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ALASKA FLY FISHING EXPEDITION

Contents 1. Project description and rational 1.1 Scope 1.2 Assessment of the expedition 2. Risk Break down Structure (RBS) 3. Project Network (AON) 4. Responsibility matrix 5. Project Resource schedule 5.1 Scheduling conflicts 6. Cash flow requirement 6.1 Financial resource schedule 7. Risk Assessment Matrix 8. Risk Response Matrix 9. Management issues 10. Project manager role 7 10 14 15 16 17 17 18 19 21 21 5 6 6

11. Key to success

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GEOGRAPHICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF THE PROPOSED CAMPSITE Alaska State is a part of the United States of America. According to the historical records Alaska State was purchased from Russia by the United States in1867. Since then Dillingham is very popular part for the salmon industry and outdoor expeditions. Dillingham is a part of Alaska which is set on an inlet of Bristol Bay of Alaska. Alaska has more than 3 million lakes under 20 acres areas. Bristol Bay often sees 20 million Red salmon in its waters every year. Dillingham is home to the largest state park in the nation - Wood-Tikchik State Park. It is a superb destination for planning sport fishing such as fly- fishing since the place is best known for king salmon.

Many people find the largest fish they have ever caught in these locations. The types of fish we are interested in catching will determine where we should do fly-fishing activity at. King Salmon are found all along the coast of these areas.
CLIMATE

The landscape of the City of Dillingham consists of rolling hills with many irregularly shaped moraine knolls and ridges separated by flat, wetlands and muskeg. The average temperature in the summer season would be ranging from 37 to 66 degrees Fahrenheit. The average temperature in winter season would be ranging from 4 to 30 degrees Fahrenheit. The annual rainfall is 26 inches, and annual snowfall is 65 inches. There is heavy fog observed in the months of July and August. Also, there may be possibility of winds up to the speed of 60-70 miles per hour (mph), this can be expected at any time of the year, however there are common from August through December, roughly coinciding with the peak Pacific typhoon season. Most of the rivers are commonly ice-free from mid-May through late October in a year. The water temperature also affect the amount of king salmon
catch due to the possibility of changing distribution of fish and marine mammals during water temperature is very low.

WILD THREATS In Alaska lot of issues created from mosquitoes specially in mid summer. They are commonly harmed to humans in night and infecting diseases. On the other hand bears are always reaching to water for eat salmon. They dont like to link with humans and try to attack them.

SCOPE OF THE PROJECT

This project focuses on the planning of five-day fly-fishing expedition that has been arranged for the top management team of Blue Note, Inc at the request of its president. This expedition is arranged and leads by The Great Alaska Adventure (GAA) a firm that involves in arranging these kinds of outdoor expeditions for organizations and teams. This expedition is scheduled to take place at the site located in the remote back country of Tikchik River. This area is popular because for its wildlife and rugged terrain. People who wish to engage in sport fishing prefer to be in this area which is also best known for its salmon fishing. The total expenses of the expedition will be paid by the Blue Note, Inc however the following will be excluded from the package, i.e. : cost pertaining to their own transportation to the Dillingham base Camp and from Dillingham base camp back to Alaska also the equipments and clothing required for fly-fishing . The GAA will need to provide Air Taxi transportation from Dillingham to the Camp site one and at the end of the programme from the second Camp site located in Tikchik River Basin back to Dillingham along with that boat transportation with motors, camping equipments such as tents, cots, beddings and lanterns , three meals a day, experience tour 3

guides and a four-hour fly-fishing training instruction . We will also required to provide fishing licenses for all the guests along with four experienced river guides.

ANALYSING THE PROJECT DELIVERABLES a. Providing air transportation from Dillingham, Alaska to Camp I and from Camp II back to Dillingham on completion of the expedition This The first most important thing involved in the planning stage would be finding way to get from Dillingham to the Tikchik River Basin. we need to find to deal with the time people going on float trips down the river begin by taking a float plane to the lake at the head of the river. Our first concern will be the cost of renting the float plane and making certain that it has sufficient space for our guests and our equipment. b. Providing river transportation consisting of two eight-man (8) drift boats with outboard motors. c. Provide three meals a day for the five days spent on the river. d. Provide four hours of fly-fishing instruction. e. Provide overnight accommodations at the Dillingham lodge plus three, four-man tents with cots, bedding and lanterns. f. Provide four experienced river guides who are also fly fisherman. g. Provide fishing license for all guests. We will also need to hire four experienced guides who are also adept at fly-fishing and can teach our guests how to fly fish once we get on the river. Once we get to the river, we will be able to make the float trip in 4 to 5 days. We will plan on food for six days at minimum and also take additional equipment for immediate preparation of our catch. In case of really bad luck fishing, we will take sufficient food to take care of three meals per day for at least six days. We will also want to take water purification tablets for drinking water and snacks. The boats will then be taken to the river and we will commence our trip down the river. 4

The first thing will be our fly fishing class and then we will have lunch. Then we will float down the river for about four hours and get to the campsite for the evening. We will make camp and begin the first evening of serious fishing. This will be repeated for the next four days. It sounds simple and like nothing could go wrong, right? Right. Nothing. Except what if the motors on the boats dont work, it rains every day and the raft capsizes the first day and we lose our food. What if we encounter a grizzly who thinks our guests look like a good morning snack or one of the guests is allergic to fish? What if they forget their hip waders and end up with hypothermia? Some of these risks we can plan for and account for and some we try to mitigate. For example, by hiring experienced guides we should be able to minimize the chance of capsizing the raft and losing our equipment. In addition, we will hire at least one, preferably two guides with extensive first aid training and survival training, so that they can deal with injuries or illness in our guests and whatever the wildlife try to thrown at us. We will precheck the equipment before leaving Dillingham to make certain that the equipment is functional. This should reduce the chance of malfunction once we get into the wilderness. In addition, we will take both cellphones and a CB radio so that we can communicate with civilization should we need immediate medical assistance. We will carry flares and the guides will be armed with shotguns in case of an animal attack. Since we are going in June, the likelihood is that the weather will be cooperative and we should have warm enough temperatures, but we will need to consider what alternatives will be in place should the week of the trip arrive and the weather be inappropriate for a trip into the back country. For example, if we find that the entire week is expected to be rainy and cold, we need to have an alternative plan in place. What is our responsibility if the trip must be canceled due to inclement weather?The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recognizes the best, most up-to-date health information is without value unless it is pertinent and accessible to the people it is meant to serve. Lockheed Martin Information Technology has been tasked to conduct a risk assessment of the
1. Please search in the website about Alaska in the US (write half

page of the geographic location alska of Alaska)

2. 3.

Climatic Changes and its affect for peoples living or people there. Animal and species living there which are harmful to human beings (

(Environmemt analysis) Biological Review) Report II : Activity related risk (Task related risks) Four Page (Lakshika and Shanthi) ( Excluding Report I ) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. What is fly fish expedition? is all about What are the equipment or important stuff required for this type What are activities involved in this adventures at Alaska ( Plenty Please list out at least 10 risks associated with activities How do you sort out the risks

of adventure holidays? of stuff available in the internet )

Report III : Human Life Related Risk (Four pages Tharaka and Razlan ) 1. 2. 3. 4. Identify the site related risk harmful to human life Risk within the group (not listening the advises ) Food risk to the group Please list out at least 10 risks associated with human life risk

Report IV : PERT Review techniques and the usage to this expedition ( Abdullah Two pages ) Report V : Finance Related Risk and Reputational risk Two page ( Janitha) 1. 2. 3. Real cost exceeding budget Budget Delay due to some unavoidable situation that affect the good will the Company any other risk ??????

1. Project description and rational

GEOGRAPHICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

PREPARATIONS When planning any fly fishing trip it is essential to always be prepared. This is even more important when planning a fly fishing trip to Alaska where the hours are long and the climate is harsh. The proper gear can make the difference between a successful expedition and one resulting in failure. It is highly recommended that you check with a reputable outfitter before setting out on any adventure that your equipment is proper and in good working order, with that in mind, The following list is some the must haves on any fly fishing adventure to Alaska these can insure a safe and productive outing: Fishing Equipment The proper size rod for the specific fish you are after with corresponding hooks and lures.Also a net and a way of keeping your catch are also important. Proper Line Safety Items are always a good thing to have on hand and are essential to your trip and could save your life. Always have a Fire extinguisher Make sure to have the proper Fishing license A loud Horn or whistle for warding off bears etc and alerting others to any possible danger or your location if you happen to get hurt Proper fitting life jackets for everyone in the party A well stocked first aid kit

Additional Items Be sure to carry a current map Enough Extra gas or oil for any unforeseen occurrence A cell/ satellite phone or even a GPS is good to have on hand A Compass Enough extra food for any unforeseen occurrence Additional dry clothes and rain gear Now that the list is compiled it is also a good idea to create a detailed itinerary and to leave a copy with a friend. One of the best ways to guarantee a successful endeavor is to hire a licensed guide. There are many reputable organizations to choose from and since most trips are of short duration it is often beneficial to expend the additional cost to hire a professional that can lead you safely to the prefect fishing site and back. Alaska is a fantastic location for fishing during various times of the year. In order to get the most benefit from your fishing in Alaska you want to do some research before you go. You will find that certain lakes and streams are more prosperous during various times of the year. When you take the migrating of the fish into consideration you will also know which direction you need to be in order to catch them along the way. During the colder months you can take part in ice fishing in Alaska as well. Make sure you have the right equipment though when you go fishing in Alaska. If you are used to catching fish that weight a few pounds your line isnt going to be right for catching the much larger fish that are found here. You can get all the right equipment you need at local sporting goods stores. You also want to use live bait to catch your fish while in Alaska. If you arent sure about what all fishing in Alaska has to offer, you can hire a guide to assist you. Some of them even offer their boats as a charter and will take you to the prime locations for the afternoon. If you want to make a go of it on your own you can certainly do so. Just take the time to listen to the many locals out there that will give you additional tips so you can get the most from your fishing in Alaska experience.

There are many exciting fishing vacations and expeditions to Alaska. You can look online for information on how to become part of one. You can also contact your local travel agent to assist you. If you are ready for a dynamic fishing experience that is beyond anything you have done in the past, Alaska is the place to do it. Posted in fishing in alaska | No Comments Fishing jobs in Alaska September 2nd, 2008 by fishingi Alaska commercial fishing has been somewhat glamorized in the television and movie industries and through legend. The lure of living an adventurous life at sea appeals to the pirate in many of us, but the reality of commercial fishing may not be what one has in mind when deciding to put ones things in storage and hop a plane to look for fishing jobs in Alaska. Commercial fishing is a big industry in Alaska, but this doesnt mean a job is guaranteed. In fact, crew members tend to hold on to jobs theyve found to be reliable, so it can be hard to find fishing jobs in Alaska, especially since job openings are spread largely through word of mouth. Be preparedmentally and physicallyto do a lot of waiting. Landing one of the few fishing jobs in Alaska, necessitates several things, such as $250300 worth of equipment, from a sleeping bag to wet weather gear and obtaining a fishing license. One should also expect to be charged a share of the operating expenses, and once on board, to forgo any expectation for privacy, whether using the toilet or trying to relax. Fishing jobs in Alaska can pay well if there is a good harvest. Of course, there is no guarantee, and a poor harvest means the crew members share or percentage of the harvest can be meager. There is no minimum wage for crew members, so be sure to sign a reasonable payment agreement before signing on to a vessel. Aside from the monetary risk, be aware of the physical dangers of the industry. Commercial fishing is one of the most dangerous occupations in America, and since accidents, if they occur, will take place far from medical facilities and assistance, the risk to ones health and safety is even greater. Thus, to survive in commercial fishing in Alaska, one must be physically strong, willing to work hard, able to tolerate constant companionship for extended periods of time, and willing to take and follow directions.

Deliverables

Milestones a. Contract signed January 31. b. Guests arrive in Dillingham June 30. c. Depart by plane to Base Camp I June 21 d. Depart by plane to Base Camp II to Dillingham June 25. Technical Requirements a. Fly in air transportation to and from base camps. b. Boat transportation within the Tikchik River system. c. Digital cellular communication devices. d. Camps and fishing to conform to state of Alaska requirements. Limits and Exclusions a. Guests are responsible for travel arrangements to and from Dillingham, Alaska. b. Guests are responsible for their own fly-fishing equipment and clothing. c. Local air transportation to and from base camps will be outsourced. d. Tour guides are not responsible for the number of King Salmon caught by guests. Customer review The president of Blue Note, Inc. 1. Risks analysis in the Alaska fly-fishing expedition:

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Risk Identification a. Personal hazards during expedition. E.g. Hypothermia due to exposure of bad weather temperatures for repeated periods. Injury to head, limbs and other parts through falling, slipping and carelessness on board the vessel. Injuries also sustained during moving, transporting or storing equipment b. The absence of immediate medical care and the likelihood that significant delays may occur before medical care when injured by equipment on the vessel or by their own carelessness. c. The potential that control of the vessel might be lost, due to inadequate vessel equipment resulting GET BETTER GRADES a. in inability to maneuver and colliding with other objects, which may result in people being thrown overboard. b. Fuel shortage due to miscalculation of the amount of fuel needed for the entire expedition and the potential that this may cause a fire or an explosion on board the vessel and the lack of proper fly-fishing equipment. c. The extremes weather and sea conditions -unsuitable weather conditions, including deterioration in weather, which may result in the capsize of the vessel and the death of individuals on board

President of Blue Note, Inc. wants to reward her top management team by taking them on an all expensed paid fly fishing adventure in Alaska.

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has been given the responsibility to organise and lead the five day fly fishing expedition down the Tikchik River system in the Alaska The project would be commencing on the 21st June 2011 and would be finishing 25th June 2011 . ( Both days are included in the project plan ) The Total budget allowed to this expedition would be USD 27,000 Introduction The Great Alaska Adventures(GAA) has been given the task of planning a five-day flyfishing trip for the executive team of BlueNote , Inc . at the bequest of its President . The trip will be into the remote back country of Tikchik River , an area known for its wildlife and rugged terrain . The area is best known for its salmon fishing . The trip will be all-inclusive except that the executives will be responsible for their own transportation to the Dillingham base camp . We will need to provide transportation from Dillingham to the Tikchik River Basin , boat transportation with motors , camping equipment and meals , guides and a four-hour fishing class . We will provide fishing licenses for all the guests and four experienced river guides . Discussion The first thing we need to find to deal with in the planning process is to find a way to get from Dillingham to the Tikchik . Most of the time people going on float trips down the river begin by taking a float plane to the lake at the head of the river . Our first concern will be the cost of renting the float plane and making certain that it has sufficient space for our guests and our equipment . We will also need to hire four experienced guides who are also adept at fly-fishing and can teach our guests how to fly fish once we get on the river . Once we get to the river , we will be able to make the float trip in 4 to 5 days . We will

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plan on food for six days at minimum and also take additional equipment for immediate preparation of our catch . In case of really bad luck fishing , we will take sufficient food to take care of three meals per day for at least six days . We will also want to take water purification tablets for drinking water and snacks . The boats will then be taken to the river and we will commence our trip down the river . The first thing will be our fly fishing class and then we will have lunch . Then we will float down the river for about four hours and get to the campsite for the evening . We will make camp and begin the first evening of serious fishing . This will be repeated for the next four days. It sounds simple and like nothing could go wrong , right ? Right . Nothing . Except what if the motors on the boats don 't work it rains every day and the raft capsizes the first day and we lose our food . What if we encounter a grizzly who thinks our guests look like a good morning snack or one of the guests is allergic to fish ? What if they forget their hip waders and end up with hypothermia ? Some of these risks we can plan for and account for and some we try to mitigate . For example , by hiring experienced guides we should be able to minimize the chance of capsizing the raft and losing our equipment . In addition, we will hire..
1.1 Scope This project is being initiated in order to setup a coastal based tourism venture in Mirissa Sri Lanka. The venture is being undertaken mainly to setup facilities for Whale and Dolphin watching off the coasts of Mirissa, Sri Lanka. The venture also hopes to provide facilities to its customers for a range of other activities such as water sports, sports fishing, snorkeling and sea kayaking. Providing star class accommodation will not be a priority in the near future for this venture, however a rest house with a restaurant and summer huts will be constructed on the premises of the venture in order to accommodate and serve its customers. Project completion date estimated for January 2012 Duration for completion one year and ten days.

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1.2 Trade off assessment Although the venture hopes to maintain focus on all three control trade offs, the relative importance of finishing the project within the budgeted cost and the performance specifications is greater than on time delivery. Budgeted cost is a constrain, and is a fixed requirement for the project. It is hoped to enhance the performance of the venture over the other trade offs especially in light of the competition that the venture faces. Completion of the project on time will be accepted as a parameter that may not be met. Reducing its importance in the trade off assessment may be justified due to factors such as delays and bureaucratic red tape in obtaining approvals for the project due to its environmentally sensitive nature. Although these trade offs have to be made more time on the project will result in more costs as such all attempts will be made to prevent schedule time overruns. Priority Matrix Time Performance Constrain Enhance Accept O O Cost O

2. Work Break down Structure (WBS) The work break down structure of the venture will break down the total project scope in to the main deliverables of the project along with the sub deliverables and work packages. The main deliverable of the venture is to create a sea and coast based tourism resort which will provide the facilities for its customers to engage in the activity of Whale & Dolphin watching whilst also being able to accommodate its customers at its water sport / adventure resort. Sub deliverables of the project will mainly be the setup of the business, the design and construction of the premises, procurement of the necessary equipment and boats, marketing and fulfilling the staffing requirements of the venture. The work packages will be the main activities under each sub deliverable that need to be completed in order for the sub deliverable to be complete.

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The work break down structure will basically tie activities and responsibility by assigning the work to be done along with the budgeted cost, time and resources within which that work must be accomplished. The WBS develops the baseline of the project and can be used along the life cycle of the venture to monitor and track progress of activities. If there are problems on the project the WBS will enable tracking those problems to the source activities and responsibilities.

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Work Break down structure (WBS)

Sea and Coast based eco tourism venture Procurement Marketing Staffing

Setup of venture

Premises

A & E Firm
Legal Approvals Budgets Construction Sign Agreement

Prepare design plan

Boats

Equipment

Recruiting

Training

Initial plan Revised plan

Approach vendor Inquire price Make offer

Call for quotation Evaluate Build networks Inspect sample Purchase Approach tour Agencies & hotels Advertise using mass media Selecting Hands on Interviewing Class room

Inspect Purchase

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Activity ID and description followed by budgeted cost in Rupees for completion Setup of venture A Obtaining approvals for project 50,000 B Legal, company registration etc 5000 C Budget preparation 5000 Premises D Sign agreement with architecture and engineering firm for construction - 1000 E Initial design plan requirements of investor - 2000 F - Revised design with architect input - 5000 G Construction 200,000,000 Procurement H Approach vendors for boat purchase - 5000 I Inquire price and make offers - 2000 J Inspect if up to standard, specification and safety requirements 50,000 K Purchase 25,000,000 L Call for quotations for water sports goods and leisure equipment - 5000 M Evaluate quotations - 2000 N Inspect samples 10,000 O Purchase 5,000,000 Staffing P Interviewing prospective employees for the venture 50,000 Q Selecting the best out of the interviewees - 5000 R Class room training 10,000 S Hands on training (boat and water sport equipment use) 10,000 Marketing T - Advertise opening of resort through mass media specially travel magazines and travel web sites 1,000,000 U Build networks in the tourism industry 100,000 V - Approach tour agencies and hotels for promotion of Whale and Dolphin watching to its customers (this can work on a commission basis) - 50,000 W Commence operations 3. Project Network (AON)

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The project network uses the activity on nod (AON) technique in order to highlight the activities of a project and the sequence they need to be completed in. The necessary approvals from the different authorities along with the legal registration need to be obtained first in order for the project to move forward especially due to the ventures environmentally sensitive nature. Once these have been obtained budgets can be prepared which will then enable the designing of the premises and construction activities to follow while procurement, staffing and marketing based activities will make up the remaining sequences of the network. The final milestone activity will be the commencement of operations of the venture. The project network will give the venture a basic time frame from start to finish in addition to start and finish days for each of the activities on the network. Most importantly the network enables the calculation of the critical path which is the shortest possible duration in which the project can be completed any delay on this path will delay the entire project. The network also facilitates calculating slack time for certain activities which is the time an activity can be delayed after the start of a longer parallel activity or activities. The network will enable the venture to direct resources for activities as an when they are needed as identified by the sequence of dependencies and also use resources of activities with slack to speed up work on the critical path.

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Project network Activity on Nod (AON)

L C

O T

P A

V G D E F

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* ID of critical path activities marked in red

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Activity ID and description followed by time in days for completion AObtaining approvals for project -30 BLegal, company registration etc-12 CBudget preparation-7 DSign agreement with architecture and engineering firm for construction of premises- 5 EInitial design plan requirements of investor- 3 F-Revised design with architect input- 3 GConstruction 250 HApproach vendors for boat purchase-14 IInquire price and make offers- 14 JInspect if up to standard, specification and safety requirements- 10 KPurchase- 5 LCall for quotations for water sports goods and leisure equipment- 14 MEvaluate quotations- 3 NInspect samples- 7 OPurchase- 2 P- Interviewing prospective employees for the venture- 7 QSelecting the best out of the interviewees- 2 RClass room training- 2 SHands on training (boat and water sport equipment use) - 7 T-Advertise opening of resort via mass media specially travel magazines and travel websites- 30 UBuild networks in the tourism industry- 14 V-Approach tour agencies and hotels for promotion of Whale and Dolphin watching to its customers (this can work on a commission basis) - 7 WCommence operations- 14

Activity ID Duration A B C 30 12 7

Early start 0 0 30

Early finish 30 12 37

Late start 0 20 30

Late finish 30 32 37

Slack time 0 20 0

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D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W

5 3 3 250 14 14 10 5 14 3 7 2 7 2 2 7 30 14 7 14

30 30 33 37 287 301 315 325 287 301 304 311 287 294 296 330 337 337 337 367

35 33 36 287 301 315 325 330 301 304 311 313 294 296 298 337 367 351 344 375

32 31 34 37 287 301 315 325 304 318 321 328 319 326 328 330 337 353 360 367

37 34 37 287 301 315 325 330 318 321 328 330 326 328 330 337 367 367 367 375

2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 17 17 17 17 32 32 32 0 0 16 23 0

* Critical path activity details marked in red Critical path A, C, G, H, I, J, K, S, T, W Earliest time in days for schedule completion 375 days

4. Responsibility matrix The responsibility matrix will show who bears responsibility for each and every activity on the project schedule in addition it will also highlight the individuals who will support the activity on to its achievement.

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Responsibility Task Deliverable Obtaining approval Company registration Budget preparation Oversea construction Purchasing boats/Equipment Marketing

Project Manager

Finance Officer

Procurement Officer

Marketing Officer

HR Officer

Team members 5 Nos

R R S R S S R R R

S S S S S S

Staffing R = Responsible

S = Support / Assist

5. Project resource schedule

Work / tasks Approvals Legal Budget Sign agreements

Labor resource Project manager/ team member Project manager/ team member Finance officer/ team member Project manager/ team

Time/ Schedule (Days) 30 12 7 5

Budgeted cost (RS 000) 50 5 5 1

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Initial design Revised design Construction oversea Approach vendor boat purchase Inquire price / make offers Inspect Purchase Quotations for equipment Evaluate quotations Inspect samples Purchase Advertise mass media Build networks Tour agencies and hotels Interviewing Selecting Class room training Hands on training

member Project manager/ team member Project manager/ team member Project manager/ team member Procurement officer/ team member/ Procurement officer/ team member Procurement officer/ team member Procurement officer/ team member Procurement officer/ team member Procurement officer/ team member Procurement officer/ team member Procurement officer/ team member Marketing officer/ team member Marketing officer/ team member Marketing officer/ team member HR officer/ team member HR officer/ team member HR officer/ team member HR officer/ team member

3 3 250 14 14 10 5 14 3 7 2 30 14 7 7 2 2 7

2 5 200,000 5 2 50 25,000 5 2 10 5,000 1,000 100 50 50 5 10 10

5.1 Scheduling conflicts

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The nature of this project is such that the project managers input may be required at the same time on activities of different sub deliverables as a result conflict may arise due to the time constraints faced by these tasks and sub deliverables. This may result in time schedule revising from the original plan. Although each of the five team members have been assigned to assist each of the officers and project manager it is at the discretion of the project manager to redirect any one of the team members to different tasks as per requirement. This may also cause conflicts. 6. Cash flow requirement Total cost of project along with amounts attributable to each of the main deliverables of the project. Project deliverables Setup of venture Premises Procurement Staffing Marketing Total Budgeted cost in Rs 60,000 200,008,000 30,074,000 75,000 1,150,000 231,367,000

6.1 Financial resource schedule This schedule shows by which day after the project begins will activity funds be required, and the day by which those funds are expected to be consumed along with the completion of that activity. Work / tasks Approvals Legal Budget Sign agreements Initial design Revised design Construction oversea Approach vendor boat purchase Inquire price / make offers By when funds required (days) 0 0 30 30 30 33 37 287 301 By when funds consumed (days) 30 12 37 35 33 36 287 301 315 Budgeted cost (RS 000) 50 5 5 1 2 5 200,000 5 2

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Inspect Purchase Quotations for equipment Evaluate quotations Inspect samples Purchase Advertise mass media Build networks Tour agencies and hotels Interviewing Selecting Class room training Hands on training

315 325 287 301 304 311 287 294 296 330 337 337 337

325 330 301 304 311 313 294 296 298 337 367 351 344

50 25,000 5 2 10 5,000 1,000 100 50 50 5 10 10

7. Risk Assessment Matrix

Risk Assessment Form


Risk Event Likelihood Impact Detection Difficulty When occur

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Risk Severity Matrix

Likelihood

2
Impact

29

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Risk Response Matrix

Risk Event

Response

Contingency Plan

Trigger

Who is Responsible

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Activity General walking/fishing outdoors

Hazard Sunlight

Hazard effect Sunburn

Minimise risk by Wear sun cream/block, even when cloudy Wear a sunhat and sunglasses to protect eyes from glare Keep well clear of wasp, hornet nests and beehives. Wear insect repellent to deter biting bugs. MAKE YOUR GUIDE AWARE IF YOU HAVE ANY ALLERGIES TO STINGS Do not touch snakes Do not insert any part of the body into any burrow or hole in stone walls and/or bankings Check body for ticks immediately after returning from the field. Remove any ticks and swab the area with alcohol

General walking/fishing outdoors

Insects

Bites and stings

General walking/fishing outdoors

Attack by addersPoisonous bites

General

Lymes disease Potential illness

walking/fishing outdoors from ticks

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Activity

Hazard

Hazard effect

Minimise risk by Report any unexplained fever or rash at the bite site to your doctor as

Walking to field sites rivers, streams, lakes, reservoirs & ponds

soon as possible Poor or extreme Potential injury/illnessTake appropriate warm outdoor clothing and waterproofs Take spare clothes, extra food and water, a First Aid kit and a mobile phone (but dont expect it to work in all areas) Plan the route, watch footing and wear adequate footwear with ankle support Avoid fields with cows and young calves, bulls, rams and farm dogs conditions

and fishing areas around weather

Walking to field sites rivers, streams, lakes, reservoirs & ponds Walking to field sites rivers, streams, lakes, reservoirs & ponds Walking to field sites rivers, streams, lakes, reservoirs & ponds

Falling or slippery, unstable and

Potential injury/risk of drowning

and fishing areas around slipping on

uneven ground Attack by farm Potential injury

and fishing areas around animals

Falling off

Potential drowning

Take care crossing uneven or slippery ground, or where guard rails are low

and fishing areas around bridges

injury/illness/risk of bridges, particularly on

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Activity Fly Fishing or sampling rivers, streams, lakes, reservoirs and ponds from the bank or in the water

Hazard Falling into water

Hazard effect

Minimise risk by

Drowning/getting wet Be careful and watch and cold your footing in the water and on the riverbanks. Beware of undercut banks and steep drop-offs. Do not enter the water if flows are very high. Be aware of slippery rocks and hazards, particularly in poor weather conditions. In rivers, be aware of flash flooding. Wear suitable waterproof clothing. A life preserver is always recommended. Wash your hands as soon as possible after fishing or sampling and before eating, drinking or smoking. Cover all wounds with waterproof plasters and wash all new cuts with alcohol before covering with a waterproof 34

Fly Fishing or sampling rivers, streams, lakes, reservoirs and ponds from the bank or in the water

Contracting Weils disease or infectious hepatitis

Potential illness

Activity

Hazard

Hazard effect

Minimise risk by plaster. Report all instances of unexplained fever to your doctor Do not touch any part of Giant Hogweed (unless wearing protective gloves). Do not lick or chew any plant, or eat unidentified berries or fungi Do not sample in water that has a bright bluegreen algal scum. If contact is made with such scum, wash off immediately. Do not drink the water Your duty of care to conditions. Be sure to advise others of what to look out for and what to do Carry First Aid kit or medication appropriate to your condition

Fly Fishing or sampling rivers, streams, lakes, reservoirs and ponds from the bank or in the water

Being poisoned Potential illness or suffering dermatitis from poisonous plants and fungi

Fly Fishing or sampling rivers, streams, lakes, reservoirs and ponds from the bank or in the water

Being poisoned Potential illness by blue-green algae

Fly Fishing or sampling rivers, streams, lakes, reservoirs and ponds from the bank or in the water

Medical conditions

Physical weakness and others

endangering yourself advise others of medical

Minor cuts and abrasions

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Activity Fly Fishing in general

Hazard Electrocution

Hazard effect

Minimise risk by

Severe burns or Death Do not fish or walk with a fishing rod in the air during electrical storms. Always keep well clear

Fly Fishing in general

Casting and handling fly fishing tackle

Cuts and abrasions

of overhead power lines Beware fishing hooks are sharp and lines can cut deep. Keep well clear of others that are casting. If you need to approach others that are casting make them aware of your presence as you approach. Always where glasses to

Fly Fishing in general

Fishing from boats

protect your eyes. Drowning/getting wet Take care when and cold embarking and disembarking the boat and be aware of slippery or uneven pontoons. A life preserver must be always be worn at all times when fishing from a boat

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Activity

Hazard

Hazard effect Potential illness

Minimise risk by Wash your hands as soon as possible after working with samples and always before eating, drinking or smoking. Cover all wounds with waterproof plasters and wash all new cuts with alcohol before covering with a waterproof plaster. Report all instances of unexplained fever to your doctor. Use appropriate tools and equipment for each task.

Identifying invertebrates Contracting in collecting trays either indoors or outdoors Weils disease or infectious hepatitis

Presentations, identifying Contact with invertebrates in collecting trays indoors or outdoors & fly tying and fly tying type tools

Potential

sharp laboratory injury/infection

workshops and equipment Presentations, identifying Emergency Potential injury invertebrates in collecting trays indoors or outdoors & fly tying workshops evacuation

Establish the location of emergency exits, procedures and assembly points.

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Activity

Hazard

Hazard effect Potential injury

Minimise risk by Wipe up spills and endeavour to keep power cables tidy, do not block or clutter work area and exits with equipment/power cables

Presentations, identifying Falling or invertebrates in collecting trays indoors or outdoors & fly tying workshops slipping on slippery floors, tripping over equipment and/or power cables

Equipment used for Fly Fishing 1. Rods and reels Than reels rods are more important in fly fishing. 2. Line A good Quality fly line will be cost usually of $ 30 upwards. 3.Flies Its depend buying the files , pattern of the fly fishing . Dry Files using for fishing the surface of the water and Wet Files flies for fishing under the surface. Nymph patterns are usually tied with a weighted material to get the fly to sink. It also can be tied with what is called a bead head. A bead head is a bb-sized, metal ball (gold colour) .this is an attractor for the fish 4.Waders A good pair of waders is important for fly fishing and it gives more clearance for back cast. 5. Vests While doing fly fishing need to have variety of flies, different size tippet, a knife and something to eat. Fly fishing vests been created to carry these stuff. 6. Knots Arbor Knot this is using to attach your backing material to reel arbor

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Clinch Knot it is recommended for tying fly to your leader or tippet. This is a simple knot to gain experience fly fishing. Nail Knot - The Nail Knot requires a small diameter utensil, toothpick, or some other object about the twice the diameter of fly line. Surgeons Knot - Easiest knot to tie and used to attach tippet to leader.

Also sunglasses, nets , Fly Boxes and Hats also very important equipments for fly fishing.

Risks in Fly Fishing 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. Sunburn, poisonous bites and bites and stings from insects by general walking and fishing Injuries and illness can be caused by walking to field sites and fishing areas like rivers, Falling or slipping on slippery Drowning Attack by farm animals Falling off bridges Suffering dermatitis poisonous from poisonous plants and fungus Tripping over equipment Medical conditions Electrocution Using sharp laboratory fly tying types tools and equipments out door streams, lakes , reservoirs and ponds

How to overcome the Risk 1. 2. 3. Wear sun cream , wear a sun hat and sunglasses to protect eyes Check the body after returning from the field. If got any fever, rash or bytes seek for Use appropriate clothing, extra food, water , first Aid and waterproofs

medications immediately

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4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Take care crossing bridges Wash hand as soon as finish fishing before eating , drinking or smoking Cover all the wounds with water proof plaster before fishing Not to lick or chew any plant, or eat unknown berries. Use suitable equipment and tools Establish the emergency exists and procedures for fishing

The main risks that the project faces are time schedule delays events such as unnecessary delays in obtaining approvals for the project which may occur at the inception or startup, and delays in other project activities which may occur through the life of the project such as construction delays. Unforeseen cost increases in both construction of premises and procurement of equipment which may also occur at any point in the project life cycle and ability to obtain all necessary equipment and boats on time to ensure enhanced performance of the venture are the other areas prone to risk. Staffing problems can be various from recruited and trained staff leaving to wrong selections in recruitment being made, this risk event may occur throughout the staffing stage of the venture right up to commencement of operations. Assessment Form Risk event Timeline Cost Equipment Staffing Risk Severity Matrix 5 Timeline Equipment Staffing 1 3 4 5 Impact Cost 4 Likelihood 3 2 1 2 Likelihood 4 4 3 2 Impact 3 4 3 3 Detection Difficulty 1 1 3 2 When Life cycle Life cycle Procurement Pre operations

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8. Risk Response Matrix The risk response and the contingency plans for the identified risk events are. For the inability to meet the scheduled timeline the project manger will provide for by having time buffers for certain identified bottleneck activities that are expected to cause delay such as obtaining approvals. These time buffers will only be used if the risk event occurs and there existence will not be communicated to the team, only the project investor will be aware of these time buffers. Although costs will be a tightly controlled element of the project and sticking to budget will be of high priority contingency funds will be separated at the beginning of the project to be used in the case of unexpected events occurring. Obtaining the necessary boats and equipment on time is a risk event where the risk will be transferred by payment of advances to suppliers to ensure on time delivery this will be done however after a careful selection and identification of what the most essential and difficult to obtain equipment are. Special attention will be paid to the procurement of the deep sea boat. Inappropriate or wrong staffing and staff turnover may seriously harm the venture and may inhibits its customer service therefore the project contingency plan is to maintain all records of the interviewees from the recruitment and selection process in order to be able to fill any sudden unforeseen vacancies that may arise or changes that may have to be made post training pre operations.

Risk event Timeline

Response Mitigate

Contingency Use of time buffers on identified bottlenecks Contingency funds available Advance payments to suppliers Keep records of all interviewees for unforeseen staff shortages.

Trigger

Responsibility Project manger

Actual not inline with schedule

Cost Equipment

Mitigate Transfer

Actual not inline with budget Negative responses from suppliers Staff turnover or unnecessary staff issues

Finance officer Procurement officer HR officer

Staffing

Mitigate

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9. Management issues Even though the project team is small motivation problems may arise midway in to the project due to its duration of one year. The project manager reaffirming the project objective and vision to hi team along with having meetings with the project investor to give pep talks to the project team should be good techniques to rejuvenate the project team. Problems that arise during the project need to be dealt with in order to ensure that the project stays on schedule and within budget, the problems that can arise in a project such as this are numerous, like cost and schedule overruns the project manager needs to be a problem solver and foresee and anticipate problems that may arise so that solutions can be formulated more easily.. Conflicts arising within the project need to be resolved by the project manager. Although functional conflict can be encouraged as it is productive and may result in improvements to the project dysfunctional conflicts need to be eradicated. The project manager should intervene and prevent stalemates between two conflicting parties. 10. Project manager role The project manager will have to provide the frame work to plan and communicate the work that needs to be done on the project, he is the initiator he needs to identify and gather the resources that will be required on the project. The project manager will be responsible for providing direction, preparing schedules, assigning work responsibilities, coordinating efforts, integrating plans and controlling costs. The project manager should be able to address the right issues at the right time and make the right decisions. The project manager should have leader ship skills especially for implementing change etc in order to be able to show the way. He should be a problem solver and provide solutions to his

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teams problems. He should intervene and prevent conflict when ever it arises and prevent stalemates developing between team members The project manager should be an optimist and tray to be positive as possible he should t6ake all the opportunities available to him in encouraging and motivating his team 11. Key to success Project manager competency is of paramount importance for project success he should lead by example and manage all project stake holders since each of them will have there own priorities. He should manage by wandering around since this is construction project he should be onsite when ever possible. The project manager should build a high performance project team this can be achieved by creating a effective shared vision an sense of common purpose, make effective use of individual talents and expertise, managing a good reward system, ensure they set high performance standards and rejuvenating and refreshing the teams mindset from time to time. Use available expertise and techniques to ensure estimates are accurate as possible, although this is a one off project and there is more uncertainty and risk involved and probability of estimates being wrong, techniques such as top down estimating using group consensus, mathematical models and quotations from vendors etc will be used to make estimates as accurate as possible, time in to the project the WBS information will be used to create bottoms up estimates that will then enable the reconciliation of both types of estimates. Once baseline estimates are made they will be monitored right up to project completion. Monitoring of actual data and comparing with baseline data is another very important activity for project success as this enable the management to take corrective action as and when needed. Good change management skills are essential as changes may have to be incorporated in to the project at any given point of time in the project life cycle if things are not going according to plan. Change identification, change implementation responsibility, conflict management are some of the activities dealt with here

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Equipment and boats should be rigorously tested Safety equipment and all equipment and rations necessary in case of emergency should be maintained on board as well as on the resort. Resort team staff should be highly trained and when selecting priority will be given to experience gained on the field over everything else. The management of the project using the above guidelines should enable the successful completion of the project along with the smooth functioning once operations of the venture commences.

Identifying Site related risks ===Climate in the south to the cooler, dryer continental influence of the interior to the north. The weather is generally cool and moist with daily July high/low temperatures averaging 65F and 46F, respectively.in jun temprture is around 68 F Annual snowfall averages 60 to 70 inches at Dillingham and may reach more than 160 inches at Lake Nerka. Winds are usually moderate (0-30 mph), prevailing from the southeast/southwest in summer and from the north and east in winter. Alaska is known as the Land of the Midnight Sun because of the really long days .in jun 18 hrs having day time. ====Safety Considerations File a trip plan. Leave it with a friend, your air taxi, the Wood-Tikchik State Park office, or someone else reliable. Be sure to close it when your trip is complete. Avoid the bears. View bears from a distance. Keep a very clean camp. Do not bury trash; haul it out. Avoid camping in the vicinity of salmon spawning streams and other spawning areas when salmon are present. The bears will be there!

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Protect your equipment. Bears and porcupines love to disable rafts and skinned kayaks. Protect them. You're a long way from the road head. Giardiasis. The intestinal parasite Giardia Lamblia is prevalent in many lakes and streams in Alaska. Giardiasis may be contracted by drinking untreated water in areas of beaver and other water mammal activity. The symptoms are diarrhea and severe cramping, and may appear up to two weeks after exposure. Treat water by boiling, using chemical tablets or biological filter. Beware of weather. Wind on the open lakes can quickly create dangerous whitecap conditions. Always wear a personal flotation device and travel close to shore during transitional weather patterns. Immersion in cold water will result in exhaustion or unconsciousness within 30 to 60 minutes. Use effective rainwear and keep a lighter or waterproofed matches available. Fires. Open fires are permitted only on gravel beaches and bars. Use dead and down wood only. Extinguish fully and bury completely before leaving the site. The use of portable campstoves is permitted throughout the park and is encouraged. Live tree cutting is not permitted. Insects. Although not regarded a safety hazard, mosquitoes and biting flies can diminish an otherwise wonderful trip. Pack your favorite repellent. Food and fuel. Weather and other unforeseen variables can often extend a trip unexpectedly. Carry extra food and fuel, just in case.

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