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The RegeneRaTion issue

EDITORIAL

The Regeneration issue
This entire issue is dedicated to the ingenuity of architects in regenerating the environments that we live and work in. Preserving and adapting existing buildings and townscapes to suit new uses is sustainable, saving on resources and making the most of assets. But it also carries with it a challenge for designers in developing their particular interpretation of history and context for the 21st century. The diverse projects that we explore here demonstrate different approaches to this challenge and range from additions and interventions with existing structures, to new buildings interacting with the old to reshape urban areas. But one common strand runs through them all: the unique and numerous possibilities offered by copper and its alloys for architectural expression. Our cover story ably demonstrates this. Here, brass-clad forms worm their way amongst the urban fabric, defining new vistas and a fresh focus on Lund Cathedral. Initially bright and modern, the brass surfaces will soon darken and mellow, taking on a timeless feel. The same quality applies to the pre-oxidised copper interventions to an historic Italian villa (p 18–21), redirecting axes and circulation to suit the building’s new role as a hotel. Copper’s ageless and permanent nature is further reinforced by the brass elements added to a Spanish castle (p 34–35). Here, there is no pretence at literal reference but an abstract aesthetic totally in keeping with the massive stone remains. This approach has parallels with the use of copper to clearly express modern additions to a traditional Luxembourg village house (p 26–29). On a bigger scale, the new extension to a restored London warehouse (p 12–15) uses bronze cladding to define its thoroughly contemporary massing. In this case, an uncompromising form reflects the gabled profile of the original, creating a unified composition. A similar but lower key approach is taken with a London church extension (p 32–33). The relationship of new and old linked buildings is also explored with a new country house ‘orangery’ (p 8–11) in the Netherlands. This fresh take on an old typology is a heavily glazed pavilion with a curved, green pre-patinated copper roof which bonds it with the original house. A more literal stance is taken with Warsaw’s new water treatment plant (p 22–25) that refers strongly to the gabled forms and curved-head windows of its 19th century neighbours. Here, copper plays a more traditional role as a roofing material. And we consider the part played by copper in different forms – transparent and modulated – to regenerate uninspiring 20th century buildings (p 16–17 and p 30–31). We end as we began, with another example of a copper intervention reshaping the urban context of its older host – this time the former public baths in Thiene, Italy (p 36–38). Here, a redundant building has been given a new life as a unique youth centre defined by organic, curved copper shell additions. We hope you enjoy this journey around these inspirational projects, where copper acts as a catalyst for inventive architectural and urban regeneration. Editorial Team

Copper Architecture Forum 32, April 2012 Copper Architecture Forum is part of the ”European Copper In Architecture Campaign”. It is published twice a year and has a circulation of 25.000 copies. The magazine is distributed to architects and professionals in the building construction industry in Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Russia, Spain, Sweden, Ukraine and United Kingdom.

Editorial team: Lennart Engström, Ari Lammikko, Chris Hodson, Hannele Kuusisto, Hermann Kersting, Robert Pinter, Irina Dumitrescu E-mail: editorialteam@copperconcept.org Address: CAF, European Copper Institute, Avenue de Tervueren 168 b-10, B-1150 Brussels, Belgium Publisher: Nigel Cotton, ECI Layout and technical production: Naula Grafisk Design, Sweden Printing: Strålins Grafiska AB 2012, Sweden Editorial panel: Birgit Schmitz, De Kazimierz Zakrzewski, Pl Marco Crespi, It Nicholas Hay, UK Nikolaos Vergopoulos, Gr Nuno Diaz, Es Olivier Tissot, Fr Paul Becquevort, Benelux Pia Voutilainen, Se, No, Fi, Dk Robert Pintér, Hu, Cz, SVK Vadim Ionov, Ru birgit.schmitz@copperalliance.de kazimierz.zakrzewski@copperalliance.pl marco.crespi@copperalliance.it nick.hay@copperalliance.org.uk nick.vergopoulos@copperalliance.gr nuno.diaz@copperalliance.es olivier.tissot@copperalliance.fr paul.becquevort@copperalliance.be pia.voutilainen@copperalliance.fi robert.pinter@copperalliance.hu vadim.ionov@copperalliance.ru

Front Cover Lund Cathedral Visitors’ Centre (pages 4-7). Photo: Åke E:son Lindman

Back cover The Granary, London (pages 12-15). Photo: Tim Crocker

© Copper Architecture Forum 2012

www.copperconcept.org

Contact us now. We do want to hear from you, both with your comments on Copper Architecture Forum and suggestions for projects or topics that we can cover in future. Simply email the editorial team or your local editorial panel member, listed above.

32

2 4–7
4 8

– editorial comment

The Regeneration Issue

Divine Intervention Copper Continuity

– a new visitors’ centre for Lund Cathedral, Sweden – redefining the country house Orangery in the Netherlands – a modern bronze extension rejuvenates a traditional London warehouse – regenerating wasted rooftop space in Helsinki’s city centre – a copper-clad intervention restructures an Italian villa for new uses – Warsaw’s new water plant refers to neighbouring 19th century buildings – additions to a traditional Luxembourg house are expressed in modern forms – transforming a 1970s office building with a transparent copper skin – returning a 19th century London church to religious and community use – simplicity and permanence define additions to an ancient Spanish castle – distinctive copper-clad forms redefine the urban role of a disused bath house in Italy

8–11 12–15

A Fusion of New and Old Copper Skyline

12

16

16–17 18–21

Timeless Copper

18

22

22–25 Pure Water under Copper Roofs 26–29 Copper Cottage 30–31 Box Top

26

30

32–33

Copper for House on the Rock

34–35 Timeless Brass 36–38 Urban Shell

32

34

39 Back to the Future
36

– new projects in our next issue and Copper Architecture news.

COPPER ARCHITECTURE FORUM 32/2012

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Divine intervention
A new visitors‘ centre in the southern Swedish city of Lund uses brassclad faceted forms to link together disparate existing buildings and to regenerate the square fronting the 12th century cathedral that it serves.
by Chris Hodson

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Architect Carmen Izquierdo’s design, developed from a competition-winning entry, is centred on a thoroughly contemporary brass and glass intervention winding its way between several old buildings, binding them to the complete scheme. The street frontage to Kyrkogatan incorporates a brass canopy, simply continuing the roof plane of the adjacent building, with an entry forecourt below. The building continues back to Kungsgatan, then extends towards the cathedral with an ex-

pressive form – the auditorium – terminating with a funnel window, symbolically reaching up towards the historic towers.

ral way by capturing the scale and lines of the existing buildings. The motto of the winning entry was ‘Portal and Atrium’, and the ambitions of the original proposal are followed up with a completely new programme in the final design.”

Adding to the Historical Strata
Carmen Izquierdo said: “The vi-

sion was to create a contemporary building that adds a new layer to the historical strata that make up central Lund. The new building endeavours to blend in with the townscape in a natu-

Brass... a natural material that gives a rich vibrant surface mellowing with age to blend in with the townscape.

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Internally, the dominant space is the entrance lobby, served both from the cathedral square and Kungsgatan. With its double height atrium, it is a convivial meeting place used for reception, exhibitions and refreshments, overlooked by offices on the upper floor. Here, the solidity of the plank shuttering embossed concrete walls contrasts with the openness created by fully glazed partitions. The expressive auditorium is designed as a unique space with its distinctive, trapezoidal funnel window framing views of the cathedral spires.
Architect: Carmen Izquierdo Copper Installer: Malmö Plåtservice AB Copper Product: Nordic Brass Photos: Åke E:son Lindman

A Gateway for Visitors
Carmen Izquierdo added: “The building creates interesting

outer and inner sequential spaces and will be a gateway for visitors to the Cathedral and a forum for in-depth study and discussion. The new building has a simple but expressive design that interplays with the surrounding townscape through its angles and declivities. Brass was chosen for the new building’s external skin as a natural material that gives a rich, vibrant surface. As the material mellows with age, the building will gradually blend in with the townscape.”
In its new, bright state, the building is certainly assertive and demands a response from visitors. But as the brass darkens naturally with age over the first few years, it will take on a more subtle, timeless quality. The forms and movement of the building across the site succeed in preserving important historic views while also creating new perspectives. More intimate and varied public spaces are also generated around and within the visitors’ centre. At its opening last year, Bishop Antje Jackelén aptly described the new building as “the Cathedral’s extended embrace”.

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DEPOT

CONFERENCE AND CHAT ROOMS BOOKSTORE ARKEN AUDITORIUM

GROUP ROOM

OFFICE

CLEANNING STAFF BOOKSTORE KITCHEN LAURENTIIHALL

PASSAGE

OPEN AREA DOWN

OFFICE

HALL BOOKSTORE ARKEN YARD STAIRWELL FOYER ELEV.

DEPOT / STORE
YARD STAIRWELL CONFERENCE

RESTROOM

OFFICE

ELEV. STAFF

DEPOT

WAITING

EXHIBITION

ELEKTRICITY DEPOT / STORE

YARD KUNGSGATAN

INFORMAL MEETINGPOINT

CHECKROOM

RESTROOM

PORTAL KYRKOGATAN OFFICE

REPRO/ PRINTING

CLEANING

ENVIRONMENTAL ROOM

OPEN AREA DOWN

PASSAGE/ LIBRARY GROUP ROOM OFFICE

REFRESHMENT
OFFICE GROUP ROOM

DEPOT / STORE ACTIVITY ROOM

DEPOT / STORE

TECHNIQUE

STAIRS

Ground Floor Plan

Upper Floor Plan

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Copper Continuity
Architects Braaksma & Roos’ interpretation of the country house Orangery uses copper to provide contextual continuity – but as a thoroughly modern material, as they discuss here. Commissioned by SAS Institute Inc., we developed a plan for their headquarters in The Netherlands. SAS (formerly known as “Statistical Analysis System”) is based in a grand, historic country house in Huizen. When the company approached us, the house had an extension wing that dated from the early 1960’s in decay. The essence of our design concept lay in replacing this extension with a contemporary interpretation of the Orangery – a traditional outbuilding associated with grand country houses. This was intended as a legible addition to the historical context of the original house, whilst at the same time setting itself apart as a thoroughly modern building.

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A dialogue was developed between old and new. The original house is mainly defined by white plaster with glass as the collateral material, whereas the new Orangery is effectively built of glass with secondary internal elements executed as white plastered boxes. The entire Orangery roof is covered in copper, just as the distinctive, original curved bays of the house. Pre-patinated copper perforated screens are used to form the main doors to the east elevation, adding to the Orangery’s air of transparency.

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©Kim Zwarts

A dialogue was developed between old and new.

©Kim Zwarts

Transparent Copper With the transparency of its glass and perforated copper facades and its physical separation, the Orangery stands apart from the main house and the surrounding landscape “washes” through its space. To further diffuse the transition from inside to out, the interior stone floor extends outside to follow the outline of the roof’s projection. A wooden deck extends around this stone floor, given more width on the South side to form a fine terrace.

©Kim Zwarts

The main function of the Orangery on the ground floor is to “Meet & Greet”, largely within the dining area. In addition, a separate interior and exterior Auditorium and a lecture room are also situated here. The first floor accommodates two open plan offices, as well as cellular offices, while secondary spaces are contained within the white boxes. Above these boxes, situated on the north side, the copper roof lifts up like a bonnet, to house the air exhaust.

Architect: Braaksma & Roos Architectural Office www.braaksma-roos.nl COPPeR INSTAlleRS Roof: Ridder Metalen Dak- en Wandsystemen BV Screens: Non Ferro BV COPPeR PRODUCTS Roof: TECU® Patina Screens: TECU® Patina Mesh Photos: Paul Becquevort, Kim Zwarts

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DETAILS

Detailed cross section

DETAILS
Detailed transverse cross section

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Pollard Thomas edwards architects

A FUSION OF
This project showcases creation of a new life for old buildings with facilities to meet 21st century needs, whilst respecting and celebrating their integrity. A new bronze-clad extension is both a dramatic statement and a delicate intervention – the whole is a harmonious fusion of new and old.
Located in the Abbey Road Riverside Conservation Area of the Roding Valley in east London, the locally listed Granary building had been derelict and unoccupied for some considerable time and was in urgent need of comprehensive restoration to bring it back into use. In 2009 planning permission was granted for a scheme designed by Schmidt Hammer Lassen (SHL) for a new Creative Industries Quarter centred on the former Granary and Malthouse buildings.

NEW AND OLD

A light Gentle Touch
Pollard Thomas Edwards architects (PTEa) was subsequently appointed to develop the SHL scheme – the essence being to optimise the use of the space, both in the new and old buildings, whilst at the same time preserving the original character and historical references. Although substantial work was needed to repair and restore the original fabric, as far as possible the ethos of the conversion was sensitive restoration – a light and gentle touch. The refurbished Granary, with its new bronze-clad extension will form the new headquarters base for the developer and contractor Rooff, as well as occupation by other creative and commercial users. Rooff have introduced sustainable construction methods, to deliver the highest quality working environment at a viable cost. The plan form and shape of the new extension is respectful of the original building and takes its cue from its strong gabled form. The new materials, notably bronze panels, further complement the original. The entrance opens directly into a central vertical circulation hub between the two wings, which has been carefully inserted into the old building fabric – with modern materials, colour and lighting complementing the background historic fabric. This hub gives a new and dynamic heart to the building, fully accessible to the public who enter. The new accommodation is attached to the existing via the vertical circulation core and a high-level bridge link.

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River frontage before work commenced...

...and after completion.

Catalyst for Regeneration
The completion of the Granary and the construction of the stunning new bronze clad extension form part of the first phase of the longer term regeneration objectives for the Roding riverside frontage and is very much seen as an important catalyst for further regeneration in the area. It is being held up as a beacon of good design and conservation practices, delivered in one project, and won the ‘Commercial’ sector of the 2011 World Architecture News Awards.

Architects: Pollard Thomas Edwards architects - www.ptea.co.uk Initial design architects: Schmidt Hammer Lassen Copper installer: Roles Broderick Roofing Ltd Copper products: TECU® Bronze Photos: ©Tim Crocker

The entrance opens directly into a central vertical circulation hub between the two wings.

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Ground Floor Plan

3rd Floor Plan

INTERVIEW
Chris Hodson discusses the design of the bronze cladding on this project with Andrew Stokes, project architect at Pollard Thomas Edwards architects. CH: How did you develop the design of the prismatic extension? AS: initially, working with SHL, we used techniques such as solid and void relationship studies to explore form, fenestration and sun control. CH: How did the selection of bronze cladding for the new extension come about? AS: The initial SHL proposal used Corten steel but this was changed to copper due to client concerns over weathering and waterproofing details. We then reviewed copper, bronze and brass and various other metal cladding materials but in the end bronze was chosen. The design intention was for a modern aesthetic and detailing to the extension, to contrast dynamically with the historic context, whilst at the same time acknowledging this history by using a traditional building material like bronze or copper.

CH: Did you also consider material changes over time? AS: The weathering characteristics were also key, as the roof – or inclined wall – is very visible and will weather differently to vertical surfaces. We were advised that in the short to medium term the bronze was likely to weather slightly more evenly. CH: What about sustainability and environmental considerations – were they important? AS: Yes, definitely. Like copper, bronze has sound and proven sustainable credentials in terms of its exceptional durability and lifespan, the fact that it is virtually maintenance free and that it can be completely recycled. CH: How was successful detailed design of the facades achieved? AS: We used envelope working models to explore different ways of expressing the metal cladding – for example, panel shape and size, and vertical, horizontal or inclined joints. The shape of the building called for a more 3 dimensional approach, as the roof is essentially an inclined wall, and these models allowed us to understand the interplay of key elements such as windows, rooflights and the main gutter with various metal panel configurations.

Studies for the extension exploring solid and void relationships.

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Cross section through new extension, hub and existing building.

The models enabled us to explore solutions for maintaining the integrity of the prismoidal shape by creating a similar appearance on all faces of the building, not only in terms of the cladding, but in the form, shape and detailing of the windows and the roof-lighting which we felt should be expressed as ‘windows in the roof ’ rather than traditional rooflights. CH: How do you feel about the completed bronze cladding? AS: We are very pleased with the final realisation. The bronze is weathering well, the edge, reveal and arris details are crisp and clean, and the horizontal format of the panels and staggered vertical joints integrate well with the random window location and sizing. The subtle undulations of the panels lighten and soften the ‘newness’ of the extension, which marries well with the patina of age we endeavoured to leave evident on the historic buildings. Careful consideration was given, in liaison with the cladding subcontractor, to all junctions of materials with the cladding and the detailing and setting-out of all joints, which has paid off in the final look of the building.

Like copper, bronze has sound and proven sustainable credentials in terms of its exceptional durability and lifespan.

Extension envelope working models.

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COPPER

SKYLINE

The regeneration of rooftop areas above Helsinki’s City Centre Mall provides a sustainable solution to providing much-needed office space. extensive use of pre-patinated copper cladding to this new intervention adds to the historic green copper backdrop of the city’s skyline.
The Evli Bank Office Tower is a new building in an unusual location – constructed on top of the huge City Centre Mall in the very heart of Helsinki city, which houses a mixture of offices and shops. Evli Bank already operated from various locations in the mall, but wanted to have its entire staff under the same roof. It is nearly impossible to find empty building land in the centre of Helsinki and to build a new office at the old familiar address on top of the mall provided a neat solution. The new five-storey building uses up wasted roof top space including old car parking areas. The crisp commercial-style building sits within a paved forum setting, partly enclosed by high-level parts of the existing Mall. The copper-clad, L-shaped office building defines a new, fully glazed atrium box, flooding light into the internal windows. This space then burrows downwards within the original building below, introducing daylight and providing vertical circulation.
by Hannele Kuusisto and Chris Hodson

many copper-clad buildings in the vicinity. Its high level location demanded a prestigious material and the parent buildings of the Mall already had copper façades. The Evli Bank façades use pre-patinated copper with flecks of green revealing a little of the dark oxide below, giving a varied, lively surface. This material is then used in two forms: curved profile sheets as a continuous, modulated surface and a horizontal system of profiled louvers creating transparency. The 90mm deep louvre sections are fixed to assembly profiles, which have a dark oxidised copper surface, using acid-proof rivets. The combinations of profiled and louvred facades, enhanced with their living pre-patinated copper surfaces, add a rich, green layer to Helsinki’s historic skyline.

Material Determined by Context
Architects: Arkkitehtitoimisto CJN Oy Copper Installer: Suomen Ohutlevyasennus Oy, Lai-Teräs Oy (louvre system) Copper Products: Nordic Green™ Living profiled sheets and Nordic Green™ Living Louvred System Photos: Matti Kallio

According to Olli Rouhiainen of architects CJN, the two most important considerations in choosing copper for the façades were the important cultural and historic city centre context, and the presence of

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Cross section through the Mall showing the new building‘s rooftop position.

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by Chris Hodson

Timeless

COPPER
In its inspirational rural setting at the foot of Italy’s Monferrato Hills, Rocca Civalieri was the summer sanctuary of Piedmontese nobles from the late Middle Ages. The villa and its associated buildings have now been restored, adapted and drawn together by a thoroughly contemporary, copper-clad intervention which fully respects the original building fabric, to create a convention centre, hotel and spa.

A timeless skin of pre-oxidised copper is used to express the new additions, starting as a ‘rusticated’ base to the original classical villa. The horizontally stratified dark copper then develops into a new spa building which defines and divides separate external areas either side. The overall composition aims to create “a place with clearly recognizable connotations – respecting the existing architectonic and landscape values.” As architect Stefania Masera explained: “The demands of a building complex accommodating various different functions but still presenting itself as unitary whole suggested the creation of new circulation routes on two levels leading into a new addition. This addition then defines a new, open, main entrance courtyard to the complex. It also establishes, in conjunction with existing buildings now converted to bedrooms and suites, a more intimate courtyard characterised by a central, light timber pergola structure. The copper additions draw together the diversity of buildings and their spatial organisation, creating a place with clearly recognizable connotations.”

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Alterations to the original fabric have been minimised and focused on the creation of flexible spaces to meet changing needs of the complex. on the ground floor, in addition to entrance, reception and bar, there are various communal and meeting rooms. The first floor houses a conference room with a small foyer and restaurant with kitchen and staff room, and hotel rooms and suites occupy the second floor.
Architects: Studio Baietto Battiato Bianco Associated Architects www.baiettobattiatobianco.com Copper Product: TECU® Oxid Photos: Studio Baietto Battiato Bianco - Torino TO

Site plan

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South-East facade

South-West facade

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by Chris Hodson

Copper Roofs
Commissioned in 1876, the Filtry Waterworks was designed by British engineer William Lindley, who had previously gained recognition working with railways and, particularly, municipal infrastructure projects in numerous European cities. He designed the first underground sewers in continental Europe and, together with his sons, he designed systems for cities in Germany and elsewhere – including St. Petersburg, Budapest, Prague and Moscow – also turning his attention to urban planning. At Warsaw, he created a water purification system that continued to operate until the latest regeneration work. Here, he also collaborated with the architect Julian Herde with a complex of buildings generally faced with red ceramic tiles and decorative sandstone elements. Roofs were metal sheet on structural steel and windows steel-framed. A key aspect of Filtry’s success in its urban context is the green landscape covering about 70% of the site area. This unique and historic infrastructure complex is ‘protected’ locally and listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Pure Water under

Upgrading Performance
The well-loved landmark endured various changes after the 19th-century including additions in the 1970’s which took no account of the local environment and attached no importance to the original buildings’ scale and form. In the mid-1980s, restoration of the original buildings began under the current architect, Richard Sobolewski of Dorjon International, including replacement of the zinc-coated iron plate roofs with copper. Technical and performance requirements have driven the latest, recently completed new treatment building. Water quality has now been improved within modern parameters and in line with European Union standards, and the use of chlorine dioxide for water disinfection and treatment has also been substantially reduced.

With thanks to Richard Sobolewski of Dorjon International for help with this article. Architect: Dorjon International Copper Products: Nordic Brown™ Light Copper Installer: Eurodach, Piaseczno Photos: Sebastian Taciak (new building exteriors), Richard Sobolewski (original buildings and interior)

Site Plan, showing the 30ha complex, with the new building highlighted red and original 19th century buildings black.

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The regeneration of a remarkable 19th-century water treatment complex serving Warsaw takes a traditional approach – with steeply-pitched copper roofs above brick walls, referencing without copying the style of the original architecture.

Original 19th century buildings (shown black on the Site Plan) have already been restored with copper roofs.

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The architects faced major challenges in accommodating the complex technical demands of the plant upgrade. From an architectural perspective, they have taken the original buildings as their reference point. They have rejected the notion of introducing modern forms and interventions as a contrast to the remaining fabric. Instead, they have embraced the architectural language of massive 19th century infrastructure buildings. Richard Sobolewski commented: “ We have not replicated the original architecture

ding dominate internally. Natural daylighting plays an important role where appropriate, via generous provision of rooflights and substantial vertical glazing.

Bringing Life to Surfaces
The problem of large windowless façades, dictated by buildings of this type, has been successfully resolved by planted embankments, creating a park-like landscape, as well as contrasting material textures and colours. The interplay of surfaces is also emphasised by the way the roofs are faceted and shaped. Different forms of pre-oxidised copper sheet have been used, including standing-seams alternating with the wider batten-role joints to generate a rhythm across the long-strip installation. It is particularly appropriate that such a large amount of copper roof surface is used on a complex dedicated to the delivery of clean water to a city’s population. This is a clear reminder of copper’s long history in serving us with safe water within our homes.

but have developed a similar character for the new block using modern materials. Extensive copper roofing plays a central role here and gives the permanence that buildings of this type merit.”
Key to the architects’ approach is the differentiation of architectural forms for individual building elements. For example, steeply pitched roofs with strongly expressed gables covering particular areas contrast with landscaped ‘green’ roofs over the main filter hall. Dramatic interiors result from the large spaces generated by this type of infrastructure building, and brick and ceramic clad-

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Cross Section through the new building

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Copper Cottage
Architects team31 explain the rationale behind contemporary interventions to a traditional luxembourg village house.
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T

he owners of this 19th century cottage in a small village north of Luxembourg decided that they would retire there. The house, as it was, had the charm of an old cottage but did not offer the required comfort for a main
Photo: Paulo Lobo – Luxedit

residence. The attached barn was being used as a garage and shed and the idea was to transform this huge empty volume into a new living room with a kitchen and to alter the existing cottage as little as possible. Various considerations influenced our design. The existing cottage has very small windows which give uninteresting views of neighbouring buildings, roofs and streets. The owners wanted views of their own property, gardens and the landscape. The existing stairs in the cottage were narrow, too steep and considered to be dangerous. It was decided that they should be replaced with wider and less steep staircases for safety and comfort.

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As the cottage will now be used by older people wishing to spend the rest of their lives there, it seemed obvious to design the layout in preparation for potential future mobility issues. As a result, it was necessary to locate a kitchen, living room, office, sanitary facilities and sleeping rooms all on the ground floor of the building, whilst retaining the possibility of a second, independent living space in necessary to clearly define the new parts of the building and the existing 19th century building. The owners wished to retain the authenticity of the existing cottage, which was probably built between 1805 and 1820.
Photo: Paulo Lobo – Luxedit Photo: team31 Photo: Paulo Lobo – Luxedit

the cottage. From an architectural point of view, we considered it

Designers’ Response
Working with the interior designer, our analysis of the owners’ proposal rapidly revealed that the barn was not big enough to accommodate the new living room and kitchen. Moreover, there were not enough windows on the facade to allow sufficient light into the living room and they did not offer the desired views of the landscape and the property. It was therefore obvious that an extension was necessary. In accordance with the wishes of the owners, the forms of the new volumes signal a contrast between our way of living now and the way we lived some 200 years ago. As a result, the old and the new are interrelated - yet provide a contrasting effect. The transition from old to new does not operate on one precise borderline but rather by the effects of transparency and sightlines from old to new and vice versa. The new, very large plate glass windows open the perspectives up to the more set back location of the cottage. The old cottage has been kept in its original

Photo: Paulo Lobo – Luxedit

state (almost), with its configuration of small rooms, low ceilings and exposed beams and old stone and parquet floors. The facades and roofs of the new volumes are characterised by a covering of copper – used here as a modern material. It is both rustic and modern, and with a visual appearance that develops in sympathy with the rural setting in the north of the country.

Architects: team31 architecture office (Folmer/Rodesch/Weyland) www.team31.lu Interior Designer: Laurent Biever Copper Installer: KALBFUSS GMBH Copper Products: TECU® Classic and TECU® Zinn

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Copper – rustic and modern... developing in sympathy with setting the rural setting.

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Photo: Paulo Lobo – Luxedit

BOX TOP
An undistinguished 1970s office building in the Netherlands has been transformed with a rooftop extension encased by a transparent copper skin enveloping the original building.
The building owners, Trinité Automation Uithoorn (NL), sought to office building. As well as upgrading with higher energy performance and other improvements, the project also needed to create more space. This was achieved with a rooftop extension providing a canteen and meeting rooms, as well as a large multi-purpose seminar room. Here, high, sloping ceilings give a distinctive character to the internal space.
Photo: Erik ten Hove

by Chris Hodson

express the company’s innovative nature in the expansion of their

Original office building before alteration.

Integrating Intervention
box-like form, firmly integrated into the existing building fabric and reacting with existing facades – not just a new storey sat on top. The new box is completely covered in a transparent copper mesh skin, simply passing over windows, frames and solid walls behind, providing a seamless continuum expressing the geometric shape of the addition.
Cross section showing new roof level intervention.
Drawing: Erik ten Hove

Externally, the intervention is conceived as a three dimensional

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Photo:Hans van Nieuwkoop

COPPER CLOSE-UP
The designers, Architektenburo Ten Hove, commented:

“We deliberately chose copper for the mesh skin, where the colour of the material naturally changes over time and therefore indicates the age of the building.” Using a grid of equilateral triangles gives
freedom from the constraints of linear structures and, with the copper mesh, diffuses the box surfaces externally. But internally, the mesh screen still allows clear views to the outside while providing solar shading, and inward opening windows allow ventilation and cleaning.

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Photo: Hans van Nieuwkoop

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Photo: Hans van Nieuwkoop

Architect: Architektenburo Ten Hove, www.archiTENHOVE.nl Copper Installer: Vetkamp Soest bv

Copper products: TeCU®Classic Mesh Photos: Hans van Nieuwkoop, Erik ten Hove

COPPER ARCHITECTURE FORUM 32/2012

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Photo: Erik ten Hove

Photo: Erik ten Hove

Drawings: Erik ten Hove
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Copper for house on the rock
Regeneration of this 19th century london church involved an extensive refurbishment programme to return the building to its former use. But it also involved a modern extension to provide a permanent home for the growing, 3,000 or so, congregation of the Nigerian-based‚ House on the Rock‘ church, as architects Paul Davis + Partners describe.

St George’s Church in the tufnell Park Conservation Area was built in 1867 as a historical, circular building based on a 5th Century Greek Church and modelled on Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre. The building has had a colourful past. Saved from demolition in 1973, actor George Murcell turned the church into the St George’s Theatre. More recently it fell into the hands of squatters and it was only when they were finally evicted in 2006 that the project was able to commence. As well as its primary function as a church, the building is also used as a community
32 COPPER ARCHITECTURE FORUM 32/2012

centre, adult learning centre, crèche and a venue for other social events. to meet these demands, a new, copper-clad extension creates a contemporary architectural solution – contrasting with the church aesthetic, yet remaining subservient to the original building and making no attempt to emulate its style. This modern 2-storey extension links the existing church and the bell tower and provides flexible multi-purpose spaces to meet the needs of both church and community. The new intervention is separated from the original fabric of the church by a continuous band of glazing.

Matching the contemporary materiality of the new building with the stone and slate of the existing church provided a welcome opportunity to explore solutions for an ever-occurring challenge. Copper, with timber cladding and glass, provided the answer with a naturally changing surface and an air of permanence. The designers endeavoured to minimise energy demand by considering the embodied energy of materials and using recycled materials wherever possible.

Copper... a naturally changing surface and an air of permanence

GENERAL NOTES. All dimensions to be che and/or preparation of any Sizes of and dimensions See structural engineers Sizes of and dimensions See service engineers d This drawing to be read specifications and other

DO NOT SCALE F

Cons
PRAYER ROOM

FFL 38.440

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16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9

8 7

6 5

Architects: Paul Davis + Partners - www.pauldavisandpartners.com Copper Installer: Guaranteed Asphalt Ltd Copper Product: TECU® Oxid
SECOND FLOOR TOWER
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Photos: Adam Parker

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LOBBY
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OFFICE

OFFICE

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PASTORS OFFICE

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1

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FOYER
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(00)110

Rooflight over

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FELLOWSHIP HALL COMMUNITY USE

MEETING ROOM
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Work In Progress

First floor plan
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description

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project no.

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1:100 @ A1

COPPER ARCHITECTURE FORUM 32/2012
FIRST FLOOR PLAN

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project client

Genera

First Flo

St. Geo Tufnell House

X

Timeless

BRASS

Castle entrance approached via the straight staircase bridge with curved brass handrail.

A gradual regeneration is taking place to the ancient Ribadavia Castle in the Ourense area of north-west Spain, heralded by new brass elements transforming the entrances to the castle. Architect Miguel Angel Calvo Salve describes his approach to these interventions, which add an ageless simplicity and sense of permanence.
Since 1999 we have been working on a lengthy process of study, research, consolidation and retrieval of the remains of Ribadavia Castle. The remains are extremely fragile due to their abandonment and the neglect of local government in the past. Ribadavia Castle is located within the historic area of the village and was built incorporating the old wall and supported by a series of circular and square towers on a large rock outcrop. There is no record of the earliest human settlement, apart from the fact that a necropolis and a temple existed in the upper part of the town, where the castle now stands.

Architect: Miguel Angel Calvo Salve Copper Specialist: Aceros Argimiro Photos: Miguel Angel Calvo Salve

Establishing a Methodology
We believe that maintaining, transforming or reusing this historic building requires at least that we understand its physical and emotional realities, in its present state and throughout its history. Through very careful observation and systematic documentation, intensive research of historical sources, technical analysis, study of pathologies, identification of traces and memories, and finally a reflective intuition, we have established a methodology expressed in a “Master Plan” for this castle that will substantiate the basis for future interventions in the monument, thus creating the potential for its transformation and reuse.

Strength and Malleability
A part of the intervention was to design the entrances to the ruins of the Castle. It was decided to make various individual elements in brass, and also bronze, to give a jewel-like quality amongst the ancient building fabric. These included access bridges with stairs, gateway doors and exhibition display elements. The choice of brass was based on its qualities as a material that ages with time, developing a patina – just as the stone walls have done. Its strength and malleability was essential in the creation of these disparate elements.

34 COPPER ARCHITECTURE FORUM 32/2012

The brass main doors appear impenetrable with a strong silhouette and square apertures reminiscent of a portcullis.

Smaller brass doors in the Necropolis share the open linear grid.

Simple, folded brass elements are used to hold information display boards.

The choice of brass was based on its qualities as a material that ages with time, developing a patina – just as the stone walls have done.

The brass Necropolis door is more open in character with a linear grid highlighting the stone archway.

COPPER ARCHITECTURE FORUM 32/2012 COPPER ARCHITECTURE FORUM 32/2012

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36 COPPER ARCHITECTURE FORUM 32/2012

URBAN SHELL
Architect luisa Fontana explains how a shell-like copper and glass intervention regenerates a disused public bath house and reorientates the building to define a new urban square.
The original, early 20th century building had been unused for over 40 years and its previously hidden, undistinguished rear façade was exposed by the creation of a new public square in the 1980s. The restoration and expansion of the building provided an opportunity to redefine a new urban role. The European funded project is for a new Centre for Cultural Activities for Youth and is unique in Italy. It provides a link between the University and the World of Employment, creating an international focus to serve the local community.

Rear facade of the disused bath house before addition and renovation.

A Bold Approach
The regeneration – carried out in conjunction with engineers Arup (structure and energy strategies) and Manens (installation) – reflects a bold architectural and urban planning approach. It involves restoration of the original building and addition of a new volume, in the form of “shell” made of steel, copper and glass. The profile of the shell develops a close relationship with its urban context. It is
N E W S

‘closed’ next to the old buildings, forming an intimate interior space, then opening up with a large glazed front drawing in the new square. The main façade onto the square is completely glazed, with micropArchitect: Luisa Fontana / FONTANAtelier Copper Installer: Roberto Canova Copper Product: TECU® Classic Photos: FONTANAtelier

erforated brise soleil that protect the interior from direct sunlight, and characterised by different heights. A second opening – smaller and varying in shape, is on the north side, opposite the old buildings.

Floor Plan and Urban Context

COPPER ARCHITECTURE FORUM 32/2012

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Energy Independent
The building is also an example of smart design and energy self-sufficiency, to minimise energy consumption and carbon emissions. Dynamic thermal modelling software, developed for the Arup building energy simulation, enabled solutions to be optimized and energy saving benefits quantified. The project has achieved an ‘A’ certification in the Eco Domus energy class with a system developed by VI. Energy. The result is an integrated organism, energy independent from the network, where climate and environment interact. Various renewable techniques are incorporated including geothermal energy, the pre-heating of primary air through an underground maze and self-generation of electricity using biodiesel. The design optimizes natural lighting and ventilation, while the building materials provide a high performance, thermal inertia envelope.

Volumetric Design Studies

Cross Sections

38 COPPER ARCHITECTURE FORUM 32/2012

Copper architecture Forum 33
With a change of direction, our next issue focuses on new-build copper projects and how they are achieved. Alongside comprehensive case studies, including Copper in Detail working drawing and Close-up focus pages, we shall be discussing technical and topical issues – notably the impact of “Building Information Modelling” (BIM) techniques on architectural freedom.

Project Preview
Shown here is a competition visual for The Museum of the History of Polish Jews in Warsaw - but how will it look in reality? You can find out in our next issue. The competition-winning design, by Architects Lahdelma & Mahlamäki (working in conjunction with Kurylowic & Associates in Poland) aims to create a ‘lantern in the park’. The design features a layered facade design using pre-patinated copper in combination with glazing. The play of advanced LED lighting behind the decorated glass on the green corrugated copper will play a key role in this luminescence.

Register now at www.copperconcept.org to make sure you receive your copy of issue 33.
Forum Copper Architecture from with Architecture Austria
COPPER ARChitECtuRE

DAS MAGAZIN FÜR KUPFER UND ARCHITEKTUR I

3 0/20 11

Copper Architecture Forum with Architecture from Austria Belgium Czech Republic Denmark
DEL RAME IN ARCHITETT URA I 3 1/20 11
COPPER ARChitECtuRE FORuM

Finland France Greece Germany Holland Hungary Italy Luxemburg Norway Poland Russia Spain Sweden Switzerland UK

LA RIVISTA

Architecture from
Austria • Belgium Czech Republic • Denmark

ˇ FÓRUM O MEDI
Č ASOPIS O MĚDI A JE JÍM V YUŽITÍ VE STAVEBNIC T VÍ • 26/2009

new initiatives from Copper in architecture
The European Copper in Architecture Campaign was set up by panEuropean and local industry associations with the support of participating copper fabricators to promote copper and its alloys in architectural applications. It achieves this through various means, principally: • an architect-focused website copperconcept – with a substantial and rapidly growing project gallery. • a pan-European architectural awards programme – the latest, 15th iteration attracting 66 entries of a particularly high standard. • Copper Architecture Forum magazine – with a circulation of over 25,000 throughout Europe and beyond. We are always looking for new ways to engage with architects and designers, particularly to find out about and publish inspirational designs and projects. Now, we are introducing a number of new initiatives: • Share your copper project – simply upload images and information yourself by following the instructions on the website. • Copperconcept Newsletter – register now via the website for this short, emailed update and you could win an iPad. • Copper and the Home Awards 2012 – seeking innovative and inspirational design ideas for the home from furniture to fittings and finishes, with categories for professional designers and students.

Belgium Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Greece Germany Holland Hungary Italy Luxemburg

TIDNING FÖR BYGGBRANSCHEN OM KOPPAR I
KUPARIFOORU

UM I ORArchitecture from KU PAR IFO
2 9/20 10
EHTI KUPARIN AIKAKAUSL KÄYTÖSTÄ OLLISUUDES AKENNUSTE SA• 24/2008

Finland • France Greece • Germany

FORuM

Austria

KUPARI

• Belgiu

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Inspirational architecture and design with copper from:
COPPER ARChitECtuRE FORuM

Norway Poland Russia Spain Sweden Switzerland UK

Czech Repub lic • Denm Finland • Franc e any

Holland • Hungary Italy • Luxemburg Norway • Poland Russia • Spain

KU PA RI
lehti

MI

www.copperconcept.org

FOORUMI

kuparis

FO OR UM
ta arkkite htuuris sa • 28 /20

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Austria • Belgium Czech Republic • Denmark Finland • France

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Greece • Germ Holland

• Hungary burg d

Obytný komplex Frederikskaj v Kodani Nová měděná střecha pro katedrálu v Roskilde Accordia – britský bytový komplex Sportovní hala v Budapešti

www.copperconcept.org

rconcept.org ww w.coppe

Greece • Germany Holland • Hungary Italy • Luxemburg Norway • Poland Russia • Spain Sweden • Switzerland United Kingdom
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Italy • Luxem Norway
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Sweden • Switzerland United Kingdom

• Polan

Russia

• Spain erland

www.copperconcept.org
Sweden • Switz United Kingd om
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www.co

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8 Transparenta inskriptioner i Lettland – 10 Treklöver i koppar 22 Cipea Villa Nanjing i Kina – 26 En flytande bronstrapp – 36 Dipoli, en modern klassiker

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minassa ri Kööpenha pääkontto eskus n juutalaisk Nordin uusi GN Store skus voittaja: Müncheni vierailuke Copper Awardin kansallispuiston uusi Unkarin Aggtec –

KAUNIS
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KoKo VUoSIS

oNKo KUPAR

ADAN – TAI PIDEM PÄÄNK VUoDEN IN • KUPAR 2009 I INSPIR IARKKITEHTU KUPARIPALKI oI • KUPAR NNoN VoITTA URI KESTÄ I oSUI KULTA JA • ISLAND VÄÄ? • SUoNE HAKAN CoPPER EN IEMENRANTA 6 – KUNNo STUSPRoJEK T

Register for the Copperconcept newsletter for a chance to win an

iPad 2!

Register for our NEWSLETTER in any of the available 17 languages to find out about the latest copper clad buildings and for a chance to win an iPad 2.
All new registrations between

1 March and 30 June 2012

will be entered into a prize draw for an iPad 2. The winner will be informed via e-mail.

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More information on these and all our initiatives can be found on the website – www.copperconcept.org

COPPER ARCHITECTURE FORUM 32/2012

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www.copperconcept.org

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