You are on page 1of 488

-

----

·-- -

--

.

-

0

L

D

.VOLUME

P· L

THE

A

'I; -.•, 4

Y

P.Q-tf-R--T·H.

CONTAINING

.s.

GEORGE A OREEN, TllE PINNER OF -WAKEFIELD.

THE FIRST PART OF JERONYMO. THE S}'ANISH TRAGEDY, BY THOMAS KYD. THE HONEST WHORE, PART I. BY THOMAS DEKKER.

THE HONEST WHORE, PART II.

a

BY THE S.AME.

A SELECT COLLECTION 0 L D OF PLAYS. IN TWELVE VOLUMES. T H E COI.I.ECTED

A

SELECT

COLLECTION

0

L

D

OF

PLAYS.

IN

TWELVE

VOLUMES.

T

H

E

COI.I.ECTED

S E C 0

N

D

E

D I

~

AND

COLLA T.ED \VI TH

THE

WITH

I

0

N,

OLD COPIES.

NOTES

CRITICAL

AND

EXPLANATORY.

 

V 0

L

U

M

E;

Ill.

L

0

N

D

0

N,

 

PRINTED

BY

J•

NICHOLS; '

F 0 R

J

D 0 D S LE Y,

P ALL

M A L L •

MDCCLXXX.

GEORGE A GREENE,

THE

}?INNER OF W.t\1\.EFIELD.

yoL. Ill.

A

,., '"' IUUIII'···_ T HE Author of this ·Play is unknown. · Philil" ancl .
,.,
'"'
IUUIII'···_
T
HE
Author of this
·Play is unknown. · Philil" ancl
. Winftanley arcribe 1t to John Heywood, author of the

Folll'" Jl's, and otner pieees which bear not the leafl refem- blance to the prefent peiformanct. The ~ory on which it i1 grounded ferm• to have ill foundation in the particular tradi- tions of the Town of W akefteld: that part wftich relates to

Robin Hood is contained in one of the popular Ballads con· cerning that celebrated Outlaw, printed in the firft volume of

Evans'a Col/eilitm tf OIJ BaW, p. 99•

Tqis Ballad is men•

tioned, by Drayton, in liis Po!J-o/!Ji.;•, Song the Twentieth· •

eighth:

·

.

"

l_t cJumc'd aie in

her ~urfa on Kirkbey call

her eye.

"

Where merry Robin Hood, that honeft thief, doth lie;

"

Beht>lding fitly t90 before how W akefield 1tood,

"

She duttt not only think of lufly Robi11 Hood.

"

But of hia ~rry man, the Pindar of the town

"

Of Waltefiekl, George a Green, whofe famca fo far &lW

"

blown

"

For their fo valiant fight, that every free man'i fong

u

Can tell you of the fame, quoth fue be talk'd on long,

"

For ye wc:re merry lada, and thofe were merry daya; &c."

And Richard Braithwaite, in the StrajlpMh for t1H Dl'lli4

r6r5, Svo. p~ 203. f~tys:

" At leaft fuch places labour to make known,

" Aa former tinies have henour"d with renown.

A

a

"Se

~4.

~

" So by thy true relation "t may appear

" They are no others now, than as they were

" Ever elleem'd by auntient times records,

"-Wbi'ch futlll.be~b•eefit:ia few~.-­

;, · The ·fi;'lfwi~rliar'flnie~d t~·rhb~.= --- :~.c : !

" Is merry Wak.efield and her Pindar too :

" Which Fame hath blaz.'d with all that did belong,

" Unto ~hat Towne in many gl~dfome fong: ,

" The Pincl\irs'"''hloiir,'and'haw:fliin 'he fiood,

:. ·~ In ' th' Townes . 'de{~~ce ·'gh!~1l;.~J{r~b~l.Robin Hoocl,

•• · How ftoUt:ly llc: ~av'd bi~telfe,and would, · . ".In fpite of Robin bring his ·Jtorfe to th' fold; .

,

" His manyMilY.games wbich

:w·ere

to be

feene, ·

:

.

" Yeerely pl-efen~ed upon Wakcifield greene,

· · " 'Wherelovely Juice and httlieYlh woufdgo, '' To fee '1'0111'1ivr!J turne upon the toe; ··

" Hoh; Loh, and Crowde t.be fidler 'would be there,

" And many more I will not fpeakc of htre:

'' Good god ! how glad hath been thi.s hart of mine To fee that Towne, which hath in fbrmer'timo

. ·~ So flour~fu'd ahd fo gloried in · her naine, ·

" Famous by 1lle Pindar whci firfi rais'd the fame;

'' .Yea, I lirive·pared ore that gru1u and ore,

•• And th'mrn<e I faw't, ftoo-keJielight the more,

" For where we take contentment i11 a place,

cj A whole ' daies

walke feeme5 as a cinquepace.

·" Unto thy ta1ke, my mufe, and now make knowne

., ·· '' :The jolly !boo-maker of

Bradford towne,

" His gentle craft fo rais'd in former time,

;- '' •By princcly.Jouroey-men ~s aifcipline,

" Where he was wont with pallengers to quaffe,

" But fuffer none to c~rry l'P their fraffe

" Upon their !boulders, whilft they pail through

" For if they did, he foon {hould beat them downe:

town

"

(Se

" (So valiant was the Souter) and from hence,

'~ T~ix!~obi~JI~ a~d himgre~ th.differepce;

" "'-Which, ciufe,it is oy. moft fiagel poets writ,

'

i

'

" For brevity, I thought good to omit."

-~

AJ

'

\,

D R A•

D It A M A T I S

P E RS.Q N.£

E DWARD, King of England.

JAMJU, King of Scotland, ·

·

Earl of K.£NDALL.

Lord

WARWICK,

Lord BoNFIELD.

Lord HvMu.

Sir GILBERT All.MSTRON~.

Sir NrcHOLAI

GEORGE

Old MusGaovE.

Young CvooY 1 his Son.

Mr. Guan:. BETTRI~, his Daughter.

MANNEII.ING.

A

0REENE.

Hooo. }ENKIN, a Clown.

RoBIN

WlL"fo

MvcH, the Miller's Son.

Maid MAJllON,

Sc#-RLET, 1

A JusTICE.

A TowNsMAN.

JOHN,

JANE

A BARLEY.

.

A

SHOEMAKER, SoLouu,

MEssENGUa,

&c.

THE

PINNER I

(

7

]

THE

'

OF WAKEFIELD.

Enttr tbe Ean ¥( Kendall, 'U1itJ, bitl. tht L.nl Bonfild, Sir

Gilbert Annilrong, 111111 John.

Earl uf KmJaO.

W ELCOME to :Bradford, manial gentlemen, Lord Bonfield, and flr Gilbert Armftroag both.

And all my troops, even to my bafeft groom, Courage and welcome ; for the day is ours. Our eau fe is 200'1, it is for the land's avail: . Then let us ffght, and die for England'• good.

OmtUs.

KnulsU.

As I at1\ Henry Momford, Keodall's earl, You honour me with rhia afleat of yours; "And here upon my fword I malo;e proteft, For to relieve ~hepoor, or die my1elt~

1 Pimo,-J Or Pindar~ the k~per ef the Pinfolds belonging to the common fields about Wakefield. Junius, in his Ety-logicM, voc~ Pentk, fays: " Pm.Jelncludere eh. ab A. S. p.ennan pyndan idem fignificante.

" Hine p:,J.r pi1111er. ~i pecora ultra lines vagantia fepto includit.'' Mr. Steevens obferYes, that the li~re of this rullick hero is ilill pre- ferved on a fign at the bottom of Gray's-Inn-Laae.

We will, my lord.

,,aJ,, protefl,J lt was formerly common to

{wear "/'0" the f'word; that is, upon the crofs which the old fwords alwaya had upon th~ hilt. Of this cu from many inftances are quoted by Dr. Farmer and Mr. Steevena in their Notes on JttJifllet, A. S.

~ And here •/""' "!)' Jword I

Again, in Tour ji'IJI Ga/imm, by Middleton,

A

4.:

"

Sweare on tliit

"f'word

then to fet fpurs to your

horfe, not to loo"e back, to give

no

" markcs to any pail"enger."

I

C E 0

J1 G

!

f1

:G J1 E E N' E,

And know, my lords, that James, the king ofScots, Wars hard upon the borders of this land:

Here is his poll; fay, John.T.JiflQt, What ne\Vs with king James I John. W:lr, my lord, I tt:ll; and good news I trow ;

For king James vows to meet

Of this month, God willing' marry doth he, iir.

you· the twenty-fu:tli

KenJaiL

·

My friends, you fee .what we have

to win.

Well, Jobn, commend me to king James, and tell him,

I will tnett him the twenty-fi.xth of this month, And all the reft; and fo tarewel; [E~itJohn. Bonfield, why lland'll thou as a man in dumps? Courage ; for if I win; I'll make thee duke. ·

I Henry Momford will be king myfelf,

A 1 wiU

And Gilbert Armfrrong lord of Doncaller.

Bo.fold.

Nothing, my lord, makes me amaz'd at all, But that out" foldiers find our victuals fcant. We mull make havock of thofe country fwains; For fo will the refr tremble and be afraid, And humbly fend provifion to your camp.

Gi/Dm.

make thee ·duke of Lancaiter,

·

. My lord Bonfieid gives good advice;

They make a fcorn and lland upon the king:

So what is brought is fent from them perforce;

A1k Mannering elfe. Xrnda/1.

What fayefr thou, Mannering?

ManMring.

When as 1 lhew'd your high commiiiion, They made this anfwer,

Only to fend provifion for your horfes.

Krnda/1.

Well, hie thee to WJ~kefield, bib the town To fend me all provifion that I want; Lell I, like mania! Tamberlair.e, lay wafte

Their

THE

P·iNNER 6F

WAK.EFIELD.

9

'l'heir bordering countries, leaving none Alive that contradiCts my commiffion.

ManN!ring.

Let me alone, my lord, I'll make them

V ail their plumes; for whofoever he be,

. The proudeft

knight, or jut1i~:e, or other, that gainfayeth

Your word, I clap him f.tll, to make the reil to.fear.

Do fo, Nick!

Kentlt¥11.

hie thee thither prefently,

And let us hear of thee to-morrow.

Mannering.

Will you not remove, my lord ;

JG:ndaU.

No, I will lie at Bradford all this night,

And all the next.

Come, Bunfield, let us go,

And lifien out fome bonny lalles here;

[ Exeu11t Dmltes.

E11ttr the Juftice, t1 Townfman,

G~orge a

Greene, a1uJ Sir

Nicholas Mannering with his ,·omm:ffion.

Jl!f!ice.

M. Mannering, Jland atiie, whilfl: we confer What is befr to do, towufmen of Wakefield:

The earl of Kendall here hath fent for viCtuals ; And in aiding him. we fhew ourfelves No lefs than traitors to the king; Therefore let me hear, townfmen, What is your confents.

tTorw1t{mnt,

Even as you pleafe, we are all content,

Ju)lict.

Then M. Mannering we are rciolv'd--

AJ how?

Mannering.

Ju}licc.

Marry, fir, thus. We will fend the earl of Kendall no viCtuals, Becaufe he is a traitor to the king. And in aiding him we !hew our!dves no lefs.

1e

G

.E 0

lt G

E

A

G R E J

N

Mlllllln'ittg.

E.

Why, men of Wakeliekl, are you waxen mad. That prefent danger cannot whet your wite, Wifely to make provi6on of yourfeive& t The earl is thirty thoufand men !rrong in power, Aad what town foever him refift, He lays it fiat and level with the ground :

Ye filly men, you feek your own decay:

Thcretore fend my lore! fuch provifion as he wan11, . So he will fpare your town, aud come no ne~r

Wakefield than he is.

J'!flict.

l.hller M'annering, you have your anfwcr, Yuu may be gone.

·

Mamurittg,

Well, Woodrotfe, for fo I guefs is thy name, I'll make thee curfe thy 1 overthwart denial; And al11hat fit upon the be'nch this day . Shall rue the hour they have withfrood my lord's

Commitlion.

Jt~jiiu.

Do thy worft, we fear thee not~

.

Mamrering.

Sec you rhefe feals! before you pafs the town, l Will have all things my lord doth want, In fpite of you.

GtDrgt.

Proud dapper Jack, vail btlnnet t~ the bench That reprelt:nts the perfon of the kmg; Or, firr:~bil'lllay thy head before thy teet.

MaJVJtrilll•

GtDrgt.

Why, I am GeoJige a Greene, :True liegeman to my king,

I -nwtlrr::"rt dm'al;J So, in Erafmus ' s Praife of Folir,_ TS49t

"-but when the God~ are fette _at b~nkeue, be pla.etlt the

"jefter, now wyth hys lymph•ultynge, »<>w wah h1s lkoi!inge:, and naw

"with h ;s

as Ullt to youn' to undedlancfe•

Whe

H W Clbftlll~te to. Wtlt/i'WilJ'I."

Why, who art thou ?

Sign.

C 1:

trJrrtb-rva •·te woords to provole them. all to l~ughter. "

-

.

E"J'b•ts "'.J bi > l'•p,-ltp~.l, p '37:

THE -PIN-NE'R OF WA.K;&,IELD.

u

Who fcorns that men of fuch efieem aa thefe, Should brook the braves of any traiteroUJ fqtsire You of the bench, and ~ou my fellow-friends, Neighbours, we fubjeds a!I unto the king; . We are Englifh born, and therefore Edw11rd's friends, Vow'd unto him even in our mothers' womb, Our minds to God, our hearts unto our king; Our wealth, our homage, and our carcafe.,

'Be all king Edward's.

Then, firrah, we have

Nothing left for traitors, but our fwords, Whetted to bathe them in your bloods, And die againfi you, belore we fend j'ou any viCtuals.

J'1fli~~.

Well fpoken, George a Greene!

cr~W11Jitlan.

Pray let Georgc a Greene fpeak for U

G~orgt.

Sirrah, you get no viCtuals here, Not if a hoof of beef would fave your lives.

1l1annrring.

Fellow, I !land amaz'd at thy prefumption. Why, what art thou that dart!l gain fa~· my lord, Knowing his mighty puifhnce and hts ftroke? Why, my frrend, I ~ome not barely of myfelf; For fee, I have a large commiffion.

Let me fee it, tirrah.

· G~org~.

Who!e feals be tbefe l

Man~~t•·ing.

Th~s is the earl of Kendall'£ feal at arms; This lord Charnel BJnfit:ld's; And this fir GJberr Atmil:rong's.

GeiJrgt.

I tell thee, firrah, d;d good k;ng Edwar~'sfon Seal a comn,itfi.,n againtt tbe king his father, Thus would I tear ir in defjlire of him,

. .

Being traitor to my foveraign.

[ Ht. ttt~~·s tbt .commilfiD

What!

Mannrring.

.

hall thou torn H•)' lord', ~ommiffionl

Thou 1halt rue it, and fo lhiiU all Wak.dield.

u

G

E 0

R G

E

A·,

G R

Georgt.

E

E N

P: 1

What, are ynu in choler? I will give you pills To cool your ilomach. Seeft thou tb,.efe feals l Now by my father's foul, which was a yeoman, When he·was a!ive, 4 eat them, or eat My dagger's point, proud fquire.

Mahneriilg.

But thou doe!l but jell:, I hope.

Gcorge.

Sure that iball you fee, before we two patt.

Manntrit~,g.

Well, and there be no remedy, fo George, One is gone; I pray thee, no more now.

Georgt.

:

·

0 fir, if one be good, the others cannot hurt.~

So, fir, now you may go tell the earl of Kendall, Although 1 have rent his large commiffion,

Yet of curtefy I have fent all his feal¥ Back again by you.

Manntring•

Wdl, fir, I will do your errand.

GciJI"gt.

(E.,,,;it,

Now let him tell his lore!, that he h~rh Spoke with Geotge a Greene, right Pinner _Of merry W~kdield town, that h;ah phyiick for a fool, }'ills tor a traitqr that doth \rfong his fovcreign. Are you coutem with this th~r 1 have done?

J11fice.

Ay, cor.tent, George; For highly hall thou honour\! Vlakefield town, In cutting ot- proud Mannerirrg fo lhort.

bears fo near a r~femb!:ince to a

ftory rdat~d of Robcrt Greene, that it probably wa~ takeo from itl ·"Had hre hv'd,Gabrid, and thou Jhouldft fo unartificially and .odioufly "l~l'd again!l: him as thou haft done, he would have thee an example -'of-ignominy to all ages that arc to come and driven thee 10 rate th,J

U MUll~ h~e bZJttr.r~d, a; 1 )awe bim malu an apparjtet: onte in a Tavet(t' eat~

4

-eat

I I'm•,. &c-J

This

incident

"his cilot:on, wax' and all, vny handfom(y frrv'd twix1 1wo d!Jbes."

, Nalb's Apolog:e ?f Pimc Pem1<lej'e, 4\0. IS93·

In the Play of Si• 'JofJn O!dcajl!-:, the S1,1mner is compdled to· eat hio

citation in l.kc rr.anncr.

Come,

THE PINNER

O_F

WAKEFIEJ.D.

13

Come, thou !halt be my welcome gueO: to-day; For well thou-haft deferv'd reward and favour. [.l.mrlll ,_,

Enter oltl Mufgrove, .andyiJJm$ CudJie his ~

CudJit.

Now, gentle f~ther, liO: unro thy fon,

And

And bonny- in thine eye, grant one petition

That I ihall demand.

for

my mnther's love, that erft was blythe

·

0/J Mufgr()'!J~,

What i~ that, my Cuddie?

C"dtiit.

Father, you know

· _

The

And the wily Soo~, whereof they have oath, Not to leave one alive that s {!:rides a launce. 0 father, you ~rt: old, and waibing age unto the gra~e; Old William Mufgrove, which whilom was thou~h~ The braveO: horleman in all Wellnurland, Is weak, and forc'd to flay his ann upon a flaff, That 11 erfl: could wield a launce. · Then, gemle father, refign the hold to me;. Give arms to youth, and honour unto age.

ancient enmity of la~e between the Mufgrores

Mufirove.

Avaunt, falfe-hearred buy, my j0ints do quake Even with anguilh of thy very words. Hath \Vi!Jiam Muf<{rove.fee-n an haadrtd yeard Have l be-en fear\\ and dreaded of the Sc(lls, Thar, wllen they he.1rd my name in any roaJ, They flee\ away, and polled thence amain 1 No, Cuddie, no: thus re:olve I. Here have lliv'.l, and here willi'>Ill(grove c\ie. [ E.rcu;,t omnn,

S flri4<t a lau,.-<.]

i.e. not to

leave ~ven a child

ytbo t'juttn: ;, arundine longa.

S.

,.

trjl)

i. ~- once, in f'ltmer times.

$.

of

~hem alivt-, (!ne

14 GEORGE

A

GREEN!',

EM, Lfii'J BoDficld, Sir Gilbert ~Annftrong, Jrl. Grime, ifN/

Bcttri1 his tla•ght",

Bi.ji&l.

·

Notv, gentle Grime, god a mercy for our good cheer, Our fare was royall, and our welcome great ; And fith fo kindly thou haft eotcrtaio'd us, Jf we return with happy viaory, We will deal as friendly wirh thee in recompence.

Grimt.

Your welcome was but ~uty, gentle lord:

For wberefon: have we given us our wealth, But to make our bcrters welcome when they come?- 0, thia goes hard when traiton mull be fiatter'd; But life is fweer, and I cannot withtland it. God I hope will revenge the quarrel of my king.

What

Gi/!Jtrt,

faid you, Grime? Grimt.

fay, fir Gilbert, looking on my daughter, I curfe the hour that ere I got the girl :

For, fir, fhe may have many wealthy fuitors, And yet lhe difdains them all, to have Poor Geor&c a Greene unto her hu1band.

I

B01rfoid.

On thar, good Grime, I am talking with thy daughter f' But fhe, in quirks and quiddities of love, Sets me to fchool, fhe is fo overwife. But, gentle girl, if thou wilt forfake The Pinner, and be my love, I will advance thee hi&b ; To dignify thofe hairs of amber hue, J'll grace them with a chaplet made of pearl, Set wirh choice rubies, fparks, and diamonds, Planted upon a velvc:t hood, to hide that head, Wherein two faphires burn like fparkling fire:

This will I do, fair Bettris, and tar more, If thou wilt love the lord of Donc:ailer.

Btttris. · Htigh ho! my heart is in a higher pl,lce, }'ai,apa on the cad, if thal be he.

THI PINNER OF WAKEFIELD.

iJ

~ where he cornea, or angry, or in love·;

For why? his colo11r loolreth diftontent.

Emtf the tttrl '.! Kenda.ll aNI Nicho)K Mml~Cria:­

Kmda/1;

Come, Ni~k, follow me.

Btmfi~IJ.

How now, my lord I what newa t

Ktnd411.

Such news, Bonfield, as will make thee laugh, And fret thy fill, to hear how Nick was ua'd. Why, the juflices ftand on their terms. Nick, as you know, is haughty in his words; He laid the law unto the Juftices ' With. threatening bral'CS, that one look'd. on aaotber, Ready to itoop ; but that a churl came in, One George a Greene, the Pinncr of the town, And with his dagger drawn laid handa on Nick, And ·by no ·bcggart fwore that we were traieora; Rent our commiffion, and upon a bra-,e Made Nick to eat the feals, or broo~ the flab:

Poor Mannccing, afraid, came pofiing hither ftrai&fJt.

Bettris.

Oh l011ely George, fortune bc·fiill thy fri~nd ! And as thy thoughts be high, fo be thy miad lp all accords even to thy heart's defire !

.

Bonfo/J.

.

What fays fair Bettrii? Grime.

My lord, fhe is praying for Grorge a Greene; He is the man, and fhe will none but him.

Bonfit/J.

But him ! why, look on m•, my girl:

Thou knoweft, that yefternight I courted thee, And fwore at my rerurn to wed with thee. Then tell me, love, fhall I 7 have all thy fair l

1

-

IHivt alltbJ fair']

In the fottaer Eolition Mr. Docllley had a}.: .

terecl fair to fait b. Fair was, however, frequently ufed by eoutemporny writen as a fubfl:antive ; and feveral inftances of it are procluced bv Mr.

le~TCS your ftJir, ,.'.A. 1~'

Stenens, in his Note OD the words," Demctriut

.a.·'' of MiJflllflfl"'' Nizht's Dr-.

w

GXORGE

A

GREENB,

 

z

 

u

I care not for earl, nor yet for ~night,

"

Nor baron that is fo

bold :

 

For George a Greene, the merry · Pinner,

., •• He bath my heart in hold."

.

Bt111fi~ld.

Bootlefs, my lord, are many vain replies.

Let us hie us to Wakefidd, and fend her the Pincer's boad. •

It

!hall be fci.

Kwla/1.

Grime, gramercie,

Shut up thy daughter, 8 bridle her alfetla, Let me not mifs her when I make return 1

Therefore look to her, as to thy life, good Grime.

'

Grime.

I warrant you, my lord,

Knu/a/1.

[E.rtu~rt Grime mu/ Bettris.

.

And, Bettris, leave a bafe Pinner,

For to love a11 earl.

This Pinner, George a Greece.

Nick Mannering 1hall lead on the battle,

Fain would I fee

klhalJ be thus;

bridl~btr affells,] Affitls are affetli011s, and in that fenfe the·

11

-

word is ufed in many contemporary auth~rs.

Jer.,.;,;, p. ~50: -

." neyther feemeth

As Gafcoigne's Fabl< •f

1t reafonable that one lhollfd

" have the power to dtfcover the thoughts, or at leaft to b_ridl< th< afftiJ•.

" of all the reft."

that either carried the

" motion of his minde in his manners, and that the tifif{Js of tho he't;

" were bcwrayed by the eye•"" Ben Jonfon's Cynthia's Rroe!,, A. 3· S. 3:

Euphues tuUi his

E,glattd,

p. 7 :

-"

Caving

·

" -- the fimo aff<Ds

" That he cloth pear to his lick patient,

" Should a right mind cany to fach u "thefe.''

Marfton's What vou -''• A. 3·

S.

1

:

" Ift poffibfe I'fhould be dead fo foon

"

In her ajfifls!'

·

A

lJt,tch CoMrtt:li!JQif' A. a. &. I " GiYe entenain to murua1 affi8s.!'

Othtllo, A. t. ,

:

.

··

S. 3 :

"--(the young aff<!Js

" la me dtfuntl,")

&e alfo the fevcrd lnli:~onc~ quoted by Mr. Stecvens 1 in hii N<>te on

lJ\•

paiTage.

THE PINNER OF WAKEFIELD.

Jr

And' we chree will gl) to. Wakefield in fome difg!life:

Jilut howfoever, I'll have his head to-day.

[E.mmt _,s,

Enter the Ki11g ef'Scots, iorJHumes, with &/Jiers allli Jo'bllY•

.

.

'Ki"$·

Why, Jol!ny, then thj: earl ol Kendall is blithe,

And hath brave men tpat troop along with him l

.

]Dh'!J•

· Ay marry, my liege, ,And bath good men that come along with him,

And vows to meet you at Scraib!efea, God willing,

King. If goodS. Andrew lend king Jamie leave, I will be with pim at the appointed day. Put foft : Whofe pretty boy art thou 1

·

$11ttr Jane a Barley's St111,

.Ned.

Sir~I am fon unto fir John a Bariey, :Eldeft, and all that ere my mother h<i4r Edward my name.

Ja111.

And whither art thoq going, pretty Ned? NeJ. To feek fome birds, ~nd kill them, if I caq. And now my fchool-mafter is alfo gone, So have I liberty to ply my bow :; For when he aomes, I fiir not from my book,

·

·

jamts.

Lord Humes, but mark t~e vifage of this child' By him I guefs the beauty of his mother:

None but L;eda could breed Helena. Tell me, Ned, who is within· with thy mother l

Ned.

None but herfelf and houfh~ldfervants, fir; If you would fpeak with h(:r, knock at this gat~,

. Jam~s.

Johny; knock at that gate.

V9 x

UI.

~

~"'"

GEORGE

A'GREENE,

Et1ttr. Jane a Barley •Jo• the walls.

Jane. 0, I am betray'd! What multitudes be thcfd Jamts.

Fear not, fair Jane, for all thefe men are minep And all thy friends, if thou be friend to me :

I am thy lover, Jamesr the king of Scotts, That 9ti: have fued and wooed with many letters, P-ainting my outward pa!1ions with my pen, When as my inward foul did bleed for woe. Little regard was given to my fuit, But haply thy hufband's prefence wrought it.· Therefore, fweet Jane, I fitt~d me to time, · And, hearing that thy hufband was from h0me.

Am come to crave what long I have defir'd. Ned. Nay, fofi: you, fir, you get no entrance heret That feek to wrong fir John a Barley fO, And olf~rfuch difuonour to my mother. James.

Why, what difuonour Ned!

Though young,

NrJ.

·

Yet often have I heard my fatber fay, No greater wrong than to- be made a cuckold. Were I of age, or were my body il:rong,. \Vere he ten kings, 1 would fuoot him to- the heart, That fuould attempt to give fir John the horn. Mother, let him not come in, I will go lie

At Jockie Miller'i houfe.

Stay him.

Jamts.

Jane.

Ay, well faid, Ned, Thou hafl: given the king his anfwer; For were the ghofl: of C:rfar on the earth, Wrapped in tlie \Yonted glory o. f his honour, He ihould not make me wrong my hufband fo.

'tH~ PJNN ER .OF. WA.KEFl ELD.

:But good king James is pleafant, u I guef•, And means to try .what humour 1 am ia ; Elie would he .never have brought an hoft of mea, To ha\'e them witnefs of hii Soottith luH.

Jane, .in faith, Jane-

Jamcs.

Jmu,

·

Never reply, For I proteft by the highefi holy f7od, That doometh juft revenge for things amits, King James, of all men, fuall not have my love.

'-*'·

.

Then lift to me, faint Andrew be my boot~ But I'll rafe thy callle to the very ground, Unleli thou opeQ the gate, and let n1e in.

Jant.

I fear thee not, king Jamie;

do thy worfto.

•9

This cafile is too firong for thee to fcale;

Befides, to-morrow will fir John come home.

.

Jmnts.

Well, Jane, fince thou difaain'ft !ling James's love, I'll draw thee on with fuarp and deep extremes:

For by my father's foul, this brat of thine Shall perilh here before thine eyes, Unlef; thou open the gate, and let me in.

Jane.

0 deep extremes! my heart begins to break;

My little Ned looks pale for fear. My boy, I will do much for thee.

Nul.

Cheer thee

But not fo much as to dilhonour me.

Jant.

And if thou dielt, I cannor live, fweet Ncd.

Ntti.

.

Then die with honour, mc;>ther, dying challe.

I am armed.

Jtn«.

My

Joins viCtory by vinue.

hufban~'s love, his honour, and his fame,

Now, king Jam:i,

B

2

If

2.,

G

E

0

R

G E

A

G

R E E N

E,

If mother's tears cannot allay thine ire, Then butcher him, for I w1ll never yeild. The fon lhall die, before I wrong the .father.

Jameu.

Why then he dies,

Alarum withi11.

Enttr a Mc_fi:ngtr.

Me.ffingtr.

My lord, Mufgrove is at hand.

Jantts,

Who, Mufgrove? The devil he is ! Come, My horfe.

[~eunt omnu,

Enttr old Mufgrove, with King Jarnes prlfontr.

.

MujgrMJt,

Now, king James, thou art my prifoner,

Jamt,,

Not thine, but fortune's prifoner,

Enttr Cudtfy.

CuJ4y.

Father, the tiel!\ is ours;

.

Their colours we have feized; andHumes is f1ain;

I flew him hand to hand. Mu.JirMit,

' God and faint George ! Cutkfy,

0 father,

Come in, young Cuddy, come and drink thy fill:

I am fore athirfi.

Ja11t,

Bring in king Jamie with you as a gueft; For all this broil was caufe he could nut enter, [Exeunt om7ts,

' Cod and Sai•t Ceorge 1 ] .This exclamation is made by Richmond, in Rithard Ill. immediately before his attacking his adverfary. Mr. War- ton obferves, that St. George was the common cry of the Englilh Soldiers . when they charged the enemy. See Note in the !aft edition, vol. VII, P· 158.

THE-PINNER

OF

WAKEFIELD.

2f.

Enur George a Greene a~.

George.

The fweet content of men that live in love, Breeds fretti!}g humours in a reillefs mind; And fancy, being check'd by fortune's fpite, Grows too impatient in her fweet Jefires ; Sweet to thofe men whom love leads on· to blifa, But four to me, whofe bap is fiill amifs.

EnJer the Clown.

JttJUn.

Georg,.

Sir, what do you cry amen at?

:fmi11.

W:hy, did not you talk ot love?

Marry, amen, fir.

How do you know that ? George. Jmkin. Well, though I fay it that lhould not fay it, There are few fellows in our parilh So nettled with love, as I have been of late.

George.

.

Sirrah, I thought no lefs, when the other mornini You rofe fo _early to go to your wenches. Sir, I had thought you had gone about My honefl: bufinefs.

.

Jellkin.

Tro1v you have hit it; For, mafter, be it known to you, There is fome gooJ-will betwixt Madge the Soufewife And I; marry, lhe h_ath anotberlover.

George.

Canft thou brook any rivals in thy love? Jenlin. A rider 1 no, he is a fow-gelder, and goes afoot. But Madge pointeJ to meet me in your wheat clofe.

George.

Well, did lhe meet you there t

:s

0

E 0

R G

E

A

G

Jellkbt.

R E.E N

:E,

Never make quefrion of that. And fid1 I f.1luteC: her w\th a green gown. And after fell as hnrd a wooing, as if The prieft had been at our backs to have married ua.

·

What, did lhe grant ?

Georgt.

7nilin.

Did lhe grant 1 never make queil:ion of that, And lhe gave me a fhirt-collar, wroug.ht ovt:r With no counterfeit fiuff.

What, was it gold?

C';eorge.

'Jmki7l,

Nay, 'twas bet~er than goid.

.

What was it 1

Gcorgr.

Jr~~kill.

ro Right Coventry blue, Who had no fooner come there, but wot you who came by~

 

Georgt.

·

No, whol

 

JenA:i,,

Clim the .Ww-gelder.

 

Georgr.

Came he by?

 

'Jenki7l.

He fpied Madge and I fit together,

He leapt from his horfe, laid his hand on his dagger.

And began to fwear.

He had a dagger, and I nothing

Now I feeing ·

10

R,izht C()f)

of the times.

,try

blue,]

.

COfJmtry Mu is mentioned by feveral wrltcra ·

"-it

_

Laugh tmd lie.Jowne, or tl>t World•s Folly, r6o5, Sign. Ea:

" was .a fimple napkin ne wrought with Crrventry /Jiew."

Stephens's S11.1yrital EJ!ayes, r6r5, p. 355: "He muft favour of gal.,.

with Rofc cal;.~; Qr a"/·

"Janrry a little, though he perfume the Table

" propriate

Bone lace :and Coventry blue,"

·

~en Jonfon's Mahue of Gyp.ljes:

" The Crrvumy blue

I' :tfan~s there uron Pruc,"

THE PINNER

OF

WAKEFIELD.

But this twig in my hand, I gave him fair words And faid Dl)thing. ~e comes to me, · And takes me by the bofom; you wh,arefon flave, Said he, hoki my horfe, and lo~ He take nci cold in hi' feet. No :nany fhall he, fir, quoth I, I'll lay my cloak underneath him:

I took my cloak, fpread it all along, And his horit: on the midft of it,

·Georgt. Tho11 clown, dicilil dtou fet his horfe upon th.y cloak l

Jtnkin, Ay, but mark how .I fervctd him. Madge and he was no fooner gone down into the ditch, But I plucked out my knife, Cut four hoi<:s in my doak, Aoomade his horfe fiand on the bare ground.

.

George.

'Twas well done ; Now, fir, go and furvey my fields:

If you find any cattle in the corn, To pound with them.

Jmldn. And if I find any in the pound, I lhall turn them out.

Enttr the Earl of Kendall, Lara'Boufi.eld, Sir Gilbert, aU Jif

(IE.fit.Jenkin.

.

gr1ijCd,

with a train of mtfl, .Kt.Jali.

Now we have put the h~rlesin the corn, Let us frand in fome corner for to hear What braving terms the Pinner will breathe. When he fpies qur hC?rfes in the corn.

Enter Jenkin /)kr.»ing of his hDrn.

· Jmkin~

0 mafrer, where are you ? we ~av.e a prize.

George,

A prize ! what is it?

Jtnldn. :Three goodly horfe$ in our wheat clofe.

B

4

.

GtDI'?'f

Q

*.f.

GEORGE

A

GREENit,

George.

Three hor!'es in our wheat clofe ! whofe be they l ·

Jtnlun.

Marry that's a riddle to me ; but they are there. Velvet horfes, and I never faw fuch horfes before. As my duty was, I put off my cap, and fa id as followeth :

My mafiers, what do you make in out clofe? One of them hearing me aGt what ht: rtlade there, held up his head and neighed, and after his manner laugh'd as heartily as

if a mare had beeh tied to

is no laughing matter; for, if my mafier take you here, you go as round as !l top to the pound. Another untoward jade hear- ing me threaten him to the pound, and to tell you of them, cafi up both his heels, and let a monfirous great fart; that was as much as in his language to fay, A fart for the pound, and

a fan for George a Green. Now I hearing this, put on my cap, blew my horn; called them all jades, and came to tell you.

Georgt.

his girdle. My mafiers, faid I, it

Now, fir, go and drive me thofe three horfes

tro the pound.

· .1mlm.

Do you h~r? I were beit take a conilable With me.

Why-fo?

GtllfH'o

Jetr!rilr. Why, thty being gentlemen's horfe~, may fiand On their reputation, and will not obey me.

Go, do as I

bid you, fir,

Well, I may get;

Georgt.

Jmlilr;

W, Earl tf Kendall, tht Lortl Bonfield, tlnJ Sir Gilbert·Arm·

~rong, IMtt tbe•.

KentiaD.

Whither away; fir 1

jtlfkin.

Whither away? I am going to put the horfes In the pound.

.

~rong, IMtt tbe•. KentiaD. Whither away; fir 1 jtlfkin. Whither away? I am going to put

'l"HE PINNER. OF WAICEFIELD.

2f

KmJaO.

Sirrah, tbofe three hones belong to us, And we put them in~ and they muft tarry there, And eat their fill.

!Jtnkill. Stay, I will go tell my mafter.

Hear you, mafier l

Thofe three horfea be in your wheat c!ofe mu. And here be three geldings more. '

we have another prize:

Georgt.

What be thefe P

Jtnki11.

Thefe are the mailera of the horfes•

·

Gtorgt.

. Now, gentlemen, I know not your degrees• But more you cannot be; unlef& you be kings,

Why wrong you us of Wakefield with your horfes?

I am the Pinner, and before you pafs,

You 1hall make good the trefj>afs they have done.

·

Kenda/1.

Peace, faucy mate, prate not to us.

I tell thee, Pinner, we are gentlemen.

Gtorgt.

Why, fir, fo may I fir, although I give no arms.

Kmdal/. Tbou! how art thou a gentleman t Jtnkin.

And fuch is my ma1ler, and he may give as good

Arms as ever your great gran?father c6uld ·give•

.K.enda/1,

Pray thee let me heat how ? Jtnkin.

Marry, my mafter may give for his arms The pitlure of April in a green jerkin, With a rook on one fift, and an horn on the other:

But my mafier gives his ~rms the wrong way, For he gives the horn on his fill; And.your grandf.tther, hecaufe he would not Jofe llia arms, wears the horn on his own head.

Atntlall.

-?6

GEOl\G.B.A

Gl\EENE,

xnu~an.

Well, Pinner, finceour horfes be in, ln fpite of thee they now lball feed their fill; Ano eat until our leifures ferve to go.

Ororge.

Now by my father's foul, Were good king Edward!s horfes in the corn, They ihall amencl the fcath, or kifs the pound ; Much more yours., fir, whatli>e'er you be.

Kendall.

'Vhy man, thou knowefl: not us. 'We .lo belong to Henry Momford, earl of Kendall, J.'len that before a mouth be full expir'd, Will be king Edward's betters in the land.

Gtorge.

King Edward's betters ! rebel, thou liefl:.

Bonjitld.

Villain, what hafl: thou done? Thou hafl: firuck an earl.

Gcorgt.

[George jlrilm hinr,

Why, what care I? a poor man that is true, Is better than an earl, if he be falfe. Traitors reap no better favours at my ·hands.

'

Kr,da/1.

Ay, fo me thinks, but thou !halt dear 11 aby this blow. Now or never lay hold on the Pinner.

n

-aby

this blow.]

7'om Tyler and his fYije,

To

p. 19;

aby, is

to

'pay dear for, to fulfcr.

So, in

" My neighbour and I, might bap to abie,

" If we lbould fo do, as he fulfereth you."

(:hurchyard's Challenge, p. 273 :

" 0 God forbid for Mothers fault,

" the Children lbould abye:

" No graine of grudge, nor ground of gvile, "in guiltlelfe babes doe lye." Mif/jummcr's"Nigbt's DrrtJ111 1 A. 3• S. :l:

· " Thou 1halt abv it.''

.~ee alfo Mr. Stetveni's Note <m the !aft pa!I'age,

THE. PIN NE R 0 F W A K E F I EL D.

2•

Enttr all·the ambu}h.

· Gcurg~.

Stay, my lords, let us parly on thefe broils J Not Hc:rcules again!l two, the proverb is, Nor I againfr fo great a multitude. Had not your troops come marching as they did,

I would have fiopt your paffa~e unto London:

But now 1'1\ fly to fecret policy.

Kendall.

What docft thou murmur, George ~

Georgr.

Marry this, my lord ;

J mufe, if thou

That thou wilt do poor George a Greene this wrong,

~ver to match me with a troop of men.

be Henry Momford, Kendall's earl,

Krndall.

Why didil: thou. frrike me then 1

Geo1ge.

Why, my lord, meafure me but by yourfelf; Had you a man had ferv'd you long, And heard your foe mifufe you behind your back, ,t\nd would not draw his fword in your dc:tem:e, You would cafhere him. Much more, King Edward is my ~ing: and before I'll hear hi1n So wrong'd, I'll die within this place, . And maintain good whatfoever I have faid, And, if l·fpt:ak not reafon in this cafe, What I have faid I'll maiQ.tain in this place. ·

Bo,ifield.

A pardon, my lord, for this Pinner; For trufr me, he fpea~cth like a man of worth. Ktndall.

. Wilt thou leave Wakefield, and n wend with me; l'll freely put up all an.d pardon thee.

Well, George,

·

George.

Ay, my lord, confidering me one thing, You will leave rhefe arms and follow your good king.

'J wtlld] Sec Note to T(llftrrd and Gifm~nda, A. r. S-3· TO!. n. p.174t:

King.

21

C

E

d

R

G

E

A

G

King.

R

E

E

N

Et

Why, George, I ri[e not againll king Edward, Bur for the poor that ts oppre!l by wrong; And, if king Edward will redrefs the fame, I will not after him difparagement, But otherwife, and fo let this fuffice. Thou hear'1l the reafon why I rife in ann~, Now wilt thou leave Wakefield, and wend with me, 1,1 make thee caprain of a hardy bandf And, when 1 have my will, dub thee a knight,

Grorge.

Why, my lord, have ye any hope to win? Kmdall. Why, there is a prophecy doth fay, That king James and lfual! meet at London, IJ And make the).ing vail bonnet to us both.

Gl'org(.

If this were true, my lord, this were a mighty reafon. Kmdall. Why, it is a miraculous prophecy, and cannot fail.

Georgf.

Well, my lord, you have almoil turned me. '

Jenkin, come hither.

JrnliiR.

Sir.

Gfo1gr.

Go your ways ho•,e, fir, And drive me thole three horfes home unto my houfe, Ahd pour them down a bu!hel of good oats.

Jenkin. Wt:ll, I will.-Muil: I give thefe fcurvy hones ·

Oats?

[Exit Jenkin•

Grorgl'.

Will it pleafe you to command your train afide?

13

AmJ,.~e th<

k;ng vail bonnet to us both.]

To va;f bon.-t,is a phrare

wh;choccur. in Fdwa·d II. vol. II.' p. 32 t. and alfo in Fdward lll. A. 4-

S. 7·

In all tlkfe rlaces it means to fiand

unrovered as a mark offub-

m<Bic>n.

Again, we tind to va.·ljltr,-:;, to vail cnp, to vail top, in other writers

oi I he time;

and all thefe fevcral modes of exprdlion are intended to dc-

llt>te eith~r inferiority or refpett in the per[mr.; doing thefe feveral ae8.

Kcndall,

THE PINNER

OF WAK.EFIELD.

&and afide.

!Untlall.

Gtorgt.

Now lift to me:

. Here in a wood, not far from hence, There dwdls an old man 'in a cave aIon'!, That can foretel what fortunes lhall betall you; For he is greatly fkilful in m~gic art. Go you there to him early in the morning, And quellion hi.!P; if he fays good, Why then, my lord, I am the toremoll man, We will march up with your camp to Loudon, Kaula/J. George, thpu honourell me in this:

But where lhall we find him out i

.

Gtmgf.

· •9

My man lhall conduct you to the place;

But good my lords, tell me true wh•lt the old man faith.

Kenda/1.

. That will I, as I am earl of Kendall.

George.

Why then, to honour George a Greene the more,

Vouchfafe a pi~ce of beef at my

You lhall have wafer cakes your till, A piece ot beef hung up fince Marrilmas; 11 that like you nor, take whar you bring ior me.

poor houlj::;

Kn,J:dl.

.

1.4Gramercies, George.

[ExeunJ'o~J.

Enter George a Greene'o bry Wily df4uifld like a r

Wily,

wlri4JI.

0 wh;lt is love! it is fome n{ighty power,

F.lfe could it nev~r conquer George a Greene.

Here dwells a churl that keeps away his love. I know the worll, and if I be efpicd, 'Tis but a beating ; and if I by this mean$

1 4 Gramrrrirs, Gcorgt.]

c;,·amtrcy, that i~, (ays Mr. Hawk.int, Or;~

ye.

1• Y~' ,,

a,.

cJ DraiN!, vol. JJI. z69, grand.,.,, .,.; 1 or, I thank

J11 tbis fcnfc il Wll$ ~ftantly pfcd by our .Q,Jl writer~

50 GEO:R.GE

!t-

GR.EENE,

Can get fair Bettris forth her father's door, It is ellou~h. Venus, be for me, and fhe alone, Be aiding to my wily enterpriu. [He knocls at the dt»r.

Enttr Grime. GriiN. How now! who knocks there? what would you have? From whence came you 1 where do you dwell?

Wify.

I am, forfooth, a fempfier's maid hard-by, That hath brought work home to your daughter.

Gri!N,

Nay, are ye not fome crafty quean, That comes from George a Greene, that rafcal, With fome letters to my daughter? I will have you fearch'd.

.

W)fy.

Alas ! fir, it is Hebrew unto me, To tel_l me of George a Greene, or any other. Search me, good fir, and if you find a letter About me, let me have the punifhment that is due. Grimt,

. Why are you muffted ? I like you the worfe for that.

Wify.

.

I am not, fir, a!Ram'd t6 !h~w my face; Yet loth I am my cheeks fhould take the air:

Nor am I •s chary of my beauty's hue,

But that I

Grimt, 1\ pretty wench, of fmiling countenance! Old men can like, althougli they cannot love; Ay, and. love, though not fo brief as young men can. Well, go in, my wench, and fpeak with my daughter. [ E~·it Wily.

I wonder much at the earl of Kendall, Being a ~ighty man, aa ftill he is,

am troubled with the tooth-ach fore.

fo

" large

" I not over cbaric of Dlioc hooelly, you would iDYcigle me to !hake hands ·

Yet

'' with chafritie."

profer of your fervice, and lo fay re promifei of fidelitie, that were

1 S cbaryJ

CarefuL

So,

in

Eupbuer,

p• .u.

" You

have

made

THE

PIN N R R 0 F WAKE F l EL D.

3&

Yet for to be a traitor te hie "King,

Is more then God or man will well allow.

But what a fool am I

My mind ts more here of the prerty Jafs:

Had ihe brought fome forty pounds to town, I could be content to ma'ke her my wife:

Yet I have heard it in a proverb faid, He that is old, and marries with a lafs, Lie5 but at home, and proves himfelf an afl.

to talk of him t

···

En~rr Bettria itr Wily's ap;artl 111 Grime.

How now, my wench, hqw is it 1 what, not a word?

Alas~ poor foul!

Well, my wench, here is an angel for to buy Thee pins, and I pray thee ule mine houfe i

The oltener, the more welcome: farewel.

the tooth-ach plagues her fore.

&ttris.

[E_t.it.

0 blelfed loYe, and bided fortune both !

Bur, Bettris, fiand not here to talk of love, But hie thee firaight unto thy George a Grcene. Never went roe-buck fwifter on the downs,

Than I will trip it till I fee my George.

[Exit.

Entrr the Earl of Kendall, Lord Bonfield, Sir Gilbert, t~NI .Jenkin tbt crown.

 

Kcwlall.

Come, away, Jenkin.

Come, here's his houfe.

Jtn'kitr. Where be you, ho i

Who knocks there 1 G"rge. Kenrlall,

Here are two or three poor men, father,

Would fpeak with you.

Gtorgt.

.

Pray, give your man leave to lead mt.furth.

·Kmda/1.

Go, Jenkin, fc:tch him forth.

J•

G

E 0

l\ G

Come, old man,

E

A

G

Jtnlill,

R E E

N

E,

$'1ttr George a Greene d!Jiuiftd.

KttulaU,

Father, here ia three poor men come to quefiio!l

Thee a word in fecret, that concerns their lives. Gtorgt.

Say on, my fons.

Kmda/1.

Father, I am fure you hear the news, How that the earl of Kendai· wars againfi the kin~. Now, father, we three are gentlemen by birth, But younger brethren that want revenues, And for the hope we have to be prefer'd, lf that we knew that we !hall win, We will march with him:

If not, we will not march a foot to London mo~. Therefore, good father, tell ~ what !hall happen, Whethes: the king or the ea~! of Kendall1hall win, G(org(,

The king, my fan.

KmdaU.

Art thou fllrC of that r

Gtorgt. Ay, as fure as thon art Henry Momford, The one lord Bonlield, the other fir Gilbert.

Krnda/1.

Why, this is wondrous, being blind of fight, His deep perceivance !hould he fuch to know us. Gi!btrt. Magick is mighty, altJ fortelleth great matters. Indeed, father, here is the earl come to fee thee, ~ 0 And therefore, good father, fable not with him.

liS A114 Jbmfore, &c.] The fame

expreffion is in Sh~Hpca~ aad Milton,

The F~rft Part of Btnry

c,.,s, 1. Soo.

S. 2 :

" He fablts not, 1 hear the enemy."

VI.

.A.

"Shc,jablts not, I fed thllt I do fear."

THI PINNER OF WAKEPlELD.

~.

WeJcorne it the earl to my poor c:ellt Abd fo are you, my lorda ; but let me c:oad:1 )lO\I To leave tbefe W1ll'l agaioi your king. ADd li•c in quiet.

Father, we come not for advice in war, But to know whether we lhall win or •7 leefe.

K.mJ.ll.

GtfiTlto

tore, gentle Jorda, but nor by aood king Edward :

SS

Abafcr maD lhaU &ive you all the foil.

Kt.J.Ji.

J marry, fa&bcr~ what man is that? Gtwgt.

Poor George a Greenc, the PillDCI'.

Kltu/IIU.

What dWl he? G.rgt.

1»1111 aD your plumes, and fore diJhoDOur you.

He!

how?

Gmyt.

Nay, the CDd trict all; but fo it ·will fall out.

KtiUiiJI.

But fo it thall not, by my hunour Chrift. 111 rai'= my camp. and fire Wakdield town,

Aad take tbac fcrnle Pjnner Georg.: a Green~, Aad buccbcr him before kiog Ed"·lll'li'• face.

Gt.rzt·

.

Good my lord, be not othded,

For I fpeak no more than an I'C'9eals to me ~ And for greater proof, Give yow: mu lca•c to fetch me my ilaf. KnJ.IL

JcWn, fetch bim hi• walking·fta£

Jnliiflo

Here is your walki.ng·ihlff.

•t !«Jr.] i. o. loft.

Aaticnt1y fpdt iA dUI ~et'·

34.

' .G E 0

R G.E

A· G RE

Gr.-gr.

.

E ·!( E, · ·

·

I'll prove it good upl)n your e-.n"cafes: '·

A wifer wizard never met you .yet, . . Nor one that better could foredoom
A wifer wizard never met you .yet,
.
.
Nor one that better could foredoom your fall : . · · ·
Now I have fingll!d you here alone,
.,,
\.
I care not though you be thri:e'to one.
Kend411.
.
·
.·'
f
Villain, haft thou betray'd. ual
·
Gewge. ·
Momford, thou lidl, riever was I
A traitor yet ; only deviS'rl this guile .
To draw you on, for to be combatants.
Now conquer me, and then march on to London.
But it lhall go hard, but I will hold you ta1k •
.
.Gilbtrl.
.
.
Come, my lord, cheerly, I'll kill him hand to hand.
'
·
·
A tboufand pound to him that ftrikes that ftroke.
·
GrorKt•
.
Z

Then give it me, for I will.have the firfr. [Here tbl!)lfight, George ki/Js Gilbert, otbtr two ;rifotrm.

Bonfold.

Stay, George, we do appeal. Grwgr.

To whom?

Why, to the king.:

Bo»jitl.tl.

'

atHi takes t/.;~

For rather bad we bide what he appoints, Than here be munhered by a fervile groom. ·

.

Lntla/J.

What wilt thou do with us l

·

Grorgr."

Even as lord Bonfield 18 witl :'

. You lball unto the king, and for that purpof~:, See where the jufiice is placed.

11 ""Ifi]

Thought.

So,

in Laurh and lie down IJI tbe H'orlti'I Folly,

t6os, Sign. E 4:

" would bavt falne out."

"- witb 11.

.kcpc li&b, fayi!l&:i H2d· owjfl this ·

.E11Ur

THE ~Y.~N:E~ :9~· W!\;K~F-IEL~.

3~

Entrr.·Jrtjf'~.

JrJiice.

Now, my lord of Ken~all; w~ere.be all. your ~ta i ·

Even as the caufe, fo is the combat fallen, Elfe one could never have conquer'd three.

KrntitllJ.·

I

pray thee,

W oodrotfe, d~ nol t\iit me;

 

. :

.•. : ,· ,;

If I have

fault~:I'J mufr make amends. · :

,

.

,

 

Gtorgt. ·

·

·

Mafrer Woodrotfc, here is not a ~ace:for many,wordt•

I befeech ye, fir, difcharge all

That every man may go home unto hit own houfe.

his foldiers; ·

.

J'!fiict•

·

.

.

It lhall be fo; what wilt thou do; Georgd

. Mafter Woodroite; look to your charge,· Leave me to'm_y!elf.

'

1

i

.

G.orge,

,

:Juj/iu• .

.

.

Gtorgt.

Come, my lords.

, Here fit thou; George, wearing a willow wreath,

[ E~nz11tallb.l Gcor&ee

.

.

;

As one defpairing of thy beauteous love. Fie, George ! no more ; · . Pine not awar for that which cannot be.

I c-.&nnot joy m any earthly blifs, So long u I do want my Bettris.

Enttr 'Jenkin.

Jmlin.

Who

fee a

mafrer 'of niine?

How

now;

GC6f"Kt·

firrah;' whither away t Jenkin.

'·Whither away 1 why who do you ·take me to be?

, Gtorgt.

Why JenkiQ, my man.

•'

·

:

Jmkin.

I waa ro once indeed, but riow tke cafe

is

alter~.

3~

· G

-

It 0

It 0

E

A

G lt R E N' t;

I pray thee, as how l

.

.

·Gtwgt.

Jtdi••

were aot' youafortune-teller to-day ?

Well, what

So

GtfJf'gt.

.

of that ?

7tid;,;s.

I become a juggler.

fure am

·

W}ltt will you fay if I juggle your fweet-heartf'

GtfJf'[t.

Peace, prating ' 9 Ioftlt; her jealous father Doth wait over her with fuch fufpicioua eyes,

That, if a man bur dally by her feet, He thinks it itraight a witch to charm hia daughter• .Jtllkiit.

Well, what will you give .me, if l brin& her llichq r

Giwge.

A fuit of green; and twenty crowns befides.

Jtdins.

·

·tvetf, by your leave, give me room ; You mui1 give me fumething that: you have latelf worn.

GtfJf'gt.

Here is a gown, will that ferve you? Jttzillil.

. Ay, this will ferve me-: keep out of my circle,

Left ye be torn

in pieces with !he· devils:

.

Mifuifa Bctttis. once, twice, thrice.

'

• •

. ( Ht tlmrm tiNgrtntN/in, aJj/Jt CDmtl o"t,

·

Oh, IS th1s no cunmng!

Georg1.

Is this my love? or is it bu't her lbadow?

Jenkin.

Ay, this is the 1hado';V, but .here is the fubfiance,.

.

G,orgt.

Tell me, f~eetJove, _wh,r~ f~rtuncbrought theo hither I For one it waa that favoured ~~Fge a Greece.

'

.

Bttiris.

Both love and fortune brought ~c to· ·~y Gciorge_ . In whofe fweet fight is all my heart's con.tent.

••- ~ftH] Sec N'otc 66 011 G-.;i- d.J,,.•, NeeJJe, wl. n. p; 4S·

Gtorgt.,

THE ~I)N,I)R .0~ f! -\KJtF~¥LD•. 31

Tell me, fweet loore,,how~

-

-

~ fro!" thy fa.tber'sl·

'

A

. wining mind.hath many Mps, in love.

.

~~

·s~

It waa not I, but Wily thy Tweet bOy.

-

q.,.gt.

.

Aiid where ia W"Jb' .~w 1 Blltris.

·

.

.

,

.

.

·

c.

lu my apparel io my cbarriher fiiU. Gtwgt.

Jenltin, come ~it~er: go to Bradford,

And liilen out your fellow Wily.

C.-ome, ~

•. ~.ua.iA,

·

And in my c:o~.trei.J\"ill it and talk.

[ Exetmt D111'1111•

.E~~~erx:;,g B,dward, 1b# /{j/IK '!{ Scots, UJ Warwick, .JDunz

G.piy,.Fi t!Nir tr.U

EelwtrrJ.

Brother of Scotland, I do hold it hard, Seeing a league of tnu:e was late confirm'd

'Twixt you iand me, w!~~outdilj>Ieafure oftered. You fhould make fuch 1nv,afion m my laDd.

The vo~ of ki~ga fhould .be aa oradee,

Not blcmifla'd with the ftam of any breach :

Chiefly whereJ~I~,!l!d hom,age willeth it.

1111111.

Brother of En~land, rub not the fore.afrdb,

My confcience gneves me for my deep mifdecd.

I have the wqril:

of thirty tboufand 111en,

There 'fcapt not full 'tlve thoufand from· the field.

EtlwarJ. Gramerc:y, Mufgrove, elfe it had gosae hard.

Cuddy, I'll quite thee well ere we two part.

But had not hit old fath!,"w'tt"JiamMufgnwe,

Plaid twice the man, I had not now been here. _A tlronger man I feldom felt before;

Bur o'ne of more:.refolute valiance Treads not, 1 think. upon sh~En&Wh arouDd.

c J

.

.

.

E.i'TJ.YI1'4.

;_ 3s

d i o'!Ji 'G i

'A: ai

~·:i N F.,T

~a''Ui~rl,.rf

, J·wof well, M~fg~oi(.e·_)h fill no!\.io.'te lri'i''1it~~.

.

.

.

.·T

And it pleafe your grace, my 11ther'w:i,f

. ·c~tkf:t.·

.

u

<

Five fcore and three

at Midfum~el'·t:i~~pill£···

·:

•·

: .,.

·!

Yet had king James been ·as g~ as Gearge a Gr~nc, Yet Billy Mufgrove would have fotignt'.wit'h '.him. ·

 

. ·EJ-.JJdrd,

tu George a Greene·? ··

~

·

J

'("<!

::.

:·.::.

;·, ·

I pray thee, Cuddy, Jt:t me' quenion

Much

have I heard,'fince I came· t0

Many

in manner of a proverb fay, ·

thee,

mf crown~' ·

.'

.

·'

,

· !

H; ·

·:

.

-: •·

;;

,

. ·.

r-.

,_-,Y,m he as g«~das George a Greene, I W11uld~rlle'hlmfo~t.

· I pray thee tell me, Caddy, can'ft tMu inform rrie; · · What is that Geor&e a Greene 1

· :. '.«.

.

Cua'i!Y•. ·

--., .t:. '·

1

.

Know, my lord,-l'never faw dte·nitit/

But mickle talk is of hi!Jl·.in th.e country:

 

They fay he is the Pioner of Wakefielcl tQWil:.;. '

But for his other qualities, I let alo~1~

• .'

·"

. J.f

;:.

 

·.

.

.

·

. 1Yarwlcl~ ~~ ··

. ·

·

May it pleafe yo,ur~g~a~e.El~;.·~V:~h~~~i~.tiiQ _w~ll~

·Too well! why fo~Warwick?

'

Warwick.

,! .

·

{'

,

.,

For once he fwing'd nie,till my boiiea did ake."·'

·.

;,

.', •. E.dWlllrt/.

~.·n

'•;

4

Jl -;

Why, dan:s' h_<: ~~ik,e

.

.

.

c;a~ll-. ,,. '

An earl, my lord! ,n·ay, he will ihi'k,e a.-ldng." · Be it not king Edward: For ftatlu-e he is fraai'd · Like to the piCture qf ftout Hercules,J ·. And for his carria,ge.pa,f.I'~.ihRobip fl®d•,·

The

boldeil earl or 'bcirOii of our land,

··

, ·q

. war'Wlc~. , :, '

~:}

,

: :.d'J

,

·

··' ·

·. ,.)

·.I!

·;

I

That offer~~ ~ ~~~ uPFo· the town of,~a~efi~l.~,­

;.

George w1ft arre~_lilSpledge unto the J.>O.u.Jld ; :

.

so jcath]

ScatJ. is harm;

mif~hief. As

i~ Ri;h;;rd UI. A, r.

" To pray.for them that have done ftatbe to lis.'' • 1 '

'fhe Second Parr-of

Jl.nry

VI. A.:. S.4:

·.-

All thefe couldnot proc11,re Jlle any fcathc."

s: 3:

·

And

THE ·p·hiNER OF·WAKiFI;ELD. "st

And wh~·fu refiA:eth bears away the blowa, For he himfelf is