I Love the Sun

by Teacher Hazelle Preclaro

I love the sun (5x) Because it lets me have fun (5x) If it’s a sunny day, I can go out and play. I want to… [pick an action word: clap, jump, swim ] clap, clap, clap, clap, clap and have some fun with you. Let’s have some fun (5x) Thanks to the sun!
Astilla, Dela Paz, Par, Preclaro, Principe, Razon, Santos, Zuniga

The English Curriculum

Astilla, Dela Paz, Par, Preclaro, Principe, Razon, Santos, Zuniga

The Philippine Language Context
Cross-Linguistic Transfer of Literacy Ability Readers use knowledge of their native language as they read in a second language (Durgunoglu & Oney, 2000)

Possibly, transferability is bi-directional (Fitzgerald, 1999)

The Philippine Language Context

Cross-Linguistic Transfer of Literacy Ability Monolingual beginning reading instruction in Filipino had positive effects on children’s English literacy skills – specifically in terms of the alphabet and phonological awareness (Aquino, 2005)

The Philippine Language Context

Cross-Linguistic Transfer of Literacy Ability Filipino and English bilingual-biliterates show cross-language interactions of various reading and language based skills (Ocampo, 2005)

Transition from MT to English
Experience Oral Symbols in L1 Printed Symbols in L1

Oral Symbols in Filipino

Printed Symbols in Filipino

Oral Symbols In English

Printed Symbols In English

Transition from MT to English
First Quarter Mother Tongue
*All domains

Second Quarter Mother Tongue
*All domains

Third Quarter Mother Tongue
*All domains

Fourth Quarter Mother Tongue
*All domains

Filipino

Filipino

Filipino

Filipino
*All domains

*Exposure to *Exposure to *All domains the Language the Language

English
*Exposure to the Language (Oral language, Phonological Awareness, Vocabulary, Listening Comps, Grammar)

English
*Exposure to the Language (Oral language, Phonological Awareness, Vocabulary, Listening Comps, Grammar)

Integration of Language, Literature and Literacy Skills
Reading
Literature

Listening

Speaking

Writing

The English Curriculum

At the end of third grade the…
students should be able to demonstrate eagerness to explore and experience oral and written texts and to communicate meanings and feelings effectively.

Literacy Domains:
• Book and print orientation • Alphabet knowledge • Phonics and Word Recognition • Fluency • Writing and Composition /Handwriting • Spelling • Reading Comprehension • Oral Language • Vocabulary • Grammar • Phonological Awareness • Listening Comprehension • Attitude • Study Skills

Domains not included in the First Grade English Curriculum: • Book and print orientation • Alphabet knowledge • Phonics and Word Recognition • Fluency • Writing and Composition/Handwriting • Spelling • Reading Comprehension

These three domains are among the areas that should have already been covered using the Mother Tongue.
• Book and Print Orientation • Alphabet Knowledge • Handwriting

Definitions of the Content Standards for the Integrated Language Arts Curriculum for the K-12 Basic Education Program of the Department of Education

Proposed Standards

At the end of Grade 3, students should:

Book and Print Knowledge

use narrative and expository texts for independent study and reading for pleasure.

Grade 1 English

Definitions of the Content Standards for the Integrated Language Arts Curriculum for the K-12 Basic Education Program of the Department of Education

Proposed Standards

At the end of Grade 3, students should:
recognize, name and sound out all the upper and lower case letters of the alphabet.

Alphabet Knowledge

Grade 1 English

Definitions of the Content Standards for the Integrated Language Arts Curriculum for the K-12 Basic Education Program of the Department of Education

Proposed Standards

At the end of Grade 3, students should:

Handwriting

write legibly in cursive writing.

Grade 1 English

These are the domains or areas that will not be explicitly taught at the first grade level. However, know that these domains will be

modeled and may be learned incidentally.

• Phonics and Word Recognition
• Fluency • Writing and Composition • Spelling • Reading Comprehension • Study Skills

Definitions of the Content Standards for the Integrated Language Arts Curriculum for the K-12 Basic Education Program of the Department of Education

Proposed Standards

At the end of Grade 3, students should:
use sight word recognition or phonic analysis to read and understand words in English that contain complex letter combinations, affixes and contractions.
Grade 1 English

Phonics and Word Recognition

Word Recognition
Skills that may emerge: Identify signs, symbols, labels, and captions in the environment Recognize some common words on sight (e.g. A, the, and, said etc.)

Definitions of the Content Standards for the Integrated Language Arts Curriculum for the K-12 Basic Education Program of the Department of Education

Proposed Standards

At the end of Grade 3, students should:

Fluency

read aloud grade level texts effortlessly, without hesitation and with proper expression.

Grade 1 English

Fluency
Skills that may emerge: Participate in shared reading of repetitive texts

Definitions of the Content Standards for the Integrated Language Arts Curriculum for the K-12 Basic Education Program of the Department of Education

Proposed Standards

At the end of Grade 3, students should:
express their ideas effectively in formal and informal compositions to fulfill their own purposes for writing.

Writing/Composition

Grade 1 English

Writing and Composition
Skills that may emerge: Make appreciable marks on a page Understand that drawings convey meaning Write with a purpose in mind Dictate ideas that

Share preferences Narrate a story/experience
Describe (e.g. person, animal, object, place)

Writing and Composition

Draw ideas that Share preferences Narrate a story/experience Describe (e.g. person, animal, object, place) Engage in free writing

Definitions of the Content Standards for the Integrated Language Arts Curriculum for the K-12 Basic Education Program of the Department of Education

Proposed Standards

At the end of Grade 3, students should: glean meaning from a range of texts written in various contexts for a variety of purposes.

Reading Comprehension

Grade 1 English

Definitions of the Content Standards for the Integrated Language Arts Curriculum for the K-12 Basic Education Program of the Department of Education

Proposed Standards

At the end of Grade 3, students should:

Study Skills

use strategies for purposeful literacy learning.

Grade 1 English

Study Skills
Skills that may emerge:
Follow directions Interpreting pictographs

Interpreting simple maps of familiar places

Domains included: • Oral Language • Phonological Awareness • Vocabulary • Listening Comprehension • Grammar • Attitude

Definitions of the Content Standards for the Integrated Language Arts Curriculum for the K-12 Basic Education Program of the Department of Education

Proposed Standards

At the end of Grade 3, students should:

Oral Language in English

have sufficient facility in English to understand spoken discourse and to talk and interact with others about personal experiences and text listened to or read.
Grade 1 English

Oral Language Activity

Oral Language Skills
Standard for Grade 1: Use speaking skills and strategies appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes

Oral Language Skills
Listen and speak with a purpose in mind Listen and respond to others Give directions Give information shared by others Express their feelings about others ideas Ask simple questions Seek help Interact with others Initiate a conversation Engage in a dialogue Share information and stories with others

Oral Language Skills
Identify/Share relevant information Describe/talk about ones experiences Talk about the experiences of others Describe a sequence of events Describe ones environment e.g. persons, animals, places , things , events etc.) Identify similarities/differences

Oral Language Skills
Make interpretations Listen and respond to texts Clarify meanings heard while drawing on personal experiences Identify, describe and use some commonly used verbal and non-verbal features in a range of texts Restate and retell information Engage in a variety of ways to share info (e.g. role playing, morning message, show and tell) Retell a story

Oral Language Skills
Express oneself Speak clearly and audibly Speak in full sentences Express thoughts and feelings Share own ideas Share preferences

Definitions of the Content Standards for the Integrated Language Arts Curriculum for the K-12 Basic Education Program of the Department of Education

Proposed Standards

At the end of Grade 3, students should:

Phonological Skills

be able to demonstrate phonological awareness at the levels of the syllable and the phoneme.

Grade 1 English

PA Activity: Head and Feet
• Touch your head if the end part of the word I say has a similar ending sound as head. • Touch your feet if the end part of the word I say has a similar ending sound as feet. Ex. Goal: Identifying which word rhymes bed red meet feet said street fed sweet bread

Can you turn a hen into a pig?

Turning a hen into a pig
Hen = change h and replace with p Pen = change e and replace with i Pin = change n and replace with g What do we have??? A pig!

Phonological Awareness Skills
Standard for Grade 1: Display sensitivity to sounds in spoken language

Phonological Awareness Skills
Display sensitivity to sounds in spoken language Recognize rhyming words Distinguish rhyming words from non-rhyming words Supply rhyming words in response to spoken words Identify/count individual words in phrases and sentences Identify/count syllables in words Identify/count sounds in a word Identify the beginning sound of a word Identify onsets and rimes

Identify the final sound of a word

Definitions of the Content Standards for the Integrated Language Arts Curriculum for the K-12 Basic Education Program of the Department of Education

Proposed Standards

At the end of Grade 3, students should: acquire, study, and use English vocabulary words appropriately in relevant contexts.

Vocabulary

Grade 1 English

Vocabulary Activity
Which word will you replace to fix these silly statements? Provide a word that you know to fix each statement. On my plate I have a moon. I can use my mouth to walk. On my bed, I like to weep. To check the time, I look at my sock.

Vocabulary
Standard for Grade 1: Use a variety of words to communicate ideas orally for a variety of purposes and to understand oral and written text

Vocabulary
Differentiate English words from words in other languages spoken at home and in school Ask about unfamiliar words to gain meaning Sort and classify familiar words into basic categories (e.g., colors, shapes, foods). Describe familiar objects and events in both general and specific language. Show curiosity about and play with words and language

Vocabulary
Use new words learned thru stories in own speech Know and use words that are important to school work, such as the names for colors, shapes, and numbers Know and use words that are important to daily life like names of persons, animals, things, places and events Determine what words mean using context clues

Vocabulary
Ask, talk about and determine the meaning of new words Use new words when speaking Recognize that some words have the same meaning Recognize that some words have opposite meanings Recognize that words play different roles in sentences (for example, some words—nouns—name things and some words—pronouns—replace naming words)

Definitions of the Content Standards for the Integrated Language Arts Curriculum for the K-12 Basic Education Program of the Department of Education

Proposed Standards

At the end of Grade 3, students should: glean meaning from a range of texts in various contexts for a variety of purposes.

Comprehension

Grade 1 English

Comprehension Activity Pitter-patter! Splish-splash!
One day, Jana was walking outside.
She was on her way home. Pitter-patter! Splish-splash!

Suddenly, it started to rain.
Pitter-patter! Splish-splash! “Oh no! I forgot my umbrella.”

Pitter-patter! Splish-splash!
What was Jana doing? What does Jana need?

Definitions of the Content Standards for the Integrated Language Arts Curriculum for the K-12 Basic Education Program of the Department of Education

Proposed Standards for At the end of Grade 3, Reading students should: Comprehension activate prior knowledge conceptually related to Use of Context and Prior text and establish a Knowledge purpose for listening/ reading.

Grade 1 English

Definitions of the Content Standards for the Integrated Language Arts Curriculum for the K-12 Basic Education Program of the Department of Education

Proposed Standards for At the end of Grade 3, Reading students should: Comprehension be self-aware as they discuss and analyze text Comprehension to create new meanings strategies and modify old knowledge.

Grade 1 English

Definitions of the Content Standards for the Integrated Language Arts Curriculum for the K-12 Basic Education Program of the Department of Education

Proposed Standards for At the end of Grade 3, Reading students should: Comprehension respond to literary text through the appreciation Comprehending of literary devices and an Literary Text understanding of story grammar

Grade 1 English

Definitions of the Content Standards for the Integrated Language Arts Curriculum for the K-12 Basic Education Program of the Department of Education

Proposed Standards for At the end of Grade 3, Reading students should: Comprehension locate information from expository texts and use Comprehending this information for Informational Text discussion or written production

Grade 1 English

Definitions of the Content Standards for the Integrated Language Arts Curriculum for the K-12 Basic Education Program of the Department of Education

Proposed Standards
Listening Comprehension

At the end of Grade 3, students should: Glean meaning from a range of texts perceived auditorily for a variety of purposes

Grade 1 English

Listening Comprehension
Standard for Grade 1: Glean meaning from a range of texts perceived auditorily for a variety of purposes

Listening Comprehension
Identify connections between text listened to and personal experience Make predictions about stories based on the cover or title, pictures, details in the text Expect written text to make sense Use an understanding of characters, incidents and settings to make predictions Identify story elements (title, characters, setting) Validate ideas made after listening to a story Use/ Modify prior knowledge based on new knowledge from text

Listening Comprehension
Retell and/or reenact events from a story Talk about texts identifying major points and key themes Participate / Engage in a read-along of texts (e.g. poetry, repetitive text) Determine whether a story is realistic or fantasy

Listening Comprehension
Listen carefully to texts read aloud Ask and answer questions about texts Answer simple questions (who, what, where, when) about the text listened to Derive meaning from repetitive language structure

Listening Comprehension
Restate facts from listening to informational text Ask and respond to questions about informational text Follow a sequence of directions Use details and pictures found in the informational text to create meaning Use an understanding of characters, incidents and settings to establish relationships between characters and events (e.g. sequence of events, cause and effect, problem-solution)

Definitions of the Content Standards for the Integrated Language Arts Curriculum for the K-12 Basic Education Program of the Department of Education

Proposed Standards

At the end of Grade 3, students should:
● demonstrate grammatical awareness by being able to read, speak and write correctly. ● communicate effectively, in oral and written forms, using the correct grammatical structures of English.

Grammar Awareness and Structure

Grade 1 English

Activity for Grammar
I want a hotdog.

What kind of word is ‘hotdog?’

Activity for Grammar
I want a hot dog.

What kind of word is ‘hot’?

Grammar
Standard for Grade 1: Apply grammar to communicate effectively

Grammar
Sentence Recognize sentences and non-sentences Use simple sentences Use different kinds of sentences (e.g. declarative, interrogative) Recognize punctuation marks (e.g. period, question mark)

Grammar
Noun Use nouns in sentences (people, animals, places, things, events) Recognize the use of a/an Use plural form of regular nouns by adding /s/ or /es/

Grammar
Pronoun Use personal pronouns (e.g. I, you, he, she, it) Use commonly used possessive pronouns Use demonstrative pronouns (this/that, these/those) Use interrogative pronouns (e.g. who, what, where, when, why)

Grammar
Adjective Use common positive forms of adjectives Verb Use the simple forms of verbs

Grammar
Preposition Recognize directional prepositions (eg. in, on, under etc.)

Definitions of the Content Standards for the Integrated Language Arts Curriculum for the K-12 Basic Education Program of the Department of Education

Proposed Standards for At the end of Grade 3, Reading students should: Comprehension demonstrate a love for reading stories and Attitude confidence in performing literacy-related activities/tasks.

Grade 1 English

Attitude
Standard for Grade 1:
Display a positive regard towards literacy learning.

Attitude
Revisit favorite books, songs and rhymes Attempt to read or re-tell texts listened to

The Matrix

The Teaching Guide is organized in the form of a matrix. An overarching social studies based theme is used the take-off point for designing the lessons. The matrix has the following parts:

The Matrix
1. Objectives 2. Pre-Assessment 3. Activating Prior Knowledge 4. Presentation 5. Modeling 6. Guided Practice 7. Independent Practice 8. Post-Assessment

English Curriculum Teaching Guide

The Matrix – The Objectives
This portion of the matrix focuses on setting the targets for the daily and weekly lessons. The objectives portion identifies what the students should be able to understand (insight/value or concept) exhibit (skills) and appreciate at the end of each lesson. These objectives are based on the standards and competencies to be met by first graders.

The Matrix – Sample Objectives
Theme: Me and My Family At the end of the lesson the students should be able to: Expressive Objectives: Realize that we have body parts that can do many things Appreciate that singing songs and reciting rhymes can be fun Instructional Objectives: •Oral language: Listen and share about him/herself •Phonological Awareness: Recognize words that rhyme •Listening Comprehension: Listen and share about him/herself; Follow directions •Vocabulary and Grammar: Recognize, identify, and give examples of naming words (body parts)

The Matrix – Pre-Assessment
This portion of the matrix focuses on activities designed to determine what the students know and need to learn. This will be the basis for redesigning or adjusting the contents of the lesson.

The Matrix – Sample Pre-Assessment
TOUCH YOUR BODY PART Have the class point to a body part 1. Teacher will ask the students to touch a body part. Ex. “Can you touch your nose?” 2. The students will attempt to touch the body part that the teacher says. 3. Teacher will assess the knowledge of the students as the activity goes along.

The Matrix – Activating Prior Knowledge
This portion of the matrix focuses on activities designed to determine what the students know about the content to be covered in the lesson. The goal is to create an intersection between the background knowledge of the students and the content of the lesson. By tapping what the students know, we are awakening their interest, building motivation and preparing them for the learning experience.

The Matrix – Sample Activating Prior Knowledge
BODY PART PUZZLE 1. Divide the class into groups. 2. Distribute the body parts cut-outs to each group. 3. Ask the children to form the puzzle of a boy and a girl using the different body parts (paper cut-outs) 4. Ask the children to share the names of body parts they already know.

The Matrix – Presentation

This portion of the matrix focuses on unpacking the contents of the lesson. This may focus on interacting with the text or the explicit instruction of content.

The Matrix – Sample Presentation
Sing a SONG about the parts of a body

Clap your Hands Clap your hands Touch your toes Turn around Put your finger on your nose Flap your arms Jump up high Wiggle your fingers And reach for the sky.

The Matrix – Modeling

This portion of the matrix focuses on showing the students how to go through a particular thought process or how to perform a particular skill.

The Matrix – Sample Modeling
Teacher will model identifying the names of particular body parts. 1. Teacher says “These are my fingers” while showing his/her fingers to the class. 2. Teacher asks “Can you show me your fingers?” Teacher asks the students to show their fingers to the class. 3. Teacher asks “What do we call these?” 4. Students will say the name of the body part that teacher is showing.

The Matrix – Guided Practice

This portion of the lesson focuses on providing an opportunity to practice a particular skill in a whole class setting. This serves as an opportunity to provide feedback and to clarify concepts learned/applied.

The Matrix – Sample Guided Practice
CLASS ACTIVITY 1. Teacher asks volunteers to show and name the body parts they have. 2. Teacher guides and assists the students as they attempt to talk about their body parts. Student 1: These are my ears. Can you show me your ears? Student 2: This is my nose. Can you show me your nose?

The Matrix – Independent Practice

This portion of the matrix focuses on providing the students an opportunity to perform a particular skill and gain mastery.

The Matrix–Sample Independent Practice
TWISTER GAME 1. Divide the class into 2 groups. (or more depending on size of class) 2. Lay a Twister mat on the floor. *Twister mat is divided into squares. Each square has a different color. There should be at least 2 squares with the same color. 3. Give directions that will use names of body parts and colors. ex. Put your right hand on the color yellow. Put your left knee on the color blue. 4. Each player should be able to follow accordingly.

The Matrix – Post-Assessment
This portion of the matrix focuses on activities designed to determine what the students know and need to learn. This will be the basis for redesigning or adjusting the contents of the lesson.

The Matrix – Sample Post-Assessment
Play the Body Parts Game and check if the students will be able to touch the correct body part you refer to. a. Student says: “Touch your part of the body.” Ex. Touch your feet. (Classmates should be able to touch their feet.) b. Teacher checks if the students are able to touch the correct part of the body mentioned.

I. Theme II. Objectives III. Subject Matter and Materials IV. Pre-Assessment V. Procedure A. Activating Prior Knowledge B. Presentation C. Modeling D. Guided Practice E. Independent Practice VI. Post-Assessment
Grade 1 English

Lesson Plans

Sample Lesson

Sample Lesson

Sample Lesson

Sample Lesson

Sample Lesson

Sample Lesson

Sample Lesson

Sample Lesson

Sample Lesson

Sample Lesson

English Curriculum Appendix

The appendix is organized Weekly and divided into three parts: a. Poems/Songs/Stories (Literature) b. Art Activities c. Games and Other Activities

Sample Song

The Food Song (Tune: Skip to my Lou) I like fruits. Yes I do! I like fruits. Yes I do! I like fruits. Yes I do! My tummy loves them too.

Sample Poem
I am Special I am special. I am me. I have two hands, two eyes to see. A nose to smell. My ears hear well. A mouth to talk, and two legs to walk. But that’s not all, because you see. I am special. I am me.

Sample Story
Leonel by Nati A. Santos and Dinna SantosPolo Leonel loves to make a wish. “I wish I were a king,” he said. So he sat on a throne. But poor Leonel fell down. “I wish I were a bird,” he said. So he tried to fly. But poor Leonel fell down.

“I wish I were a monkey,” he said. So he tried to climb a tree. But poor Leonel fell down. “I wish I were a dancer,” he said. So he tried to dance. But poor Leonel fell down. “I wish I were a biker,” he said. So he tried to bike. But poor Leonel fell down.

“I wish I were a skater,” he said. So he tried to skate. But poor Leonel fell down. “I wish I were a baby,” he said. “But you are a baby,” said his mom. “My baby,” she hugged Leonel. And Leonel wished no more.

Other Titles
Are you my Mother? by Rodolfo Desuadiso New Shoes, Red Shoes? by Susan Rollings My Five Senses by Margaret Miller The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle From Head to Toe by Eric Carle What Will Fat Cat Sit On? by Jan Thomas Whose Mouse Are You? By Robert Kraus & Jose Aruego No David! By David Shannon

The Integration of Science

Astilla, Dela Paz, Par, Preclaro, Principe, Razon, Santos, Zuniga

The Integration of Science
A child’s scientific thinking is strengthened when Science is integrated to literature. Integrating Science to literacy is one example of helping apply scientific concepts/information within a particular context so that it is presented in an understandable and interesting language. (Zeece, 1998)

The Integration of Science
The integration of Science motivates children to be more curious in solving problems. This integration also helps present models of scientific methods of observation, hypothesis formulation, collecting data, experimentation and evaluation. Lastly, it helps children to appreciate, value, understand and respect their world.

The Integration of Science
Science process skills include:

1. Observing qualities 2. Measuring quantities 3. Sorting/classifying 4. Inferring 5. Predicting 6. Experimenting 7. Communicating

The First Quarter Science Topics
Sense Organs: eyes, ears, nose, tongue, skin Observing and Describing things using the sense organs Care of the Sense Organs

Food: Different Kinds of Food Living and Non-Living Things

The Second Quarter Science Topics

A. Plants 1. Parts of a plant (leaves, stem, roots, flower, and fruit) 2. Common Characteristics of Plants – 3. Uses of Plants 4. Needs of Plants 5. Care for Plants

The Second Quarter

B. Animals 1. How Animals Move 2. Where Animals Live 3. How Animals Eat 4. Comparing Animals 5. What Animals Need 6. Caring for Animals

Reminders When Teaching English

Concept, Language and Literacy are Intertwined
• The more children experience the world, the more they will have to talk about.

• The more language models children
interact with, the more opportunities they will have to develop language skills. • The better their language activity and the more experiences children have, the more prior knowledge they will be able to bring to text when they read.

It all begins with a sense of wonder… • Develop varied interests and skills. • Explore everything and anything. • Talk about everything and anything we’ve explored. • Allow them to explore the language. Encourage their attempts to express themselves. Provide options for them to respond and share.

Always…
• Start from meaningful words and good quality literature (e.g. songs, rhymes, stories etc.) • Develop oral language ability in the language in which literacy will be developed (in this case, English) • Use the different senses to develop knowledge of words and concepts/ideas • Make learning fun and relevant!

Strategies for Teaching the English Language Domains

Oral Language, Vocabulary and Grammar

Four Most Effective Strategies in Language Teaching (Facella et. Al 2005)
(a) the use of gestures and visual cues (e.g. Total Physical Response – learning action words by watching and imitating what the teacher says and does)

Song: Our Body Parts
(To the tune of “Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star”)

We use our legs when we walk. We use our mouths when we talk. We use our hands when we write. We use our teeth when we bite. With each part, we can do a lot. Let’s be proud of what we’ve got.

Steps to using Total Physical Response

1) Teaching/Learning 2) Practice or rehearsal 3) Testing or evaluation

Sample Application of TPR
(for the line “We use our legs when we walk”)
1) 2) While saying each line of the song, demonstrate the action and point to the body part that is moving. Demonstrate a ‘think-aloud’ by pointing to the body part that is moving and saying, “These are my/This is my ______.” Allow the children to label the body part (once they are ready) – “This is my _______.” Ask the students to point/talk about their body parts. Repeat the process, demonstrating less for the succeeding days.

3)
4) 5)

Pass It On
Choose a set of five or six students and have them form a circle. A leader must pass around an action clockwise (counter clockwise) by demonstrating what it can do. The action will be repeated by each seatmate until it reaches the end of the circle. Once it reaches the end, ask the question, “What body part can (action word)?” Answer by saying the phrase, “My _________”

Four Most Effective Strategies in Language Teaching (Facella et. Al 2005) (b) the repetition of opportunities for practicing skills (i.e. building memory and concept mastery);

Nose, Nose, Nose, Nose, Mouth
1. This game may be a whole class activity. Demonstrate how the game is to be played by pointing to your nose (4x) while naming it. On the fifth try, name one of your other body parts and point to another (e.g. Say ‘eyes’ but point to your ‘ears’) The students should point to the correct body part and say “This is my ________.” The students can take turns being the leader.

2.

3.

4.

Four Most Effective Strategies in Language Teaching (Facella et. Al 2005)
(c) the use of objects, props, hands-on materials and realia to clarify meaning (e.g. using a puzzle; pictures; themselves)

Unlocking of Difficulties
New Manner of Unlocking Words

eyes

nose

“Last night, I saw the eyes of the cat. Looking at me. This is what I saw. (show picture) Where are my eyes? “I put the calachuchi flower under my nose. (demo) Where is my nose? The calachuchi flower smells good.”

toes

“I can reach my toes.” (demonstration) Where are my toes?

Body Part Memory Game
1. Have two sets of pictures of the body parts included in the lesson. 2. Post them on the board (face down). 3. Flip open only two of the pictures. The object is to find a perfect match. 4. Once a pair is found, ask the student to give the name of the body part.

Four Most Effective Strategies in Language Teaching (Facella et. Al 2005)
(d) the use of multisensory approaches (i.e. activities that target a variety of learning styles and modalities)

Sing a Song
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Sing a song to the child. Unlock important words in the song Sing the song again! Teach the melody and the words Draw the song, Dance the song, Recite the song!

Song Remake!
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Sing a song to the child. Unlock important words in the song Sing the song again! Teach the melody and the words Draw the song, Dance the song, Recite the song! 6. Change some words to create a new song 7. Sing the new song

Funny Bones
1. Have the students choose a partner. 2. A chosen leader gives directions and asks the students to match a particular body part (e.g. hands) with that of his/her partner (e.g. hands) 3. The students can take turns being leader.

Finish My Song
• Sing the target song together. Sing a few lines and leave a line unfinished. Ask a student to finish the song by providing the missing word. “Clap your hands. Touch your _________. Turn around. Put a finger on your ________. Flap your arms. Jump up high. Wiggle your ___________ and reach for the _____.

Phonological Awareness

Silly Mistakes
Say a common song/rhyme and replace some of the words. Have the students identify what makes each sentence silly. Jack and Jill went up the stairs. To fetch a pail of milk. Jack fell down and broke his foot, and Jill came jumping after.

You’re It!
Eyes, ears, mouth, pencil “Pencil - You’re it!” Head, foot, sun, nose “Sun - You’re it!” Fingers, chair, toes, arms “Chair - You’re it!” Door, cheeks, legs, neck “Door - You’re it!”

Word Walk
1. Introduce the concept of counting words in a sentence by taking a walk as you say the words out loud. SENTENCE: I am Teacher Hazelle. STEP 1 2 3 4

2. Have students practice by giving them sentences to walk to. 3. The students can also make their own sentences.

Rhyme Remake
Say this rhyme and add the name of a boy and girl. Find two other names that rhyme with theirs.
Horsey, Horsey Run around with Betty. Kitty, Kitty Leap up and down with Horsey, Horsey Run around with Letty. Kitty, Kitty Leap up and down with

Marlon.

Jon.

Rhyme Dominoes

Mr./Miss Beginning & Mr./Miss End
 Pass two balls/objects around the room while singing a song (e.g. Happy birthday to you). One ball must be labeled beginning and the other, end. At the end of the song, give a word:

c a t

Ask Mr./Miss Beginning to give the beginning sound of the given word and ask Mr./Miss End to give the last sound in the word.

Listening Comprehension

Activities to Develop Listening Comprehension
Provide experiences for the students to think and talk about: • Take a ‘Nature walk’ so they can label their world • Demonstrate a Procedure/Process • Provide thought-provoking pictures, wordless picture books • Present different kinds of literature (e.g. songs, poems, stories etc) Engage the students in conversations about these experiences. • Model a ‘Think-Aloud’ • Provide them questions/prompts to guide them when sharing with each other • Provide sentence stems to get them started

Sample questions to ask before a text is presented
1. Tap Prior Knowledge 2. Do a picture walk through (if available) a. Have the student name/label the pictures b. The students can narrate what is happening using the pictures 3. Have students predict what might happen. 4. Ask questions to prepare them for the text. “Based on the pictures on the poster/in our book what do you think will the song/story be about?”

Ask different kinds of questions using The Dimensions of Comprehension
LEVEL V Creative Comprehension (Creating my own lines/story) LEVEL IV LEVEL III LEVEL II Integration (Application to Self) Evaluation (Critical Comprehension)

Interpretation (Making interpretations and connections)

LEVEL I

Literal Comprehension (Finding details in the story)

Sample questions to ask as the text is being presented

1. Who is this song/story about? 2. What is happening? 3. What do you think will happen next? 4. What does the character feel? 5. Why do you think does the character feel that way? 6. Will he/she continue to feel that way?

Sample questions to ask after the text has been presented 1. Did you like the song/poem/story? 2. What is your favorite part of the song/poem/story? 3. Can you retell the story? 4. Which character do you like best? 5. Why do you like him/her? 6. What do you feel after having listened to the poem/song/story?

TELL THE STORY IN THESE PICTURES FROM THE STORY I DON’T WANT TO EAT PUBLISHED BY ADARNA HOUSE

May you have many fun-filled learning experiences! 

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