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Pelham~Windham News 5-04-2012

Pelham~Windham News 5-04-2012

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Volume 9 Number 42 May 4, 2012 16 Pages

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National
Teacher
Appreciation
Week
May 7- 11
submitted by Michael Theriault
The Nutfeld District of the Daniel Webster Council held
its annual recognition dinner in April.
Troop 263 of Windham for the second year in a row
achieved the status of Unit of Honor. The Troop had
to achieve certain goals and meet many requirements,
ultimately ensuring a great program for boys to be a part of.
Congratulations to the boys and the adult leaders of Troop
263 for another great year in scouting.
Also in April the troop participated in a white water
rafting excursion on the Kennebec River in Maine
which was an awesome adventure. With many exciting
adventures still to come Troop 263 are always looking for
new boy Scouts. If you would like to check us out come
to Windham Middle School Monday nights from 7 to 8:30
in the Cafe during the school year or visit our Website at
www.troop263nh.org.
Boy Scout Troop 263 Earns Unit of Honor
by Doug Robinson
Since 1984, National PTA® has
designated the frst full week in
May as PTA Teacher Appreciation
Week, a special time to honor the
men and women who lend their
passion and skills to educating
our children. PTA events at
the national, state, and local
levels celebrate the outstanding
contributions teachers make.
Teacher Appreciation Week
begins on the 7th until the 11th of
May. During this time, students
are offered the opportunity to
show teachers how thankful they
are for their support. It it’s time
for students and communities
to demonstrate how much our
teachers mean so that we can
have a better future.
Teachers, the people who
educate us, and give us the vital
knowledge which we need to
live our lives. They encourage,
support, discipline and prepare
us for the road ahead and now
it’s time for us to show them our
appreciation.
The 8th of May will mark
Teacher Appreciation Day and
students all across America
will show their appreciation by
rewarding their teachers with
lovely gifts. These gifts can come
in a variety of shapes and sizes
– remember, it’s the thought that
counts.
“NEA (National Education
Association) and its affliates
continued to observe National
Teacher Day in March until 1985,
when the NEA Representative
Assembly voted to change the
event to Tuesday of the frst full
week of May. The origins of
National Teacher Day are murky.
Around 1944 Arkansas teacher
Mattye Whyte Woodridge began
corresponding with political
and education leaders about the
need for a national day to honor
teachers. Woodridge wrote to
Eleanor Roosevelt, who in 1953
persuaded the 81st Congress to
proclaim a National Teacher Day’
writes the NEA.
The NEA, along with its Kansas
and Indiana state affliates and the
Dodge City (Kan.) Local, lobbied
Congress to create a national day
to celebrate teachers. Congress
declared March 7, 1980, as
National Teacher Day for that
year only.
Some schools may have a
special schedule lined up which
will provide many outlets for
students and communities to
show how much a specifc
teacher or school system means
to you them.
Teachers will also be able to
recognize the positive effects,
which he or she has on students,
which is sure to give everybody
involved in education a huge
boost.
Litchfeld School
Superintendent commented,
“Teachers are the lifeblood of
learning, and instill a passion for
learning in students. Although
technology has made vast
advances in how we learn,
nothing takes the place of the
human factor of the teacher in the
classroom.
We all remember the teacher
who inspired us in a given feld
and gave us the confdence
to achieve more than we ever
imagined.
On National Teacher Day,
thousands of communities
take time to honor their local
educators and acknowledge
the crucial role teacher’s play
in making sure every student
receives a quality education.
by Marc Ayotte
Pelham center was the happening place on Saturday,
April 28, particularly for dog lovers, as the Animal Rescue
Network of New England (ARNNE) showcased several of
their dogs that are currently available for adoption. As
evidenced by the frequency of their ‘adoption days’ held
at the common near the First Congregational Church, there
is an enormous need in this community, as well as other
surrounding areas, to fnd good homes for pets, according
to ARNNE president Donna Clark.
Accordingly, the Pelham Animal Holding Facility works
in conjunction with other area shelters in attempting to
place the wayward dogs in loving homes. As Clark sadly
pointed out, “there are more dogs than homes” and she
urges pet-seekers to adopt versus buying. “We service the
local animal shelter to house unclaimed dogs” explained
Clark, adding “Pelham dogs are our frst priority” but also
noted that they do reach out to other facilities in need of
placing dogs in that special home. She also indicated that
for potential ‘foster parent/owners,’ pure breed shelters do
exist with dogs that are “adoptable for a fee that is much
less than a breeder’s price.”
The showcase dog for the day was Maggie; “she’s the
long timer,” noted Clark. Maggie is a one and a half year
old Pit bull who Clark describes as being “perfect with
people, kids and has basic manners and is also in training”
(see photo). Also on the marquee was a loveable Australian
Kelpie, Cattle Dog (mix) named Molly. She’s a bundle of
ARNNE Holds Monthly Pet Adoption Day
by Diane Chubb
To date, three separate lawsuits have been
fled challenging the redistricting plan created by
the House. The plan was drawn up in 2011 as a
result of updated census data.
In 2006, New Hampshire voters
overwhelmingly approved an amendment to the
state constitution to ensure that communities
with enough population - 3,291 residents -
“shall have its own district of one or more
representative seats.”
For the past few months, the battle regarding
redistricting has raged on and Pelham has been
one of the casualties. The redistricting plan
denies 59 of these towns its own representative.
Pelham is among these towns, which has
suffcient population to support 4 representatives.
After the bill was vetoed by Governor Lynch,
almost immediately, House Republicans
took up a vote to override the veto. Pelham’s
Shaun Doherty was the only one from the
local delegation to support the veto. The other
members of the delegation, all of whom live in
Hudson and Litchfeld, voted to override the
veto.
Since that time, some of the local legislators
have tried to explain the reasoning behind
their vote. However, Pelham residents remain
unconvinced that the representatives are serving
the needs of the town.
To date, there are three separate lawsuits
contesting the redistricting plan.
One was fled by Manchester Mayor Ted
Gatsas. House Republicans claimed that it was
merely a political move and chastised the mayor
for “deciding to waste taxpayers’ resources.”
Manchester was negatively impacted by the
redistricting, losing seats and being combined
with Litchfeld.
Concord fled a similar suit, stating the
plan combines city wards with surrounding
communities to create House districts. Under
the redistricting plan, Concord is combined with
Hopkinton to form a three-person district.
A third suit has been fled by Democratic
state Rep. Mary Jane Wallner (Concord) along
with other state representatives, citizens and the
activist group Granite State Progress.
“The New Hampshire House of
Representatives is by design a large and distinct
body to accurately represent the individual
character of each of our state’s communities,”
said Wallner. “The House redistricting plan is
unconstitutional and violates the letter and the
spirit of the 2006 constitutional amendment
overwhelmingly approved by New Hampshire
voters.”
Other petitioners include former Rep. Harold
Lynde of Pelham.
The suit states, “The full House or its Special
Committee on Redistricting considered and
rejected a number of alternatives that would have
allowed more towns and wards to have their own
districts.”
The petitions for the three lawsuits will be
heard on Thursday, May 3, in Hillsborough
County Superior Court in Manchester.
Documents forwarded to the court include
four different plans, including those that were
originally presented during the redistricting
debate.
Representative Doherty stated, “I do not
believe that this redistricting plan follows
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continued to page 7- Arnne Receiving attention from brother and sister, Nicolas and Samantha Fisher, is Maggie. Te 18-month-old
Pitbull is friendly with kids and in need of a loving home (see story)
Pelham Considers Options
on House Redistricting Lawsuits
continued to page 4- House Redistricting
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2 - May 4, 2012 | Pelham - Windham News
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Charles Pitt, son of Annelise
and Charles Pitt of Windham, was
named to the Dean’s List for the
fall semester at Saint Michael’s
College. Pitt is a Senior Religious
Studies major. He is a graduate of
Salem High School.
The Curry College
Communication Department
is pleased to announce that
Kassandra Spadaro of Pelham was
inducted into the Lambda Chi
chapter of the Communication
Honor Society, Lambda Pi Eta on
April 3.
Kassandra
celebrated this
accomplishment at a
dinner reception on
the Milton Campus
with faculty, family,
and fellow Lambda
Chi members. Each
inductee received
their certifcate after
a traditional candle
lighting ceremony.
Members of this accredited society
receive a pin and honor cord to be
worn at graduation.
Lambda Pi Eta, founded in 1985,
has over 18,000 members in nearly
400 colleges and universities
worldwide. The honor society
is sponsored by the National
Communication Association and
is an accredited member of the
Association of College Honor
Societies. Lambda Pi Eta members
are undergraduate students who
have achieved a high level of
academic excellence in the
communication feld.
Lambda Pi Eta represents
what Aristotle saw as the three
ingredients of persuasion: Logos
(Lambda) meaning logic, Pathos
(Pi) relating to emotion, and
Ethos (Eta) defned as character,
credibility, and ethics.
Plymouth State University has
named Briana Laura D’Avanzo
of Pelham and Heather Kathleen
Jacques of Windham to the
President’s List for the fall semester.
Named to the Dean’s List for
the fall semester at Plymouth
State University were Leatrice M.
Lafontaine of Pelham and Peter
Attila Kovacs of Windham.
Katelyn Williams, a lifelong
resident of Windham, and the
daughter of Chuck and Erin Upton,
attends Keene State College (KSC)
and was recently elected to the
role of Student Body President
for the 2012-2013 school year.
Katelyn attended school in
Windham and is a 2009 graduate
of Salem High School, where
she also served on the student
senate as publicist and was an
active member of the band. At
KSC, Katelyn has had many
accomplishments. Most recently,
she participated on a committee
to develop a campus-wide Good
Samaritan policy (policy to be
enacted in the fall 2012; states
that students under the infuence
of alcohol/drugs will not have
punitive repercussions if they seek
medical attention, rather they will
have to participate in educational
programs to help them better
understand the risks associated
with alcohol consumption/ drug
use), a committee to change to
a paperless format for student
course evaluations and is currently
on a committee to advocate for
additional changes to the smoking
policy on campus to protect non-
smokers. Katelyn balances her
student involvement with her
academics and consistently makes
the Deans List. She was recently
selected to be on the search
committee for the next president
of KSC.
Demetra Diamantopoulos, a
resident of Pelham and a graduate
of Massachusetts School of Law,
has passed her Bar exam for the
State of Massachusetts. She is
the daughter of Paul and Helen
Diamantopoulos.
Send your Accolades to news@
areanewsgroup.com with a photo
by Barbara O’Brien
Just over a year after Windham voters approved an expansion
to the parking area adjacent to Griffn Park, the $200,000-plus
project is nearing completion.
Former selectman Charlie McMahon, who has been
instrumental in the development of the town-owned Griffn
Park from its inception, met with town offcials during their
April 23 board of selectmen’s meeting to provide an update
on the project. “We’ve come to the end of a 15-year project,”
McMahon
commented,
referring to the
length of time the
recreational facility
has been a work in
progress. “The goal
of expanded parking
and a quality build
have been met,”
McMahon said.
The renovated
parking lot, that
was scheduled to
be paved before
the end of April,
includes 234 parking
spaces, including
a dozen spaces
for handicapped
parking, and now
includes a one-way
design, with only
one entrance and
one exit. Previously,
there were three
entrances to the
area, a situation
that town offcials
considered to be a hazard. The only entrance to the park is now
located by Johnson’s Farm Stand, McMahon said. The former
entrance, located by Memorial Rock, is now to be used only for
emergency access. One potential parking space was lost in this
area in order to widen the access for fre trucks
The new parking area boasts large signs, ones that McMahon
said people “can see even if they’re visually or attention-
impaired.”
McMahon said that a proposal to make the parking spaces
angled, rather than straight, was abandoned because it would
have meant the loss of 30 percent of the parking spaces that are
possible with straight parking.
The main reason that the new parking area was constructed
was to eliminate parking along Range Road; a situation town
offcials and many residents considered to be hazardous,
particularly with young children having to cross the busy state-
owned road.
Selectmen’s Vice-Chairman Ross McLeod said he has
concerns about motorists having to go back out onto Range
Road to reverse direction should they miss a vacant parking
space and have to go all the way around again. McLeod said he
would prefer to have an internal one-way confguration.
McLeod also said that he feels a clearly marked pedestrian
crosswalk is needed in the parking lot, even if it means
eliminating another parking space. McMahon disagreed with
McLeod’s suggestion, commenting that parking is already at
a premium. McMahon said he feels that a crosswalk would
only serve to give people “a false sense of security.” “First,
parents have to watch their children, and, second, people
have to drive slow,” McMahon commented. “I expect
people to follow the rules,” he added.
Selectman Phil LoChiatto agreed with McLeod, stating that
he also thinks a crosswalk should be painted in the parking
lot. “A crosswalk would make it very clear that people
might be in this area,” LoChiatto said. “It would be a visual
indicator.”
Despite McMahon’s pleas to leave the plan as it was
proposed and wait to see if a crosswalk is actually needed,
selectmen voted 4 to 0 to make the change now. Voting
in favor of a crosswalk running from the middle gate of
the parking lot through the middle row of parking spaces
were Chairman Bruce Breton, Vice-Chairman Ross
McLeod, Selectman Roger Hohenberger and Selectman
Phil LoChiatto. Selectman Kathleen DiFruscia was not in
attendance at the April 23 board meeting.
“It’s well worth one space to improve safety,” McLeod
said, adding that it is also much more cost-effective to create
the crosswalk now than later, after the project is completed.
McLeod also asked that “invisible fencing” be installed
underneath the split rail fence to stop soccer balls and
baseballs from rolling into the parking lot. McMahon agreed
with McLeod’s suggestion, commenting that the Windham
Baseball League might be willing to pick up the tab.
Parking Improvements at
Griffn Park Near Completion
staff photo by Len Lathrop
by Barbara O’Brien
Windham Tax Collector Ruth Robertson reports that the
still lagging economy continues to have a negative effect
on local residents, specifcally in their ability to pay their
real estate taxes on time. The affect of the economy is also
evident in the number of residents who are losing their
homes to foreclosures.
During the selectmen’s meeting on April 23, Robertson
said she has been seeing “a lot more foreclosures” on
properties in Windham, than was the case in the past.
During 2011, there were a total of 41 Windham properties
foreclosed on, while, already this year; foreclosures have
affected 19 property owners. In addition, 16 Windham
residents have declared bankruptcy thus far during 2012.
“This is the most I’ve ever seen,” Robertson told
selectmen.
As many as 173 properties could also have tax liens
placed on them within the next few days, Robertson
reported, referring to those with overdue taxes. This
accounts for approximately 3 percent of the 5,845 tax
bills issued during 2011. This time last year, there were
tax liens placed on 126 properties, she said, showing an
increase of 47 properties within the past year.
As for the possible placement of tax deeds on
Windham properties, Robertson said 34 notices of
pending tax deeds were mailed out as of April 16.
Three of those property owners were subsequently given
30-day extensions. Those past due taxes were paid
prior to the expiration of that extension, Robertson said
and no tax deeds were taken. Tax deeds are placed
on properties where the taxes are at least two years in
arrears.
Robertson said she wants residents to know that
town offcials are willing to work with property owners
in coming up with payment plans that will ultimately
allow them to catch up on any past due taxes.
During 2011, property taxes in Windham totaled
$46,488,053, while taxes assessed on properties placed
in current use totaled $174,800. The population
of Windham is estimated at approximately 15,500
residents.
The 2011 Windham Tax Rate was $23.08 per $1,000
assessed property valuation. This compares with $21.98
per $1,000 assessed property valuation for 2010 and
$18.92 per $1,000 in 2009. 2008 saw an annual tax
rate of $18 per $1,000 assessed property valuation. The
tax rate for 2012 will be set by the New Hampshire
Department of Revenue Administration (DRA) this
coming October.
Economy Affects
Local Tax Situation
Pelham - Windham News | May 4, 2012 - 3
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submitted by Beth Knight, Pack 25
On Sunday, April 22, the American Legion’s
Woman’s Auxiliary hosted their annual barbecue
for the special needs with the help of Pelham
Pack 25 scouts! The weather may have been
dreary outside but the sun shone in on this bright-
eyed group! Recently graduated Pack 25 Cubs
Nicholas and Peter Alborghetti and their Mom
and Den Leader Marie Yanish and Pack 25 Tiger
Cub Jacob Knight were there to help and have
fun! They flled pots of pansies for each family to
take home. Helped with the set up and clean up.
And enjoyed the company of this awesome group.
There was live entertainment, music, dancing,
delicious barbecued food, and delectable deserts.
A fantastic time had by all!
We thank the American Legion, he Woman’s
Auxiliary and the Pack 25 Scouts for all their hard
work! And for all the families that came out to
enjoy this wonderful day!
Scouts is a wonderful way for young boys
to learn skills and values that they will keep
with them for a lifetime. Check out Pelham’s
Pack 25 at www.pelhamweb.org/pack25/
or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/
PelhamNewHampshireCubScoutPack25 and see
all the fun and exciting things we are enjoying
and planning!
Pelham Cub Scout Pack 25 Lends a Hand
at the American Legion’s Special Needs Barbecue
by Barbara O’Brien
Listed on the agenda for the April 23 Windham
Selectmen’s meeting was a presentation by Cliff
Sinnott, director of the Rockingham Planning
Commission. Sinnott has appeared before
local boards on numerous occasions, providing
information regarding regional proposals and
undertakings and soliciting input from town
offcials and residents, alike. The controversy
that was sparked during the April 23 session,
however, was unlike any other prior presentation.
Sinnott’s topic for the evening was “Sustainable
Communities” and Windham’s possible
involvement in the development of a new regional
plan.
It became obvious, shortly after Sinnott began
his presentation, that there was a great deal of
discord among many of those in attendance. The
majority of the people attending the meeting are
members of the local chapter of the Southern NH
9.12 Project.
According to the website for the Southern
NH 9.12 Project, the organization is a non-
partisan, ultra-conservative group that believes in
adhering strictly to the founding principles of the
United States Constitution. “They are passionate
about the need for government to return to
those principles and operate according to the
Constitution,” information on the website states.
According to the 9.12 Project website, “Departure
from those ideals threatens our liberty and has led
to an escalation of government spending – so out
of control, that we have already mortgaged the
future of our children and grandchildren.”
Many of the 9.12 Project members who
attended the selectmen’s meeting are also
members of the conservative organization known
as “Americans for Prosperity,” a group whose
candidates for local offces were defeated at the
annual Town Election held this past March.
Sinnott began his presentation by explaining
that the Rockingham Planning Commission,
which includes communities in the southeast
corner of New Hampshire, has been in existence
since the 1960s. It’s primary purpose has been
to prepare and maintain a regional plan for these
communities, allowing them to work together
and beneft from each other’s expertise whenever
possible. The planning commission is made up
of representatives from each member community.
These representatives are nominated by local
planning boards and, subsequently, appointed
by local boards of selectmen. There are three
representatives from the Town of Windham.
Sinnott’s purpose in meeting with town offcials
on April 23 was to solicit Windham’s cooperation
in updating the existing regional master plan.
Sinnott said that the original project was an
unfunded mandate and, due to a lack of funding,
as the years went by, the regional master plan
became outdated.
In 2010, the federal Housing and Urban
Development Agency (HUD) established a grant
program, funds for which Rockingham County
was initially denied. This past December,
however, the Rockingham Planning Commission
was notifed that funding was approved for the
“Sustainable Communities Initiative; a project
intended to address New Hampshire Livability
Standards.
The project funding from HUD would total
$300,000 over a three-year period. No matching
funds would be required from local or county
coffers, Sinnott explained, only volunteer labor to
oversee the development of a regional plan.
As of the end of April, 18 of the 27
communities belonging to the Rockingham
Planning Commission had already confrmed
their willingness to participate in the “Sustainable
Communities Initiative”, while only one
community, Hampstead, had actually declined to
participate. Sinnott said Hampstead’s refusal was
“a philosophical decision not to accept federal
dollars.”
Sinnott said the project would include
developing a regional plan based on individual
local plans, then combine the nine regional
plans to develop a New Hampshire Master Plan.
The framework of the study would be based on
common elements of each regional planning
commission, which would be based on common
elements of each local community. The project
would start from the bottom up, Sinnott said, not
from the top down. Local communities would
provide input frst, he said. The State would not
be telling communities what to do.
The proposed regional master plan would be
“advisory only,” Sinnott said. Nothing would
be mandated. The content of the study would
be strictly up to the towns in each region. The
project would provide a lot of new information
that would be benefcial to each community and
each region, he told selectmen.
Immediately following Sinnott’s presentation,
members of the 9.12 Project began hammering
him with questions, barely allowing him the time
to answer one question before another was aimed
his way. Despite the deluge, Sinnott managed to
remain calm and polite throughout the encounter.
Proposed Involvement in Regional
Planning Initiative Sparks Controversy
April Reidy, cousin and guest, mesmerizes the audience
with her incredible voice and beautiful guitar playing!
Everyone there, we had a great time!
courtesy phtotos by Beth Knight Pack 25
continued to page 5 -
Involvement in Regional Planning
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4 - May 4, 2012 | Pelham - Windham News
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the state constitution. I hope that at least
one of these legal challenges is successful and
a district that is constitutional and fair for the
people of Pelham can result from it.”
He added that legal action could have been
avoided, “if House leadership had been willing
to listen to alternative plans proposed to fx the
problem of communities being disenfranchised.
Pelham has the right to four members of the
legislature and anything less is unconstitutional.”
Concord and Manchester also fled challenges
to the law currently under review by the U.S.
Department of Justice (DOJ), who will determine
if it violates the federal Voting Rights Act. The act,
passed in 1965, outlaws discriminatory voting
practices and prevents minority vote dilution. It
requires the DOJ to approve any proposed voting
change which may result in discrimination.
The Legal Defense Fund (LDF), one of the main
defenders of the Voting Rights Act, notes that,
“During the redistricting process,
state and local offcials may
create districts that fairly refect
minority voting strength, or they
may move to dismantle districts
that provide minority voters an
opportunity to elect candidates
of their choice.” The LDF makes
sure that during redistricting,
districts that are constructed are
fair to minority voters.
The Pelham Board of
Selectmen has not yet considered
fling a suit or an amicus brief.
BOS Chair Bill McDevitt
stated, “We’ve had no discussion
about it. Our next meeting is
after the May 3 initial hearing on
all three. If the suits go forward
after that it would be speculation
about what the Board might do.”
“The suit fled by Mary Jane
Wallner is co-petitioned by our
Hal Lynde, Thomas Katsiantonis,
Jean Sanders, Kathryn Miller,
Patricia Martin, Joe Cicirelli and
William Butynski,” added BOS
Co-Chair Ed Gleason.
“Such being the case, I believe
Pelham is represented through
Hal and I will support him in
whatever he wants to undertake
under the suit.”
House Republican leadership
have fled emergency motions to
intervene before the hearing on
Thursday.
by Barbara O’Brien
Last year at this time, it was the
Windham Fire Department that was
dealing with unanticipated overtime.
This year, it is the Windham Police
Department that is dealing with the
issue.
According to Assistant Town
Administrator and Financial
Director Dana Call, the unforeseen
extended absence of several patrol
offcers, due to injuries, disabilities
and military leave, has caused the
overtime budget for 2012 to be
overspent for this time of the year.
As of March 31, which is 25 percent
into the year, the overtime police
budget was 51.9
percent expended.
Out of the $107,110
budgeted for
overtime, $55,544
had been spent by
the end of March.
Call said that
there would be
some anticipated
savings in the
regular salary line,
however, which
should help to offset
the high overtime
costs incurred
so far this year.
Regular salaries are
budgeted at a total
of $1,292,395 for
this year. As of March 31, $1,030,
998 (20.2 %) of that amount had
been expended.
Call had good news when it
comes to money spent on winter
highway maintenance during the
frst three months of the year. “The
expenditures for plowing and
sanding represent the lowest costs
for this three-month period since
2004,” Call told selectmen. The
reason, of course, was that this past
winter wound up having one of the
lowest snowfalls on record for this
part of New England.
Selectmen’s Chairman Bruce
Breton said that he estimates there
will be between $50,000 and
$80,000 left in this portion of the
highway budget by year’s end;
unless, of course, the end of 2012
winds up being snowier or icier than
normal. Breton told Call that he
wants any leftover highway winter
maintenance money returned to the
general fund to help offset next year’s
tax rate.
Overall, the amount of money
spent on vehicle fuel is running
within budget, Call stated. The
amount budgeted for 2012 was
$3.52 per gallon for regular gasoline,
while diesel fuel was budgeted at
$3.60. The average price paid for
regular gas during March 2012 was
$3.52, exactly what was budgeted,
while the cost of diesel in March was
$3.82; which is 22 cents higher than
the amount budgeted.
The price of propane being paid
out of town coffers is fxed at $2.02,
while heating oil is fxed at $3.24.5
per gallon, Call said. Both of these
prices are below current market
pricing. Heating oil is used in three
of the town-owned facilities; the
Bartley House, the Searles School
and Chapel and the Senior Center.
Propane is used in all other town
buildings.
As for incoming revenue, Call
reported that most items are in line
with expectations. “We need a few
more months of activity to determine
if budgeted amounts remain
reasonable,” she said.
A $45,662 reimbursement from
the Federal Emergency Management
Administration (FEMA), for local
expenses incurred during last
October’s major snowstorm, will
be added to the 2011 fund balance
and used to help offset the 2012 tax
rate, an amount to be determined by
the New Hampshire Department of
Revenue Administration (DRA) this
coming October.
As of the end of the frst quarter
of this year, $2,559,364 of the
total $12,794,605 budgeted for all
of 2012 had been spent; leaving
a balance of $10,235,241 for the
remainder of the year.
Police Budget Stretched
by Overtime Demands
House Redistricting- continued from front page
Help Wanted
Please consider taking on one of these
important roles for our schools and community:
Wanted: Persons with a commitment to
education, community and family; self-starters,
who display clear understanding of the worth of
involvement in educational programs; should be
dependable, motivated and goal oriented. No
experience needed! Job sharing is a possibility!
Benefts: Chance to work directly with and
for the beneft of your own family, our schools
and community; privilege of choosing working
hours that ft individual lifestyles.
Compensation: Directly proportionate to
time invested; new friends; understanding
and appreciation of school programs and
opportunities for your child; acquired leadership
skills and your child’s self-esteem.
Job Title: PTA Volunteer
Te Windham PTA and its volunteers all
work together as a team. You will always have
the help you need to accomplish any given
task. We are currently seeking volunteers for
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Membership Director, Treasurer, Secretary,
Community Education, School Liaisons and
others.
Please contact Anne-Marie O’Neil
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Rosemarie Kelly, Windham PTA, Windham
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visit the website at www.windham-nh.com and
make sure to thank White Water Mountain
Design & Development, LLC for their support
of community economic development in
Windham.
Laura Scott, Community Development
Director, Windham
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submitted by Pelham School District
The Pelham School District
annually consults with stakeholders
at St. Patrick School to consider the
needs of special education students
enrolled there. Discussion and
subsequent decision-making at this
meeting will directly affect the types
of services that will be provided to
St. Patrick students during the 2012-
2013 school year. All stakeholders
and members of the public are
encouraged to participate in this
consultation process. The meeting
will take place on Wednesday, May
16, at 3 p.m., at Pelham Elementary
School (Offce of the District Special
Education Coordinator). Along
with the ongoing childfnd process
for students enrolled at St. Patrick
School, the following topics will
serve as agenda items:
A. How special education and
related services will be provided
for these students.
B. Where special education and
related services will be provided
for these students.
C. Who will provide the special
education and related services
for these students
D. What types of services will
be provided: direct services,
contracted services, or
alternative service delivery
mechanisms.
E. How services will be
apportioned if the funds
are insuffcient to serve all
parentally placed children.
F. How the decisions in A-E will
be made.
FY-13 Individual Service Plan Funding
for St. Patrick School
Pelham Structure Fire
Pelham Fire Department responded to a structure fre on Birch Lane late Tuesday afternoon, May 1.
The fre went to two alarms. Firefghters from Pelham, Salem, Hudson, Litchfeld and Windham all went
to the fre.
Pelham - Windham News | May 4, 2012 - 5
The frst question came
from Ken Eyring, spokesperson
for the 9.12 Project. “What
autonomy will the town lose?”
Eyring asked, referring to the
proposed acceptance of federal
funds to conduct the update in
regional planning. “None at
all,” Sinnott replied. “There are
no obligations, no restrictions.”
Bill McNally, another 9.12
Project member, said he
feels that the “Sustainable
Communities Initiative” comes
directly from the United
Nations Initiative. “I would
like to see the initiative kept
here in Windham,” McNally
said, adding that he didn’t want
Windham to become a part
of the regional project. “I am
dead against this 100 percent,”
McNally stated. “Beware,” he
cautioned town offcials.
“There is no connection
to the United Nations,
whatsoever,” Sinnott responded.
“The United Nations has no
authority over what we do,”
he continued, referring to
the Rockingham Planning
Commission. “They have no
regulatory infuence. Sinnott
reminded those in attendance
that Windham has belonged
to the Rockingham Planning
Commission since 1973.
“Master plans are simply about
planning for the future,” Sinnott
emphasized. “They help to
prioritize a limited amount of
money.”
Another resident and
member of the NH 9.12
Project also spoke about her
opposition to the regional
planning concept. “I am very
concerned,” Eileen Mashino
said. “This is very far-reaching.
The board [of selectmen]
should take a hard look at this.
It is far more than land issues.”
“ This looks like social justice,”
Mashino said. “Windham
shouldn’t be involved!”
Windham Planning Board
member Kristi St. Laurent was
the only person who came to
the microphone to speak in
favor of regional planning. “We
are very much affected by what
happens in surrounding towns,”
St. Laurent said. “Projects don’t
stop at the town line.” It would
be very helpful for Windham to
have the regional information
this study would provide, she
added.
Sinnott agreed with St.
Laurent. “Water resources
don’t have town boundaries,”
Sinnott said. “Towns have to
cooperate with one another.”
“Sometimes you can do a better
job if you cooperate with your
neighbors,” he said.
Vice-Chairman Ross
McLeod said that he feels
working in cooperation with
other communities in New
Hampshire is a good thing for
Windham. “It’s incumbent on
us to help the State operate
more effciently,” McLeod said.
“Too many communities have
zoned out and failed to address
issues. This is a chance to step
up and indicate what Windham
wants included in regional
planning. This is the chance
to coordinate what should
go where,” he said, regarding
future development.
“We don’t want anyone from
the State telling us what to do,”
Selectmen’s Chairman Bruce
Breton said.
Selectman Roger
Hohenberger said he agrees
with developing a master plan
at the State level, but has some
concerns about some of the
State and Federal agencies that
are involved in the “Sustainable
Communities Initiative.”
Selectman Phil LoChiatto
said he understands the need
for regional planning, but
has some concerns about
accepting federal funding.
“You know you’re on the hook
for something when you take
federal money,” LoChiatto
said. “What kind of toll will
be exacted in the fnal plan?”
LoChiatto asked.
Selectman Kathleen
DiFruscia was not in attendance
at the meeting where the
regional planning project was
discussed.
Eyring said town offcials
need to fully understand what
they would be getting into
“with all eyes open.” He
asked selectmen to conduct
a future workshop on the
issue, one at which all sides
would be represented. “We
need to know all the pluses
and minuses,” Eyring said.
“I am concerned about
having unelected bureaucrats
representing us, rather than
local elected offcials.” Sinnott
reiterated again that the
proposed project would not
be owned by federal offcials
at HUD, that it is for advisory
purposes only and includes no
mandates or restrictions of any
kind.
On a suggestion by McLeod,
selectmen decided to continue
the discussion on “Sustainable
Communities” and regional
planning at a future meeting,
most likely sometime in late
May. “We need time to digest
the information. We need to
decide what is germane to the
issue,” McLeod said.
Breton said that he has
no intention of signing an
agreement with HUD or
any of the other agencies or
organizations involved in the
proposed development of a
regional master plan.
Although Breton’s direct
involvement with the NH 9.12
Project was not confrmed,
some of those in attendance
said that Breton was the one
who asked the members of
9.12 to attend the meeting
that night. Generally, when
public input is allowed during
a meeting, the chairman
will limit the amount of time
someone is allowed to speak.
Breton did not put any such
limits on those who came to
the podium to oppose Sinnott’s
proposal. Breton also allowed
the barrage on Sinnott to
continue without interceding.
As of press time, a specifc
date had not yet been set for
the continued discussion on
the “Sustainable Communities
Initiative.” The meeting date
will be posted on the offcial
town website when it becomes
available.
Involvement in Regional Planning - continued from page 3
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Pelham - Windham News | May 4, 2012 - 6
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Locally owned & operated in
Pelham.
978-265-2923 4/20-5/11/12
K.H. CONSTRUCTION-
Remodeling Specialists.
Replacement windows &
doors, Roofng, Siding,
Kitchen, Bathroom,
Basements. Tile & Hardwood
fooring.
Licensed & Insured. Tel:
603-234-7569 3/16-5/4/12
KME PAINTING LLC.
Why Remodel? Painting is
quicker, cleaner and better
bang for the buck. Interior,
exterior, home improvement.
Quality work at a fair price.
Fully insured, call for a free
estimate. 603-759-5680
4/27-5/11/1
START to FINISH Home
Repair: Home repairs,
additions, remodels, and
basement specialist. Free
estimates, insured. Call Ed at
603-305-3355. 4/13-5/4/12
INSTRUCTION
GUITAR/BASS and Ukulele
teacher: New students, frst
lesson free, Berklee graduate,
35 years teaching experience,
all styles and all levels.
Rentals available. References
supplied. Your house or mine.
John, 978-975-0335, www.
merrimackvalleyguitar.com 4/27-
6/15/12
JUNK REMOVAL
JUNK REMOVAL. Call us
for all your Junk Removal
needs. Small or big, we take
it all. Call John, 603-889-
7173, 978-758-8371. www.
junkoutnh.com
5/4-5/11/12
SUMMER SPECIAL– Up to
40% of junk removal services.
TV’s, furniture, appliances,
construction debris. We
take all junk. Lowest price
guaranteed! Pick-ups for as
low as $35. Call: Trash Can
Willy’s,
603-389-9246.
www.trash-can-willys.com
5/4-5/25/12
LANDSCAPING
AAA LANDSCAPING:
Lawn Mowing, Most lawns
$30-45, Spring Clean-ups,
Walkways, Patios, Walls,
Irrigation, Fence Installation,
Fully Insured, Free Estimates.
Call, 603-759-4591, www.
jasonsAAAlandscaping.com. 4/27-
5/18/12
ACCENT LAWN Services-
Spring clean-ups, dethatching,
mow and trim as low as
$30.00. Free Estimates.
603-890-1223 4/13-5/4/12
Free fertilizing service
with mowing contract.
603-635-1378
Spring Clean-ups
We will meet or beat any
competitors’ pricing by
10% or more!
Advanced
Landscape Design
www.ahandyco.com
ALL ABOUT MOWINGS:
Now scheduling weekly and
biweekly mowings. We also
do brush removal, spring
clean-ups and mulching. Free
estimates, fully insured.
Call John, 603-889-7173,
978-758-8371 5/4-5/25/12
LANDSCAPING
Fully Insured -
Free Estimates
Complete Property
Maintenance &
Installation
603-234-2630
B.K.C. Landscaping B.K.C. Landscaping
www.bkclandscaping.com
603-860-4276
Spring is Coming!
Complete Landscape Maintenance
Brick & Stone: Retaining Walls,
Patios, Walkways,
Lawn Mowing, Fertilization, etc.
www.emeraldgreenlandscapingnh.com
FIRST CHOICE
LANDSCAPING is now
scheduling Spring Clean-ups.
We ofer leaf clean-ups, brush
removal, and tree removal.
Also get your quotes today for
walk-ways, patios, and walls.
We also ofer Bobcat Services,
irrigation and new lawn
installation. Call Chris at
231-2483 for your free
estimate today! 4/13-5/4/12
JOEY’S LANDSCAPING:
Spring Clean-ups, Lawn
Maintenance, Shrubs
Trimmed, Fertilizing,
Mulching and Snow Plowing.
603-560-8183 4/27-5/4/12
Spring Clean-Ups
Tree Service, Bobcat Service
Irrigation, Walls, Walkways,
Landscape Design,
Free Estimates
603-305-6845
Fully
Insured
MC/Visa
accepted!
LANDSCAPING
LANDSCAPING
Complete Property Maintenance
Or call Gary –
603-883-1028 603-490-7757
Hydroseeding, Loaming, Mulching

www.pelhamlandscaping.com
Pelham - Fully Insured - Free Estimates
Spring Clean Up &
Thatching ~ 10% OFF!
visit
ROTOTILLING SERVICES:
Any size garden, quality
machine, excellent results, free
estimates. Call Paul, 305-
1716. 4/13-5/4/12
SOLID FILL – Dirt cheep.
Call 603-598-2608.
4/20-5/11/12 AR
POOL SERVICES
LINER REPLACEMENT
and Repairs, pool removals,
13 years+ experience. Call
Dan, 603-765-1818. 5/4-5/25/12
SERVICES
IN-TUNE Piano Services,
Certifed Piano Technician.
Tuning, Repair, Regulation,
Appraisals, Rebuilding.
603-429-6368.
randy@in-tunepiano.com,
www.in-tunepiano.com.
4/6-5/25/12 AR
T.J. MALLEY Electric:
Service Work is Our Specialty.
Authorized GENERAC
Dealer. Major Credit Cards
Accepted. Call today!!
603-595-2970 www.
MalleyElectric.com
5/4-5/25/12
WANTED
A’s UNWANTED Scrap
metal, cars and trucks, lawn
tractors, washers and dryers,
hot-water tanks, etc. Will
pick up. Call Steve at
261-5452. 4/27-5/4/12
Delivering over 36,000 copies to homes weekly
Read by over 100,000 people


Delivering over 36,000 copies to homes weekly
Read by over 100,000 people



Delivering over 36,000 copies to homes weekly
Read by over 100,000 people


Delivering over 36,000 copies to homes weekly
Read by over 100,000 people

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$10/week - up to 20 words
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$37 for 4 weeks
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Email text to:
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Town of Pelham
Pelham Public Library
Under NH RSA 202-A:4-c (III), the Pelham Public Library Board of Trustees
hereby provides notice that the Board will meet on Monday, May 14, 2012
at 4:30pm in the Law Reading Room of the Pelham Public Library for the
purpose of accepting unanticipated moneys donated by Anna M. Beaudoin
in the amount of $47,266.44. This amount will be placed in a trust entitled
the “Anna M. Beaudoin Book Fund” and will be an “income -only” trust for
the purpose of purchasing books for the Library.
PUBLIC NOTICES
Town of Pelham
Board of Adjustment
Legal Notice
Notice is hereby given that a hearing will be held Monday, May 14, 2012 at
7:00 p.m. at the Pelham Town Hall, 6 Village Green, to hear the following
petitions:
Case #ZO2012-00008 WUNDERLICH, Richard and Kathleen, 501 Bridge
Street Map 22 Lot 8-109-2 seeking a Variance to Article III, Section 307-12,
Table 1 to permit a second commercial building to be constructed 15’ from
a lot with a minimum of 30’ required on a lot having only 196’ +/- of
frontage with 200’ required on a 1.5 acres +/- lot in the business zone.
Case #ZO2012-00009 LISTER, Carol and LEHANE, Kevin, 79 Marsh Road
Map 28 Lot 7-135-1 seeking a Variance to Article III, Section 307-12, Table
1 to permit a two family dwelling to be constructed on a lot having 67,065
sqft. with 87,120 sqft. minimum required.
Case #ZO2012-00010 LEONARD, Paul and Russell, Chagnon Lane Map 35
Lot 6-105 seeking a Variance to Article III, Sections 307-12 and 307-14 to
permit the approval of two lots on an approved road with frontage of less
than the required 200ft.
Betty M. (Ebert) Foster Joaquim,
86, of Derry, died April 29, 2012, in
her home.
Born and educated in Salem, she
graduated from Woodbury High
School and St. Joseph School of
Nursing in Lowell, MA.
Betty was a member of Calvary
Bible Church in Derry. She enjoyed
the ocean and the mountains, and
she was a loving and dedicated
mother, wife and daughter. She took
care of her mother, father, and son in
the home. The most important things in Betty’s
life were her love of God and her family.
She was predeceased by her husbands, Rene
Labrecque and John Foster; her son, Robert
Labrecque; and siblings, Marion Dickey and
Lauren Ebert.
She is survived by her husband, Joseph
Joaquim of Derry; sons, Rene Labrecque and
his wife Anna of Port Orange, FL, Charles Foster
and wife Yvonne of Kingston; daughters, Gayle
Mangano of Derry, Marilou and her husband
William Dickey Jr. of Salem, Dorothy Lynelle
Bartlett of Manheim, PA, Linda and her husband
Paul Schumann of Waldoboro,
MA, Gayle and her husband
Richard Lizotte of Goffstown;
stepchildren, Joseph Joaquim and
wife Mary Ann of Revere, MA,
Jeffrey Joaquim and wife Brenda of
Windham, Jerry Joaquim and fancé
Cathy Underwood of Windham,
James Joaquim and wife Cheryl of
Windham, Angela and husband
Richard Grondin of Milan, Brenda
Sullivan and Jim Lynch of Exeter,
Cheryl and husband Jason Rogers of
Windham, and Darlene and husband Douglas
Baker of Methuen, MA; many grandchildren and
great-grandchildren.
Funeral services were held on May 3 at the
Douglas and Johnson Funeral Home, followed
by burial in Pine Grove Cemetery, Salem.
Memorial donations may be made to Sonshine
Kitchen, 4 Crystal Avenue, Derry, NH, 03038
or Calvary Bible Church, 145 Hampstead Road,
Derry, NH 03038.
To send a message of condolence to the
family, please view the obituary at www.
douglasandjohnson.com.
Betty M. (Ebert) Foster Joaquim
Nancy G. (Gremminger) Carr, 79, of
Salem, beloved Mother and Nana, died
April 26, 2012, at Merrimack Valley
Hospital in Haverhill, MA.
Nancy was born and educated in
Wisconsin, the daughter of the late Esther
(Beyer) and Leo Gremminger. Before
moving to Salem 10 years ago, she had
lived in Lowell, MA.
Nancy retired from the IRS in Andover,
MA, where she had worked for 20 years.
She was a member of the Red Hatters Club.
She was an avid reader and loved spending
time with her children and grandchildren.
Nancy also loved her cats. She was at her
happiest preparing wonderful home cooked
meals for her loving family.
She was predeceased by her husband,
Richard Carr, Jr.; her son, Michael Carr; her
grandson, Christopher Flaherty; and her
brothers, Jack and Neal Gremminger.
She is survived by her sons, Richard
Carr and his wife Karen of Windham,
and Steven Carr and his wife Christine
of Lynnfeld, MA; her daughter, Karen
Flaherty of Derry; her sister, Georgia
Petersen of Campbellsport, WI; her
grandchildren, Rick, Jeff and his fancé
Colleen, Steven, Ethan and Katherine; three
great-grandchildren and many nieces and
nephews.
There are no calling hours. A Funeral
Mass will be celebrated on Saturday, May
5, at 10:30 a.m. at Mary Queen of Peace
Church.
In lieu of fowers, contributions in
Nancy’s memory may be made to St. Jude’s
Children’s Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude
Place, Memphis, TN 38105.
Arrangements are under the direction of
Douglas and Johnson Funeral Home, 214
Main Street, Salem. To send a message of
condolence to the family, please view the
obituary at www.douglasandjohnson.com.
Nancy G. (Gremminger) Carr
Obituary
Obituaries
Rosalie (Goolkasian) Gattinella,
73, of Windham died peacefully
April 29, 2012, at Parkland Medical
Center, Derry, with her family at her
side.
She was born in Lawrence, MA,
where she grew up and attended
schools. She was a resident of
Windham for the past 48 years.
Mrs. Gattinella was a homemaker
and was a member of St. Matthew’s
Parish in Windham. She loved
cooking, entertaining friends
and family, and gardening.
Most of all, Rosalie loved
caring for her family, and loved
taking care of her children and
grandchildren.
She was predeceased by
her husband, Concetto “Jack”
Gattinella.
She is survived by her sons,
Peter and his wife Wendy
Gattinella of Kingston, Jack
and his wife Dana Gattinella
of Windham; daughters,
Leanne and her husband
Nathan DeCotis of Windham,
and Ann Marie Vallee of
Manchester; grandchildren,
Matthew, Braydan, Arianna,
Sienna, Gianna, Sophia,
and Charmaine; and great-
granddaughter, Leah.
A Funeral Mass was celebrated
on May 3 at St. Matthew Parish,
Windham, followed by burial in
Cemetery on the Plain, Windham.
The Douglas & Johnson Funeral
Home in Salem had care of the
arrangements. To send a message
of condolence to the family,
please view the obituary at www.
douglasandjohnson.com.
Rosalie (Goolkasian) Gattinella
energy and according to Tom McGee,
who spends a lot of time with Molly,
“she is great for an active family”, citing
hiking and mountain climbing as family
activities that Molly would love to be a
part of. Similarly, Mia is
also an Australian Cattle
Dog, who is incredibly
affectionate, smart and
full of energy; “they’re just
meant to have a
job,” noted McGee.
And certainly not
to exclude the
Labs, brothers Joe
and Rocky were
there looking for
a new home. The
Labrador Retriever
(mix) pair was
also parading the
grounds looking
for that special
someone to adopt
them.
And fnally, a
recent arrival that
certainly stole
my heart was
Cora, a Shepard-
Border Collie
mix. According to
Katherine Curry,
a volunteer for
the day, Cora is
13 weeks old and has
all her shots. Having arrived in
Pelham, just hours earlier from
South Carolina, Cora is certainly
worth checking out, as is the entire
Pelham facility. The pet adoption
day is typically held on the last
Saturday of each month. For more
information on bringing one of these dogs
into your life and for the entire adoption
process, contact the Pelham Animal
Holding Facility at 233-4801 or go to
www.arnne.org
Pelham - Windham News | May 4, 2012 - 7
Outdoors
Outdoors
with with
Charlie Chalk
Charlie Chalk
Charlie Chalk
FOR WOMEN
Crossroads Mall, Londonderry, NH
603-216-5782
We take pride in our friendly, non intimidating environment!
NOW OPEN FOR TOURS
AND REGISTRATION!
weight and interval training in
small group,one hour training
sessions for as little as
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We offer a variety of programs for
women with different abilities, ages
and interests, each of which is customized
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Recieve 1 month free when you sign
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Nashua
(29 Northwest Blvd.)
Hudson
(300 Derry Rd.)
Merrimack
(696 DW Highway)
Pelham
(Summer 2012)
When you can’t wait to feel better,
call 603-577-CARE.
For life’s “not-so-good”
combinations.
When life’s minor illnesses and injuries occur you can count on Immediate Care
of Southern New Hampshire—providing medical care that is quick, convenient
and affordable. For more information, visit www.immediatecareofsnh.org.
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Pub: Hudson-Li t chf i el d News & Pel ham Wi ndham News
Si ze: 6 x 7” ( 11. 625” x 7” )
Sect i on: FF, RHP
I nser t i on: 5/ 4/ 2012
Pl ease di r ect al l quest i ons about ar t wor k/ f i l es t o:
Squar e Spot Desi gn- Li sa Lei dy- 603-625-6003
l i sa@squar espot st udi o. com
Sout her n NH Medi cal Cent er
Ti t l e: I mmedi at e Car e - Socks
Arnne- continued from front page
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This year, 2012, marks the 75th anniversary of the passage of the
landmark Pittman-Robertson Act. In 1932, Congress authorized an
excise tax on frearms and ammunition that went into the general
treasury of the United States. Five years later, with the passage of
Pittman-Robertson, those excise taxes had to be passed on to state
game agencies for the exclusive use of funding programs designed to
improve wildlife habitat, as well as improve hunter access.
Here’s a look at the state of game populations and hunting
opportunities at the time Pittman-Robertson was passed:
• In 1937, 11 states had no open seasons for deer and three others
only had local seasons. Missouri’s deer season was only three days
long.
• No states had dedicated archery or muzzleloader seasons.
Here’s how things stand now:
• Today, virtually every state boasts lengthy deer seasons.
• Missouri hunters enjoy more than 123 days of hunting for deer each
year.
• Special archery-only and muzzleloader-only seasons are held in
nearly every state.
Even considering recent declines in the total number of hunters,
there is still more than twice the number of hunters in 2010 than there
were in 1937.
Celebrate the passage of the Pittman-Robertson Act and all it has
done for hunters and wildlife.
Charlie Chalk can be reached at
outdoorswithcharlie@areanewsgroup.com
Pitman-Robertson Act
Marks 75 Years
Bryant, wearing his Nationals baseball cap, pets Joe,
a Labrador Retriever (mix) during the ARNNE pet
adoption day in Pelham on Saturday, April 28
Showing afection and sending out kisses is Molly, an Australian
Kelpie, Cattle Dog (mix); according to Steve McGee who
is holding Molly, “she’s a sweetie.”
submitted by Ken Eyring, Southern NH 9.12
Imagine hearing the news that you or a loved one has just been
diagnosed with brain cancer. A surreal feeling overtakes you as a
food of uncertainty rushes through your mind. You try to process
all of the conficting emotions while felding questions that you are
bombarded with by the doctors – pushing you for decisions on their
recommended procedures. Time is short as you try to come to grips
with the fact that life hangs in the balance. The weight on your
shoulders grows exponentially as the frightening reality sinks in that
it is your responsibility to make the life or death decisions.
If you are like most Americans, you will feel helpless, unprepared
and completely reliant on the advice of a few individuals.
It is only after situations like this, that hindsight is 20/20, and
(many times) we wish that some of the decisions we made were
different. This is what happened to Mark Lutter and his wife when
their two year old daughter Alexa, was diagnosed with brain cancer
last year.
While Alexa is now cancer free, the surgery produced numerous
complications and Mark is haunted by the fact that many of their
decisions were made without the beneft of knowing all of the
available facts and options. It is his desire to educate others, and
to share why some of their decisions would have been different had
they known then, what they know now.
Please join us at the next Southern NH 9.12 meeting on Tuesday,
May 8, at 7 p.m. at the Windham Senior Center, 2 North Lowell
Road. This meeting is free and open to the public, snacks and
refreshments will be served, and everyone is encouraged to attend.
Learn About One Family’s Fight Against Cancer





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Pelham~Windham
Pelham~Windham Pelham~Windham
Sports
Sports Sports
Pelham~Windham
Pelham~Windham Pelham~Windham
Sports
Sports Sports
Python Baseball Faces Tough Second Half of Season
by Marc Ayotte
Not that the frst half of the season has been a
walk in the park with Yogi and Boo-Boo, but the
remainder of the Pelham baseball schedule looks
daunting to say the least; with games against
number three Portsmouth and undefeated Hollis-
Brookline scheduled to take place before the ink
on this paper fully dries. The Pythons will also
have to face the H-B Cavaliers again on May 9 in
Pelham in their quest to qualify for post-season
play.
In an attempt to not ‘borrow trouble,’ let’s
instead focus on the recent accomplishments of
the Python nine. On April 27, Pelham started
their win streak, albeit a modest two- gamer, with
a 7-2 road decision over Coe-Brown and followed
that up three days later with a convincing 6-0
blanking of Oyster River, also on foreign soil. In
keeping things real however, the Pythons did
begin the week back on April 25 with a home
feld loss to Bedford by the score of 7-1.
The Bull Dogs came into Pelham with a solid
4-2 mark, losers to only Hollis-Brookline and
Goffstown, who currently have a combined 13-1
win-loss record. The Pythons, with Nick Roussel
on the hill stayed close through three complete,
trailing 3-1. But a three run sixth and one in the
fnal frame put the game out of reach for Pelham.
Although they were only able to push one
runner across the plate, there was considerable
improvement in the batter’s box, as the Pythons
were able to collect a total of eight hits on the day.
Leading Pelham at the plate was Alex Newton,
who was perfect on the day, going 3 for 3. Devin
DeCarteret and Pat McLean each went 2-3, while
David Bronson stroked a two-bagger in going 1-3.
With the loss, Pelham slipped to 1-6 in the D-II
standings.
In Northwood, the Pythons struck early and
often against Coe-Brown. A Justin Moran RBI
single driving in Bronson followed later in the
inning by a Nick Roussel sac fy driving in Evan
Sage, gave Pelham the 2-0 frst inning lead.
With one in the second, and three more in the
third, Pelham jumped out to a comfortable 6-0
lead before the home team answered back with
a harmless single run in their half of the third.
David Bronson was the starter and winner for
Pelham, throwing four innings, allowing fve hits,
zero earned runs while fanning six. With the win,
Bronson improved to 2-0 on the year. Adding a
nice touch to the Pelham victory was the relief
performance by Ryan Frank. Celebrating his 16th
birthday, Frank fred three innings of one hit ball,
striking out two in picking up his frst varsity save.
Offensively, Pelham once again mustered up
eight hits, with Justin Moran and Alex Newton
leading the way with a multi-hit game. Moran
slapped out three singles, knocking in a run as
well as scoring a run and Newton’s RBI and run
came as a result of his two singles. Pat McLean
contributed nicely with a single, two ribbies and a
run scored. Jake Vaiknoras (RBI), Evan Sage (run),
and David Bronson (run) each recorded singles as
well.
In what Coach Billy Beauchesne referred to as
“by far, the best game we’ve played as a team” the
Pythons received a complete game performance
from Justin Moran on the hill in their 6-0 blanking
of host Oyster River. Moran, in going the distance
for his shutout, allowed only two hits, fanned fve
Bobcats and did not allow a single base on balls.
“The defense was absolutely phenomenal,”
exclaimed Beauchesne in the win. Depicting the
Python coach’s claim was the 5-4-3 double play
gem turned in by Nick Roussel, Chris Gamble
and Devin DeCarteret, respectively. With Pelham
owning a 1-0 lead after scoring in the top of the
frst, Moran surrendered one of his two hits on
the day in the second inning. But the Python trio
quickly squashed any chance of a Coe-Brown
rally by turning two.
Pelham effectively put the game away by
scoring three runs in the third. A leadoff double
by Jake Vaiknoras and a single by David Bronson
(2-4, 2 runs) created a runners on frst and third
scenario. After Bronson picked up one of his two
steals on the day by claiming second base, Evan
Sage (1-3, run) plated both he and Vaiknoras with
a two RBI triple.
Additionally, Alex Newton remained hot at the
plate, going 3 for 4, highlighted by his two RBI
single in the ffth. Nick Roussel, Newton and
Pat McLean each recorded stolen bases for the
Pythons. With the back-to-back wins, Pelham
improved to 3-6 on the year. Pelham’s next
home game is on May 7 when they face Sanborn
Regional.
Alex Newton banged-out fve hits in Pelham’s two wins this
past week; here, Newton beats out a bunt in a home game
against Bedford
Pitcher Nick Roussel makes a nice play, coming of the mound and fipping the ball to Pelham frst baseman
Devin DeCarteret in time to get the Bull dog runner at frst
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Python Boys’ Tennis; Snakes in the Tall Grass;
Smith & Taylor Remain Undefeated
by Marc Ayotte
According to an ancient Chinese proverb, “He who was
bitten by a snake avoids tall grass.” Nine matches into the
season, the Pelham boys’ tennis team fnds itself slithering
around, if not in the tall grass, at least on the tennis courts
normally reserved for the big guns of Bedford, Portsmouth
and Hanover. And as a consequence, opponents just
might not be taking the Pythons quite so lightly this season.
As the calendar turned a page into the frst day of May, the
Pythons inarguably led NH Division II tennis in team wins
with eight. Granted, Pelham will not face the Bull dogs
nor the Marauders during the regular season, and where
they ultimately stand in the pack will come to light in early
May, when they face the Clippers of Portsmouth.
The last eight state titles in Division II (or equivalent)
have gone the way of perennial powerhouses Hanover
(5), Bedford (2), and Portsmouth (1). Nonetheless, Pelham
has fourished since a season opening loss to cross-town
Windham. Now, all being said, Windham has since
incurred a 9-0 thrashing to Portsmouth, proving that the
top three teams really are the elite in this division. But
with the potent 1-2 punch of Matt Smith and Jared Taylor,
who through the frst nine matches remain undefeated
in their respective singles matches, as well as together as
doubles partners, the Pythons are making quite a name
for themselves; ranked ffth, just percentage points behind
Bedford in the rating category.
In a home match on April 25, the Pythons improved to
seven wins against the single loss with a 6-3 team victory
over Goffstown. Number one seed Matt Smith kept his
perfect season in tact with an 8-0 beat down of Marty
Pelletier in Pelham’s best performance of the day. Second
seeded Jared Taylor grabbed a 7-4 lead before fnally
fending-off the Grizzlie’s Pat Bruzqua, 8-6 to also stay
undefeated. Pelham received singles match victories from
number three seed Adam Duff-Marsh who defeated Kyle
Arnold, 8-4, and Andrew Janocha who edged out Grant
Caine, 8-6 in a number six seed match. Smith and Taylor
clinched the win for the home team with their doubles
play while Duff-Marsh/Janocha added a little frosting to the
cake with their 8-0 blanking of Sheehan/Tardiff.
In closing out the month of April, Pelham faced
Souhegan in the middle match of their three match home
stand. The Pythons won their seventh consecutive match,
improving their team record to 8-1, by emerging with a
slim 5-4 win over the Sabers. Adam Duff-Marsh, adding to
wins from Smith (8-0) and Taylor (8-6), gave the Pythons a
nice 3-0 lead in the team scoring, when he posted a solid
8-3 win over Jason Emmond.
After Smith and Taylor easily won their ninth straight
doubles match, it took Ben Harris and Jared Labonte’s 9-8
(7-4 tiebreaker) doubles win to provide the necessary ffth
team point, giving Pelham its eight win of the season.
Unbeaten number one seed Matt Smith (Pelham) shows a nice touch,
dropping a volley softly over the net for a point against Gofstown’s
Marty Pelletier
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Area News Group
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Home
Improvement
Home
Improvement
Pelham - Windham News | May 4, 2012 - 9
Replace or Repair?
That’s the Home Improvement Question
Maintenance and improvement are both essential realities of
home ownership. From windows and skylights to gas ranges and
front doors, everything in your home will eventually need some
work. But how do you know when something simply needs
repair, or merits being replaced?
Of course, each situation will be as unique as the home in
which it occurs - and as individual as the homeowners them-
selves. A few good rules of thumb, however, do apply in most
cases. When you’re considering repair or replacement, ask
yourself these questions:
* How old is the malfunctioning item?
* How extensive/pervasive is the problem?
* Will the cost of repair approach the cost of replacement?
* Which course - repair or replace - will yield the maximum
energy effciency?
* How does the cost of repair measure up to the value it
will provide? How does replacement stack up using the same
measure?
To help you get an idea of how these rules apply, here’s what
some experts have to say about home elements that frequently
raise the repair/replace question:
Skylights
While many modern skylights are energy-effcient, qualify
to use the Energy Star mark and are leak-free, if you have an older,
plastic model it’s probably a good idea to replace it. Not only are
these older plastic bubble-type skylights often faded and unsightly,
reducing visibility, they are not UV resistant, are not energy effcient,
and are much more likely to leak.
“There are millions of those unattractive, cracked and yellowed
plastic skylights still out there,” says Ross Vandermark, national
product manager of VELUX America, which markets the warranted
“No-Leak Skylight.” “Replacing them with new energy-effcient,
double-pane (insulating) glass models is quick and easy. They don’t
leak, they look better, they reduce UV rays and provide substantial
energy savings.”
In fact, based on an estimate of 15 cents per kwh/hr, replacing an
old plastic skylight with an Energy Star-qualifed VELUX skylight can
save a 2,000-square-foot home about $194 a year on cooling costs,
a company study shows. Add skylight blinds - which are available in
a variety of styles that can be remote-controlled, including blackout
to block light, light fltering to diffuse light, or Venetian to adjust light
- and the energy savings can be enhanced even more. And blinds in
colors and patterns can add a fresh look to your room decor. What’s
more, depending on the age and condition of even older glass
skylights, it’s not a bad idea to consider a modern, more energy ef-
fcient model. To learn more about replacement skylights, visit www.
veluxusa.com.
Windows
Recent research shows that skylights and vertical windows can
work well together to effectively daylight a home while contributing
to heating and cooling energy savings.
Like skylights, windows have vastly improved in energy effciency
over the past few decades. Leaky, ineffcient windows can be a ma-
jor source of heat loss in a home, boosting energy bills and decreas-
ing the comfort level indoors. Window manufacturer Pella points
to these signs that old windows need to be replaced:
* They’re diffcult to open or close.
* You can feel air leaking in or out around them.
* Condensation or fogging occurs on or between glass panes.
* You can see chipping, deterioration or water stains on the
window or the wall around it.
* Cleaning is a major chore and you avoid it because of the
diffculty.
* It’s diffcult or impossible to fnd replacement parts for the
old windows.
The Effcient Windows Collaborative (www.effcientwindows.
org) site also provides extensive information on selecting both
windows and skylights, including fact sheets and computer
simulations for typical houses using a variety of windows in a
number of U.S. cities.
Heating, ventilation and air cooling
Furnaces and air conditioning units are among the most
important parts of your home’s infrastructure; they’re directly
responsible for the comfort level and air quality inside your
home. They’re also among the more costly items to repair or
replace.
So how do you know when it’s time to replace part of your
heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system? EnergyStar.
gov offers these guidelines:
* If your heat pump or air conditioner is older than 10 years.
* Your furnace or boiler is more than 15 years old.
* Your energy bills are spiking.
* Equipment needs frequent repair.
* Some rooms are too hot while others are too cold.
* The HVAC system is very noisy.
* Your home is very dusty.
Replacing older HVAC systems with newer, Energy Star-qualifed
ones can signifcantly impact your heating and cooling costs, ac-
cording to EnergyStar.gov. An Energy Star-qualifed heat pump or
AC unit can save up to 20 percent on heating and cooling costs, the
website says. You can learn more at www.energystar.gov.
- ARA Content
Replacing older skylights with more energy efcient models,
and adding remote-controlled blinds, is an attractive and cost efective home upgrade.
and Gardens, “growing your own fruits, veggies and herbs
is something Americans are doing in record numbers this
season.”
“It’s cheaper to grow your own produce than buy it - one
$3 tomato plant will yield pounds of produce all season
long,” Jimerson says. “Plus, the produce you grow just tastes
better than even your grocer’s best. And while it’s healthy to
eat and grow your own, gardening is rapidly gaining popu-
larity as a great way to get some exercise, relieve stress and
spend healthful family bonding time.”
Eating foods grown in your own backyard means you
won’t be contributing to the carbon footprint left behind by
the “food miles” it takes to bring imported produce to your
local grocers - so you’re helping the environment, too.
Growing vegetables is easier than you think. Plan it
properly, and you can enjoy a healthy, homegrown harvest
from the fruits of your labor - without having to spend hours
tending it.
Gardening 101
Sunshine is suste-
nance - Vegetables
need at least six hours
of full sun per day. The
easiest thing to do is to
place your garden in
full sunlight. Make sure
it’s easily accessible for
watering; if the garden is
too far from your house
it could get neglected.
Check the last frost date
in your region and wait
until threat of frost is
past before you begin
planting.
No yard necessary
- Gardening doesn’t
require a lot of room -
although if you have the
space and time to go
large, go for it!. Many
popular vegetables and
herbs grow just fne in
containers, making them
a great option for those
with limited space. For
smaller yards, raised beds are an easy, low-maintenance op-
tion. If your garden is going right into the ground, just turn
the earth with a shovel, toss out roots and rocks, mix in a
soil amendment for healthy soil, and plant.
Water relief - Water regularly, but avoid doing so during
the heat of the day when evaporation will diminish the ef-
fectiveness of irrigation. Water to wet the soil about 8 inches
deep, but don’t over-water.
Feed your food - All edible plants draw nutrients from the
ground, and can quickly exhaust the soil without the help of
a fertilizer. Always follow label directions.
Growing for it
Now that you’ve got an idea of the basics, it’s time to pick
your plants.
Start with transplants - seedlings are way easier to get
growing than seeds, so you’ll save loads of time and enjoy
improved success. Fortunately, national purveyors like Bon-
nie Plants make it easy to fnd hardy, high-quality, regionally
appropriate plants at your local garden retailers. Bonnie of-
fers time-tested vegetable and herb favorites, as well as new
varieties, in eco-friendly, biodegradable pots that not only
reduce plastic waste in landflls,
they reduce transplant shock.
Simply tear off the bottom of
the pot and set the whole thing
- plant in pot - directly into the
ground. Be sure to pay close
attention to plant tags, they’re
packed with facts and details to
help you successfully grow your
plants.
Here are some favorites to
consider for your garden:
* Tomatoes - The most
popular, most-grown vegetable,
tomatoes are always a best
bet. Disease-resistant Bonnie
Original is a hardy, favorful ad-
dition to any backyard garden.
For containers or small spots,
try Sweet n’ Neat, a prolifc
plant that sets fruit in grape-like
clusters.
* Basil - The perfect comple-
ment to tomatoes, basil works
well in gardens and containers.
New Greek Columnar Basil
is particularly bountiful, as it
grows high, leafs out densely
and rarely fowers. The favor
blends traditional basil with
spicy overtones of cinnamon,
allspice and cloves.
* Bell peppers - Versatile,
favorful and nutritious, bell pep-
pers are great raw snacks and
make an awesome ingredient
for a variety of cuisines. Harvest
peppers when they’re green or
red when the vitamin levels are
higher.
* Eggplant - Black Beauty is
the quintessential eggplant with
a deep purple, glossy skin and
meaty texture, and thrives in hot
weather. White-skinned varieties
like Cloud Nine offer a sweeter,
bitter-free fesh.
* Mints - Easy-to-grow mints
are available in traditional spear-
mint and peppermint and in
more exotic favors like Bonnie
Plant’s new apple mint, orange
mint and even chocolate mint,
which has a favor that echoes
the classic Girl Scout cookie.
Hefty
harvest - The
general rule: If
it looks good
enough to eat,
it probably is.
With many
vegetables,
the more you
pick, the more
the plant will
produce. For
more garden-
ing tips, ideas
and advice,
visit www.bon-
nieplants.com.
- ARA
Content
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May 4, 2012
Page 10
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Who would have thought getting dirt under your fngernails would ever be considered one of the hottest trends going? According to Doug Jimerson, garden core director for Better Homes
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Page 11
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Tips for Refreshing
Your Home with Paint Color
For many people, the onset of spring
and summer is the ideal time to take on
a home improvement project. Paint is
a popular choice for those looking to
freshen up their space, given that it is an
easy, economical activity and a fun way to
make a dramatic difference.
In fact, painting tops spring home
improvement wish lists, according to the
2012 Spring Home Improvement Survey
by the National Association of the Re-
modeling Industry (NARI). With seven of
10 homeowners planning home improve-
ment projects, nearly half (49 percent) cite
painting as the most-desired need. They
say that bedrooms and bathrooms are the
frst targets for fresh paint (both at 29 per-
cent), followed by living or family rooms
(28 percent).
To help people jump start spring
endeavors with low-cost project ideas
and tips, NARI and Sherwin-Williams
are launching National Painting Week on
April 16. “People are looking for more
cost-saving ways to enhance their spaces,”
says NARI chairman Paul Zuch, certifed
remodeler. “Some of the most dramatic
transformations are projects like resur-
facing cabinets or changing kitchen or
bathroom hardware, as well as painting
the interior or exterior of your home.”
With today’s technologies at your fn-
gertips, determining the right paint color is
easy and anyone can be their own interior
decorator.
* Choose colors like a pro using co-
ordinated color collections. “It’s easy to
achieve designer looks in your own home
with HGTV HOME by Sherwin-Williams,”
says David Bromstad, HGTV designer.
“Each of the collections represents a style
to match your own, and features colors
that work together in any combination.
The wallpaper coordinates with the colors
and the exterior color collections high-
light your home’s architecture to achieve
a harmonious look room to room, inside
and out.”
* See your fnished look without picking
up a brush with Sherwin-Williams’ color
visualizer, where you can digitally repaint
your space, or get inspired with Chip It!
(www.letschipit.com), which instantly
turns any online image into a color palette
using more than 1,500 colors. With the
mobile ColorSnap app, you can turn any-
thing that inspires you into paint colors.
Capture an image with your smartphone
and you will be able to see the paint color
and two complementary colors.
* Liven up your living area by revamp-
ing the bedroom, giving new life to an old
piece of furniture or staining the deck.
* Defne your style. Make a statement
combining bolder paint colors with their
neutral counterparts.
* Use high-quality materials. Spending a
little more at the outset saves money in the
long run.
For more tips, visit www.NationalPaint-
ingWeek.com.
Don’t Let Garden Insects Destroy the Fruits of Your Labor
Gardeners are familiar with the joy of
planting and nurturing fowers, fruits and
vegetables to maturity and the bliss of
harvesting nature’s bounty. One of the few
things that can make that bliss turn into
annoyance is an infestation of bugs. While
many insects are benefcial to the garden,
others can be very destructive. Arm yourself
with the facts for handling insects in your
garden this growing season.
Benefcial pollinator bugs like bees may
be welcomed guests, but their destructive
cousins can have devastating effects on even
the healthiest garden. There is nothing worse
than having a cucumber vine wither just
before harvesting the frst crop, or picking
a breath-taking rose just to fnd it covered
with aphids.
Aphids, mealy bugs, mites, thrips, slugs,
snails and cutworms are some of the most
problematic garden insects across the coun-
try. Keep these and other pesky insects from
“bugging” you and destroying your garden
this summer.
Know the enemy:
Having the ability to identify problem
insects in the garden is a big step toward
overcoming them. Proper bug identifcation
is key to protecting your plants and veggies.
Also check your plants for symptoms to
help identify the visitors to your garden. Is
something eating seedlings at night? Maybe
you have cutworms. Are plants’ leaves look-
ing like lace? Sounds like Japanese beetles.
Look around and see what is there. Find-
ing an effective treatment is easy once you
know what you are actually dealing with.
Plant wisely:
Sometimes the simplest bug prevention
is using a few smart tips when planting or
caring for a garden. Remember to clean up
all plant debris at the end of the growing
season to discourage insects from wintering
over in the veggie patch.
Another easy tip is to consider planting
fowers among fruits and vegetables. Flow-
ers look great and will attract benefcial
bugs that pollinate, like bees, but will also
attract bugs that will eat pests, like ladybugs.
Rotating crops can also prevent recurring
insect problems. This will discourage last
year’s insects that may have wintered over
from sticking around because the crop they
found so delicious is no longer present.
Seek advice:
Do not be afraid to ask for help. Local
gardeners and extension agents make great
resources. Ask around and see what others
have used that worked.
Your grandma may have used cans to
keep cutworms from eating the seedlings
in her garden. Simply cut both ends off
of some cans and
place them around
seedlings when
transplanting to cre-
ate a protective bar-
rier from cutworms,
slugs and snails
while plants are get-
ting established.
If your neighbor
has had success
using row-covers
placed on crops
that are targeted by
certain local pests,
then that may also
work for you. Just
be sure to leave the
covers off for part of
the day to allow for
pollination.
For more infor-
mation and to fnd
solutions quickly,
download the Ortho
Problem Solver App
from the iTunes
store.
Fight back:
When nothing else seems to be working,
take serious action by fnding the appropri-
ate pest control for your garden and your
situation. Home remedies, organic solu-
tions or more conventional means of insect
controls in the fower or vegetable garden
are all options available.
Ortho Flower, Fruit & Vegetable Insect
Killer kills over 100 garden insects without
harming plants or blooms. For your organic
garden, try Ortho Elementals Insecticidal
Soap to kill some of the
most bothersome bugs,
like aphids, leafhoppers,
mealy bugs, mites and
thrips - along with a long
list of other bugs. For
snails and slugs invading an organic garden,
try Ortho Elementals Slug & Snail Killer, or
Ortho Bug-Geta Snail & Slug Killer 1. Both
options are effective on a wide variety of
snails and slugs.
Now that you are armed with all the
right information, get out there and defend
your garden, lawn and home from invasive
insects.
- ARA Content
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May 4 , 2012
Page 12
Ceiling Fans, Outlets, Lighting, Flood Lights, Surge Protectors, Phone
& Cable, Breaker Panels, Troubleshooting Experts, and much, much more!
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info@pelhamgifts.com • www.facebook/PelhamGiftsStore
Hours: Wed - Fri 10am-7pm
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Closed Mon and Tues
patio - walkways - walls - stairs - bulkheads
fireplace - chimney - chimney liners and much more
Free estimate - Quality Work - Insured
patio - walkways - walls - stairs - bulkheads
fireplace - chimney - chimney liners and much more
Free estimate - Quality Work - Insured
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Masonry Work & Repair
All types of masonry. Also stone work!
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(603)421-0033
Scott Richard
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Simple Solutions to Common Landscaping Issues
There’s one in every neighborhood - the
house with the bright green grass, perfectly
trimmed shrubs and fowers in full bloom.
As you look at your own lawn, plagued
with weeds and sparse patches, you wonder
how your neighbor is able to achieve such
a beautiful outdoor space. The secret isn’t in
how much time or money can be invested,
but rather taking the right steps at the right
time to eliminate lawn and garden prob-
lems.
Here are some common landscaping is-
sues and the easy steps any homeowner can
take to correct them:
Sparse, brown lawn
If your lawn is looking sparse and brown,
the likely culprit is thatch. Thatch is the
layer of dead grass, leaves and stems that
block water and nutrients from reaching
the roots. To revive your grass, you need to
remove this layer and prime your lawn for
strong regrowth.
A dethatcher, also known as a power
rake, is the easiest way to get rid of the layer
of thatch. Then you’ll want to use an aera-
tor to poke small holes in the dirt so that
nutrients, air and moisture can get to the
roots. These two pieces of equipment are
critical for repairing sparse, brown lawn, but
purchasing them outright is costly. Consider
renting them from your local American
Rental Association rental store. Find the one
nearest you by www.RentalHQ.com.
Weeds
No single method will eliminate all
weeds, so the best action really depends
on what types of weeds you have. Here are
some tips on the most common:
* Dandelion - It’s imperative to dig out
dandelions before they go to seed. You can
also spot treat dandelions with a broadleaf
weed killer. If you do this, make sure your
product does not kill grass.
* White clover - This weed can spread
quickly on undernourished lawn. Combat
by watering regularly and applying nitrogen
fertilizer. You can also use a broadleaf weed
killer for spot treatments.
* Crab grass - If it’s early in the season,
consider applying a pre-emergence crab-
grass herbicide. Because crabgrass thrives
on shorter lawns, set your mower to a
higher setting, about 2.5 to 3 inches.
Overgrown hedges, shrubs and trees
Meticulously trimmed hedges and trees
make a yard look perfectly manicured.
The tools of the trade will make the job a
breeze, but you don’t need to purchase a
tree trimmer or chainsaw. You can easily
rent those at your lo-
cal American Rental
Association rental
store for a fraction
of the cost of buying
them.
The most important
consideration when
operating a chain saw
or trimmer is safety.
When you rent, you
get personalized
training on the equip-
ment. Tell the rental
professional what you
want to accomplish
and they will help
you fnd the equip-
ment you need to get
the job done, while providing you with tips
on how to use the equipment and safety.
When you’re done trimming and clearing
out your area, renting a chipper can make
cleanup quick and easy.
Wilting, dead plants
No matter where you live, if your out-
door plants start to wilt or turn brown, it’s
likely that they need water. Sounds simple
enough, but it’s also easy for plant novices
to overwater - which can kill your plants
and fowers just as easily as under watering
them.
Start by always watering during the early
morning or late evening hours. Watering
during peak sun hours will cause most of
the water to evaporate and little will reach
the plants’ roots. Research the recommend-
ed watering schedule for your lawn and
plants so that you can create a weekly wa-
tering schedule. Some plants may only need
watering once a week, while others may
need it daily. You can also ask your local
nursery or the Extension Service of the US
Department of Agriculture for planting and
watering recommendations in your area.
Striped lawn
Nothing is more frustrating than the ho-
meowner who spends lots of time on yard
work only to wake up one day to a striped
lawn. If you have healthy lines of green
grass that alternate with yellow or brown
stripes, likely the cause is uneven fertilizer
application.
The trick to fertilizing evenly with a drop
spreader is overlapping wheel tracks by an
inch or two. This will help ensure no area
gets missed and any potential for stripes is
eliminated.
Insulation’s
Cooling
Features
Many people equate insula-
tion with keeping things warm,
but ample attic insulation
and other insulating factors
around the home can help
keep a home cooler during the
summer as well. Rather than
keeping a home cool or warm,
insulation’s main purpose is to
maintain a consistent tem-
perature in the home. In terms
of summer comfort, insula-
tion will prevent hot air from
seeping into the home and
keep residents from adjusting
the thermostat to compensate.
Insulation in the attic can actu-
ally help isolate potential leaks
or sources where air is coming
in. That’s because the insula-
tion should remain relatively
clean if the home is properly
sealed. If you fnd areas of attic
insulation that appear soiled
or wet, you could have an
air or water leak somewhere.
Insulation can also increase
a cooling unit’s effciency. If
the HVAC system doesn’t have
to work hard to keep cool-
ing the home due to warm air
infltration, it will be easier to
keep a consistent, comfortable
temperature. That means less
chance of fuctuating warm
and cool air in the house.
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“Thumbs up to Windham students (all grades)
wearing uniforms. It puts all students on the same
‘economical’ level, assures that all children are
dressed respectfully and adds a much needed
measure of discipline to the public school arena.
And what’s this about asking the students their
opinions? This is not a decision that minors
should be making! Uniforms or not the adults
should make the decision and I for one am totally
in favor of uniforms.”
“Thumbs down to Principal Dr Mohr,
threatening the baseball team, that their season
would be over if the parents signed a petition
to dismiss the baseball coach. One of your own
coaches complained of the baseball coaches
disregard for safety in the heat when a player
was ready to pass out from the heat. How much
more do the kids have to put up with? If it wasn’t
for the kids, you wouldn’t be needed. The
Superintendant and School Committee should
look into handling of this problem. If need be, it’s
time you made the right choice! and dismiss the
coach. Will this be another hockey and soccer
debacle, as coaches are hired with no viable
experience and lies on their resumes? When is it
time? No JV team this year! No Varsity team next
year?”
“Thumbs up to the Relay For Life! I am a
cancer patient who resides near the school. I
embrace this community’s commitment in raising
awareness and money for this horrible disease.
For those thumbs down to this venue, if you’re a
cancer patient or survivor walk the survivors lap.
It’s truly amazing. If you’re lucky and cancer hasn’t
touched your life come and see what the relay is
all about.”
“Thumbs up to accountability. Parents have a
right to know if a their children’s teacher showed
up for work. Pelham/Windham School Boards/
Administration, let’s just have it noted on the
report card, anytime a substitute or different staff
member needed to be called in to cover a class.
Thanks!”
“Thumbs down to T. Gaydos. What is he doing
that requires $41,548 in overtime? No wonder
our taxes are skyrocketing. Guess what, if we
don’t deal with this abuse now, we will be paying
him $150,000 a year in retirement.”
“Thumbs down to Administrator Gaydos,
Why overtime? I make the same base as he
does working 70-80 hours a week. I don’t get
overtime, nor will I get the golden pension plan.
I say Revolt.”
“Thumbs up to the new French Regime.
Nicolas Sarkozy is standing up to terrorism. He
will change France for the better. Go President
Sarkozy, Go France. If Obama wins this fall, I’m
moving to France.”
“Thumbs up- to the guy/gal last week who
brought up the issue about the municipal pension
system. When most companies terminated their
pension plans in the 1980’s, many towns trying to
attract good employees enacted a very lucrative
plan. To top it off, some individuals knew the
loopholes and abused the plan by increasing
overtime and getting their vacation and other
PTO paid out at the end to increase the pension
calculation. Thus 30 years later, we now have
a pipeline of employees retiring. This is just the
beginning.”
“Thumbs down- We need to revamp the towns
retirement system, How does our ex police
chief work 28 years, retire at 50ish with a annual
pension of $104,000. He was paid $1.5 million
over 28 years but will take in $2.5 million if he
lives to 75. I get nothing until retiring at 67 (yes, I
get nothing if I retire at 50). No wonder our taxes
are bankrupting us folks.”
“Thumbs up to a new well deserved ‘Robert
Haverty Fire House.’ No one in the town worked
as hard as he did on this project. Thank you.”
“Thumbs down to Griffn Park recreation
department for not rescheduling practices or
games while the parking lot was closed for
restriping. Very dangerous with so many cars
parked on the road.”
“Thumbs up for an 11 year old young man who
plays for the Windham Lacross Team, Yale. He
made a spectacular goal on Saturday and it was
a very nice goal. He did it with confdence and
pride and his team won the game. I just wanted
to say, Anthony is a great competitor and a great
grandson.”
“Thumbs up to a kids that was playing lacross
last week. Last Sunday I had the pleasure of
watching a game and I saw a young kid on the
Windham Yale team score goal one of the game
and then celebrate with a team member. The goal
was frst class and the celebration was fun to see.
He was the picture of what kids’ sports aught to
be.”
Thumbs Up? Thumbs Down? Thumbs Up? Thumbs Down?
Tank you for your submissions. All comments, thumbs
up or down, are anonymous and not written by the
Pelham~Windham News staf. Tumbs comments can be
sent via telephone, 880-1516 or emailed to us at thumbs@
areanewsgroup.com. When submitting a Tumbs com-
ment, please specify that you would like it printed in the
Pelham~Windham News. No names are necessary. Please
keep negative comments to the issue. Comments should be
kept to 100 words or less.
Comments expressed in this column are the sole views of those callers and do not refect the views of the Pelham~Windham News or its advertisers. Town and school offcials
encourage readers to seek out assistance directly to resolve any problems or issues. The Pelham~Windham News editorial staff holds the right to refuse any comment deemed
inappropriate.
Pelham - Windham News | May 4, 2012 - 13
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Pelham~Windham
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Sports
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Sports
Sports Sports
Windham Boys Sweep St.
Thomas, Pembroke
Windham Baseball Tops
Souhegan
by Chris White
Following a 9-0 loss to Bedford on Monday,
April 16, the Windham High boys’ tennis team
has won its last two matches. The Jaguars swept
St. Thomas Aquinas, 9-0, in Dover on Wednesday,
April 18 and then earned a 9-0 sweep of
Pembroke at home on Monday, April 30.
In singles match play versus St. Thomas, David
Hutchings led the Jaguars with an 8-2 win in the
number one singles match, while Tyler Somen
also earned an 8-2 victory for the Jags in the
second singles match. In number three singles,
Windham’s Andrew Sun beat his opponent, 8-5,
and Steven Brandt won an 8-3 decision in the
number four match-up. Jaguar David Musto also
took an 8-2 win in the ffth singles match, as
Windham’s number six, Connor Golden, defeated
his opponent, 8-5.
In doubles play, the tandem of Hutchings
and Somen took an 8-1 victory in number one
doubles, while Sun and Brandt won, 8-4, in
number two doubles. The team of Musto and
Golden sealed the sweep for Windham with an
8-1 victory in the third doubles game.
Against Pembroke, Hutchings earned an 8-4
victory in the frst singles match, as Somen took
an 8-5 victory in number two singles. Brandt
defeated his opponent, 8-3, in the third singles
match and Musto took an 8-1 victory in the
number four match. Rounding out singles play
were Windham’s Joe Forti with a 9-7 victory at
number fve and Golden with an 8-3 victory at
number six singles.
In the doubles round, Hutchings and Somen
team up for an 8-2 win in number one doubles,
while Musto and Brandt won the second doubles
match, 8-2. Meanwhile, Forti and Anthony
Cappiello fnished the sweep for Windham with
an 8-3 victory in the third doubles match.
Windham improved its record to 5-2 this season
with the win over Pembroke. The Jaguars will
visit ConVal Regional for their next match on
Friday, May 4 at 4:15 p.m. They will have their
next home match on Monday, May 7 at 4:15 p.m.
versus Souhegan.
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Windham’s number one player, David Hutchings, prepares
to return a serve versus Pembroke
by Chris White
The Windham High baseball team picked up its
third win of the season at home against Souhegan
on Monday, April 30. The Jaguars edged the
Sabers, 7-6, improving their record to 3-6 on the
season. The win was just what the Jags needed as
they entered the contest having dropped their last
four decisions.
The Jaguars took a 2-0 lead in the bottom of the
second, but Souhegan responded quickly, plating
four runs in the top half of the third for a 4-2
advantage. With Souhegan leading 5-4 after fve-
and-a-half innings, the Jags rallied with three runs
in the bottom of the sixth to take a 7-5 lead. The
Windham rally was highlighted by a two-run triple
from senior centerfelder Steve Dastous (1 for 4,
two RBIs), who drove in the game-winning run.
Souhegan answered with another run in the
top of the seventh, but the Jaguars held on for a
one-run victory. Jeff Peterson pitched the fnal
two-and-two-thirds to pick up the win. The
sophomore allowed only one hit and struck out
two on the mound, while going 2 for 3 at the plate
with one RBI and a run scored. Also contributing
to Windham’s offense were David Carbonello (1
for 3), Adam Dolan (run scored), Dan Moynihan
(run scored), Mike DiOrio (run scored), Max
Masse (RBI, run scored), Connor Whittemore (1
for 2, run scored), Matt Carbonello (RBI), and
Greg Macary (run scored).
The win over Souhegan was a nice rebound
from losses to Division II powers Portsmouth and
Goffstown. Windham fell to Portsmouth, 10-0, at
home on Wednesday, April 25 and then took a 9-0
loss at Goffstown on Friday, April 27.
Moynihan and Dastous registered hits for
Windham versus Portsmouth. Against Goffstown,
hits were provided by DiOrio and David
Carbonello.
After hosting Hollis-Brookline on Wednesday,
May 2, the Jaguars will play their next game
at Kearsarge on Monday, May 7. The Jags are
scheduled to play their next home game on
Monday, May 14 against St. Thomas Aquinas at 4
p.m.
Windham pitcher Adam Dolan fres a pitch against
Souhegan
by Chris White
The Windham High softball team took
one win and one loss in two games last
week. The Jaguars earned an 11-7 victory
at Goffstown on Friday, April 27, but were
edged by Souhegan in a 19-17 slugfest at
home on Monday, April 30. After playing
Souhegan, Windham’s record stands at 3-4
on the season.
Windham enjoyed a come-from-behind
victory against Division II powerhouse
Goffstown. The Jags fell behind 5-1 after
three innings but outscored the Grizzlies
10-2 over the last four innings, including a
four-run ffth and a fve-run sixth.
Ashley Adamson (3 for 4, six RBIs, three
runs scored) led the Jaguars with three home
runs and was the game’s winning pitcher.
Windham third baseman Heather Tornquist
also had a solid day at the plate, going 3
for 4 with a home run, two RBIs, and a run
scored, while Emily Comtois went 2 for 4
with two RBIs and three runs scored. Also
contributing to Windham’s offense were
Makenzie Magee (1 for 4, run scored),
Fallon Golden (1 for 4, RBI), Lauren Rogers
(1 for 4), Olivia Estes (1 for 4, run scored),
Brooke Cormier (run scored), and Morgan
Apkarian (run scored).
Against Souhegan, Windham trailed
the Sabers 5-3 after four innings, but the
Sabers’ offense exploded for eight runs in
the top of the ffth
to extend their lead
to 13-3. The Jaguars
responded with
seven runs in the
bottom half of the
ffth inning to keep
pace, cutting the
Souhegan lead to
13-10.
However,
Souhegan added to
its advantage over
the last two innings
and held a 19-10
lead going into Windham’s last ups in the
bottom of the seventh. Once again, the
Jaguars put together a seven-run rally but to
no avail, as Souhegan held on for the win.
Offensively, Comtois led the Jaguars,
going 4 for 4 with fve RBIs and a run
scored. Also contributing to Windham’s
offense were Michaela Hatem (1 for 2,
RBI), Tornquist (2 for 4, four RBIs, two
runs scored), Magee (2 for 5, two RBIs, run
scored), Estes (1 for 4, RBI, run scored),
Cormier (1 for 2, RBI, two runs scored),
Golden (1 for 5, RBI, three runs scored),
Rogers (3 for 4, two runs scored), Haley
Psareas (1 for 3, two RBIs, two runs scored),
Lindsay Hillyer (two runs scored), and
Christina Steere (run scored).
Windham Softball Beats Goffstown, Falls
to Souhegan in Slugfest
Jaguar right felder Makenzie Magee throws the ball
back to the infeld versus Souhegan
Community Events ---------
Saturday, May 5
Windham High School’s SMILES
community service club is proud to
announce the 3rd annual STYLES &
S.M.I.L.E.S. Breast Cancer Charity Fashion
Show. In collaboration with Windham’s Team
BellaDonna, an Avon breast cancer group, we have
created an event to bring together everyone in the
community and raise money and awareness in the
battle against breast cancer. This event offers music,
entertainment, food, fashion, and fabulous raffe
prizes available in the lobby. The fashion show will
take place at 6 p.m. in the Windham High School
auditorium. Tickets are available at the door for this
spectacular charity event. We also have a special
discounted price for 2 people. All proceeds will
go directly to the Avon Breast Cancer Foundation,
a national charity. For more information, contact
Liz Colacchio (WHS Student Coordinator for the
Fashion Show and Team BellaDonna member) at
603-401-8483.
Saturday, May 5
A Purse Auction will be held at the
American Legion Hall, Windham Road,
Pelham, from 1-6 p.m. as the First Annual
Circle of Friends Relay for Life Fundraiser. A
preview hour will run from 1-2 p.m. and the live
Auction will start at 2 p.m. There will be food,
raffes and more, so come on down and help
support the fght against cancer.
Monday, May 7
The Salem Train Station will be open from
6-8 p.m. Videos of the history of the Town
of Salem and transportation will be shown
as well as the history of Canobie Lake Park
and Rockingham Race Track. These videos and
books are on Salem and all proceeds go towards
the maintenance of the building. The fnal phase of
the restoration of the depot will be the landscaping.
Just had “date nails” donated so come and learn
the history of them. If you have any history you
would like to share, please let the volunteers record
it. Any questions, please call Marie or Beverly at
893-8882.
Saturday, May 12
The Windham Garden Club will hold its
Junior Gardeners’ Flower Sale featuring
self-grown fowering plants in festively
wrapped containers and decorative baskets
just in time for Mother’s Day. The sale will take
place at the Transfer Station from 8 a.m.-2 p.m.,
with cash or local checks accepted.
Friday, May 18
Ellie Morin’s long time friend, Allison
Doucette, has planned a memorial
event to celebrate Ellie’s life. Ellie died
unexpectedly and tragically last December
21, leaving family and friends in shock. The
memorial event will take place on Friday, May 18,
from 7-10 p.m. at the Searles School and Chapel,
35 Range Road, Windham. There will be many
raffe items, from handmade quilts, to gift cards, to
local business establishments, generously donated
by local businesses and other kind hearts. Food
and beverages will be provided. All proceeds will
go to the Elizabeth Claire Memorial Scholarship.
For more information, contact Allison Doucette at
arm63@wildcats.unh.edu.
Saturday, May 19
Spring has sprung and it is the time for
the Annual Pelham Garden Groups’ plant
sale, which will be held from 9-11 a.m. at
the First Congregational Church of Pelham,
3 Main Street, Pelham. Those who have purchased
the very reasonably priced plants in prior year’s
sales know the quality of the locally grown plants
that are offered for sale by the Group. Members of
the Garden Group will be on hand to discuss the
attributes of the plants for sale. Should you have
any questions concerning this event call Warren
Leuteritz at 635-7568.
Sunday, May 20
Pelham’s New Greeley Singers present the
Rutter Requiem in their Annual Spring
Concert Memorial to First Director. This
moving choral work is being presented
in memory of Rodney Mansfeld, who founded
the New Greeley Singers as part of the Town of
Pelham’s 250th Anniversary Celebration in 1996,
served as its frst director, and who passed away last
year. The concert will also include a sampling of
show music, a piece from the lighter side of John
Rutter (“Banquet Fugue”), and the well-known
Drinking Song from Verdi’s opera LaTraviata. The
New Greeley Singers are a popular community
chorus composed of talented singers from many
local communities, directed by Michael Green and
accompanied by Elizabeth Tousignant. The concert
will be performed Sunday, May 20, at 3:30 p.m.
at the First Congregational Church, 3 Main Street,
Pelham. Tickets may be obtained at the door. Light
refreshments will be served after the concert to give
a chance for the audience and performers to meet.
For more information, contact Paul at 635-7549,
Helen at 978-453-9982, e-mail ngsingers@gmail.
com , or visit our website,newgreeleysingers.org.
Library -----------------------------
Thursday, May 10
Sunday, May 13 is Mother’s Day and we
would like to help you make this special
person in your life feel appreciated. On
Thursday, May 10, starting at 3 p.m. you
can come to the Pelham Public Library to
make a gift for your mom or some other special
person in your life. We will have all the supplies
you need to make the gift plus an accompanying
card.
Meetings --------------------------
Tuesday, May 8
The next meeting of the
Southern NH 9.12 group
will focus on a topic that
will impact nearly half of
all Americans in their lifetime
– Cancer. This unfortunate reality is
even more devastating when the news
is about your child. Join us on Tuesday,
May 8, at 7 p.m. at the Windham Senior
Center, 2 North Lowell Road. This
meeting is free and open to the public,
snacks and refreshments will be served,
and everyone is encouraged to attend.
School Activities ----------
Now through Friday, May 25
The Rotary Club of Greater Salem
is soliciting applicants for its Community
Service Scholarships (two $1,000 awards
will be given) from this year’s graduating
high school seniors who reside in the towns
of Salem, Atkinson, Hampstead, Windham or
Pelham. Students with service activities performed
in the community while in high school are urged
to apply. Applications are available at the Salem
High School Guidance Department or on line:
www.salemnhrotary.org or by calling 893-8167.
Deadline for receipt of completed applications is
May 25.
Seminars & Courses---
Wednesday, May 16 – Tuesday, May 20
The Salem Boys and Girls Club is offering
American Red Cross Lifeguard Training,
to take place May 16-20. The course
includes Standard First Aid, CPR/AED for
the Professional Rescuer, as well as Rescue
and Recovery skills. Candidates must be 15 years
old and meet all prerequisite requirements for
participation. The class will meet Wednesday
and Friday, May 16 and 18, from 6 to 9:30 p.m.
and Saturday and Sunday, May 19 and 20, from
8 a.m. to 6 p.m. There is a cost for the course.
Space is limited, so early registration is suggested.
Registration is open at the Salem Boys and Girls
Club. For more information call 603-898-7709.
Sports & Recreation ---
Sunday, May 6
In an effort to raise money for Relay For
Life, the F2FC: Fight to Finish Cancer
Family 5K Fun Run/Walk will be held
on May 6 at 10 a.m. at the Lobster Tail, 4
Cobbetts Pond Road, Windham. Registration
will begin at 9 a.m. at the Lobster Tail, and the race
will begin promptly at 10 a.m. It is approximately
a 3.2 mile course. A clock will be provided for
runners to secure their own times. Pre-registration
forms can be mailed to B.J. Martin at 44 Flying
Rock Road, Hudson. Restrooms will be available
inside of the Lobster Tail. Specifcs on parking will
be available closer to the date of the race on our
website: https://sites.google.com/site/f2fcrace and
our Facebook Page: Team Golden Brook. It will
also be emailed out to anyone who provides us
with an email address. There will be an on-site
drawing, luminary bags, magnets for miracles and
other items. Proceeds from this event will support
the American Cancer Society Relay for Life. The
ACS provides support to cancer patients, their
families and on-going research to fnd a cure for
cancer!
Starting Monday, May 7
Pelham Parks and Recreation is holding
registration for the 2012 Men’s Spring
Slow Pitch Softball League for men over
age 18. Register online, or in person at the
6 Village Green offce. Payment must accompany
sign up and the deadline is April 24. All games will
be played at Golden Brook Park, Newcomb Field
on Mondays, Tuesdays and/or Thursdays, starting
at 6 or 6:30 p.m., May through August. E-mail
recreation@pelhamweb.com or call 635-2721 with
any questions. Visit https://webtrac.pelhamweb.
com for online sign ups and credit card payment.
Sunday, May 20
The Pelham High School Baseball Program
will present a free showing of “Rookie
of the Year” at noon at the school. The
Special Guest will be the Offcial Lowell
Spinners mascot, Canaligator! Starting at
11:15 a.m., the Canaligator will be available
for photos and autographs prior to the movie.
Admission will be free or you can give a $1
donation per person to the PHS Baseball Program.
One hundred percent of the proceeds will beneft
your own Pelham Pythons Baseball Program.
Check our website for updates: https://sites.google.
com/site/pelhampythonsbaseball or Facebook:
http://www.facebook.com/PelhamPythonsBaseball.
Windham Regular Meetings & Events
American Legion Post 109, Town Hall, upstairs, 7:30 p.m.,
third Tuesday
CHADD, Windham Presbyterian Church, 7:30 p.m., third Thursday
(Judy Holt, 880-4997)
Conservation Commission, Planning & Development
Conference room, 7 p.m., second and fourth Thursday
Garden Club, Windham Town Hall, 7:30 p.m., third Thursday (except
July/August)
Hannah Dustin Quilters Guild, Hudson Community Center,
9 a.m., frst Monday (except June – August)
Historic District/Heritage Commission, Bartley House, 4 p.m., second
Wednesday
Lions Club, Windham Senior Center, 7 p.m., frst and third Wednesday
(except July & August) Visitors are always welcome.
MOMS Club, (Moms supporting moms), Windham Bible Chapel,
second Wednesday, 9:30 a.m. (Contact: Nicole Sharpe,
nicole.p.sharpe@gmail.com)
Pelham Community Spirit Group, VFW Hall, 7 p.m., third Thurs.
Planning Board, Planning & Development Conference Room, 7:00
p.m., frst and third Wednesday
Recreation Committee, Planning & Development Conference Room, 7
p.m., third Thursday
Selectmen, Planning Department, 7 p.m., Mondays
Technical Advisory Committee, SAU Building, 7 p.m.,
second Thursday (except July, August, December)
Toastmasters, Windham Senior Center, 7 p.m., second Wednesday
Windham Bible Chapel Youth Group, 6:30 p.m., Wednesdays
Windham Democratic Town Committee, third or fourth Thursday, see
www.windems.org for date and location.
Windham Newcomers & Friends, Membership, Koffee Klatch, 10 a.m.,
second Tuesday; Windham Depot Rail Trail, 9:30 a.m., Thursdays
Windham Woman’s Club, Windham Town Hall, 11:30 a.m.,
frst Wednesday, September through May; second Wednesday in
January (434-5096)
Zoning Board, Planning & Devel. Conference Room, 7:30 p.m.,
second and fourth Tuesday.
Pelham Regular Meetings & Events
Animal Rescue Network of New England, Pelham Police Department
Community Service Room, frst Monday, 7 – 8 p.m.
Budget Committee meeting, Mondays and Thursdays, 7:30 p.m.
Conservation Commission, Sherburne Hall, 7:30 p.m., second
Wednesday
Council on Aging, Pelham Senior Center, 1 p.m., frst Thursday (except
July and August)
CTAC, Town Hall Annex, 7 p.m., second Wednesday
GriefShare, grief recovery support group, Mondays, 6:30-8:30 p.m.,
Crossroads Baptist Church
Hannah Dustin Quilters Guild, Hudson Community Center, 9 a.m., frst
Monday (except June-August)
Historical Society, Historical Society Building, fourth Monday
Knights of Columbus, K of C Hall, 7:30 p.m., frst Wednesday
Library Trustees, Pelham Library, 6:30 p.m., second Wednesday
MOMS (Moms Offering Moms Support), Pelham Public Library, Molly
Hobbs Room, 9:30 – 10:30 a.m., First Monday (unless it’s a holiday,
then second Monday).
MOPS (Mothers of Preschoolers) and MOMSnext (Mothers of school aged
children), Crossroads Baptist Church, 9:30 – 11:30 a.m., frst and
third Thursdays of most months. (For info., call 635-1556)
Pelham Community Spirit Group, VFW Hall, 7 p.m., third Thursday
Planning Board, Town Hall, 7:00 p.m., frst and third Monday
Pulpit Rock Lodge Number 103, A&FM Meeting, every second Monday
(except July and August), 7:30 p.m., at the Lodge.
Pulpit Rock Lodge’s Public Breakfast, every third Sunday (except July and
August) 8 – 10 a.m.
Royal Red Hat Society, Pelham Senior Center, 1:00 p.m., frst Monday
Rockingham County Women’s Connection, Rockingham Race Track,
Belmont Room, 11:30 a.m., third Tuesday
Selectmen, Sherburne Hall, 6:30 p.m., Tuesdays
Single Mom Small Group, 7 p.m., Fridays, Mindy 635-8679
St. Patrick School Board, School Library, 7 p.m., second Tuesday
Support Group for Parents of Children with Special Needs/Unique
Challenges, Pelham Public Library, Molly Hobbs Room, 6:30 p.m.,
First Thursday
VFW, 6 Main Street, Pelham, 7 p.m., frst Thursday
Wattannick Grange, Hudson Grange Hall, 7:30 p.m., frst and third
Monday
Zoning Board, Town Hall, 7:00 p.m., second Monday
Good for the Community
Your Hometown Community Calendar
M
ay
2012
M
other’s Day
M
other’s Day
M
em
orial Day
M
em
orial Day
Your Hometown Community Calendar
www.windhamorthodontics.com
Danielle C Ross DMD, PC
Call for your complimentary consultation!
Windham Orthodontics
25 Indian Rock Road, Windham NH.
603.216.1188
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Community News In A Home Town Format
Area News Group Papers • 880-1516
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e Area News Group prints “Letters to the Editor” on
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writers. Requests to withhold a writer’s name will be
honored at the discretion of the editor. Letters more than
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This is the month to honor the special
woman in your life. The one who sacrifced
for your beneft. The unsung heroine of the
world ... Mom.
Breakfast in bed has been done. She’s
probably gotten her share of blouses or foral
bouquets. This year you may want to do some-
thing different. But what will that be?
Consider these ideas to say thank you to
your mother, stepmother, aunt, mentor, or
any other woman you’d like to recognize this
holiday.
* Spa retreat: What
woman doesn’t enjoy a
little pampering from time
to time? Investigate the
spas and salons in your
area. Many full-service
spas have treatments rang-
ing from facials to hour-
long body massages. They
may even offer packages
that enable you to group
services together, allow-
ing Mom to start her day
with a relaxing massage
and fnish up with a new
haircut and style.
* Dream vacation: Is
there a place Mom has
always wanted to visit?
Maybe fnances were tight
and she put her needs
aside for a family trip
instead? Giving
back may mean
giving her a spe-
cial time away.
Cruise ships and
all-inclusive
resorts offer a
host of activities
all for one price.
This could be an
option for gifters
looking to book
a vacation that
does not require
a lot of itiner-
ary planning or
coordination.
Just make sure
Mom has her
passport or other
necessary travel
documents and you’re set.
* Catch a concert: You may or may not have
the same taste in music as your mother, but
surprising her with concert tickets can be an
ideal way to show you care about her hobbies
and interests. Many bands and singers that
experienced their heyday when Mom was
spinning her vinyl records or popping a tape
in the cassette deck are still pumping out hits
today. And chances are they’re performing at
venues around the country, too. Maybe she
likes the adult-contemporary sounds of Mi-
chael Buble. Or she’s a country gal interested
in seeing Brad Paisley. Mom may love the hard
rock of the 1980s, and scoring tickets to a Bon
Jovi concert will knock her socks off.
* On to the theater: Perhaps your mother
would be interested in seeing a play or musi-
cal. You don’t need to travel to Broadway these
days to see top stars in the shows you love.
Traveling troupes and even local venues host
popular stage shows. If you want to seek out
the bright lights of Broadway, shows Mom may
enjoy include “Wicked,” “Come Fly Away,”the
enduring “Phantom of the Opera,” or “South
Pacifc.” Just be sure to book early if you desire
weekend tickets. They tend to go fast.
Pelham - Windham News | May 4, 2012 - 15
224 N. Broadway,
Salem, NH
located at the Salem Market Place
603.458.2630
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Great Ways to Say Thank You on Mother’s Day
Give the Gift of Green for Mother’s Day
Mom may enjoy a special vacation or even a girls’ day out this year.
Mom may appreciate chocolate or fowers. But for chil-
dren who want to offer her something a little more special
-- especially for their eco-conscious moms -- there are a
number of different gift options to make Mom’s big day as
eco-friendly as it is enjoyable.
An eco-friendly gift for Mom is a gift that keeps on giv-
ing. When you jot down your gift idea list, think about
adding these “green” gifts.
* Make a basket of gardening gear. Garden plants and
supplies are perhaps the greenest gifts to give Mom. Plants
are so plentiful and varied that there are bound to be ideal
fowers or greenery for every mother’s tastes. Compile
different gardening essentials, such as seeds or seedlings,
organic soil mix, mulch, all-natural compost, and a few
different planting containers. You can also include garden-
ing gloves and ergonomic tools made of recycled materials.
Finish the gift with the inclusion of a book that describes
different garden designs and gives tips for beginners.
* Dine at a local restaurant. Many families take Mom out
for a meal on her special day. To make the experience eco-
friendly, select among restaurants that are close to home in
the area. Explore the possibilities of restaurants that
may serve foods made with local, organic ingredi-
ents. If you cannot fnd such a restaurant, do not
worry, just choose a local establishment to conserve
fuel.
* Pay for a car tune-up. Improving the gas mile-
age on Mom’s car is one gift that
can be environmentally friendly.
According to the United States De-
partment of Energy, keeping a car
in shape can help save money and
improve fuel economy. Fixing a se-
rious maintenance problem, such
as a faulty oxygen sensor, can improve Mom’s gas mileage
by as much as 40 percent. Also, be sure to have her car
tires properly infated. She can be losing gas mileage by
0.3 percent for every 1 psi drop in all four tires. Getting
an oil change with the recommended grade of motor oil is
another gas mileage improvement measure.
* Purchase eco-friendly kitchen items. It may be a major
faux pas to give Mom an appliance or a new vacuum for
Mother’s Day. However, if your mother is an avid cook
or baker, she may appreciate some new mixing bowls
or utensils made from recycled materials. If Mom is the
consummate entertainer, get her new glass tumblers and
sipping straws made from recycled glass. They are perfect
for serving cocktails and outdoor entertaining.
* Pamper mom with organic products. What mom
doesn’t enjoy a little pampering from time to time? You
can treat your mother to a spa experience at home by as-
sembling a basket full of organic shampoo, conditioner,
massage oils, bath salts, and any other organic spa items
you can fnd.
Just For Mom
Mother’s Day
2012
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Mother’s Day
2012
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PHS Girls’ Sports Roundup
by Marc Ayotte
Talk about your bad stretches. This past week
saw the Pelham girls’ varsity softball, lacrosse,
and tennis teams go a combined and woeful 0-6
in divisional play. The last victory recorded for
any Lady Python team was on April 18 when the
softball team upended Milford. Coincidentally,
or not, on that same day the tennis team also
recorded their most recent win, also against the
Spartans.
Lacrosse
After evening their early season record at 1-1,
Coach Carmody’s LAX-ers have fallen upon
hard times. Most recently, the Python defense
continued to surrender a plethora of goals in their
two losses. At Harris Field on April 26, Pelham
began their mini, two-game home stand with a
17-4 trouncing at the hands of ConVal. Four days
later, they dropped a 13-8 decision to Kingswood
Regional. With the two home defeats, Pelham
now stands at 1-5 in the division III standings.
Against ConVal, the game was pretty much over
when the teams’ face-off specialists crossed their
sticks for the frst time at midfeld. The Cougars,
winners of four straight coming into Pelham,
grabbed control of the ball and scored on their
frst fve possessions; two of them coming before
the two minute mark. It wasn’t until 10:23 into
the game that Brooke Paradis put the Pythons on
the board with her frst of two goals on the day,
making the score 7-1 in favor of ConVal. Trailing
10-2 at the half, Broghan Gilligan answered a
Cougar goal early in the second half to bring
Pelham as close as it would come at 11-3. Becca
DeBaldo scored the other goal for the Pythons.
“Their passing was unbelievable,” noted Carmody
of the Cougar’s ball possession, as they headed
to the practice feld in preparation for a visit from
their next opponent.
With all of her players back from vacation
and a successful weekend of practices in the
books, Carmody was optimistic about their
encounter with the visitors from Wolfeboro. But
once again, the Pythons faced a tough team in
Kingswood, which was 3-1 on the season, and
found themselves in an early hole, falling behind
9-3 to the Knights by half time. One of the two
bright spots for Pelham came in the form of
Erica Calistro. The Python keep “looked really
good” recounted Carmody of her goalie’s second
half performance. In recording 10 saves on
the afternoon, Carmody noted, “she’s (Calistro)
starting to talk with the defense. I think she’ll do
really well for us.”
The other shining star for Pelham came via an
offensive output that was not dominated by just
one or two scorers. Instead, the Pythons received
goals from fve different players. Broghan Gilligan
led the second half comeback bid with two of her
four goals on the day; “she’s a strong transition
player,” commented Carmody,
adding that “she doesn’t shy
away from playing defense,
which is nice to see.” Also
scoring single goals for Pelham
were Alissa Laidlaw, Brooke
Paradis, Amber Buckley, and
Michaela Roman.
Softball
In a stark and eerily similar
fashion, the Lady Pythons
incurred defeats on the softball
diamond. Neither of the team’s two losses for the
week went the distance as they dropped a fve-
inning, home decision to Bedford by a score of
17-2 and followed that up with a six inning road
loss at Coe-Brown, 15-3.
In the home loss to Bedford, Pelham found
themselves trailing by only a pair after two
innings. But four in the third and a devastating
eight-spot in the fourth blew the game wide open
for the visiting Bull Dogs. The offensive highlight
for the Pythons came in the third, when Kathryn
Mostone’s bases loaded fy to deep right off the
glove of the Bedford right felder was ruled a
double, producing Pelham’s two lone runs on the
day. Also picking up hits for Pelham were Hannah
Paitchel with a double, Elissa Mogauro with a
pair of singles and Chantal Roussel with a single.
Jordan Parece started in the circle for Pelham and
was tagged with the loss.
Two days later, on April 27, the Lady Pythons
lost their third straight, dropping their record to
2-5 on the year. Pelham stepped off the bus and
jumped to a 3-0 frst inning lead, compliments
of Alex Hall’s double that plated all three Python
base runners. But the following inning saw the
hosts from Northwood put up four of their own to
take a 4-3 lead after two. Once again it was the
fourth inning that defated the Pythons, as Coe-
Brown came through with seven runs, increasing
the lead to 11-3.
Despite not scoring after the frst inning, Pelham
was able to collect a total of nine hits on the
day. Hannah Paitchel was the only Lady Python
with a multi-hit game as she recorded a double
and a single. Six different players registered a
single each; Jordan Parece, Chantal Roussel,
ElissaMogauro, Julia Barsalou, Kathryn Mostone
and Kelsey Grimard. After the loss, head coach
Todd Lozeau remained optimistic noting that his
team is young as well as indicating that they did
face the most diffcult part of their schedule in the
frst half of the year.
Tennis
Unfortunately, the report on the tennis front
is much the same. The Lady Pythons also went
zero for the week with a 7-2 loss to ConVal at
the Pelham courts, followed by an 8-1 loss at
Souhegan. As a result, Pelham’s record fell to 2-7
on the year.
The two Pelham team points in the match
against ConVal came in the form of singles
victories posted by #2 Lisa Yeaton’s 9-8 (7-3
tiebreak) thriller over Chloe Tournier-Decret
and #5 Brooke Coupal’s 9-7 decision over
Ashlynn Wing. According to Coach Casey
Tryon; “Yeaton played a great match and really
picked it up to win in the tie-break with some
great net play again.” The Pelham coach also
had words of praise for the play of her number
fve seed, Coupal; “She never gave up and had
great placement of the ball.” Trailing 1-6 in her
match, Coupal mounted a fantastic comeback in
capturing her frst singles victory of the season.
At Souhegan, the Sabers slashed the Pythons,
taking all but one singles match while sweeping
the doubles competition. The lone Pelham team
point came from Rebekah Day compliments
of her impressive eight games to four win over
Katie Casper. Coach Tryon also hailed the play
of Meaghan Barcelos, saying the senior “played a
great singles and doubles match coming up just
short in both.”
Girls’ (and boys) track and feld results were not
made available by press time.
S
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Python second baseman Julia Barsalou felds a ground ball and fips it to shortstop Hannah Paitchel covering
second for a force-out
Broghan Gilligan crosses in front of the ConVal goal,
scoring a goal in the ensuing action
Pelham third baseman Elissa Mogauro felds a Bedford bunt during a game with the visiting Bull Dogs
by Chris White
After a strong start to the season followed
by a couple losses, the Windham Jaguar boys’
lacrosse team got back on track last week with a
convincing win at home versus ConVal Regional
on Friday, April 27. The Jaguars thumped the
Cougars, 13-1, for their ffth win of the season.
The win improved Windham’s record to 5-3 in
Division III.
Windham held a commanding 8-1 lead at
halftime, and then shut out ConVal, 5-0, in the
second half to cruise to the victory. Anthony
Gallo led the Jags with four goals, while providing
one assist. Colby Larsen, Jeff Trovato, and Colin
Gerstenberger each had four assists to lead the
Windham offense.
Also scoring for Windham were Larsen and
Mitch Dolloff with three goals apiece, Trovato
with two goals, and Gerstenberger with one goal.
Meanwhile, David Selden registered nine saves in
goal for the Jags.
“It was good to get back on track today,”
Windham coach Joe Young said. “We just got
back to the basics. We took care of the ball on a
consistent basis and we were able to control the
ball from the get-go.”
The win over ConVal came at the right time
for the Jaguars, who had dropped two straight
entering Friday’s contest. The Jags took a 6-2
loss at Monadnock Regional on Friday, April 20,
and fell to Pelham on the road, 13-3, on Tuesday,
April 24. Larsen led Windham with one goal and
one assist versus Monadnock, while Gallo led
Windham with two goals versus Pelham.
“We emphasized getting a win today to get
back on track,” Young said of Windham’s game
versus ConVal. “It will be important to get better
in our next few games as we play other teams in
Division III. If we continue to play well on offense
and do the little things, we can be successful.”
For its next contest, Windham is scheduled to
visit Milford on Friday, May 4, at 4 p.m. After
that, the Jags will play at top-ranked Gilford on
Tuesday, May 8 and then travel to Division I
Manchester Central on Wednesday, May 9. The
Jags will play their next home game against
Kennett on Tuesday, May 15 at 4 p.m.
Jaguars Trounce ConVal in Boys’
Lacrosse
Jaguars Colby Larsen (left, #25) and Brandon Swift (#15)
battle a ConVal defender for a loose ball
S
t
a
f
f

p
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o
s

b
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C
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i
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W
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Windham’s Andrew Koch makes a move to the net
versus ConVal
Have you sent in your
check yet?

Windham High School - "Last Night" is a senior safe night modeled
after Salem High School's safe night for their graduating seniors.
Ours will also be an all night event for seniors held the night of
graduation at WHS and is our way of saying; "Congratulations and
Good Luck".
Please donate $20.12
in honor of the
Graduating Class of 2012!
Please donate $20.12
in honor of the
Graduating Class of 2012!
All tax deductible donations can be sent
to WHS, 64 London Bridge Road,
Windham, NH 03087.
W
SUPPORTER
LAST NIGHT
Windham, NH
Windham High School-”Last Night” 20.12
Twenty dollars and .12/100
Supporter of Last Night
Congrats
Class 2012
May 2012
Join us at our next Last Night planning meeting Tuesday,
May 15
th
7pm in the WHS Media Room

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