P. 1
UMBC Poll about Islam uploaded for Masrur

UMBC Poll about Islam uploaded for Masrur

|Views: 82|Likes:
Published by Omar Shehab

More info:

Categories:Types, Research, History
Published by: Omar Shehab on May 12, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/12/2012

pdf

text

original

UMBC: Home A­Z Index Events Directory Maps 4 7

 A. Shehab Uddin Ayub 

Log Out

Start
Switch Role:

Topics
Staff

Community
Graduate Student

Help

 Favorites

Search  Enter search terms

  Go
Hide this bar »

Community Discussions
4
bury ▼

Squirrels in the Fall by Dustin Eby

US Military Officers: America's Enemy Is Islam In General
David Adamsen ∙ posted about 22 hours ago

Discussion Info
posted May 11, 2012 sponsor Students For The Founders topics
Arts, Culture & Entertainment Community News & Opinion myUMBC

Excerpts of anti­Islamic military course
A course for U.S. military officers has been teaching that America's enemy is Islam in general, not just terrorists. The Pentagon suspended the course last month after a student complained, and Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Martin Dempsey said the Joint Forces Staff College was reviewing how curricula are designed. Here are some excerpts of statements from the course: —"They hate everything you stand for and will never coexist with you, unless you submit." —"Islam as it currently defines itself is an ideology rather than solely a religion with the normally associated protections we afford such beliefs." —"It is therefore time for the United States to make our true intentions clear. This barbaric ideology will no longer be tolerated. Islam must change or we will facilitate its self­destruction." —"The United States has come to accept that radical 'true Islam' is both a political and military enemy to free people throughout the world." —Possible outcomes of an anti­Islam campaign: "Saudi Arabia threatened with starvation, Mecca and Medina destroyed, Islam reduced to cult status." Also, see DefenseNews.com for a similar article.

tags

us­military­against­islam­in­ general war­on­terror­is­war­on­islam west­vs­islam

share

 

 

 

 

 

Recent Discussions
1 13

QLTY.
0 replies

Understanding MyUMBC's Secret Messages
18 replies ∙ last was about 3 hours ago

Poll Question:  Is "radical" Islam or "mainstream" Islam the real problem, or are they really any different from one another?
(edited about 22 hours ago)

3

You Know You Spend Too Much Time on MyUMBC when.....
12 replies ∙ last was about 2 hours ago

0

ROOM SUBLET FOR SUMMER
0 replies

Vote in Poll

2

Optional to pay Athletic Fee???
10 replies ∙ last was about 4 hours ago

Other Discussions from

Students For The Founders
3

Coroner's Office Speaks On Breitbart's Death
22 replies ∙ last was about 22 hours ago

8

Congress Debates Ending the Federal Reserve?
23 replies ∙ last was about 17 hours ago

7 2 9

State Bans Bake Sales
37 replies ∙ last was 3 days ago

May Day Rally In Los Angeles
37 replies ∙ last was 6 days ago

Black Male Guns Down “White Hispanic” After Argument
79 replies ∙ last was 9 days ago

US Military Officers: America's Enemy Is Islam In General
10

7.5

Number of Votes

5

2.5

0

"Radical" Islam is the real problem, not "mainstream" Islam. "Radical" Islam IS real Islam. Terrorism has nothing to do with Islam or any other religion. The War on Terror is really a war between the West and Islam. "Radical" Islam and "mainstream" Islam are essentially the same. "Mainstream" Islam IS real Islam I don't know anything about Islam, so I can't say. "Mainstream" Islam is the real problem, not "radical" Islam.

There were 24 total votes.

Comments (86)
Christopher Nguyen  about 22 hours ago Obligatory: This poll is flawed. You should make the choices checkboxes since your choices are not necessarily mutually exclusive (which is real vs which is the problem are two separate questions). Also, the terrorism and war on terror questions are kind of their own yes/no questions.
reply  1 reply 0   bury ▼ paw 3   bury ▼

David Adamsen  about 22 hours ago  edited Thanks. Good idea. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . done.
reply

paw

Christopher Nguyen  about 22 hours ago

paw

3   bury ▼

Also, I bet the course was designed with a certain intent in mind (fight the terrorists), but the course content did not properly reflect that (terrorist = muslim) so they yank it.
reply 1   bury ▼

Paul Adamsen  about 22 hours ago  edited

paw

Western secularists think that religion is stupid and irrelevant, that all religious people are basically the same, and that deep down nobody really cares. They scornfully gloss over the differences between religions, and they have no idea what it is like for faith to define and deeply influence a person's life. There are many Muslims who do not follow the example of the Prophet Muhammad, or who do so very selectively. We call them moderates. And then there are those who do follow him, who share his goals and who live the way he did. We call them radicals.
reply  2 replies 2   bury ▼

Christopher Nguyen  about 21 hours ago
reply  2 replies

paw

Same could be said of Christianity. God forbid anyone follow the Bible to the letter. Yikes!

Paul Adamsen  about 19 hours ago  edited
reply  4 replies

paw

4   bury ▼

Really? Which parts of Jesus' life and work were violently imperialistic?

Christopher Nguyen  about 19 hours ago Bible does include the old testament, you know? Erik Walker  about 17 hours ago

paw

1   bury ▼

paw

2   bury ▼

The OT is presented as a cautionary tale, not as an example to be emulated. The Jews were conquered, besieged, defeated etc dozens of times (hundreds, total) over their thousand­year history as a nation. Their mistakes are recorded for our benefit so that we can learn from them AND NOT REPEAT THEM. How you go from that to "the Bible preaches violence" is impossible to understand. Michelle Czarnecki  about 17 hours ago
2   bury ▼

paw

@Erik: Exactly. That just brought up another point that the Law was one of God's ways to set the Jews apart from the rest of the world, pertaining to the promise God made to Abraham/Avraham/Ibraihm in Genesis 12. Paul Adamsen  about 1 hour ago  edited
1   bury ▼

paw

We can talk about the Old Testament some other time. We can talk about the Qur'an some other time too. I compared Jesus to Muhammad, and right now we're talking about Jesus' example, which is what we use to interpret the rest of the Bible because He is God incarnate. So I ask again: which parts of Jesus' life and work were violently imperialistic? Michelle Czarnecki  about 19 hours ago
1   bury ▼

paw

Chris, I don't think there would have been a need for God to make certain laws back then if we didn't need them back then and now. The Spirit of the Law is love. Matthew 22:34­40
reply  12 replies Brian Frey removed this comment.

Christopher Nguyen  about 16 hours ago

paw

1   bury ▼

Yet you said below that you agreed with Erik, that the OT is just a history and not how Christians should live. They can't both be true. Michelle Czarnecki  about 12 hours ago
1   bury ▼

paw

I meant that they are both true and that the reason the OT happened was so that we could see our need for the coming Messiah, who is Jesus. Christopher Nguyen  about 4 hours ago That doesn't explain why we need the Law now. Erik Walker  about 4 hours ago
0   bury ▼ 0   bury ▼

paw

paw

The Law brings people to a knowledge of sin. Secondly, it reveals God's Perfect will to us, so that we can know what's good and what's bad from an objective source­­since everyone's conscience is imperfect and what someone recognizes to be sin, someone else might be failing to see as such. Christopher Nguyen  about 4 hours ago  edited
1   bury ▼

paw

Erik, you do not need to speak for Michelle, unless you are attempting to follow 1 Timothy 2:12. Not to mention you've quoted many times before that Christians are not bound under the Law. Erik Walker  about 4 hours ago
1   bury ▼

paw

What do you think that means, Chris? And your eisegesis of Scripture is horrible.

Christopher Nguyen  about 4 hours ago Ooooh. It's Erik's new Word of the Week!! Erik Walker  about 3 hours ago It's only new to you. Christopher Nguyen  about 3 hours ago

paw

0   bury ▼

paw

0   bury ▼

paw

0   bury ▼

You must not read very much. It's amazing what you can learn from books. ;­) Michelle Czarnecki  about 3 hours ago @Erik: High five.  @Chris: Dude, get into the Word. You might be surprised by what you'll find. Also, Erik was not speaking for me but merely supporting what I said, which I appreciate. BTW, as he and I are both Christians, we are both aware of being "surrounded by a great cloud of witnesses" (cf. Hebrews 12:1­2). Chill. Christopher Nguyen  about 3 hours ago
0   bury ▼ 0   bury ▼

paw

paw

^^ Michelle, I understand your bias to support him, but even he has said himself that Christians are not bound under the Law. So he hasn't explained why the Law is needed now. I'm still waiting to hear a solid argument. Michelle Czarnecki  about 19 hours ago
1   bury ▼

paw

Exactly. Why, sadly, I believe that were people to study the Koran for what it really is, as I have, they would see frightening contradictions that they can only reconcile by concluding that Islam is, essentially, focused on one goal: jihad in some form, whether it is physical or spiritual ("radical" vs. "moderate" Islam).
reply  1 reply 2   bury ▼

Christopher Nguyen  about 19 hours ago

paw

I think they'll see as many contradictions in the Koran as Christians see in the Bible. Similarly I think Christians see as many contradictions in the Koran as rational people see in the Bible.
reply  15 replies 2   bury ▼

Michelle Czarnecki  about 18 hours ago

paw

The problem is, they don't have context. They read what they read and that's it. . . . . Christopher Nguyen  about 18 hours ago
1   bury ▼

paw

And you're saying you have context on the Koran? There is a fundamental problem with your argument. The same answers you give to the questions I give you can be thrown back at you replacing Bible with Koran. Erik Walker  about 17 hours ago
2   bury ▼

paw

No, they can't......they're not even close to similar... that just shows that you haven't read either one. Michelle Czarnecki  about 17 hours ago  edited
2   bury ▼

paw

Okay. Challenge me, Chris. I am well aware of what you are trying to do. Thomas Riley  about 17 hours ago Erik, you've read the Koran? 8th Commandment Erik Walker  about 17 hours ago
3   bury ▼ 1   bury ▼

paw

paw

Large chunks of it, yes. Have you tried? The vast majority of it is garbled nonsense. There's a reason the religion includes interpretive books, because without them the Qur'an often makes almost no sense.

Michelle Czarnecki  about 17 hours ago @Erik: Thank you. 

paw

0   bury ▼

@Chris: Historically, he's right. In principle, they may seem the same, too, but they are nothing alike at their cores. Christopher Nguyen  about 16 hours ago
0   bury ▼

paw

@Michelle: Have you read the Koran yourself, or just Christian­authored websites on the Koran? Christopher Nguyen  about 16 hours ago >> The vast majority of it is garbled nonsense. This statement alone proves you know nothing about the Koran. :­) Michelle Czarnecki  about 16 hours ago
1   bury ▼ 0   bury ▼

paw

paw

I have read parts of the Koran on both secular and Christian sites, both pro­ and anti­Islam. I have also spoken to many Islamic friends who confuse me all the more when they explain the Qu'ran to me, Chris. Christopher Nguyen  about 16 hours ago  edited
2   bury ▼

paw

I think you need to do more reading on the Koran. When put into context against the Torah and the Bible it makes a lot more sense from an objective perspective. Erik Walker  about 5 hours ago
0   bury ▼

paw

"This statement alone proves you know nothing about the Koran. :­)" That very statement shows you're in so deep over your head that you're practically walking on the ocean floor. Christopher Nguyen  about 4 hours ago  edited
1   bury ▼

paw

^^ Agreed. The ocean floor at Ocean City at low tide. How's the Mariana Trench by the way? Erik Walker  about 4 hours ago
1   bury ▼

paw

Let me know when your level of insults rises above the 3rd­grade "I know you are but what am I?" level. Thanks. Christopher Nguyen  about 4 hours ago You must enjoy the darkness down there. Gregorio Vazquez   about 19 hours ago I have an idea: let's throw more money at the problem and hope it goes away.
reply 5   bury ▼ 3   bury ▼ 1   bury ▼

paw

paw

Rachel Robinson  about 18 hours ago

paw

This is just the military way of teaching. They aren't trying to enlighten anyone or make anyone a critical thinker, people. They have an agenda, and their "education" is a an oversimplification of the issue so that it becomes black and white. Soldiers do as they're told, and fight for the cause of their superiors. So of course this "class" is highly flawed! You think there isn't heaps and heaps more of this stuff out there that you don't know about? There is a fundamental difference between education and "training". Source: I served active duty in the US Army Military Intelligence Corps, Linguist.
reply  2 replies 0   bury ▼

Michelle Czarnecki  about 18 hours ago I might consider that. C'est possible et merci pour l’idée!
reply

paw

Aakif Haque  about 14 hours ago >I served active duty in the US Army Military Intelligence Corps, Linguist. Really? I had you penned down as a 17­18 y/o freshman
reply

paw

1   bury ▼

Michelle Czarnecki  about 18 hours ago

paw

2   bury ▼

Whoever's been pawing me, what is your take on the issue? I am sure you have an equally valid opinion.
reply  2 replies 0   bury ▼

Christopher Nguyen  about 18 hours ago I can think of 3 people and only 3 people.
reply  1 reply

paw

Michelle Czarnecki  about 18 hours ago  edited

paw

0   bury ▼

If he or she would answer, we'd know who said person is. Let's just hope the discussion continues well, as it is now.
reply 3   bury ▼

David Adamsen  about 18 hours ago  edited

paw

That would be me. I agree. We should read the Koran ourselves so that we can understand those who try and defend the Koran by misrepresenting it. No sane person can read the Koran and believe it is really the word of God. But that's why Mohammed invented taqiyya, so that Muslims could lie about their religion to convert nonbelievers.
reply  3 replies 1   bury ▼

Michelle Czarnecki  about 18 hours ago

paw

Hahaha! I figured that you, Paul, or Erik would have pawed my comments. We think alike, thank God, and for good reason, I believe.
reply  3 replies 2   bury ▼

David Adamsen  about 18 hours ago

paw

Well, you make a good argument. People need to judge Islam by both the fruits of its followers and the teachings of the Koran. Otherwise, we are left to believe the lies spread about it by both Muslims and the naively stupid media. Michelle Czarnecki  about 17 hours ago Exactly, and I do that carefully. Christopher Nguyen  about 4 hours ago s/Islam/Christianity/g s/Koran/Bible/g s/Muslim/Christian/g Wow. The point works both ways. Michelle Czarnecki  about 18 hours ago  edited
1   bury ▼ 0   bury ▼ 1   bury ▼

paw

paw

paw

I also wouldn't be surprised if we are viewed as bigots. Let me, then, be clear that I love Muslims and hate Islam. I also respect the rights of others to hate my faith, as I know many will.
reply 1   bury ▼

Thomas Riley  about 17 hours ago

paw

Christians can lie about their religion and repent to save souls too. Losing your eye is not like losing your soul. Same with arm, leg, etc. It logically fits.
reply  7 replies 1   bury ▼

Erik Walker  about 17 hours ago

paw

No, Christians cannot lie. Lying is a sin. Both the OT and the NT condemn lying.

Michelle Czarnecki  about 17 hours ago

paw

1   bury ▼

Islam does that, Thomas, not to mention orthodox Muslims often abuse women (generally), nonbelievers, et cetera, to "keep them in line". . . . . Christopher Nguyen  about 16 hours ago  edited
1   bury ▼

paw

Yet you have no problem doing that Erik. I guess that means you're not a Christian. Erik Walker  about 4 hours ago
1   bury ▼

paw

No, it means that you constantly lie when you accuse me of lying. God help you, man. Christopher Nguyen  about 4 hours ago ^^ Prove it or you're a liar. Erik Walker  about 4 hours ago Grow up, child. Christopher Nguyen  about 4 hours ago
1   bury ▼ 2   bury ▼ 2   bury ▼

paw

paw

paw

Thank you for conceding your stance. Welcome to the family fellow non­ Christian. *hugs* Erik Walker  about 17 hours ago
2   bury ▼

paw

On the one hand, Islam is just one of many false religions that turn people away from God. On the other hand, it's the biggest threat to freedom and civilization worldwide today. On still another hand, it's almost undeniable that Islam is the "Beast," i.e. the religious vehicle of the Antichrist, or Mahdi, as they know him.
reply 1   bury ▼

Erik Walker  about 17 hours ago  edited

paw

▼ show entire comment ▼ reply  1 reply 0   bury ▼

Michelle Czarnecki  about 16 hours ago

paw

Hmmmm...did anyone else hear that? "The law is the greatest of all deceivers". One could take that as anti­Semetic and anti­Christian, yes?
reply  2 replies 2   bury ▼

Christopher Nguyen  about 16 hours ago  edited

paw

No, you're just deaf. He said "Allah is the greatest of all deceivers". The speaker is Walid Shoebat who used to be part of the Muslim Brotherhood, a terrorist organization. He started going on a crusade against Islam after converting to Christianity. He went from one type of radicalism to another. A true role model. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walid_Shoebat http://www.shoebat.com/bio.php
reply  2 replies

Erik Walker  about 4 hours ago

paw

0   bury ▼

Saul of Tarsus went from radical Orthodox Judaism to 'radical' Biblical Christianity. And he is a true role model. So your slight against Walid is just silly, from an informed perspective. Anyway, the whole point of Christianity is that we all have flaws. Christ is our role model to emulate. Gregorio Vazquez   about 1 hour ago Does that mean I have to give up going to the gym? Michelle Czarnecki  about 12 hours ago
1   bury ▼ 1   bury ▼

paw

paw

Thank you for the correction, Chris. He's certainly right that Allah is a deceiver because Allah is in fact a false god, therefore being a devil.
reply  8 replies 1   bury ▼

Christopher Nguyen  about 5 hours ago I think Allah is as real as the Christian god. Christopher Nguyen  about 4 hours ago The confirmation bias... it hurts so much. Erik Walker  about 4 hours ago

paw

paw

1   bury ▼

paw

0   bury ▼

Well, Satan is a real living being...so....I guess I'd have to agree with you, Chris. Christopher Nguyen  about 4 hours ago Prove that they both exist. Then you can talk. Erik Walker  about 4 hours ago
0   bury ▼ 1   bury ▼

paw

paw

Already have. You can wallow in your ignorance for all I care. I have no pity for you. Christopher Nguyen  about 4 hours ago ^^ Copping out again as usual. :­) Gregorio Vazquez   about 1 hour ago Don't worry, I got this one, Erik. Genesis 3:4 and 3:14 1 Chronicles 21:1 Job 1:6 and Zechariah 3:1­2 and 1 Peter 5:8 Matthew 4:1­3, Luke 4:2 Matthew 12:24, Mark 3:22, Luke 11:15 Matthew 12:43
▼ show entire comment ▼ 0   bury ▼ 1   bury ▼

paw

paw

Matthew 13:19 and 1 John 2:13 David Adamsen  34 minutes ago Luke 10:19 ...minus b****, please. John 8:44 Paul Spause  about 5 hours ago  edited John 12:31 and 14:30 and 16:11
paw 0   bury ▼

paw

1   bury ▼

Leaving out the "your god is not our God" conflict that happens whenever religion vs religion (or sect John 13:27 vs sect) discussions ensue, the political aspirations of Islam are a threat to the United States. The establishment of a worldwide caliphate under Islamic law is in direct opposition to the sovereignty of 2 Corinthians 4:4 the United States. 2 Corinthians 6:15 This is not universally accepted among all Muslims, especially the Muslims in the United States I have met. I can see how a course for high ranking officers would spell this out and draw the Ephesians 2:2

conclusion that the goal of foreign Islamic governments is the eventual downfall of the US in the name of Islam. Conversely, I expect foreign Islamic governments to view the US as hostile to their sovereignty when goals of US foreign policy are the equal and fair treatment of all people (as judged under US ▼ show entire comment ▼ standards) and embodied in many international documents. Exporting US­style freedom is a threat reply  2 replies to many (not all) Islamic governments. Christopher Nguyen  about 5 hours ago
paw 0   bury ▼

I think you're over­generalizing. I can see ­­ as a realistic problem ­­ having any kind of religion as a state religion being the problem. When you have a state religion, you appoint someone has the head of religion. Often this person has more power than your head of state (if they aren't one in the same). The result is that the secular head of state becomes a puppet because one's religious beliefs outweigh other factors. This would hold true even if we made Christianity ­­ as an example due to its prevalence and relevance ­­ the state religion.
reply 0   bury ▼

Erik Walker  about 4 hours ago

paw

It would also hold true if we infused earth­worship and president­worship into our national fabric. I would call this an atheistic state religion, which it is. It nonetheless forces people to give obeisance to the State on a level that would parallel, or surpass, the level of religiosity of muslims during the Hajj. Except it would be 24/7. The idea that you can't have an atheist theocracy is nonsense. A simple knowledge of events from last century should dispel that idea.
reply  2 replies 0   bury ▼

Christopher Nguyen  about 4 hours ago

paw

>> It would also hold true if we infused earth­worship and president­worship into our national fabric. I would call this an atheistic state religion, which it is. While I'd debate the name, I can't think of anything better to call it, so we'll work with that for now. But as for the spirit of your reply, indeed that would be true. Do you have an example of this in the modern world though? Fortunately we live in a country where the position of President is limited to no more than 10 years and is chosen by the people. Furthermore, I know of no people that accept laws as blindly as religion. Perhaps they feel helpless to change them and follow them out of intimidation, but I know of no people that follow them as if they were religious doctrine. Do you have examples of such people?
▼ show entire comment ▼ >> The idea that you can't have an atheist theocracy is nonsense. A simple reply knowledge of events from last century should dispel that idea.

I think you're just on a war against the non­religious. I cite myUMBC as your bury ▼ paw 0   Erik Walker  about 4 hours ago intolerance of other religions as evidence. Atheism is not a religion, but I can see "Furthermore, I know of no people that accept laws as blindly as religion." your viewpoint. I do. They're the people who use the "age of consent" laws as a rebuttal to the idea that pedophilia might be legalized in the future. People who don't realize that laws can change are perhaps more dangerous than the people who think laws are useless and seek to get rid of them.
reply  4 replies 1   bury ▼

Christopher Nguyen  about 4 hours ago

paw

>> I do. They're the people who use the "age of consent" laws as a rebuttal to the idea that pedophilia might be legalized in the future. People who don't realize that laws can change are perhaps more dangerous than the people who think laws are useless and seek to get rid of them. That's a strong assumption about people you're making. Are you certain that people believe laws cannot change or is this another baseless claim? I think you're misinterpreting law worship for general ignorance of the legislative process, which is true and certainly not the same. Erik Walker  about 3 hours ago You're too dumb to understand.
1   bury ▼

paw

Christopher Nguyen  about 3 hours ago #Victory Christopher Nguyen  about 3 hours ago

paw

1   bury ▼

paw

2   bury ▼

▼ show entire comment ▼

Erik Walker  about 4 hours ago "Exporting US­style freedom is a threat to many (not all) Islamic governments." ...which one is it not a threat to? Just sincerely wondering.
reply  1 reply

paw

1   bury ▼

Michelle Czarnecki  about 3 hours ago  edited

paw

0   bury ▼

Exactly. I challenge anyone to name an Islamic government that does NOT oppress women, nonbelievers (of Islam), and does not hate America, for example. I can think of (maybe) only one, which is Turkey's governement. Even that is a stretch.
reply

This comment will be visible to anyone logged into myUMBC. Post a comment on US Military Officers: America's Enemy Is Islam In General...

UMBC Community Standards

  Post Comment

myUMBC Topics

Start  |  Alerts  |  Mail  |  Blackboard  |  Calendar Staff Center  |  Advising & Student Support  |  Arts, Culture & Entertainment  |  Athletics & Recreation  |  Billing & Personal Finances  |  Books, Goods & Services  |  Classes & Grades  |  Community News & Opinion  |  Computing & Technology  |  Diversity  |  Facilities & Operations  |  Financial Services & Accounting  |  Food & Dining  |  Health, Wellness & Safety  |  Human Resources  |  Involvement & Leadership  |  Jobs & Internships  |  Library  |  Parking & Transportation  |  Professional Development  |  Research & Grants  |  Teaching & Learning Spotlights  |  News  |  Events  |  Discussions  |  Media  |  Groups Request Help  |  About myUMBC Profile  |  Avatar  |  Appearance  |  Notifications  |  Password  |  Roles

What do you love or hate about myUMBC?

Send us Feedback

Community Help Settings

About myUMBC | Community Standards | Contact Us | Equal Opportunity © 2010 University of Maryland, Baltimore County. • 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250 • 410­455­1000 Diagnostic Info: 1.3.0.39 ­ 3506 ­ production ­ prod3 ­ staff

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->