Last Reich Humanity Wikileaks Our Executive GICCERS occupied Parliaments oust TKO3 com

www.tko3.com

“It is only the wisest and the stupidest that cannot change” “They must often change who would be constant in happiness or wisdom”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confucius

According to tradition, Confucius was born in 551 B.C., in the Spring and Autumn Period, at the beginning of the Hundred Schools of Thought philosophical movement. Confucius was born in or near the city of Qufu (曲阜), in the Chinese State of Lu (魯) (now part of Shandong Province). Early accounts say that he was born into a poor but noble family that had fallen on hard times.[8]

Confucius was from a warrior family. His father Shulianghe (叔梁紇) had military exploits in two battles and owned a fiefdom. he Records of the Grand Historian (史記), compiled some four centuries later, states that Confucius was born as a result of a yehe (野合), or "illicit union".[9] His father died when Confucius was three years old,[10] and he was brought up in poverty by his mother. His social ascendancy linked him to the growing class of shì (士), a class whose status lay between that of the old nobility and the common people, that comprised men who sought social positions on the basis of talents and skills, rather than heredity. As a child, Confucius was said to have enjoyed putting ritual vases on the sacrifice table.[9] He married a young girl named Qi Guan (亓官) at 19 and she gave birth to their first child, Kong Li, (孔 鯉) when he was 20. Confucius is reported to have worked as a shepherd, cowherd, clerk, and a book-keeper.[11] His mother died when Confucius was 23, and he entered three years of mourning for the loss of his mother. Confucius is said to have risen to the position of Justice Minister (大司寇) in Lu at the age of 53.[12] According to the Records of the Grand Historian, the neighboring state of Qi (齊)was worried that Lu was becoming too powerful. Qi decided to sabotage Lu's reforms by sending 100 good horses and 80 beautiful dancing girls to the Duke of Lu. The Duke indulged himself in pleasure and did not attend to official duties for three days. Confucius was deeply disappointed and resolved to leave Lu and seek better opportunities, yet to leave at once would expose the misbehavior of the Duke and therefore bring public humiliation to the ruler Confucius was serving, so Confucius waited for the Duke to make a lesser mistake. Soon after, the Duke neglected to send to Confucius a portion of the sacrificial meat that was his due according to custom, and Confucius seized this pretext to leave both his post and the state of Lu.[9][13] Although Confucianism is often followed in a religious manner by the Chinese, arguments continue over whether it is a religion. Confucianism discusses elements of the afterlife and views concerning tian (Heaven), but it is relatively unconcerned with some spiritual matters often considered essential to religious thought, such as the nature of the soul.

In the Analects (論語), Confucius presents himself as a

"transmitter who invented nothing".[6]
He puts the greatest emphasis on the importance of study,[18][19] and it is the Chinese character for study (or learning) that opens the text. In this respect, he is seen by Chinese people as the Greatest Master.[20] Far from trying to build a systematic theory of life and society or establish a formalism of rites, he wanted his disciples deeply for themselves and relentlessly study the outside world,[21] mostly through the old scriptures and by relating the moral problems of the present to past political events (like the Annals) or past expressions of feelings by common people and reflective members of the elite, preserved in the poems of the Book of Odes (詩經).[22][23]

to think

Often overlooked in Confucian ethics are the virtues to the self, namely sincerity and the
cultivation of knowledge. Virtuous action towards others begins with virtuous and sincere thought, which begins with knowledge.

A virtuous disposition without knowledge is susceptible to corruption and virtuous
action without sincerity is not true righteousness. Cultivating knowledge and sincerity is also important for one's own sake; the superior person loves learning for the sake of learning and righteousness for the sake of righteousness. Two of Confucius's most famous later followers emphasized radically different aspects of his teachings. In the centuries after his death, Mencius (孟子)[35] and Xun Zi (荀子)[36] both composed important teachings elaborating in different ways on the fundamental ideas associated with Confucius. Mencius (4th century BC) articulated the innate goodness in human beings as a source of the ethical intuitions that guide people towards rén, yì, and lǐ, while Xun Zi (3rd century BC) underscored the realistic and materialistic aspects of Confucian thought, stressing that morality was inculcated in society through tradition and in individuals through training. In time, their writings, together with the Analects and other core texts came to constitute the philosophical corpus of Confucianism. This realignment in Confucian thought was parallel to the development of Legalism, which saw filial piety as self-interest and not a useful tool for a ruler to create an effective state. A disagreement between these two political philosophies came to a head in 223 BC when the Qin state conquered all of China. Li Ssu, Prime Minister of the Qin Dynasty convinced Qin Shi Huang to abandon the Confucians' recommendation of awarding fiefs akin to the Zhou Dynasty before them which he saw as counter to the Legalist idea of centralizing the state around the ruler. When the Confucian advisers pressed their point, Li Ssu had many Confucian scholars killed and their books burned—considered a huge blow to the philosophy and Chinese scholarship. During the Song Dynasty, the scholar Zhu Xi (AD 1130–1200) added ideas from Daoism and Buddhism into Confucianism. In his life, Zhu Xi was largely ignored, but not long after his death his ideas became the new orthodox view of what Confucian texts actually meant. Modern historians view Zhu Xi as having created something rather different, and call his way of thinking Neo-Confucianism. Neo-Confucianism held sway in China, Korea, and Vietnam[37] until the 19th century. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burning_of_books_and_burying_of_scholars

Burning of the books and burying of the scholars (traditional Chinese: 焚書坑儒; simplified Chinese: 焚 书坑儒; pinyin: Fénshū Kēngrú) is a phrase that refers to a policy and a sequence of events in the Qin Dynasty of Ancient China, between the period of 213 and 206 BC. During these events, the Hundred Schools of Thought were pruned; legalism survived. One side effect was the marginalization of the thoughts of the school of Mozi and the survival of the thoughts of Confucius. In the Analects (論語), Confucius presents himself as a "transmitter who invented nothing".[6] He puts the greatest emphasis on the importance of study,[18][19] and it is the Chinese character for study (or learning) that opens the text. In this respect, he is seen by Chinese people as the Greatest Master.[20] Far from trying to build a systematic theory of life and society or establish a formalism of rites, he wanted his disciples to think deeply for themselves and relentlessly study the outside world,[21] mostly through the old scriptures and by relating the moral problems of the present to past political events (like the Annals) or past expressions of feelings by common people and reflective members of the elite, preserved in the poems of the Book of Odes (詩經).[22][23] Often overlooked in Confucian ethics are the virtues to the self, namely sincerity and the cultivation of knowledge. Virtuous action towards others begins with virtuous and sincere thought, which begins with knowledge. A virtuous disposition without knowledge is susceptible to corruption and virtuous action without sincerity is not true righteousness. Cultivating knowledge and sincerity is also important for one's own sake; the superior person loves learning for the sake of learning and righteousness for the sake of righteousness. "Learning without thought is labor lost; thought without learning is perilous" "He who keeps danger in mind will rest safely in his seat; he who keeps ruin in mind will preserve his interest secure; he who sets the dangers of disorder before himself will maintain a state of order" "Mens natures are alike; it is their habits that carry them far apart" "A man who has made a mistake and doesn't correct it is making another mistake" "To see what is right, and not do it, is want of courage, or of principle" “A little learning is a dangerous thing; Drink deep and taste not the Pierian spring; There shallow draughts intoxicate the brain; And drinking largely sobers us again.” Alexander Pope 1688 - 1744 Roll Call 1 or 666? "Mens natures are alike; it is their habits that carry them far apart"

Material world belongs to 1 (Humanity) Spiritual Apocalypse 666 Speak up IT is democracy 1 or 666? Humanity Spirit S Ess Epitome Simplicity Sanity The success of any person dependent on being perceived as 1 with Humanity Registered? If not agin wind farter soon dearly departed

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful