Jillian Berk Howell 3 3 August 2011 AP Government: Federalist #10 Worksheet Paragraph 1: Summarize how Madison feels about

“factions.” Madison believes that although factions are at odds with each other, they frequently work against the public interests, and infringe upon the rights of others. Paragraph 2: Define faction. If Madison were alive today, what “factions” would he see?” Madison defines that factions are groups of people who gather together to protect and promote their special economic interests and political opinions. If Madison was alive today, he would see factions in the form of interest groups, including anti-apportion groups, pro-gay marriage groups etc. Paragraph 3: What are two methods of curing the mischief’s of factions? Would this be possible today? To Madison, there are only two ways to control a faction: one, to remove its causes and the second to control its effects. The first is impossible. There are only two ways to remove the causes of a faction: destroy liberty or give every citizen the same opinions, passions, and interests. Destroying liberty is a "cure worse than the disease itself," and the second is impracticable. The causes of factions are thus part of the nature of man and we must deal with their effects and accept their existence. The government created by the Constitution controls the damage caused by such factions. Paragraph 4: What are two methods of removing the causes? Would this be possible today? The causes of factions are thus part of the nature of man and we must deal with their effects and accept their existence. The government created by the Constitution controls the damage caused by such factions. The two methods of removing the causes, then, are removing liberty and giving every citizen the same opinion. Paragraph 5: How does Madison feel about the first remedy? Why? Madison does not believe that taking peoples’ liberty is an effective option. Paragraph 6: How does Madison feel about the second remedy? Why?

Madison offers two ways to check majority factions: either prevent the "existence of the same passion or interest in a majority at the same time. Paragraph 10: What will happen when the faction is a minority? What will happen if the faction is a majority? It is okay. according to Jefferson. when the faction is a minority. Paragraph 11: What are the two possibilities of solutions? He then argues that the only problem comes from majority factions because the principle of popular sovereignty should prevent minority factions from gaining power. Paragraph 8: What will factions do to the good of the whole society? Factions will leave society meek when it comes to the public good. the faction that is the majority will reign supreme because popular government reigns supreme. Paragraph 13: What promises the cure? With pure democracy he means a system in which every citizen votes directly for laws. those who govern should be the least likely to sacrifice the public good to temporary condition. As in a Republican government. and these interests then. Madison hopes that the men elected to office will be wise and good men the best of America. Paragraph 9: How does Madison say that factions can be controlled? If the new plan of government is adopted. Paragraph 12: Is there a cure in a pure democracy for the mischief of faction? Madison states “The latent causes of faction are thus sown in the nature of man” so the cure is to control factions’ effects. This is certainly still today. but the opposite might happen. should be regulated with legislation. and with republic he intends a society in which citizens vote for an elite of representatives who then vote for laws. Paragraph 7: What does Madison say about the causes of factions? Is this true today? How should theses interests be legislated? Madison tells us that they are caused by unequal distribution of property.He believes the second remedy to be impractical because the causes of factions are thus part of the nature of man and we must deal with their effects and accept their existence. Theoretically. He makes an argument on how this is not possible in a pure democracy but possible in a republic." or render a majority faction unable to act. He indicates that the voice of the people pronounced by a body of representatives is .

since again. specifically delegated to it. for example. direct democracies where it is easier for factions to consolidate their strength. leaders of factions may be able to influence state governments to support unsound economic and political policies to promote. Paragraph 14: How does Republic compare to a democracy? Which is best? Why? Representative government is needed in large countries. specifically delegated to it. Paragraph 18: What is the “happy combination” that will cure the problem? He wanted a republic diverse enough to prevent faction but with enough commonality to maintain cohesion among the states. the states. retain much of their sovereignty. for example. Paragraph 16-17. factions will be numerous. Why do extensive republics provide the best safeguard against factions? In this country. Paragraph 21: How will Federalism stop the growth of tyranny? No matter how large the constituencies of federal representatives. In this country. far from being abolished. retain much of their sovereignty.more conformable to the interest of the community. but they will be weaker than in small. Paragraph 19-20. Why will extend republics able to do better? Why will large republics have an advantage over small ones? In large republics. but to guard against the rule of the mob. . not to protect the people from the tyranny of the few. the states. leaders of factions may be able to influence state governments to support unsound economic and political policies to promote. common people’s decisions are affected by their self-interest. far from being abolished. local matters will be looked after by state and local officials with naturally smaller constituencies.