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Metro Weekly - 04-26-12 - Youth Pride

Metro Weekly - 04-26-12 - Youth Pride

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Metro Weekly's special issue: Youth Pride
Metro Weekly's special issue: Youth Pride

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Published by: MetroWeekly on Apr 30, 2012
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APRIL 26, 2012 WASHINGTON’S GAY & LESBIAN NEWSMAGAZINE

pride
youth
2O12
SPECIAL ISSUE
LANDMARK: IN A MAJOR DECISION, EEOC RULES THAT TRANS WOMAN IS
PROTECTED UNDER FEDERAL SEX-DISCRIMINATION LAW. BY CHRIS GEIDNER
6 APRIL 26, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
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Now online at MetroWeekly.com
Catch the latest in News, Arts, Nightlife
and much more, every day online.
President Obama speaking at March 2011 White House Bullying Prevention Conference
Obama endorses two bills tackling bullying in schools
Presidential Support
by Chris Geinder
T
HE WHITE HOUSE
announced April 20
that President Obama is
endorsing the Safe Schools
Improvement Act (SSIA) and Student
Non-Discrimination Act (SNDA), two
bills pending in Congress to address
bullying and discrimination faced by
students across the nation.
White House spokesman Shin Inouye
tells Metro Weekly, “The president and
his administration have taken many
steps to address the issue of bullying.
He is proud to support the Student
Non-Discrimination Act, introduced
by Sen. [Al] Franken (D-Minn.) and
Congressman [Jared] Polis (D-Colo.),
and the Safe Schools Improvement
Act, introduced by Sen. [Robert] Casey
(D-Pa.) and Congresswoman Linda
Sánchez (D-Calif.). These bills will help
ensure that all students are safe and
healthy and can learn in environments
free from discrimination, bullying and
harassment.”
The SSIA would amend the Safe and
Drug-Free Schools and Communities
Act to include bullying- and harassment-
prevention programs, including ones
based on sexual orientation or gender
identity. The SNDA, modeled after Title
IX, would add sexual orientation and
gender identity to federal education
nondiscrimination law.
White House senior advisor Valerie
Jarrett, in a blog post, noted the news,
writing, “Recently, I watched the
movie Bully with my mom. We were
both deeply moved by the film and the
stories it tells of students, families, and
communities impacted by bullying.”
She went on to note the
administration’s work to address
bullying, then added, “We also hope
that Congress will take action to ensure
that all students are safe and healthy
and can learn in environments free
from discrimination, bullying, and
harassment by passing the Student Non-
Discrimination Act (SNDA) and the
Safe Schools Improvement Act (SSIA).
These pieces of legislation are critically
important to addressing bullying in
our schools and safeguarding our most
vulnerable students.”
The news comes, Inouye wrote,
as, “the White House Office of Public
Engagement is holding a screening of
the documentary Bully at the White
House with bullying prevention
advocates from a wide range of
communities.”
More than a year ago, the president
held the first White House conference
dedicated to discussing bullying
prevention and sharing ideas and
strategies for combating the problem.
Gay, Lesbian & Straight Education
Network (GLSEN) Executive Director
Eliza Byard said in an April 20 statement,
“Today’s announcement is a vital show
of support to students everywhere of all
identities, backgrounds and beliefs who
face bullying and harassment in school.
By speaking out on GLSEN’s Day of
Silence in support of these two critical
bills, the President has given greater
hope to students who often feel that
they have nowhere to turn. It is deeply
moving to know that lesbian, gay,
bisexual and transgender students who
face the multiple threats of harassment,
violence and discrimination have the
President as an ally in their efforts to
win all of the protections that they
deserve.”
Before the April 20 announcement,
Inouye and other administration
officials had said the administration
supported the goals of both of the bills,
but there was no specific endorsement
of either bill. Specifically, Inouye told
LGBTNews
8 APRIL 26, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
Marine Killed
in Possible Hate
Crime
Witnesses say fellow Marine
suspect claims self defense in Bar-
racks Row stabbing
by John Riley
A MARINE FROM CAMP LEJEUNE,
N.C., was fatally stabbed in Southeast
D.C. early Saturday, April 21, following
an altercation with another Marine who
allegedly used a homophobic slur before
attacking the victim.
According to a press release from
the Metropolitan Police Department,
forwarded by Capt. Edward Delgado of
the MPD’s Special Liaison Unit, which
includes the Gay and Lesbian Liaison
Unit (GLLU), officers from MPD’s
First District responded to a stabbing
in the 700 block of 8th Street SE at
approximately 2:41 a.m. Saturday. This
strip of 8th Street is known as Barracks
Row, named for the Marine Barracks
on the block, also home to several
restaurants and bars.
Upon arrival, police found the victim
suffering from a stab wound. Information
uncovered during the preliminary
investigation indicated the victim and
suspected assailant were engaged in
a verbal altercation during which the
suspect used an anti-gay epithet.
D.C. Fire and Emergency Medical
Services personnel transported the
victim, identified as Philip Bushong, 23, to
Washington Medstar Hospital where he was
pronounced dead at 3:58 a.m. An autopsy
News 1 Schools (you’ve got)
News 2 Stabbing (you’ve got)
News 3 Endorsements (editing)
News 4 LCR (editing)
News 5 Bullying (editing)
News 6 March (I need to pull it from online and edit.)
Metro Weekly in March 2011, “We support
the goals of both of these bills. This year,
when the Elementary and Secondary
Education Act is being considered, we
look forward to working with Congress
to ensure that all students are safe and
healthy and can learn in environments
free from discrimination, bullying and
harassment.”
When the Senate Health, Education,
Labor and Pensions Committee
considered the Elementary and Secondary
Education Reauthorization Act of 2011, it
passed the bill in October 2011 without
inclusion of or even a vote on either the
SNDA or the SSIA.
The SSIA was reintroduced by Sens.
Casey and Mark Kirk (R-Ill.) the week
of the White House bullying conference
in 2011 and currently has 38 co-sponsors.
The House version, introduced the next
month Rep. Sánchez, currently has 147
co-sponsors. The SNDA, meanwhile,
was reintroduced by Rep. Polis and
Sen. Franken the week of the bullying
conference in 2011. The House bill has
157 co-sponsors, and the Senate version
has 37 co-sponsors.
Human Rights Campaign President
Joe Solmonese said in a statement, “The
President’s endorsement of the SNDA
and SSIA recognizes the importance of
providing LGBT students with the same
civil rights protections as other students.
No student should feel scared when
walking into their school and these bills
would address the discrimination and
bullying that our youth have endured for
far too long.”
Regarding the SNDA, the American
Civil Liberties Union, which has strongly
pressed the bill, called the development
“key.”
“Having the White House stand behind
the Student Non-Discrimination Act is
key to getting this necessary legislation
passed into law,” Ian Thompson, ACLU
legislative representative, said in a
statement. “Our public schools should be
a safe harbor for our youth, not a place
of exclusion and ridicule. By passing
the Student Non-Discrimination Act,
Congress can have a profound and very
real impact in improving the lives of
LGBT students. It’s time to make passage
of this bill a priority.”
The news comes as the White House
has faced blistering criticism – from
LGBT advocates to The Washington Post
editorial board – for Obama’s decision
not to pursue an executive order banning
federal contractors from discriminating
against employees on the basis of sexual
orientation or gender identity.
Friday’s endorsement also comes one
day after The Huffington Post’s Amanda
Terkel reported on New Mexico U.S.
Senate candidate Heather Wilson’s
comments criticizing the SNDA.
Several others offered statements
regarding the president’s endorsement.
“I’m extremely pleased that
President Obama has endorsed my
Student Non-Discrimination Act, which
will help ensure that LBGT students
can attend school free of harassment,
discrimination and violence,” said Polis.
“This endorsement is an enormous step
forward for equality, but on a human
level it is about the right of any student
in America to attend school and learn
without the fear of being bullied. I intend
to work with President Obama and
Senator Franken, who introduced the
companion bill, to see that the Student
Non-Discrimination Act becomes the law
of the land.”
Mara Keisling, executive director of
the National Center for Transgender
Equality said, “These two safe schools
bills are just tremendously important
to trans youth and President Obama’s
endorsement is another example of his
broad commitment to trans people and
trans issues. According to the National
Transgender Discrimination Survey,
trans and gender nonconforming
young people face startling amounts of
harassment, assault and sexual violence
at school, with more extreme rates of
harassment and violence among trans
youth of color. Trans kids are hurting and
we have a way to stop that. Congress must
act quickly to protect our transgender
young people.”
Jeff Krehely, Center for American
Progress vice president, said, “Together,
these bills offer a comprehensive approach
to ensure that all children – including
those who are gay and transgender – in
our nation’s public schools have a safe and
positive environment in which to learn.
President Obama should be commended
for his leadership on this issue. We hope
that the administration continues raising
awareness of this problem and its impact
on gay and transgender youth.”
National Gay and Lesbian Task Force
Executive Director Rea Carey said,
“We have a responsibility to ensure all
young people are protected from this
pervasive bullying, discrimination and
abuse. Parents, educators, policymakers
— all of us — need to stand against this
unacceptable behavior. The president did
that today. We urge him to now help get
these life-saving bills through Congress.”
And from Abbe Land, executive director
of the Trevor Project: “At The Trevor
Project, we know that young people who
are at risk to harm themselves, including
attempting suicide, are less likely to do
so if they know of one resource that
they can safely turn to in times of crisis.
By endorsing these important pieces of
legislation, the Obama Administration is
sending a strong message to ensure every
school and university has the support
and responsibility to be a life-saving, life-
affirming resource.” l
LGBTNews
10 APRIL 26, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
by the D.C. Medical Examiner revealed that
Bushong had been killed by a single stab
wound that had punctured his heart, and
ruled the manner of death a homicide.
Police arrested 20-year-old Michael
Joseph Poth of Southeast D.C., who
has been charged with second-degree
murder while armed.
According to charging documents, a
Marine on post at 8th and G Streets
SE saw Poth walking southbound on
8th Street SE, while Bushong and a
companion were walking north. As their
paths crossed, Poth exchanged words
with Bushong, prompting Bushong to
turn around and follow Poth.
The Marine who witnessed the
incident told police that Poth said, “I’m
going to stab you.” The witness said he
saw Bushong grab Poth’s shoulder and
Poth motion with his hand as if he was
going to throw a punch. The witness also
told police that Poth had a knife in his
hand and thrust it into Bushong, causing
him to fall to the ground. The witness
then yelled for two other Marines to
detain Poth, which they did.
According to the charging documents,
the second and third witnesses saw the
confrontation between the two men,
chased Poth and detained him. One
of those men told police that when he
detained Poth, Poth had a knife clipped
to his right front pants pocket that was
closed and covered with blood.
A fourth witness, referred to as “it” in
the charging documents, told police that a
short, young white male, with short blond
hair and blue jeans, and tattoos on his arm,
had been walking in the area of 8th Street
around 1:30 or 2 a.m. The witness heard
the man say, “I’m going to stab somebody,
or cut their lungs out; they are fucking with
the wrong person.” The fourth witness’s
description matches Poth’s appearance.
According to charging documents, even
after Poth was detained at the crime scene,
he let loose a string of statements such
as “Call me boots and the fight started,”
“Marines control me and my brain,” “You
start with me and I’m going to defend
myself,” “He was talking shit, so I stabbed
him,” and “He punched me in my face,
so I stabbed him.” After overhearing a
radio transmission about Bushong being
transported to the hospital, Poth allegedly
said, “Good, I hope he dies.”
When interviewed by Metropolitan
Police, Poth told them he stabbed
Bushong because Bushong had punched
him in the head, and that he was defending
himself. According to police, he pointed
to his head where he had supposedly been
punched, but detectives did not report
any wounds or abrasions, and Poth did
not request any medical treatment.
On April 22, OutServe, the association
of actively serving LGBT U.S. military
personnel, issued the following statement:
“We are deeply saddened by the death of
Lance Corporal Phil Bushong at the hands
of a fellow Marine. We are troubled by the
specter that this might have been a hate
crime; if so, we anticipate the authorities
will pursue it to the fullest extent of the law.
“This is particularly upsetting since,
overall, gay and lesbian Marines have been
accepted and treated equally in the force since
the repeal of ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.’ We look
forward to the results of a swift and thorough
investigation of this tragic incident.”
Bill Miller, a spokesman for the U.S.
Attorney’s Office for the District of
Columbia, said the U.S. Attorney’s Office
will be prosecuting the case.
Appearing in D.C. Superior Court
before Judge Karen Howze, Monday,
April 23, Poth was held without bond as
he awaits his preliminary hearing, which
has been scheduled for May 15. l
LGBTNews
12 APRIL 26, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
McDuffie, Day Net
Endorsements
As election approaches, candidates
woo LGBT voters to break away
from crowded field
by John Riley
IT’S ENDORSEMENT TIME IN THE
Ward 5 race.
With less than a month remaining
before the May 15 special election to
replace former Ward 5 Councilmember
Harry Thomas Jr. (D), the candidates
seeking to replace him are reaching out
to various groups, including the LGBT
community, as they scramble for the votes
needed to tip the election in their favor.
Thomas, who earned praise from LGBT
advocates after voting in favor of the District’s
marriage-equality law in 2009 despite fierce
opposition from some constituent groups in
his ward, pleaded guilty to embezzlement
and tax fraud in January.
In an effort to find a candidate who
would be at least as strong an ally as
Thomas, several LGBT groups have been
grilling the field of candidates on their
positions on issues ranging from marriage
equality to anti-transgender employment
discrimination.
On April 19, six of the nine Democratic
candidates running for the Ward 5 seat
presented themselves to the Gertrude
Stein Democratic Club, among the city’s
most prominent partisan clubs, to vie for
the LGBT club’s endorsement. With David
Mariner, executive director of The DC
Center, moderating, Kenyan McDuffie,
Drew Hubbard, Shelly Gardner, Frank
Wilds, Ron Magnus and Kathy Henderson
fielded questions about LGBT issues.
Candidate Ruth Marshall was
absent due to a scheduling conflict, and
organizers said they were unable to reach
candidate Rae Zapata. The remaining
Democrat, Delano Hunter, initially
accepted, but later backed out.
Hunter came under fire during his 2010
primary race against Thomas when he
said he would have opposed the marriage-
equality law. He also attended an Aug. 15
rally held by the National Organization
for Marriage (NOM) opposing marriage
equality, and received campaign donations
and other support from NOM.
Stein Club President Lateefah
Williams read to the group a statement
Hunter submitted to the Stein Democrats.
In it, Hunter thanked the group for the
invitation, but said he would not appear
after being advised that LGBT leaders
closely tied to Stein had made statements
indicating Hunter would not be favored
for the endorsement.
“I completed both the GLAA and
the Gertrude Stein Democratic Club
questionnaire, neither for political
gain nor favor, but rather as a means
to continue establishing working
relationships between myself and the
LGBT community,” Hunter said in
his statement. “I would like to extend
again my sincere apology to the LGBT
community for materials disseminated
unbeknownst to our campaign throughout
Ward 5 during the 2010 primary election.
Furthermore, neither me nor members
of my campaign condone rhetoric that
pushes intolerance. Our shared interests
and concerns should trump any personal
political agenda, and if elected as the next
Ward 5 councilmember, I look forward to
discussing these issues with the Gertrude
Stein Democratic Club in a more fair and
objective environment.”
Prior to the Stein Club meeting,
the Gay and Lesbian Activists Alliance
(GLAA) of Washington, D.C., asked all 11
Ward 5 candidates, including Republican
Tim Day and Independent John C.
Cheeks, similar policy questions. GLAA
does not endorse candidates, but it does
rate them on a scale of -10 to 10.
Hubbard, who has worked for the
past seven years as a legislative director
and policy aide for former Mayor
Anthony Williams and Councilmembers
Kwame Brown (D-At Large) Marion
Barry (D-Ward 8) and Michael Brown
(I-At Large), began his remarks to the
Stein Club citing his 5.5 GLAA rating,
the highest of all 11 candidates. As the
meeting continued, the largest Stein blocs
appeared to form behind Hubbard and
McDuffie. GLAA rated McDuffie a 4.
The three other Democrats to complete
the GLAA questionnaire, Zapata, Magnus
and Hunter, received scores of 2, 1.5 and
0.5, respectively, with Hunter losing
two points for his ties to NOM and for
accepting $5,500 in bundled donations
from the Stadium Club, a Ward 5 strip
club, which financially benefited from the
sale of a warehouse that was intended to
house an HIV/AIDS nonprofit.
On the first round of Stein Club
balloting, McDuffie earned 54.7 percent
of votes, compared to Hubbard’s second-
place showing, 23.8 percent of the 42
ballots cast. The remainder fell to the
other candidates, as well as votes for
no endorsement. With no candidate
meeting the club’s 60 percent threshold
for endorsement initially, McDuffie won
endorsement in a run-off with Hubbard,
securing 70.4 percent of the votes.
“This endorsement really means
a lot to me,” McDuffie said following
his victory. “I came before you all two
years ago, and I didn’t get it, but I didn’t
disappear. I worked with folks in the
LGBT community. I know that your issues
are my issues. Our concerns are similar
concerns. … I look forward to working with
everybody who’s a member of Gertrude
Stein and everybody who’s a member of
the LGBT community so we can positively
change how we do politics in Ward 5.”
But LGBT support has not only gone
to Democrats. Republican Tim Day, an
out gay man who ran against Thomas
in the 2010 general election and helped
expose the councilmember’s corruption,
has been getting his own endorsements.
Day, who earned a 5 rating from the
GLAA, beating out every Democrat
except Hubbard, has received the backing
of the D.C. Log Cabin Republicans and the
Gay and Lesbian Victory Fund, a national
organization that seeks to elect openly
LGBT, qualified candidates.
Robert Turner, the president of DC
Log Cabin Republicans, said that his
organization was enthusiastically backing
Day. Turner said Log Cabin has donated
to Day’s campaign and will be organizing
volunteers for voter-outreach efforts.
“I think Tim’s message resonates with
voters once people remove the idea of
Democrat or Republican from a candidate
and just look at the candidate for what
they stand for, what they’ve done in the
community, what their track record is,”
Turner said. “Then they see that this is
a good person, he would do well on the
council, he represents my views, my
values, and he would help weed out bad
and unethical behavior like he’s already
done with Harry Thomas Jr.”
Added Denis Dison, Victory Fund
vice president of communications: “Tim
is an accomplished and committed
community leader, a small business
owner and a good government activist
who has already made a difference for his
Ward. As an openly gay person of color,
Tim’s service on the D.C. City Council
would also reflect the diversity of the
city’s LGBT community. He’s incredibly
well-qualified to help lead D.C., and we’re
proud to endorse him.” l
marketplace - real estate
13 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 26, 2012
marketplace - real estate
14 APRIL 26, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
15 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 26, 2012
Lanier Meets with
LCR-DC
Police chief talks to gay Republicans
about bias crime
by John Riley
With a mix of blunt honesty, cheerfulness
and quick-witted humor, Metropolitan
Police Department Chief Cathy Lanier
charmed the members of the DC Log
Cabin Republicans at the group’s April 18
meeting, during which she spoke candidly
about MPD’s efforts to combat overall
crime, and, more specifically, crimes with
a bias motivation.
Lanier told the assembled audience
at the Camden Roosevelt on 16th
Street NW that there were two factors
contributing to many recent crimes
committed against members of the LGBT
community: perception of affluence
and gentrification. Lanier also praised a
March 20 grassroots-organized march
against hate crimes, saying it was “one
of the most amazing things” she’d seen
because it galvanized huge cross-sections
of different communities within the
District.
Lanier also voiced her disdain for
“Prostitution Free Zones.”
“It’s the city’s attempt at no-loitering
laws,” she told the group. “It’s saying, ‘I
have a reasonable belief that you are going
to commit a crime – move on.’ It makes us
put in lots of effort for little result.”
Most Log Cabin members told Metro
Weekly afterward that they were highly
impressed with Lanier.
“I wish she’d run for mayor,” one man
was overheard saying. Then, quickly
rethinking it, he said, “But it’s probably
better that you don’t know the police
chief’s political beliefs.”
Robert Turner, president of Log Cabin,
said he was grateful that Lanier was able
to appear in person.
“When I made the ask, I didn’t actually
think we’d get the chief,” Turner said. “I
know Gertrude Stein had a deputy come
speak to them, but she had the time, and
she was willing to speak with us. We’re
very thrilled about it.”
And extended version of this story is
available online at MetroWeekly.com l
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APRIL 26, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
professional services
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Connections
METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 26, 2012
Interns Get the Job Done
A small investment today may yield benefits well into tomorrow
by Kate Karasmeighan
With Youth Pride Day this Saturday,
April 28, and the Capital Area Gay
and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce
(CAGLCC) Nonprofit and Association
Lunch May 2 focusing on interns, it’s a
fine time to spotlight the important role
youth play in D.C.’s workplace.
Those who work with interns know
there is a certain amount of effort
involved in bringing new folks to an
organization. You have to train them on
the work you do. You have to walk them
through work that sometimes takes a
little more time to explain than just
doing it yourself. But making that effort
yields great benefit.
“The more interns you have, and
the better their experience is, the more
people you have going out into the
community being great mouthpieces
for your organization,” says Felicia
Powers, director of human resources
at the National Gay & Lesbian Chamber
of Commerce. “Your interns are going
to be professionals somewhere –
and just because they’re not in your
office anymore, that doesn’t mean the
relationship ends. Investment in interns
is a long-term effort, but so worth it.”
Jeanie Adkins, development manager
at Mautner Project (and a member of
CAGLCC’s Board) shares a success
story demonstrating how internships
can also be a great way to make a career
transition.
“One of the most rewarding things
about my job is giving someone an
opportunity to pursue their passion and
make a difference. Riana Buford interned
with me after realizing broadcasting
wasn’t for her,” says Adkins. “Now she’s
our associate for educational programs
and is an incredible asset to our team.”
Buford reflects on her journey: “After
graduating from Howard University, I
realized television production wasn’t
what I wanted to do forever. I wanted
to make a difference. I lost my mom
in 2010 to breast cancer and decided I
wanted to help other people who were
dealing with the same thing. Interning
at Mautner Project was the perfect fit
for me! Thanks to a grant from [the
Department of Health], I was eventually
hired. I suggest interning at a nonprofit
and working your way up, especially if
it’s something you’re passionate about.”
The Youth Pride Alliance (YPA) is
another wonderful resource for youth
development. As Jessica Rotem, a YPA
board member, says, “We believe youth
engagement is vital to a successful
Youth Pride Day and honoring our
mission. The youth involved in OSSE’s
Youth Advisory Committee harness
and develop their inherent leadership
qualities to support programming
and design of Youth Pride Day. This
collaboration provides an opportunity
for growth and an enriching alliance for
all individuals involved.”
Business owners are also learning
the value an intern can bring to the
team. Says Ernesto Santalla of Studio
Santalla, a boutique architect firm
in Georgetown, “Our firm offers a
combination of the services provided
by architects and interior designers. As
such, the best candidates to join our
team are those with the least amount
of preconceived ideas, as they are the
most adaptable. In mentoring them,
I help them develop their unique
talents, which in turn, becomes their
contribution to the overall work product
– a win-win situation.”
If you don’t have an internship
program and are interested in building
one, or if you have a program but
you’d like to strengthen it, consider
CAGLCC’s Nonprofit and Association
Lunch on Wednesday, May 2. The
luncheon features discussion about
fitting interns (and volunteers) into
long-term management plans, from how
to attract and retain interns to managing
and utilizing interns effectively.
See Metro Weekly’s guide to Youth Pride
online at MetroWeekly.com or visit
youthpridedc.org.
The CAGLCC Nonprofit and Association
Lunch is May 2, from 11:30 a.m. to
1:30 p.m. at the Renaissance Dupont
Circle Hotel (1143 New Hampshire
Ave. NW). Register at caglcc.org/
AssocNFPLuchMay.
The Chamber means Business. For more
information, visit caglcc.org. l
19
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Metro Weekly’s Community Calendar highlights important events in the
gay community, from alternative social events to volunteer opportunities.
Event information should be sent by e-mail to calendar@metroweek-
ly.com; by fax to 202-638-6831; or by mail to Metro Weekly, Attn:
Community Calendar, 1012 14th Street NW, Suite 209, Washington, D.C.
20005. Deadline for inclusion is noon on the Friday before publication.
“Announcement” submissions that are not date-specific may run for two
weeks, with the option for listing organizations to resubmit if appropriate.
Questions about the calendar can be directed to the Metro Weekly office
at 202-638-6830.
LGBTCommunityCalendar
APRIL 26, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
THURSDAY, APRIL 26
LAMBDA SCI-FI book group discusses Order 66
by Karen Traviss. Bring snack or nonalcoholic
drink to share. 7 p.m. 1425 S St. NW. Peter, 202-
483-6369, peter.p.knapp@gmail.com. lambdascifi.
org.
GAY & LESBIAN ACTIVISTS ALLIANCE
presents Distinguished Service Awards at 41st
Anniversary Reception. 6:30-9 p.m. Washington
Plaza Hotel, 10 Thomas Circle. Tickets $50. 202-
667-5139, glaa.org.
AIDS WALK WASHINGTON KICKOFF PARTY
offers free registration for Oct. 27 Whitman-
Walker Health fundraiser. 6-9 p.m., Nellie’s
Sports Bar, 900 U St. NW. aidswalkwashington.
org.
WEEKLY EVENTS
ANDROMEDA TRANSCULTURAL HEALTH
offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV services
(by appointment). Call 202-291-4707, or visit
andromedahealthcenter.org.
DC AQUATICS CLUB (DCAC) practice session
at the Takoma Aquatic Center, 7:30-9 p.m. Visit
swimdcac.org.
DC LAMBDA SQUARES gay and lesbian square-
dancing group features mainstream through
advanced square dancing at the National City
Christian Church, 5 Thomas Circle NW, 7-9:30
p.m. Casual dress. Email info@dclambdasquares.
org, call 301-257-0517 or visit dclambdasquares.
org.
The DULLES TRIANGLES Northern Virginia
social group meets for happy hour at Sheraton
in Reston, 11810 Sunrise Valley Drive, second-
floor bar, 7-9 p.m. All welcome. Email info@
dullestriangles.com or visit dullestriangles.com.
HIV TESTING at Whitman-Walker Health. The
Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St.
NW, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. At the Max Robinson Center,
2301 MLK Jr. Ave. SE, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Call 202-
745-7000. Visit whitman-walker.org.
IDENTITY offers free and confidential HIV
testing in Gaithersburg, 414 East Diamond Ave.,
and in Takoma Park, 7676 New Hampshire Ave.,
Suite 411. Walk-ins 2-6 p.m. For appointments
other hours, call Gaithersburg at 301-300-9978 or
Takoma Park at 301-422-2398.
SATURDAY, APRIL 28
The DC Center and SAGE-Metro DC offer
training for the FRIENDLY VISITOR PROGRAM
coordinating weekly volunteer visits to LGBT
seniors. 3-5 p.m. 1318 U St. NW. Registration
required, space limited. sagemetrodc@
thedccenter.org.
RAINBOW FAMILIES DC holds 2012 Family
Conference of workshops, discussions and
networking. 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Georgetown Day
School, 4200 Davenport St. NW. Onsite adult
registration, $50 members, $60 nonmembers.
202-747-0407, rainbowfamiliesdc.org.
BURGUNDY CRESCENT gay volunteer
organization helps Youth Pride, Rainbow
Families Conference, Food & Friends, and Casey
Trees Community Tree Planting Program.
burgundycrescent.org.
ADVENTURING outdoors group hikes 9 miles
on Old Rag in Shenandoah National Park. Bring
boots, snack, water, lunch and fees. No dogs. Meet
8:30 a.m., East Falls Church Metro Kiss & Ride.
Jeff, 703-775-9660. OR, hike 8-mile roundtrip on
the C&O Canal at Sycamore Landing, Md. Bring
bug spray, lunch and fees. No dogs. Carpool at 9
a.m. from top escalators at Crystal City Metro.
Don, 703-473-9193. adventuring.org.
LGBT DOGGY STYLE: DC, a social group for
LGBT dog owners, meets for Brookside Botanical
Garden walk. 1 p.m. For details, doggystyledc.com.
WEEKLY EVENTS
ANDROMEDA TRANSCULTURAL HEALTH
offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV
services (by appointment). 202-291-4707 or
andromedahealthcenter.org.
BET MISHPACHAH, founded by members of
the LGBT community, holds Saturday morning
Shabbat services, 10 a.m., followed by kiddush
luncheon. Services in DCJCC Community Room,
1529 16th St. NW. betmish.org.
BRAZILIAN GLBT GROUP, including others
interested in Brazilian culture, meets. For
location/time, email braziliangaygroup@yahoo.
com.
DC AQUATICS CLUB (DCAC) practice session at
Marie Reed Aquatic Center, 2200 Champlain St.
NW. 8-9:30 a.m. swimdcac.org.
DC FRONT RUNNERS running/walking/social
club welcomes all levels for exercise in a fun and
supportive environment, socializing afterward.
Meet 9:30 a.m., 23rd & P Streets NW, for a walk;
or 10 a.m. for fun run. info@dcfrontrunners.org or
dcfrontrunners.org.
DC THIRTY SOMETHING social group (dinners,
concerts, etc.) for gay guys in their 30s meets.
To join/more information, send name and email
address to dcthirtysomething@yahoo.com.
US HELPING US hosts a Narcotics Anonymous
Meeting, 6:30-7:30 p.m., 3636 Georgia Ave. NW.
The group is independent of UHU. 202-446-1100.
WASHINGTON RENEGADES RUGBY
FOOTBALL CLUB practice, 6:45-9 p.m. Cardozo
High School outdoor field, Florida Avenue & 13th
Street NW. 6:45-9 p.m. dcrugby.com.
FRIDAY, APRIL 27
WEEKLY EVENTS
ANDROMEDA TRANSCULTURAL HEALTH
offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV
services (by appointment). 202-291-4707,
andromedahealthcenter.org.
BET MISHPACHAH, founded by members of the
GLBT community, holds Friday night Shabbat
services followed by “oneg” social hour. 8-9:30
p.m. Services in DCJCC Community Room, 1529
16th St. NW. betmish.org.
GAY DISTRICT, a non-church-affiliated
discussion and social group for GBTQ men, 18
to 35, meets 8:30 p.m., St. Margaret’s Episcopal
Church, 1820 Connecticut Ave. NW. gd@
gaydistrict.org or gaydistrict.org.
GAY MARRIED MEN’S ASSOCIATION
(GAMMA) is a peer-support group that meets in
Dupont Circle every second and fourth Friday at
7:30 p.m. gay-married.com or GAMMAinDC1@
yahoo.com.
HIV TESTING at Whitman-Walker Health,
Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St.
NW, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 202-745-7000, whitman-
walker.org.
SMYAL’S REC NIGHT provides a social
atmosphere for GLBT and questioning youth,
featuring dance parties, movie nights and game
nights. Leandrea.Gilliam@smyal.org.
TRANSGENDER HEALTH EMPOWERMENT
“Diva Chat” support group. 6-8 p.m., 1414 North
Capitol St. NE. Snacks provided. 202-636-1646.
21 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 26, 2012
22 APRIL 26, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
DIGNITY NORTHERN VIRGINIA sponsors Mass
for LGBT community, family and friends. 6:30 p.m.,
Immanuel Church-on-the-Hill, 3606 Seminary
Road, Alexandria. All welcome. 703-912-1662,
dignitynova@gmail.com.
DC SENTINELS basketball team meets at Turkey
Thicket Recreation Center, 1100 Michigan Ave. NE,
2-4 p.m. For players of all levels, gay or straight.
teamdcbasketball.org.
IDENTITY offers free and confidential HIV testing
in Takoma Park, 7676 New Hampshire Ave., Suite
411. Walk-ins 12-3 p.m. For appointments other
hours, call 301-422-2398.
SUNDAY, APRIL 29
CHRYSALLIS ARTS & CULTURE group visits
Smithsonian Museum of American Art to see
“Annie Leibovitz: Pilgrimage.” Free, all welcome.
Meet 12 p.m., 8th & G Streets NW lobby of Old
Patent Office Building. Craig, 202-462-0535.
craighowell1@verizon.net.
CITY OF REFUGE-DC celebrates a 5th Year
Church Anniversary and Pastor Installation Service,
“Let the Church Say Amen.” 3 p.m. Riverside
Community Center, 5200 Foote St. NE. refugedc.
com.
WEEKLY EVENTS
DC AQUATICS CLUB (DCAC) practice session at
Takoma Aquatic Center, 300 Van Buren St. NW.
9-10:30 a.m. swimdcac.org.
The LGBT-inclusive ALL SOULS MEMORIAL
EPISCOPAL CHURCH celebrates Low Mass at 8:30
a.m., High Mass at 11 a.m. 2300 Cathedral Ave. NW.
For information or additional services, call 202-232-
4244 or visit allsoulsdc.org.
BETHEL CHURCH-DC progressive and radically
inclusive church holds services at 11:30 a.m. 2217
Minnesota Ave. SE. 202-248-1895, betheldc.org.
DIGNITY WASHINGTON offers Roman Catholic
Mass for the LGBT community. 6 p.m., St.
Margaret’s Church, 1820 Connecticut Ave. NW. All
welcome. Sign interpreted. 202-546-2235, dignity@
dignitywashington.org, or dignitywashington.org.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST welcomes all to 10:30 a.m. service, 945 G
St. NW. firstuccdc.org or 202-628-4317.
FRIENDS MEETING OF WASHINGTON meets for
worship, 10:30 a.m., 2111 Florida Ave. NW, Quaker
House Living Room (next to Meeting House on
Decatur Place), 2nd floor. Special welcome to
lesbians and gays. Handicapped accessible from
Phelps Place gate. Hearing assistance. quakersdc.
org.
HOPE UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST welcomes
GLBT community for worship. 10:30 a.m., 6130 Old
Telegraph Road, Alexandria. hopeucc.org.
METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH OF
NORTHERN VIRGINIA services at 11 a.m., led by
23 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 26, 2012
Rev. Kharma Amos. Children’s Sunday School, 11
a.m. 10383 Democracy Lane, Fairfax. 703-691-0930,
mccnova.com.
METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH OF
WASHINGTON, D.C. services at 9 a.m. (ASL
interpreted) and 11 a.m. Children’s Sunday School
at 11 a.m. 474 Ridge St. NW. 202-638-7373,
churchoffice@mccdc.com, mccdc.com.
NATIONAL CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH, inclusive
church with GLBT fellowship, offers gospel
worship, 8:30 a.m., and traditional worship, 11 a.m.
5 Thomas Circle NW. 202-232-0323, nationalcitycc.
org.
RAINBOW FAMILIES DC’s “Maybe
Baby” series for LGBT singles and couples
considering parenthood meets 3-5 p.m. info@
rainbowfamiliesdc.org.
RIVERSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH, a Christ-centered,
interracial, welcoming-and-affirming church, offers
service at 10 a.m. 680 I St. SW. 202-554-4330,
riverside-dc.org.
ST. STEPHEN AND THE INCARNATION, an
“interracial, multi-ethnic Christian Community”
offers services in English, 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m., and
in Spanish at 5:15 p.m. 1525 Newton St. NW. 202-
232-0900, saintstephensdc.org.
UNITARIAN CHURCH OF ARLINGTON, an
LGBTQ welcoming-and-affirming congregation,
offers services at 10 a.m. Virginia Rainbow UU
Ministry. 4444 Arlington Blvd. uucava.org.
UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CHURCH OF
SILVER SPRING invites LGBTQ families and
individuals of all creeds and cultures to join the
church. Services 9:15 and 11:15 a.m. 10309 New
Hampshire Ave., Silver Spring. uucss.org.
UNIVERSALIST NATIONAL MEMORIAL
CHURCH, a welcoming and inclusive church. GLBT
Interweave social/service group meets monthly.
Services at 11 a.m., Romanesque sanctuary. 1810 16th
St. NW. 202-387-3411, universalist.org.
MONDAY, APRIL 30
Whitman-Walker Health, The DC Center and
SAGE-Metro DC present another installment of the
Community Conversation series: IMPROVING THE
HEALTH OF OLDER MEMBERS OF THE LGBT
COMMUNITY. 7-9:30 p.m. The DC Center, 1318 U
St. NW. 202-682-2245. thedccenter.org.
Thinking Beyond the Beltway, GradPride, the
MENA Forum and Africa Forum present HUMAN
RIGHTS AND HOMOPHOBIA IN AFRICA: A
CONVERSATION WITH FRANK MUGISHA. 7
p.m. White-Gravenor Hall, 201A, Georgetown
University. mc747@georgetown.edu.
24 APRIL 26, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
professional services
25
LGBTOpinion
METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 26, 2012
APRIL 26, 2012
VOLUME 18 / ISSUE 52
PUBLISHERS
Sean Bugg, Randy Shulman
EDITORIAL
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Randy Shulman
ART DIRECTOR
Todd Franson
MANAGING EDITOR
Will O’Bryan
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Chris Geidner
STAFF WRITER
John Riley
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Ward Morrison
CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS
Dylan Comstock, Julian Vankim
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Chris Heller, Carrie Megginson, Jonathan Padget,
Troy Petenbrink, Richard Rosendall,
Doug Rule, Daniel Villarreal, Kate Wingfield
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David Uy
MULTIMEDIA
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Julian Vankim
INTERN
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Randy Shulman
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Rivendell Media Co.
212-242-6863
DISTRIBUTION MANAGER
Dennis Havrilla
PATRON SAINT
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COVER PHOTOGRAPHY
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COVER DESIGN
Tony Frye
METRO WEEKLY
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Washington, DC 20005
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All material appearing in Metro Weekly is protected by federal copyright law and may not be
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responsibility for unsolicited materials submitted for publication. All such submissions are subject
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such person or organization.
© 2012 Jansi LLC.
by Sean Bugg
Seeing gay politics through the prism of the 1990s
promotes overly cautious approach to LGBT issues
Backward Glances
Some large portion
of the collective
Democratic mind
will always see
the world as if it’s
still 1993. That’s
when the backlash
against President
Bill Clinton’s
promise to end
military discrimination against gay and
lesbian soldiers opened up a media circus
and political feeding frenzy, with such
memorable moments as U.S. senators
touring a submarine to show how tight
the bunks and shower facilities could be.
That experience of the creation of
“Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” has colored every
political consideration about LGBT lives
since. And that reasoning — that fear of
a political backlash must be prioritized
over choosing to do what’s right — went
on to give us such legislative gifts as the
Defense of Marriage Act.
Although I wrote last week that
it seemed impossible to tease out the
Obama administration’s actual political
reasoning behind announcing that there
will be no executive order this year
banning employment discrimination
against LGBT employees of federal
contractors, over the past week a general
consensus on the White House hesitancy
has been put forward. Not surprisingly,
it’s a political perspective piped in from
two decades ago.
Writing in the Advocate, longtime
Democratic activist and openly gay
business leader Andrew Tobias makes
the reasoning explicit for the White
House, arguing that Obama’s quashing
of the executive order is the “safest path
to ENDA.” It’s very clear where Tobias
(and, presumably, the administration)
sees the risk: “Picture such a [swing]
state flooded with $20 million in
grotesquely unfair, Willie Horton-
type ads featuring trial lawyers suing
small business owners over employee
bathroom issues.”
Interestingly, Tobias never once uses
the word “transgender” in his op-ed,
and only uses “gender identity” in
conjunction with a fear of Karl Rove
and the Koch brothers. But when you’re
talking about bathrooms, Willie Horton
and Karl Rove in the same column,
you’re talking about trans-panic.
The underlying argument is the same
that it has been for two decades now: It’s
an election year, so it’s time for us to be
quiet. In our new SuperPAC democracy,
we have to watch our presence lest our
issues be turned into scary commercials
about hairy men in dresses stalking
women’s restrooms.
But this is going to happen anyway.
Even without this week’s groundbreaking
EEOC ruling on gender identity and
discrimination — truly a milestone for
transgender equality — Obama has
already taken a number of administrative
actions that benefit transgender people.
None are as sweeping as an executive
order would be, but that’s irrelevant if
we’re talking about fodder for anti-trans
advertising. Nothing as mundane as the
truth will ever get between a SuperPAC
and its attack ads.
And the truth is it’s always an
election year as presidential campaigns
blur into midterms and then back,
an ever-tightening cycle of polls and
PACs seeking political advantage. To
argue that LGBT issues should only be
considered through the lens of political
risk — that to insist on our issues in this
election year is to risk “catastrophe,” as
Tobias puts it — is to argue for stasis.
There will always be a potential of
backlash. And the more successful we
are in securing our equal standing in
society, the fiercer that backlash will
become among the ever-smaller group
of bigots who view LGBT lives with fear
and hatred.
No one who cares about LGBT
equality — and I have absolutely no
doubt that Tobias and the White House
care quite deeply — believes it will be
easy. But leadership is often about doing
what’s right, not what’s easy. And in this
case, the first step is to acknowledge that
we’re not in 1993 anymore. l
26
LGBTOpinion
APRIL 26, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
THE VATICAN’S
Congregation for the
Doctrine of the Faith
(CDF) used to be called
the Supreme Sacred
Congregation of the
Roman and Universal
Inquisition. That came
to mind last week
when the CDF cracked
down on the Leadership Conference of
Women Religious (LCWR) for tolerating
“radical feminist themes” and focusing too
much on social justice instead of opposing
abortion and gay marriage.
I called my favorite nun, Sister Katherine
M. Donnelly, to express my solidarity. She
is one of my Boston cousins, chaplain at a
by Richard J. Rosendall
Regardless of faith, advocates of social justice
have reason to applaud LCWR
Sister Courage
Katherine’s work is about ministering
to people. Amid so much controversy,
the Pastoral Response Team quietly but
effectively lives out the purpose outlined
in its application for tax-exempt status in
Massachusetts: “We have been called [in
the words of Saint Francis of Assisi] ‘to heal
wounds, to reunite what has fallen apart and
to bring back those who have lost their way.’”
Katherine’s effort to be a healing
presence does not preclude her from taking
a strong stand against injustice. As far back
as 1985, in a guest editorial in the Boston
Herald, she condemned the vitriolic anti-
gay rhetoric that brought about a change
in the foster care policy “in two weeks,
with less debate than the bottle bill. If only
traditional families can provide a ‘warm,
stable, nurturing home for a child,’ what
about single parents and nuns ‘without
previous parenting experience’ who have
cared for children throughout the years?”
Others have noted the irony of the
CDF cracking down on LCWR in the same
week that the U.S. Conference of Catholic
Bishops criticized Rep. Paul Ryan’s
federal budget proposal as neglecting the
poor. One action emphasizes the Catholic
Church’s doctrinal authority, the other
its pastoral mission; but the nuns are
laboring in the same vineyard as the
bishops who challenge the government to
help the vulnerable.
Citing comments by Sister Nuala Kenny,
a pediatrician from Nova Scotia, on the need
for the church to address its “underlying
systemic issues,” Katherine writes, “These
women, who on a daily basis reach out to
those in pain over all that has happened to
the church they love, may have the wisdom
needed to help point the systems in the
church in a new and life-giving direction.
Reaching out to include them in a positive
dialog about how to heal the church would
be far more productive than another
investigation of these gifted women.”
I hear the question, “Why don’t they
leave?” But it avails nothing to judge others’
choices by one’s own experience. I deeply
respect nuns like my cousin who follow
their consciences as they did when they took
up their vocations. They work together on a
national and global level with organizations
like LCWR to confront grave injustices like
human trafficking. They prod the Catholic
Church to face the challenges of life today.
Whatever our faith, these brave witnesses
for justice deserve our applause.
Richard J. Rosendall is a writer and
activist. He can be reached at rrosendall@
starpower.net. l
small inner-city school for girls in Boston
where the focus is on the “Catholic social
teachings” and the need for the young
women to become productive citizens and
leaders in their community.
Katherine has also worked for more
than 30 years in the field of child abuse
prevention. In 1992, with Thomas F. Carr,
a family therapist and highly respected
child abuse investigator for the Boston
Juvenile Court, she co-founded the
Pastoral Response Assistance Team Inc.,
a multidisciplinary team of highly skilled
professionals, to deal with the crisis of
clergy abuse in the Catholic Church.
Over the years the team has donated
countless thousands of hours to fill gaps
in service to any religious institution
where allegations had been made, to help
empower survivors of sexual abuse to
take positive action, and to promote an
honest discussion of sexual abuse within
a church setting.
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Victory Fund National
Champagne Brunch
Sunday, April 15
Washington Hilton
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
WARD MORRISON
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applied as a man before transitioning
and she says, “Within three days after
my background [check] was completed
and they alerted the lab that Mia would
be coming to work, I was notified that
the position was no longer available —
even though I was certified and trained
for the job.”
She later found out that another
person had been hired for the position.
Macy says that before she even knew
about the other person being hired, she
“didn’t think something was right” and
contacted the Transgender Law Center,
which took her case. Davis says Macy’s
case was an obvious one to pursue.
“We hear from 1,500 people a year
who are experiencing discrimination,
and our attorneys work every day to
help out everyone who calls and make
sure they have the legal information
and support they need to be successful.
Sometimes we hear from people
who have suffered such egregious
discrimination that we have to put
every resource into righting a wrong,”
he says. “And, in this case, we heard
from Mia Macy, who was so clearly
discriminated against — somebody who
had been so clearly qualified for a job
that she had every right ... and we had
every responsibility to bring this case
forward.”
TLC filed a formal complaint on
behalf of Macy with the Office of Equal
Opportunity (EO) of the ATF, which
is responsible for handling internal
complaints of discrimination within the
ATF. Among the claims was one that
Macy was discriminated against under
Title VII because of her gender identity.
According to Macy’s TLC attorney,
Matt Wood, “in October [2011], [the
EO] responded to that filing by letting
us know that the EEO process was
not available to her because they did
not view, in their mind, that Title VII
applied to transgender employees.” In
a series of letters between ATF and
Wood the issues underlying Macy’s
claim were disputed, but Wood says
that, eventually, “We appealed to the
EEOC, and that was in December of last
year, asking for them to clarify the law.”
THE LAW: In 1974, Ramona Holloway —
initially hired as Robert — was fired after
telling her employer, Arthur Andersen
and Company, that she was taking
hormones and intended to transition.
In a lawsuit challenging that firing,
A
N EMPLOYER WHO
discriminates against an
employee or applicant on
the basis of the person’s
gender identity is violating
the prohibition on sex discrimination
contained in Title VII of the Civil
Rights Act of 1964, according to an
opinion issued on April 20 by the Equal
Employment Opportunity Commission
(EEOC). The opinion, experts say, could
dramatically alter the legal landscape for
transgender workers across the nation.
The opinion came in a decision
delivered on Monday, April 23, to lawyers
for Mia Macy, a transgender woman
who claims she was denied employment
with the Department of Alcohol,
Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives
(ATF) after the agency learned of her
transition. It also comes on the heels of
a growing number of federal appellate
and trial courts deciding that gender-
identity discrimination constitutes sex
discrimination, whether based on Title
VII or the constitutional guarantee of
equal protection of the laws.
The EEOC decision, issued without
objection by the five-member, bipartisan
commission, will apply to all EEOC
enforcement and litigation activities
at the commission and in its 53 field
offices throughout the country. It also
will be binding on all federal agencies
and departments.
In the decision, the EEOC states,
“[T]he Commission hereby clarifies
that claims of discrimination based on
transgender status, also referred to as
claims of discrimination based on gender
identity, are cognizable under Title VII’s
sex discrimination prohibition ....”
Masen Davis, head of the Transgender
Law Center (TLC), says the decision is
a “big leap forward.” TLC advocates,
who brought Macy’s case, note that after
the Friday, April 20, ruling transgender
people who feel they have faced
employment discrimination can go into
any of those 53 offices and the EEOC
will consider their claims. What’s more,
the EEOC could take action itself to sue
the employer for discrimination.
“Given the incredibly high rate of
employment discrimination facing
transgender people, this is incredibly
significant for us. Data from the National
Center for Transgender Equality and
National Gay and Lesbian Task Force
found that 78 percent of transgender
Americans say they’ve experienced
workplace discrimination at some point
in time,” Davis tells Metro Weekly.
“Given that transgender people do not
have employment protections in the
vast majority of states, this creates a
whole new fabric of legal support for
our community.”
Macy says that the discrimination
she faced after having gone through
the background check for a job as a
ballistics technician was abrupt. She had
EEOC ruling that gender-identity
discrimination is covered by Title VII is a “sea
change” that opens the doors to employment
protection for transgender Americans
by Chris Geidner
Transgender
Breakthrough
34 APRIL 26, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
treatment.
Applying other courts’ Title VII
analysis to Glenn’s claim brought under
the 14th Amendment’s Equal Protection
Clause, the three-judge panel held,
“We conclude that a government agent
violates the Equal Protection Clause’s
prohibition of sex-based discrimination
when he or she fires a transgender or
transsexual employee because of his or
her gender non-conformity.”
Appeals courts in San Francisco,
Boston and D.C. have reached similar
conclusions.
THE EEOC: Less than two months before
the 11th Circuit’s opinion in Glenn’s
case, the EEOC had put down a marker
on its view of the question in a little-
noted filing by the commission’s general
counsel in a trial-court case involving
Freedom Buick GMC Truck in Midland,
Texas.
In the case, in which Alex Pacheco
had been fired from her job as a
receptionist at the dealership shortly
after she had begun taking hormones
and disclosing that she wished to begin
presenting as a female at work, the
EEOC filed a motion Oct. 17, 2011, asking
the court to allow it to file an amicus
curiae, or friend-of-the-court brief.
The EEOC regularly files such briefs
to inform courts about its views on the
state of the law.
As Minter says, “The EEOC is the
administrative agency that is charged
with interpreting Title VII and other
nondiscrimination statutes, and the
federal courts give a lot of deference
to EEOC’s interpretation of the statute.
They’re not strictly bound by it, but an
EEOC ruling does get a lot of deference.”
In Pacheco’s case, the EEOC had
sought to file a brief stating, “In Price
Waterhouse, the Supreme Court
recognized that Title VII’s prohibition
of discrimination ‘because of … sex’
means ‘that gender must be irrelevant
to employment decisions.’” It went on
to note the “discrimination based on
a failure to conform to stereotypical
gender norms” is thus prohibited and
concluding that “if an employer were
to take an adverse employment action
because an employee’s gender identity
is not consistent with the employee’s
biological sex, the employer would be
discriminating ‘because of … sex.’”
In an appellate court, the EEOC would
“statutory prohibitions often go beyond
the principal evil to cover reasonably
comparable evils, and it is ultimately the
provisions of our laws rather than the
principal concerns of our legislators by
which we are governed.”
Although neither was directly
on point, the Price Waterhouse
conclusion that sex discrimination
includes protection of those who are
gender nonconforming and the Oncale
conclusion that Title VII’s protections
do expand, within the text of the law,
to areas not considered when the law
was passed opened up the pathway
to a reversal of those 1970s and 1980s
decisions.
Assessing the landscape, Minter
contrasts the early cases to the more
recent cases, saying, “It was really so
clear when you read those decisions
that they were simply based on disdain
for transgender people, and it has been
very encouraging over the past 10 to 15
years to see the courts changing that, to
see that trend reversing itself.”
Ilona Turner, the legal director at
TLC, concurs, telling Metro Weekly,
“The very strong, very clear trend by all
of the federal courts that have heard this
kind of case in recent years has been to
hold that Title VII’s sex-discrimination
prohibition protects transgender
people.”
When the U.S. Court of Appeals for
the Sixth Circuit in 2004 heard the case
of Jimmie Smith, a lieutenant in the
Salem Fire Department in Ohio who
claimed he was suspended in retaliation
for hiring counsel after officials learned
of Smith’s plans to transition, it applied
Price Waterhouse to Smith’s claim. “[D]
iscrimination against a plaintiff who is a
transsexual — and therefore fails to act
and/or identify with his or her gender —
is no different from the discrimination
directed against Ann Hopkins in Price
Waterhouse, who, in sex-stereotypical
terms, did not act like a woman,” the
three-judge panel held.
This past December, the U.S. Court
of Appeals for the 11th Circuit held
that Vandiver Elizabeth Glenn — a
transgender woman fired from her job
as an editor with the Georgia General
Assembly’s Office of Legislative Counsel
because her boss, among other things,
said her transition was “unnatural” —
was discriminated against on the basis
of sex because of anti-transgender
the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth
Circuit noted that, after the disclosure
of Holloway’s intended transition, “an
official of the company suggested that
appellant would be happier at a new
job where her transsexualism would
be unknown.” Soon thereafter, when
she did not leave the company after
asking that her name be changed in the
company’s records, she was fired.
When the Ninth Circuit looked at
Title VII, including the amendments to
it contained in the Equal Employment
Opportunity Act of 1972, the court
concluded that “the provisions were
intended to place women on an equal
footing with men.” In light of this,
the court dismissed Holloway’s claim
because, as the court held, “Giving the
statute its plain meaning, this court
concludes that Congress had only the
traditional notions of ‘sex’ in mind.”
Although claims of transgender
discrimination were treated with
“disdain” in those early days of Title VII
interpretation, as National Center for
Lesbian Rights legal director Shannon
Minter puts it, two Supreme Court cases
that followed dramatically changed the
views of lower courts on the issue.
In the first, Price Waterhouse
v. Hopkins, the Supreme Court in
1989 addressed the claim brought
by Ann Hopkins, who sued for sex
discrimination because she was not
offered a partnership at the accounting
firm. Her chances would be improved
in the future, she had been told, if she
“[w]ould ‘walk more femininely, talk
more femininely, dress more femininely,
wear make-up, have her hair styled,
and wear jewelry.’” Describing Title
VII, the court noted the words in the
statute prohibiting sex discrimination
and concluded, “We take these words to
mean that gender must be irrelevant to
employment decisions.”
In the second, Oncale v. Sundowner
Offshore Services, Inc., the Supreme Court
considered the case of Joseph Oncale, a
man who worked on an oil platform in
the Gulf of Mexico and was “forcibly
subjected to sex-related, humiliating
actions against him” by members of the
eight-man crew, “physically assaulted
... in a sexual manner” and threatened
with rape. Noting that male-on-male
sexual harassment was “assuredly” not
the aim of Congress when passing Title
VII, Justice Antonin Scalia noted that
35 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 26, 2012
transgender, the employer has engaged
in disparate treatment related to the
sex of the victim,” the decision states.
“This is true regardless of whether an
employer discriminates against an
employee because the individual has
expressed his or her gender in a non-
stereotypical fashion, because the
employer is uncomfortable with the
fact that the person has transitioned or
is in the process of transitioning from
one gender to another, or because the
employer simply does not like that the
person is identifying as a transgender
person.”
The case has now been sent back to
the ATF for consideration in light of the
EEOC decision, but either the agency
or Macy now have 30 days to ask the
commission to reconsider its decision.
THE IMPLICATIONS: Minter, who has been
working for LGBT legal equality since
law school in the early 1990s, says, “This
is huge. This is a real sea change.
“To have just a clear, definitive EEOC
ruling that Title VII protects transgender
people gives us so much more certainty
two Republican members — objected
to the conclusion that gender-identity
discrimination is sex discrimination
actionable under Title VII. Because
the case is an appeal from the ATF EO
decision, the case was considered by the
Office of Federal Operations within the
EEOC and then presented to the full
commission for its consideration.
In the decision, which is signed by the
executive secretary for the commission
— a procedural move that those familiar
with EEOC process say means the
decision is binding on all federal agencies
— the commission considers first whether
the case has properly come before it
for review and then, because of ATF’s
conclusion that Title VII’s prohibition
on sex discrimination does not include
transgender discrimination, whether it
has jurisdiction over the case.
In Friday’s opinion, the EEOC
concludes that the case is properly
before it and that, consistent with the
overwhelming trend of federal courts, the
ATF conclusion was incorrect.
“When an employer discriminates
against someone because the person is
have the right to file an amicus brief
without obtaining court permission, but,
at the trial-court level, it must seek court
approval to do so. In Pacheco’s case, the
EEOC filed a motion asking the court to
let it file an amicus brief in the case — but
also attached the brief that it would be
submitting in the case as an exhibit to
the motion. Here, the judge denied the
EEOC’s request as moot on Nov. 1, 2011,
because the judge decided days earlier, on
Oct. 28, 2011, that Freedom Buick GMC
Truck’s motion to have the case decided
in its favor before trial was denied.
On March 23, the court in Texas
closed Pacheco’s case because earlier that
day the court had received notice that
Freedom Buick GMC Truck had reached
a settlement with Pacheco.
But, the brief was submitted on the
EEOC’s behalf, and though little noted
at the time — likely since it was never
accepted by the court — the October filing
was given new life on a far more broad
level with the EEOC’s ruling in Macy’s
case.
In the decision in her case, none of
the five commissioners — which include
Understanding
the EEOC Process
The Equal Employment Opportu-
nity Commission (EEOC) is the agency
charged with enforcing federal antidis-
crimination law. Both federal and private
employees, or applicants, can find their
claims before the five-member body.
Although the federal employee process
begins with the specific agency’s equal
employment opportunity office, appeals of
those agency decisions come to the EEOC,
where they are considered by the Office of
Federal Operations within the EEOC and
circulated to the commission.
In a 2005 article for the Hofstra Labor
& Employment Journal by two attorneys
who then worked with the EEOC, Anne
Noel Occhialino and Daniel Vail, the
lawyers detailed the EEOC process’s four
main steps.
CHARGE: The process begins “when
the EEOC receives a charge of
discrimination alleging that an
individual or class was discriminated
against because of race, national origin,
color, religion, or sex (or in retaliation
for engaging in protected activity).”
After an initial review as to whether
it appears whether discrimination
has occurred, an investigation begins
for those most likely to have involved
discrimination. In the article, they note,
“Some investigations are completed as
soon as an investigator reads a charge.
In other cases, an investigator may
request position statements or evidence
from the alleged victim and employer
and from the person or entity who made
the charge, if it was not the victim.”
RESOLUTION: The commission then
issues a “letter of determination,” which
either states that no determination could
be made about whether Title VII was
violated and a “right to sue” is given to
the person claiming discrimination or it
finds “reasonable cause” to believe there
was discrimination and moves forward
in the process.
CONCILIATION: When the EEOC
determines there is reasonable cause,
it first attempts to handle the case
“through informal methods, including
conciliation.” Additionally, “the parties
may voluntarily agree to have the
EEOC attempt to mediate the charge.”
If, however, informal methods do not
resolve the case, “the EEOC may decide
to litigate the matter on its own. If the
Commission decides not do so, a ‘notice
of right to sue’ is issued to the person
claiming to be aggrieved.”
EEOC LITIGATION: In addition to the
private right to sue for a violation of
Title VII once the administrative course
has been exhausted, the EEOC also has
the authority to bring its own litigation.
According to Occhialino and Vail, “The
EEOC is also committed to vigorous
enforcement of the statutes over which
it has jurisdiction, and will not hesitate
to seek appropriate legal remedies
through litigation when warranted.”
“While it can and often does seek
relief on behalf of specific victims
of discrimination, the EEOC does
not function simply as a vehicle for
conducting litigation on behalf of
private parties,” they write. “[T]
he agency does not simply stand in
the employee’s shoes.” In addition
to seeking individual relief, in other
words, the EEOC in those cases also is
pursuing the public’s interest in ending
employment discrimination.
-- Chris Geidner
36
APRIL 26, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
that opposes it and a Democratic-led
Senate that hasn’t even held a hearing on
the measure during this Congress.
Both Davis and Minter say that
the EEOC’s decision doesn’t reduce
the need for ENDA — particularly as
the decision has no impact on sexual-
orientation discrimination — but Minter
acknowledges, at least as to gender
identity, that this decision could shift the
ground somewhat.
“It would still be important to have
specific federal protection, but having
protection by an EEOC ruling — which is
consistent with the trend of federal courts
— that is very significant, that’s very
strong protection,” he says. “Title VII is
a very protective statute, and transgender
people being able to rely on that statute
now is transformative.”
The EEOC’s decision, though given
significant deference by federal courts,
could be overturned by the U.S. Supreme
Court, which — though unlikely following
Price Waterhouse and Oncale — is a
possibility that will lead advocates like
Minter to continue to push for gender-
identity-specific protection, as well
as sexual-orientation protection, in
legislation like ENDA.
The Friday, April 20, decision also
could make the signing of the executive
order and the passage of ENDA easier
if the gender-identity provision in those
items would be seen as buttressing
existing Title VII protections because of
the fact that, as ENDA lead sponsor Rep.
Barney Frank (D-Mass.) said at the end
of the 111th Congress in 2010, the gender
identity provision had been the provision
about which more education was needed
before enough members would be willing
to support it.
For now, though, transgender
advocates are focused on the EEOC
decision, itself a breakthrough.
Turner, TLC’s legal director, says,
“Discrimination against transgender
people in the workplace remains at
unacceptably high levels, but we’re
hopeful that with a positive ruling from
the EEOC, transgender people across the
country will now know that they are in
fact protected by federal law if they’re
denied a job or fired just because of who
they are. And that’s a really big deal.”
Macy, hopeful even a year into this
fight to do the job that she’d been trained
to do, breaks it down even further.
“It’s one more piece in the puzzle of
equality. It’s kinda hokey, but it is,” she
says. “It’s one more locking little piece in
that puzzle.”l
Macy, and the fact that Friday’s decision,
while significant, doesn’t mean her case
is over. The decision only sends Macy’s
case back to the ATF Office of Equal
Opportunity for resolution. “We need to
make sure that Mia is able to have her
case dealt with fairly, and we’re confident
in a positive decision from the ATF,”
Davis says.
Minter notes that the decision will, in
his view, quickly have application outside
of the case, the EEOC and the courts,
noting: “It sends a really strong message
to all employers and I think will have a
dramatic impact on business culture. This
has such a strong legitimating impact in
many different arenas.”
One of those potentially impacted
arenas is the political one, where
President Obama has faced criticism
for nearly the past two weeks since
his decision, announced April 11, not
to pursue an executive order banning
federal contractors from discriminating
in employment on the basis of sexual
orientation or gender identity. Although
White House press secretary Jay Carney
has repeatedly pointed to the Employment
Non-Discrimination Act as the path
forward for workplace protections, that
bill is stalled in a Republican-led House
and security and solid, reliable legal
protection. For decades now, advocates
and scholars both have been saying
Title VII should be applied to protect
transgender people,” he says. “And now, to
have the EEOC confirm that, ‘Yes ... Title
VII should and does protect transgender
people when they’re discriminated
against because they’ve changed their sex
or intend to change their sex or because
they’re gender nonconforming. That
is sex discrimination.’ That is really an
important capstone.”
Davis, the head of the Transgender
Law Center, says the decision is a “big
leap forward in the journey to equality.”
Explaining, he says, “It is the game-
changer, asserting that transgender
people can bring claims at EEOC offices
across the country.”
Throughout the 53 district offices of
the EEOC, investigators will now accept
claims brought by transgender people,
and — though the EEOC process means
it could take some time — the EEOC’s
legal staff can bring lawsuits against
employers the agency has determined
have discriminated against transgender
employees or job applicants.
Another impact, Davis says, is on
37 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 26, 2012
M
ia Macy is a veteran and
police officer, married to
the woman she met in
her teens, who wanted
to take a job as a ballistics technician for
the Department of Alcohol, Tobacco,
Firearms and Expalosives (ATF).
“I was in the military and then I
became a cop. One of the last jobs I had
with the Phoenix Police Department,
I worked on an ATF [team], and it’s a
gun squad, and I was certified by the
ATF. They came in and they certified
us for these pieces of equipment, and
I worked on the gun cases,” she tells
Metro Weekly. “I got a job offer to
come out to San Francisco … and work
for the ATF in their lab, and went
through the process and went through
the background and completed that.”
Over the course of the process,
Macy, who had worked for the Phoenix
P.D. as a man, had begun transitioning,
and showed up for the background
check as Mia.
“We moved out to the [San Francisco]
Bay [where the job was to be located], and
within three days after my background
was completed and they alerted the lab
that Mia would be coming to work, I was
notified that the position was no longer
available — even though I was certified
and trained for the job.
“At that point, I needed some help. I
didn’t think something was right.”
Macy went to the Transgender Law
Center, and she filed a complaint with
the ATF, which responded that Macy
was not protected from discrimination
based on gender identity under Title
VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
“How did I feel? It was humiliating.
Justice is blind, but in my case she
was also deaf — because I wasn’t even
allowed in the building.”
Trish, Macy’s wife, says, “I was
shocked initially and didn’t know what
we’re going to do at that point.
Basically, the burden was placed on me
to get a job and to keep a job and then,
when I wasn’t having my own personal
stress about that, I was also having to be
a support for Mia.
“And watching her, she was so
defeated. It was so hard to watch
because she was clearly the most
qualified person. She had already been
doing the job, and then to have it taken
away from her, she felt like she was
being robbed.”
Macy says, “I had come from being
a soldier to going to college to being
a cop, so I served my country and my
community, and so did Trish, and we
both believe in that idea. It was scary
for me because I didn’t want to question
– I’m smart enough to understand that
discrimination happens, but I didn’t
want to believe it.”
Macy assesses the situation directly,
but with a focus on the greater impact
of her case.
“It’s a trial by fire for us, and it’s
been an emotionally hard time for us,”
she says, “but, for me, if one other
person doesn’t have to go through this,
then I already, for myself, have won.”
As Trish says, the situation has
been tough on them, but Macy adds,
“We’re kind of meant for each other.
We were both in the military, and we
kind of have that adapting personality.
Everything’s fluid and you adapt to the
situation. It sounds goofy, but we both
— it’s just one more hardship that you
have to adapt to, and we’ve become
very regimented to that kind of role.
“My transition, more than the EEOC,
has made us more close. You don’t get
any closer than if you’re with somebody
that goes through this process. And
then, on top of it, having the ATF and
the EEOC process….
“But it’s something we’ve become
able to adapt to. We’re good at it? I
don’t know.”
Trish says, “We’re very resilient.”
Macy laughs, but then gets serious.
“Any discomfort or anything that
I might be facing, I don’t see it as a
discomfort. Because every second that
we can tell the story and talk in a
positive way and listen to other people’s
opinions, I don’t think it can hurt. It
will be good,” she says. “At the end of
the day, this isn’t about me. There is my
side, how I feel, that I want justice, but
it’s bigger. It’s for every trans person
that comes through that door — to have
it open a little wider maybe.” l
A Woman’s Fight,
a Couple’s Resilience
by Chris Geidner
38 APRIL 26, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
pride
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39 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 26, 2012
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C
ELEBRATING LGBT
youth pride seems to
gain traction with every
passing year. People come
out younger. Institutions
working with youth – like
schools, nonprofits, local governments,
religious groups – cater to LGBT and
questioning youth in ways that might have
seemed unthinkable a decade ago.
Then again, it’s not as though LGBT
youth have managed to altogether escape
bullying and harassment, or keep from
being disproportionately affected by
homelessness.
As progress is made in some areas,
more problems might be revealed, or
resources can shift to address problems
that have gone largely ignored.
Whether it’s celebrating the good or
countering the bad, Youth Pride Day has
it all, a very rare pride event dedicated
to LGBT youth. This year, D.C.’s special
day marks its sweet 16th birthday with
vibrancy. But since its birth, Youth Pride
has thrived.
“We had about 900 people show up
for the first year,” says Christopher Dyer,
looking back to 1997, when he was 27.
“I think I was expecting 200 or 300. It
was quite fun. The second year we had
This year, D.C.’s special day marks its sweet 16th birthday
with vibrancy. But since its birth, Youth Pride has thrived.
By Will O’Bryan
about two thousand. From that point on,
the event just sort of took off. And the
organization took off.”
Dyer, who directed Mayor Adrian
Fenty’s Office of GLBT Affairs from 2007
to 2010, was a main figure in launching
Youth Pride Day and its sponsoring
organization, the Youth Pride Alliance. He
recalls that it took a couple years for what
was initially intended as some fundraising
efforts for D.C.’s Sexual Minority Youth
Assistance League (SMYAL) to evolve into
the Youth Pride Day locals enjoy today.
“In 1995, the whole LGBT youth
movement was really just beginning,”
he says. “The National Youth Advocacy
Coalition had just gotten formed. There
wasn’t a lot going on for LGBT people. …
Since I’d been involved with Capital Pride
folks – I volunteered in ’95 for backstage
security – I thought, yeah, we could do a
Youth Pride Day. We put a group together
to try to organize it – God love everyone
who sat around these meetings – but we
were more interested in adopting bylaws
and a mission statement and it just sort of
never took off.”
At least not right away. The idea for
a Youth Pride Day had taken root. Soon,
Dyer was prompted to give it another shot,
and more meetings were called.
“I had my first organizational
meeting in October ’96 at Café Luna,”
Dyer says. “I had the second and third
meetings around my kitchen table.
We sort of came up with ‘Youth Pride
Alliance,’ I think, around that table. And
we started figuring out what to do.”
With other community members
as eager as Dyer to get the idea off
the ground, the crucial elements came
together. To Dyer, that meant someone
who could craft the young organization’s
message, people to raise money, and an
engineer who knew his way around a
stage and its attendant wiring. That first
Youth Pride Day, in Dupont Circle, also
had some luck on its side. Rudy Galindo,
the famous gay ice-skater, was in town
to sign his 1997 biography, “Icebreaker.”
That was enough for the Youth Pride
Alliance to get Galindo to serve as the
first Youth Pride Day’s keynote speaker,
adding some celebrity to the event.
From its start in Dupont Circle,
Youth Pride Day rolled down to the
wide lawn of P Street Beach. But, with
last year’s 15th anniversary, Youth Pride
Day returned to its Dupont Circle roots.
Eboné Bell got her first taste of Youth
Pride Day at P Street Beach – as E-Clef,
her drag alter ego. She’s guessing it was
sometime in the early 2000s.
“I was probably 21 or 22,” Bell, now
30, says of her first Youth Pride Day
appearance. “The first thing I thought
was, ‘How did I not know about this
sooner?’ It was really cool to see all these
LGBT organizations coming together for
the greater good of the community and
for youth. It was a way for me to find out
about a lot of other organizations that
cater to the community. Youth Pride
does a great job of bringing all these
people and resources together. It was an
amazing effort.”
That orientation, the chance for
her to learn about so much of her
community at once, likely helped get
Bell where she is today, heading her
own B.O.I. Marketing & Promotions
and a very well-known face around
D.C.’s LGBT community.
“A lot of us, when we were younger,
weren’t able to be ourselves,” she says.
“I completely admire these kids who
are coming out in middle school, in high
school, really being open with themselves,
not being afraid of who they are. What’s
cool about Youth Pride is to go and see
how far we’ve come.”
BRIAN WATSON, A FORMER Youth
Pride Alliance board member who
40 APRIL 26, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
manages Transgender Health Empowerment’s Wanda Alston
House, one of only a handful of transitional homes in the country
dedicated to LGBT youth, is reminded daily that there is still a long
way to go. At least Youth Pride Day is a bright spot for the 30-year-
old’s eight residents, whatever trials they may be facing.
“The kids always have a wonderful time,” he says, adding
that one resident, Zion Lopez, has even participated as Youth
Pride Day emcee. “Every year there’s something new, something
different.
“Kids don’t really have anywhere to go. Adults, we can always
go have a drink at the Fireplace, or go to Town or Cobalt. The kids
don’t get this on a daily basis. This one day out of the year is really
when they get to come out and celebrate their identities with one
another. Young people really need that.”
Jayden Lovee and Aaron Lewis are two such young people.
And while the Youth Pride Day is certainly a celebration, the
20-year-old Lovee is looking for more than that at his first Youth
Pride Day, which will have him volunteering with SMYAL.
“It’s more important than a celebration,” he says. “It’s also
camaraderie. It shows that other people support us. It shows
youth that they’re supported and loved.”
For the 19-year-old Lewis it’s also about education, giving
non-LGBT youth a chance to feel more comfortable about sexual-
minority issues.
“Last year was my first time. I had fun, but I also learned a
lot and networked,” says Lewis, a senior peer educator at Metro
TeenAIDS, who plans on bringing others to Dupont Circle
this year for their first Youth Pride Day. “A lot of people in our
generation may not be gay or curious or bi or whatever, they may
not understand youth who are.”
The celebration, the networking, the education – it’s all
exactly what Nikisha Carpenter, the 33-year-old president of the
Youth Pride Alliance, says the day should be.
“It’s all the performances and the dance afterward is
great,” says Carpenter. “But it’s also an opportunity for a lot
of organizations to see a lot of youth in our community. It’s a
great way to find out what’s out there, like the Human Rights
Campaign, SMYAL, the [National Gay and Lesbian] Task Force.”
She adds that when she joined the board in 2005, the intention
was to grow both the alliance and its signature event. To that
end, the most notable news these days is not the move back to the
circle, but ways D.C. authorities have stepped up support.
“Support from [Advisory Neighborhood Commissions] 1A and
2B has been great,” notes Carpenter. “And support from the D.C.
Office of Human Rights. That’s really helped us move forward
and grow the last two years. Our goal next year is to put on 10 to
14 events during the year.”
Dyer is certain Youth Pride Day has made its mark – and will
continue to do so.
“Youth Pride has been effective in the sense that it provides
a safe space for young people to come together,” says Dyer. “The
issues we were addressing 16 years ago – like LGBT homelessness
and suicide ideation and depression and substance abuse and all
these challenges that young people face – they’re still facing now.
Things are still ridiculously tough for LGBT people as they come
out, but I’m struck by the resiliency of the community.
“And I’m incredibly proud,” he continues. “It amazes me that
what was just a crazy idea, they’ve been able to maintain every
year. Youth Pride Day has become part of the cultural landscape
of D.C., the kick-off for Pride season. It’s just absolutely amazing.”
Youth Pride Day is Saturday, April 28, in Dupont Circle, noon to
5 p.m. Rain date is Saturday, May 12. Infatuation Dance, April 28,
is 5 to 9 p.m. at Patty Boom Boom, 1359 U St. NW, 21 and younger,
$3. For more information, visit youthpridealliance.org.l
41 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 26, 2012
42 APRIL 26, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
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43 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 26, 2012
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The Youth Pride Alliance, now in its
16th year, was founded in 1996 by
Christopher Dyer. Its primary function
is the annual production of D.C.’s Youth
Pride Day. As a small, all-volunteer
run organization, the YPA relies on
the support of the community for our
programs and events. In addition to
Youth Pride Day, it also organizes others
events for Gay, Bisexual, Transgender,
Queer, Questioning, and Ally youth
throughout the year.
The Youth Pride Alliance is a
501(c)3 non-profit organization for
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender,
Queer, Questioning, and Ally youth
empowerment to encourage positive
self-development and expression, as well
as leadership, while bridging diverse
communities and individuals to address
issues of visibility, equality, and social
justice. It is dedicated to celebrating the
dignity and courage of all young people.
BOARD
Nikisha Carpenter, President
Elke Chen, Vice President
Franklin Johnson, Treasurer
Jessica Rotem, Secretary
Sheldon Scott
Margaret Albamonte
Jose Ramirez
VOLUNTEERS
Sarah Arango
Matthew Dochterman
Kinsey Holloway
Brandon Sousa
Angela Ferrell-Zabala
If you are interested in joining the Youth
Pride Alliance Board, please email
Nikisha Carpenter at ncarpenter@
youthpridealliance.org or visit
youthpridealliance.org.
ABOUT THE YOUTH
PRIDE ALLIANCE
44 APRIL 26, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
45 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 26, 2012
SPEAKERS
Andrew Barnett, SMYAL
Franklin Johnson, Youth Pride Alliance
Gustavo F. Velasquez, DC Office of Human Rights
Sheldon Scott, Youth Pride Alliance
Jeffrey Richardson, GLBT Affairs Office
Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton
Celina Gerbic, The Trevor Project
Markia Lee, The DC Center
Youth Testimonials throughout the day
PERFORMANCES
330
B Steady
Drag City DC
Khyisha
Je Nier Blue Dupree
Laronica Vegas
LCDP-Mpodérate!
Lost Bois
MR/Miss Mpodérate! 2012
Private Tails & Xion Lopez, Emcee
SMYAL
Sylvanna Duvel
Tyra Demarest
SPONSORS
Platinum
DC of State Superintendent of Education
DC Office of Human Rights
SMYAL
Gold
La Clinica del Pueblo
HRC
Silver
La Clinica del Pueblo
Whitman Walker Clinic
National Gay and Lesbian Task Force
Metro Teen Aids
Bronze
Mautner Project
Metro-DC PFLAG
The D.C. Center
Transgender Health Empowerment
pride
youth
2O12
SPEAKERS &
PERFORMERS
Saturday, April 28, Dupont Circle
Noon to 5 p.m. Subject to change
Rain date: Saturday, May 12
46 APRIL 26, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
pride
youth
2O12
47 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 26, 2012
Saturday, April 28th
Dupont Circle
Noon to 5 p.m.
Rain Date: Saturday, May 12
Advocate for Youth
American University
Beltway Bears
Burgundy Crescent
Catholic University
DC area Transmasculine Society
DC Office of Human Rights
DC Trans Coalition
Eleanor Holmes Norton
GLBT Mayor’s Office
Gay and Lesbian Liaison Unit, MPD
Gay Men’s Chorus of Washington
GMU Pride
GW University
Howard University
Human Rights Campaign
Identity Inc.
James Madison University
La Clinica del Pueblo
Latin American Youth Center
Latino GLBT History Project
Mautner Project
Metropolitan Community Church of DC
Metro Teen Aids
Metro Weekly
Mount Vernon Place United Methodist Church
National Youth Advocacy Coalition
Northern Virginia AIDS Ministry
PFLAG DC
Rainbow History Project
Rainbow Response Coalition
Rainbow Youth Alliance
Riverside Baptist Church
Sexual Minority Youth Assistance League
Team DC
The Center
The National Gay and Lesbian Task Force
The Trevor Project
Transgender Health Empowerment
Youth Advisory Committee
Youth Pride Alliance
Whitman Walker Health
pride
youth
2O12
BOOTHS &
VENDORS
48
Compiled by Doug Rule
APRIL 26, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
APRIL 26 - MAY 3, 2012
Award, will speak about the struggles facing LGBT
individuals in his country and the entire continent.
Monday, April 30, at 7 p.m. 201A White-Gravenor
Hall, Georgetown University’s main campus. For
more information, email mc747@georgetown.edu.
GARY FISHER AT VITRUVIAN GALLERY
“Masculine Impressions” is the next titillating exhibit
to come to Vitruvian Gallery, the gallery devoted
to male figurative art. Gary Fisher’s latest series of
artworks, mostly oil paintings and charcoal drawings,
grows from the command “take off your clothes and
make yourself comfortable.” Fisher’s strokes capture
models doing exactly that, stretching, flexing and
relaxing in a sensual display of masculinity. Through
May 13. Vitruvian Fine Arts Gallery, 734 7th St. SE,
2nd Floor. Visit vitruviangallery.com.
GAYLARIOUS!
For the May edition of their popular monthly gay
and gay-friendly comedy show at the new Riot Act
Comedy club, Chris Doucette and Zach Toczynski
present a “ladies night” with comics Lori Sommer
and Emma Willmann. Wednesday, May 2, at 8:30 p.m.
Riot Act Comedy Theater, 801 E St. NW. Tickets are
$15. Call 202-697-4900 or visit riotactcomedy.com.
L’ENFANT’S SPEAK EASY
Following on its insanely popular brunch house party
La Boum every Saturday and the annual Bastille Day
French Maid Relay Race, L’Enfant Café and Bar offers
this social dining event on select Sundays each month.
Speak Easy transforms the space into a Prohibition
Era venue Ð complete with back door entrance,
dim lighting and drawn shades Ð serving drinks, a
three-course dinner and a live show that’s very of this
century, with singing drag queens, comedians and DJs
spinning dance tunes. New York singing drag artist
legend Joey Arias co-produces the show, but while
he does his run at Woolly Mammoth for Arias With
A Twist, he’s lined up fellow New York drag singers
to helm things. Next Sunday, April 29, he’s got Lady
Bunny and Flotilla DeBarge. Most late shows end in
a DJ dance party. Sunday, April 29. L’Enfant Café and
Bar, 2000 18th St. NW. Reservations are required;
cost is $50 for the 7 p.m. dinner show, or $10 plus a
two-drink minimum for the 10:30 p.m. late show. Call
202-319-1800 or visit lenfantcafe.com.
SUZANNE VEGA & DUNCAN SHEIK
It’s not too much of a stretch to see these two pop
songsmiths on a bill together. But they’ve actually
also collaborated on music for Vega’s one-woman play
Carson McCullers Talks About Love, about the mid-
20th Century bisexual Southern writer. Given Sheik’s
success with the musical Spring Awakening, it’s great
to see him returning to the format. Except them to
perform together a few tunes from that, along with
their solo hits, from “Luka” to “Barely Breathing.”
Sunday, April 29, at 7:30 p.m. The Birchmere, 3701
Mount Vernon Ave., Alexandria. Tickets are $45. Call
703-549-7500 or visit birchmere.com.
SWEETLIFE FOOD AND MUSIC FESTIVAL
Merriweather Post Pavilion kicks off its 2012 season
with this festival, sponsored by delicious local
salad chain Sweetgreen and headlined by Swedish
electronic whippersnapper AVICII, rapper Kid Cudi
SPOTLIGHT
COME FLY AWAY
HHH
Singing to recorded music signals that you can’t afford
live musicians. What Twyla Tharp has done in Come
Fly Away, putting a big band onstage to accompany
recorded vocals by Frank Sinatra, signals that she
couldn’t afford not to have live musicians. Not if she
wanted a commercial product that could justify hefty
ticket prices, anyway. But it’s a superfluous gesture
that the famed choreographer has made in her latest
dance musical — one that subjugates Sinatra’s voice
more than it showcases it, and one that confines her
impossibly beautiful dancers to a generically glossy
nightclub setting from which Tharp draws something
short of inspiration. In its glimpses of the romantic
entanglements among four couples, Come Fly Away
Soul-Stirring
Fifteen homeless women make
their Kennedy Center debut in
Theatre Lab show
by Doug Rule
MOST ACTORS DON’T MAKE THEIR
stage debut at the Kennedy Center. But
then the 15 women in the Theater Lab’s
My Soul, Look Back and Wonder aren’t like
most actors.
“All of them are homeless and in
recovery,” explains Deb Gottesman,
co-founder and co-executive director
of the Theatre Lab. “Almost all of them
share histories of physical abuse. Several
of them are HIV-positive. Some of them
have done some time in prison for either
using or distributing. And most of the
women have never done any kind of
acting.”
Local playwright Jennifer Nelson
worked with the women to develop
a script, incorporating storytelling,
monologues and songs, using their
individual words to tell a collective story.
“It’s a way, I think, to get people to really be
able to hear voices that usually go unheard
in our society,” says Gottesman, who,
with Buzz Mauro, started Theater Lab
20 years ago. The lab offers classes, many
taught by celebrated theater veterans, for
children and adults of all backgrounds,
aiming to “transform lives through theater
education.”
The women in My Soul are all residents
of N Street Village, a women’s recovery
and wellness center. In years passed,
graduates of the Lab’s 14-week theater
classes at N Street would perform a
show that would then be edited into a
professionally produced DVD.
This year, however, filmmakers
have been involved since the beginning
to produce a documentary. Gottesman
thinks it’s also possible a core group of the
women could tour the show to churches.
“It’d be a very meaningful experience
for people from all walks of life to see [My
Soul],” she says. “It’s very, very moving,
very powerful, and full of surprising
humor.”
Theatre Lab’s My Soul, Look Back and
Wonder is Monday, April 30, at 7:30 p.m.,
followed by a panel discussion featuring
R. Gill Kerlikowske of the White House
Office of National Drug Control Policy,
at the Kennedy Center Terrace Theater.
Tickets are $25, or $100 for performance
and reception. Call 202-824-0449 or visit
theatrelab.org. l
only hints at emotional complexity as it hurtles
through nearly 30 Sinatra songs in not even the 80
minutes it’s advertised to run. Twarp’s intensely
athletic style here trumps the passion that should
be on display, making for an affair that’s easy on
the eyes and, alas, easy on the heart, too. Closes
this Sunday, April 29. Kennedy Center Eisenhower
Theater. Tickets are $69 to $125. Call 202-467-4600
or visit kennedy-center.org. (Jonathan Padget)
FRANK MUGISHA: “HUMAN RIGHTS AND
HOMOPHOBIA IN AFRICA”
Frank Mugisha, executive director of Sexual
Minorities of Uganda, has received multiple death
threats in his native country, home to “Kill The Gays”
legislation and where his close colleague David Cato
was murdered last year. Currently on a U.S. tour,
Mugisha, the 2011 winner of the RFK Human Rights
49 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 26, 2012
50 APRIL 26, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
and indie darlings The Shins. Also on the bill: Fun.,
Zola Jesus, Ben Browning of Cut Copy and local
band BLUEBRAIN offering a DJ set. Local farmers
will also offer hearty, organic grub at this “carbon
neutral event.” Saturday, April 28. Doors at 12 p.m.
Merriweather Post Pavilion, 10475 Little Patuxent
Parkway, Columbia, Md. Tickets are $75 to $125. Call
800-551-SEAT or visit merriweathermusic.com.
THE WASHINGTON SAVOYARDS
The formerly Gilbert & Sullivan-only company is now
more broadly focused on light opera and American
musicals, as evidenced by its current show. A Grand
Night for Singing is a Tony-nominated Rodgers &
Hammerstein revue from 1984.
To May 6. Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St.
NE. Tickets are $15 to $40. Call 202-399-7993 or visit
atlasarts.org.
FILM
BULLY
HHHHH
As the title suggests, Bully is about our shameful
failure as a culture to recognize and prevent bullying.
But it’s also about the subjects, the kids, who appear
dead-eyed and undeniably burdened by that cruel
torment, targeted for all sorts of reasons: sexual
orientation, disability or appearance, for example.
The documentary is so viscerally demanding, so
breathtaking, that it’s almost tempting to ignore its
glaring problems. Director Lee Hirsch’s composition
is much of the same stuff that plagues most of the
documentary genre. He presents a problem, uses a
collection of profiles to explain that it’s a big problem,
then he misappropriates an uplifting moment to
suggest that the problem can be solved. Meanwhile,
there’s little to no effort made to explore the “why” of
bullying, to learn what’s turning these kids into sadists.
The strength is the story, not the storyteller. Now
playing. Area theaters. Visit fandango.com. (Chris
Heller)
COMIC-CON EPISODE IV: A FAN’S HOPE
HHH AND ONE HALF
There’s little to no condescension in A Fan’s Hope, a
documentary about Comic-Con International, a four-
day convention that draws more than 100,000 to San
Diego every year. Writer/director Morgan Spurlock
seems to understand that his subjects shouldn’t be
ridiculed for their passions – and those passions shine
through brilliantly, with an amiable hue. And yet,
that’s the fundamental problem with the documentary.
While it’s clear Comic-Con has outgrown super-fans
and become a testing ground for money-making
ventures, Spurlock doesn’t cut with the wry criticism
that made him famous in Super-Size Me. A Fan’s
Hope is funny, revealing and incredibly encouraging
to fan culture. As a piece of entertainment, it succeeds.
All the other stuff – the stuff that documentaries are
supposed to be made of – is where it doesn’t. Spurlock
has a great eye for hypocrisy and a track record
of spinning it with trenchant analysis of relatable
social issues. That he doesn’t do the same here is
disappointing. Now playing. West End Cinema, 2301
M St. NW. Call 202-419-FILM or visit westendcinema.
com. (Chris Heller)
DARLING COMPANION
Diane Keaton stars as a woman who loves her rescued
dog more than her husband, played by Kevin Kline –
but then her husband loses her dog at their vacation
home in the Rockies. So Keaton sends out a search
party, including Dianne Wiest, Richard Jenkins and
Sam Shepard, who end up finding more than they
bargained for. Awww. Opens Friday, April 27. Area
theaters. Visit fandango.com.
SAFE
Jason Statham stars as a former elite special agent
who has to rescue an abducted girl, fight off warring
mafia factions and avoid capture at the hands of
corrupt cops. If that sounds familiar, it’s because
you’ve seen Safe before. It’s also known as Every Jason
Statham Movie Ever Made. Opens Friday, April 27.
Area theaters. Visit fandango.com.
SOUND OF MY VOICE
Brit Marling stars as an enigmatic young woman
who leads a mysterious group, which a team of
documentary filmmakers attempts to expose. Zal
Batmanglij directs this drama. Opens Friday, April 27.
Area theaters. Visit fandango.com.

THE CABIN IN THE WOODS
HHHHH
Don’t watch the trailer, don’t ask your friends, and
above all else, don’t read about it online: The Cabin
in the Woods is a movie to be seen without the
faintest idea of what it’s about. Think Evil Dead
meets Scream, magnified 10-times over in a movie
so steeped in horror that it repurposes clichés into
delightful critiques about our expectations of the
genre. Cabin works so well because Joss Whedon
and his partner-in-crime Drew Goddard rail against
convention by wrapping themselves in it. They pick
apart the genre from the inside out, mining to find the
best, most exhilarating elements. Cabin isn’t Whedon
and Goddard’s love letter to horror -- it’s their wish
list. Whedon and Goddard are proving that filmmakers
can make something that’s smart and scary, self-aware
and compelling. (And that’s without even mentioning
Cabin’s impressive wit and sense of timing.) Now
playing. Area theaters. Visit fandango.com. (Chris
Heller)
THE FIVE-YEAR ENGAGEMENT
And finally, the worthwhile comedy of the season rears
its Apatow-produced head. Muppets buddies Jason
Segel and Nicholas Stoller reunite with this R-rated
comedy about a couple that keeps putting off their big
day. Come for Segel’s comic bumbles, but stay for the
killer cast he’s put together to back him up, including
Emily Blunt, Alison Brie, and Chris Pratt. Opens
Friday, April 27. Area theaters. Visit fandango.com.
THE HUNGER GAMES
HHHH
The first thing worth mentioning about The Hunger
Games is the silence. Few characters say much, and
those that do don’t repeat themselves. Their thoughts,
feelings and schemes are rarely spelled out, but rather,
punctuated by quiet. As someone who read Suzanne
Collins’s trilogy of young adult novels that inspired the
movie, that quiet is fulfilling -- and frankly, more than
I had prepared to see in a big-budget adaptation with
massive box-office ambition. For those who are not
familiar, though, I can’t help but wonder if the silence
will have the same effect. Can the story’s intricacies
hold up without an internal monologue? The Hunger
Games allows for social commentary and the very
kind of mindless bloodshed it’s allegedly trying to
decry. Under other circumstances, that relationship
would seem hypocritical, but as it was in the book, the
violence is a practical necessity. Now playing. Area
theaters. Visit fandango.com. (Chris Heller)
THE PIRATES! BAND OF MISFITS
A fun-looking kid’s flick from the minds behind
Wallace & Gromit about a swashbuckler, played by
Hugh Grant, who’s competing for the “Pirate of the
Year” award. If you’ve got little grommets of your
own, just don’t forget: It could be much worse than
this. Jeremy Piven and Salma Hayek are among the
voiceover cast in Peter Lord’s film. Opens Friday, April
27. Area theaters. Visit fandango.com.
THE RAVEN
John Cusack plays Edgar Allen Poe, as he tries to hunt
down a murderer who mimics his macabre and lurid
tales. James McTeigue’s stylish, gothic thriller also
stars Luke Evans, Brendan Gleeson and Alice Eve.
Opens Friday, April 27. Area theaters. Visit fandango.
com.

STAGE
1776
HHHH
Springing to full-blooded life onstage at Ford’s under
the assured direction of Peter Flynn, the Founding
Fathers of 1776 can be a horny, harried lot, yearning
for their faraway wives as much as they yearn for
liberation from a faraway tyrant. By the time the
president of Congress, John Hancock, and his cohorts
have agreed on a statement they can put their, um,
John Hancocks on, the document feels as though
it’s ready to burst into a song of freedom as lively as
any of the ditties Sherman Edwards penned for the
1969 show. Of course, Edwards and librettist Peter
Stone breathe new life not just into the Declaration
of Independence but into the lives of the men who
shaped it. To May 19. Ford’s Theatre, 511 10th St. NW.
Tickets are $15 to $60. Call 800-982-2787 or visit
fordstheatre.org. (Jonathan Padget)
ARIAS WITH A TWIST
HH AND ONE HALF
Man, if we had a dollar for every time we’ve seen
a drag queen onstage simulating a three-way with
satanic puppets, we’d have... a dollar to loan you.
Which would best be applied to the purchase of
your mind-altering drug of choice, if you’re inclined
to check out Arias With a Twist, the eye-popping
collaboration between two bastions of New York’s
avant-garde: cross-dressing chanteuse Joey Arias and
experimental puppeteer Basil Twist. Head into Woolly
Mammoth stone-cold sober and you, too, may marvel
at the originality of Twist’s visual language, yet also
wonder what the point is to all the effort. Arias does
have a compelling voice (although his commitment
to live performance is undermined by recorded
accompaniment), but he’s not always a compelling
character. Or a timely one, with flat jokes about who’s
to blame for the world’s problems (Bush) and why
a gay couple he spies in the audience needn’t worry
about Arias exposing their relationship (“Don’t ask,
don’t tell”). Granted, the show has been around since
2008, but there’s no reason it shouldn’t adapt to the
times. As it is, Arias With a Twist comes up a day late
and a dollar short. To May 6 at Woolly Mammoth
Theatre Company, 641 D St. NW. Tickets are $35 to
$72.50. Call 202-393-3939 or visit woollymammoth.
net. (Jonathan Padget)
CAB CALLOWAY’S MINNIE THE MOOCHER
Puppets, dancers and a seven-piece jazz band weave
together Cab Calloway’s most famous songs to tell the
story of a “frail” named Minnie the Moocher and her
“hepcat” beau Smokey Joe in this Pointless Theatre
production. Matt Reckeweg directs a cast including
Aaron Bliden, Thony Mena, Sadie Leigh Rothman and
Maddie Whiting telling a jazz age tragic love story.
Closes this Sunday, April 29. Mead Theatre Lab at
Flashpoint, 916 G St. NW. Tickets are $15. Call 202-
315-1310 or visit flashpointdc.org.
CROWN OF SHADOWS: THE WAKE OF ODYSSEUS
Jason Gray Pratt wrote this Round House Theatre
world premiere offering a gripping, modern take
on The Odyssey using contemporary language and
leanings to paint a chilling portrait of the family the
warrior leaves behind. Blake Robison directs this
production starring Michael Morrow Hammack,
Deborah Hazlett, Julia Proctor and Jefferson A.
Russell. To May 6. Round House Theatre, 4545 East-
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Birthday Bear
By Will O’Bryan
“MY BIRTHDAY IS ACTUALLY ON FRIDAY, while we’re doing our book
signing,” says Travis Smith, whose party will be promoting “Guide for the Modern
Bear,” his new book with Chris Bale, at the weekly Bear Happy Hour at Town. “I
think it’s going to be the most awesome birthday ever. Back in D.C., back with my
old peeps.”
Smith is referring to his nearly two decades in the District, where he owned
The Good Eye design store in Friendship Heights. For the past few years, he’s been
in Phoenix, luxuriating in mid-century design -- and devising a bearish expression
of same.
“Modern Bear is a multimedia company,” he says. “We’re already working on
the Modern Bear cookbook.”
Hibernation would not seem to be on the agenda. Still, first things first. And
that’s Guide for the Modern Bear, which Smith says is modeled on the Cub Scout
manuals of many a gay bear’s youth.
“It’s really a little guidebook,” he says. “Each chapter concentrates on the
city each fictional character lives in.” The book moves through the bear lexicon
of “polar bears,” “otters,” “wolves” and the rest of the furry family. While each
chapter’s “bear-achter” may be fictional, venues highlighted are genuine, hence the
feeling of the book being a guide. And while the book gives the Modern Bear boys a
tangible presence, most of the meat is still online.
“Where it’s all happening is on the damn Facebook page,” Smith says of the
page that enjoys about 14,000 “likes” and shows no signs of slowing. “I remember
how excited we were to hit a hundred fans.”
The Guide for the Modern Bear book signing is Friday, May 4, from 6 to 11
p.m., at D.C. Bear Crue’s Bear Happy Hour at Town, 2009 8th St. NW. The book is
available for $19.95 at modernbear.net.l
West Highway, Bethesda. Tickets are $26 to $61. Call
240-644-1100 or visit roundhousetheatre.org.
DANCING AT LUGHNASA
Brian Friel’s Tony-winning transcendental play,
loosely based on events from his own life, takes
place during the Celtic harvest in 1930s Ireland and
focuses on five unmarried sisters. Craig Mummey
directs a Quotidian Theatre Company production
featuring among others David Dubov, Rebecca Ellis,
Doug Krehbel, Leah Mazade, Stephanie Mumford and
Alyssa Sanders. To May 20. The Writer’s Center, 4508
Walsh St. Bethesda. Tickets are $25. Call 301-816-1023
or visit quotidiantheatre.org.
FIVE LITTLE MONKEYS
Adventure Theatre’s latest show is based on the series
of children’s books by Eileen Christelow and adapted
for the stage by Ernie Nolan. Five Little Monkeys,
told in cumulative verse, focuses on silly simian
siblings insisting on doing things their own way. Karin
Abromaitis directs the play starring Valerie Leonard.
Opens in a pajama party Friday, April 27, at 7 p.m. To
June 3. Adventure Theater, 7300 MacArthur Blvd.,
Glen Echo. Tickets are $18. Call 301-634-2261 or visit
adventuretheatre.org.
GOD OF CARNAGE
Yasmina Reza’s play about upper-middle-class
Brooklyn couples, who meet to discuss an incident of
playground violence between their sons, won the 2009
Tony for Best Play. Joe Calarco directs a Washington
premiere production of the play. To June 24. Signature
Theatre, 4200 Campbell Ave., Arlington. Call 703-820-
9771 or visit signature-theatre.org.
HAMLECCHINO: CLOWN PRINCE OF DENMARK
Faction of Fools Theatre Company, the 2012 Helen
Hayes Award winner for Outstanding Emerging
Theatre Company, focuses on the Italian commedia
dell’Arte theater style of physical comedy.
And it concludes its third season with a stylistic
interpretation of Shakespeare’s Hamlet. The show,
directed by Matthew R. Wilson, who also plays the
title character, is billed as a “high-octane dose of
Shakespearean tragi-comedy.” Opens Friday, April 27,
at 8 p.m. To May 19. Elstad Auditorium at Gallaudet
University, 800 Florida Ave. NE. Regular tickets are
$25. Call 800-838-3006 or visit factionoffools.org.
LAS MENINAS
Set in the court of France’s Louis XIV, Lynn Nottage’s
drama is an irreverent and incisive reconsideration of
the historical scandal involving Queen Marie-Therese
and a unique gift from Africa. Eve Muson directs
the production. To May 6. Rep Stage: The Horowitz
Center’s Studio Theatre at Howard Community
College, 10901 Little Patuxent Parkway, Columbia,
Md. Tickets are $22 to $33. Call 443-518-1500 or visit
repstage.org.
LONG DAY’S JOURNEY INTO NIGHT
The darker side of Eugene O’Neill is represented in
this Pulitzer Prize-winning classic, considered one of
the most powerful plays in American theater and also
his autobiographical masterpiece. To May 6. Arena
Stage -- Mead Center for American Theater, 1101 6th
St. SW. Tickets are $51 to $66. Call 202-488-3300 or
visit arenastage.org.
ON THE WATERFRONT
Kathleen Akerley directs an American Century
Theater production of Budd Schulberg’s play, which
has some significant differences from Elia Kazan’s
1954 Oscar-winning film, but enough similarities to
appeal, including all the vivid characters, speeches and
drama, set in the Mob-infested New York dockyards.
The ensemble cast includes Dan Corey, Joe Cronin,
Cyle Durkee, Jack Powers and Caitlin Shea. Closes
this Saturday, April 28. American Century Theater
-- Gunston Theater II, 2700 South Lang St. Arlington.
Tickets are $30 to $35. Call 703-998-4555 or visit
americancentury.org.
PURO TANGO
GALA Theatre offers a celebration of the tango,
directed by Hugo Medrano and featuring singer
Nelson Pino and other internationally acclaimed
musicians, dancers and actors from Argentina and
Uruguay. Opens Thursday, April 19, at 8 p.m. Closes
this Sunday, April 29. GALA Theatre at Tivoli Square,
3333 14th St. NW. Tickets are $20 to $38. Call 202-
234-7174 or visit galatheatre.org.
SPIDERMUSICAL
The charmingly wacky, Fringe Festival-like Landless
Theatre Company presents the final in its season of
silly superhero-themed shows – after such campy
spectacles as Cannibal! The Musical and Devil
Boys from Beyond. This time around the show
is Spidermusical, a low-budget spoof of the most
expensive show in Broadway history, Spider-Man:
Turn Off The Dark by U2’s Bono and The Edge.
Timothy Michael Drucker and Randy Blair wrote
Spidermusical, a follow-up to the 2010 spoof Perez
Hilton Saves The Universe. Closes this Sunday, April
29. District of Columbia Arts Center (DCAC), 2438
18th St. NW. Tickets are $25. Call 202-462-7833 or
visit landlesstheatre.com.
STRANGE INTERLUDE
HHHH AND ONE HALF
Eugene O’Neill’s very long but very engaging Strange
Interlude is a tale of unfulfilled lives and loves. At
nearly four hours, this isn’t exactly dinner theater –
but don’t be deterred. The play positively flies thanks
to director Michael Kahn’s keen vision, inspired
casting – Francesca Faridany as the lead Nina Leeds
is absolutely stellar – skillful editing and beautiful
pacing. And to be sure, in true O’Neill fashion, the
next witty line is never far behind the dire or the
deep. Closes this Sunday, April 29. Sidney Harman
Hall, Harman Center for the Arts, 610 F St. NW.
Tickets are $20 to $105. Call 202-547-1122 or visit
shakespearetheatre.org. (Kate Wingfield)
THE 39 STEPS
Four actors play over 150 in this comedic adaptation of
Hitchcock’s famous thriller about a suave, somewhat
bored Englishman who naively agrees to date a
mysterious woman he meets at the theatre. He finds
himself in a world of spies and adventures. Clay
Hopper directs this Olney Theatre production adapted
by Patrick Barlow and starring Susan Lynskey and
Jeffries Thaiss. To May 20. Olney Theatre Center,
2001 Olney-Sandy Spring Road, Olney, Md. Tickets
are $34 to $54. Call 301-924-3400 or visit olneytheatre.
org.
THE BIG MEAL
Five generations of a family share their experiences,
both epic and intimate, all while sitting at a single
restaurant table at a chain restaurant in Dan LeFranc’s
play. Johanna Gruenhut directs this Studio Theatre
SecondStage production, starring Josh Adams, Ashley
Dillard, Hyla Matthews and Sam O’Brien. To May 20.
Studio Theatre, 14th & P Streets NW. Call 202-332-
3300 or visit studiotheatre.org.
Dan LeFranc’s play
THE SEAFARER
SCENA Theatre presents a humorous and haunting
production of The Seafarer from perhaps Ireland’s
greatest modern playwright Conor McPherson. To
May 20. The H Street Playhouse, 1365 H St. NE.
Tickets are $30. Call 866-811-4111 or visit scenatheatre.
org.

THE WHIPPING MAN
Right now, not one but two major theater companies in
dining
54 APRIL 26, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
55 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 26, 2012
the region are staging productions of Matthew Lopez’s
play set in 1865 and focused on two newly freed slaves
and the son of their former master, celebrating an
unconventional Passover Seder and struggling with
the concepts of justice and mercy. D.C.’s Theater
J offers a production directed by Jennifer Nelson
and starring Mark Hairston, Alexander Strain and
David Emerson Toney. To May 20. The Aaron &
Cecile Goldman Theater, Washington, D.C.’s Jewish
Community Center, 1529 16th St. NW. Tickets are $30
to $60. Call 202-518-9400 or visit washingtondcjcc.
org. Meanwhile, Baltimore’s leading theater company
CenterStage features Michael Micalizzi, Kevin
Morrow and Johnny Ramey in a production directed
by its artistic director Kwame Kwei-Armah. To May
13. Center Stage, 700 North Calvert St., Baltimore.
Tickets are $10 to $55. Call 410-986-4000 or visit
centerstage.org.
WORKING THE MUSICAL
Keegan Theatre offers a production of this musical
based on the book by Pulitzer Prize-winning author
Studs Terkel and adapted by Stephen Schwartz
(Wicked, Godspell) and Nina Faso, WORKING
celebrates everyday people and the changing dynamics
of American society in this compelling musical that
is marked by both the range and humanity of its
characters and its absorbing and diverse score. To
May 13. Church Street Theater, 1742 Church St. NW.
Tickets are $35 to $40. Call 703-892-0202 or visit
keegantheatre.com.
COMMUNITY THEATER
HELLO, DOLLY!
Next year, Virginia’s Signature Theatre will offer a
new production of this Jerry Herman classic. But
there’s no need to wait for your Dolly fix: Just head
north, to Baltimore’s Spotlighters Theater, where
Fuzz Roark directs locals, led by Maribeth Vogel
Eckenrode as Dolly Gallagher Levi, in Herman’s
ebullient and irresistible musical celebrating the joy
of living. The performance Thursday, May 3, at 8 p.m.,
is a benefit for the gay leather group COMMAND
MC. To May 20. Spotlighters Theatre, 817 St. Paul St.,
Baltimore. Tickets are $18. Call 410-752-1225 or visit
spotlighters.org.
MUSIC
AARON LAZAR
Broadway actor and singer Aaron Lazar was last at
the Kennedy Center last fall singing Rodgers and
Hammerstein standards as part of the kick off to
the National Symphony Orchestra Pops season. Next
Friday, he returns as part of Barbara Cook’s Spotlight
cabaret series. Lazar has starred on Broadway in Les
Misérables, A Little Night Music and The Light in the
Piazza – so it’s probably safe to expect a broad range
of Broadway favorites. Friday, May 4, at 7:30 p.m.
Kennedy Center Terrace Theater. Tickets are $45.
Call 202-467-4600 or visit kennedy-center.org.
BALTIMORE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Marin Alsop conducts the BSO in Dmitri
Shostakovich’s profoundly moving Symphony No.
7, which was composed in 1941 and dedicated to the
city of Leningrad while it was under siege by German
forces. Friday, May 4, at 8:15 p.m. Music Center at
Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda.
Also Saturday, May 5, at 7 p.m. Joseph Meyerhoff
Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St., Baltimore. Tickets
are $28 to $88. Call 410-783-8000 or visit bsomusic.
org.
BOHEMIAN CAVERNS JAZZ ORCHESTRA
Every Monday night the 17-piece jazz orchestra
performs a variety of music from the big band
56 APRIL 26, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
body
57
caption
METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 26, 2012
repertoire -- including pieces by Duke Ellington,
Count Basie, Billy Strayhorn and Maria Schneider,
plus originals from band members -- at its namesake
venue. Founded by baritone saxophonist Brad Linde
and club owner Omrao Brown, features some of
D.C.’s best jazz musicians, including Linde and
trumpeter Joe Herrera, who co-direct. Performances
at 8 p.m. and 9:45 p.m. every Monday night. Bohemian
Caverns, 2001 11th St. NW. Tickets are $7. Call 202-
299-0800 or visit bohemiancaverns.com.
BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN & THE E STREET BAND
The rock legend and his band just appeared a couple
weeks ago at the Verizon Center, but that venue’s
small potatoes compared to Nationals Park, where the
Boss returns once again in September for a stadium-
filling show in support of the band’s 17th studio album,
Wrecking Ball, and at least an implicit nudge to fans
to get out and vote. These days Springsteen, after all,
is pretty rootin’ tootin’ angry over the woeful state of
economic justice in America today, and the political
overtones of that. Tickets on sale Friday, April 27, at
10 a.m. for September 14 concert. Nationals Park, 1500
South Capitol St. NE. Tickets are $53 to $103. Call
202-640-7000 or visit tickets.com.
DENYCE GRAVES, ANNAPOLIS SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA
The Annapolis Symphony Orchestra offers a 50th
Anniversary concert featuring world-renowned
mezzo-soprano Denyce Graves in a program that
includes Dvorák’s festive Carnival Overture, Ravel’s
vivid Daphnis et Chloé and a world premiere by ASO
Composer in Residence and Latin Grammy award-
winning composer Gabriela Lena Frank. Sunday, May
6, at 5 p.m. Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center’s
Dekelboum Concert Hall, University of Maryland,
University Boulevard and Stadium Drive. College
Park. Tickets are $60, or $150 including a reception.
Call 301-405-ARTS or visit claricesmithcenter.umd.
edu.
DJ DREDD’S 1958 PARTY: PRINCE, MICHAEL
JACKSON, MADONNA
Three of the leading influences on pop music as we
know it today – and especially dance-pop – were
interestingly all born in 1958. DJ Dredd will spin
through the hits from the late King of Pop, what some
call the Queen of Pop – and certainly the gay favorite
here – and the Funky One. Saturday, April 28, at 9 p.m.
Rock and Roll Hotel, 1353 H St. NE. Tickets are $13.
Call 202-388-ROCK or visit rockandrollhoteldc.com.
GIRLYMAN
Girlyman, the sweet and sensitive queer group now
including three girls and a boy, creates soaring three-
part harmony in the acoustic-leaning folk-pop manner
of the Indigo Girls or Paul Simon. 2009’s Somewhere
Different Now (Live) captures some of the banter that
makes the trio an engaging presence on stage, and
now the quartet tours in advance of the June release
of its fifth studio set Supernova. Saturday, April 28, at
7:30 p.m. The Birchmere, 3701 Mount Vernon Ave.,
Alexandria. Tickets are $25. Call 703-549-7500 or
visit birchmere.com.
CHAKA KHAN
Since it opened a few weeks ago the Howard Theatre
has been on a tear spinning through music legends.
This weekend, for example, offers a performance
by rock-and-roll legend Chuck Berry. But we’re
especially feeling for the venue next Saturday, May
5, when soul diva Chaka Khan will serenade the
celebrated space with her repertoire of hits, including
“Ain’t Nobody,” “Through The Fire,” “I’m Every
Woman” and of course “I Feel For You.” Tickets
remain for the Saturday, May 5, show at 10:30 p.m.
The Howard Theatre, 620 T St. NW. Tickets are $75.
Call 202-588-5595 or visit thehowardtheatre.com for
more details.
NATIONAL CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH’S ORGAN
RECITALS
Every Friday in April this Thomas Circle church
offers lunchtime recitals featuring some of the nation’s
finest concert organists playing on and discussing
the church’s 7,100-pipe, five-keyboard Möller organ.
Fridays in April at 12:15 p.m. National City Christian
Church, 5 Thomas Circle NW. Call 202-232-0323 or
visit nationalcitycc.org.
SPECIAL AGENT GALACTICA
Local drag phenom Special Agent Galactica, a.k.a.
the “pink-haired diva,” performs a free bi-monthly
happy hour show at Black Fox Lounge, singing with
her “Very-Sexy-Cute-Boy” combo and offering some
lip-sync favorites. Galactica will also be joined by
special guests. The next show is Friday, April 27,
from 6 to 9 p.m. Black Fox Lounge, 1723 Connecticut
Ave. NW. Tickets are free. Call 202-483-1723 or visit
blackfoxlounge.com.
STEFAN JACKIW
The Washington Performing Arts Society presents a
violinist who is generating a lot of buzz in the classical
musical world. The Washington Post suggested that to
hear the young artist’s skill today makes one “wonder
whether this was what it was like to hear a Perlman or
a Stern in his early years.” Jackiw performs a program
of works by Stravinsky, Brahms, Strauss and a world
premiere by David Fulmer, all accompanied by pianist
Anna Polonsky. Saturday, May 5, at 2 p.m. Kennedy
Center Terrace Theater. Tickets are $25. Call 202-467-
4600 or visit kennedy-center.org.
AMERICAN INDIAN MUSEUM’S BEADED VW BUG
“Vochol: Huíchol Art on Wheels” is the grand title for a
new glorious installation at the Smithsonian’s National
Museum of the American Indian: A Volkswagen dgers
58
STAGE
APRIL 26, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
KATE WINGFIELD
GOD OF
CARNAGE
HHH
To June 24
Signature Theatre
4200 Campbell Ave.
Arlington, Va.
$65-$70
703-820-9711
signature-theatre.org
Despite Signature’s admirable effort, the somber notes of
this French play on playground bullying lose something
Crossed Lines
S
C
O
T
T

S
U
C
H
M
A
N
Sudden eruptions: Jacobson and Morella
A
S A PIECE ARRIVING
in the midst of a
chattering class
that has not only
discovered the joy and angst of
parenthood but also the new
media with which to talk about it,
Yasmina Reza’s God of Carnage
is an “it” play. Urbane, funny
and appropriately fraught, it is
a clever mirror held up at just
the right angle to allow as much
self-recognition as it does amused
disdain.
Yet as a foray into the familiar
theme that, despite our pretence
of civilized decorum, social
chaos is always a mere hair’s
breadth away, the piece never
quite delivers on the promise. For
though Reza is a fine observer
of the 21st century bourgeoisie,
along with their general state of
agitation, a greater insight into
what ails eludes her. Though her
characters, at moments of clarity,
may reflect gravely on their state
of “unhappiness,” if there is a
“why” (beyond bad manners,
crappy marriages and the
neuroticism of the overeducated
and under-engaged) it is far too
deeply buried in the sparring and
acting out.
Still, timing is everything.
Hence a Broadway run and a
Polanski film.
And, without doubt,
Signature’s production. It’s a
fast-paced, occasionally rowdy,
occasionally grim, American-
adapted version, something of
an educated-crowd pleaser, if for
nothing else but the premise. Set
in a condo living room aspiring
to good taste, two couples, the
Novaks and the Raleighs, meet to
discuss an incident in which the
Raleigh’s young son has hit the
Novak’s son while at a local park.
As the couples awkwardly vie for
what they want, tempers begin to
flare, neuroticisms surface and,
when the alcohol flows, volcanic
emotions erupt. By afternoon’s
end, gender and parenting battles
have raged and marital angers
and disappointments have been
aired.
Succeeding here are strong
characterizations and an
ensemble working hard to keep
it real and engaging. And this is
no small task. As astute and funny
as some of Reza’s observations
may be and as much as one may
wonder, gleefully, where it will all
end, the failure of the Raleighs to
simply remove themselves from
the rapidly devolving situation
becomes a distraction. Whether
one calls it a touch of Waiting
for Godot-esque Theatre of the
Absurd or booze-based silliness
as dramatic device, the skill it
takes the cast to carry this off
cannot be overstated.
Striking the perfect balance
between comic and credible is
a brilliant Naomi Jacobson as
Veronica Novak. Mother of
the boy who has been injured,
Jacobson captures with perfect
pitch the tense restraint of one
who has already made up their
mind about the kind of parents
who could have raised such a
perpetrator. Despite Reza’s
narrow exploration and director
Joe Calarco’s emphasis on the
play’s potential for physical
comedy, Jacobson is the only
actor who delivers any sense of
the confusion and despair that
may lurk beneath the conflict.
Looking effectively perpetually
stricken, Vanessa Lock gives her
highly strung Annette Raleigh
strong presence, but there is little
she can do with Reza’s failure
to show us more. And though
her nausea is as convincing as
it is symbolic, her eventual,
if brief, alliance with Veronica
isn’t. As her husband, Alan, Paul
59 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 26, 2012
Morella creates a nicely drawn demi-
cad though his cell-phone style lacks the
casual inevitability displayed by the true
addict. Finally, Andy Brownstein gives
his Michael Novak convincing moments
as a long-suffering husband and exudes
well the working-class man-made-good.
Still, even with these recognizable
East Coast types, there remains a palpably
European sensibility in both Reza’s
writing and Calarco’s pacing. Whether
it is in the indirect way the characters
emote or the quiet lapses found only
in cultures far more comfortable with
silence, there is a rhythm that is distinctly
un-American. This alone would be
no cause for concern (and might even
be celebrated) except that here, it
argues. And in such intimate confines,
it argues loudly. Indeed, Reza herself
acknowledges that adaptations have
altered the play’s tone, with the Parisian
version being described as somber and
the American comic. Yet if a play is to
be this organic, it must have a resonance
that survives cultural translation. Though
God of Carnage entertains and, at its best,
provokes some thought, Reza needed to
wield a far bigger stick. l
60 APRIL 26, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
61 METROWEEKLY.COM
THURSDAY, 04.26.12
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4pm-7pm
• $4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis • Upstairs open
5-10pm
BANANA CAFÉ
Piano Bar Happy Hour,
4-7:30pm • $3 rail
margaritas, rail drinks
and domestic beers •
$3.95 Cuervo margaritas
• Chuck Smith on piano,
7:30pm-close • $3 off
Mojitos after 7:30pm
COBALT/30 DEGREES
2-4-1 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$1 Vodka Drinks, 9-11pm •
Underwear Contest hosted
by Lena Lett and Ba’Naka,
midnight • $200 in cash and
prizes • DJ Sean Morris •
DJ Chord • Door at 9pm •
$3 Cover • 21+
DC EAGLE
Happy Hour, 4-9pm • $1 off
regular prices • Power Hour,
4-6pm • Additional $1 off
Happy Hour prices • $3.50
for rail and domestic to all
people who are shirtless
until midnight
FIREPLACE
Any Absolut or Bacardi $4
from 10pm-Midnight • VJ
Dina
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm •
Shirtless Men Drink Free,
10-11pm • “Best Of”
Contest, 11:30pm • DJ
Back2bACk t
LISTINGS
Destinations on page 68
LIFE
NIGHT
63
Photography by
Julian Vankim
For addresses, phone numbers and locations of individual clubs, bars, parties,
and special events, please refer to our Destinations on page
t
METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 26, 2012
A childhood accident nearly claimed Mark’s life. It also shaped his worldview.
When he was six, he fell out of a boat and was about to be sucked into the
propeller just as his mother saved him and pulled him to safety. Consequently,
the Annapolis-area native emerged from that experience with very close family
ties, a realization that life is short and a thirst for adventure, living every day as
if it were his last. “I like being spontaneous, not having a plan -- that’s always
so much fun,” says the 21-year-old. A senior studying acting and film at Towson
University and a server at the Cheesecake Factory, Mark hopes to become an
actor. He hopes to explore more of D.C.’s bar scene now that he’s of age.
JR.’S
Happy Hour, 5-8pm • $15
All You Can Drink Rail
Highballs and Domestic
Drafts ($22 upgrade for
a step-up from rail) • $5
Rail, $2 JR.’s drafts, 8pm
to close
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Active Duty Military Night
• Beat The Clock Happy
Hour -- $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15
NUMBER NINE
1435 P St. NW
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 Drinks,
5-9pm • New Drink Menu
• No Cover
PHASE 1
Karaoke, 9pm • Drink
Specials • No Cover
PHASE 1 OF DUPONT
1415 22nd St. NW
(Formerly Apex)
Jock U • Men’s College
Night • DJ Steve
Henderson & DJ Ivan Rios
• Go-Go Boys by Male
Box • Happy Hour 9-11
• No Cover before 11 w
college ID • Doors at 9pm
• 21+
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Karaoke in the Lounge
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
Secrets All male, nude
dancers • Shirtless
Thursday • DJ Tim E in
Secrets • Doors at 9pm
• Cover 21+
FRIDAY, 04.27.12
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis • Upstairs open
5-11pm
BANANA CAFÉ
Piano Bar Happy Hour,
4-7:30pm • $3 rail
margaritas, rail drinks and
domestic beers • $3.95
Cuervo margaritas •
Gordon Kent on the Piano,
8:30pm-12:30am
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Special performance by
Sherry Vine at midnight
• DJs Randy White and
Keenan • Free Vodka
Drinks, 11pm-midnight •
Cover • 21+
DC BEAR CRUE
@Town
Bear Happy Hour, 6-11pm
• $3 Rail, $3 Draft, $3
Bud Bottles • Free Pizza,
7pm • Hosted by Charger
Stone • No cover before
9:30pm • 21+
DC EAGLE
$2 off across the board for
people in gear • Club Bar:
Mr. Mid-Atlantic Leather,
Matt Bronson
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
FUEGO SALVAJE
@Cafe Asia
720 Eye St. NW
Open 10:30pm-3am •
fuegosalvaje.com
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm •
All-U-Can-Drink Smirnoff
Buffet, $16, 10-11:30pm •
Mama’s Trailer Park, 10pm
HIPPO
Baltimore, Md.
Lust presented by the
Ladies of Lure • DJ Rosie
• Karaoke, 9pm to 1am in
the Karaoke Bar • Doors
at 10pm • $5 before
midnight, $7 after
JR.’S
DCAC Bachelor Auction,
8pm • Buy 1, Get 1,
11pm-midnight • Happy
Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm • $5
Coronas, $7 Vodka Red
Bulls, 9pm-close • Retro
vs. Top 40 • Boy Bands
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
DJ Della Volta • Videos,
Dancing • Beat The Clock
Happy Hour -- $2 (5-6pm),
$3 (6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15
NUMBER NINE
1435 P St. NW
New Drink Menu • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 Drinks, 5-9pm
• $3 drinks after midnight
• No Cover
PHASE 1
DJ Styalo • Dancing • $5
cover
PHASE 1 OF DUPONT
1415 22nd St. NW
(Formerly Apex)
For the Ladies • Doors at
9pm • 21+
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Drag Show in lounge • Half
price burgers and fries
TOWN
Upstairs: DJ Wess •
Downstairs: DJ BacK2bACk
• Doors open 10pm • Drag
Show starts at 10:30pm
• Hosted by Lena Lett
and featuring Tatianna,
Shi-Queeta-Lee, Jessica
Spaulding Deverreoux and
Ba’Naka • $3 rail drinks
from 10-11pm • For 21+,
$5 from 10-11pm and $10
after 11pm • For 18-20, $10
all night
64 APRIL 26, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
What’s on your nightstand?
Ibuprofen, a bottle of water, pictures
of friends, a dream catcher, a lamp, my
keys.
What’s in your nightstand drawer?
Clothing. Because I live in the dorm
and I’m stuck in this little box.
Where do you keep the
condoms and lube?
I’m a 21-year-old virgin. If I did have
them, they’d probably be on top of the
dresser because I don’t care.
I’m very open and I don’t keep
secrets from my friends. There’s an
unused dildo suction-cupped to my
fridge called the “Almighty Weiner.”
What are your television favorites?
Walking Dead. I’m really obsessed
with zombies. I don’t know why.
What was your favorite cartoon
when you were a kid?
Clifford.
What superhero would you be?
A Transformer. I’d like to be able to
turn into whatever.

Who’s your greatest influence?
My parents. And then I’d have to say
Jack Dawson from Titanic. I always
wanted to be like him.
What’s your greatest fear?
Losing friends in any sense.
Ending up alone.
Pick three people, living or dead,
who you think would make the most
fascinating dinner guests imaginable.
Marilyn Monroe. Will Smith. Miley Cyrus –
I want to get inside her brain.
What would you serve?
Barbecued chicken and ribs, hot dogs
and hamburgers. And for dessert,
chocolate cake. It’s my favorite.

How would you describe your dream guy?
Someone who can talk to me and takes me
for who I am. Nice, funny, smart.
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers
• DJ Timothy Mykael in
Secrets • DJ Joey O in
Ziegfeld’s • Ladies of
Illusion with host Kristina
Kelly, 9pm • Cover 21+
SATURDAY, 04.28.12
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Raw • DJs Shea Van
Horn and Bil Todd • Guest
Performer: Heidi Glum •
$7 • 21+
DC EAGLE
$2 off for Club Colors or
Club Mugs • Free pool for
shirtless players until 9pm
• Club Bar: SigMa
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Diner Brunch, 10am-3pm
• Crazy Hour, 4-8pm
• Karaoke and/or live
entertainment, 9pm
GREEN LANTERN
Tainted Love ‘80s Dance
Party, 10pm • Happy Hour,
4-9pm with Beat the Clock
Specials on Rolling Rock
and Rail Vodka starting
at $1 • All-U-Can-Drink
Bacardi Buffet, $18,
10pm-11:30pm
HIPPO
Baltimore, Md.
DJ Kuhmeleon • Doors
Open 10pm • Karaoke,
10pm-2am
JR.’S
$4 Coors, $5 Vodka
highballs, $7 Vodka Red
Bulls
NELLIE’S
Zing Zang Bloody Marys,
Nellie Beer, House Rail
Drinks and Mimosas, $4,
11am-5pm • Buckets of
Beer, $15
NUMBER NINE
1435 P St. NW
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 Drinks,
5-9pm • $3 drinks after
midnight • No Cover
OMEGA
DJ Tre • Pool Tournament
at 9pm
PHASE 1
Dancing, 9pm-close
PHASE 1 OF DUPONT
1415 22nd St. NW
(Formerly Apex)
For the Ladies • Doors at
9pm • 21+

PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Karaoke in the lounge •
Charity Bingo with Cash
Prizes 3rd Sat. of Every
Month
TOWN
Dirty Pop • DJ Drew G •
The Stars of CollegeDudes.
com • Drag Show at
10:30pm • Downstairs: DJ
Wess • Doors at 10pm •
$8 from 10-11pm • $12
after 11pm • 21+
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All nude male dancers
• The Ladies of Illusion
hosted by Ella Fitzgerald,
frst show at 11pm • DJ
Spyke in Ziegfelds • Cover
SUNDAY, 04.29.12
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Martini Madness • $5
martinis all day and
night, 4pm • Homowood
Karaoke • $4 rail drinks &
domestic beers, 10pm •
No cover • 21+
DC EAGLE
Open 4pm • Pizza Buffet,
5-8pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm with
$3 Smirnoff (all favors)
• Trailer Park Karaoke,
9:30pm
HIPPO
Baltimore, Md.
Marry Me in Maryland
Wedding Expo, 1-5pm •
$10 suggested donation
JR.’S
Sunday Funday • Liquid
Brunch • Doors open at
1pm • $2 Coors Lights &
$3 Skyy (all favors), all
day and night
NELLIE’S
Drag Brunch, hosted
by Shi-Queeta-Lee,
11am-3pm • $20 Brunch
Buffet • House Rail
Drinks, Zing Zang Bloody
Marys, Nellie Beer and
Mimosas, $4, 11am-close
• Buckets of Beer, $15
NUMBER NINE
1435 P St. NW
New Drink Menu • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 Drinks,
5-9pm • No Cover
OMEGA
Church Lady Bingo with
Kristina Kelley • $4 House
Vodka
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Happy Hour all night
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
Decades Night • DJ Keith
Hoffman • Complimentary
drinks with trivia quiz •
All nude male dancers
upstairs in Secrets • Drink
and Beer specials • Cover
MONDAY, 04.30.12
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
BANANA CAFÉ
Open Mike, 7pm-close •
Emceed by Zoe • $3 off
all Mojitos after 7:30pm
COBALT/30 DEGREES
2-4-1 Happy Hour, 4-9pm
• 21+ • No cover
DC EAGLE
Open 4pm • New Specials
• $1 Drafts (Bud and Bud
Light)
65 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 26, 2012
Pick three people, living or dead,
who you think would make the most
fascinating dinner guests imaginable.
Marilyn Monroe. Will Smith. Miley Cyrus –
I want to get inside her brain.
What would you serve?
Barbecued chicken and ribs, hot dogs
and hamburgers. And for dessert,
chocolate cake. It’s my favorite.

How would you describe your dream guy?
Someone who can talk to me and takes me
for who I am. Nice, funny, smart.
Not rugged
exactly, but not
with a pressed
shirt or perfect
hair. Someone
who can hang out
in sweats with
me and watch
the game. People
with a different
ethnicity or some
kind of culture
would be nice.
FREDDIE’S
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4pm-close •
Karaoke, 9:30pm • Bears
Do Yoga, 6:30pm
JR.’S
Happy Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm
• Showtunes Songs &
Singalongs, 9pm-close •
DJ Jamez • $3 Drafts
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour -- $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Poker Texas Hold’em, 8pm
NUMBER NINE
1435 P St. NW
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 Drinks,
5-9pm • No Cover
OMEGA
2 for 1 Happy Hour 4 - 9
Rouge Show • Different
performers each week •
Drink Specials
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Buzztime Trivia
competition • 75 cents off
bottles and drafts
TUESDAY, 05.01.12
ANNIE’S
Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
BANANA CAFÉ
Piano Bar Happy Hour, all
night • $3 rail margaritas,
rail drinks and domestic
beers • $3.95 Cuervo
margaritas • Gordon Kent
on the Piano, 7:30pm-close
COBALT/30 DEGREES
2-4-1 Happy Hour, 4-9pm
• DJ Erik Lars Evans •
2-4-1 rail drinks • 21+ •
No cover
CRAZY TUESDAYS
@V3 Majestic Lounge
6763 Wilson Blvd.
Falls Church, Va.
Crazy Tuesday • Drink
Specials, 10-11pm • Show
hosted by Jocelyn Carrillo
and her stars, 12:30am •
18/21 • Cover
DC EAGLE
Open 4pm • $2 Rail and
Domestic, 4pm-midnight •
Pool League, 7:30pm
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour Prices,
4pm-close • FUK!T
Packing Party, 7-9pm
(upstairs)
HIPPO
Baltimore, Md.
Showtune Video Madness,
7:45pm-12:30am • VJ
Brian Mongeon • Best of
Hollywood and Broadway
Showtunes
66 APRIL 26, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
Define good
in bed.
I guess I
wouldn’t really
know. For the
first time, I
want to be with
someone I love.
Who should
star in a movie
about your life?
Me.
Who was your first celebrity crush?
Leonardo DiCaprio, my perfect
dream guy.
Who gets on your nerves?
I’m pretty understanding. I hate
hypocrites, though.
If your home was burning, what’s the
first thing you’d grab while leaving?
If there were any people there, I’d grab
them and head out. Otherwise, pictures,
because of the memories.
JR.’S
Underground (Indie Pop/
Alt/Brit Rock), 9pm-close
• DJ Wes Della Volla •
Special Guest DJ Matt
Bailer • 2-for-1, all day
and night
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour -- $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Drag BINGO hosted by
Shi-Queeta Lee, 8pm
OMEGA
2 for 1 Drinks, 4pm-close
• Bear Night • Men of
Omega, 9:30pm • $3
Drafts, $4 House Vodka •
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
75 cents off bottles and
drafts • Movie Night
WED., 05.02.12
ANNIE’S
Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
BANANA CAFÉ
Happy Hour, all night •
Gordon Kent on the Piano,
7:30pm-close
COBALT/30 DEGREES
2-4-1 Happy Hour, 4-9pm
• Wednesday Night
Karaoke at Cobalt, 10pm
• $5 Absolut & Smirnoff
favors • $8 • 21+
DC EAGLE
Open 4pm • Power Hour
$1 off Rail and Domestic,
4-6pm • Wooden Nickel
Night, 9pm-close •
Receive a wooden nickel
for every drink purchased
FIREPLACE
Hump Day • $3 Domestic
beer, all night
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm • Drag
Bingo, 8pm • Karaoke,
10pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour Prices,
4pm-Close
HIPPO
Bingo, 8:30pm • Cash
Prizes and Progressive
Cash Jackpot Game
JR.’S
Happy Hour: 2-for-1,
4-9pm • College Night,
Comedy and Trivia,
9pm-Close • $2 JR.’s
Drafts with College ID, $4
Bud/Bud Lights, $5 Rail,
$6 Skyy • The Queen with
Ba’Naka • Win $200 with
a chance to win $1,000 •
Follows Trivia
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour -- $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
SmartAss Trivia, 8pm
67 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 26, 2012
Who was your first celebrity crush?
Leonardo DiCaprio, my perfect
dream guy.
Who gets on your nerves?
I’m pretty understanding. I hate
hypocrites, though.
If your home was burning, what’s the
first thing you’d grab while leaving?
If there were any people there, I’d grab
them and head out. Otherwise, pictures,
because of the memories.
What’s your biggest turn-on?
Guys that hold the door open for you,
or pick up something for you when you
drop it. Guys that are nice.
What’s your biggest turn-off?
Guys who are overly confident or
cocky. You just want to tell them,
“You’re not that great.”
What’s something you’ve always
wanted to do but haven’t yet tried?
I want to bungee jump. I want to]
pet a tiger.
What’s something you’ve tried that
you never want to do again?
One time I was on the monkey bars and
I tried to jump to another set of monkey
bars, and I hit my face. I didn’t like that.
What’s the most unusual place
you’ve had sex?
The most unusual place where I would
want to have sex is outside in the
woods or on a beach.

What position do you play in
the big baseball game of life?
I don’t know. I’ll probably be versatile.
What’s something you want more of?
Better, more decent guys in the world.
Some of them suck.
State your life philosophy in 10
words or less.
Just gotta believe.
NUMBER NINE
1435 P St. NW
New Drink Menu • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 Drinks, 5-9pm
• No Cover
OMEGA
2 for 1 Happy Hour, 4-9pm
• Shirtless Men Drink Free
House and Domestics,
10-11pm • Men of
Omega, 9:30pm • Pool
Tournament, 9pm
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Free Pool • 75 cents off
Bottles and Drafts
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
New Meat Wednesdays
• DJ Don T, 9pm •
Cover 21+
THURSDAY, 05.03.12
ANNIE’S/ANNIE’S
Upstairs
4@4 Happy Hour,
4pm-7pm • $4 Small
Plates, $4 Stella Artois,
$4 House Wines, $4
Stolichnaya Cocktails, $4
Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis • Upstairs open
5-10pm
BANANA CAFÉ
Piano Bar Happy Hour,
4-7:30pm • $3 rail
margaritas, rail drinks
and domestic beers •
$3.95 Cuervo margaritas
• Chuck Smith on piano,
7:30pm-close • $3 off
Mojitos after 7:30pm
COBALT/30 DEGREES
2-4-1 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$1 Vodka Drinks, 9-11pm •
Underwear Contest hosted
by Lena Lett and Ba’Naka,
midnight • $200 in cash
and prizes • DJ Chord
Bezerra • DJ MadScience
Door at 10pm • $3 Cover
• 21+
DC EAGLE
Happy Hour, 4-9pm • $1
off regular prices • Power
Hour, 4-6pm • Additional
$1 off Happy Hour prices •
$3.50 for rail and domestic
to all people who are
shirtless until midnight •
DC Boys of Leather • Boys
Night Out
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm •
Shirtless Men Drink Free,
10-11pm • “Best Of”
Contest, 11:30pm • DJ
Back2bACk
JR.’S
Red Crush • An evening
for redheads and the men
who love the • Redheads
drink free from 10-11pm
• Happy Hour, 5-8pm •
$15 All You Can Drink Rail
Highballs and Domestic
Drafts ($22 upgrade for a
step-up from rail) • $3 Rail
Vodka Highballs, $2 JR.’s
drafts, 8pm to close • Top
Pop Night
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour -- $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Active Duty Military Night
NUMBER NINE
1435 P St. NW
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 Drinks,
5-9pm • No Cover
OMEGA
2 for 1 Happy Hour, 4-9pm
• Karaoke with Howard,
10pm • $4 House Vodka
PHASE 1
Karaoke, 9pm • Drink
Specials • No Cover
PHASE 1 OF DUPONT
1415 22nd St. NW
(Formerly Apex)
Jock U • Men’s College
Night • Doors at 9pm
• 21+
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Karaoke in the Lounge
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
Shirtless men drink free
(rail & domestic), 10-11pm
• All nude male dancers
• Dancing w/ DJ Tim E,
9pm-close • Cover l
11 THE FIREPLACE
22nd & P Streets NW
(202) 293-1293
Dupont Circle Metro
m v
13 FUEGO SALVAJE
Cafe Asia
1720 I St. NW
www.clubfuegodc.com
m d t
14 GLORIOUS
HEALTH CLUB
2120 W. VA Ave. NE 20002
(202) 269-0226
m o s
15 GREEN LANTERN
1335 Green Court NW (behind
1335 L St.)
(202) 347-4534
McPherson Square Metro
m l
17 JR.’S
1519 17th Street NW
(202) 328-0090
Dupont Circle Metro
m v
LACE
2214 Rhode Island Ave. NE
(202) 832-3888
w r d
19 NELLIE’S
SPORTS BAR
900 U Street NW
(202) 332-6355
U Street / Cardozo Metro
m&w r
37 NUMBER NINE
1435 P Street NW
Dupont Circle Metro
20 OMEGA
2122 P Street NW (rear)
(202) 223-4917
Dupont Circle Metro
m v
D.C.
1 18th & U
DUPLEX DINER
2004 18th Street NW
(202) 265-7828
Dupont Circle Metro
r
9 9:30 CLUB
815 V Street NW
(202) 265-0930
U Street / Cardozo Metro
3 BACHELOR’S MILL
1104 8th Street SE
(202) 546-5979
Eastern Market /
Navy Yard Metro
m d
4 COBALT/30 DEGREES
17th & R Street NW
(202) 462-6569
Dupont Circle Metro
m d t
5 CREW CLUB
1321 14th Street NW
(202) 319-1333
McPherson Square Metro
m o s
6 DC EAGLE
639 New York Ave. NW
(202) 347-6025
Convention Center /
Gallery Place /
Chinatown Metro
m l
7 DELTA ELITE
3734 10th Street NE
(202) 529-0626
Brookland Metro
m d
21 PHASE ONE
525 8th Street SE
(202) 544-6831
Eastern Market Metro
w d
22 REMINGTON’S
639 Pennsylvania Ave. SE
(202) 543-3113
Eastern Market Metro
m cw d v
23 TOWN
2009 8th Street NW
(202) 234-TOWN
U Street / Cardozo Metro
m d v t
24 ZIEGFELD’S /
SECRETS
1824 Half Street SW
(202) 863-0670
Navy Yard Metro
m d v t gg
MARYLAND
CLUB HIPPO
1 West Eager Street
Baltimore, MD
(410) 547-0069
THE LODGE
21614 National Pike
Boonsboro, MD
(301) 591-4434
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855-N Washington, Blvd.
Laurel, MD
(301) 498-4840
VIRGINIA
12 FREDDIE’S
BEACH BAR
555 South 23rd Street
Crystal City, VA
(703) 685-0555
Crystal City Metro
m&w r
V3 LOUNGE
6763 Wilson Blvd.
Falls Church, Va.
301-802-8878
26 ALBERTO’S
2010 P Street NW
2438 18th Street NW
(202) 986-2121
Dupont Circle Metro

27 ANNIE’S PARAMOUNT
STEAK HOUSE
1609 17th Street NW
(202) 232-0395
Dupont Circle Metro

28 BANANA CAFÉ &
PIANO BAR
500 8th Street SE
(202) 543-5906
Eastern Market Metro

29 BEACON BAR & GRILL
1615 Rhode Island Ave. NW
(202) 872-1126
Dupont Circle Metro
37 B. SMITH’S
50 Massachusetts Ave. NE
(202) 289-6188
Union Station Metro
68
DESTINATIONS
m mostly men w mostly women m&w men and women r restaurant l leather/levi
d dancing v video t drag cw country western gg go-go dancers o open 24 hours s sauna
BARS & CLUBS
RESTAURANTS
APRIL 26, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
69 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 26, 2012
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70 APRIL 26, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
Freddie’s Beach Bar hosts this year’s Miss Gay Arlington drag pageant
Taking a Drag in Arlington
YOU WON’T SEE DRAG
queens in swimsuits at
the Miss Gay Arlington
pageant.
“There are several
queens who God blessed
with an extremely good
body, and many of their
numbers incorporate
swimsuit-like attire,” says
Daniel Hays, promoter of
the pageant, which takes
place Saturday, April 28, at
Freddie’s Beach Bar. But
like most drag contests,
Miss Gay Arlington
celebrates those who like
to put on extra layers of
costumes and makeup to
create a female persona
-- the focus isn’t the body.
The Arlington Gay &
Lesbian Alliance presents
the pageant, now in
its second year, as a
way to reach a younger
demographic. According
to Hays, former president
of AGLA, the pageant also
provides “an entry step
for those queens who
want to compete in the
pageant world but aren’t
very well established.”
Kristina Kelly, Ophelia
Bottoms and Charity B
are among those will
perform during the show,
along with Diamond
D. Bottoms, who is
the inaugural Miss Gay
Arlington and will crown
this year’s winner. Hays
expects to enlist at
least two and as many
as seven contestants,
competing in evening
gown, talent and on-stage
question categories as
well as “presentation.”
“All contestants will have
to incorporate some kind
of a Mardi Gras-themed
attire in that category,”
Hays says, noting that
Diamond is originally from
New Orleans.
Pageant-goers, who
should reserve a table in
advance if they want to
guarantee a seat, are also
encouraged to wear Mardi
Gras garb. The pageant is
at Freddie’s, after all, so
the crazier, the gaudier
the get-up, the better.
For his part, Hays,
currently recovering
from major neck surgery,
plans to wear a suit
and tie, something less
demanding than what
the legislative analyst for
the Department of Labor
would normally wear, at
least when portraying
his drag alter-ego Muffy
Bottoms.
Muffy, you might say,
has been muzzled for the
time being.

Miss Gay Arlington is
Saturday, April 28, at 8
p.m., at Freddie’s Beach
Bar, 555 South 23rd St.,
Arlington. Cover is $10.
Call 703-685-0555 or visit
freddiesbeachbar.com. l
71 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 26, 2012
72
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APRIL 26, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
NO MORE DICK… And
so ends a New Year’s Eve
tradition. No more betting
on how many minutes
he would get through on
the live telecast (last year
was a record low -- five
minutes). Yes, Dick Clark
is dead. I first learned
the news not from the
Internet, or the television,
or even the radio. Far
in the distance, I heard
a voice that sounded
remarkably like Ryan
Seacrest squealing,
“Mine! It’s all mine!”
Perhaps I was mistaken.
Maybe it was Richard
Simmons -- I get them
confused so often. If
one believes what his
people say, Dick was
(relatively) functional till
the end. He died of a heart
attack while in a Santa
Monica hospital having
an outpatient procedure
for a prostate condition,
which is certainly not
how I thought he’d go. I
was sure his lifeless body
would be found under
Mrs. Clark, with Dick
smothered by her bun. But
maybe he’s not dead at all.
Maybe he’s cryogenically
preserved and will be
thawed out for future New
Year’s Eve appearances.
Or perhaps a guest shot
as narrator at Disney’s Hall
of Presidents….
CASTING NEWZ… The
rumors are true -- Bradley
Cooper is a thespian.
That’s no news to moi.
I vividly remember him
sitting up front on Inside
the Actor’s Studio when
he was a student, sporting
less stubble and his
natural hair color. Still, I
don’t know how many
of us are breathlessly
awaiting his Hamlet or
Uncle Vanya. And yet,
he is returning to his first
love. What’s his name,
you ask? The theater,
that’s who. This summer,
Coop will be appearing at
the Williamstown Theatre
Festival for a two-week
run as... okay, get ready...
The Elephant Man! I
don’t mean to laugh, but
I do find it kinda amusing,
particularly because the
press release says he is
“returning to the role.”
Did I miss something?
Apparently he played the
part at the Actor’s Studio
as part of his senior thesis.
Honey, if that’s the criteria,
then someday I will return
to the title role in Evita
-- and I won’t sleep with
Lippy to do it.
In far more appropriate
casting, I hear that my
buddy Carson Kressley
will be returning (yes,
returning) to the Ogunquit
Playhouse this summer to
headline Damn Yankees
for three weeks (take that,
Brad!) The production will
be kind of special because
it’s moving the action
from Washington D.C. to
Boston’s Fenway Park.
The Red Sox rivalry with
the Yankees will certainly
resonate more with
audiences than the original
Washington Senators….
BRAVO!... I hope you
all watched the debut
of Kathy, Ms. Griffin’s
weekly talk show on Bravo
(watch what happens).
But there was a very
interesting portion of the
show that the network
edited from the version
that aired. It was during
the monologue. Kath
talked about recently being
banned from the Today
Show, which airs on NBC,
the network that owns
Bravo. No worries -- Billy
found the excised footage
and will share it with you
on BillyMasters.com….
I have serious problems
when so-called celebrities
come out of the closet
with some fanfare and
yet not even I have ever
heard of them. This isn’t
to say I respect them
any less -- but when Billy
Masters has never heard
of you, how famous are
you? The latest in the
revolving closet door is
Paul Iacono who says
he’s glad to “finally come
out” at the ripe old age of
23! I did some research
on Iacono and learned he
was discovered based
on his impersonations of
Frank Sinatra and Ethel
Merman. And he’s gay?
Shocking! His coming out
interview was given to
Michael Musto of The
Village Voice, so at least
the kid’s consistent. He
feels like a “weight has
been lifted” and he’s
doing this to help younger
people who are struggling
with their sexuality. I’m
sure this news might also
help the profile of the
actor who headlined the
brief and forgettable The
Hard Times of RJ Berger
for MTV (he’s playing
gay in an upcoming MTV
show). If this third-tier
acting thing doesn’t work
out for him, I’m sure he
could get some work in
gay porn. I can just see
it now: Chi Chi La Rue
presents The Hard Times
of BJ Berger….
GLAAD TO BE HERE…
This past weekend, Josh
Hutcherson received
GLAAD’s Vanguard Award.
He told Marc Malkin
at EOnline.com that he
has a special connection
with the gay community.
He had two uncles who
were gay and died of
complications associated
with AIDS shortly after he
was born (we’re unsure
whether both were blood
relatives or if one was
a relative and the other
was his partner). There
was a silver lining to
this tragedy: “My mom
has always been a big
advocate, especially in the
gay, lesbian, transsexual
and bisexual community
so for me it’s always been
a part of my soul.” It also
inspired him to be a big
supporter of the “Straight
Not Narrow” campaign….
THREE BUCK DINNER…
How much would you
pay to have dinner with
George Clooney? What if
I threw in Barack Obama?
Is three dollars too much?
Clooney is throwing a
fundraising dinner for
President Obama at his
Los Angeles home on May
10 and guests are paying
a minimum of $35,800
to go. But Georgie wants
to open this up to real
people, so you can buy a
chance to attend. Actually,
“buy” is the wrong word.
The suggested minimum
donation for a raffle ticket
is $3, but the rules state
“no purchase, payment,
or financial contribution
of any kind is necessary
to enter or win this
promotion” (but I bet
it helps your chances if
you actually give them
the three bucks). The
winner will not only get
two tickets to the dinner
but also two round-trip
airline tickets (coach) to
Los Angeles and a hotel
for one night. You’ll also
probably get the chance to
go through all of Clooney’s
stuff -- or is it just me
who does that at dinner
parties? Anyhoo, I’ll post
the link on BillyMasters.
com. But act fast, the
73 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 26, 2012
raffle closes on April 30.
There will be no summer rerun
of the Nicollette Sheridan vs. ABC
trial. After the last go-round resulted
in a hung jury (with more people in
favor of the beleaguered actress), the
network requested that the entire suit
be dropped. The LA Superior Court
judge ruled against the network --
although the retrial date was changed
from June 4 to September 10, just
in time for the fall season! The judge
also made a pointed suggestion to
ABC’s lawyers: “I very, very strongly
urge you to continue settlement
discussions.”
When Nicollette is still
newsworthy, it’s definitely time to
end yet another column. I very, very
strongly urge you to visit BillyMasters.
com, the site with something for
every prospective juror (hung or
otherwise). If you’ve got a question
that needs my attention, drop a
note to Billy@BillyMasters.com and
I promise to get back to you before
Dick Clark turns up in a remake of
Weekend at Bernie’s…. l
74 APRIL 26, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM





Why else would they file a bill so clearly out of step with the growing trend for fairness
in this state when similar legislation filed in Tennessee last year led that state’s legislature to become
the object of national ridicule?”
-- A.J. BOCKELMAN, executive director of the Missouri LGBT rights organization PROMO,
calls the introduction in the state legislature of a “don’t say gay bill” banning discussion of homosexuality in schools
a “desperate tactic by frightened, bigoted [and] cynical individuals.”
(Vital Voice)
It’s surreal.
I knew right away that something was up.
… Not every day in the dentist’s office do you sit up and see -- you know -- that.
-- JOEY STEWART, one of the many Canadians who, when tuning in to the local morning television news show on CHCH, found
themselves watching gay pornography instead. The station has apologized, claiming repair workers had accidently spliced the
porn into the channel’s news feed while repairing a broken cable.
(UPI)
“If I was gay, why wouldn’t I admit it?
It wouldn’t harm me and my mother wouldn’t freak out.
-- SIMON COWELL, of X Factor (and formerly American Idol), on the persistent rumors that he is gay.
He discussed his sexuality in interviews for a new book on the prolific producer, Sweet Revenge.
(The Sun)
So our opposition to redefining marriage is not now a matter of
denying anyone legal rights.”
-- Rev. KURT NAGEL, pastor of the Catholic Holy Family Parish in Seattle, on his effort to have parishes
gather signatures to force a vote to repeal Washington’s marriage equality law. He claims that same-sex couples
already have equal rights under the state’s domestic policy laws; when asked, however, he acknowledged that
the Catholic Church had also opposed domestic partnerships. (Seattle Post-Intelligencer)

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