
SECTION 108 LOAN. Springfield has an
existing Section 108 loan that has been
repaid by the borrower, but not repaid
to the federal government. These funds
could be recycled as loans in connection
with projects in the tornado impact area. In
addition, Springfield has additional Section
108 borrowing capacity.
LAND COST WRITE-DOWN. To the extent
that land is owned by the City of Springfield
or the SRA, the upfront land cost could be
written down to facilitate development.
TAX INCREMENT FINANCING. Local
real estate taxes could be phased in over
a period of time to enhance a project’s
feasibility, particularly in its early years.
CORRI DOR FAÇADE PROGRAM. A
storefront façade grant program managed
by DevelopSpringfield is available to assist in
the financing of façade improvements along
Main Street in the South End.
HISTORIC INVESTMENT TAX CREDITS
(FEDERAL AND STATE). For repairing
damaged hi stori c properti es used for
multifamily rental, commercial, and mixed-
use adaptive reuse projects, these are
among the most i mportant fi nanci ng
sources for important older buildings, such
as the Howard Street Armory.
ENERGY I NCENTI VES. Gr ant s and
l ow-i nterest l oans f rom uti l i ti es and
government agencies are available for
replacing or installing energy-efficient
building components, heating systems,
weatherization, energy saving appliances,
etc.
NON-PROFI TS. Resources rai sed by
non-profits independent of the City and
Devel opSpri ngf i el d ( e. g. Habi tat f or
Humanity, Neighborhood Housing Services,
Home Ci ty Housi ng and Rebui l di ng
Together) will contribute to the rebuilding
process.
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38
Major Moves
A. The Planning Framework.
B. Housing strategy: Provide a variety of housing options appropriate to
different locations in Metro Center and the South End that enhance
downtown and neighborhood character, add market rate housing, and
raise the median household income.
C. Commercial and retail strategy: Create centers of vitality and activity
along Main Street by recruiting retail and restaurants to ground floor
spaces, office users to upper story space, and neighborhood-serving
retail, as well as assisting in the rebuilding of key sites.
D. Community institutions strategy: Enhance the anchor role of community
institutions, especially by assisting in relocation of those damaged by the
tornado.
E. Urban character and historic preservation strategy: Pursue adaptive
reuse of historic buildings and sites and establish urban design guidelines
and a regulatory framework to enhance walkability.
F. Public spaces strategy: Activate and program public spaces to create
destinations, mobilize community partners for stewardship, and connect
important public spaces.
VIII. The Framework for Rebuilding:
Major Moves to Rebuild Better
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39
Metro Center and the South End have a
shared destiny. Rebuilding and revitalization
efforts should be seen as interrelated and
mutually supportive. The Main Street spine
south from the Arch links the downtown of
tall buildings of citywide importance through
a transitional area of mid-rise downtown-
scale blocks to a more modest-scaled but
fully urban neighborhood in the South
End. A revitalized Metro Center where new
residents and businesses seek a walkable,
historic downtown will also draw people to
the South End. And the character of the
South End will also affect the Metro Center’s
progress as a downtown neighborhood.
The f r amewor k f or t he Di st r i ct One
rebuilding plan focuses on the Main Street
corridor. From State Street north, a lively
downtown Main Street is the retail and
activity spine of the urban core with Court
Square as its southern gateway, attracting
resi dents and vi si tors, and radi ati ng
vitality along the cross streets. South of
State Street, the transition to a livable,
neighborhood Main Street is marked by
mixed-use buildings with active ground
floors at all corners of Union and Main
Streets, providing a gateway commercial
focus for the South End. New and rebuilt
businesses and community institutions
support neighborhood residents and attract
visitors, and a broad mix of residents living
in the upper stories of mixed use buildings,
in rehabilitated historic buildings, and
in smaller scale one to three-family infill
housi ng ani mates downtown and the
South End. Public realm improvements
expand from Mai n Street to the si de
streets. Energy-efficient rebuilding makes
these neighborhoods more sustainable.
Union Street going west from Main Street
becomes a “festival street” that functions
as a regular street most of the time but can
be transformed into a special pedestrian
and festival connection to the riverfront with
artwork in the underpass. East Columbus
Avenue becomes a more attractive gateway
from the interstate, and the southwestern
blocks of the South End function as “flex”
space that could attract entrepreneurs or
artists. By “rebuilding better,” Springfield
will reinvigorate the South End and Metro
Center to create livable, vibrant, connected,
and complementary urban neighborhoods
that strengthen Springfield’s role as a great
place to live, work, play and visit--the city
center of the Pioneer Valley.
Major Move
A. The Planning Framework
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40
An Initiative of Develop Springfield and
the Springfield Redevelopment Authority
DISTRICT 1
METRO CENTER + SOUTH END
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THE PLANNING FRAMEWORK
LEGEND
Walk to the river
Connect to the city
Activity center
Riverfront recreation
and entertainment
Commercial/light
industrial
Park
Neighborhood-scale
Main St. mixed-use
Downtown-scale
Main St. mixed-use
Downtown/neighborhood
mixed-use
Multi-family
housing area
East Columbus
Enhancement area
1-3 family
housing area
Railroad
Riverfront Bike Path
THE PLANNING FRAMEWORK
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South End: Residential areas
Opportunity for one- to three-family infill
housing
Multi-family district
South End: Main to East Columbus
“Wal k to the Ri ver” Uni on Street
enhancements
Commercial/light industrial “flex” space
internal blocks south of Margaret
Street
Opportunity to enhance East Columbus
Avenue through design guidelines as a
gateway
Metro Center: Downtown-scale Main Street
mixed use spine with focused activity centers
North, at The Arch: Arts, Culture,
Entertainment
Boland Way: Business Center
Court Square: Downtown Gateway
Opportunity for historic rehab condos and
rentals
Mi xed Use Transi ti on Area: Downtown/
neighborhood mixed use
State Street to Union Street area
Morgan Square area
Downtown scale buildings
Opportunity for historic rehab condos and
rentals
Opportunity for redevelopment of city-owned
properties through Request for Proposals
process
South End: Neighborhood-scale Main Street
mixed-use
Concentrate density at Main and Union
gateway to make center of activity
Animate Main with active ground floor
uses
THE PLANNING FRAMEWORK
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
42
Thirteen key sites or buildings are of special
interest for the rebuilding and revitalization
of District One.
An Initiative of Develop Springfield and
the Springfield Redevelopment Authority
DISTRICT 1
METRO CENTER + SOUTH END
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Data Source: City of Springfield
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KEY DEVELOPMENT SITES
Sites for Further Study
Publicly-owned
Publicly-owned
Privately-owned
Development opportunity sites
THE PLANNING FRAMEWORK
D I S T R I C T O N E : M E T R O C E N T E R A N D S O U T H E N D
43
The residential side streets of the South
End have a mixture of single family homes
and small, rental multifamily buildings. The
need for more owner-occupied housing
in the neighborhood, preferably single-
family, has repeatedly been emphasized
by neighborhood residents in the public
meetings. The goal is to bring more income
diversity to the South End and increase the
number of residents with a long-term stake
in the neighborhood. Depending on the
future use of the Gemini site on Central
Street, the Morris Avenue vacant lots may
also be used for infill housing.
An Initiative of Develop Springfield and
the Springfield Redevelopment Authority
DISTRICT 1
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INFILL HOUSING STRATEGY
Infill housing
THE PLANNING FRAMEWORK
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
44
Provide a variety of housing options appropriate to different locations
in Metro Center and the South End that enhance downtown and
neighborhood character, add market rate housing, and raise the median
household income.
Key Initiatives
• Pursue rehabilitation and adaptive reuse rental and condominium housing
in Metro Center.
• Pursue mixed-use rehabilitation and adaptive reuse with ground floor retail
and upper story housing in downtown-scale buildings in Metro Center and
at activity centers and along Main Street in the South End.
• Pursue one-to three-family owner-occupied housing at or near market rate
for infill on the side streets of the South End to raise the median income in
the neighborhood.
• Use the rebuilding process to make housing stock more energy efficient.
• Use the Choice Neighborhoods (CNI) grant award to develop new
approaches to improve the Hollywood area for residents and other
neighborhood stakeholders.
Major Move
B. Housing Strategy
Downtown Providence (RI) is seeing ground floor retail and shops, as
well as upper story lofts and apartments on historic Westminster Street
as a result of an integrated strategy for downtown revitalization. (Source:
http://www.blogs.providencejournal.com)
D I S T R I C T O N E : M E T R O C E N T E R A N D S O U T H E N D
45
INITIATIVE
Successful downtowns today are “live-
work-play” neighborhoods that include a
critical mass of housing whose residents
help create the vitality that helps reverse
perceptions of insecurity and attracts visitors
to downtown businesses, entertainment
and cultural venues. The ULI Downtown
Technical Assistance Panel Report (ULI-
TAP) from 2007 emphasized the need for
“consistent” pursuit of market rate housing,
both rental and ownership. The December
2006 Zimmerman/Volk (ZVA) downtown
housing market study was prepared when
the housing market was stronger than
at present, but the market segments for
downtown housing remain valid: urban
pioneers such as students, artists and young
professionals without preconceived ideas
about downtown or its past; downtown
renters who may be ready to become
homeowners; and empty-nesters attracted
to urban walkability and cultural amenities.
Empty nesters generally will not make the
move until revitalization is more established
and renters may find homeownership more
of a stretch under the current economic
climate. Very limited progress was made
during the 2000-2010 decade in increasing
downtown’s population or income mix:
census data show that the population was
essentially stable and median incomes are
still very low because income-restricted
housing still predominates. In a number
of cities, the location of student housing or
campus buildings downtown has played
a critical role in downtown revitalization.
For example, in Providence, the Rhode
Island School of Design and Johnson &
Wales University have played an important
revitalization role, and in Savannah (GA),
the Savannah College of Art & Design
has renovated a large number of historic
buildings to create an urban campus. Given
likely market conditions in the next few
years, adaptive reuse of historic buildings
should be the focus.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
Devel opSpr i ngf i el d; SRA; Ci t y Housi ng
Department; OPED; HAPHousi ng; Better
Homes for Springfield; Home City Housing
Development Corporation; CNI Advisory Group;
First Resource Development Corporation; South
End Revitalization Coalition; South End Citizen’s
Pursue rehabilitation and adaptive
reuse of rental and condominium
housing in Metro Center.
HOUSING STRATEGY
Physical Educational Organizational Cultural Economic Social
Council; colleges and universities.
Resource Needs and Opportunities
See pp. 49-50 and Section VII. The Citywide Plan
includes a more detailed discussion of resource
opportunities.
Action Steps
Work with property owners and developers to
promote and assist rebuilding consistent with
this plan. Explore the potential of more higher
education presence.
Priority
High
Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
46
INITIATIVE
Build on the success of Stockbridge Court as
a successful market rate rental development
at the border of Metro Center and the
South End by pursuing condo, rental, and
mixed-use rehab of larger-scale, multi-story
buildings.
The characteristics that have helped make
Stockbridge Court successful include good
security, secure parking, good management,
and on-site amenities.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
Devel opSpr i ngf i el d; SRA; Ci t y Housi ng
Department; Office of Planning and Economic
Development (OPED); HAPHousing; Better
Homes for Springfield; Home City Housing
Development Corporation; CNI Advisory Group;
Fi rst Resource Devel opment Corporati on;
Armoury-Quadrangle Civic Association; South
End Revitalization Coalition; South End Citizen’s
Council.
Resource Needs and Opportunities
See pp. 49–50 and Section VII. The Citywide Plan
includes a more detailed discussion of resource
opportunities.
Action Steps
Work with property owners and developers to
promote and assist rebuilding consistent with this
plan.
Precedents
Ci ty of Ri chmond ( VA) Nei ghborhoods i n
Bloom program (http://www.richmondgov.com/
neighborhoods/).
Priority
High
Pursue mixed-use rehabilitation and adaptive
reuse with ground floor retail and upper story
housing in downtown-scale buildings in Metro
Center and at activity centers and along Main
Street in the South End.
HOUSING STRATEGY
Physical Educational Organizational Cultural Economic Social
Active ground floor uses promote neighborhood
vitality.
The former Milton-Bradley factory is now Stockbridge
Court.
New mixed-use buildings on a formerly vacant corner
lot in Providence (RI) are modern but compatible
with historic building types. (Image source: www.
durkeebrown.com)
Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social
D I S T R I C T O N E : M E T R O C E N T E R A N D S O U T H E N D
47
INITIATIVE
Neighborhood participants in the workshops
would like to see more owner-occupied
and single family market rate housing in the
South End. Currently, the majority of units in
the South End are rental units, including in
one- to three-family homes. Because of low
values, new construction will require high
incentives.
As noted earlier in this plan, analysis of
household incomes within the South End
shows that 74% of households have incomes
that are less than half the Springfield region
medi an i ncome ( AMI or Area Medi an
Income used by the federal government).
Federal housing funds can be used to
target households earning 50% to 80% of
the regional AMI, which would bring some
much-needed income diversity to the South
End. (See the Appendix for details on the
data.)

Partnerships / Stakeholders
Devel opSpr i ngf i el d; SRA; Ci t y Housi ng
Department; HAPHousing; Better Homes for
Springfield; Home City Housing Development
Corporati on; CNI Advi sory Group; Fi rst
Resource Development Corporation; South End
Revitalization Coalition; South End Citizen’s
Council.
Resource Needs and Opportunities
See pp. 49–50 and Section VII. The Citywide Plan
includes a more detailed discussion of resource
opportunities.
Action Steps
Work with property owners and developers to
promote and assist rebuilding consistent with this
plan.
Precedents
Ci ty of Ri chmond ( VA) Nei ghborhoods i n
Bloom program (http://www.richmondgov.com/
neighborhoods/).
Priority
High
Pursue one-to three-family owner-
occupied housing at or near market
rate for infill on the side streets of
the South End to raise the median
income in the neighborhood.
HOUSING STRATEGY
Physical Educational Organizational Cultural Economic Social
Tradi ti onal housi ng types for i nfi l l woul d be
compatible with the neighborhood.
Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
48
energy efficiency assistance to cities and towns);
EcoBuilding Bargains.
Action Steps
Set up a program to inform property owners
and developers about the program and make
assistance available.
Priority
High
The Commonwealth of Massachusetts has
a program to partner with cities and towns
to provide services to make buildings more
energy efficient.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
OPED; SRA; property owners; neighborhood
associations; Western Massachusetts Electric
Company (WMECO) and Columbia Gas.
Resource Needs and Opportunities
Serrafix (consultant to the state that provides
Use the rebuilding process to make housing stock more energy efficient.
HOUSING STRATEGY
Physical Educational Organizational Cultural Economic Social
Work with the new owners and managers of
. s g n i d l i u b l a t n e r d o o w y l l o H / k r a P g n i t u O e h t
The improved development will include on-
site management; landscape and parking
improvements; on-site amenities; and road
improvements to Dwight St Extension.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
CNI Advisory Group; South End Revitalization
Use the Choice Neighborhoods (CNI) grant award to develop new approaches to
improve the Hollywood area for residents and other neighborhood stakeholders.
Coalition; South End Citizens’ Council; First
Resource Development Company; Marble Apts
and Outing Park tenants; business owners;
South End Middle School; Square One; SRA
; Sout h End Communi t y Cent er …many
neighborhood stakeholders to be involved in the
CNI process.
Resource Needs and Opportunities
See pp. 49-50 and Section VII. The Citywide Plan
includes a more detailed discussion of resource
opportunities.
Action Steps
Facilitate discussions among homeowners,
management, and tenants in the neighborhood
to agree on measures to eliminate problems and
reduce crime.
Priority
Very high
Worthington Commons in Springfield: buildings similar
to those in the Hollywood area after rehabilitation by
the same development group.
Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social
D I S T R I C T O N E : M E T R O C E N T E R A N D S O U T H E N D
49
Incentives will be needed for housing
development in District One. The current
cost of redevelopment—building new or
rehabilitated housing units—in Metro Center
or the South End is higher than the market
value of the development at completion.
Spr i ngf i el d housi ng pr i ces ar e ver y
affordable. The graphs on this page from
the real estate website Trulia.com indicate
housing sales price trends since 2000 for the
City of Springfield and the neighborhood
residential markets of Metro Center and the
South End. In Metro Center, the median
sales price for the October to December
2011 period was $42,000. Of the 24 homes
for sale in Metro Center at the end of
December 2011, five were in foreclosure.
Eighteen were condos, ten of which had an
asking price of $50,000 or less. Similarly, in
the South End, where duplex or single family
homes in the 1500-2000 sf range are typical
of the housing for sale, the median sales
price for the October to December 2011
period was $70,000. Of 12 homes for sale,
six were in foreclosure. Prices ranged from
$45,000 to $162,000.
Innovative and unconventional development
incentives will be needed to make the
rebuilding process successful in advancing
the revitalization of housing in District One.
Ownership or Rental Type Development Potential
Owner-occupant Condo - rehabilitation or adaptive reuse of existing building Good
Owner-occupant One- to three-family infill Modest
Rental Apartments - new construction or rehabilitation of existing
building
Good
Rental Mixed-use - apartments above storefronts Good
Feasibility Testing: Housing Resource Needs
HOUSING STRATEGY
Source: trulia.com
Source: trulia.com
Illustrative proformas
I n an ef f ort to eval uate the f undi ng
requi rements associ ated wi th vari ous
redevel opment concepts f or Di stri ct
One, real estate experts Byrne McKinney
& Associates, Inc. devised and tested a
series of illustrative programs for economic
feasibility. This approach uses a residual
valuation model to compare the value
produced by each program with its cost
of development—a comparison of what it
costs to develop a project including land,
design, building construction, and a variety
of other costs, with how much the project
would be worth given the prevailing market.
A “proforma” was prepared for hypothetical
development types envisioned by this plan
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
50
in order to identify where gap funding or
incentives would be needed to achieve
the plan’s goals. A proforma begins by
describing the “program” of the proposed
project, for example, the number and size
of housing units. This is followed by likely
esti mated revenues based on market
conditions, the costs that will have to be
incurred, and the net financial return that
a developer expects to achieve. When the
cost to develop a project exceeds its value
on completion, gap funding or incentives
will be required to make it economically
feasible. Springfield will need a special
appropriation from the state and/or federal
governments to close funding gaps for
tornado rebuilding projects. The full Byrne
McKinney report with the proformas can be
found in the Citywide Rebuilding Plan.
Infill housing
All infill housing concepts are likely to
require some level of incentive to produce
feasible development conditions. The
infill housing programs tested include
single family, two family and three family
i l l ustrati ons, each model ed assumi ng
1,500 sf per unit, which is consistent with
the l ocal market standard. Proformas
were devel oped for each case under
the assumption that there would be an
owner occupant. For two and three-family
developments, the second and third units
are expected to be rented to underwrite
the occupancy cost for the owner-occupant.
The net sale proceeds (values) estimated for
each illustration are consistent with market
pricing for one, two and three family product
in the local market, adjusted for a typical
sale expense. The costs of development
assume that there are no premium costs
for site remediation or demolition and have
been benchmarked to local hard and soft
cost standards. Help in closing the funding
gaps could come from underwriting the cost
of land and site preparation as well as the
use of HOME funds, especially for one and
two family infill sites, with the potential for
efficient use of rental incentive programs via
a scattered site redevelopment approach.
Although a condominium approach was not
explicitly modeled for the two and three-
family infill programs, it appears that this
approach might yield a somewhat smaller
incentive requirement.
Multi-family housing
The mul t i - f ami l y housi ng pr ogr ams
tested include a 50-unit rental apartment
(new construction) and a 50-unit for sale
condominium (loft/rehab) illustration—
neither with retail square footage. Both
concepts assume unit sizes at 1,000 SF
(net living area) with an 85% net to gross
ef f i ci ency. Both mul ti -f ami l y housi ng
concepts are likely to require some level of
incentive to produce feasible development
conditions. Underwriting the cost of land
and site preparation as well as the use of tax
credit equity programs (specifically historic
and housing credits) are likely to be the most
effective sources. These could be coupled
with other, low-cost debt vehicles (targeted
to the developer and, in the case of the
condominium option, to the end-user) to
bring the economics into balance. Although
senior housing or assisted living options
were not explicitly modeled, they might also
present a viable multi-family alternative—
and access to an array of additional funding
sources.
Mixed-use programs with housing
A mixed-use program with 25 units of
rental housing over a 7,500 sf retail base
(85% efficient) was also modeled. The value
produced is based on apartment rents being
achieved in the local market, adjusted for
market supported operating expenses. The
costs of development assumes that there
are no premium costs for site remediation
or demolition and have been benchmarked
to local hard and soft cost standards. This
mixed-use concept will require some level of
incentive to produce feasible development
conditions. The use of tax credit equity
programs (specifically historic and housing
credi ts—and perhaps New Market tax
credits) are likely to be effective sources and
with other, low-cost debt vehicles would
be expected to bring the economics into
balance.
HOUSING STRATEGY
D I S T R I C T O N E : M E T R O C E N T E R A N D S O U T H E N D
51
Major Move
C. Commercial and Retail Strategy
The commercial and retail presence in
District One needs to be strengthened.
According to CBRE’s New England 2011
Market Outlook, office vacancy is over 13%
in Springfield overall. In Metro Center, a
significant amount of upper story space
exists in older buildings (Class C) according
to knowledgeable observers, and storefront
vacancies testify to a weak retail market.
Along Main Street in the South End, the
tornado did significant damage to key
business locations, such as 979 Main Street.
The rehabilitation and redevelopment of
13-31 Elm Street has been recognized by
city, state and federal authorities as the
most important project in Metro Center,
along with the revival of Union Station. In
a prominent position fronting on Court
Square and on State Street, this building is
a symbol of Springfield’s historic character
and is critical to making Court Square a lively
and active gateway to downtown. The City
has designated a developer and the project
has received federal funding for soft costs
through the Knowledge Corridor Regional
Plan for Sustainable Development. The
developer is focusing on office development
with ground floor active uses.
At the northern end of Main Street, both
the Paramount Theatre and the former
Bowles building, approximately 66,000 sf
of office and ground floor space at 1610-
1626 Main Street, have been purchased by
the same owner. The ground floor houses
restaurants while the upper floors have been
vacant since 1997. The plan is for a mixed
use building with office or residential space
on the upper floors, as well as renovation
of the theater. With completion of these
projects and recent projects such as 1550
Main Street and 1592 Main Street, much of
the west side of Main Street downtown will
be redeveloped.
“Retail follows rooftops” is the common
saying. Typically, an average household
can suppor t about 20 squar e f eet
of nei ghbor hood r et ai l ( as wel l as
additional retail outside the household’s
neighborhood). Another way to think of it is
that 1,000-2,000 households are needed to
support a typical block (both sides) of “Main
Street style” retail. Springfield’s Main Street
from State Street to Marble Street could
The intersection of Main and Union Streets should be
a center of vitality on Main Street.
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
52
Key Initiatives
• Assist in the rebuilding of 979 Main Street
and other key buildings at and near the
Union and Main Street intersection in the
South End.
• Establish a recruitment program for Main
Street storefronts, with special attention to
restaurants to create a South End
“Restaurant Row” to build on the existing
cluster of eateries.
• Explore options for an urban grocery store
and/or drugstore in or near downtown and
the South End.
• Work with the Springfield Housing Authority
to locate administrative offices in vacant
office space in the South End.
• Use the rebuilding process to make
commercial buildings more energy efficient.
• Issue a Request for Proposals for publicly-
owned property located between Howard
and Union Streets.
Institutions and offices bring employees
to the neighborhood who support lunch
business at restaurants and some retail.
The Caring Health clinic will bring an
additional 150 employees, Square One
has approximately 50 employees and the
Community Center will also have staff in
the neighborhood. In addition to these
i nsti tuti ons, the Spri ngf i el d Housi ng
Authority is looking for approximately 30,000
sf of office space for approximately 60
administrative staff.
probably accommodate about 110,000 to
160,000 sf of neighborhood retail—which
could be supported by approximately 5,500
households at the lower bound. In 2010, the
South End had nearly 2,000 households and
they had below average incomes. Bringing
more househol ds i nto the di stri ct by
adaptive reuse and new building, as well as
raising the median income, will strengthen
the market for retail and services. Of course,
Springfield’s Main Street is more than a
neighborhood street, so daytime employees
and visitors can also contribute to the
customer base for retail businesses.
COMMERCIAL AND RETAIL STRATEGY
AC Produce in the South End.
D I S T R I C T O N E : M E T R O C E N T E R A N D S O U T H E N D
53
Assist in the rebuilding of 979 Main Street and other key buildings at and near the
Union and Main Street intersection in the South End.
COMMERCIAL AND RETAIL STRATEGY
INITIATIVE
The tornado destroyed 979 Main Street (the
Zorzi building), depriving the South End of
one of its keystone properties at the critical
Union and Main intersection. Rebuilding
of this property as a multi-story building
that holds the corner well and has an active
ground floor is a very high priority.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
Devel opSpri ngfi el d; SRA; OPED; property
owners.
Resource Needs and Opportunities
See Section VII and the Citywide Plan.
core of a restaurant row clustered near the
Main and Union intersection. Patrons of
the restaurants would create vitality at this
South End gateway location, making it a
destination linked not only with downtown
via Main Street but with the riverfront by
Union Street.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
OPED; DevelopSpringfield; SRA; business and
property owners.
Resource Needs and Opportunities
Devel op an i ncenti ves package to attract
restaurants and retailers, such as assistance with
permitting, fitting out, signage, and so on.
INITIATIVE
Along with new buildings for tornado-
dest r oyed si t es, t he r ecr ui t ment of
restaurants and specialty food shops to
cluster near the Union and Main intersection
will enhance the importance of the existing
eateries and create a “restaurant row” as
the hub of a revitalized South End Main
Street. The Italian-American restaurants and
specialty shops in the South End, especially
in the blocks surrounding the Main and
Union intersection, are an asset that should
be enhanced and developed. Well-known
to Springfield residents and downtown
employees, these businesses can form the
Establish a recruitment program for Main Street storefronts, with special attention
to restaurants to create a South End “Restaurant Row” to build on the existing
cluster of eateries.
Italian-American specialty stores are clustered on Main
Street around Union and Williams Streets.
Action Steps
Work with building owners, restaurant brokers
and local restaurant owners, the Massachusetts
Latino Chamber of Commerce, and others.
Priority
High
Physical Educational Organizational Cultural Economic Social
Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social
Action Steps
Work with property owners to establish goals
for rebuilding and determine any needs for gap
financing. Provide or facilitate assistance to fill
gaps.
Priority
Very High
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
54
Explore options for an urban grocery
store and/or drugstore in or near
downtown and the South End.
COMMERCIAL AND RETAIL STRATEGY
INITIATIVE
South End neighborhood representatives
would like to see a grocery store or a drug
store/pharmacy in the neighborhood. A.C.
Produce, a very successful specialty food
store, and Diaz Market, a bodega-style store,
are already located in the South End. The
closest full-service grocery is across the river
on Memorial Avenue in West Springfield.
The State Street planning effort has also
identified and evaluated a site at State and
Walnut Streets as the potential location for
a 55,000 sf grocery store that could serve
several neighborhoods. It is possible that
a small-format urban grocery store, which
are typically 10,000–17,000 sf in size, could
be successful in the South End, particularly
if located to also capture business from
evening commuters.
Although the new Caring Health clinic on
Main Street will include a pharmacy aimed
at filling prescriptions written at the clinic,
the neighborhood interest is in a full-service
drug store such as a CVS, which would
typically be a store of approximately 10,000
sf. A store of this kind should use a design
for urban rather than suburban places, i.e.,
parking should be at the side and rear.
The first option for a food store should
be ef f or t s t o assi st AC Pr oduce t o
expand so that the business can serve
the neighborhood as well as expand as a
specialty food store. Exploration of other
grocery options should occur in the context
of continuing efforts to bring a full service
grocery to Walnut and State Streets. A
small-format, value-priced grocery, such
as an ALDI store, might be suitable for a
location at the south end of Main Street.
As in the case of a full-service drugstore, a
building of this type should use a urban-style
design.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
OPED; DevelopSpringfield; SRA; revived South
End Business Association; business and property
owners.
Resource Needs and Opportunities
Resources for a market evaluation and for
incentives. See Section VII. The Citywide Plan
includes a more detailed discussion of resource
opportunities.
Action Steps
More detailed discussions with AC Produce on
the owner’s business goals; explore small-format
grocery models with relevant chains; identify
incentive options and funding sources.
Priority
Medium–High
Interior of A.C. Produce
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Work with the Springfield Housing Authority to locate administrative offices in
vacant office space in the South End.
INITIATIVE
The Housing Authority seeks approximately
30,000 sf of office space in the South End.
In seeking a developer for adaptive reuse
of the Armory and Zanetti School properties
on Howard Street, the option of having the
Housing Authority as a committed tenant
should be explored. An upper-story Main
Street location would also be appropriate
for Springfield Housing Authority offices and
might serve as interim open space while the
historic properties are being developed.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
S p r i n g f i e l d H o u s i n g A u t h o r i t y ;
DevelopSpringfield; SRA; City of Springfield;
developers.
Resource Needs and Opportunities
Staff time to coordinate; resources for moving.
Action Steps
Coordi nate wi th the Spri ngfi el d Housi ng
Authority to assist in locating their offices in an
appropriate South End location.
Priority
High
INITIATIVE
The Commonwealth of Massachusetts has
a program to partner with cities and towns
to provide services to make buildings more
energy efficient.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
OPED; property owners; businesses; utility
companies.
Use the rebuilding process to make commercial buildings more energy efficient.
Resource Needs and Opportunities
Serrafix (consultant to the state that provides
energy efficiency assistance to cities and towns);
EcoBuilding Bargains.
Action Steps
Set up a program to inform business and
property owners of the program and make
assistance available.
Priority
High
COMMERCIAL AND RETAIL STRATEGY
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Incentives will be needed for all but build-to-
suit development where a tenant or owner
is known in advance. Springfield will need a
special appropriation from the state and/or
federal governments to close funding gaps
for tornado rebuilding projects.
Development potential for mixed-use new
or rehabilitated buildings with ground
floor retail and housing above, and for a
mixture of retail-office uses, is good only
if the tenant is identified in advance. A
free standing grocery or drug store would
be feasible only with a build to suit tenant.
Speculative nonresidential development is
not advisable under present conditions.
Commercial programs and proformas
As i n the housi ng feasi bi l i ty anal ysi s,
proformas were prepared for commercial
programs.
Mixed use programs
The retail/housing mixed-use proforma
was discussed in the housing feasibility
analysis and found to be feasible only with
incentives. A commercial office over retail
illustration was modeled, assuming 22,500
rentable square feet over a 7,500 sf retail
base (90% efficient). The estimated values
are based on office rents being achieved
in the local market, adjusted for market
supported operating expenses. The costs
of development assume that there are
no premium costs for site remediation or
demolition and have been benchmarked to
local hard and soft cost standards. While
both residential over retail and office
over retail would require some level of
incentive to produce feasible development
conditions, there are few viable incentive
alternatives for the commercial option unless
there is a build-to-suit or owner-occupant
end user willing and able to bear the full cost
of development. That being the case, only
the residential over retail option is viewed as
a likely candidate for development in District
One.
Specul ati ve and bui l d-to-sui t/owner-
occupant office and retail
Programs for both retail and office were
sized at 25,000 rentable square feet (the
illustrations are scalable). The values
estimated produced for each illustration
are based on rents (office and retail) being
achieved in the local market, adjusted for
market supported operating expenses. The
costs of development assume that there
are no premium costs for site remediation
or demolition and have been benchmarked
to local hard and soft cost standards. Both
the owner-occupant ( non-specul ati ve)
alternatives are feasible without incentives—
producing positive returns over cost. Both
speculative commercial concepts would
require incentives to produce feasible
development conditions. There are few
viable incentive alternatives, but even if
there were, no speculative commercial
development in District One is viewed to be
financeable.
Feasibility Testing: Commercial and Retail Resource Needs
COMMERCIAL AND RETAIL STRATEGY
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Enhance the anchor role of community institutions, especially
by assisting in relocation of those damaged by the tornado.
Key Initiatives
• Assist the South End Community Center in
relocating to an appropriate site in the
South end, such as the Gemini site.
• Provide assistance, as needed, to Square
One in finding appropriate sites and
rebuilding.
Community institutions are both physical
and social anchors in any neighborhood.
The South End Community Center and
Major Move
D. Community Institutions Strategy
Square One, which serve families, children
and youth in the South End and other parts
of the city, both lost their buildings in the
tornado. Caring Health, which already had a
clinic on Main Street, has acquired a building
across the street from its current location
that was somewhat damaged in the tornado
and is renovating it into additional clinic
space. Alliance for Power is repairing their
damaged building on Union Street. The
Mental Health Association lost a four-story
11-unit supportive housing building that had
been in operation since 1982 and looking
for replacement space citywide.
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INITIATIVE
Square One provides day care and preschool
services, as well as family counseling. It was
formerly located on Main Street and would like to
rebuild there, in close proximity to Caring Health.
Square One needs approximately 34,000 sf for day
care, office and van/storage facilities. Because
completely transparent windows would not be
suitable for the pre-school classrooms, it will be
very important to make sure that a new Square One
site does not create a blank and unappealing wall
to the sidewalk. The previous building used murals.
New murals or art, etched windows, or other
strategies could be explored.
Provide assistance, as needed, to Square One in
finding appropriate sites and rebuilding.
INITIATIVE
After the tornado damaged the Howard Street
Armory leased from the city, the South End
Community Center (SECC) sought a location that
would put it closer to the population of children
and youth on the east side of Main Street and
closer to green space. The SECC would like to
continue the model of leasing space owned by
Assist the South End Community Center in relocating to an appropriate site in the
South end, such as the Gemini site.
COMMUNITY INSTITUTIONS STRATEGY
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Partnerships / Stakeholders
OPED; SECC; DevelopSpringfield; SRA; Square
One; South End Revitalization Coalition.
Resource Needs and Opportunities
See Section VII and the Citywide Plan for resources.
Private fund-raising; MassDevelopment financing
may be a key resource to support rebuilding.
Action Steps
Work with the South End Revitalization Coalition
to discuss location options; collaborate with
the institutions to provide or facilitate access to
assistance.
Priority
High
the City. The City-owned Gemini site, possibly
with additional space on vacant property on
Morris Street, could be a suitable site. It is close
to newly-improved Emerson Wight Park, it is large
enough to allow for some of the site to be used
as green space, and the location on Central Street
allows for easy access from both the South End
and neighborhoods to the east like Six Corners
and Old Hill.
The return of the SECC and Square One to the
neighborhood will be a strong signal of recovery.
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Pursue adaptive reuse of historic buildings and sites and establish urban design guidelines and
a regulatory framework to enhance walkability.
Historic Preservation
• Give a high priority to saving remaining
historic buildings and historic character by
pursuing and recruiting adaptive reuse
options, using historic tax credits as
appropriate, and enacting a “demolition
delay” ordinance.
Urban Design
• Promote urban design that activates Main
Street through pedestri an-f ri endl y
principles, creates destination focus areas
or centers of activity to attract people, and
makes parking available but unobtrusive.
• Establish design guidelines to protect and
enhance the publ i c real m and the
pedestrian environment.
Major Move
E. Historic Preservation and Urban Character Strategy
• Activate downtown and the South End
public realm with events and attractions.
• Create a safe, interesting, and attractive
pedestrian environment.
• Provi de adequate parki ng that i s
unobtrusive but easy to find through
signage.
“Walk to the River”: Urban
Design Connections to the
Riverfront
• Enhance the visibility of and access to the
riverfront and Riverfront Park.
• Make Union Street a “festival street.”
• Establish a program of art installations in the
Union Street underpass and expand to
other underpasses.
• Plan the Water and Sewer Commission
activities at the York Street Jail site to allow
for appropri ate publ i c access and
development potential.
Zoning and Regulation
• Adopt the proposed zoning and site plan
review regulations currently under review.
• Consider zoning modifications to promote
achievement of the vision and goals of this
plan.
• Expand urban renewal district plans as
needed to reflect the goals of this plan.
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INITIATIVE
Historic character gives Metro Center and
parts of the South End a strong sense of
place and uniqueness, contributing to
Micro Center’s role as the downtown of
the Pioneer Valley and also providing a
potential competitive advantage over the
smaller cities in the region. Studies show
that the “millennials,” the generation born
in the 1980s and 1990s, want to live in urban
environments with character and community.
Historic buildings adapted for new uses,
whether residential or commercial, can act as
anchors for further redevelopment.
Moreover, historic tax credits are one of the
most important incentives available today
for redevelopment in District One. Every
effort should be made to preserve and reuse
historic buildings if economically feasible.
Demol i ti on shoul d be the l ast resort,
particularly if there is no identified end user
for a building and the demolition would
simply result in another parking lot. Historic
tax credits are available for buildings listed
or eligible for listing on the National Register
of Historic Places.
Demol i t i on del ay i s a t ool used by
many Massachusetts cities and towns to
encourage preservation of historic resources.
The Springfield Historical Commission is
considering a demolition delay ordinance as
this report is being completed. Demolition
delay ordinances provide that requests for
demolition permits for buildings meeting
certain criteria (typically National Register
listing or eligibility, or 50 years or older) go
to the Springfield Historical Commission for
a determination of whether the buildings
are preferably preserved. If the Commission
finds that they are, the demolition is then
delayed for a period (generally six months
or a year) to give an opportunity to pursue
options that would preserve the building. In
the case of Main Street, there are buildings
that are not currently listed on the state
or national registers, but date from the
nineteenth or early twentieth centuries.
Many of these buildings, such as those on
the eastern side of Main Street just south
of State Street, are critical to preserving the
overall character of that part of Main Street.
It is preferable, because of this situation,
that the criteria for the demolition delay
ordinance be the age of a building rather
Give a high priority to saving remaining historic buildings and historic
character by pursuing and recruiting adaptive reuse options, using historic
tax credits as appropriate, and enacting a “demolition delay” ordinance.
HISTORIC PRESERVATION AND URBAN CHARACTER STRATEGY
than historic register listing or eligibility.
The nonprofit organization, Preservation
Massachusetts, focused its 2011 list of
“Massachusetts’ Most Endangered Historic
Resources” on communities affected by
the tornado. Two of the endangered sites
are located on Howard Street in District
One: the 1895 Howard Street Armory (most
recently the location of the South End
Community Center), and the Howard Street
Primary School (Zanetti School). The 1895
Howard Street Armory’s headhouse has
a castlelike Romanesque Revival design
that is a neighborhood landmark. The
rear drill hall was significantly damaged
by the tornado and has been demolished.
The Zanetti School dates from 1905 and
was built to serve the growing immigrant
population of the South End. It retains many
historic details. It suffered damage from
the tornado, including water damage from
sprinklers. In addition, the Hollywood area
apartments have recently been designated
by the state as the Outing Park Historic
District.
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HISTORIC PRESERVATION AND URBAN CHARACTER STRATEGY
Partnerships / Stakeholders
OPED; Spri ngfi el d Hi stori cal Commi ssi on;
Springfield Preservation Trust; City Council; City
Housing Department; Massachusetts Historical
Commission.
Resource Needs and Opportunities
Staff time; financing for adaptive reuse; historic
tax credits and other financing.
Action Steps
Draft and enact an ordinance. Model demolition
delay ordinances are available from Mass Historic
and other municipalities. Pursue adaptive reuse
for city-owned properties.
Priority
High
An Initiative of Develop Springfield and
the Springfield Redevelopment Authority
DISTRICT 1
METRO CENTER + SOUTH END
0 0.075 0.15 0.225 0.3 0.0375
Miles
[ Data Source: City of Springfield
Registered Historic
Sites and Districts
Local Historic District
National Register District
National Register Individual Site
National Historic Site
HISTORIC RESOURCES
An Initiative of Develop Springfield and
the Springfield Redevelopment Authority
DISTRICT 1
METRO CENTER + SOUTH END
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.05
Miles
[ Data Source: City of Springfield
Historic Assets
Local Historic District
National Register District
National Register Individual Site
National Historic Site
Source: City of Springfield
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Urban Design
HISTORIC PRESERVATION AND URBAN CHARACTER STRATEGY
Urban desi gn focuses on the physi cal
character of spaces in three dimensions. It
is not, as sometimes thought, simply about
visual appearance or style. Urban design
affects many aspects of how we experience
pl aces, i ncl udi ng how t he di f f er ent
elements of spaces, such as buildings,
sidewalks, roads, parking lots, and parks,
relate to one another; how spaces function
in facilitating, directing or obstructing
people’s activities; and how spaces express
aesthetic values. The historic pattern of
streets in Metro Center and the South End
reflects traditional urban design principles
based on a human-scaled environment: a
connected grid of streets with small blocks,
sidewalks and tree-lined streets, buildings
with active ground floor spaces built to the
sidewalk, shops clustered together, and
streets that accommodate cars without
being dominated by them. After nearly
a hal f century of sprawl i ng suburban
growth built at the scale of cars rather than
people, communities across the country are
clamoring for a return to the human-scaled
city environments that are Springfield’s
birthright. While cities in transition like
Springfield sometimes made changes during
the sprawl decades in an ill-fated attempt
to compete with suburban environments by
trying to mimic them, in the 21st century it
is the historic, walkable scale of places like
Metro Center and the South End that are
now in demand.
The public realm includes sidewalks, streets,
plazas, and parks. Vibrant downtowns
and neighborhood commercial districts
are about bringing people to the street
and publ i c pl aces as pedestri ans by
strengthening destinations, creating a safe,
comfortable and interesting pedestrian
environment, and programming activities.
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INITIATIVE
Main Street is the most important street in
downtown Springfield and in the South End.
• Focus activities in “pulses” or “nodes”
at important intersections and public
spaces.
• Encourage preservati on of hi stori c
character and urban fabric.
Promote urban design that activates Main Street
through pedestrian-friendly principles, and by making
parking available but unobtrusive.
HISTORIC PRESERVATION AND URBAN CHARACTER STRATEGY
INITIATIVE
A few basic, interrelated urban design
principles should guide the rebuilding and
revitalization process in District One:
• CREATE PEDESTRI AN- FRI ENDLY
ENVIRONMENTS. Downtowns and
urban nei ghborhoods shoul d gi ve
priority to pedestrians because their
presence is what creates lively, safe, and
attractive places.
Establish design guidelines to protect and enhance the public realm and the
pedestrian environment.
• PLANT TREES. Street trees, trees
in parking lots, and trees in green
spaces provide shade, cooling, water
absorption, and beauty.
• BRING BUILDINGS TO THE STREET
EDGE ON MAJOR STREETS LIKE MAIN
STREET. Buildings should be built to the
sidewalk line, unless they are set back to
provide a café or plaza space.
• PUT SURFACE PARKING TO THE SIDE
OR REAR—NOT IN FRONT. Do not
locate parking lots on Main Street or on
corners.
• CREATE VI SUAL I NTEREST ON
MAJOR STREETS AND AVOID BLANK
FACADES. Include active ground floor
uses, windows and articulated facades.
Encourage creative signage appropriate
to the location and use.
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This street in Baltimore’s Fells Point illustrates how
active uses and windows, articulated façades, simple
signage, a wide sidewalk, and street trees can create a
pleasant pedestrian environment.
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Create a safe, interesting,
and attractive pedestrian
environment.
INITIATIVE
• Locate public entrances at the street, not
the parking lot.
• Pr ovi de mar ked cr osswal ks and
pedestrian countdown lights where
needed.
• Make the ground floor of buildings
interesting by locating active uses like
retail and restaurants on the ground
floor, and minimizing curb cuts that
interrupt safe walking on the sidewalk.
• Avoid boarding up vacant storefronts—
create interim visual interest through
color and design, or temporary art
installations.
Provide adequate parking
that is unobtrusive but
easy t o f i nd t hr ough
signage.
INITIATIVE
• Put on-site parking to the side and rear.
• Enclose parking lot edges with waist-
level plantings and/or fences, and plant
trees.
• Enhance the perception and reality of
safety and improve the environment in
parking garages.
• Provide joint, small-scale public parking
areas to serve restaurants and businesses
around the corner from Main Street.
• Create a wayfinding system that makes
it easy to identify and get to parking
locations.
• Identify major routes from parking to
destinations for signage and safety
enhancements, such as sightlines and
lighting.
HISTORIC PRESERVATION AND URBAN CHARACTER STRATEGY
Activate downtown and
the South End publ i c
real m wi th events and
attractions.
INITIATIVE
Activate plazas and urban parks with cafes,
food trucks, and events. In the medium-
to longer-term, improve the Court Street
connection between Main Street and the
Quadrangle, enliven the Dwight Street
parking and garage zone, and activate
Pynchon Park with programming.
This food vendor in downtown Springfield is helping to create
vitality on the street.
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This food vendor in downtown Springfield is helping to
create vitality on the street.
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CONNE CT T HE CI T Y T O T HE
WATERFRONT THROUGH A “WALK TO
THE RIVER” SET OF PHYSICAL CHANGES
AND PROGRAMS. Innovative connections
and spaces can draw people from downtown
and especially the South End to the water
by making access streets and underpasses
pedestrian friendly. Like other public
spaces, the riverfront and the water itself
needs to be activated with events, activities
and exhibitions that will attract people in
ways that are enjoyable and safe.
Enhance the visibility of and
access to the riverfront and
Riverfront Park.
INITIATIVE
Because of highway and railroad barriers,
the Connecti cut Ri ver remai ns one of
Springfield’s greatest untapped assets.
Tornado damage to trees at the riverfront
revealed the value of managing trees to
provide selected vistas of the park and river.
Other ways to enhance visual and physical
connection with the riverfront include
recreational public access around future
“Walk to the River”: Urban Design
Connections to the Riverfront
HISTORIC PRESERVATION AND URBAN CHARACTER STRATEGY
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use of the former York Street Jail site by the
Springfield Water and Sewer Commission
and/or ot her per manent user s, and
support for the southern expansion of the
Connecticut River bike trail. The Water and
Sewer Commission can leverage resources
during its $200 million project over the next
20 years.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
Parks & Recreation Department; Springfield
Water and Sewer Commission; Friends of the
Connecticut River Walk .
Resource Needs
Funding and staff for tree management; access
funding needs to be developed.
Resource Opportunities
Spri ngfi el d Water and Sewer Commi ssi on
leverage of resources.
Action Steps
Immediate discussion with the Springfield Water
and Sewer Commission before their plan is
submitted to the EPA in May 2012.
Priority
High (initial discussions); Medium
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INITIATIVE
The City of Portland (OR) has pioneered
the concept of a “festival street” that most
of the time functions like a typical street for
cars and parking, but has special design
treatments in order make it easy to convert
it to a special event street.
1
Union Street as
a festival street would continue to carry its
usual load of traffic during commuter and
other times; the closing of the street for
festivals would be on weekend or holiday
dates when traffic could be easily diverted.
Union Street is one of the few streets west
of Main Street that connects directly under
the interstate to the riverfront development
area. With the emphasis on creating a
cluster of eateries and specialty shops in the
vicinity of the Main and Union intersection
as a retail centerpiece of a revitalized South
End, a festival street from that cluster to
the riverfront would draw attention to the
connection.
In the case of Portland, the first festival
street was designed for Chinatown and
its festivals. In Springfield’s South End, a
festival street that draws people from Main
Street towards the river could be used for
the annual Italian Feast, which is over 100
years old, as well as new festivals and events
to reflect the Hispanic/Latino residents’
heritage and other activities or programs to
connect with the river. The festival street is
intended to be a complement to Main Street
by giving the Union Street block between
Main Street and East Columbus Avenue a
special character than then spills over into
the underpass. The design of a festival
street includes special paving without
curbs, bollards that separate the pedestrian
way from the roadway, and special signs
or banners. The purpose is to create a
space that provides a special visual and
physical connection to the riverfront, with
an activity destination at each end: South
End restaurant row on Main Street and
LUXE Burger at the former riverfront visitors’
center.
The upcomi ng Spri ngfi el d Water and
Sewer Commission project will require
underground work and repaving Union
Street. This work provides the opportunity
to design and construct the festival street
in conjunction with the water and sewer
project.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
Department of Public Works; OPED; MPO;
Springfield Water and Sewer Commission; South
End Revitalization Coalition; South End Citizens
Council; business and property owners.
Resource Needs
Staff time; design and construction for one block.
Resource Opportunities
Transportation funding; Springfield Water and
Sewer Commission funding.
Action Steps
Immediate (discussion with the Springfield
Water/Sewer Commission before their plan
is submitted to the EPA in May 2012); begin
worki ng on obtai ni ng f unds f or desi gn;
coordinate with the Springfield Water and Sewer
Commission and the regional transportation
planning organization (MPO).
Precedent
Portland (OR) Development Commission.
Priority
Hi gh—t o ent er di scussi on; medi um f or
implementation
Make Union Street a “festival street”
1
http://www.pdc.us/ura/dtwf/otctstreetscape-design.asp
HISTORIC PRESERVATION AND URBAN CHARACTER STRATEGY
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Union Street could become a festival street between Main Street and the riverfront to safely, comfortably, and
attractively connect pedestrians to the riverfront park while creating a vibrant destination for culture, commerce,
and celebrations. (Image source: Portland (OR) Development Commission, http://www.pdc.us/images/photo-
library_hi-res/davis-festival-st_watercolor.jpg)
HISTORIC PRESERVATION AND URBAN CHARACTER STRATEGY
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INITIATIVE
The highway underpasses connecting the
city with the riverfront are unappealing and
deter pedestrians. A program of permanent
or temporary art installations for the Union
Street underpass can make using the route
an event, rather than an unpleasant and/or
frightening occasion. A traditional artistic
intervention would be to commission an
artist to paint the underpass. Art which is
interactive and employs light and/or sound
can be even more effective if it creates
an event atmosphere that draws groups
of people—helping to provide a sense of
comfort and safety in a group situation.
Examples include the light installations
of Bill Fitz-Gibbons in San Antonio, the
burgeoning “video mapping” or “urban
screen” art events that project images
on structures, and a sound art installation
owned by MassMOCA i n the Route 2
underpass in North Adams.
Establish a program of art
installations in the Union Street
underpass and expand to other
underpasses.
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HISTORIC PRESERVATION AND URBAN CHARACTER STRATEGY
Partnerships / Stakeholders
Department of Public Works; OPED; MPO;
Springfield Arts Council; Museum of Art.
Resource Needs
Staff time; funding for programming, installation,
and marketing.
Resource Opportunities
Transportation funding; Challenge America Fast
Track Grant, National Endowment for the Arts
(March 2012); Springfield Arts Council grants;
private grants.
Action Steps
Form committee of stakeholders; apply for NEA
Challenge America Grant and begin working on
obtaining transportation enhancement funds;
apply for Mass Cultural Council grants through
the Springfield Cultural Council.
Precedents
“Light Channels: by Bill Fitz-Gibbons, San
Antonio, 2006 ; www.urbanscreen.com; Bruce
Odland & Sam Auinger, “Harmonic Bridge,”
MassMOCA, North Adams Route 2 underpass.
Priority
High—to submit a grant proposal
The inhospitable highway underpasses separating the
South End from the riverfront could become exciting
and inviting with simple artistic interventions such as
dynamic lighting. (Image source: www.billfitzgibbons.
com)
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INITIATIVE
The proposed pump house at the York
Street Jail site would take up about half of
the four-acre site. Infrastructure facilities
are increasingly including public access
and public art to make infrastructure more
transparent and raise public awareness
about the role of infrastructure. In addition,
the development potential of this site should
be protected. Finally, Commission activities
should allow for the extension of the bike
trail to the south.
Plan the Springfield Water and Sewer
Commission activities at the former York
Street Jail site to allow for appropriate
public access and development potential.
HISTORIC PRESERVATION AND URBAN CHARACTER STRATEGY
Partnerships / Stakeholders
Springfield Water and Sewer Commission;
OPED; Springfield Riverfront Development
Corp.; Friends of the Connecticut River Walk;
Parks & Recreation Department.
Resource Needs and Opportunities
Funds to develop a plan for public access and
possible development. See Section VII and
Citywide Plan for resources.
Action Steps
Immediate discussion with the Springfield Water
and Sewer Commission before their plan is
submitted to the EPA in May 2012, in order to
keep options open.
Precedent
Deer Island public access (Massachusetts Water
Resources Authority); City of Phoenix (AZ)
transfer station.
Priority
High (initial discussions and planning)
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The York Street Jail site could be redeveloped into
a community, commercial, and recreational asset
between West Columbus Avenue and the riverfront.
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INITIATIVES
In order to implement this plan, the zoning
and regulatory frameworks must reflect the
goals and guidelines of this plan.
ADOPT THE PROPOSED ZONING AND
SI TE PLAN REVI EW REGULATI ONS
CURRENTLY UNDER REVIEW. The revised
zoning and site plan review regulations
reinforce the Rebuild Springfield objectives
for District One:
• Rehabilitation, where suitable, and new
development to enhance the district
• Preserving and strengthening the walkable
character of the district
• Supporting historic character
• Promoting economic development
CONSIDER ZONING MODIFICATIONS TO
PROMOTE ACHIEVEMENT OF THE VISION
AND GOALS OF THIS PLAN. Establish a
Neighborhood Commercial Design Overlay
on South End Main Street to enhance walk-
ability and preserve/enhance character. Con-
sider extending Business C (downtown zon-
ing) along Main to Union or William Street to
provide more fexibility in adaptive reuse and
development in the transition area.
EXPAND URBAN RENEWAL DISTRICT PLANS
AS NEEDED TO REFLECT THE GOALS OF
THIS PLAN. The urban renewal districts in the
South End and Metro Center refect a patch-
work of initiatives, with expanding boundar-
ies made over the years to refect individual
projects. One of the advantages of urban
renewal districts is that developments in the
districts must undergo design review by the
Springfeld Redevelopment Authority. Ex-
panding the urban renewal districts to refect
the entire area covered by the framework dia-
gram in this plan, at a minimum, will ensure
that development and redevelopment proj-
ects will have to meet the basic urban design
guidelines in this plan, as well as making the
area eligible for other action by the SRA that
could advance implementation of the plan.
Expanding boundaries to cover all of Metro
Center, as well as the South End, should also
be considered.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
Mayor; OPED; Planning Board; City Council; SRA;
DevelopSpringfield; neighborhood associations;
property and business owners.
Resource Needs
Staff time.
Action Steps
Enact the proposed zoning. Explore, review and
enact adjustments to better reflect the plan.
Explore options for enhancing East Columbus
Avenue gateway frontage. Expand the Urban
Renewal Districts.
Precedents
Cities such as Haverhill and Brockton have
found that overlay districts have helped them in
enhancing the urban environment and attracting
investment.
Priority
Very High. The regulatory framework must be
established quickly to clearly communicate
desired urban design standards to private parties
rebuilding after the tornado and for future
projects.
HISTORIC PRESERVATION AND URBAN CHARACTER STRATEGY
Make zoning and urban renewal districts
consistent with the rebuilding plan.
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An Initiative of Develop Springfield and
the Springfield Redevelopment Authority
DISTRICT 1
METRO CENTER + SOUTH END
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.05
Miles
[ Data Source: City of Springfield
Zoning
Vacant Parcels
Undesignated
Business A
Business B
Business C
Commercial A
Commercial P
Office A
Industrial A
Residence A
Residence B
Residence C
Residence C-2
Conn Riverfront
West Columbus
An Initiative of Develop Springfield and
the Springfield Redevelopment Authority
DISTRICT 1
METRO CENTER + SOUTH END
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.05
Miles
[ Data Source: City of Springfield
Zoning
Vacant Parcels
Undesignated
Business A
Business B
Business C
Commercial A
Commercial P
Office A
Industrial A
Residence A
Residence B
Residence C
Residence C-2
Conn Riverfront
West Columbus
An Initiative of Develop Springfield and
the Springfield Redevelopment Authority
DISTRICT 1
METRO CENTER + SOUTH END
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.05
Miles
[ Data Source: City of Springfield
Zoning
Vacant Parcels
Undesignated
Business A
Business B
Business C
Commercial A
Commercial P
Office A
Industrial A
Residence A
Residence B
Residence C
Residence C-2
Conn Riverfront
West Columbus
An Initiative of Develop Springfield and
the Springfield Redevelopment Authority
DISTRICT 1
METRO CENTER + SOUTH END
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.05
Miles
[ Data Source: City of Springfield
Zoning
Vacant Parcels
Undesignated
Business A
Business B
Business C
Commercial A
Commercial P
Office A
Industrial A
Residence A
Residence B
Residence C
Residence C-2
Conn Riverfront
West Columbus
ZONING
Source: City of Springfield
N
HISTORIC PRESERVATION AND URBAN CHARACTER STRATEGY
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Activate and program public spaces to create destinations, mobilize community
partners for stewardship, and connect important public spaces.
Major Move
F. Public Spaces Strategy
Successful public spaces are lively, secure
and distinctive places because they offer
many things to do and reasons for people
to use them in different ways. It is also
important to plan for different audiences, so
that groups can come together and overlap
in enjoyable, sociable ways.
START WITH A PROGRAM OF ACTIVITIES
AND USES. To create great pl aces,
understand the activities that are going to
occur in these spaces. Design and manage
the spaces to support these activities. Create
destinations and triangulate. Every great
destination, district or downtown needs
at least ten great places to create a critical
mass where visitors and residents alike
can become immersed for hours, or even
days—the power of ten. Triangulation is
the concept of clustering activities together
to create a busy, dynamic place for many
different types of people at different times
of day.
SUSTAIN EXCELLENCE BY PROVIDING
VIGOROUS MANAGEMENT. Great places
rely on skillful, ongoing management:
staging programs and events (festivals,
performances and markets) in key spaces;
partnership and coordination among the
civic and cultural institutions, and the
public spaces; and design for effective
management strategies.
LIGHTER-QUICKER-CHEAPER. Test ideas
and phase implementation over time to
conserve resources and see what works
through “tactical urbanism.”
MAINTAIN, ACTIVATE AND PROGRAM
EXISTING OPEN SPACE FOR MULTIPLE
USES RESPONSIVE TO NEIGHBORHOOD
AND/OR VISITOR NEEDS. There is currently
too much unprogrammed open space,
so any additional open space must be
strategically located and programmed:
• Identify use and programming first.
• Identify size and scale to support use.
• Design for visibility and security.
• Make it easy to manage and maintain.
Key initiatives for
activation and
programming
• Activate public spaces with programming
to attract people to District One.
• Activate underutilized private spaces with
temporary uses, programs and events that
enliven the public realm.
Key initiatives for parks
• Create programming and stewardship
activities for the newly redesigned and
redeveloped Emerson Wight Park.
D I S T R I C T O N E : M E T R O C E N T E R A N D S O U T H E N D
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INITIATIVE
Examples of potential programming for
public spaces include:
• Improvement in the image of downtown
and the South End wi th ef f ecti ve
wayfinding and branding signage. The
significant presence of world renowned
arts and cultural institutions is not
well-communicated in Metro Center.
Branding arts, culture and entertainment
districts, and implementing effective
signage and wayfinding also would
reduce the fears among suburban-
dwelling audiences of getting lost in the
downtown.
• Events with night lighting for historic
and architecturally significant buildings,
spaces, and streetscapes to create
i nt er est i n and appr eci at i on f or
Springfield’s urban and historic fabric.
• Li nk i ng of ar t s , c ul t ur e, and
entertainment districts with public art,
heritage trails, or special landscaping, for
example a Quadrangle District pocket
Acti vate publ i c spaces wi th
programming to attract people
to District One
PUBLIC SPACES STRATEGY
park gateway in Merritt Park (State and
Liberty).
• Creation of mini-destinations at transit
stops by working with the PVTA to install
enhancements at key locations where
people congregate for transit.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
BID; museums, library or other established
cul tural i nsti tuti ons; col l eges; merchants’
associations; PVTA.
Resource Needs
Staff time; coordination with property owners,
artists, micro-entrepreneurs, students; grants
or seed money for organization; marketing
resources.
Resource Opportunities
Springfield Museums or Library; corporate
sponsors. Consult with “Light Boston” and seek
support from Northeast Utilities.
Action Steps
Meet with cultural groups and potential sponsors
as well as similar groups elsewhere. Program a
series of monthly events for at least six months
to start. Invest in marketing the program.
Monitor and evaluate the program and make any
necessary adjustments.
Precedents
“Light Boston,” a nonprofit that promotes, plans
and implements lighting of significant buildings,
monuments and public realm with the idea
of creating a “Diamond Necklace,” including
temporary events. Foundation and private sector
grants are the major source of funding. New
Jersey Performing Art Center successful signage
and wayfinding initiative to encourage suburban
audiences to attend performances in downtown
Newark.
Priority
High
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Working with a group of cultural and civic
leaders from the City of Springfield, PPS
developed a proposed program and layout
of activities, uses, and amenities that would
serve to activate Court Square on a daily and
a seasonal basis. Court Square was selected
as the pilot placemaking site because of its
location downtown, its proximity to major
historical and cultural institutions, for its
historical significance as a central civic
square, and its role as the southern gateway
to downtown.
Daily/ongoing activities would be regularly
scheduled events, permanent amenities,
and facilities that would make Court Square
a comfortable place that people would
want to use, visit, or walk through every
day. These could include a Farmers’ Market,
table and lawn games, an information kiosk
and event signage, food trucks and outdoor
dining spaces, moveable chairs, a children’s
play area, and spaces for small concerts,
public readings and similar performances.
In the winter, activities and events would
attract people to the Square in the colder
Example: Activating Court Square in Four
Seasons
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City Hall
MassMutual
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Old First
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One Financial Plaza
Sovereign
Bank Building
The Hampden
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MassMutual MassMutual MassMutual MassMutual MassMutual
Center Center Center
Food trucks,
sidewalk extension
with outdoor seating
Gazebo, public reading,
small concerts
Chess area
Yoga
Lawn games
Lawn games
Table games
Farmers market
Kids play area
Movable chairs,
seating area
Café /w outdoor seating
Carrousel / Public Art
Kiosk, newsstand
Daily Use Diagram
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Springfield
City Hall
Springfield
Symphony Hall
MassMutual
Center
Old First
Church
Hampden County
Courthouse
One Financial Plaza
Sovereign
Bank Building
The Hampden
County Hall
of Justice
Food trucks,
sidewalk extension
with outdoor seating
Gazebo, public reading,
small concerts
Chess area
Yoga
Lawn games
Lawn games
Table games
Farmers market
Kids play area
Movable chairs,
seating area
Café /w outdoor seating
Carrousel / Public Art
Kiosk, newsstand
Draft for review only 12/14/2011
PUBLIC SPACES STRATEGY
Proposed daily use program for Court Square.
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weather, with a focus on planning events
and attractions that would be in place
before, during and after the holidays. In
summer, Court Square would be an ancillary,
alternate and satellite location where smaller
scale events that complement larger events
taking place throughout the summer all
around the city could have a downtown
venue. For example, were the Hoop City
Jazz Festival to relocate to STCC, a smaller
event, smaller jazz ensembles and youth jazz
orchestras could perform during the same
time period in Court Square. More potential
activities and programs, as well as proposed
physical layouts on Court Square, can be
found in the Appendix.
Court Square could be programmed with different
activities that vary season to season and throughout
the day.
Four-season activity is important. (Image source:
http://media.masslive.com/republican/photo/9781245-
large.jpg)
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
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INITIATIVE
Empty storefronts or boarded-up buildings
cast a pall on sidewalks, plazas and other
public spaces, detract from the pedestrian
environment, and do nothing to attract
activity or visitors. Many communities have
developed programs to activate these
spaces temporarily while permanent uses are
being sought.
Examples include vacant storefront art and
culture exhibitions and performances and
temporary uses at very low rents in vacant
buildings for micro-entrepreneurs.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
BID; Creative Springfield (artist group); museums,
library or other established cultural institutions;
Springfield Cultural Council; colleges; business
associations.
Resource Needs
Coordination with property owners, artists,
micro-entrepreneurs, students; grants or seed
money for organization.
Activate underutilized private spaces
with temporary uses, programs and
events that enliven the public realm.
Physical Educational Organizational Cultural Economic Social
PUBLIC SPACES STRATEGY
Resource Opportunities
Springfield Cultural Council grants; Springfield
Museums or Library; corporate sponsors.
Action Steps
Consult with the founders of the Pittsfield
Storefront Artist Project; identify an artist
organization to take the lead to work with the
BID. Decide on locations. Schedule to coincide
with other activities such as festivals in District
One. Invest in marketing.
Precedents
Pittsfield Storefront Artist Project; Somerville
Cultural Council.
Priority
Medium
Over ten years, the Storefront Artist Project in
Pittsfield helped spark the cultural revitalization of
the city’s downtown. (Image source: http://www.
storefrontartists.org)
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INITIATIVE
I n order to f ul f i l l i ts potenti al as a
neighborhood resource, neighborhood
residents and institutions need to feel
responsible for the success of Emerson
Wight Park. The park design includes
passive and active recreation opportunities
for people of all ages. Establishing a sense
of security from the beginning will be very
important, especially strategies for night
security. Programming through the Parks
and Recreation Department by community
institutions, such as the Middle School,
Square One and the Community Center,
and by civic groups should be encouraged.
Stewardship activities, such as park clean
up days, should be organized to include
Create programming and stewardship
activities for the newly redesigned and
redeveloped Emerson Wight Park and
for Riverfront Park.
all segments of the community. Ideally, a
Springfield business should be recruited to
“adopt” the park.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
Parks and Recreation Department; neighborhood
organizations; SECC; Square One; Middle
School; rental management; CNI Advisory Group.
Resource Needs
Support for programming, maintenance and
security.
Resource Opportunities
Create an “adopt a park” program that recruits
businesses as well as neighborhood groups.
Program classes, walking clubs, and so on to
involve residents. Corporate and foundation
donations.
Precedents
YMCA youth group adoption of a park on Lower
Liberty Heights.
Priority
High. The performance of the park in the first
year after it reopens will set expectations and
standards. If it is seen as consistently safe,
clean, and open to all ages and segments of
the community, the park will become a strong
community asset.
The Emerson Wight Park Improvement plan is currently under construction.
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INITIATIVE
The highway and rail barriers to the river
obscure one of Spri ngfi el d’s greatest
potential assets. In order to attract more
people to the park, the City and Parks
Department with other partners should:
• Manage trees to provide selected views to
the river
• Support expansion of the bike trail
• Bring people to the water by making
access streets and underpasses
pedestrian-friendly
• Program events, activities, and exhibitions
on the water
Partnerships / Stakeholders
Parks and Recreation Department; Springfield
Riverfront Development Corp.; Friends of the
Connecticut River Walk; South End Citizens
Council; PVPC.
Resource Needs and Opportunities
Funding for view maintenance. Organizations to
help program events.
Priority
Medium
Make the ri ver and Ri verf ront
Park more visible and attractive to
residents and visitors.
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PUBLIC SPACES STRATEGY
(Image source: http://www.ctriver.org)
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IX. The Framework for Specific Sites
Certain sites in the South End and Metro
Center are of special importance for the
city’s rebuilding and revitalization plan
because they have hi stori c character,
prominent locations, or are publicly-owned:
• The Gemini Site on Central Street
• Main Street sites in the South End,
especially those at or near the intersection
of Main Street and Union Street
• The Armory and the old Zanetti School,
both on Howard Street
• 13-31 Elm Street on Court Square
• The Maple Street Apartments public
housing development in the South End
• The Civic Center garage
As noted in the economic development
section, incentives for rehabilitation or
redevelopment of the City-owned sites,
such as site preparation, proper zoning, tax
increment financing, government offices as
tenants, or other benefits, can help attract
developers, as can an updated market
analysis for Metro Center and the South End.
An Initiative of Develop Springfield and
the Springfield Redevelopment Authority
DISTRICT 1
METRO CENTER + SOUTH END
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.05
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Data Source: City of Springfield
Study Area
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KEY DEVELOPMENT
SITES
Sites for Further Study
Publicly-owned
Publicly-owned
Privately-owned
Development opportunity sites
1. Gemini and
Morris Street
sites
2. Main Street
sites
3. Howard Street
Amory and
Zanetti School
4. 13–31 Elm
Street
5. Marble Street
Apartments
and Civic
Center
Garage
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R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
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This two-acre city-owned site, prominently
l ocated on Central Street, has been
remediated for soil contamination and
greened but remaining foundation and
demol i ti on rubbl e needs f urther si te
preparation. It is suitable for variety of
uses—institutional, housing, office, and
open space. The preferred redevelopment
would be compatible with preserving some
of the site as green open space to serve
the neighborhood with passive or active
recreation or community gardens. The
South End Revitalization Coalition expects to
provide the community perspective on the
reuse of this site and the site’s role will also
be discussed as part of the Transformation
Plan to be created through the Choice
Neighborhoods Initiative planning process.
The South End Community Center has
expressed interest in the possibility of
rebuilding on this site. Additional adjacent
vacant space across Morris Street could
also become part of the SECC program for
parking or other uses not suitable for the
Central Street frontage. This site is within
easy walking distance to Emerson Wight
Park, particularly if the proposed extension
of Richelieu Street to Maple Street comes to
pass as part of the Choice Neighborhoods
Initiative. Moreover, the
location on Central Street
provides excellent access
from both the South End and
Six Corners neighborhoods.
Following the model at the
Howard Street Armory, the
preference of the SECC is for
the City to retain ownership of
the land and a building to be
constructed, with the SECC
leasing the property for its
activities.
INITIATIVE
Incorporate the Gemini site in the rebuilding
process, potentially by assisting the SECC in
rebuilding and fundraising for a new facility.
Guidelines for a new use on the Gemini site
should include:
• Building(s) and green space should occupy the
frontage on Central Street. Parking should
preferably be to the rear or on Morris Street with safe
and well-lit connections to the parking area.
• The building and site should be designed to enhance
the pedestrian experience along Central Street.
Partnerships/Stakeholders
DevelopSpringfield; SRA; City of Springfield; South
End Revitalization Coalition; SECC; CNI Advisory
Group.
Resource Needs and Opportunities
Land for building, parking, and green space
activities; construction funding. See financing
discussions in this District Plan and in the Citywide
Plan.
Action steps
Work with stakeholders to assign a rebuilding use
to the Gemini site and associated Morris Street
lots. Give high consideration to use by the SECC.
Priority
High
Gemini
FRAMEWORK FOR SPECIFIC SITES
An Initiative of Develop Springfield and
the Springfield Redevelopment Authority
DISTRICT 1
METRO CENTER + SOUTH END
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As the urban spine of the South End, Main
Street must be a primary focus of rebuilding
and revitalization activities. The loss of
historic buildings to the tornado at the
critical Main and Union Street intersection
area, including 979 Main Street, was a
significant blow for the South End, where
they provided a strong welcoming presence.
However, a number of retai l ers have
repaired their buildings and returned to
Main Street, and new investments by Caring
Health and replacement of Square One
along Main Street will also add vitality and
Main Street Sites
An Initiative of Develop Springfield and
the Springfield Redevelopment Authority
DISTRICT 1
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customers during the day. Guidelines for
redevelopment of Main Street sites include
the following:
MAIN AND UNION INTERSECTION
As a South End gateway and important
center of activity, the intersection needs to
have buildings with presence that enhance
the public realm. Building facades on all
street frontages should be at least two
stories tall and built to the sidewalk, unless
a setback to provide for outdoor seating
is part of the design. Corner locations
should be occupied by the building rather
than setbacks, plazas, or parking. Any
on-site parking should be to the rear and
opportunities for shared parking should be
explored.
ALL MAIN STREET SITES
Al l Mai n Street bui l di ngs shoul d be
desi gned to enhance the pedestri an
experience along the street. Buildings
should preferably have active ground floor
uses with windows making the interior
visible. If it is absolutely necessary to limit
t r ans par enc y on t he
ground floor, there should
be no bl ank wal l s and
ar chi t ect ur al f eat ur es,
ar t wor k, l i ght i ng, or
significant plantings should
be part of the desi gn
along the street in order
This building in Greenville (SC) holds the corner, and fits
into the area’s architectural context.
Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
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FRAMEWORK FOR SPECIFIC SITES
to provide interest to pedestrians. Visible
parking and curb cuts should be minimized
and shared parking options should be
explored.
INITIATIVE
Assist Main Street property owners in
rebuilding and rehabilitation to enhance the
urban and pedestrian-friendly character of
Main Street.
Partnerships/Stakeholders
DevelopSpringfield; SRA; OPED; property and
business owners.
Resource Needs
Design and construction funding.
Resource Opportunities
See financing discussions in this District Plan and
in the Citywide Plan.
Action step
Work with property and business owners to
accelerate rebuilding at key locations, such as
Main and Union; provide incentives if needed
for timely rebuilding; promote adherence to
pedestrian-friendly design guidelines.
Priority
High
The eastern side of the Main and Union intersection was devastated by the tornado.
D I S T R I C T O N E : M E T R O C E N T E R A N D S O U T H E N D
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The Howard Street Armory and the old
Zanetti School are both owned by the
city. Both are important historic buildings
in the South End, particularly given the
scale of demolition that has already taken
place in the blocks west of Main Street
between State and Union Streets. Both
were substantially damaged in the tornado.
Acquisition by the city of the parking lot
located between the two buildings could
be beneficial in marketing these sites. As
noted earlier, Springfield Housing Authority
administrative staff could be located in office
space in one of those buildings.
Because historic urban character is one of
Springfield’s competitive advantages, every
effort should be made to find adaptive
reuse options for these buildings. They
are located in the transition area between
downt own- scal e bui l di ngs and t he
neighborhood-scale character of the South
End and would be suitable for offices or
housing.
INITIATIVE
Issue a Request for Proposals consistent
with the City’s goals for these buildings
that of f ers one or both
properties, as well as the
parking lot in between, if
possible. A market analysis
and physical analysis of these
buildings would help guide
the approach to writing the
RFP. The RFP should include
a preference for adaptive
reuse and design principles
appropriate to these sites,
as well as any incentives,
financial or procedural, that the City can
make available.
Partnerships/Stakeholders
DevelopSpringfield; SRA; OPED; South End
Revitalization Coalition; CNI Advisory Group.
Resource Needs and Opportunities
Funding for market and physical analyses;
rehabilitation and redevelopment funding;
i ncenti ve fi nanci ng; state funding may be
available for pre-development activities and gap
financing.
Action steps
I dent i f y pr e- dev el opment ac t i ons or
commitments that the City can make; pursue
financing for pre-development activities. Develop
clear reuse and design goals. Write and issue the
RFP.
Priority
High
The Armory and the Zanetti School
An Initiative of Develop Springfield and
the Springfield Redevelopment Authority
DISTRICT 1
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R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
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T h e A r m o r y
building
Historic buildings with prominent architectural features can attract
owners or tenants who want to be distinctive.
The Zanetti School
FRAMEWORK FOR SPECIFIC SITES
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13–31 Elm Street is a critical property for downtown revitalization.
The historic, SRA-owned building at 13-31
Elm Street is recognized by all as critical
to enhancing Metro Center and the Court
Square area as a downtown gateway and
symbol of Springfield’s city identity. Mixed-
use rehabilitation of this building, with
restaurants or cafes among the active uses
on the ground floor, has the potential to
revive Court Square as a vibrant urban park
and public place. Visible from the windows
of the MassMutual Center, it could bring
convention-goers out into the street for
activities and to patronize businesses. A
developer has been designated for this
building who is planning office uses for the
upper floors and restaurants for the ground
floor. It is one of the local projects to receive
funding for engineering and architectural
desi gn through the f ederal l y-f unded
Knowledge Corridor regional sustainable
development planning project.
INITIATIVE
Continue to work with the designated
developer, Knowledge Corridor funders, and
business owners to encourage progress on
this important project.
Partnerships/Stakeholders
SRA; DevelopSpringfield; OPED; developer;
Knowledge Corridor Plan.
Resource Needs and Opportunities
Rehabilitation funding; see financing discussions
in this District Plan and in the Citywide Plan.
Action steps
Support timely progress for redevelopment.
Priority
High
13–31 Elm Street at Court Square
An Initiative of Develop Springfield and
the Springfield Redevelopment Authority
DISTRICT 1
METRO CENTER + SOUTH END
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R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
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There are a number of sites in Metro Center
and the South End that merit further study
for revitalization. Two of the most important
are the Marbl e Street Apartments, an
approximately two-acre site in the South
End, and the ci ty-owned Ci vi c Center
Garage behind the MassMutual Center.
INITIATIVE
SUPPORT STUDY OF REDEVELOPMENT
OPTI ONS FOR THE MARBLE STREET
APARTMENTS.
One of the focus areas for the Choice
Neighborhood Initiative planning project
is the Marble Street Apartments owned
and operated by the Springfield Housing
Authority. The CNI process will study a
variety of options, including the replacement
of this development with new scattered site
or mixed income housing. Should this site
become available for redevelopment, it
would be suitable for housing compatible
in density and character with other housing
on Marbl e Street, or f or compati bl e
development connected to park activities.
The proposed extension of Richelieu Street
from Central Street would also become
possible, which would improve connectivity
in the interior streets of the South End.
Partnerships/Stakeholders
City of Springfield Housing Department; OPED;
Spri ngfi el d Housi ng Authori ty; South End
Revitalization Coalition; CNI Advisory Group;
DevelopSpringfield; SRA.
Resource Needs and Opportunities
CNI funding available for plan; pursue a CNI
i mpl ementati on grant for i mpl ementati on
actions.
Action steps
Create the CNI Transformation Plan.
Priority
High
Sites for Further Study
An Initiative of Develop Springfield and
the Springfield Redevelopment Authority
DISTRICT 1
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Marble Street Apartments
Physical Educational Organizational Cultural Economic Social
FRAMEWORK FOR SPECIFIC SITES
Mixed-income housing developments that preserve
population diversity and contribute to the character of
the neighborhood.
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D I S T R I C T O N E : M E T R O C E N T E R A N D S O U T H E N D
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Civic Center Garage
The Civic Center Garage could be replaced with a more attractive
parking structure with active uses along the ground floor to add street life
and visual appeal to this critical corner of Metro Center (image source:
Sitephocus).
Physical Educational Organizational Cultural Economic Social
FRAMEWORK FOR SPECIFIC SITES
INITIATIVE
PURSUE EFFECTIVE MANAGEMENT OF THE
EXISTING OR NEW USE FOR CIVIC CENTER
GARAGE.
The Civic Center Garage, with about 1,200
parking spaces, was built in 1971 and has
fulfilled its anticipated useful life. A 2008
study estimated that nearly $4 million in
capital repairs are needed. The garage
is the most frequented in the city, but the
Springfield Parking Authority’s efforts to sell
the garage in late 2010 were not successful.
Improvements to the garage or a successor
building should be part of a plan to improve
the design character of Dwight Street an
connections between Museum Quadrangle,
Pynchon Park, an Main Street connections.
Partnerships/Stakeholders
S p r i n g f i e l d P a r k i n g A u t h o r i t y ;
DevelopSpringfield; SRA; OPED; developer.
Resource Needs and Opportunities
Rehabilitation funding; see financing discussions
in this District Plan and in the Citywide Plan.
Action steps
Support timely progress for redevelopment.
Priority
High
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X. Rebuild Better
The 2011 tornado was a tragic shock for
Springfield, but the rebuilding process
offers the city’s leaders, residents and
businesses an opportunity to accelerate
downtown and neighborhood revitalization.
In District One, where the South End took
the brunt of destruction from the tornado,
a ser i es of economi c devel opment ,
business improvement, and neighborhood
revi tal i zati on pl ans have been i n the
process of implementation over the last
decade. The most recent successful result
of efforts to bring new resources for city
revitalization is the award of federal funding
under the Choice Neighborhoods Initiative
for a comprehensive planning approach
to People, Housing and Neighborhood in
the South End—one of only 13 such grant
awards nationwide in 2011.
A fundamental goal of this and previous
plans for Springfield is to make the City,
once again, the urban and economic heart
of the Pioneer Valley. Metro Center, with its
historic buildings, cultural and entertainment
assets, and empl oyment centers, wi l l
recapture its role as the downtown of the
region. The South End is an extension of
downtown, and enhancement of its urban
character as a walkable neighborhood
supports the overal l goal of maki ng
Springfield a community of choice for urban
living. Both of these neighborhoods provide
the best opportunities for connecting the
city to the Connecticut River waterfront
across highway and railroad barriers.
I n pur sui ng i mpl ement at i on of t hi s
rebuilding plan, it will be important to
build on previous accomplishments and
establish the organizational capacity to
bring stakeholders together and to pursue
innovative and unconventional funding
sources. The CNI planning process in the
South End offers a tremendous opportunity
to reinforce the recommendations of this
plan and to build broader organizational
and i mpl ementati on capaci ty on the
neighborhood level so that the full range
of neighborhood stakeholders can work
together for positive change. Early action
items that will set the stage for future
success include:
• Organizing working groups to implement
different aspects of the plan.
• Hiring of a permanent executive director
for DevelopSpringfield, so it can be a
strong partner in Rebuild Springfield.
• Focused efforts to secure funds and
financing for rebuilding initiatives.
• Working with the CNI process to broaden
community participation in rebuilding and
revitalization across the board.
• Re-establishment of community-based
anti-crime initiatives.
• Programming of events through the spring
and summer to activate Court Square and
draw people downtown.
D I S T R I C T O N E : M E T R O C E N T E R A N D S O U T H E N D
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R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
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Appendix
D I S T R I C T O N E : M E T R O C E N T E R A N D S O U T H E N D
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Many of the recommendations identified in previous plans have been completed, are ongoing efforts or partially complete, or are currently
underway. Other recommendations have been addressed through an alternative strategy, are no longer favored, or have yet to begin. A
summary of implementation progress is provided below.
1. Metro Center and South End - Previous Plans Implementation
Progress
South End Complete Ongoing Underway
Issue South End Urban Renewal Plan Amendment #8, for acquisition and demolition of 9 properties on Marble
Street; relocation of residents

Expand the Basketball Hall of Fame into a sports oriented destination center

Clear and remediate the Gemini Site.

Improve the Union Street and Broad Street connections under I-91 and across East and West Columbus Avenue;
provide underpass improvements such as lighting and art installations—signage and pedestrian improvements have
been made, some art installed.

Enhance Main Street to retain and attract retail; provide streetscape and public realm improvements—Main Street
streetscape improvement project complete

Marble Street Apartments public housing—long-term effort to secure funding underway

Improve housing in the Hollywood area; Rehab Concord Heights and Outing Park Apartments I and II

Expand and improve Emerson Wight Park

Improve Dwight Street Extension

Embark on a community master planning effort to assess the physical environment and recommend changes that
will promote safety, connectivity, and business, and residential diversity

R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
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In addition, the Hartford-Springfield area, under the leadership of Hartford’s Capitol Region Council of Governments, has secured a
Sustainable Communities Regional Planning Grant from HUD, which is known as the Knowledge Corridor. Included as one of the place-
based activities in this plan is funding for engineering design and architectural drawings intended to lead to renovation and rehabilitation of
13-31 Elm Street into a mixed-use building.
Metro Center Complete Ongoing Underway
Renovate and expand the Civic Center to establish MassMutual Center

Improve streetscapes along Main Street; strengthen Main Street’s character as a prime commercial and pedestrian
corridor

Advance adaptive reuse of the Main Street Federal Building

Improve pedestrian connections and streetscapes along State Street

Create a continuous recreational area along the Riverfront from the Basketball Hall of Fame to the Memorial Bridge

Demolish the York Street Jail

UMass Design Center now located on Court Square and Cambridge College has located in Tower Square

Provide underpass improvements such as lighting and art installations—signage and pedestrian improvements have
been made, some art installed

Activate the Riverfront with performances and events

Pursue downtown locations for future expansion of STCC, UMass, or other colleges

Develop a telecommunications strategic marketing effort to recruit and nurture telecom-based entrepreneurs, and
attract companies to Springfield -State Data Center located in Metro Center

Upgrade industrial areas

Support regional efforts around the Knowledge Corridor and High-Speed Rail

Redevelop Union Station as multi-modal center

Establish community boating at the Riverfront

Redevelop 13-31 Elm Street

Initiate design review as part of the construction permitting process - new site review process established

Advance redevelopment of the School Department Building

Create small neighborhood parks in the Metro Center including small neighborhood parks anticipated in Morgan Square

Acquire and redevelop 1592 Main Street, the former Asylum night club

Advance State Street redevelopment projects - market analysis for grocery store adjacent to Metro Center; Holiday
Inn Express completed

D I S T R I C T O N E : M E T R O C E N T E R A N D S O U T H E N D
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1. Joan Kagan, Square One
2. Ann Awad, Caring Health
3. Joe Gallo, South End Community Center
4. Patrice Swann, South End Community Center
5. Rita Coppola, Springfield Capital Asset Management
6. Paul Picknally, Monarch Enterprises
7. Evan Plotkin, NAI Plotkin
8. Don Courtemanche, BID
9. Tim Allen, South End Middle School
10. Gordon Pulsifer, 1st Resources
11. William Abrashkin, Springfield Housing Authority
12. Sean Cahillane, Springfield Housing Authority
13. Leo Florian, South End Citizens Council
14. Angie Florian, South End Citizens Council
15. John Delaney, Springfield Police
16. Mike Parsons, Northern Heights
17. Carol Costa, Classical Condos
18. Carmine Capua, Mt. Carmel Society
19. Mary Kay Wydra, Convention & Visitors Bureau
20. Paul Stegler, Appleton Corporation
21. Robert Louder, Armory-Quadrangle Civic Association
22. Pat Leary, Chamber of Commerce
23. Demetrios Panteleakis, Opal Real Estate
24. Magdalena Gomez, Teatro V!da
25. Jo Anne Shatkin, CLF Ventures
26. Allen Blair, Economic Development Council, Western Mass
27. Rich Allen, Springfield Board of Assessors
28. David Cruise, Regional Employment Board
29. Fred Christensen, Tower Square
30. John Waite, Franklin County CDC
31. Mike Crowley, Springfield Riverfront Development Corporation
32. Tony Calabrese, AC Produce
33. Sheila McElwaine, Friends of the Connecticut River Walk
34. Frank Sleegers, UMass Design Center
35. Phil Burdick, Landscape Architect
36. Elizabeth Thompson, UMass
37. Linda Williams, Mental Health Association
38. Peter and Madeline Zorzi
39. John Doleva, Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame
2. List of District One Interviewees
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
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Findings
An analysis of household incomes within the South End study area found that over 80 percent of all households earn less than 80 percent
AMI (area median income for the Springfield metro region) as determined by HUD. More specifically, 55 percent of households earn below
30 percent AMI, which HUD categorizes as “Extremely Low”; 18 percent earn between 30 and 50 percent of AMI (“Very Low”) and 8 percent
between 50 and 80 percent (“Low”).
Source: ACS 2005-2009 Estimates
Average household size in the area is 2.27, therefore, analysis is based on HUD 2 Person household income limits.
*Due to data breakdowns provided by the ACS, for purposes of analysis, “Extremely Low” includes all HHs earning under $20,000 (HUD criteria is under $19,750)
**Due to data breakdowns provided by the ACS, for purposes of analysis, “Very Low” includes all HHs earning under $35,000 (HUD criteria is under $32,850)
***Due to data breakdowns provided by the ACS, for purposes of analysis, “Low” includes all HHs earning under $50,000 (HUD criteria is under $51,400)
3. South End Household Income Analysis
South End Neighborhood Incomes
Total Households by Income
Census (ACS Estimate) Percent
Total Households 1,949 100%
Extremely Low (30% AMI - below $20K)* 1,071 55.0%
Very Low (50% AMI - $20-$35K)** 355 18.2%
Low (80% AMI or $35-$50K)*** 155 8.0%
Total Households Below 80% AMI 1581 81.1%
Market Rate (Above 80% AMI - above $50K) 368 18.9%
D I S T R I C T O N E : M E T R O C E N T E R A N D S O U T H E N D
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Assumptions
The above analysis is based on FY 2011 HUD Income Limits for the Springfield, MA MSA. Income limits used in the analysis reflect HUD’s
2-person household figures, which correspond most closely to the area’s average household size of 2.27. (Income breakdowns by more
detailed household sizes are not available.)
American Community Survey 2005-2009 household income data was compiled for the five South End study area block groups (8020.001,
8020.002, 8020.003, 8011.021 and 8011.022) to arrive at the income level percentages. Because data breakdowns provided by the ACS are
provided in predetermined increments, for purposes of analysis, “Extremely Low” includes all HHs earning under $20,000 (HUD criteria
is under $19,750); “Very Low” includes all HHs earning under $35,000 (HUD criteria is under $32,850); and “Low” includes all HHs earning
between $35,001 and $50,000. (HUD criteria is under $51,400)
Even when the 513 existing below market rate units within the South End study area are removed from the data, nearly 75 percent of
households still earn below 80% AMI. More specifically, 42 percent of households would be categorized as “Extremely Low”, 22 percent
“Very Low”; and 11 percent “Low”.
Source: ACS 2005-2009 Estimates
Average household size in the area is 2.27, therefore, analysis is based on HUD 2 Person household income limits.
*Due to data breakdowns provided by the ACS, for purposes of analysis, “Extremely Low” includes all HHs earning under $20,000 (HUD criteria is under $19,750)
**Due to data breakdowns provided by the ACS, for purposes of analysis, “Very Low” includes all HHs earning under $35,000 (HUD criteria is under $32,850)
***Due to data breakdowns provided by the ACS, for purposes of analysis, “Low” includes all HHs earning under $50,000 (HUD criteria is under $51,400)
South End Neighborhood Incomes
Total Households by Income (not including
assisted/below-market housing)
Census (ACS Estimate) Percent
Total Households 1,436 100%
Extremely Low (30% AMI - below $20K)* 600 41.8%
Very Low (50% AMI - $20-$35K)** 313 21.8%
Low (80% AMI or $35-$50K)*** 155 10.8%
Total Households Below 80% AMI 1,068 74.4%
Market Rate (Above 80% AMI - above $50K) 368 25.6%
FY 2011 Income Limit Category 2-Person Household
Extremely Low (30% AMI) Income Limits $19,750
Very Low (50% AMI) Income Limits $32,850
Low (80% AMI) Income Limits $51,400
Median Income $69,300
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
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Working with a group of cultural and civic leaders from the City of
Springfield, PPS has developed a program and layout of activities,
uses, and amenities that would serve to activate Court Square on
a daily as well as seasonal basis. Court Square was selected as
the pilot Placemaking site because of its location downtown, its
proximity to major historical and cultural institutions, for its historical
significance, and the fact that this space is the closest thing
Springfield has to a vital Central Civic Square.
WINTER PROGRAM
As a winter city, we began focusing on activities and events that
would attract people to the Square in the colder weather, with
a focus of planning events and attractions that would be in place
before, during and after the holidays.
ELM STREET SIDE
• Holiday Market/ Crafts and Gifts
• Tables and Chairs around a fire pit
• Temporary Ice Skating rink and skate rental
• Vendors selling hot chocolate and beverages
MAIN STREET SIDE
• Installation of two PVTA historic trolleys; one would serve as the
Event office
• Information kiosk/newsstand
• Event signage
COURT STREET SIDE
• Temporary/portable Stage set up on the steps of Symphony Hall
• Holiday tree/Decorations
4. Activation Program for Court Square—Springfield, MA
Submitted by PPS
COURT SQUARE AVENUE
• Holiday Market/ Crafts and Gifts
• Temporary/portable Screen
• Holiday tree/Decorations/Nativity Scene
CENTER AREA
• Holiday Food Market with prepared foods, fresh foods, carry out
• Tables and chairs/moveable seating
• Public art/Carousel
PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES
• Caroling
• Traditional African American carols by youth
• Emancipation Proclamation Event
• Tours on the Underground Railroad
• Old First Church organ recital
• Author/Poetry Reading
• Storytelling
• Winter Fashion Show - connect with Women’s History Month
events
• Community Theater Performances
• Quilting demonstrations
• Winter Market (clothing, crafts, gifts)/Cringle Market
• Art/Craft Table for kids
• Santa Arrival and Carriage Rides
• Antique Trolley rides
• Log carving
• Cross country skiing and Snowshoeing along the Riverfront
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Springfield
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Hampden County
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One Financial Plaza
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Center Center Center
Holiday market
Crafts and Gifts
Holiday food market
Crèche
Christmas Tree
Screen
Ice skates rental
Ice skating rink
Bus shelter
Hot chocolate
hot beverages
Holiday gift market
Tables and firepit
Stage, Christmas tree
Public Art / Carrousel
Kiosk, newsstand
Antique trolley
Winter event diagram
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City Hall
Springfield
Symphony Hall
MassMutual
Center
Old First
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Hampden County
Courthouse
One Financial Plaza
Sovereign
Bank Building
The Hampden
County Hall
of Justice
Food trucks,
sidewalk extension
with outdoor seating
Gazebo, public reading,
small concerts
Chess area
Yoga
Lawn games
Lawn games
Table games
Farmers market
Kids play area
Movable chairs,
seating area
Café /w outdoor seating
Carrousel / Public Art
Kiosk, newsstand
draft for revieW only 12/14/2011
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
98
SUMMER PROGRAM
The idea is to use Court Square as an ancillary, alternate and
satellite location where smaller scale events, that complement
larger events taking places throughout the summer all around the
city, could have a downtown venue. For example, were the Hoop
City Jazz Festival to relocate to STCC, a smaller event, smaller jazz
ensembles and youth jazz orchestras could perform during the same
time period in Court Square.
ELM STREET SIDE
• Food Market/ Crafts and Gifts area
MAIN STREET SIDE
• Information kiosk/newsstand
• Event signage
COURT STREET SIDE
• Temporary/portable Stage set up on the steps of Symphony Hall
• Food trucks at the corner of Main and Court with outdoor
seating
• Pop up café in the street (in an extended sidewalk area)
• Outdoor dining on the plaza of the Sovereign Bank Building
COURT SQUARE AVENUE
• Market Area
• Temporary/portable Screen
• Game Tables
CENTER AREA
• Food carts and food vendors
• Tables and chairs/moveable seating
• Children’s play area
• Public art/Carousel
• Pavilion for small concerts, author readings, etc.
PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES
• Spring Flower Market—Connect to Quadrangle Event -
• Arbor Day—Tree planting; kick off and end at Court Square
• Thai New Year—Songkran celebration
• Arbor Day—Tree planting; kick off
• Springfield’s 375th Chorus -
• Spinoff the Pancake Breakfast—evening event
• Earth Day
• Cinco de Mayo
• Ekphrasis Poetry (poetry inspired by other art)
• Bastille Day
• Hoop City jazz festival
• Ice Cream Festival
• Storm Stories Event - 1 Year Anniversary of the Tornado
• Spinoff Star Spangled Springfield— pre or post-event
• Frederick Douglas speech—should it be on July 4?
• Wild West Days
• “Maker Fair” with kids
• Harvest Festival
• Lead-up to VPC Spring/Summer Open Admission Show
• Closing Memorial Bridge for a Street Fair
• Outdoor movies
• Markets
• Poetry Slam/Continuous readings (Dr. Seuss collected works)
D I S T R I C T O N E : M E T R O C E N T E R A N D S O U T H E N D
99
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City Hall
Springfield
Symphony Hall
MassMutual
Center
Old First
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Hampden County
Courthouse
The Hampden
County Hall
of Justice
One Financial Plaza
Sovereign
Bank Building
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City Hall
Springfield Springfield Springfield Springfield Springfield
Symphony Hall Symphony Hall Symphony Hall Symphony Hall
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Center Center
Food trucks,
sidewalk extension
with outdoor seating
Pavilion, Public reading,
small concerts area
Chess area
Market area
Screen and Stage
Table games
Market area
Café, food carts
Kids play area
Movable chairs,
seating area
Café /w outdoor seating
Carrousel / Public Art
Kiosk, newsstand
Stage
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Springfield
City Hall
Springfield
Symphony Hall
MassMutual
Center
Old First
Church
Hampden County
Courthouse
One Financial Plaza
Sovereign
Bank Building
The Hampden
County Hall
of Justice
Food trucks,
sidewalk extension
with outdoor seating
Gazebo, public reading,
small concerts
Chess area
Yoga
Lawn games
Lawn games
Table games
Farmers market
Kids play area
Movable chairs,
seating area
Café /w outdoor seating
Carrousel / Public Art
Kiosk, newsstand
Summer event Diagram Draft for review only 12/14/2011
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
100
DAILY / ONGOING ACTIVITIES
These are suggestions for regularly scheduled events, permanent
amenities, and facilities that would make Court Square a
comfortable place that people would want to use, visit, or walk
through every day.
ELM STREET SIDE
• Farmers Market
• Yoga and exercise classes
• Table games (using UMASS space as the rental concession)
• Lawn Games
MAIN STREET SIDE
• Information kiosk/newsstand
• Event signage
COURT STREET SIDE
• Food trucks at the corner of Main and Court with outdoor
seating
• Pop up café in the street (in an extended sidewalk area)
• Outdoor dining on the plaza of the Sovereign Bank Building
COURT SQUARE AVENUE
• Game Tables
CENTER AREA
• Food carts and food vendors
• Tables and chairs/moveable seating
• Children’s play area
• Public art/Carousel
• Pavilion for small concerts, author readings, etc.
PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES
• Spring Flower Market—Connect to Quadrangle Event - Weekly/
Monthly
• Outdoor games:
Checkers/Backgammon - All day
Pingpong - All day
Boule/bocce - All day
Giant Chess - All day
Dominoes - All day
Horseshoes - All day
Foosball - All day
Yoga/exercise classes - Noontime
Battle of the Board Games - Annually
• Art in Vacant Storefronts - Ongoing
• Pre-events to MassMutual Center, Springfield Symphony,
CityStage, etc. early evening
• Concerts - noontime/lunchtime
• Markets - Weekly
• Noontime author readings - Noontime
• Tours of the Underground Railroad - Monthly
• Book Fairs/Book sales/Book giveaways - Weekly
• Vending Cars/Food Trucks and dining—chairs around the statue
& fountain - Daily
• Wifi - Year round
• State of the Art Transit amenities - Ongoing
• International Newsstand - Daily
• Wayfinding/directional signage/info kiosk
• Downtown BID
• Health Fairs
D I S T R I C T O N E : M E T R O C E N T E R A N D S O U T H E N D
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Hampden County
Courthouse
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Bank Building
The Hampden
County Hall
of Justice
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Center Center
Food trucks,
sidewalk extension
with outdoor seating
Gazebo, public reading,
small concerts
Chess area
Yoga
Lawn games
Lawn games
Table games
Farmers market
Kids play area
Movable chairs,
seating area
Café /w outdoor seating
Carrousel / Public Art
Kiosk, newsstand
Daily Use Diagram
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Springfield
City Hall
Springfield
Symphony Hall
MassMutual
Center
Old First
Church
Hampden County
Courthouse
One Financial Plaza
Sovereign
Bank Building
The Hampden
County Hall
of Justice
Food trucks,
sidewalk extension
with outdoor seating
Gazebo, public reading,
small concerts
Chess area
Yoga
Lawn games
Lawn games
Table games
Farmers market
Kids play area
Movable chairs,
seating area
Café /w outdoor seating
Carrousel / Public Art
Kiosk, newsstand
Draft for review only 12/14/2011
District 2
MAP L E HI GH- S I X COR NE R S ,
OL D HI L L , UP P E R HI L L ,
F OR E S T P AR K
F E B R UAR Y 2 8 , 2 0 1 2
Contents
Introduction 01
Community Driven Process 02
Vision Statement 03
Guiding Principles 05
Major Moves
Transform Housing 08
Key Initiative: Coordinated Housing Strategy 10
Key Initiative: New Infill Housing 16
Key Initiative: Preservation as a Revitalization Tool 26
Expand Economic Opportunity 34
Key Initiative: Job Training and Small Business Support 36
Key Initiative: Enhanced Neighborhood Businesses 44
Key Initiative: Promotion and Marketing of the Community 56
Invest in Quality Neighborhoods 62
Key Initiative: Streetscape Improvements 64
Key Initiative: Reuse of Vacant Lots 70
Key Initiative: Property Maintenance for Homeowners and Renters 78
Key Initiative: Safe and Convenient Transit 84
Strengthen Community Through Education Institutions 90
Key Initiative: Quality Schools as Community Anchors 92
Key Initiative: Collaborative Partnership Between Colleges and Neighborhoods 102
Promote Safe and Healthy Living 108
Key Initiative: Community Safety 110
Key Initiative: Integrated Healthy Food System 114
Key Initiative: Healthy Lifestyles 124
Build Community Capacity 134
Key Initiative: Capitalizing on an Engaged Community 136
Key Initiative: Coordination of Community Services 142
Appendix
Photograph References A4
Neighborhood Overview
Demographics A6
Land Use A6
Services and Amenities A7
Infrastructure A7
Housing A8
Employment A10
Public Safety A11
Public Health A11
Education A12
Post-Tornado Conditions A12
Needs and Opportunities A13
Community Meeting Results
October 12, 2011 Meeting A14
November 15, 2011 Meeting A20
December 14, 2011 Meeting A23
Previous City and Neighborhood Plans A30
Partnership / Stakeholder Organizations A34
Rebuild Springfield Town Hall Website Results A38
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
4
1
DI S T R I CT 2 - MAP L E HI GH- S I X COR NE R S , OL D HI L L , UP P E R HI L L , F OR E S T P AR K
1
Introduction
With the same determination, resiliency, and spirit that defined the community’s
response in the aftermath of the June 1st tornado, the people of Maple High-Six
Corners, Old Hill, Upper Hill, and Forest Park have come together to undertake a critical
dialogue about the future of their neighborhoods and city.
It is challenging to think about long-term planning while immediate rebuilding needs are
so pressing, but Springfield’s citizens have responded with a powerful shared vision for
how they can rebuild in a way that strengthens their communities for the future.
The neighborhoods of Maple High – Six Corners, Upper Hill, Old Hill, and (northern)
Forest Park make up planning District 2, a richly diverse section of Springfield. Because
only the northern area of Forest Park was damaged by the tornado, our analysis
includes only a small portion of this neighborhood (the two Census tracts bounded by
Mill River and Watershops Pond to the north, Belmont Ave, Sumner Ave, and the old
Highland Division rail line). Many challenges faced District 2 neighborhood even before
the tornado struck: abandoned properties, substandard housing, low homeownership
rates, higher than average crime and poverty, and low educational attainment. With this
context, the conversations in District 2 have been intense and complex, but consistently
hopeful and resolute to achieve something better.
In District 2, perhaps more than anywhere else in the city, there is an opportunity for the
rebuilding process to have a transformative impact. The scar of the tornado’s path in
this part of Springfield revealed the challenges and allowed them to air. What emerged
from these dialogue sessions is a strong commitment to rebuild stronger than before, an
engaged community newly energized to improve their community, and a recognition of
how District 2’s vibrant diversity could become the backbone upon which to rebuild.
There is hope and energy in District 2, and it should be channeled into the
implementation of the plan, the next stage of this work. There is room within each of
the initiatives described in this plan for every resident and stakeholder to contribute to a
better future.
To quote one District 2 stakeholder: “To rebuild the community, you need to rebuild the
mind set of the people.”
District 1
3
2
1
2
3 District 3
District 2
1
2
3
4
Six Corners 1
2
3 Upper Hill
Old Hill
4 (Northern) Forest Park
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
2
Over the past few months, hundreds of ideas were shared by residents and
stakeholders – at public workshops, online forums, stakeholder interviews, advisory
committee meetings, and numerous conversations throughout the community. This
input forms the basis of the vision, guiding principles and initiatives that follow.
This word cloud represents the ideas and input from public meetings. The larger the word, the more often it was mentioned. Credit: wordle.net
Community-Driven Process
3
DI S T R I CT 2 - MAP L E HI GH- S I X COR NE R S , OL D HI L L , UP P E R HI L L , F OR E S T P AR K
Community Meetings
Three community meetings were held in District
2 over the course of three months, allowing
residents and stakeholders to be in dialogue with
each other as they responded to questions posed
by the planning team. Common themes emerged
in these sessions, and powerful report backs from
each table set the tone for how this community’s
energy would frame a new vision. The energy and
passion exhibited in these meetings was critical to
developing initiatives that matter on the ground in
the neighborhood. This same spirit will be critical
to maintain in the implementation phase as well.
Face to Face Conversations
Beyond parti ci pati on i n the three di stri ct
meetings noted above, many stakeholders in the
community shared valuable time and input by
meeting in person with representatives from the
planning team. Held in various venues around
the city, these conversations provided specific
insight on particular issues – ranging from in-
depth knowledge or visionary input for particular
buildings and properties in the district, to broad
conversations about education and economic
vitality in the community, with much more in
between.
Social Media
Dialogue did not end at the conclusion of public
meetings. MindMixer, Facebook and other social
media served as a 24-hour-a-day public forum
for participants to continue the conversation
with each other about the rebuilding of their
community.
Existing Plans
This plan was informed by the good ideas and
thoughtful analysis from a variety of perspectives
and stakeholders, and builds upon the planning
and visioning work that already exists, including
City plans, reports and studies from a variety of
agencies, and neighborhood visioning documents
that demonstrated the proactive participation
of District 2 residents in planning for the future.
Refer to the Appendix for a comprehensive look
at the plans reviewed.
Guidance by Rebuild Springfield Advisory
Committee
An appointed group of volunteers acted as an
Advisory Committee. Over the course of the
planning process, the Advisory Committee
provided a sounding board for many items, and
offered high level feedback to guide the plan
recommendations.
Economic and Real Estate Analysis
The recommendations of this plan are grounded
in an economic analysis that reflects the unique
needs and opportunities in Springfield. HDR
provided analysis and forecasting based on an
intimate knowledge of economic and workforce
development in Springfield and the Pioneer
Valley. Byrne McKinney & Associates conducted
an in-depth real estate market analysis, as well
as an examination of the potential funding
resources necessary to implement the varied
recommendations of this plan. These analyses
guide the recommendations and resource
opportunities throughout this plan. More detail
can be found in the appendix.
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
4
Build on strong relationships and neighborhood pride
to proactively reinvest in our community. Leverage
our balanced diversity and unleash the potential of our
historic neighborhoods to create beautiful, safe, and
thriving communities.
Vision Statement
5
DI S T R I CT 2 - MAP L E HI GH- S I X COR NE R S , OL D HI L L , UP P E R HI L L , F OR E S T P AR K
Guiding Principle 1
Build on the strong commitment and pride in the neighborhoods to
support communities and organizations that are connected, engaged,
and working together.
Guiding Principle 2
Improve quality of life and provide new opportunities for residents by
enhancing the health, safety, and vitality of the community.
Guiding Principle 3
Preserve and promote the hi story and character of the
neighborhoods as an amenity that enriches quality of life and attracts
new residents and businesses.
Guiding Principle 4
Achieve a sustainable and equitable balance of owners and renters, incomes,
housing types, land uses, employment opportunities and services that meets
the needs of residents while positioning the community to thrive and flourish
in the future.
Guiding Principle 5
Value the diversity of people, cultures, and activities and recognize this
diversity as a source of resilience, creativity, learning, empowerment, and
collaboration that strengthens the neighborhoods.
Guiding Principle 6
Demonstrate public and personal commitment, improve perceptions, and
attract new energy and investment through neighborhoods that are attractive
and well-maintained.
Guiding Principles
Vision and Guiding Principles >> Major Moves >> Initiatives
• The Vision and Guiding Principles represent the high-level values and aspirations of the community and inform the Major Moves.
• The Major Moves represent the big ideas and transformative actions that together are necessary to achieve the community’s vision. The Major Moves
are supported by Key Initiatives and provide the framework to organize those Key Initiatives.
• The Key Initiatives identify specific projects, policies, and programs that support the Major Moves, with information on the partners, resources and
action steps necessary to successfully implement the recommendations.
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
6
Major Moves
The vision and guiding principles reflect
the identity, values, and priorities of District
2 residents and stakeholders, and paint a
picture of the future to which they aspire.
From this compelling vision, six Major Moves
emerged – six broad actions that will transform
District 2 neighborhoods if implemented
successfully. Each major move is supported
by several Key Initiatives. For each Initiative,
a brief description is provided, along with
suggestions of who can push forward the
implementation of the initiative, potential
Stakeholders and Partners, possible Resource
Opportunities, thoughts on Prioritization,
and recommended Action Steps towards
implementation. In some cases, the initiatives
include Implementation Opportunities, which
are specific locations or projects where the
recommendations of the initiative can be
undertaken as part of the rebuilding process.
Transform Housing
Expand Economic Opportunities
Invest in Quality Neighborhoods
Strengthen Community through
Educational Institutions
Promote Safe and Healthy Living
Build Community Capacity
Key Initiative Priority
(1-5)
Domain
Cultural Physical Economic
Organiza-
tional
Educa-
tional
Social
Transform Housing
Coordinated Housing Strategy
5
New Infill Housing 4
Preservation as a Revitalization Tool
2
Expand Economic Opportunity
Job Training and Small Business
Support
5
Enhanced Neighborhood Businesses 4
Promotion and Marketing of the
Community
2
Invest in Quality Neighborhoods
Streetscape Improvements 3
Reuse of Vacant Lots 3
Property Maintenance for
Homeowners and Renters
5
Safe and Convenient Transit 4
Strengthen Community Through Education Institutions
Quality Schools as Community
Anchors
5
Collaborative Partnership Between
Colleges and Neighborhoods
3
Promote Safe and Healthy Living
Community Safety 4
Healthy Lifestyles 3
Integrated Healthy Food System 4
Build Community Capacity
Capitalizing on an Engaged
Community
3
Coordination of Community Services 5
7
DI S T R I CT 2 - MAP L E HI GH- S I X COR NE R S , OL D HI L L , UP P E R HI L L , F OR E S T P AR K
Coordinated Housing Strategy
• Hickory Street
New Infill Housing
• Central Street
Integrated Healthy Food System
• Full Service Grocery Store
Enhanced Neighborhood Businesses
• Six Corners Intersection
• Watershops Armory Area
Promotion and Marketing of the
Community
• Mason Square
Quality Schools as Community
Anchors
• New Brookings School
• Commonwealth Academy
(Former MacDuffie School)
• Veritas Prep Charter School
District Overview Map
Healthy Lifestyles
• Mill River Trail
• Highland Division Rail Trail
Capitalizing on an Engaged
Community
• Churches as Anchors
Implementation Opportunity:
Hickory Street
Implementation Opportunity:
Watershops Armory Area
Implementation Opportunity
Potential Street Improvements
Potential Trail Network
Parks
Potential Greenways
Tornado Path
Implementation Opportunity:
Veritas Preparatory
Charter School
Implementation Opportunity:
Commonwealth Academy
(Former McDuffie School)
Implementation Opportunity:
Central Street Infill Housing
Implementation Opportunity:
Full-Service Grocery Store
Implementation Opportunity:
Mason Square
Implementation Opportunity:
Six Corners Intersection
: Implementation Opportunity:
Elias Brookings School
Implementation Opportunities
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
8
Major Move 1
Transform Housing
This Major Move focuses on strategies to support healthy,
viable neighborhoods with well-designed, high-quality housing
that meets resident needs, expands opportunities, attracts
new investment, and positions the community to thrive in the
future. A successful housing strategy must provide the right
amount of housing in the right location, and carefully integrate
new housing to strengthen neighborhoods and reinforce a
sense of community. Coordinating housing development with
associated public investments in streets, transit, community
spaces, and public facilities helps to focus energy and leverage
scarce resources for maximum impact. By supplementing
housing with capacity building efforts to promote education,
training, skill development, and self-sufficiency, housing
programs can help to support and maintain neighborhoods
over time.
Key Initiatives
Coordinated Housing Strategy
• Bring partners together to develop a coordinated strategy to:
• Provide higher quality housing that is better integrated into the community
• Provide the right amount and type of housing in the right locations
• Coordinate with public investments in infrastructure, facilities, and programs
• Supplement housing programs with capacity building efforts to promote
education, training, skill development, and self-sufficiency
New Infill Housing
• Broaden the impact of successful programs
• Explore pilot projects in heavily damaged areas
• Streamline infill housing development with vacant lot management strategies
Preservation as a Revitalization Tool
• Increase advocacy for preservation with the City and the general public
• Establish a revolving loan fund for preservation
• Supplement traditional preservation resources with programs for weatherization,
energy efficiency, and green building for all homes
• Develop an emergency weatherization and stabilization program
9
DI S T R I CT 2 - MAP L E HI GH- S I X COR NE R S , OL D HI L L , UP P E R HI L L , F OR E S T P AR K
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
10
Transform Housing
Coordinated Housing Strategy
◦ Provide higher quality housing that is better integrated into the
community
◦ Provide the right amount and type of housing in the right locations
and support expanded homeownership
◦ Coordinate with public investments in infrastructure, facilities, and
programs
◦ Supplement housing programs with capacity building efforts to
promote education, training, skill development, and self-sufficiency
District 2 neighborhoods face a balancing act for housing. On one hand, there
is a need to provide adequate affordable housing to those in need, while avoiding
concentration of poverty and the negative impacts this can have on a community.
On the other hand, there is a need to attract new market-rate housing, and create
neighborhoods that are viable and self-sustaining in the long-term. This balancing
act creates challenges for the District, but within these challenges is the greatest
opportunity for transformation. In District 2, there are a multitude of agencies and
organizations working to address different aspects of the housing challenge, including
construction of new homes, supportive services that assist new homeowners,
strategies to return vacant properties to viable use, employer incentives to attract
new residents, and many other efforts. These are important undertakings that are
having a positive impact, but to have a transformative impact at a community scale,
these efforts need to be coordinated and working toward a common vision for a
sustainable, healthy, equitable community.
Crafting a strategic and coordinated plan for housing initiatives and projects has
the potential to maximize the tremendous effort of existing agencies in Springfield.
An agreed upon strategy helps to prioritize efforts, increase the effectiveness of
grant applications and most importantly can improve the impact of projects. A
The city-wide planning process is organized according to the six domains of a healthy and vibrant
community. Domains that are positively impacted by the Initiative described on this page are
indicated above.
Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social
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shared framework for public entities, non-
profits, and developers will address housing
needs in a comprehensive and systematic way
to provide higher quality housing that is better
integrated into the community. This includes
understanding and capitalizing on emerging
market and demographic trends, providing the
right amount and type of housing in the right
locations, coordinating with public investments
in infrastructure, facilities, and programs, and
supplementing housing programs with capacity
building efforts to promote education, training,
skill development, self-sufficiency.
1
The creation of a coordinated housing strategy
would:
• Identify housing needs and establish an
appropriate balance
• Introduce new housing types
• Identify specific sites and projects
• Prioritize needs and projects
• Identify funding sources
• Identify capacity of housing stakeholders
• Coordinate partnerships and project
responsibilities
1 A preliminary analysis of the market and demographic
trends can be found in the financial analysis section of the
Citywide Appendix
• Support existing programs
• Allow housing implementation to happen at the
community scale
• Organize and integrate all of the above in a bold
new vision that embraces and transforms the
future
The development of a strategy is critical for
rebuilding efforts in District 2, and is also
fundamental to success of Springfield as a
community. Reinvestment and attention to
current housing challenges are at the core of the
creation of stronger neighborhoods and thriving
communities. The tornado rebuilding process
presents an unprecedented opportunity to take
a fresh look at the entire housing picture and
tackle the District’s housing challenges. Damaged
and destroyed housing needs to be rebuilt, and
there is a brief window where energy, attention,
and resources are focused in a way that makes a
shared housing strategy possible. The rebuilding
of tornado-impacted housing represents the
first step of a long-term coordinated strategy
and will be most successful if undertaken with a
long-term integrated strategy in mind, including
coordination with other efforts to build capacity,
improve quality of life, support homeownership,
and expand economic opportunity.
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
12
Priority
Supportive Critical
Partnerships / Stakeholders
• Springfield Development Services Division –
Office of Housing
• Springfield Development Services Division –
Office of Neighborhood Services
• Springfield Development Services Division –
Office of Planning and Economic Development
• Springfield Housing Authority
• Springfield Redevelopment Authority
• HAP Housing
• Springfield Neighborhood Housing Services
• Greater Springfield Habitat for Humanity
• Home City Housing
• Private Developers
• Neighborhood Councils
• Non-Profit Services
• Area Churches
• Springfield College
• American International College
Resource Needs
• The development of a coordinated housing
strategy is not primarily a matter of financing,
but of organization, vision, and a
comprehensive approach
• Housing needs, program needs, and resource
shortfalls would be identified as part of a
comprehensive strategy
Potential Resource Opportunities
• Various agencies and organizations are
providing housing development and programs
with existing resources. At a minimum, a
coordinated plan can focus and leverage
existing resources and efforts for maximum
impact and movement toward a long-range
vision for housing in the area. It is very likely
that a powerful new integrated vision would
create new funding potential from public and
private sources.
• Gateway Plus Action Grants. This State
sponsored program for Gateway cities provides
$1.35 million in funding to cities for planning
activities that expand housing opportunities
and support the revitalization of neighborhoods
to enhance economic vitality and the quality of
life for all residents.
Action Steps
• Bring partners together to commit to the
creation of a housing strategy
• Identify needs, capabilities, and resources
• Create a shared comprehensive long-term
strategy for housing that meets needs,
strengthens neighborhoods, and outline
available and sustainable future.
• Support, create, and expand partnerships and
programs to address housing needs in a
coordinated way at a community scale
• Identify specific sites, projects, development
opportunities and coordinate with other public
investments (infrastructure, schools, community
facilities) to have a transformative impact on the
community
• Explore new and creative financing tools to
promote quality housing
Project Location
While a coordinated housing strategy would
address housing needs and opportunities
throughout the District (and potentially city-wide),
the urgent focus of a strategy should be along the
Hickory Street and Central Street Corridors, which
were both heavily damaged in the tornado, but
which also have great potential to implement a
new approach to housing in the District. Walnut
Street, the northern sections of Old Hill, as well
as vacant, abandoned, and city-owned property
throughout the District also present opportunities
for new infill housing development as part of a
coordinated strategy.
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A Comprehensive Housing Strategy for
Washington D.C.
This 2006 plan began with the creation of
a task force representing a cross section of
stakeholders. This task force developed
a housing vision focused on increasing
residential development and preservation
throughout the ci ty, and establ i shed
recommendations for the amount of housing
at various price points, target homeownership
rates, and other measures. This task force
eventually evolved into a standing oversight
committee to implement the strategy and
report regularly to the Mayor.
Recommendations of the plan included:
• Encouraging development of “new
neighborhoods” on large privately- and
publicly-owned vacant and underutilized
sites, particularly along transit corridors.
• Supporting the formation of community
land trusts run by public, private, non-profit,
or community-based organizations, which
would acquire and hold land and provide
long-term leases to developers.
• Modifying or revising zoning restrictions to
allow development of affordable or mixed-
income housing, particularly on vacant or
underutilized parcels
• Providing pre-development, acquisition,
and rehab subsidies to developers for
acquisition and renovation of existing
buildings to preserve or provide affordable
housing, and augmenting funds to facilitate
the purchase of land and other properties at
greater scale in lower-income areas.
• Expanding the District’s employer-assisted
housing program for city government
workers by increasing the amount of awards
for down payment and closing cost
assistance, and encouraging private
employers to develop employer-assisted
housing programs.
• Targeti ng and l everagi ng housi ng
investments by coordinating use of public
money in areas with complementary support
for developing schools, jobs, and other
services and coordinating housing policy
with the work of other departments and
agencies.
• Increasing the City’s homeownership rate by
providing a tax credit to low-income, long-
term homeowners to help with home
maintenance
http://www.housingpolicy.org/building_a_
strategy/faqs/washington_profile.html
Precedents
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
14
Implementation Opportunity
Hickory Street
The areas along Hickory Street were among the most
severely damaged by the June 1st tornado. Several
factors make Hickory Street a particularly important
opportunity for rebuilding. First, a number of residential
homes and compl exes were heavi l y i mpacted
and need to be rebuilt, including the Hill Homes
housing cooperative. Second, the corridor includes
a concentration of vacant and underutilized property
that can accommodate new uses and redevelopment.
Finally, the street is anchored by a variety of important
uses that together have the potential to catalyze new
development and transform the area. Springfield
College is located at the east end of Hickory Street,
while the historic Watershops Armory building, a
neighborhood commercial center, Brookings School,
and Ruth Elizabeth Park are important amenities located
at the western end of the street.
As part of the Rebuild Springfield planning process in
District 2 many stakeholders in the area, including Hill
Homes, Springfield College, Spring Hill, and the City
of Springfield, have engaged in dialogue and formed
relationships to begin to define a new redevelopment
strategy that would transform the Hickory Street area
into a community hub for living, working, shopping,
and learning. While these talks and partnerships are
still preliminary, they represent an important model for
how a coordinated, collaborative strategy shared by
residents, institutions, developers, can have significant
long term impact on the vitality and long-term
sustainability of an area.
Many recommendati ons for i mproved
housing, streetscapes, job opportunities,
and schools are put forth in this district plan.
For these initiatives to be successful, a fully-
integrated approach is needed. Rebuilding
af ter the tornado presents a uni que
window of opportunity to implement this
catalytic redevelopment strategy. This new
approach must move forward with a diverse,
coordinated effort and be predicated on new
and innovative partnerships, housing types,
and land ownership patterns. The physical
result is a combination of mixed-income
housing units, attached and multi-family
housing, infill housing built on vacant lots
scattered throughout the neighborhood,
mixed-use development that activates the
area while supplying retail and services for
residents and students, and well-maintained
and –utilized parks and open space. Most
importantly, this new strategy results in a
more healthy, vital, and vibrant area.
The following redevelopment proposal is
one potential scenario for Hickory Street,
and illustrates how various physical elements
and stakeholders can work together to achieve
a transformative outcome. While this concept
must continue to be refined as dialogue and
negotiations between stakeholders continue,
potential components of redevelopment on
Hickory Street are described below:

Repurposed Brookings School building – After
the tornado the Springfield School District
determined that renovation of this building for
re-use as an elementary school is not ideal. The
cost of upgrades required per code is significant
and would still not yield a facility that will meet
school building standards. However, with its high
ceilings, historic architecture, and floor plan, this
building would be an ideal space for studio, one,
and two-bedroom residential units.

Development of a new Elias Brookings School –
A new community-based school at the corner of
Walnut and Hickory Streets would provide a strong
anchor for the entire district. The new location
could also create a link with Springfield College
and further promote more involvement of the
schools within the community and vice versa. A
new school site would allow for the development
of a protected outdoor space for student activities
while also accommodating a shared community
facility such as a gym (see the “Quality Schools as
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SPRINGFIELD
COLLEGE
POTENTIAL
HILL HOMES
SITE
PROPOSED
PARK
PROPOSED
SITE FOR NEW
BROOKINGS
SCHOOL
P
O
T
E
N
T
I
A
L

C
O
L
L
E
G
E

E
D
G
E
MIXED-USE,
PEDESTRIAN SCALE
NEIGHBORHOOD
CENTER
ENHANCED USE
OF WATERSHOPS
ARMORY BUILDING
NEW
MIXED-
USE
RUTH
ELIZABETH
PARK
REPURPOSED
BROOKINGS
SCHOOL
Potential Hickory Street Redevelopment Concept
Dialogue is ongoing between a variety of stakeholders to create a final redevelopment scenario
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
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Community Anchors” recommendation for further
description of Brookings). The new location would
also help connect public space along Hickory from
Ruth Elizabeth Park to improved park land along
Watershops Pond.
Relocated Hill Homes – Many units of the
Hill Homes cooperative were damaged in the
tornado and must be rebuilt. By rebuilding in a
new location along Hickory St. residents could
build better quality housing while maintaining
access to the waterfront via improved park space.
Residents would also have the opportunity to rent
or own in either attached or detached structures
interspersed throughout the neighborhood. This
allows the cooperative to forge new relationships
with the surrounding community and educational
institutions while living near the services and retail
that are also proposed.

Park and Open Space Improvements – Residents
at the community and stakeholder meetings
identified this park as unsafe because of the illicit
activity that takes place there. Redesigning and
activating this park is crucial for the vitality and
safety of the area. The integration of community
gardens, better lighting, higher levels of police/
neighborhood watch patrolling, and more activity
from the nearby recommended mixed use
structure will create more activity in and around
the park. The Park also represents an important
amenity for a repurposed Brookings school
building, a new Brookings School located across
the street to the east, and to new residential
development in the area, including Hill Homes.
The land just east of Watershops Armory has
certain restrictions that make redevelopment
of the parcel difficult. This site is ideal for new
parkland and would link to an existing park to the
east to provide continuous parkland and greater
access to the waterfront. This site would also afford
residents a unique view of the historic Watershops
Armory.
Retail and mixed use – Creating mixed-use and
retail structures near the Watershops Armory
would provide quality living options for workforce
housing and serve as another key anchor in
redevelopment of the area. The residential
component of mixed use developments help
ensure vitality and activity while new retail would
provide needed amenities and healthy lifestyle
options for current and new residents. This
additional activity would also help to strengthen
the Watershops Armory building as a community
anchor.

Potential expansion of Springfield College’s
western boundary – Available land for expansion
is a common concern among many colleges across
the country. Springfield College is confined to
the south and east and owns scattered parcels
just west of their campus. The future expansion
needs of the college must be included in the
redevelopment strategy discussion of the Hickory
Street area. A robust dialogue and partnership
between Springfield College, area residents, and
the City can ensure that expansion of the college
is integrated into the neighborhood in a way that
mutually benefits both the college and residents.
Streetscape I mprovements – Streetscape
improvements along Hickory Street, including a
reconfiguration of intersections at Allen Street
and Central Street, can provide a unifying link for
this key area functioning as an amenity for new
housing, neighborhood retail, a new Brookings
school, the Watershops Armory building, and
Springfield College.
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Existing Conditions
Potential Redevelopment
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
18
Transform Housing
New Infill Housing
The city-wide planning process is organized according to the six domains of a healthy and vibrant
community. Domains that are positively impacted by the Initiative described on this page are
indicated above.
Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social
• Broaden the impact of successful programs
• Explore pilot projects in heavily damaged areas
• Streamline infill housing development with vacant lot management
strategies
District 2 has a large number of vacant and city-owned lots, and also faces challenges
with abandoned, blighted, and foreclosed properties. The June 1st tornado has
further exacerbated these issues, with many more properties damaged or destroyed,
particularly along Central Street, Walnut Street, Hickory Street, and surrounding areas.
District 2 also has a very low homeownership rate in comparison with the rest of the
city, state, and nation, and faces challenges with maintenance and code enforcement
due to inattention from absentee investors and landlords.
Together these factors speak to the need and opportunity for new, quality infill
housing to rebuild what was lost, attract new investment, increase ownership, and
meet the housing needs of area residents while making the neighborhood more
healthy, vital, and sustainable in the long term.
There are already a number of organizations doing very successful and important
housing work in the neighborhood, including some collaborative partnerships that
are potential models for broader efforts in the community. For example the Old
Hill Neighborhood Council, Springfield Neighborhood Housing Services, Greater
Springfield Habitat for Humanity, and HAP Housing are partnering to develop one
hundred new or rehabilitated energy-efficient homes for owner occupants in the
Old Hill neighborhood, and are supported by a loan fund guaranteed by Springfield
College that allows the collaborative to acquire property at below-mark-rate rates.
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New Infill Housing
City Owned Properties
Vacant Properties
Tornado-Damaged
Residential Properties
Focus Areas for New Infill
Housing
Tornado Path
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
20
The City has been a critical partner in this effort,
providing funding and residential vacant lots for
homeownership development.
There is also a range of other successful programs
to support homeownership and infill housing
construction and maintenance that could have
a more transformative impact with greater
resources and participation, and as part of a
coordinated strategy for housing in the District.
These programs include financial resources for
new residents, such as employer incentives to
locate in the City of Springfield, and in particular
neighborhoods, and support for long-time
homeowners to improve their property through
grants for energy-efficiency and curb appeal
improvements. These programs also include
educational and support resources such as
financial fitness education that helps prospective
owners identify and overcome financing obstacles,
foreclosure assistance, and new homeowner
workshops.
The goal of this initiative is to support additional
homeownership, home rehabilitation, and new
infill housing development by:
• Continuing to build on and enhance the
partnership and collaboration between area
housing, neighborhood, and service
organizations
• Broadening the impact of successful existing
program geographically and in terms of
residents benefitted
• Identifying additional resources to support
successful programs
• Reinforcing the tight-knit community fabric of
District 2 neighborhoods by supporting
homeowners that are engaged and invested in
the neighborhood and discouraging absentee
landlords and investors
• Closing the gap between what it costs to build
or renovate a home and the price it can
command. As the neighborhood strengthens
and values rise, this gap will shrink and
investment and development activity will
become self-sustaining
All of these efforts should be implemented as
part of a coordinated housing strategy that is
looking at the needs of the entire community
with a comprehensive approach to create
viable, sustainable neighborhoods with the full
range of support systems necessary to make
homeownership successful.
Even before the tornado, areas along Central
Street included a concentration of vacant and
city-owned lots. In the aftermath of the tornado,
the Central Street corridor was particularly hard
hit, creating a large swath of vacant, damaged,
and destroyed property. However, this corridor
has also seen recent successful single-family
owner-occupied infill housing development, and
is home to faith-based institutions committed
to revitalization of their surrounding community.
The need and opportunities in this location
make Central Street a primary focus for new
infill housing development (The “Central Street
Corridor” Implementation Opportunity describes
the potential for this area in greater detail).
There are also concentrations of vacant and city-
owned lots in District 2 along Walnut Street, and
in the northern section of Old Hill where housing
organizations are already partnering to focus
new infill housing development. Both of these
locations represent opportunities for expanded
infill housing development efforts, as do many
sites scattered throughout the District.
Areas where vacant, damaged, blighted, and
destroyed properties are concentrated as a
result of tornado damage (including Central
Street) present opportunities to develop pilot
housing developments that can provide quality
housing and while illustrating new ways to
approach housing development more broadly
in the District (and throughout Springfield).
These developments could illustrate energy
efficiency and water conservation features to
reduce housing costs; construction methods
that are durable, safe, healthy, and sustainable
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while remaining affordable; creative approaches
to maintenance, property management, and
financing; sweat-equity strategies, and other
features. In the aftermath of disasters in other
communities, and in response to a compelling
vision for a better future, organizations and
creative developers such as Full Spectrum of
New York, Enterprise Community Partners,
the Salvation Army’s EnviRenew program, the
Make-It-Right Foundation, and others with
national resources and profile have invested in
other disaster-affected communities through
the development of such pilot projects in
coordination with local partners.
The process that the City uses to return City-
owned lots to private owners for development
has improved over the past several years, with
greater use of the Request for Proposals process
in lieu of property auctions, to ensure that
capable and committed buyers follow through
on infill housing development in a thoughtful
and coordinated way. While the City’s Office of
Housing, Springfield Redevelopment Authority,
and other agencies are already engaged in the
process of acquiring vacant, abandoned, and tax
delinquent property, holding it, and reintroducing
it to private ownership and development,
proactive identification, acquisition, and land
banking of vacant and abandoned properties
to facilitate investment and redevelopment in a
deliberate and coordinated way would help to
streamline new infill housing development. Land
banking also enables consolidation of property
in strategic locations that can make it easier to
develop at a scale that can attract more private
investment, accommodate a broader range
of redevelopment financing strategies, and
have a more transformative impact on District
2 neighborhoods than would be possible with
an approach that focused solely on scattered
sites passively acquired within an area. Other
strategies to address abandoned properties can
also disincent ownership of vacant properties, and
encourage action to actively reuse and redevelop
vacant sites for a variety of uses including infill
housing (See “Reuse of Vacant Lots” initiative
for more information on how potential vacant lot
management strategy may help facilitate new infill
housing development).

Partnerships / Stakeholders
• Springfield Development Services Division –
Office of Housing
• Springfield Housing Authority
• Springfield Redevelopment Authority
• Rebuilding Together Springfield
• HAP Housing
• Springfield Neighborhood Housing Services
• Greater Springfield Habitat for Humanity
• Home City Housing
• Private Developers
• Neighborhood Councils
• Non-Profit Services
• Area Churches
• Area Employers
• Springfield College
• American International College
Resource Needs
• Subsidy to cover gap construction costs for
developers until property value increases can
better support market rate rehab and
development
• Grants, donations, and other support to expand
and scale up successful programs such as
employer incentives, curb appeal programs,
energy efficiency upgrades, and others
• Materials and sweat equity
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
22
Potential Resource Opportunities
Local
• CDBG and HOME funds support the “American
Dream Downpayment Initiative” (ADDI) through
HAP Housing for up to $10,000, and the
“Downpayment Assistance Program” through
Springfield Office of Housing for up to $2,500
• Rebuilding Together Springfield: A nonprofit
agency that provides free rehabilitation and
critical repairs to the homes of low-income
homeowners, by using volunteer labor and
donated materials. The local agency is one of
200 affiliates nation-wide
• City of Springfield Emergency Homeowner
Repair Program: Provides technical assistance
and non-interest bearing deferred payment
loans to assist eligible low and moderate-
income households within the City of
Springfield
• Buy Springfield Now - Employer incentives for
homeownership in Springfield and specific
neighborhoods
• Curb Appeal Program. This program sponsored
by Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance
Company (MassMutual) provides funding to
improve the exterior appearances of homes in
neighborhoods along Springfield’s State Street
corridor
State
• Housing Stabilization Fund: A state funded
bond program that assists in the production and
preservation of affordable housing for low-
income families and individuals. HSF monies
may be used for the acquisition and/or
rehabilitation of existing structures for sale to
income-eligible first-time homebuyers,
including distressed or failed properties, or the
new construction of homeownership projects. In
recent years, Massachusetts has used these
funds for activities other than supporting
homeownership; Springfield will need to
advocate with the state to change this policy.
• Housing Innovation Fund: A state program that
provides funding for the creation and
preservation of alternative forms of affordable
housing. While these funds can be used for
affordable homeownership, Massachusetts has
not used the funds for this purpose in recent
years. Springfield will need to advocate with the
state to change this policy.
• The Soft Second Loan Program: A joint initiative
of the public and private sectors to increase
affordable housing opportunities for low- and
moderate-income homebuyers combining a
conventional first mortgage with a subsidized
second mortgage to help low- and moderate-
income households to qualify for a mortgage
and purchase a home for the first time.
• Housing Development Incentive Program: The
HDIP is designed to increase residential growth,
expand diversity of housing stock, support
economic development, and promote
neighborhood stabilization in designated
Housing Development Zones within Gateway
municipalities, such as Springfield. It provides
tax incentives to developers to rehabilitate
multi-unit properties for sale or lease as market
rate units: a local-option property tax exemption
and a new state tax credit for qualified
rehabilitation expenses.
• State Historic Tax Credits
• Massachusetts Housing Investment Corporation
Debt and Equity Financing. MHIC provides
financing to nonprofit and forprofit sponsors of
affordable housing and commercial real estate
(in low-income communities). MHIC finances
both large and small developments -- including
rental, SRO, ownership, assisted living,
cooperative, commercial, and senior-housing
units.
Federal
• Federal Disaster Funds
• HUD Community Planning and Development
office and HUD Choice Neighborhood funding
• Low Income Housing Tax Credits
• New Markets Tax Credits
• Federal Historic Tax Credits
• CDBG funds can support homeownership
through:
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• Emergency repair
• Pre-purchase counseling budget
management, credit counseling for renters
and buyers
• Infrastructure and streetscape
improvements around new developments
• Contracts with non-profits to provide
assistance navigating home repair and
application for recovery resources
• The recovery from many other natural disasters
has been facilitated by a special federal
appropriation. These funds, often channeled
through the Community Development Block
Grant (CDBG) program, provide funds for gap
financing and needed public improvements.
• HOME Investment Partnerships. Eligible
activities include home purchase or
rehabilitation financing assistance to eligible
homeowners and new homebuyers, as well as
assistance for building or rehabilitate housing
for rent or ownership
• Neighborhood Stabilization Program funding
Energy Efficiency / Renewable Energy
• Rebuild Western Massachusetts Program:
Sponsored through the Massachusetts
Department of Energy Resources; Promotes
energy efficient building practices for new
construction and repairs of residential and
commercial structures, including grant and zero
interest construction loan funds.
• State income tax credit for renewable energy:
15 percent up to $1,000 for installation of a
renewable energy system in a home, including
solar, photovoltaic, solar space heating, solar
water heating, or wind
• Federal Tax Credits: 30 percent with no upper
limit for geothermal heat pumps, solar energy
systems, solar hot water heating, and small wind
turbines. Particularly in larger redevelopment
areas, a district geothermal system would be
particularly attractive as a cost effective solution
• An Energy Efficient Mortgage (EEM) is a
mortgage that credits a home’s energy
efficiency in the mortgage itself. EEMs give
borrowers the opportunity to finance cost-
effective, energy-saving measures as part of a
single mortgage and stretch debt-to-income
qualifying ratios on loans thereby allowing
borrowers to qualify for a larger loan amount
and a better, more energy-efficient home.
EEM’s are now more easily available through
Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, and available
through FHA.
Other
• Center for Community Progress (Land Bank
Expert)
• Enterprise Community Partners (in particular the
Green Communities group) provides capital
solutions and policy advocacy for local housing,
community development and greening efforts
• Federal Home Loan Bank’s Affordable Housing
Program provides grants to support specific
development projects serving a wide range of
neighborhood needs including seniors, the
disabled, homeless families, first-time
homeowners and others with limited resources.
The Federal Home Loan Bank System is the
largest single funding provider to Habitat for
Humanity.
• Full Spectrum of NY, LLC is the national market
leader in the development of mixed use and
mixed income green buildings in emerging
urban markets.
• EnviRenew is a program supported by The
Salvation Army that seeks to address the glaring
discrepancy between good quality, sustainable
homes and their high purchasing and
occupancy costs. EnviRenew aims to establish a
replicable model for affordable housing while at
the same time establishing community capacity
so that communities can grow even stronger
than before.
• Make It Right builds safe, sustainable and
affordable homes for working families. Make it
right emphasizes high quality design, while
preserving the spirit of the community’s culture.
(See the Citywide Appendix for more detailed
information on housing resources, including sample
pro formas that illustrate potential construction
costs, values, and financing gaps for various types of
housing.)
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
24
Action Steps
• Determine which existing programs are the
most successful with the most potential to
expand and scale up
• Create a narrative that can be used to tell about
exciting successes and raise new funds
• Target grant monies for existing housing
organizations to pursue as a consortium in
support of existing successful programs
• Identify specific sites or a collection of sites
(within the above identified corridors) to
implement a pilot infill housing development
project and solicit organizations at a national
scale who are interested in bringing energy,
innovation, and resources to the recovery effort
• Tie housing work, priorities, and needs with
other volunteer programs to identify sweat
equity opportunities
• Develop a public method to monitor and share
progress to build ownership in the investment
and shape a confidence in positive change
Priority
Supportive Critical
Precedents
Make it Right, New Orleans, LA
Make it Right began in December 2007
in response to the lack of progress made
in rebuilding the Lower 9th Ward of New
Orleans, following Hurricane Katrina.
Make It Right set out to be a catalyst for
redevelopment by building a neighborhood
comprised of safe and healthy homes with
an emphasis on high quality design, while
preserving the spirit of the community’s
culture. In addition to building 150 new
homes in the Lower 9th Ward, Make it
Right engaged in innovative efforts to
repair and improve the infrastructure,
storm-preparedness, and the beauty of the
neighborhood. Through May of 2011 75
homes have been completed.
Land Banks:
• Determine legal authority necessary to acquire,
manage and dispose of property, and support
other functions a land bank might provide
• Identify funding, including potential self-
supporting revenue sources through land bank
activities.
• Establish organizational structure
• Identify critical policy goals
Project Location
• With a concentration of vacant, abandoned, and
city-owned properties, as well as properties with
significant tornado damage, the Central Street
corridor represents the primary focus for new
infill housing development as part of the
rebuilding effort
• Although not directly impacted by the tornado,
the Walnut Street corridor and northern sections
of the Old Hill neighborhood are also important
areas to focus new infill housing, both because
of the available infill development opportunities
in these areas, and existing housing
partnerships focusing efforts here
• Vacant, abandoned, and city-owned properties
are scattered throughout District 2 and present
opportunities for new infill housing
development
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The adjacent map indicates both the urgent need and great potential
to transform Central Street through new infill housing development in
coordination with other public improvements and rebuilding efforts. Vacant
and abandoned properties along with property maintenance and street
appearance issues presented challenges for this corridor before the tornado.
Compounded by a high concentration of tornado-damaged properties in this
area, the need for transformation along Central Street is great.
The recent private development of six single-family homes on the south side
of Central Street has a been a welcome change in trajectory for the corridor,
and the consolidated collection of vacant and city-owned property along the
corridor present immediate development opportunities that can continue
to fill the gaps along the street, bring interest and activity to the area, and
provide quality housing that strengthens the neighborhood while meeting
resident needs.
There is space and potential on Central Street for a coordinated model
neighborhood development of multiple homes that could demonstrate
innovative techniques in home construction, financing, maintenance, and
resident support, with potential application and benefits throughout the
tornado-impacted areas, and the City.
The New Hope Pentecostal Church is located on Central Street and has
expressed interest in an expanded mission to support the surrounding
neighborhood, including the potential development of a community
resource center. Nearby on Florence Street, the S.R. Williams Resource
and Development Center is also actively planning to expand its services to
improve the quality of life for area residents. With strategic coordination,
these faith-based institutions can play an integral role in the total
revitalization of Central Street, supplementing physical improvements along
the corridor with capacity building and support for residents that is critical to
a vital, healthy neighborhood over time.
New infill housing can be supported by revitalization of neighborhood-
scale activity centers along Central Street. The “Watershops Armory”
Implementation Opportunity in the “Enhanced Neighborhood Businesses”
initiative describes the potential public improvements and redevelopment
opportunities in the activity center located just to the west of the historic
Watershops Armory building. The intersection of Central Street and Pine
Street also has potential to function as a small neighborhood node serving
surrounding residents. The apartment building at the northeast corner of
the intersection is currently under renovation for residential use. District 2
residents have repeatedly identified the nuisances and negative impacts of
a package store on the adjacent corner. The redevelopment or reuse of this
site as a community space in combination with the renovation across the
street provides an opportunity to create a vital neighborhood anchor in this
location that serves the surrounding neighborhood. Toward this end, the
City should work to acquire the property where the existing package store is
located for redevelopment.
Implementation Opportunity
Central Street
Potential Infill
Housing
Potential Infill Housing
P
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t
e
n
t
ia
l In
fi ll H
o
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s
in
g
P
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t
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l In
fi ll H
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s
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Potential Infill
Housing
Potential
Community
Center

City-owned Properties
Tornado-Damaged Properties
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Before / After: Conceptual Rendering of Central Street Improvements
Infill Housing on Central Street: Central Street is on of the areas most heavily-impacted by the tornado, and includes a concentration of vacant, city-owned,
and tornado-damaged lots. There is an opportunity to transform Central Street with new infill housing, streetscape improvements, and community facilities.
1. New Infill Housing 2. Streetscape Improvements 3. Replacement of Street Trees 4. Community Facilities 5. Reuse of Vacant Lots (Community Gardens)
1
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Transform Housing
Preservation as a
Revitalization Tool
The city-wide planning process is organized according to the six domains of a healthy and vibrant
community. Domains that are positively impacted by the Initiative described on this page are
indicated above.
Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social
◦ Increase advocacy for preservation with the City and the general
public
◦ Establish a revolving loan fund for preservation
◦ Supplement traditional preservation resources with programs for
weatherization, energy efficiency, and green building for all homes
◦ Develop an emergency weatherization and stabilization program
Preserving and renovating damaged structures, rather than demolishing them, was
one of the most strongly supported ideas that emerged from community input during
the Rebuild Springfield planning process. The historic structures and neighborhoods
in District 2 are assets that make the area a unique and interesting place to live. As
Maple High- Six Corners, Old Hill, and Upper Hill rebuild from the tornado and seek
ways to strengthen their communities by attracting visitors, new residents, and new
investments, the historic character and architectural quality of the neighborhoods
are an important part of that effort. Well-preserved, well-maintained homes can also
instill a sense of pride and ownership in an area, enhance public safety, and begin
to strengthen property values, making market –driven reinvestment in the area more
viable.
The City has established a number of historic districts, and locally and nationally
designated historic places. The City’s Historical Commission and the Springfield
Preservation Trust do important work, but even with these efforts, there is a need
for additional financial and organizational resources, and recognition that there are
important historic and architectural assets throughout the tornado-affected area
whose preservation and renovation can support the recovery efforts and long-term
vitality of the community. This initiative recommends a number of measures to reflect
the importance of preservation as a neighborhood revitalization tool for designated
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Preservation as a Revitalization Tool
historic homes and districts, but also for District
2 neighborhoods in general. This initiative also
identifies strategies to bring new resources to the
City’s preservation efforts.
Increase advocacy for preservation with
the City and the general public
Based on the importance that residents have
placed on preservation in community meetings,
and wealth of historic resources in the community,
stronger advocacy for preservation with the
City and the general public can increase the
awareness and impact of preservation efforts.
This advocacy should include expanded technical
assistance, outreach, education, and events,
as well as proactive identification of creative
resources to support preservation efforts.
Focused advocacy could also help to more
effectively secure limited, competitive, state
historic tax credits. While it is difficult to focus
City staff attention on preservation efforts when
the City faces budget challenges, increased
advocacy could include some combination of City
staff, an expanded role for the City’s Historical
Commission and a more robust partnership
between The Springfield Preservation Trust and
the City.
Designated Historic Properties
and Neighborhoods
Tornado Path
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Establish a revolving loan fund for
preservation
A revolving loan fund is a tool employed by many
communities to support historic preservation
efforts, and is useful for the preservation of owner-
occupied residential properties, where historic tax
credits are not available, and can be coordinated
with programs and resources offered through local
housing and community service organizations to
support neighborhood revitalization in a coordinated
and integrated manner. To maximize the impact of
revolving fund investments, loans can be targeted in
areas where residents have the greatest need, and
historic resources are most at risk. The Providence
Preservation Society Revolving Fund is a successful
local example of a revolving loan fund designed to
support neighborhood revitalization efforts. The
fund was initially capitalized with the help of CDBG
funds, corporate and foundation grants, loans from
the State Historic Preservation Office, and local
banks.
Supplement traditional preservation
resources with programs for weatherization,
energy efficiency, and green building for all
homes
While District 2 includes several signature historic
properties (including the Watershops Armory
bui l di ng and the former MacDuffi e School ),
the overall historic character of its residential
neighborhoods also represent an important
asset for the area – an asset that benefits existing
residents and can also be marketed to potential
new residents and visitors. However, economic
trends, housing markets, and other factors have
contributed to a gradual degradation of the
quality of the housing stock in District 2 over time,
including a number of properties that are now
vacant or have serious maintenance challenges.
State and federal historic tax credits are available
to support historic preservation, but requirements
for these incentives to be used for income-
producing properties limits their potential
impact in largely residential areas. The existing
housing challenges in District 2 are evidence
that these incentives alone are not enough. This
initiative recommends a deliberate strategic
effort to restore and maintain District 2’s historic
housing stock through creative resources that
can supplement traditional historic preservation
efforts. These resources could include federal,
state, and local programs, private fundraising
and donati ons, grants and i ncenti ves for
weatherization, energy efficiency, and green
building, and other sources. The community
of Lowell, Massachusetts is a local example of
such an approach. In partnership and with seed
funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s
Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, Lowell
is implementing a neighborhood-scale energy
efficiency program targeting the city’s historical
buildings. Identifying and securing creative
resources to support historic preservation
would be one of the expanded roles of a
historic preservation advocate as described
above.
Develop an emergency weatherization
and stabilization program
Where resources for preservation are limited, it
is sometimes not financially feasible to restore
properties that have fallen into disrepair.
Residents have emphasized the importance
of addressing property maintenance issues
in the District, and the City is actively working
to address vacant and abandoned properties
that have fallen into disrepair through its blight
reduction program. In some cases, homes
can be made safe and structurally sound
for a fraction of the cost of full restoration,
and sometimes for less cost that it would
require to demolish the structure. While
demolition is a necessary tool to address
blight and abandonment in the District, this
initiative recommends developing a program
that can provide emergency weatherization
and stabilization for properties of particular
historic value as a stopgap measure until these
properties can be fully restored.

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Partnerships / Stakeholders
• Springfield Preservation Trust
• Springfield Historical Commission
• Massachusetts Historical Commission
• Preservation Massachusetts
• National Park Service (through Springfield
Armory National Historic Site)
• National Trust for Historic Preservation
• Springfield Development Services Division -
Office of Planning and Economic Development
• Springfield Development Services Division -
Office of Housing
• Neighborhood groups
• Community organizations
• Housing developers
• Corporate and private donors
Resource Needs
• Capital for the revolving loan fund will need to
be raised from a combination of public and
private sources that could include corporations,
foundations, local banks, state and federal
historic preservation programs, CDBG and
HOME funds, and other resources
• Financial and organizational capacity to
increase advocacy for preservation
• Funding to support home improvements
focused on short-term stabilization, plus
long-term weatherization and energy-efficiency
measures
Potential Resources Opportunities
• While a revolving loan fund would require a
source of initial capital, operating income for
the fund could be derived in part from loan fund
interest
• Grants and private donations
• State and federal historic tax credits
• Massachusetts Historical Commission
administers a federally funded, reimbursable,
50/50 matching grant program for planning and
survey work.
• Massachusetts Preservation Projects Fund. This
State sponsored program supports preservation
through a State-funded 50% reimbursable
matching grant program.
The f ol l owi ng pr ogr ams and r esour ces
hel p homeowners wi th home repai rs and
improvements for historic and non-historic
homes:
• City of Springfield Emergency Homeowner
Repair Program: Provides technical assistance
and non-interest bearing deferred payment
loans to assist eligible low and moderate-
income households within the City of
Springfield.
• City’s Heating System repair / replace program:
Provide emergency heating system repair, pays
for the cost of an annual inspection of a fuel
burning system, or pays for the replacement of
the system, if needed. The program is intended
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
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to assist homeowners whose household income
does not exceed 60 percent of the area median
income.
• Rebuilding Together Springfield: A nonprofit
agency that provides free rehabilitation and
critical repairs to the homes of low-income
homeowners, by using volunteer labor and
donated materials. The local agency is one of
200 affiliates nation-wide.
A variety of energy-efficiency programs that may
be aligned with preservation efforts:
• Mass Save Major Renovations Program:
Provides homeowners who are renovating,
remodeling or making other home
improvements the opportunity to increase the
energy performance of the home, including
technical support, financial incentives, and other
offerings.
• Mass Save Energy Assessments: Mass Save
works with certified Energy Specialists, Home
Performance Contractors (HPCs) and
Independent Installation Contractors (IICs) to
provide high-quality Home Energy Assessments
and weatherization installations.
• Rebuild Western Massachusetts Program:
Sponsored through the Massachusetts
Department of Energy Resources; Promotes
energy efficient building practices for new
construction and repairs of residential and
commercial structures, including grant and zero
interest construction loan funds.
• Federal tax credits for residential insulation,
windows, heating and cooling systems and
water heaters.
• Weatherization Assistance Program: Funded by
the U.S. Department of Energy, the
Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP)
enables low-income families to permanently
reduce their energy bills by making their homes
more energy efficient. In Springfield, the
program is administered through Springfield
Partners for Community Action.
Action Steps
Increase advocacy for preservation with the City
and the general public
• Identify staff and volunteer capacity to support
expanded technical assistance, outreach,
education, and identify creative preservation
resources
• Advocate for projects in tornado-impacted
areas eligible for competitive state historic tax
credits
• Fill vacant appointments to Springfield
Historical Commission
Establish a revolving loan fund for preservation
• Establish a capital pool and source of operating
income
• Create an oversight structure
• Develop and formalize partnerships with
neighborhoods, housing developers ,and
community organizations
• Define criteria for eligibility to maximize impact
and support long-term goals
Supplement traditional preservation resources
wi th programs for weatheri zati on, energy
efficiency, and green building
• Identify available resources
• Compile and advertise available resources as
potential preservation tools
Develop an emergency weatherization and
stabilization program
• Develop criteria to identify properties with
historic value outside of existing designated
historic districts
• Work with Springfield Preservation Trust to
identify properties especially at risk for
demolition
• Review legal requirements and policies to
determine where and how available resources
can support interim stabilization and
weatherization for at-risk properties
Location
The Springfield Historical Commission has
identified areas where needs are most urgent
following the tornado, including areas in District
2: damaged buildings in the Maple Hill Historic
District including the MacDuffie campus and
210 Maple Street, and damaged historic but
undesignated buildings throughout the Six
Corners neighborhood.
Priority
Supportive Critical
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Precedents
Pr ovi dence Pr eser vat i on Soci et y
Revolving Fund - Providence, RI
“Rebuilding Community - A Best Practices Toolkit for
Historic Preservation and Redevelopment”
Si nce 1980, t he nonpr of i t Pr ovi dence
Preservation Society has worked to preserve
Providence’s architectural heritage and stimulate
community revitalization through advocacy,
low-interest loans, technical assistance, and
development. To that end, the Providence
Preservation Society Revolving Fund (PPSRF)
manages a capital pool that is used for
rehabilitation loans to homeowners and to
acquire abandoned property for development
and resale in targeted low and moderate
income historic neighborhoods. The capital
pool was raised from public and private sources
and includes loan funds from the Rhode
Island Historical Preservation and Heritage
Commission and Bank Rhode Island. Operating
income is obtained from interest, development
fees and other fees for services, memberships,
and grants from public and private sources.
To maximize its impact, the PPSRF targets its
resources to specific low and moderate income
historic neighborhoods that are in need of
revitalization and partners with neighborhood
steering committees and community-based
organizations to tailor strategies to meet the
needs of the area. In its 20 year history, the
PPSRF has loaned in excess of $2.5 million
for 146 restoration projects, including the
renovati on of 39 previ ousl y abandoned
buildings.
PPSRF treats housing as a component of a
comprehensive neighborhood revitalization
strategy that includes neighborhood organizing,
infrastructure improvements, promotional
activities, overall design enhancement, and
economic development initiatives.
Historic Energy Efficiency Program,
Lowell, MA - U.S. Department of Energy
With $5 million in seed funding from the U.S.
Department of Energy’s Better Buildings
Neighborhood Program, Lowell is implementing
a nei ghborhood-scal e energy effi ci ency
program targeting the city’s historic commercial
and multifamily buildings. The city created
BetterBuildings Lowell Energy Upgrade (BLEU)
in partnership with the Massachusetts Historical
Commission and the National Park Service to
demonstrate how energy efficiency upgrades
can be achieved in commercial buildings while
also adhering to historic standards.
Historic buildings often show the years of wear
and tear—especially when it comes to energy
efficiency. Windows are often old or cracked.
There is little to no insulation, and doors lack
weather stripping. BLEU has developed a suite of
solutions, to show property owners how energy
efficiency upgrades can go hand-in-hand with
historic preservation:
• To ensure energy efficiency measures won’t
conflict with preservation standards, the city
enlisted historic preservation specialists to
provide technical assistance to property owners
implementing efficiency upgrades.
• Because property owners may be concerned
about the financial feasibility of addressing both
preservation and efficiency standards, the city is
providing incentives to owners through grant
and loan programs, as well as direct install
rebates.
• Lowell plans to implement outreach and
marketing efforts such as direct mail and blast
emails to property owners to help combat a
general lack of awareness of how historic
preservation and energy efficiency can co-exist.
http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/
betterbuildings/neighborhoods/lowell_profile.html
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Major Move 2
Expand Economic Opportunity
Expanding economic opportunity includes addressing the need
for jobs in the community through a combination of support
for existing and startup businesses, and strategic use and
tailoring of available job training and workforce development
resources. Supporting businesses in District 2 both spurs job
creation and enhances the retail and services available to District
2 residents. This Major Move also focuses on the development
of vibrant neighborhood activity centers through a combination
of supportive land use policies, incentives to promote local
businesses, and strategic infrastructure improvements to catalyze
private investment. Finally, building upon the existing historic,
cultural, and institutional assets in District 2 can improve the
quality of life for existing residents, while promoting District 2
neighborhoods to new resident and visitors.
Key Initiatives
Job Training and Small Business Support
• Small Business and Entrepreneur Support for Startups and Existing Businesses
• Connecting Employers, Workforce Training, and Employees
Enhanced Neighborhood Businesses
• Clustering Around Activity Centers
• Strategic Public Investments to Support Neighborhood Businesses
Promotion and Marketing of the Community
• Neighborhood Events
• Public Realm Improvements and Programming
• Support and Shared Promotion of Local Businesses
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Expand Economic Opportunity
Job Training and
Small Business Support
The city-wide planning process is organized according to the six domains of a healthy and vibrant
community. Domains that are positively impacted by the Initiative described on this page are
indicated above.
Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social
• Small Business and Entrepreneur Support for Startups and Existing
Businesses
• Connecting Employers, Workforce Training, and Employees
While District 2 neighborhoods are primarily residential and do not include the
number or scale of employment uses found in Springfield’s downtown and other
parts of the city, there are areas such the State Street Corridor, and to a lesser degree
Walnut and Hancock Streets, with higher concentrations of businesses. District 2
residents have emphasized the need for employment and job training opportunities
in general, as well as support for neighborhood businesses that can employ local
residents and are conveniently accessible to surrounding residents. District 2 also
includes several institutions such as Springfield Technical Community College (STCC),
Springfield College, American International College, and other resources that are
important for supporting long term job growth and skill development not only for
District residents, but for the entire city.
Employment is an issue that was raised in all Districts and at every community
meeting during the planning process, and is an issue with a scale and importance
that necessitates city- and region-wide solutions. The Citywide section of this plan
addresses employment through its recommendations to “Streamline the investment
process and provide creative incentives and policies to encourage economic
development and entrepreneurship” and “Expand career/workforce development
and educational partnerships to provide all residents with an opportunity to
meaningfully contribute to Springfield’s economy and meet the needs of employers.”
Within District 2 there are opportunities to improve small business and entrepreneur
support for startups and existing businesses and to continue to enhance workforce
training resources.
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Small Business and Entrepreneur Support:
Startups
With a variety of businesses, small business
suppor t or gani zat i ons, and wor kf or ce
development initiatives, the 15 acre STCC
Technology Park represents the region’s most
significant set of small business resources. This
Park includes the Springfield Business Incubator
at the Scibelli Enterprise Center, the Western
Massachusetts chapter of SCORE (the nation’s
largest volunteer business counseling service), and
the Western Regional Office of the Massachusetts
Small Business Development Center (providing
advice to small businesses). Located in the former
Springfield Armory complex on State Street, these
considerable resources are located right at the
doorstep of District 2 neighborhoods. Affordable
lease space, free advisory and on-site business
consulting services, networking opportunities,
mentoring, access to supportive local lenders
and links with STCC’s academic programs are all
available through the Scibelli Enterprise Center .
Greater awareness and access to available small
business resources for District 2 businesses and
entrepreneurs, and strategic efforts to align
these resources with small business needs in
the surrounding neighborhood can maximize
the impact of these resources for the District,
where economic challenges are particularly
acute. Local chambers of commerce can play
an important role in connecting entrepreneurs
to resources, including increased coordination
and outreach to Latino / Hispanic entrepreneurs
through the Massachusetts Latino Chamber
of Commerce. The Springfield Chamber of
Commerce administers a Technical Assistance
Program that provides grants of up to $5,000 for
a variety of business services, and has expressed
interest in offering expanded technical assistance
(such as accounting or banking services) to small
businesses.
Small Business and Entrepreneur Support:
Existing Businesses
While assisting startups is often the focus of small
business efforts, helping existing businesses
expand is a component of small business support
that should not be overlooked. The first step
in a strategy to support existing businesses in
the district is conducting an outreach effort to
identify what existing small businesses need to
be more competitive and expand. This includes
determining needs for financing, staffing,
marketing, or other assistance. As with startups,
the STCC Technology Park is a significant
potential resource to address these needs or
gaps for existing businesses. Another resource
for existing District 2 businesses is the Western
Massachusetts Development Collaborative
(WMDC), a non-profit development corporation
that works with minority and women-owned
businesses to provide access to financing,
procurement opportuni ti es, trai ni ng and
education, and a variety of business services.
Small investment façade and shop window
i mpr ov ement pr ogr a ms c a n benef i t
neighborhood businesses and enhance the
visual appearance of streets within the District.
DevelopSpringfield operates a successful Corridor
Storefront Improvement Program that provides
grants of up to $10,000 for improvements
including restoration of architectural details,
painting, window and door replacement, signage,
lighting, and other facade work. Currently this
program is limited to Main Street and State Street,
but with supplemental funding this model could
potentially be expanded to other corridors in
District 2, particularly in tornado-impacted areas.
The City of Springfield also offers a storefront
improvement program that offers grants of up to
$10,000 through CDBG funding.
Beyond physical improvements, capital and
advisory support for existing businesses is critical.
The City’s Office of Planning and Economic
Development provides a Small Business Toolbox
that compiles a range of grants, loans, incentives,
and resources to assist small businesses, including
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tax increment financing, state tax credits, and
Section 108 loans (funded through CDBG) that
could support job-creating development activities
in District 2 and citywide. New tools to support
existing businesses in the District and throughout
the City could include a multi-day seminar to
help existing businesses scale up, expand, and
become vendors to the City’s large businesses
(Mass Mutual, Baystate Health, area colleges,
etc.). In 2011, a similar program organized by
the Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of Greater
Springfield and Baystate Health with facilitation by
Next Street, a Boston-based company, was very
successful. The Scibelli Center at STCC or other
higher education institutions could potentially
offer such a program, with assistance/sponsorship
from a local major employer. The program could
be competitive, structured, focused on existing
businesses, and emphasize “buy local” in terms
of linking larger businesses with local vendors.
Additional private sector resources to support
small businesses and help them grow include
several emerging private sector angel-investing
and mentoring programs (such as River Valley
Investors and Valley Venture Mentors) that are
largely based in Springfield and focused on
support for innovative businesses.
Connecting Employers, Workforce
Training, and Employees
Employment for District 2 residents can be
supported by conti nui ng to i mprove the
connection between employers and potential
employees through workforce training efforts.
Various initiatives to do this already exist in
Springfield, including a recently revitalized effort
by STCC and Holyoke Community College to
reach out to area businesses and better tailor
curriculum and training programs to business
needs. STCC has also been proactively forming
workforce training partnerships with regional
and national companies, particularly in the
telecommunications sector. The MassGREEN
i ni ti ati ve through STCC provi des energy
efficiency workforce training programs to help
ensure that the state has the workers and
businesses necessary to achieve ambitious energy
efficiency goals. FutureWorks is a career center
operated in support of Regional Employment
Board of Hampden County (REB) efforts to
address workforce development for the entire
region. Located at the STCC Technology Park,
FutureWorks is well located to serve District
2 residents, and provides a variety of classes,
workshops, advisory services, and employment
resources.
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A range of adult “job readiness” and literacy
programs is also critical. Located in District 2’s
Educational Corridor, the Massachusetts Career
Development Institute (MCDI) offers training to
out of school youth and adults who want to learn
a skill for job placement, with the capability to
train up to 1800 students per year. MCDI provides
career counseling services, job seeking skills
and services, and internship programs. MCDI
also provides a youth program to re-engage
disconnected youth through vocational training,
work experience, and life skill workshops.
Organizations such as YouthBuild and ETS Career
Services are also located in District 2 and provide
a variety of training, skill development, and
employment services.
FutureWorks, MCDI , and the many other
workforce training and employment assistance
services could increase their impact on District
2 neighborhoods with greater visibility and
awareness of their resources for area residents.
Increasing awareness of existing resources
includes better disseminating knowledge of many
resources available, and providing assistance in
navigating the multitude of offerings available.
(The “Coordination of Community Services”
initiative recommends strategies, including the
students to potential employers requires a
partnership between businesses and education
institutions where businesses communicate
their skill needs with area colleges, and colleges
respond with curriculum and career development
programs to prepare students to meet those
needs. The relationship between business and
education institutions is addressed in the Citywide
section of this plan, but the presence of major
education institutions, career training resources in
District 2 and the particular need for quality jobs
for area residents makes this effort particularly
critical in District 2.

development a community resource network, that
may help improve the efficiency, effectiveness,
and awareness of existing workforce development
programs.)
Job training efforts that focus on growing
economic sectors where Springfield maintains
competitive advantages in comparison to other
regions, such as financial services, medical and
nursing professions, and precision manufacturing,
can help to maximize the long term benefit
and opportunity for District 2 residents, and
support the City’s economic development
goals. Companies including Baystate Health,
Liberty Mutual, and Smith and Wesson have
undertaken training and development programs
in Springfield. With continued focus on key
industries, there is potential with successful
programs to simultaneously enhance opportunity
for j ob seekers, strengthen Spri ngfi el d’ s
major employers and growth engines, and
position Springfield for long-term economic
competitiveness.
There is an opportunity to better match high
school and college students with the city’s
successful companies through mutually beneficial
internship and training opportunities. Linking
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
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• Local businesses (from small entrepreneurs to
major corporations)
• Local banks
Resource Needs
• Resources to promote and increase awareness
of available small business and workforce
development services
• Resources for physical improvements to
businesses
• Resources for existing businesses to scale up
and expand
• Sponsorship for potential small-business
seminar
• Skills and training for District residents to
compete and find employment
• Internship opportunities
Potential Resource Opportunities
• The City’s Economic Development Incentive
Program combines local TIF financing and
property tax abatement with a suite of state
incentives including 5 percent state investment
tax credit and 10 percent abandoned building
tax credit
• Section 108 is a loan guarantee provision of the
Community Development Block Grant (CDBG)
Program that provides communities with a
source of financing for physical and economic
revitalization projects. Section 108 allows cities
to transform a portion of the CDBG funds into
federally guaranteed loans that can provide
resources and confidence for private
investment.
• CDBG Small Business Loan Program: Typically
$1,000 to $10,000 to support job creation and
elimination of blight
• Scibelli Enterprise Center and Small Business
Incubator: Low-cost space, advisory services,
classes, lending support, networking
• Futureworks: Classes, workshops, advisory
services, employment assistance
• Technical Assistance Program: Up to $5,000 for
a variety of business services
• Corridor Storefront Improvement Program (if
expanded): Up to $10,000 for façade
improvements
• Neighborhood Storefront Improvement
Program: up to $10,000 for façade
improvements
• Massachusetts Career Development Institute
(MCDI) provides out of school youth and adults
career counseling services, job seeking skills
and services, internship programs, and a youth
program to re-engage disconnected youth.
• Baystate-Springfield Educational Partnership
Partnerships / Stakeholders
• Springfield Technical Community College
(STCC)
• STCC Technology Park
• Scibelli Enterprise Center
• Springfield Business Incubator
• Western Mass Regional Small Business
Development Center
• Western Massachusetts SCORE
• Regional Employment Board
• FutureWorks career center
• Springfield College
• University of Massachusetts
• American International College
• Massachusetts Career Development Institute
• Western Massachusetts Development
Collaborative (WMDC)
• Massachusetts Office of Business Development
• YouthBuild Springfield
• Springfield Chamber of Commerce and
Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of Greater
Springfield
• Massachusetts Latino Chamber of Commerce
• Develop Springfield
• Springfield Development Services Division –
Office of Planning and Economic Development
• River Valley Investors
• Valley Venture Mentors
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between Baystate and Springfield Public
Schools
• The Big Y supermarket chain operates a
program called the Springfield Work
Scholarship Connection that links students with
mentors, called youth advocates, starting at the
transition between the 8th and 9th grade.
Students apply for summer jobs at the Big Y and
receive on-the-job coaching. Students also
participate in workshops and other learning
opportunities.
• The Martin Luther King Jr. Center (located in the
Old Hill neighborhood but serving all of
Springfield) receives funding to help a small
number of young adults tap workforce
opportunities while earning a stipend. The
young adults find jobs at community-based
organizations in the area that are willing to hire
former offenders and provide them with the
opportunity to learn on-the-job skills
• YouthBuild Springfield is located in District 2
along State Street and offers job training,
education, counseling and leadership
development opportunities to unemployed and
out-of-school young adults between the ages of
17 and 24.
• The MassGREEN Initiative at STCC was
established in July 2009 to develop and deliver
energy efficiency workforce training programs
under the state’s Energy Efficiency and Building
Science Initiative and help ensure that
Massachusetts has the quality and quantity of
workers and businesses needed to achieve the
state’s ambitious energy efficiency goals.
• The New England Business Associates (NEBA)
Business Consulting Center provides
entrepreneurial training and support to
individuals with disabilities, from the
development of a business concept and the
writing of business plans, to the implementation
of the business. Business support services also
include individualized consultations and sales
assistance.
• Common Capital (CC), formerly the Western
Massachusetts Enterprise Fund, helps
individuals and small businesses finance their
business needs through loan programs and also
provides technical assistance through
collaboration with regional organizations.
• U.S. Small Business Administration. Property
owners impacted by the tornado are eligible for
special disaster recovery loans from the Small
Business Administration (SBA). Approved loans
can be increased for protective measures to
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Priority
Supportive Critical
• Work with local chambers of commerce
(including the Massachusetts Latino Chamber of
Commerce headquartered in Springfield) to
expand their role in connecting entrepreneurs
to resources
Small Business and Entrepreneur Support:
Existing Businesses
• Conduct an outreach effort to identify what
existing small businesses need to be more
competitive and expand. This includes
determining needs for financing, staffing, or
other assistance
• Explore potential to expand Corridor Storefront
Improvement Program to other corridors in
District 2, particularly in tornado-impacted areas
• Hold a seminar to help existing businesses scale
up, expand, and become vendors for
Springfield’s large businesses
Connecting Employers, Workforce Training, and
Employees
• Organize partnerships between businesses and
education institutions where businesses
communicate their skill needs with area
lessen similar future damages. Additionally,
small businesses and most private nonprofit
organizations can obtain loans for unmet
working capital needs.
• MassDevelopment. MassDevelopment
provides real estate and equipment financing
with higher advance rates and low interest rates
to help for-profit and nonprofit organizations
grow their businesses. With financing tools
including development funds, tax-exempt
bonds, loans, and guarantees, they can provide
financing at any stage of a project – from
predevelopment to permanent financing.
Action Steps
Small Business and Entrepreneur Support:
Existing Businesses
• Improve awareness, understanding and ease of
access of the many existing small business
resources available to District 2 businesses and
entrepreneurs by increasing outreach into the
neighborhoods.
• Address the acute employment challenges in
District 2 by identifying the small business needs
in District 2 neighborhoods and strategically
aligning programming and resources to meet
those needs
colleges, and colleges respond with curriculum
and career development programs to prepare
students to meet those needs
• Increase the impact of existing workforce
development programs through efforts to
increase awareness and visibility for District 2
residents
Project Location
Employment and business development are
critical for residents and business owners
throughout the District. The Scibelli Enterprise
Center, Springfield Business Incubator, and
FutureWorks Career Center are all located at
Springfield Technical Community College, making
this an important location for job training and
small business support for the District.
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Precedents
The Watershops Armory building located at 1 Allen Street
already functions as an informal business incubator in District
2. The following precedents provide examples of how the use
of this facility could be enhanced to transform what is already
a community asset into a truly unique anchor that strengthens
the area economy and adds vitality to the surrounding activity
center:
Nashville Entrepreneurship Center, Nashville, TN
Nashville’s Entrepreneur Center helps individuals start
businesses through events, mentorship, training, resources,
and access to investors. The center is located in downtown
Nashville, and benefits from the area’s lively atmosphere.
The center is a non-profit 501c3 organization and is funding
through sponsorships, partnerships, donations, and grants
CoCo (Coworking and Collaborative Space),
Minneapolis, MN
CoCo i s a coworki ng and col l aborati ve space f or
entrepreneurs, freelancers, and other solo and remote workers.
This open office space is located in the historic Minneapolis
Grain Exchange building. CoCo provides office amenities and
a chance to collaborate for workers who do not have offices.
CoCo (Coworking and Collaborative Space)
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Expand Economic Opportunity
Enhanced Neighborhood
Businesses
The city-wide planning process is organized according to the six domains of a healthy and vibrant
community. Domains that are positively impacted by the Initiative described on this page are
indicated above.
Cultural Physical Economic Organizational Educational Social
• Clustering Around Activity Centers
• Strategic Public Investments to Support Neighborhood Businesses
District 2 residents have identified the need for enhanced neighborhood-oriented
businesses, including greater access to basic retail and services to meet everyday
needs. Residents seek a greater quality and variety of businesses that are convenient,
walkable, and accessible within the neighborhood. In addition to concerns about
commercial properties that are run-down or vacant, residents have also expressed
concerns about the proliferation of certain businesses such as liquor stores and
payday loan establishments.
The rebuilding process presents an opportunity to enhance neighborhood businesses
to better meet resident needs, attract visitors, and provide local jobs. A mix of
supportive land use policies, incentives and tools for neighborhood businesses, and
strategic infrastructure improvements can together help to create vibrant, attractive,
walkable neighborhood activity centers. These transformed activity centers can in turn
better attract and support the neighborhood establishments that residents desire.
Clustering Around Activity Centers
With the exception of the State Street corridor, at the northern edge of District
2, commercial uses in the district are neighborhood scale. Walnut Street, Hancock
Street, and to a lesser extent Central Street are eclectic corridors with a mix
of residential and commercial uses. These corridors are products of historical
development patterns not found in newer development elsewhere in the city, and are
important assets in creating the vibrant, complete, urban neighborhoods residents
envision for the District.
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Existing Commercial Corridors and Activity Centers
S
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Six Corners Intersection
Watershops
Armory Area
Neighborhood Activity
Centers
Commercial Corridors
Existing Commercial and
Business Zoning
Tornado Path
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There are centers of activity where these corridors
converge within the tornado-affected areas at
the Six Corners Intersection and the Watershops
Armory area. Clustering new uses, investment,
and development around these activity centers
is important to focus energy and resources, and
create a critical mass of interest and activity.
Focusing on these activity centers also maximizes
the impact of targeted infrastructure investments
such streetscape improvements, and helps to
create identifiable destinations that are attractive
and inviting to surrounding residents and
visitors alike. Established, healthy, pedestrian-
scale activity centers can begin to have positive
spillover impacts on surrounding corridors and
residential areas in terms of perception, interest,
and investment. Areas in close proximity to the
Six Corners Intersection, Watershops Armory
Area, Springfield College, and other anchors
also happen to be areas heavily impacted by the
tornado, where new interest and investment is
most needed.
It is important that the appropriate zoning is in
place to focus activity around key neighborhood
centers, permit interesting, eclectic mixed use
corridors while managing impacts on residential
uses, and elevate the design quality of commercial
development within the district. The City’s
proposed zoning ordinance is generally well-
positioned to accomplish those tasks. Most of
the commercial corridors and activity centers are
proposed to be zoned as “Business A” districts
which are described as pedestrian oriented
shopping districts with residential allowed. Some
corridors include “Commercial A” districts, which
are intended for small scale retail and services,
while some locations include “Commercial B”
districts intended for more intense uses than
allowed in Business A. All of these districts permit
the commercial, residential, and mixed uses that
together create the unique urban character of
District 2 corridors, and the proposed zoning
code establishes a system of design review that
allows greater scrutiny for more intense uses with
greater potential impacts on the neighborhood.
For example, while the “Business B” district
permits a variety of automotive uses that may not
be compatible with the existing neighborhood
character, these uses require a Special Permit
Review by City Council, ensuring that there is an
opportunity evaluate whether or how such uses
might be developed on a particular site.
The pr oposed zoni ng code cr eat es a
“Neighborhood Commercial Overlay District”
which includes design standards intended to
create a human scale place with pedestrian
amenities, sign rules, window requirements, and
other features. While such an overlay district is
not currently proposed for the tornado-impacted
areas, this may be a tool to enhance the design
and appearance of key activity centers in the
District, including the Six Corners Intersection
and Watershops Armory area. The proposed
zoning code also creates a new “Mixed Use
Industrial” district intended for sites with a variety
of compatible uses including light industrial,
residential, services, retail, and office. This new
district may be appropriate for a re-envisioned
Watershops Armory site at 1 Allen Street (see
Watershops Armory Implementation Opportunity).
Strategic Public Investments to Support
Neighborhood Businesses
In areas that were experiencing a lack of
investment even before the June 1st tornado, the
rebuilding process provides a chance to change
the existing economic trajectory by creating
vibrant, attractive, walkable places that are more
likely to spur private investment. Demonstrating
public commitment to these areas through
infrastructure, facility improvements, and other
public investments is a powerful tool to attract a
higher quality, more diverse mix of businesses
within the District.
Physical improvements are the most visible public
investments in the community. In the public realm
these investments could include infrastructure
upgrades such as streetscape improvements,
sidewalk repairs, or enhancements to transit
stops. Public investments could also include
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Springfield Zoning Districts under Proposed Zoning Ordinance
R E B U I L D S P R I N G F I E L D
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facility improvements such as the construction
of a new Brookings school (See “Streetscape
Improvements,” “Safe and Convenient Transit,”
and “Quality Schools as Community Anchors”
Initiatives). Public investment in physical
improvements also comes in the form of grants,
loans, and other resources that assist private
businesses and property owners with upgrades
to their property (see the Job Training and
Small Business Support Initiative for a summary
of available façade and business improvement
programs).
The City’s Blight Reduction Program to remove
vacant, abandoned, or structurally unsound
structures, and the temporary activation of
storefronts with arts, educational, and other
creative uses are two other examples of programs
that can have a visible impact and improve the
appearance of commercial areas. In addition
to physical improvements, land use and zoning
policies that set expectations for higher quality
development, and small business tools that help
neighborhood businesses to be successful also
represent important public commitments to
creating more vibrant places.
Partnerships / Stakeholders
• Springfield Development Services – Office of
Planning and Economic Development
• Springfield Development Services Division –
Office of Neighborhood Services
• Springfield Department of Public Works
• Springfield Chamber of Commerce and
Affiliated Chambers of Commerce of Greater
Springfield
• Massachusetts Latino Chamber of Commerce
• DevelopSpringfield
• Springfield Redevelopment Authority
• 1 Allen Street
• Local Businesses
Resource Needs
• Appropriate zoning tools to focus activity in key
neighborhood centers, permit eclectic mixed
use corridors, mitigate negative impacts, and
elevate design quality; while the City’s proposed
zoning ordinance is generally well-positioned
to accomplish these goals, targeted rezoning or
overlay districts may be helpful
• Financing for infrastructure improvements
to support neighborhood activity centers,
including streetscapes, transit stops, public
facilities, and others
• Resources for commercial building
improvements, small business supp