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Bates-Camping & Camp Cooking 1909

Bates-Camping & Camp Cooking 1909

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CAMPING
AND

CAMP COOKING
BY

FRANK

A.

BATES

(MatasisoJ AUTHOR OF " GAME BIRDS OF NORTH AMERICA," STORIES OF LAKE, FIELD AND FOREST," ETC.

BOSTON THE BALL PUBLISHING
1^09

CO.

<*
Copyright, 1909,

By The

Ball Publishing Co.

portion of this first appeared in a different form in the columns of " The Amateur Sportsman & Sportsman's

A

Magazine," and thanks are due the publisher of that magazine for permission to republish. The chapter on cleaning fish was written specially for this volume by Mr. Leslie F. Bosworth. It needs no
eulogy.

LIBRARY

of

CONGRESS
Received

Two Copies

APR

19 100s

CLASS

XXc, No,

Go ms jftfenfc FRANK W. BRETT, M.D.,
THE COMPANION OF MANY CAMPS, AND THE FRIEND OF MANY DAYS, THIS LITTLE BOOK IS AFFECTIONATELY DEDICATED BY THE AUTHOR

INTRODUCTION
Vacation time brings to
out-door
life,

many

the desire for

as a refreshment for

mind and body.

There seems

to be a strain of wild blood in the

most of

us, that impels

us to leave the haunts

of man, occasionally, and getting out into the

wildwood, to

live

close to nature

for awhile.

The expense
for those

of

summer

hotels

and camps deters

many, and the cost of hiring professional guides

who wish

to get rid of the formalities

of such resorts and do not

know how

to care

for themselves, prevents others.

There are many who
for a
side.

like to leave their

work

few weeks and go to the woods or lakeThey have neither the time nor the in-

clination to adopt the life of the professional

trapper

who

lives

by the chase and sleeps on the

soft side of a slab.

They want

rest; they

wish

for pleasure; they require three square meals a

day, and they

want the food well cooked, not

too full of ashes, and not too different from that
to

which they have been accustomed for the other
7

8

INTRODUCTION
To
this

forty-nine or fifty weeks of the year.
class, the business

man, the

clerk, the

mechanic,

to every one

not

who wishes to camp out and does know how to do it and still keep his self-rebook
is

spect, this

addressed.

It is the result

of an experience of over twenty

years, during

which the writer has spent many
woods, and
fitted

months

in the

out

many

other

parties for their

summer

vacations.

Over the

camp
it,"

fire,

while discussing methods with other

campers, or instructing the learner "

how

to

do
and

he has been asked many times to put his ideas

into shape for publication.
it is

Here they

are,

his

hope that everyone who takes

this little

book with him to camp, may enjoy himself to
the limit.

Frank A.

Bates.

CAMPING OUT

CAMPING
CHAPTER
I

CAMP OUTFITS

A
with
but

camping
all

outfit

should be light and compact
all

unnecessary articles eliminated and

needful ones included.
it

That reads a

little

funny,

is

the gist of the whole question and the

biggest question that

man.

That

is,

you

will think so

was ever presented to a when you are

trying to get a ioo-pound outfit over a

swampy
first

carry on a rainy day and while laying up over

a spell of wet weather afterward.
place,

In the

truck,

you wonder why you brought so much and in the second place, why you did not

bring

many

other things.

So

it

seems needless
taste of the
trip.

to say that the composition of an outfit depends,
to

some

extent,

on the individual

camper, and more upon the character of the

No

sane

man would

carry the same amount of
if

" duffle " on a walking trip that he would
ii

he

;

12

CAMPING
in a per-

went with a team, or if he was to be manent camp during the whole of
Hence,
I

his

trip.

propose to classify them into two sorts walking trips and permanent camps. But be-

fore I set

down

the

list

of impedimenta I want

to moralize a

little.

I confess that I

enjoy the comforts of

life,

and

as

many

of the luxuries as

my

purse or circum-

stances will allow;

many tramps with
ily

carry in

my

I have enjoyed nothing but what I could easknapsack, I enjoy one much

and while

better if I have

more conveniences, and very few

rough it " too much in the short time they have for their annual trips, and there is no need to do so.

vacationists care to "

One of the finest woodsmen and grandest of men, " Nessmuk," has written a book which is a
criterion for the
trip; but

man who
if

can stand that kind of

what

sort of a vacation

a city clerk would have
after

do you suppose he patterned his trip

this model ? The question was not needed he simply would not try it; for the average city clerk is not so big a fool as he appears to the

average
that.

country

dweller.

So
trail

let

it

go

at

To

get back on our

again.

A

party

would not need the same would require in October

— and

outfit in July that

he
is

while there

CAMP OUTFITS
no sense
in sleeping cold at night
is

13

because of a
sleepthis

lack of blankets, there

also

no use for a
trip,

ing-bag for a July camping

and
is

in

judgment of the actual
average camper
fails.

necessities

where the
the

The majority of camping parties occur in warm season when game birds and animals
protected by law, and there
is

are

no need for a gun,

but most
security

men will confess when there is a
serve

to a feeling of greater

firearm in camp.
all

A
dull

light revolver will

purposes to drive

away marauding animals or
hour
at target practice,
it

to while
little

away a

and a

practice will

render

thus available.
fall

In the

of the year the fishrod will be rerifle,

placed by the shotgun and

but

it is

always

well to have a line and a few hooks in the ditty

bag.

A

few

fish will
if

make an

acceptable change

in the diet,

even

a deer hangs at the tent door.

The following
the experience of
for the

lists

have been compiled from
years in fitting out parties

many

woods and are intended to cover everything that is needed and with the idea that the man who reads them knows but little about the subject and wants to know all about it; and as parties will vary in number of persons composing
it,

I

have individualized the items.

14

CAMPING
SUM-

OUTFIT FOR A TRIP OF TEN DAYS ON FOOT

MER OR
For
Light tent
Light axe

FALL.

the Party.

Fry pan
Coffee can

Camera

Tight

can

for

con-

Camp

kettle

densed milk
etc.,

Clothes, bedding,

for each man.

Rubber poncho

Mosquito net
Belt and knife

Heavy

blanket

Cloth bag for pillow

Pocket knife

v

Some

small cloth bags

Compass

for provisions

Watch
Tin plate
Fork, large and small

Pack strap Whetstone

Map
Rod,
reel

spoon

and

line

Tin cup
Pipe and tobacco

2 dozen

flies

2 dozen hooks on gut
Suit of woolen clothes

Matches

Waterproof matchbox
Insect repeller

Wool outing
Soft hat

shirt

2 suits of underwear

Cake of soap

Comb
Needle,
buttons
Pencil and notebook

2 pair extra socks

thread

and

Shoes
2 handkerchiefs 2 towels

Money

in small

change

I

CAMP OUTFITS
Y2.

15

pint brandy

and Ja-

1

ounce Tinct.
barb

Rhu-

maica ginger

Food for Each Man.
5 lbs. hard bread
A y
lb.

tea
1st

7
2
2 y

lbs.

ham, bacon or
dried fruit

After September

pork
lbs.

add

a

sleeping

bag,

gun and 50
rod and

cartridges,
fishing

2 cans condensed milk
lb.

and omit the
reel,

salt

but carry

2
1

lbs.
lb.

sugar

a line and a few hooks.

coffee

OUTFIT FOR TEN DAYS IN PERMANENT CAMP

SUMMER OR
For

FALL.

the Party.

To
Baker

the previous

list

add:

Broiler

Lantern
Candles

Iron bean-pot

Stew pan

Laundry soap Soap powder
if

Camp
wish

stove

you

50

ft.

Y^-'m. rope

and

some twine
Kit of tools
Nails and screws

Bucket

4

tin plates for service

4

glass fruit jars for
butter, etc.

Boards for table

Canoe or boat

:

i6

CAMPING
For Each Man.

To

the

list

of clothes,

etc.,

add
tin plate,

Rubber boots
Table knife

Another

cup

and spoon

Food per Man.
2
lbs.

crackers

I lb rice
I

5 lbs. flour

qt.
2

pea beans
onions

3
2 y

lbs.
lb.

meal
baking powder

y
i I

pk. potatoes

I qt.

4

lbs.

ham, bacon or

2 y

lb. salt

pork
2 cans corned beef
I

oz.
lb.

pepper
butter

lb.

dried fruit

3
I

lbs.
lb.

sugar
coffee
tea

3 cans fruit
3 cans condensed milk

Y

A

lb.

much can There is a golden mean between bare necessity and absolute convenience, that must be estimated by the character of the trip. When
In regard to the cooking apparatus
be said.
walking, with the lightest
"duffle," a tin plate

possible

amount of
in the
I

may

be used to cook everyuse a
bail.

thing that cannot be spitted
ashes.

or baked For a camp kettle on a walking trip
pail

common tin

with riveted ears to hold the
it

Do

not

let

the water boil out of

while on the

CAMP OUTFITS
fire.

17
get to the end

Throw
trip.

of the

away when you In permanent camp
it

this is replaced

by a " graniteware "
hicle for

kettle,

which forms the ve-

many

a savory stew and chowder, be-

sides the
fer this

more plebeian potato and onion. I preform of kettle, even if it be a little cumfor
if

bersome,

the water boils

away, as

it

sometimes

will in spite of all precautions,

you

will not be left

with a bottomless dish.

The
that
it

coffee can

whatsoever form

it

may also may be,

be a tin
see that
fire.

pail,

but in

it is

so

made
all

can be hung over the

Eschew

patent contrivances for

making

coffee; they are

a delusion and a snare for the feet of the un-

wary, and utterly unnecessary.
for condensed milk
is

The

tight can

a necessary thing

when
is

moving about;
best.

to prevent

waste a screw top

The
fit,

fry

pan

is

an important part of the outIn
it

but not the most important.

cooked the entire food for the party
bread and even the coffee.
it

— meat,

may

be

fish,

But look out

that

is

of a convenient pattern for transportation.

Get a ten-inch thin iron pan, with a socket on
one side for a temporary handle, or have the handle entirely

removed, and

fit

it

with a portable

handle to screw to the

side.

This detachable

18
handle

CAMPING
may be used to lift any dish from the fire. But because you have a pet fry pan, with autoit.

matic accessories, do not become a slave to

Use

the broiler on

all

possible occasions.
will stand

The
severe

stomach of the camper
strains,

many

but

it

will finally rebel if treated to too

much

grease.

Use

as

little

of this lubricant as

Fry pan
possible,

and you

will be surprised at the small

quantity needed.

The remainder

of the

kit,

with the exception

of the baker, needs no special comment; and of
that piece of apparatus,
I

have long been in

doubt whether

it

was a

desirable article for the

camping
to bake
roll in

outfit.

Personally, I never use the baker, as I prefer

my

bread in the fry pan, and

my

fish I

wet paper or leaves and bake
desire to advise those
I

in the ashes.

With a
me,
I

who

disagree with

wish to say that

was with a party who

used an oven which accompanied a cooking outfit,

and

it

paratus

worked nicely. In fact, the whole apwas without reproach, and was evi-

CAMP OUTFITS
dently the result of practical experience.

19
If I

could afford

it,

and had the room for
to provide for, as
it

its

transI

portation, I should use one just like

it,

when

had a large party

it

saved time

and some trouble; but
which

was no

better than the

more primitive method of the " bean
will be discussed later.

hole,"

A

rubber blanket of some description

is

very
slit

necessary, and I prefer the poncho with a
in the

middle to enable

it

to be

put over the

shoulders in case of rain as well as to lay be-

neath the blankets while sleeping, to keep off the

dampness of the

earth.

If this pattern

cannot

be obtained have two eyeletted holes made in

one edge of a rubber sheet, far enough apart so
so that
it

may
I

be looped around the neck.

The

ordinary blanket
is

may

be of any character that

desired.

use a light wool blanket together

with a light cotton blanket, both double and uncut, for summer use, and a regulation sleeping bag for cooler weather. The latter may be made of oiled duck lined with the summer blankets,

or with one or more quilted puffs made of
ico

cal-

and cotton
cloth

batting.

The

bag

size of

a pillow case
filled

is

a

very convenient
fir spills
;

article to

be

with leaves or

this,

however,

is

not indispensable, for

20
a good pillow
them.

CAMPING
may
be extemporized of a pair of

shoes with a person's outer clothing laid over

The

small cloth bags will be found con-

venient in packing remnants of food, sugar, coffee, etc.,

which

is

so easily scattered

by the or-

dinary paper packages becoming broken.

Now
felt hat,

a word in regard to clothes.

caps, helmets

and straw

hats,
;

Eschew and wear a soft
will stand rain,

the softer the better

it

will not get broken, will

keep the sun out of the

eyes and can be used for a multitude of pur-

poses from acting as holder for a hot pan or
kettle to stopping

a hole in a stoven boat.

Canlot

vas clothes are a delusion; they

make a

of

noise in the brush and are uncomfortable

when
These

wet.
light

Wear
flannel

a suit of old woolen clothes with a
shirt;

no

vest

is

needed.

garments are comfortable and warm, even when

damp, and are
feet;

easily dried.

Look out

for your

wear good,

solid leather boots,

and change
This

your socks every night, washing out and drying
each night the pair worn during the day.
little

attention to the comfort will prevent sore

feet

on a long tramp.
boots.

The remainder

of the ar-

ticles

seem to explain themselves.

Never wear

new

CAMP OUTFITS
FOOD.

21

There now remains the question of food, and
it is

the most difficult of

all

to handle, since there
I

is

such a diversity of

taste.

have endeavored
be more

to apportion the ration to a healthy man's appetite

and have considered that there
fish,

will

or less
party.

game,

berries, etc.,

gathered by the

If there is

no one who can cook, of

course food must be procured already prepared.

But

it

seems very improbable that some of the

party will not take sufficient interest in this most

important requisite of camping to secure infor-

mation from his feminine relatives or friends,

and practice

sufficient to enable

him

to

make a

good cup of coffee, a respectable flap- jack and to fry a pan of fish. With the materials set down
in the
in,
list,

with what

fish, etc., will

be brought

an ordinary camp cook
the week.

will, in

a permanent

camp, supply a different menu nearly every day
in

For

instance,

a party of three

would be provided with 18 pounds of meat for ten days; this would include 3 pounds ham, 4
pounds bacon,
corned beef.
5

pounds

salt

pork and 6 pounds
in bak-

The pork would be used
fish,

ing beans and frying
broiling

and the others for
flap- jacks,

and hashes, while
and
list.

johnny-

cakes, pan-cakes, rice

fruit

puddings could

be concocted from the

CHAPTER

II

CAMP SHELTER

One

of the foremost considerations which con-

fronts the

camper

is

shelter

;

for

upon

it

depends,

to a large extent, his health

and comfort.

Of
upon

course, the character of this shelter depends

the

many things: camp and
first

individual preference, location of
facilities

for transportation.
is

But

the

consideration

a tight roof and pro-

tection

He
forest

from cold winds. is a poor woodsman, indeed, who

in

a

cannot provide himself with protection

from the weather.
to

camp
is

is

But every man who wishes woodsman, and is the man not a

who
sleep

looking for advice.

Woods

frequenters

many

nights with nothing but the blue can-

opy of heaven for a roof, and men have camped
for
"

weeks with only a square of canvas for a
tent."

dog

But although
I

I

have tried both
a

plans and thoroughly enjoyed myself, I

confess

that

hanker

for

must good wall or

shanty tent

when

the winds blow cold or the rain
2.2

CAMP SHELTER
falls

23
ex-

wet, and these things

we must always

pect.

THE WALL TENT.
If

camp

is

located
is

where transportation by

team or water
is

available,

when

the temperature
tent,

above freezing, carry a wall

with a

fly.

Wall tent
It

admits of better ventilation than an

A

tent,

gives

more head room
trifle

for the sleeper
all

and weighs
the

but a
fly.

more.
this,

By

means do not omit

Without

in a driving rain, the in a fine spray

water

will beat

through

and dampen
almost im-

everything inside.

Moreover,

it

is

possible to avoid hitting the canvas, sometimes,

and the

result

is

that

whenever the wet

cloth is

24

CAMPING
it

touched from the inside
the canvas
is

will start

a leak unless

very thoroughly waterproofed.
site,

In pitching a tent, select a suitable
top of a
little

on

knoll
be.

if possible,

with the ground

as level as

may
it

Do

not under any circum-

stances pitch

in a hollow or gully
in.

where the

water will run
all

Clear off the brush, remove

bunches from the ground and carefully pitch

the tent.

See that

that the guys

all is clear before raising and hang evenly and run smoothly.

Next, dig a trench about six inches deep

all

around the outside, and about six inches from
the canvas.
tion or

Be

sure not to neglect this precauin a

you may awake
is

puddle of water,

which
mind.

not conducive to a happy frame of
will con-

Also remember that dampness

tract the cloth

and ropes; so before you go to
little

bed, slacken the guys a

or, if

it

rains in

the night, you

may awake with

a tent pin flap'or

ping about your ears, the cloth torn

the tent

blown down.

SHANTY TENT.
If there are only

one or two in the party, and
is

especially if weight

a consideration, a " shanty
I

tent "

is
is

desirable.

One which

have just comft.

pleted

6

ft.

high in front and 2

high in

CAMP SHELTER
back, 7
ft.

25

long,
if

6

ft.

wide, with

fly.

No
is

poles

are needed

there are trees, for the head rope
stretched

which goes across the front at the top

between, two trees and the tent guyed from that.

The

front of the tent

may

be

lifted for

an awn-

Shanty tent
ing,

when not needed
is

to close the tent,

by suptent

porting the canvas on poles.
there
sufficient length for

With
tall

this

a

man, width

enough for two to sleep comfortably and room enough to stow the " duffle," while there is sufficient

head room

at

the rear to afford

good

26

CAMPING
I prefer this patall

ventilation for a small party.

tern of tent to
is less lost

others for the reason that there

space in ratio to the weight, with

more
to

convenience, than in any other style

known

me.

THE DOG TENT.

Now,
tent
is

so far as a substitute for a comfortable

concerned^ there

is

a wide range for

Dog
choice.
little

tent

When

traveling rapidly on foot, with as
possible, a simple square

impedimenta as

canvas, furnished with loops at
large enough
fice.

to shelter a

man,

will

When

the time arrives to

two sides and amply sufmake camp a

CAMP SHELTER
pole
is

27

lashed across two trees or supported on
is

crotched sticks, the canvas

thrown across

it

and pinned down by the side loops and the camp
If you wish to shut up one end cut is ready. some evergreen boughs and stick them thickly in the ground at that end this will break the wind. Build your camp fire in front of the opened end and you will be comfortable.
;

THE LEAN-TO.
If

you desire

to

travel

lighter

still,

or are

caught in the woods without shelter, a few minutes'

work

will suffice to build a " lean-to."

To

erect this structure find

two

trees about four to

28

CAMPING
two
poles into the ground.
five

six feet apart, or drive

Lash another pole across them about

feet

from the ground for a ridge pole. Cut five poles about eight feet long and lay across this, with

*^
Another Lean-to

one end resting on the ground to form the roof.

Cover these poles with bark,
ion,
It is

laid shingle fash-

or with a thick layer of evergreen boughs.
astonishing

how heavy

a rain a bough roof

CAMP SHELTER
will

29
stick

shed

if

properly laid on.

Now

some

poles at the

two

sides,

with the tops lashed to

the side roof poles, wattle in

you have a camp that
with a good
fire in

will

some brush and keep you dry and

front will be as

warm

as a log

house, for the heat of the

fire is all reflected

down

by the slanting roof.
If

struction, cut a pole, rest

you have no time for so elaborate a conone end in the crotch

of a tree, the other on the ground.
for a ridge pole lean
side
till

With
If

this

up poles and brush on each
shelter.

you have room for your

you

have no axe to cut a pole, find a leaning tree or
a fallen log, or even a boulder, and pile brush

against

it,

having

first

thrown down a

lot

of
is

boughs for a bed.

This sort of a structure

capable of infinite variation.

THE LOG HUT.
Sometimes
sary to have
in cold

weather

it

becomes necessubstantial than

some
is

shelter

more

a tent or even a bark shanty, especially

when a

some central place. A log hut will provide for this, and when timber is plenty can be made with no other tools than a narrow axe. Do not be too extravagant
prolonged stay
to be at
in

made

your idea of

size.

A

small building

is

more

30

CAMPING

easily kept warm than a large one and a house 8xio feet will shelter four men. Cut straight logs about 8 inches in diameter. Nine logs n feet long for the back; three logs ii feet long, and sixteen logs 4 feet long for the

front; eighteen logs 9 feet long for the ends.

Clear a level place free from brush and lay two
1 1 -foot

and two 9-foot logs on the ground

in

the form of a square, with the ends of the logs

notched to hold them in place, with notches deep

enough so that the next log when
fitted will lie

similarly

snugly on top.

Now

proceed to

pile the logs

up

like a cob-house,

notching each

log at the corners and using the long logs for
the back

and two of the short logs for the front

to provide for a door in the center,

where the

ends of the logs should be held by a pole on

each

side.

When

the short logs are used up put

on the long ones.
back should be
laid

The

logs of the

front

and
al-

with the butt and top

ternated to keep them level, but the ends of the

camp should have
front to

the butts all laid toward the form the pitch of the roof and those

with the greatest taper should be selected for the
ends.

For the

roof, cut poles 13 feet long, lay

them

CAMPING
of the ends.
bark.

31

lengthwise and notch them into the top logs

Then cover with
poles

birch or hemlock

Lay

across
it

to

prevent the high

winds from displacing

and throw on evergreen
rain.

boughs to break the force of the
If
it

be desired to have a pitch roof cut short
fill

logs to

in the gable

ends and

hew down
be

the

pitch to the desired angle.

Fill all crevices

with
of

moss, grass or clay.
slabs split

A

door

may

made

from a cedar

tree

and hung on leather

or rawhide hinges.

For fittings build two bunks of poles across narrow end and fill them with fir browse. There will be room enough to stow personal bethe

longings at the foot of the bunks and they will

add to the warmth.
place
it

If a

camp
If

stove

is

used

at the

back opposite the door and run

the pipe through the roof.

no stove

is

used,

make
If dry

a fireplace of rocks laid up in clay and
in the roof for the
is

have a hole

smoke
fire

to

go out.
is

wood

used the smoke in the room
little

not offensive, for a very
the place as

will

warm

much
for the

as i3 desirable.
fire,

Do

not use

cedar
all

wood

for the sparks will fly

over the place.
If desirable,

many

elaborations of this build-

32
ing can be made.
it

CAMPING
If a

chimney

is

desired build
it,

of stones and clay and build the wall into

so as to leave the chimney half inside and half
outside.

CHAPTER

III

GENERAL ADVICE
In preparing for camp, one of the most important questions to be settled
is

the choice of

companions.

Nowhere
is

will

human

nature

be

developed as in the camp, where quarters are limited

and when there

no opportunity to get out
" that ugly feeling "
If there
will rise
If a
it

of the

way and stamp down

that the best of us have at times.
single bristle

is

a

on a man's back

it

on an
is

uncomfortable rainy day in camp.

man

a gentleman he keeps his coat on and

bothers

no one but
bler, a

his

own

conscience

;

but a surly grumjust

gourmand who must have
eat, irrespective

what he
trouble

wants to
it

of

how much
man,

may make,

or a
all

selfish, lazy

will disturb

the feelings of

the rest.

And a word of advice here. Constitute one man, the best-posted and most equal-tempered
man
in the party, as captain;

and when a man
will not

makes himself obnoxious and
soned with,
let

be reaif

the captain call

assistance,

33

34

CAMPING

him off in the nearest him to the nearest point of embarkation and bid him a long farewell; at all events, remember next year that he is not
necessary, and either cool
lake or quietly escort
eligible for

membership.
is

Make
is

the party small (four for

enough, three

better),

many

reasons.

There
is

is

less

chance for argument, crowding
transportation facilitated.
sarily larger, divide
it

avoided, and

If the party is neces-

up

into squads, so that the

man in charge of the party may not have all his own fun spoiled in attending to the needs of others. Make one man paymaster and do
not ask

him

to shoulder the whole expense of

the trip, but

make an

estimate of the cost and
in advance.

hand over your share
the trip
is

Then when
and
if

over, cheerfully settle up,

you

are not wholly satisfied, do not put up a kick,

but swallow the dose and remember
time.

it

the next

More than

that,

always remember that
if

life is

too short to grumble or fight, and

any camprid of

mate makes himself too obnoxious, get
him, or manage to get a letter calling you

home
to get
life,

on important business.
needed
rest

You go

to

camp

and escape the

fights of a

busy

and no man has a right to interfere with an-

GENERAL ADVICE
other's pleasure
;

35

always provided that the other

party behaves like a

man

himself.

Now
your

let

us suppose that you have procured
selected

outfits,

your camp ground, and
Set to work quickly

have arrived at the place.
for

to select a site for the tent,

and get

it.

ready
hold

occupancy at once.

All hands take

under the direction of your captain, and the

work will all be over in a short time. Pitch the tent and get your beds ready; make a fireplace and get wood for a fire, so the cook will be able
to tend strictly to his cooking.
If

Joe or

Tom

grabs his rod the

moment
is

it

is

taken from the

conveyance, unless he
tain, just insert

so ordered

by the caphis coat col-

your fingers under

lar

and

politely kick a little sense into him.

When you
way
til

get your

first

meals do not give

to the
air

abnormal appetite always generated

by fresh

and

exercise, but eat moderately unto the

you get accustomed

changed conditions,
ills.

and thus avoid a multitude of
ing to a sensible
himself and then

It is disgust-

man

to see a

campmate gorge
in

wake everyone

the small

hours of the night groaning with

colic.

A

sick
if

man

in

camp
is

is

a nuisance at the best, and

the sickness

caused by the sufferer's

own

fault

he will hardly get

much sympathy.

36
Again,
in the
if

CAMPING
you have any liquor
it

in

camp, put

it

hands of the most level-headed
only moderately.

the party, and use

man in I am not
all.

preaching a temperance lecture, but the use of
liquor should be in moderation,
if

used at

When
The

drinking, hunting

and

fishing

go together,

the hunting and fishing get poor attention.
first

night that you are in

camp

will

probably be destitute of
iences, for
all

many
is

of the convensettled.

you seldom get well
really necessary

About

that

is

to get the beds

well established and a light supper prepared.

The next
up.

day, get

all

the

camp

luxuries fixed
the
on.

Make some hooks on
nails,

the trunks of

nearest trees to

hang the odds and ends
or they

These may be

may

be forked twigs

pinned to the wood.

Sort out the provisions and

put them where they will keep sweet and dry.

Do
salt

not lay the pork on the sugar bag, nor the
against anything
else.

The beds are
economize on
bidding.
If

of prime necessity.

If

you must

anything,

let

it

not be on the

you are where you can get plenty
Cut a large supply and spread
place.

of

fir

or spruce boughs, you have the finest bed

in the world.

them over the sleeping
larger pieces and lay a

Start with the

row along

the head of

GENERAL ADVICE
the bunking place.

37
the foot,
at least

Then work toward
till

lapping them like shingles

the bed

is

seven feet long.

Next

start again at the

head

and put on another
into the first layer.

layer, forcing the butts

down
using

Continue

this process,

smaller branches with each layer, finishing off

with the fine
as

tips

on
it

top.

Make

this

bed as thick

you can, for

will settle with use.

When
fir

you have nothing
tips
this,

else to do, put

some more

on the top.

Lay

the rubber blankets

on

so that he can easily crawl into

and make up each man's blanket separately, it and cover up,
browse " Cut four
scarce or absent,

without disturbing the others.
If " fir
is

make a

pole bed.
end.

sticks

with a crotch at one

They should be

at least three inches in di-

ameter.

Force these into the ground so that the
shall

head and foot of the bed
feet apart,

be about seven

and so placed that poles of about the
shall
lie

same
gether

size

across the head and foot.

Across the poles lay other smaller ones close totill

the frame

is

wide enough

to

accommo-

date the party.

On

this

foundation lay the brush

or dry leaves.

When
camp

nothing else
is

is

available,

and

I

am
is

in

a

that

to be permanent, I generally
it.

buy a
gen-

bale of cheap hay, if I can get

There

38
erally a

CAMPING
farmer
the

who can
point

supply

it,

or

it

can be

obtained at

of

disembarkation and

brought in with the luggage.
fussy, but I

This

may seem

am

supposed to be writing for the

benefit of people

who
to

are accustomed to soft

beds,
If

and who come

camp

to enjoy themselves.

you wish to " rough it," spread your blanket for one night on the ground beneath the starry
sky.

A

convenient bed

The next night you will have a bed made. is made of a strip of canand sewn together

vas, 63^2 feet square, doubled

at the sides, with the ends open.
it

When you

put

up, drive four crotched sticks into the

ground

at the four corners

and stretch on poles placed on
is

these crotches.

The next important adjunct
It

the

camp

fire.

seems almost superfluous to
it is

tell

a

man how
It
fire."

to build a fire, but

an old saying, that "

takes a wise
I

man

or a fool to

make a good

take

it

the reader classes himself as neither.
fire will

The cooking
you have
the
fire will

be the most important.
lay

If

flat stones,

up a

fireplace, placing

stones

close
all

enough together so that the
around the
kettle,

play

and with a
It is

space long enough to

hang two

pots.

a

good idea to have a low place in front wide enough to set on the fry pan, and high enough so

GENERAL ADVICE
that

39

you may haul the

live coals

between them.

This will save you holding the pan in your hand
all

the time

you are using

it.

Matasiso Stove

If

you are

in a

permanent camp where there

are plenty of rocks, build a pier of stones about
three feet high, leaving a hollow in the center for

a fireplace, which

may have

a bottom of turf.

4o

CAMPING
This device will save a good

many back
little

aches.

Make

the fireplace at the back a

narrower

than the fry pan, and wider at the front. On this you may boil your potatoes, make your coffee, and fry your fish at the same time. The rocks will hold the heat, and food may be kept warm
while waiting,
if

care

is

taken to have the stones

on the top
stewed

flat

and

level; in fact, I

have often

fruit, etc.,

with the dish on the edge of

the fireplace.

In temporary camp, cut three logs, about a foot
in diameter
logs, build
;

lay one for a back log,
fire

your
in

when

it falls

two for side on top with small stuff, and coals you have a convenient place

to set your fry pan, coffee can, etc.

large one.

Remember that a small fire is better than a With the latter you cook your face
food,

more than your

and there
,

is

more

liability

of spoiling the cooking.

Hard wood
coals are

is

better than pine or spruce; the

what you want, and the longer they will remain hot the better for the cook. By no means use hemlock or cedar, as the sparks fly all over
everything,

burning the towels and the cook,

soiling the food

and setting

fire to

the surround-

ing dry leaves.

Although

I

prefer " frying pan bread,"

I

want

GENERAL ADVICE
an oven to bake beans,
it

41

fish,

etc.,

and construct
with rocks,
within
till

as follows

:

Dig a hole

in the
;

ground, preferit

ably on the side of a knoll
possible
;

line

if

build a fire of hard

wood

it

and

keep

it

up for a half hour

at least,
is

the rocks

or the surrounding earth

very hot; rake out

the coals and ashes, leaving three to four inches

of

live

coals

and ash

in

the bottom.

Put

in

whatever you have to bake, cover with the ashes.

The length of this operation will depend upon so many conditions that it will be impossible to set
a time, but a
the question.
little

experience will soon settle

The evening camp
is

fire is

a great comfort, and
Select a

an altogether different proposition.

place in front of the tent, and

some ways from it, and place a big log, or pile up several smaller ones with stakes to hold them in place, for a
back
the
log.

Build the

fire

in front of

it.

Start

bottom with

fine

dry chips, branches, or
After

shavings, place larger dry branches on these and

top off with good sized pieces.
alight,
it

it is

well

will

consume damp or even green wood.
will reflect the heat into the tent,

The back log
and

will hold the fire for a

long time.
in the

Supposing that you wake

morning with
not try to

a steady rain pouring down.

Do

42

CAMPING
a shift with " cold grub."

make

That

is

the

time you need a

warm

meal.

blanket over your shoulders, and go out.

Put your rubber If you
tent,

are wise, you will have prepared a store of dry
soft
if

wood, which

will

be stored in the

but

precaution, hunt

you have used it up or have neglected this up a pine log or a dead pine tree, and chop off the outside; you will find plenty of dry wood inside. Rake open the ashes
in the

camp
fir

fire,

where you

will probably find

plenty of live coals, put on your dry chips, cover

with pine,

or spruce boughs, blow up the

fire

and you
tent dry,

will soon

have heat enough
to

to

keep the
It will
fire if

and coals enough

cook by.

take a pretty hard rain to put out a good

once under headway.
If there are

any mosquitoes, as when are there
splinters
will

not, fasten the netting over the opening of the
tent.

Hard wood

do the

trick.

Keep
It is

this netting in place as

much

as possible.

much

easier to keep these pests out, than to
If these insects are

get them out afterwards.

too troublesome use the Insect Repellent freely.

There are numerous preparations which can be purchased ready made. The most of them answer the purpose very
to
well.

But

if

you wish

make

it

yourself, the following recipe, fur-

GENERAL ADVICE
nished

43

me by
is

Dr. L. O. Howard, the U. S. Eneasily

tomologist,

mixed and very good.

INSECT REPELLENT

2

oz. Oil of Citronella

2 oz.
1

Camphor
Cedar

oz. Oil of

The
knew,

recipe furnished by "

Nessmuk," one of

the best old sportsmen that the country ever
is

made

as follows:

PUNKEY
Pine Tar
Castor Oil

DOPE.
3 oz.

2
.
.

oz.
oz.

Oil Pennyroyal

1

Simmer
well

the tar and castor
oil

oil

together;

when

amalgamated add the
It is

of pennyroyal, and

set to cool.

well not to have the mixture

too
it

warm when the pennyroyal is added, because may evaporate, and it is the real life of the
Bottle and cork
it

mixture.

tight.

Use

copi-

ously and you will have no trouble with the pests
of the woods.
flies,

It is

equally efficacious for black
flies,

mosquitoes or horse

injury to the skin.

Please

and will do no wash your hands,

however, before you mix the bread.

CHAPTER

IV

CLEANING FISH

The remarks

that follow are intended for the

novice in the Waltonian pursuit, rather than for
the experienced angler or camper, the latter prob-

ably

knowing from experience how
his catch to his

to care for

and dress

own

satisfaction,
;

and
but

probably in a better manner than the writer

for the benefit of the uninitiated I will attempt
to describe

what

I consider, after several years'

experience in the sport of Uncle Izaak and the
care of the results, the best methods of procedure.

One
ered

of the most important points to be consid-

is,

What means

shall

we employ

to insure

our
at

fish

being in good condition on our arrival
at the point

camp or

where the catch
the

is

to be

cleaned.

The
sun
is

angler

who

fishes

stream can, of
if

course, only put his fish in the creel, but
bright, a layer of

the

damp moss

will prevent

44

CLEANING FISH
the fish

45

from drying, which

is

of the utmost im-

portance.

But

to the boat fisher the ensuing reIt

marks are of
perience that
well built in

salient value.
if

has been

my

ex-

the boat used has not a fishbest to use an open-mouthed

it, it is

Fish-bag

knit fish bag,

made

of extra heavy cotton cord

with an inch mesh, which can be hung over the

shady side of the boat, thereby keeping the
in their native element,

fish

and generally
sun.

alive for
is

a long time,

away from the

This

of the
detri-

utmost importance, as the sun has a very

46

CAMPING
fish,

mental effect on the

oftentimes softening

them so that dressing them in a presentable or skillful manner is out of the question. The result of this is generally

more bones

in the frying

pan than

fish.

We
fish,

have

now

arrived at the point where the

after

having furnished sport for the angler,

are of no use until

his skill with the knife,

some of the party displays and the speed and results
will take pains to

exhibited by one

who

render

Fish-knife

himself thoroughly conversant with the following
instructions will be a revelation to the

man who

spends an hour in cleaning a dozen
supper.

fish for his

After landing, the
is,

first
?

question often asked

"

Who

has a knife

" and everybody pulls one

out,

ranging from a penknife to an 8-inch hunt-

ing knife, neither of which, in

my mind

2

is

worth

a

last year's bird's nest, for reasons

which we
use

have not here space to explain.
all

After trying

shapes, kinds and sizes, I for

my own

prefer the shape

shown

in the cut.

CLEANING FISH
This

47

may be made
its

out of a good pocket knife,
fitting

by breaking

back and

a hardwood strip
entire handle

in slot for blade

and winding the
in the blade

with strong twine.

The advantage
is

being at an angle

in its tendency to

always cut deeper into the

flesh, instead

of coming out of the cut, thereby

enabling the user to

make

long, clean cuts

down

each side of the dorsal

fin,

which can then be

removed

entirely, leaving

none of the annoying

small bones to cause an inelegant flow of lan-

guage on the part of the hungry sportsman and

numerous cuts on thumb and

forefinger.

After seeing that your knife has a keen edge,
pick out a firm-fleshed yellow perch from the bag, grasp firmly in the left hand, belly down,
the hand being closed firmly along the sides to

prevent the sharp points of the
ing the hand.

gill

covers enter-

Make

a cut crosswise at the nape

of the neck, insert point of knife in cut and run
entire length of fish, each side of the dorsal fin,

which can then be removed entire by catching

thumb and knife blade and pulling quickly upward toward the head.
the lower end between the

Then grasp the the thumb and

flap of skin at the

nape between

the point of the knife

and

pull

outward and downward, tearing the skin from

48
the side

CAMPING
down
nearly to the anal fin; repeat this
;

on the other
the skin

side

then grasp in the same manner
side as near the vent as

on the under

possible, so that both sides

may be removed at same time, and tear quickly down to the tail, the anal fin nearly always coming off with the skin pull off the head and the entrails will come
the
;

with

it,

the whole operation requiring five cuts

with the knife and eight motions of the hand,

and

less

time than

it

takes to

tell it.

In dressing white perch,

first scale

them thor-

oughly, which operation consists in holding knife
blade at an angle of about ioo degrees to the
skin of the fish; press lightly and by a series of

movements from the tail toward the head, remove all the scales thoroughly. The dorsal fin is best removed as in
quick, short, scraping

dressing yellow perch.

Next, with

fish in

left

hand, belly up,
rectly

make a downward
fins to

cut from

di-

back of the pectoral

a point just

back of the

gills; insert point of knife into this

cut and run entire length of belly, continuing

down one
fish over,

side of anal

fin,

make a

cut on the op-

posite side

and remove the

fin entire;

turn the

sever the neck at the nape, and the head

and

entrails will

be removed as in previous case.

Pickerel should be thoroughly scaled, and af-

CLEANING FISH
slime
entirely

49

terwards cleanly scraped with the knife until the
is

removed, leaving the
all

fish nice

and white, which takes away
able

the disagree-

muddy

flavor so

common

in this fish.

Fins

should be removed as in previous cases.

Of
fish,

all fish

that the novice

may

be called on to

dress, the

Hornpout, bullhead, or Eastern catvariously called, will probably give

as

it is

him the most trouble. The best and quickest way is to remove fins by cutting down each side and tearing out cut the entire length of the belly to a point a little beyond the vent; then sever the head from the body from the under side, without cutting the skin grasp the body with the
;
;

fingers of the left hand, take the

head

in the

right

and a quick

pull will take off head, skin

and

entrails entire, if

a

little

care

is

taken in

starting the operation.

Of
to
gills

all

fresh-water fish the trout

is

the easiest

no knife being needed. Remove the thumb and forefinger, wash thoroughly, and the fish is ready for the
dress,

and

entrails with the

pan.

In closing, a
fish that

word

to the

camper.

Never use
than

have

lain in the

sun or have begun to
less palatable

soften.

They are not only

freshly caught fish, but at times positively dan-

50

CAMPING
Take
all

gerous to the health.

such

fish,

chop

them up and take them, with the
other refuse of the cleaned
fish,

entrails

and
fish-

out to the

ing ground and throw them overboard.
is

If this

done daily at the same
ledge,

spot, especially if

near
a

some sunken

you

will be able to catch

dinner there at any time, as the fish will con-

gregate there in large numbers.
ground-baiting.

This

is

called

CHAPTER V
WHAT
TO DO IF LOST IN THE WOODS

at a distance of
ization,
i.

Every man who goes camping in the woods, more than five miles from civiland does what nearly every

man

does do,
is liable

e.,

" take a

walk to see the country,"
if

to miss his
is.

way and

he

is

not

lost,

the

camp
and

I

have talked about

this

with a few people

who have been

in that unenviable position
is difficult

the answer to the question

and varied.

" You just can't tell what you would do." You may theorize all you choose beforehand, but when
the time comes

and your brain
It is a

is

bewildered, you
that your

would take the most solemn oath
pass
is

com-

wrong.

most horrible sensation

to find that

you do not know how to get out of

the woods, with perhaps miles of almost trackless
forest before you; the one safe place, perhaps,
is

only a short distance away, but you do not
that

know where
I

way

is.

have roamed the woods for thirty years,
51

52

CAMPING
May
ist to

sometimes being in camp from

De-

cember

ist.

I

have hunted summer and winter
sportsman and
as

in strange localities, as naturalist,

surveyor, and while I do not

know

much

woodcraft as I wish I did, I have had some experience
in

getting lost

— and

finding myself
lost.

again

;

in fact, I
I

have a faculty for getting

When

am

following a rare or

unknown

bird I

endeavor to keep

my

eye on
it

it,

irrespective of

the direction in which

may

take me, sometimes

across country and often in circles, and

get ready to resume

my

quiet path I

when I know not
positive

where

I

maxim:
tled

am. So I have adopted a "Whatever you do, do not
lose

get rat-

and

your head."
for instruction in the woods, to re-

I often

have had to caution a "novo" who

looked to

me

member
lies."

the above every minute,

and

to

add

to

it it

" Always carry a compass and never think that

Most people have heard of
it.

local attrac-

tion in the compass,

and they always think they
is

have found

There

only about one per cent,

of the country that will show anything of the

kind and even then

it

would not

deflect the needle

enough
were

to carry the traveler far astray.

If

it

deflected, the needle

would keep you from

WHAT TO DO
wandering
in circles in
lost.

IF

LOST
lies

53

which

the greatest

danger of being

Now

supposing that you are camping on the

shore of a lake in the woods, and you want to
look over the neighborhood.
to look at a

Your
if

first

duty

is

map

of the locality,

you have not
a general

already done so, so that you

may have

idea of the characteristics of the surrounding

country; especially of the trend of the

hills,

the

locations of streams or roads or the direction of

the coast or lake shore, as compared with your

camp.

If

you cannot do
find that

this

do not go.

When
you
are,

you

you do not know where
positive that the sun
is

and you are

setting in the east or in

quarter, endeavor to

some other impossible make up your mind as to
five miles,
lies

where you are within a radius of
think in which general direction

and

some
it is

river,

road or other landmark, and then set up a stick
or blaze a tree in that direction.
late in the day,

If

not too

make up your mind
to

in

which

direction

you ought

go,

set

your compass,
If the

take a bearing on some prominent tree or other

mark
set

in that course,

and go

to

it.

woods

are so thick that you cannot pick out a mark,

up a peeled

stick or blaze

a tree once in a

54

CAMPING
trail.

while so you can look back and see your

When you

have gone as far in any direction as

you are certain o favour course, lay it out again, always by compass, and you will come out some-

where
If

at a place that

you

will recognize as lead-

ing to some
it is

known

point.

late in the day,

do not wander around
to build a lean-to;
last
it

in the dark, but pick out a comfortable place, cut

some boughs

to

lie

upon and

gather fire-wood enough to

through the
to,

night or as long as you want

and make
have some
one night,
eat,

yourself as comfortable as possible until morning.

If

you are fortunate enough

to

lunch with you, you will probably get a fair
night's sleep.

You

will not starve in

and you can usually find something to
if it is

even

not so nice.

In very few places would

there be the slightest danger of molestation from

any source.

instructions for getting out, as

Next morning you may follow the shown in the prehear someone say, suppose you
etc.
if

ceding paragraphs.

Methinks
that

I

have no map, compass, matches,

I

reason

you are a
If

rational being
will

these things

you

you have not not be foolish enough to
to provide

and

go

out.

you do not know how

WHAT TO DO

IF

LOST

55

yourself with the necessary comforts, you have

not read this book understandingly.

In the case of a hunting party in the deep

woods,

it

is

the custom

among

the parties with
lost

which
call."

I

have been associated, to have a "

We

generally separate in the morning to

hunt in different sections, which are duly allotted
beforehand, so that each

member knows
to be.

just

where the other men ought

In case any

one of them becomes so overcome with the ardor
of the chase, or in the following of

wounded
rifle

game, that he does not know
camp, he gives the
in
call,

how

to get back to

three shots of the
replied to, the lost

succession.

If not

one

starts in the direction that

he believes the camp
time has elapsed

to

be situated, repeating the signal occasionally.
is

Usually he

heard before
If
is

much

and

is

answered.

he does not show up by
formed, and he
is

dark, a search party

trailed

by the

light of birch
is

bark torches, or the lanterns.
all

Seldom

a

man

compelled to stay out

night.

CAMP COOKING
The following receipts for cooking are the reof many years' actual experience, and have all been tried in actual camp-life. They are all
sult

comparatively simple, and

may

be prepared by

aid of the utensils mentioned in these pages.

The

materials

may

generally be easily obtained
fitting out, or of the

at the stores,
in the

when

farmers

neighborhood.

It is

assumed that a certain judgment

will

be

exercised in the selection of rations, to govern
the personal tastes of the various

members

of

the party, and the resources of the surrounding
country.

One would

not expect to have a va-

riety of fresh vegetables in the

Maine Woods nor
;

would
nities

it

be reasonable to neglect such opportuoffered.

when

Hence a

selection
fit all

is

pre-

sented,
tions.

which may be presumed to

condi-

57

"

We

can

live

without Love
the

— what
live

is

passion

but

pining ?

"But where

is

man who

can

without dining?"
by the way."

"As we

journey through

life, let

us

LIVE

58

CHAPTER VI
CAMP COOKING
There is a favorite saying in camp, that " the Lord sends grub, but the devil sends cooks." This expression is old and homely, but it is apt, and many times, when it is the turn of the greenest man in camp to get dinner, we find reason to consider it true. We have seen an old woodsman toss together a few ingredients and turn out a meal that would cause our stomachs to cry, " Encore, encore/' and we have most of us experienced the sad results from guides who pretended to be finished cooks and had the whole party homesick before they had been in camp three days. The best supplied camp cuisine in the world would not keep off the " blue horrors "

when
it,

in the

hands of such bunglers.

Of
to do
learn.

course, everyone

must

first

learn the
fail

how

and equally of course some
latter could not boil

to ever

The

water without

59

60
burning
perience,
it.

CAMPING
I well
I

remember
I

my own

first

ex-

and

remember,

too, the experiences

with some of the boys that
to cook.

have tried to teach
certainly,

The genuine camper
who, taking but
little

is,

the

man
most
In

food with him, lives upon

the spoils of his rod and gun.

This

is,

in

cases, impracticable to the ordinary camper.

the

first place, it

takes

some experience

to

In the second place, but few desire to do
there
is

so,

do it. and
party

no reason why they should.

A

can
if

live just as well in
to,

camp

as they can at
it.

home,
also a

they wish

and can afford

And

party can live on a dollar a week apiece,

if

they

choose; and live well, too.

BREAD AND CEREALS.

Baked Bread:

— Put
i

in the

mixing dish

(I

use the stew pan),

quart of flour, 4 teaspoon-

fuls of baking powder, and a teaspoonful of salt, and mix together; then work in a little butter with the hand or mixing spoon, add cold water, stirring all the time, till you have a stiff dough

without lumps.

Turn

it

out on a plate, wash the

dish thoroughly, grease the inside so the
will not stick.

dough

Put the dough back
plate, place
it

in the dish,

cover

it

with a tin

on the coals

CAMP COOKING
in the oven,

61

and cover with the hot coals and
Leave
it

ashes that you have just raked out.
for from one to two hours.
will be
it,

A

little

experience

needed to know just

how

long to bake

for a rock oven, with a heavy bed of coals,

will

bake more quickly than a hole in the ground

with pine embers.
quantity of baking
at

(N. B.

I

use double the
I

powder

in

camp, that
it it

use

home, because

I

have found

necessary to
is,

obtain the desired result.

Why

I

do not

know.)
Spider-cake:

— Mix

i

pint

wheat

flour,

i

tea-

spoonful salt and 2 of baking powder.

Add

water to make a thick batter.
over the

Grease the fry

pan, and turn in the batter; bake very slowly
fire.

As soon
it

as the crust forms on

the bottom, so that

can be moved without

breaking, loosen

it

in the

pan with a thin
it

knife,

and shake
ing.

it

occasionally to keep

from scorchit

When

baked on one
side.

side,
is

turn

over and

bake the other

(This

not called spiderfall

cake on account of the insects that might
it,

into

while in process of cooking, but because in

olden times the fry pan was called a spider.)

Flapjacks or Batter-cakes:

— Mix

1

quart of

62
flour, i

CAMPING
teaspoonful of
salt,

4 of baking powder,

and 4 of sugar or a
to

little

molasses.

Add

water
it

make a

thin batter.

If

you have milk,

may-

be used instead of the water, to the benefit of the
cakes.

A

teaspoonful of condensed milk disis

solved in the water
fry

also good.

Grease the
to

pan and drop
side, slip
it

in

enough batter
as the cake

make a

thin layer.

As soon
over.

browns on the
it

under
it

a thin knife or cake-turner under

and turn

When

baked, take
it

off

onto a plate, placed where

will

keep

warm

grease the pan again and repeat the operation.

The

best results

the inside of the

will be obtained by keeping pan smooth, and using as little

grease as possible.
in

This receipt

may

be varied

many

ways.

A

mixture of corn meal and

flour in equal parts will give variety.

Rice-cakes and Oatmeal-cakes are simply the

above mixture with the addition of 2 cups of
boiled rice or rolled oats or

hominy mixed with
If

one-half the above quantity of flour.

eggs

are obtainable, one or two stirred into the batter
just

before

cooking,

improves the cakes im-

mensely.

If whortleberries or dangleberries or

blueberries are in season, stir in a cupful.

The

boys will

like

them.

My

experience has taught

CAMP COOKING
me
be about the right
or sugar,
size.

63

that an extra quantity of berry flapjacks will

Maple syrup, molasses,
with these.

may be used

Boiled Rice:

— Wash
salt.

clean

1

pound of

rice,

and put
off

in

2 quarts of boiling water with 2
Boil one-half hour.
tightly

teaspoonfuls of

Take

and drain, cover the dish

and

set aside

to steam.

Corn-meal Mush:
water,
salted
to

— Have
Sift

a dish of boiling
in

taste.

the

cornmeal

slowly with the one hand, while stirring briskly

with the other, until the porridge

is
it

thick enough.

This
to do

may seem
it

very

trivial,
it

but

takes patience

properly or
Set
it

will

be

full of

lumps of

dry meal.

on one

side the fire
If

and steam
is

slowly for 15 minutes.

your patience

not
cold

sufficient for this process,

water to make a thick

mix your meal in batter. Have your

dish

of water boiling, and turn in the batter slowly,
so as not to stop the boiling.

When

properly

done, and

it

is

not so easy either, this makes a

good dish

for the camper.

The remainder may
in pieces

be put one side until cold, sliced

about

one-half an inch thick, and fried in butter.
is

This

improved by dipping the

slices in

beaten egg,

64
before frying.
erly

CAMPING
If the

mush has not been propfall in pieces.

made

at first }

the slices will

Milk Toast:

If

you have any
not, if

stale

bread in

camp

(as

when do you

anybody goes near

on the visit to town), make it up for milk toast. Put on the stew pan, with a cup of milk. Put in a pinch of salt, a generous lump of butter, and allow it to come to a boil. In the meanwhile toast your bread to a nice brown, and
a bakeshop

when of

the right complexion, drop

it

into the

boiling milk.

Cereals:
their

— Of
is

these

various
all

preparations,

name

legion,

and nearly

of

them have

directions for cooking, printed
I

on the package.
This
not,

have tried a number of them, and the receipts
is

hold as good in camp as at home.

however, a guarantee that the rule will always
hold good.

Why

it is

I

do not know, but some

things cannot be handled the same in

camp

as

when prepared over

the stove at home.

There are various makes of prepared
the market, under as
rule they are very

flours in

many

various names.

As

a

handy

to the camper, as they

are put up in small packages, by which the ne-

CAMP COOKING
cessity

65
package
is

of

breaking

out

a

large

avoided, and they also avert some mistakes of

omission

common

to

men doing work

they are

not accustomed to do.

Fils-d'une-chienne:

— Fry
SOUPS.

out the

fat

from
till

some

salt

pork.
it

is soft.

Drop

in the hot fat

Soak hard-tack in water and cook.

it

Take Beef Stew: wash clean, and put it
fire.

1

pound of lean meat,
water over a slow
in pieces
falls

in cold

Cook

until the

meat

when

from 3 to 4 hours, during which time there must be enough water to cover
stirred; this will take

the meat.

Now

add about a quart of
very
thin,

sliced po-

tatoes, a small onion, sliced
until the potatoes are soft.

and cook
salt

Season with

and

pepper to
u

taste.

Camp Stew:
is

— Prepare the beef by boiling as
onion
it

in the previous receipt, except that a large

needed, and
is

must be added

at the

same time
is

the meat

put on.

When

the meat

done,

add the potatoes as before, and a can of tomatoes. Flavor with salt, pepper and curry powder.

Just

before

serving,

take

some

wheat

66
flour

CAMPING
and mix with water
;

to
it

make

it

about the

consistency of cream

beat
;

together thoroughly
boiling,

so there will be no lumps

have the stew

and turn
liquid.

in the flour,

which

will thicken the

This dish
all

may

be varied by the addition

of any or

of the vegetables which

may

hap-

pen to be within reach.
bage, cauliflower, parsnips,

Carrots, turnips, cabetc.,

should be peeled

and cut
eter.

into dice of about a half-inch in

diamlittle

These vegetables should be cooked a

So far as the meat component goes, almost any flesh is suitable. The leftovers from the broiled steaks or chops
longer than the potatoes.
chickens or fowls, ducks, grouse, shore birds or

any other meat from the roast or
greater the variety, the better the stew.

spit;

the

If fresh

meat

is

purchased, get the neck, shin, bottom of

the round, or any of the inferior pieces in prefer-

ence to the, so-called, choicer cuts.

Although
It

not so tender, they have a far richer flavor.
is

needless to say that venison, rabbits, or squir-

rels are

adapted to this dish.

word of caution just here may not be out of place. When making venison stew, look out that the meat has been well bled and hung for
forty-eight

A

hours,

if

possible.

Otherwise you

;

CAMP COOKING
will think

67

you have been taking a dose of Ep-

som
and

salts.

When
night.
is

preparing rabbits and squirrels, skin

dress, then soak the flesh in salt

water over

This will remove the strong flavor, which

obnoxious to many.
Turtle Soup:

— Parboil the meat
Take out
till it

in water, in
salt,

which has been put a small handful of
about a half hour.
the

for

meat and throw
in

away
add a

the water.

Put the meat
and four large

fresh cold

water and stew slowly
sliced onion
salt

will pull into pieces

sliced potatoes,

season with
savory,

and poultry dressing (sage,

thyme and pepper or other fragrant
stew.

herbs will do as well), and thicken the same as
the

Camp

This
it

is

for the

common

"

mud

turtle,"

and be
it is

known

that an unreasonable

prejudice exists against this animal.

Properly

prepared,

a dish for the gourmet.

Skunk Stew:
sert this here,

I was in doubt whether to inon account of the prejudice that

some people have against
prepared,
it

this animal.

Properly

is

really

a delicacy.
kill

When you
if

catch a skunk, of course you

him,

you can,

68

CAMPING
If the

before he explodes.
the carcass over a

odor

is

strong,

hang

smudge of hemlock

twigs, be-

ing careful not to scorch the fur.
dress,

Skin and

being careful not to break the musk-

glands, which
in cold

must be carefully removed. Put fire, and boil for an hour, or as long as any fat will rise to the top. Skim off this fat and carefully preserve it in a
water over a slow
time

bottle, against the

when

the baby has the

croup, or you yourself have a sprained muscle;
it is

very penetrating.
boil the

Throw away

the water,

and

meat with a sliced onion in fresh water, till the meat will slip off the bones. Add sliced potatoes and season with salt, pepper, and
a very
little

sage or poultry dressing.

Many

a

man
after

has

become a confirmed mephitiphagist partaking of the above without knowing
until

what he was eating
meal.

he had finished his

Lob-scouse:
of salt
is

— Boil corned beef
it.

till

the excess
fill

out of

Drain
;

off the

water and

up with fresh water put any vegetables that you happen to have, except the potatoes, and boil till the meat will come to pieces about half an hour
;

before

it

is

done, add

some

sliced potatoes

and
it

hard bread.

This

is

not a dainty dish, but

;

CAMP COOKING
affords a variety

69
is

when
diet.

the stomach

cloyed

with a hard-times

Start with cold water.

Fish Chowder:
in the

— Fry

out two

slices of

pork
large

bottom of the

kettle,

and when well cooked,

turn in 2 quarts of boiling water.
potatoes, sliced thin,

Add 6

and cook

until they can be

broken by the mixing spoon.

Have about

3

pounds of
should
in

fish cut into

convenient pieces, which

now be put in and cooked till it will break pieces. Then add 1 quart of milk and season

to taste with salt and pepper.

When

it

comes
Set

to the boiling point, break in 12 crackers.
it

off the fire

till

the crackers are steamed soft

and
thin,

serve.

Some

think that the chowder

is

im-

proved by the addition of a small onion,

sliced
in.

and added when the potatoes are put

Fish Chowder, Southern Style:

— Cover
;

the

bottom of the pot with

slices

of fat salt pork;

over that put a layer of sliced raw potatoes

then
fish,

a layer of chopped onions; then a layer of
cut into pieces, leaving out
all

the bones possible
first

on the

fish

put a layer of crackers,

soaked in

water or milk.
pork,
till

Repeat the

layers, except the
is

a sufficient quantity

obtained.

Each

layer should be seasoned with salt

and pepper.

70

CAMPING
in

Put
mass

enough cold water

to moisten the

whole

well,

cover the kettle closely, and cook

slowly for an hour or more.
rather thick,
stir it

When

it

appears

gently and serve.

Webster Chowder: The famous Daniel Webster lived in the section where my ancestors
passed their
lives,

and

his neighbors, for miles

around, gleaned a portion of their sustenance

from the contiguous waters. Many of them were professional fishermen and their wives were famous cooks in the direction of these products.

As Webster's Chowder was
friends,

a noted receipt,

it

be-

ing said that he furnished the following to his

we need no

excuse for

its

insertion here.

"

Cod of 10 or 12 pounds

well cleaned, leaving

on the
salt

skin, cut into slices of

ty 2

pounds each,
clear, fat

preserving the head whole;

iy 2

pounds

pork cut in thin

slices; slice

twelve pota-

toes.

Take the
first,

largest pot

you have, try out the
that

pork
in

take out the pieces of pork, leaving

the

dripping;

add

to

three

pints

of

water, a layer of fish so as to cover the bottom

of the pot, next a layer of potatoes, then two tablespoonfuls of
salt, one teaspoonful of pepper, then the pork, another layer of fish and the re;

mainder of the potatoes

fill

the pot with water

CAMP COOKING
enough
to cover the ingredients; put
let
it

71

over a

good
utes
;

fire,

the

chowder

boil twenty-five

min-

when

this is

done have a quart of boiling
split

milk ready and ten hard crackers
the whole boil five minutes.

and
let

dipped in cold water; add milk and crackers,

The chowder
if

is

then

ready and will be
the directions.
that flavor."

first

rate

An

onion

is

you have followed added if you like

of the farmers to

Once or twice each summer, it was the custom make up a party and go to some beach for a picnic. A chowder was considered
a necessary adjunct of the festivities, and
I still

retain lively recollections of the quality of this

toothsome dish.
then and

Perhaps

it

the sauce of youth and hunger, but
is

was flavored with it was good

now.

Clam Chowder:
those

— Shuck out a peck of clams
fish.

and add to the chowder instead of the

For
in

who have

never learned the art of shucking

clams, the shellfish

may

be put on the

fire

a kettle, with just enough water to cover them.
Please use hot water, turned over the clams, so
as to avoid trouble with the Society for P. O. C.

T. A.

When

the clams open their shells, take
fire,

the kettle off the

turn them out into a pan

72

CAMPING
Make
;

to cool, saving the liquor to use in the chowder.

Shell out the clams.

the chowder as by

the

first receipt
is

given, using as

much

of the clam

water as

necessary

the children will take care

of the remainder as a beverage.

Do

not put the

clams into the chowder until
they will be tough.

it is

nearly done, or

Bean Soup: Wash 2 quarts of beans, and them to soak over night or parboil them till the skins begin to peel off. Scrape clean one pound of salt pork and cut into thin
either put
slices.

Boil the beans for an hour or longer

if

necessary, then
in the

mash

the beans into a pulp

;

put

pork and cook slowly for another hour.
it

Stir

occasionally so
salt

will

not burn.

Season

with
to

and pepper to taste. It is a fussy job and not burn it, and at the same time have it good; but it is worth the while.

make

this

Pea Soup:
the

— Take

a

ham

bone, from which
sliced.

most of the meat has been
if it

There

is

no objection
will slip out

has been once boiled.

Put over
bone
peas
split

the fire with cold water

and cook

until the

of the meat.
soft.

and cook

till

Then add Have some cubes

of bread,

about one inch square, prepared, fried in lard or

CAMP COOKING
butter.
will

73
it

When

the soup has thickened, which

do as soon as the peas are cooked

soft,

put in the bread, and serve immediately.

Half a cup of oysters you please), with a very little water; simmer over the fire till the beards
Oyster

Stew:
if

(shucked,

wrinkle.
ter, salt

Turn

in a pint
;

of milk, a piece of but-

and pepper

let it

come

to a boil, stir in
eat.

a

little

thickening, and

it is

ready to

Don't

burn your tongue.
MEATS.
Unless camping in a

game

country,

we seldom
be brought

have any other meat than what
into
it

may

camp on

the occasional visits to town.

But

has been thought advisable to treat the sub-

ject as if there

were a market within easy ac-

cess, for the benefit of those

who may be

thus

advantageously placed.
rels, rabbits,

Deer, bear, hares, squir-

grouse, quail and shore birds,

how-

ever,

will

be at times available.
art
is

And

as the

acme of the camper's

to live, so far as
will

possible, off the country,

due attention

be

paid to those dishes which can be prepared from

those products.

No

hard and fast rules can

be made, for individual preferences vary to such

74

CAMPING
Nevertheless,
it

an extent that what would be luxury to the one,

would be starvation to another.

may be

considered that

all

wild meats should be

well done, except in the case of an occasional

chop from some member of the deer family.

With

fowl, however,

it

is

different.

All dark
all

meated birds should be rare done;
meated birds well cooked.
dence,
if

white

I consider that critiis

cism of a man's epicurean tastes
if

pure impu-

not

insult.

It is

none of

my

business

a

man wants

to

make

a salmi of his

woodcock

I

simply deplore his taste or ignorance.
I shall

commence with what has probably been
have to hunt far to know how to cook
Beef, pork, lamb, ham, bacon, sausage,

brought in when the party arrived, so the cook
will not

supper.
etc.

Broiled Steaks:

— Camp

is

a poor place for

tough meat; so when you buy, get something
so that you can, at least, stick a fork in the gravy

when wood
get
it

it

is

cooked.

coals, if possible.

Have a good bed of hardAt any rate, have no
and
the steak and
is

smoke.

Put the
over the

broiler over the hot coals

hissing hot.

Then put on
one side
fire

hold

it

fire till

seared; turn
that,

the other side to the

and sear

after

CAMP COOKING
which
cooked
it

75
till

should be turned back and forth

to suit the taste.

Lay on a warm
that

plate,

put on a

liberal piece of butter, a little salt

and
This

pepper, and give thanks

you have been

given a palate to appreciate good food.
rule applies to

lamb as well as beef; to venison
In cooking pork chops,
is,

as well as to pork chops.

however,

my

preference

to heat the fry
till

pan
well

very hot, drop in the meat, and cook
done.
If there is

no

broiler, this plan
little

may

be

followed with any meat, but a

butter must

be used,

if

there

is

not sufficient fat in the meat

to prevent its sticking to the pan.

But by

all

means, use as

little

grease as possible, and have

the pan hot, to start with, so as to quickly sear the surface and keep in the juices.

In cooking

meats, in the fry pan,
especially that

if

there

is

any

fat left,

from pork and bacon, turn it into a clean can (I use the empty condensed milk cans), and save it to fry fish.
Fried Salt Pork:


it

Slice clear, fat pork; slash
will not curl in the

the rind edge, so

pan;

scrape off

all bits

of salt or other attachments;
till

put in a cold fry-pan and cook

well done.
will

Do

not get the pan too hot, for
grease, and spoil the flavor.

it

burn the
off grease

Drain

?6

CAMPING
dry.

and serve with hot potatoes.
smooth and
wholesome.
Broiled Salt Pork:

Good salt pork is Damp, clammy pork is un-

Slice thin

and toast on

the broiler, the same as steaks.
slices

Or

hold the

over the

fire,

on the end of a green switch.

Look out

that the

smoke from the drippings

does not reach the meat.

Fried Bacon:
pan.

Slice thin

and drop into a hot
it

Watch
it

carefully that

does not cook too

much, or

will be
it is

hard and dry; remove each done and drain dry.

piece as soon as

Some

cooks always lay the cooked meat on paper to
absorb the grease.

Do
it

not soak in water before

cooking;

it

renders

hard when done.
the

Ham
pork.
into

and Eggs:

— Fry

ham

the

same

as

When

cooked, break the eggs separately
fat.

a cup, and drop into the hot

The

white of the egg will spread out and should be
turned up against the yolk as soon as
ficient consistency; this
it

gains suf-

prevents the outside of
leathery.

the albumen
ject of

from becoming

The

ob-

breaking the eggs into a cup before drop-

CAMP COOKING
ping into the pan,
is

77

to avoid getting an ancient

tgg among the

others.

Fried Sausages:

— Cut the
It is
is

links apart, prick

each sausage with a sharp fork so they will not
burst in cooking.

Place in the cold fry pan, and
not safe to eat any

cook

until well done.
it

pork product unless
Boiled

well cooked.

Beef:

— Put
it

the

meat

into

boiling
till

water, so that

will

be covered and cook

tender; about 15 minutes to the pound will gen-

Use a teaspoonful of salt for every 5 pounds of meat, added when it is nearly cooked. This method will be proper for
erally be sufficient.

corned beef,
water.
is

also,

but omit

salt

and use cold
it

If the beef is not corned, just before

done allow the liquor to boil
this
is

away

to about

a pint, season with pepper, and thicken with
flour;

makes an

excellent

gravy.

If

no
one

gravy
side

desired, the liquor should be set
cool,

till

the hardened

fat
if

removed and
desired, this

saved to fry with.
liquor

Afterward,

may be used

for a foundation for a vegeta-

ble stew.

78

CAMPING

Hash:
left

— Take

of boiled beef, or the scraps

in

slicing the boiled

ham, one part;

cold,

boiled potatoes,

two

parts.

Chop

into small bits,
little

and
fat.

warm up
Have
pork
fat

in the fry

pan with a

pork

If desired this

may
in

be varied in several

ways.
little

the fry pan hissing hot.

Put
sliced

in

a

and drop

an onion,

very

fine.

Stir rapidly, so

it

will not burn.

Have

the hash prepared, which roll into flat croquettes,

dip in sifted corn meal and fry

brown

in the fat,

from which the pieces of onion have been removed. Or, have the pan half filled with clean,
sweet grease (lard, or beef drippings), slightly
salted.

Break one or two eggs
roll

into the

hash and

mix thoroughly;

into

croquettes or balls,

drop into the hot fat and fry brown.
should be as hot as
it

The

fat

can be without burning.

Barbecued

Meat:

— Ribs

of

mutton,

thin

pieces of beef, rabbits, squirrels or almost

any

other flesh can be prepared in this manner.

Lay

your meat on the broiler over hot
singe the outside immediately.
utes,

coals, so as to

After a few minlittle

move away from
till

the intense heat a

and cook

done through, basting frequently

with the following dressing:

CAMP. COOKING
Barbecue Dressing:

79
of vinegar,

— One

pint

half a can of tomatoes,

two teaspoonfuls of red
salt,

pepper (chopped pepper-pods are better), a teaspoonful of black pepper, same of
spoonfuls of butter.

two

tableit

completely amalgamated.

Simmer together Have a bit

till

is

of clean

cloth or sponge tied on the end of a stick,

and

keep the meat well basted with the dressing as
long as
dish
is
it is

on the

fire.

The
it

preparation of this

a lot of work, but

pays.

Fried

Egg

on Hash:

— Make

your hash of

meat and potato; fry out the fat from a few slices of pork; roll your hash, wet with enough
water to make
large
it

stick together, into flat cakes

enough for a single Lay in a dish where they
fry

service,
will

and fry brown.

keep

warm

;

grease

the fry-pan and drop in the eggs in couples, and
till

the whites congeal; roll the edges of the
slip of!

white over the yolk and

on to the hash

cakes, one couple to each cake.

When
is

served,

which should be as soon as the egg
the yolk and
let it

done, break

run down over the cake.

game.
This word,
like

sweet Charity, covers a multi-

tude of

sins.

I

might read you a homily on the

80

CAMPING
wood and
field

sin of killing the creatures of the

but I

am

not going to do

it,

for several reasons.

First 'twould do no good, for
killing.

you would keep on

Second,

it is

none of
is

my

business any-

way.

My

business now,
will

to

tell

cook so that you

come out of
want
In the

the

you how to woods well

and hearty, and without a bad case of dyspepsia.

With

this digression, I

to start in with a
first place,

few words of advice.
bleed your

always
flesh of

game

as soon as killed.
is

The
not

an animal that has not been bled

fit

to eat.

Always let the animal heat get out of the body before you cook it. The fact that it will not rest well on your stomach is proof positive that it is not healthful. So unless you are on the verge
of starvation, heed these words.

Fish

is

the

only meat that

is

not subject to this rule.

Fried
legged

Squirrel:

— The

most common four-

game

that the ordinary

camper
latter,

will get,

are squirrels and rabbits.
are not suitable for food
in
till

The

however,

the late

summer, and
are not

most

sections are protected

by law for a cer-

tain season of the year. just

We, however,

now

interested in the getting of them, but

the cooking.

Skin and dress them carefully, and

parboil for half an hour in salt

and water,

to

CAMP COOKING
take out the strong flavor.

81
off the water,

Drain

drop the meat

in the pan, with a bit of butter

and

a dash of curry powder, and brown.
like the
rels

Those who

gamey

flavor,

sometimes soak the squir-

in salt
broil

and
dry.

and water for an hour, wipe dry, over the coals with a slice of pork fat

laid over the

meat

to baste

it

so

it

will not be

Fried Rabbit:
salt

— Dress four
better
if

rabbits

;

parboil in

and water
Drain
It is

till

the bones will slip out of the

meat.
butter.

off the

water and fry the meat in
the bones are
all

much

taken out before
necessary.

frying,

although not at

all

strictly

Woodchucks, porcupines and skunks are not game, but they are fully as edible as
if

other animals, and,
cate.

properly cooked, very deli-

They should be parboiled thoroughly, and

then roasted or stewed like any game.

Roast Woodcock or Quail:
for the spit),

— Dress
is

and imthe best

pale with a green stick (black birch

and put a
roasts.

slice

of fat pork on the

end of the
the bird as

spit,
it

so the fat will drip

down over

Have

a large quantity of

very hot coals; thrust the stick into the ground

82

CAMPING
an inclined position, so

in front of the fire, in

the bird will be over the heat.
in order to

Turn

frequently,
to avoid

cook on

all

sides

and also

burning.

The

hotter the coals, the better the

bird, for the intent is to sear

over the outside as

quickly as possible to avoid loss of the juices.

Any

small bird, like snipe, plover or other sand-

pipers

may

be cooked in the same manner.

Rabbit Curry:
till

— Dress
come

two

rabbits

and

boil

the flesh will

off the bones.

Take the
it

bones out and put the meat in the kettle with
a large cupful of the water in which
boiled.
it

was

will

(Do make
salt

not use too

much

of this liquor;

the curry taste rank.)

Add two
it,

slices

of bacon, cut in strips; season with curry

powder,

and pepper.

If

you have

put in
for

a small glass of Burgundy.

Cook slowly

twenty minutes.
rice
;

Have

dish lined with boiled
it

take out the meat from the stew, and lay

in the dish; thicken the liquor left in the kettle,

with a little flour rubbed up in cold water; turn over the meat in the dish. Serve.

Roast Grouse au naturel:
nards " and
dressing.
fill

— Take out the

" in-

the cavity with the following

Roll crackers into crumbs and

mix

CAMP COOKING
with a
little salt 4

83
little

pepper and sage; turn a

hot water on to moisten the crackers.
in the bird, cover with a thin slice of

Put

this

pork and
pail of

sew the skin together tightly. water in which stir clay until

Have a
it

is

of the con-

sistency of thick porridge or whitewash.

Now

take the bird by the feet and dip into the water.

The
ers.

clay will gather

on and between the feathis

Repeat

till

the bird

a mass of clay.

Lay

this in the ashes,

being careful to dry over the
it

outside of the clay, before you get

into the fierce

heat of the

fire.

burned to a

brick.
ball

the clay is almost Bake Rake the bird out of the fire,
it till

and rap the
till

of clay with a stone or

stick,

it

cracks open.

The
This

feathers

and skin

will

all

come

off with the clay, leaving the meat as
is

clean as possible.

the perfect

cooking game.

Any

fowl or animal
If

way of may be

you try ducks, woodchucks or hedgehogs chop an onion and add
cooked in the same way.
to the stuffing.

Partridge Fricassee:
joints

— Divide your birds
;

into

and

roll

them

in flour

put in the fry pan a

generous lump of butter, heat very hot and put
in

your pieces of

bird.

Cook

for about ten min-

utes, then

add water to keep from burning and

84
cook slowly
till

CAMPING
the

meat

is

tender.

meat and put
flour

in a dish; turn in

Take up the the pan enough
it

water to make a gravy, thicken

with a a
little

little

rubbed up in cold milk;
it

salt it

and

pour

over the birds.
FISH.

There
ing

is

such a difference in

fish

taken from

different waters, that

any general rule for cookflesh.

may

lead to distaste and disappointment by

reason of the poor quality of the

Fish

taken from sluggish,
inferior to the

muddy

waters are decidedly

same

species taken

from the
in salt

cold,

clear streams

and ponds.
will

Soaking

and

water before cooking
fish,

improve these inferior
caught in clear

but

all

the preparation in the world will
taste like the fish
if

not

make them

waters.
net,

Again,

or a well in

you have not a fish car or the boat, by which means they
till

can be kept alive

they are ready for use,
at once,

al-

ways

kill

your catch

and keep them out
Reference to the
will

of the sun.

Fish that have lain in the sun for

a half hour are unfit for food.
article

on Fish Cleaning, by Mr. Bos worth,
it

give you needed instructions, which
well to follow.

will be

Trusting that you have studied

CAMP COOKING
this, I will

85

say no more on the subject, but pro-

ceed to the cooking.

Fried Perch:
with hot
fat.

— Have

the pan well supplied

If there is not a supply in

camp,
Roll

try the fat out of a half-pound of salt pork.

the

fish,

previously skinned and well washed, in
If you wish to do them first in well

corn meal or cracker crumbs.
it

up

in real fine shape, roll

beaten egg and then in crumbs.

Drop
hot.

in the fat

and fry brown, turning frequently, so as to have

them

evenly

cooked.
all

Serve
fish

This

rule

holds good for

kinds of

not over a half-

pound
sides

in weight.

If larger, either cut

them

in

slices across the

body, or

slice the

meat of the

from the backbone.

Boiled Fish:

— Do
fish.

not attempt to boil a fish

under three pounds
boiling.

in weight.

Have your water

Put
in

in a couple tablespoonfuls of salt,
It is

and drop
it

your

a good plan to wrap
it

in a clean white cloth, so

will not fall in

pieces.

Cook

until

the fish will

easily

cleave

away from
cook
in half

the bones.

A

three-pound

fish will

an hour or

less,

and about

five

min-

utes for every extra

pound may be considered

86
about right.

CAMPING
But there
is

a difference in species.

Too much cooking
fish,

will spoil the flavor of

some

the salmon for instance, or the lake trout.

Serve with some sauce.
Fish Sauce:
in the

— Have a quart of water boiling
Put
in

stew pan or the fry pan.

two

ta-

blespoonfuls of butter, one teaspoonful of

salt.

Mix
up

in a

cup three tablespoonf uls of flour rubbed
little
it

in

a

cold water
is

till

the lumps are

all

broken, and

of the consistency of cream.
it

Stir this into the boiling water slowly, so

will

not form lumps, and the sauce will thicken. Milk
in place of the

water
If

is

preferable, or half milk

and half water.
will curdle.

you want a sour sauce, add
it

a teaspoonful of vinegar, but do not use milk,

A
an

glass of wine in place of the

vinegar

is

improvement,

especially

when

served with boiled trout.

Baked Fish:
stuffing
little

— Take

a fish of not less than

three pounds; scrape and

wash

it

well; prepare

composed of cracker or bread crumbs, a salt and pepper, a small lump of butter,
little

seasoned with sage or poultry dressing, mixed

with a very

boiling water; if

you have eggs
Put the
stuf-

drop one

in

and mix thoroughly.

CAMP COOKING
fing in the cavity

87

whence the

entrails

were

re-

moved, not too

tightly,

and sew up the opening.

Rake the hot

coals out of the bake-hole, put a

thick layer of green grass (if there should hap-

pen to be some mint

in

it

all

the better), over

the hot ashes, lay the fish

on

this,

put on another
all,

layer of grass, rake the hot coals over

and

build a fire on top.
like the flavor

Bake

for an hour.

If

you

put a small onion in the dressing.
bacon, laid over the fish before
flavor.

A

few

slices of

covering, will

improve the

Small

fish

may

be prepared for the table by
it

baking between the layers of grass, but
not take so long to cook them.
In fact,

will

when

on
I

a

long

tramp,

in

light

marching order,

prefer to cook them this way, rather than to

lug a fry pan.

Sharpen a small straight Skewered Fish: stick and take off the bark. Thrust this through small fish and slices of bacon alternately, and
hold over the hot coals.

They

will

cook in a

few minutes.

Look out

that they do not drop

off the stick at the last stage of the

game.
heads

Broiled
split

Fish:

— Take

off

the

and

down

the back, leaving the skin over the

88
stomach
intact.

CAMPING
Lay on
the broiler with strips

of fat pork or bacon laid across, and cook over

hot coals.

Mackerel and bluefish do not need

the fat meat, but they are by no
thereby.

means injured

Planked Fish:
that

— This

is

the quintessence of

camp cookery, and is so easy that it is a wonder more people do not use the method. Have a hard wood plank, large enough to hold the fish, laid out flat. And do not throw away the
plank after using;
the fish
it

improves with use.

Split
it

down

the back, as for broiling.

Tack

to the plank, skin side down.

Skewer on
fire.

strips

of bacon, and stand up before a hot
to have a end,

Be

sure

good

sized piece of bacon

on the head
fish.

so the
until

dripping fat will baste the

Cook

you can

easily thrust a sliver into the

thickest part of the meat.

Take off the plank, and dress with salt, pepper and butter, and do not be afraid to put on enough butter. Lay on all you think the state of the supply will allow, and then shut your eyes and put on another
piece.

Serve hot.

Baked

Fish,

Lumberman
it

Style:

— Take

a

fresh caught fish and rub

in soft clay

from

f
CAMP COOKING
the
river

89 and
gills.

bank,

against
a

the

scales

When
ered.

the clay

is set
till

little, roll

the whole fish in

a blanket of clay,

the body

is

completely cov-

Dry
is

in

the heat of the fire for fifteen
till

minutes; bury in the hot coals and ashes
the clay
hard.
it

Rake

the brick out of the

fire

and crack
taken out
ball,

open with the hatchet.

The

fish

will split in
;

two

pieces; the spine can be easily
little

the " innards " are shrunk to a
flipped off,

which can be

and the

scales are

stuck on the clay.

Dust on a

little salt,

and you

have a meal

fit

for

— a hungry

bacon
in

hunter.

Fried Oysters and Bacon:
Blankets)
:

(Little

— Cut

Pigs in
slices.
little

fat

very thin

Lay on each
salt

piece a large oyster, dust

on a

and pepper, and
it

fold the oyster inside the

bacon, securing
toothpick.
in

with a sliver or a wooden
fry

Heat the

pan very hot and drop

the " pigs " and cook about four minutes. cut as thin as possible and
" pigs " cooked only

The bacon must be
the

enough

to

make
it

the

bacon palatable.
all,

Some never

eat the bacon at

but are contented with the flavor

gives

the oysters.

Fried Clams:

— Shuck

out the clams, select-

9o
ing the large ones.

CAMPING
Roll them in cracker crumbs
fat.

or in corn meal, and fry them in deep

Fish Balls:
fry at dinner

— Take the

fish left
all

over from the

and pick out

the bones.

Chop

up the cold boiled potatoes,
one of
fish to

in the proportion of

to taste; break in

Form
deep

into

two of potato, season with salt an egg and mix thoroughly. balls or flat croquettes, and fry in

fat.

Build an oven of rocks, on Baked Clams: bottom and sides, top left open. Build a hot fire and keep it burning till there is a heap of hot coals and ashes, and the rocks are heated through. Rake out all the bits of unburned wood which would burn and smoke the bake. Throw on a
layer of rock-weed to cover the ashes; lay the

clams on
relish,

this,

with a few ears of corn for a

cover with more weed and throw, an old

piece of sail over the heap.
will slip in the shell.

Bake

till

the clams

Uncover, and serve with

melted butter and vinegar.
EGGS.

When

they can be procured,

eggs are the

refuge for the hurried meal, or for lunch; but

CAMP COOKING
is

91

do not run away with the idea that any old way
right to cook them.
it

A

plain boiled

egg may

be delicious or

may

be a clammy mass.

Of

course individual taste will govern the length of

time they are cooked.

A
if

soft-boiled

egg should

be cooked 3 minutes,
ter.

dropped in boiling wato a boil, then

If

wanted for a cold lunch, put them on
water and
let

in cold

them come
will

cook 20 minutes.

You

be surprised
will
be.

mealy and palatable the yolk
off the fire,
set

how Some
them

people have the water boiling furiously, then set

drop

in the eggs, cover

and

let

6 minutes.

Fried Eggs:

— Grease
Have

the fry pan, as
it

if

for

cooking flapjacks.

hissing hot; break

the eggs into a cup, one by one, so as to be

sure that they are fresh; turn into the fry pan,

and when the white, which has run out,
gealed, turn
it is it

is

contill

in

toward the center.

Cook

of the desired consistency.
if
it

The egg may be
fat
little

turned over,
hard.

is

desired that the yolk be

Eggs

fried

in

too

much
if

will

be

leathery and indigestible, but
used, and the above

a

care be

directions
if

followed, they

may
If

be as easily digested as

soft-boiled.

egg sandwiches are desired for lunch, put

92

CAMPING
slices

one of the fried eggs between two
flavor with salt

of bread,

and pepper.
fit

Have

the size of

the sandwich to
ter than to

the single egg.

This

is

bet-

make

the double egg filling for the

whole

slice

of bread.

Break the eggs in a dish, Scrambled Eggs: and beat the yolks and whites well together.
Grease the bottom of the fry pan with butter,

drop in the eggs and
that
it

stir till

done.

Look out
Season

does not stick on at the bottom.

with

salt

and pepper,

after serving.

Omelette:
dish: beat

— Break four eggs
well,

into the

mixing
and

them

and season with
is

salt

pepper; rub a tablespoonful of flour in four
times that quantity of milk,
till

it

smooth;

pour into the eggs and beat
the mixture and
set,

all

together.

Have
is

the fry pan well greased with butter, pour in
let it

cook

till

the bottom
slip

well

and the top

will not

run;

a thin knife

under one side and turn one-half over onto the
other.

Cook

as

much
it

as' desired,

turning occa-

sionally, so that
let it

will

be evenly cooked.
if
it

Don't

burn onto the pan;
it

shows signs of
cooked, drop

burning before

is

sufficiently

CAMP COOKING
a
little

93

piece of butter in the spot
lies,

where the
a moment.

danger

and hold

off the fire for

Ham

Omelette:

— Mince
little

some

boiled

ham,

season to taste with a

curry, or other con-

diments, and lay a large spoonful on the omelette

before you turn the two halves together.

This fancy omelette
ways.
like
lette

may be

varied in

many

Minced beef, lamb, cheese, or even fish salt cod and smoked halbut, gives the omea distinctive
flavor.

Omelette

aux Fine Herbes:

— Break
little

eight

eggs in the stew pan, to which add a teaspoonful
of chopped shallot or mild onion, one of chopped
parsley, half a teaspoonful of salt, a

pepper,

and two large tablespoonfuls of cream; beat them well together. Put two ounces of butter
in the fry pan, set over the fire,

and as soon as
will not stick,
it

the butter has melted, so the

egg
till

pour

in

the mixture, and stir quickly until
;

begins to set

hold

it

a

moment

a crust forms

on the bottom; turn one-half over the other, and serve. It must not be done too much.
Fricasseed Eggs:

— Boil

a half dozen eggs

94
hard and
onion, a
slice

CAMPING
them.

Chop very

fine

a small

parsley or celery-leaves, and two mushrooms; put a generous lump of butter in the fry pan, season with salt and pepper; when the butter is melted, lay in the vegetables and heat thoroughly, but do not brown;
little

or three

add a

gill

of milk with a tablespoonful of flour
let it

rubbed in for thickening; lay in the eggs,

come

to a

boil,

and

serve.

VEGETABLES.
All vegetables should be carefully looked over

and washed

in cold water.

If to
if

be boiled, drop

them

in boiling water,

and

the water in the
fill

kettle gets

low during the process,
possible,

up with
water as

boiling water, never with cold.

Keep
off the

the kettle

covered,

if

and drain

soon as

cooked.

Some very

strong flavored

vegetables are improved by boiling in
ters.

two wacooked,

That

is,

when they are
fill

partly

drain off the water, and
water.
shall

up with fresh hot

The
boil

question

is

often asked,

how long
will be

we

them ?

I

never found any hard and

fast rule.

Perhaps the following table
is

of assistance, but the time
potatoes
will

variable.

Small

cook

five

minutes quicker than

CAMP COOKING
large ones.
It is

95

a safe rule to cook until you

can easily stick a splinter in the fleshy parts.

Potatoes, boiled

Sweet potatoes, boiled
Shell beans, boiled

20 to 30 minutes 45 minutes 60 to 90 minutes 60 minutes

String beans, boiled

Green peas, boiled Green corn, boiled
Asparagus, boiled
" other " greens

20

to

40 minutes

10 to 15 minutes
15 to 30 minutes

Cabbage, dandelions, spinach and
Turnips, parsnips and carrots

60

60 to 90 minutes to 90 minutes
45 to 60 minutes take, or you may

Onions

Pay
water.

the farmer for

what you

find yourself, as well as the vegetables, in hot

Boiled Potatoes:

— Wash
till

thoroughly in cold

water

;

cut out

all

the decayed parts.
boil

Drop them
easily stick a

in hot water

and

you can
all

sliver into the largest. set

Drain
Select

off the

water and

one side to steam.

potatoes for a

boiling of about the

same

size,

so one will not

be cooked before another, as they are liable to
burst their jackets and become water-soaked or

96
lost.

CAMPING
If the potatoes are very old, peel off the

skins,

put a handful of
;

salt in the

water in which

they are to be boiled

have the water very hot
possible.

and cook as quickly as

Mashed Potatoes: After boiling, peel and mash thoroughly with a stick or the bottom of a
Stir in salt, pepper, butter and enough milk to make the consistency that of

clean bottle.

dough.

Baked Potatoes:
til

— Cut

off the ends,

bury in

the hot ashes and leave there for an hour, or un-

you can pinch them with the
Boiled-fried Potatoes:

fingers.

— Peel
slice.

the skins

from

cold boiled potatoes and

Have
stir

the bottom

of the fry pan covered with " screeching hot
fat.

Drop

in the slices

and

frequently to

prevent burning.

When

they are slightly brown

they are ready to serve.

Stewed Potatoes:
into small pieces.

— Cut
Put

cold boiled potatoes

in the

stew pan with
salt,

enough milk

to cover them.

Season with

pepper and butter, and stew gently, stirring occasionally, until the

milk

is

nearly boiled away.

CAMP COOKING
Lyonnaise Potatoes:

97

— One

quart cold boiled

potatoes cut small, three tablespoons butter, one

of chopped onions and one of chopped parsley,
salt

and pepper
salt

to taste.

Season the potatoes
in the

with the
butter,

and pepper, fry the onions

and when they are yellow, add the po-

tatoes; stir with a fork, being careful not to

break them;

when

hot add the parsley and cook

two minutes

longer.

Serve at once.

Potato Salad:

— Ten medium-sized cold boiled
fine,

potatoes, cut into small pieces; one small onion,

chopped

fine;

half a dozen hard boiled eggs;

chop the whites

mash

the yolks

and add to

them one teaspoon each of ground mustard and sugar, one tablespoon of melted butter, some salt and pepper. Rub all together well and put in
the potatoes, with about four tablespoonfuls of
salad dressing.
tles,

(This can be purchased in botsave

and

will

much

trouble in making.)
If

Add
get
is

about half a cup of vinegar.
celery,

you can
Lettuce,
will

some

chop up about as much as there

of the potato, and

mix

all

together.

kale, parsley or

any green salad plant

do

instead of the celery, or the salad plant

may be

omitted altogether, in which case, be more sparing of the vinegar in the dressing.

98

CAMPING

Boiled Green Corn:
is

— The
it

flavor of the corn

better preserved

if

is

cooked in the husk.

Pull off the outer husk, turn
leaves, pull off the silk

down

the inner

and turn back the inner Put some
boil
salt

husk and
the corn.

tie

the ends.
it

in the in
is

water as soon as

comes to a
let it

and drop

Do
this

not

stay in longer than
If

necessary to
to

make

it

soft.

one does not wish

cook

it

way, follow the same plan after

taking off the husk.

Succotash

— (so

called):

Cut the corn from

the cob and shell the beans.

The proportion

should be two-thirds corn and' one-third beans.

Put
and

into the kettle with a generous piece of pork,
boil
till

tender.

Take out

the pork, drain

off the water,

add a cup of milk and a piece of

butter the size of an egg, and stir over the fire
till

it

boils up.

taste with salt

Take off the and pepper.

fire

and season to

This

is

not the real succotash of the south-

eastern section of Massachusetts,
first

where

it

was
first

transmitted from the Indian to the

settlers.

Nearly every one of the old colonial

families has its receipt for this dish,

and few
are
all

of them are alike in their

detail.

They

CAMP COOKING
good enough.
Suffice
salt beef,
it

99

to say that the

body

is

composed of
in

pork, chicken, veal, and

ever

many cases the remnants of the dinner, whatit may have been, in the line of meat, saved
Here
is

by the frugal housewife.
as given

one method

me by one

of the old-time mothers of

the Cape.

Cape Cod Succotash:
beef for an hour
of
it.

— Boil

a piece of salt

till

the salt has got soaked out

fill up with fresh, some chicken, a piece of pork about a quarter as big as the beef, and boil till it all comes to pieces. Scrape off the corn from the cobs and put in with about half as many beans, and cook till the beans are ten-

Drain

off the

water and

cold water.

Put

in

der.

Season to

taste.
is

Of

course green shell

beans are what

intended in the above.

Boiled Beets:

— Wash

the beets, but do not

break the skin, for that will make them bleed,

and thus
in

lose

boiling
till

some of the sweetness. Put them water, enough to cover them, and
Drain
off the

leave

they are tender.

water

and drop them
be easily

in cold water,
off.

when

the skin

may
from

rubbed

If there are

any

left

ioo
the meal, slice

CAMPING
them
into a shallow

dish and

cover them with vinegar.
relish.

This

is

a splendid

Pork and Greens:
this

I

am

requested to men-

tion the variety of plants

which may be used for

homely

dish.

No
list

one need to go hungry

in the country, for the fields are filled with edi-

ble plants.
will

Their

would be

legion, but

I

mention a few:

Dandelion, nettles, milk-

weed, spinach, beet-tops, turnip-tops, mustard,

narrow dock, cowslip (marsh marigold),
herd's purse, and a myriad others.

kale,

poke, brussels sprouts, cabbage, purslane, shep-

Any

of the

above, cleaned and boiled

till

tender with a gen-

erous piece of pork, and served with boiled potatoes, is not

only satisfying, but

is

an excellent
it is

corrective for the system.

Of

course,

un-

derstood that the young plants or shoots are the
portions to be used.

You might

as well try to
if

get nourishment from a piece of wood,
try to use

you

them

after the hard fiber has

formed

in these plants.

Stewed Tomatoes:
off.

— Peel by pouring boiling
will easily

water over them, when the skin

come

Cut up

in the

stew pan, throwing out the

CAMP COOKING
hard and unripe
parts.

101
until they

Stew gently

come
and a

to pieces; season with butter, salt, pepper
little

sugar

if

desired.

Baked Beans:
and
is

— This

New
its

England dish
perfection.
all

is

almost a sine qua non in the Eastern woods camp,
seen nowhere else in

Pick

over a quart of beans, discarding
Parboil until the skin starts.
ter

poor ones.
off the

Drain

wait

and throw

it

far

away from

the camp, for

does not smell particularly sweet.

Put half the

beans in the bean pot, then a generous junk of
fat salt pork, then the rest of the beans, so that

the pork shall be bedded.

A

little salt

and some

molasses, the quantity depending on the taste,
will

complete the

list.

ter to cover the beans.

Pour in enough hot waPut on the cover of the

pot,

and

set in the

hot ashes of the bean hole,
to bed.

just before
it,

you go

Rake

the coals over

put a few sticks on top, so the ashes will keep

hot,

and go to bed.

In the morning rake out
will

the bean pot, and you

find

them

nicely

baked, and redolent of that aroma so dear to

every Yankee.

If

the worse for you,

you do not relish it, so much and so much the better for

the rest of the party, for there will be

more

for

them.

102

CAMPING

Macaroni:
into

— Break

the

sticks

of macaroni

convenient lengths; put in the stew pan
till

with hot salted water and cook
half a can of tomatoes
till

tender.

Stew

you can mash them up with the spoon and pick out the skin and the hard lumps put in a lump of butter, a little salt
;

and pepper, and thicken with
rubbed smooth.

flour

and water,

Pour

this

over the macaroni

and

serve.

MUSHROOMS. At
the earnest request of a friend, but with
at the possible results,

fear and trembling

do

I
is

include this chapter in these notes.

There

no shadow of doubt that men have gone hungry
in the

midst of plenty, from the lack of knowlall

edge of the food that was

around them.
that

the average camper, with his of

But meager knowledge
eating wild

mycology, generally
is

feels

mushrooms
magazine.

much

like living

over a powder

If a person of average intelligence

will take the pains so to educate himself that

he can surely identify the edible varieties, and
it

needs no more than that, there
is

is

no more dan-

ger than

present in eating the fish you catch

But if you are not positive that you can identify each specimen as you gather it,
from the
lakes.

CAMP COOKING
let it

103

go,

and confine yourself

to those that

you

do know are harmless.

My

experience in this

direction has been so limited, that I

am

obliged to

copy,
others.

in

most
There

scriptions

from the experience of no space here to go into deof species, but the literature on the
cases,
is

subject

is

so easily obtainable, that there seems

no need

to

do

so.

Broiled Russula:

— Thoroughly

clean the top

or peel off the skin; place the cap on a gridiron

over a hot

fire, gills

but do not scorch.

downward, and heat through, Turn over and repeat the

process; lay on a hot plate, gills

upward and
little salt

drop on a piece of butter with a
pepper.

and

cies

This speA. ostreatus: grows out of the sides of trees and stumps. Broil the young and tender specimens the same
Vegetable Oyster

as in the last instance; or they
butter, or in batter, or in fact
real oyster is cooked.

may

be fried in

any way that the
it is

As a stew
a
in the

delicious.

The Elm Mushroom, named family, is cooked
but the flavor
is

species

of the last

same manner,
fish.

decidedly that of

104

CAMPING

with a

Shaggy-mane Coprinus: Put in a stew pan little milk, add a piece of butter, a little pepper and salt. Or, put about two ounces of butter in the stew pan with a teaspoonful of salt and a little pepper, with a slight pinch of powdered mace or nutmeg. Put in a pint of mushrooms and stew for a few minutes; then add a little milk and
stew for about twenty minutes, or
tender.
till

they are
flour

Thicken the gravy with a
in milk.

little

rubbed up

Stewed Chantarelle:
chicken, veal or
till

— Soak the mushrooms

in

milk over night; chop up some boiled meat,

lamb preferred; mix and stew

tender; flavor with salt and pepper.

Vegetable Beefsteak:

Slice

and
too

broil over the coals, the

young specimens same as you would
not spoil
it

a nice cut off the rump.

Do

with

much condiment.
Clavaria:

Fried
very
that

— This

delicious

fungus

is

common and so free from insect enemies, pounds of it may be gathered in almost any
Simply fried in the pan with butter or
it

woods.
oil,

and properly seasoned,

has furnished an

CAMP COOKING
addition to

105

many
its

a meager meal of the ones

who

understood

value.

Puff Balls:
fry in butter

— Pick

out the

specimens with

white meat (they turn black as they

and serve on

toast.

grow older), They are as

good

as eggs.

After you have tried these and have become
a confirmed mycophagist, you will have obtained
literature

on the subject and know how to adapt

the cooking to the characteristics of the species.

Warning:
insects.

— Be

sure

that

you have young

specimens, clean and free from the ravages of

DESSERTS.

Rice Pudding:

— Boiled
;

rice,

about a quart;

one can of condensed milk one-half cup of sugar
or molasses; ground nutmeg or mace to taste:
sufficient

water to keep
if

it

from burning; one or
stir

two eggs,

you have them:
fire

together and
stir-

cook over a slow
hot or cold.

for fifteen minutes,

ring occasionally to keep from burning.

Good,

Corn-starch Pudding:

— Heat

three pints of

106

CAMPING
it

milk to boiling, and watch

that

it

does not boil

over; have three tablespoonfuls of corn starch

rubbed up
a

in a little cold

milk add two eggs and
;

little salt,

beat

boiling stir

and when the milk is the mixture into it. It will immediit

together,

ately thicken up,
fire,

cool.

must be taken from the turned out into a dish, and set one side to Serve with sugar and milk.
it

when

Tapioca Pudding:
ca "
;

— Buy
If

the " minute tapio-

it

saves time.
it

you have only the other
swells

kind, soak

in

milk

till it

up

soft.

Stir into

a quart of the jelly, or the advertised allowance of the " minute " brand with enough milk to

make
taste,

the quantity,

two

eggs, a

little salt,

spice to

and

set

over the

fire till it

comes

to a boil.

Set off the

fire,

and

just before serving, put in

a dash of lemon juice or }4 teaspoonful of essence of lemon.

Apple Slump:
sliced

Fill
;

the kettle half full of
sprinkle

and cored apples

on a

little spice,

one cup of sugar or molasses; cover over and
cook for a few minutes.
Prepare a crust the
tea-

same as for bread spoonful of salt and two of baking powder
or biscuits, stirring y^

into

a pint of

flour,

and wetting with milk or water

CAMP COOKING
till it

107

makes a

stiff

dough.

Lay

this

dough over
till

the top of the apples, cover and steam crust rises and

the

you can thrust a sliver into the Set off crust without the dough sticking to it. keep covered till needed. Serve the fire and with pudding sauce or with milk and sugar.
}

Pudding Sauce: One pint of water in the stew pan mix three tablespoonfuls of flour in a little cold water and rub it to a smooth paste: when the water boils, put in a small lump of butter, a cup of sugar, a little spice, and when the
;

sugar

is

dissolved stir in the flour paste.
boiling

If the

water

is

when
jelly.

the flour

is

put

in, it will

thicken up into a
in a
is
little

Just before serving
extract.

stir

lemon juice or

If this flavor

put in too soon, the savor will evaporate.

This sauce
If

may

be

made
is

of milk

if
it

you have

it.

condensed milk

used, dilute

with water,

and do not use so much sugar.
Plain Flour Pudding:

— Mix a quart of

flour,

and a tablespoonful of baking powder, and a
spoonful of
salt in

tea-

water enough to make a thick
in hot water, dust the

dough.

Dip a cloth bag

inside with dry flour 2 put in the dough,

and

tie

up, leaving

room

for the

pudding to

swell.

Place

io8
in boiling water
boil

CAMPING
enough to cover the bag, and for two hours. Serve with syrup or pudding

sauce.

Plum Pudding:
fourths of a

— One

quart of flour, three-

pound of
salt

raisins, three-fourths of

a pound of fat
small pieces,
tle
it

pork well washed and cut into
lit-

two tablespoonfuls of sugar or a

molasses.

well.

Mix in just sufficient water to wet Some think it is improved by the addipowder
stirred

tion of a tablespoonful of baking
into the flour before mixing.

Boil in a bag, as in

the case of the plain flour pudding.

The pudif
it

ding will come out of the bag easier,

is

plunged into cold water for an instant, as soon
as
it

is

taken out of the

kettle.

Do

not

let

it

set in the bag.

All bag-puddings must be kept
all

covered with water and kept boiling violently
the time they are on the
fire.

Also they must be
Other-

mixed with

as

little

water as possible.

wise they will either be soggy or will be a

mush

from absorption of the water
Fig Pudding:
slow
fire;

in the pot.

— Cut

6

figs

in pieces,

cover

with cold water and

let it

come

to a boil over a

put into a dish and add 2 teaspoon-

fuls of sugar.
salt

Beat up an egg with a pinch of
flour,

and a tablespoonful of sugar, one of

CAMP COOKING
and
stir it into
it

109

a half pint of boiling milk.

As
saw and

soon as

thickens,
I
I

pour the mixture over the
have forgotten where
going to appropriate
I
it

figs in the dish.

this receipt,

but

am

the author will please accept
here, if he sees this, for
it is

my

thanks right

good.

DRINKS.
Coffee: — The
finest

drink for the camper

is

good coffee, but there is more coffee making than would drown all the
Coffee boiled
is

spoiled in
fraternity.

coffee

spoiled.

The

simplest

method
finely

is

to put in the can

one tablespoonful of

ground coffee for each person to be served, and one more for the pot. When the water is
boiling hard, turn in a cupful for each person

and and

one more for a possible extra.
set

Cover

tight

where

it

will

keep hot and not

boil, for fif-

teen minutes.

The grounds
If

will settle of their
it

own

accord.

wanted

in a hurry, let
stir

set a
stick.

few minutes and then
it is

with a clean

This will saturate the grains more quickly, but
at a slight

expense of aroma.

Black Coffee
lator or

— (Cafe

noir)

:

Have

a perco-

large strainer; put in one cupful of
to each quart of water.

ground coffee

Have

the

no
colator.

CAMPING
it

water boiling and pour

slowly through the per-

The
is

surface of the water should be

just above the coffee in the strainer,

when

the

allowance
let it boil.

in the pot.

Keep
is

it

hot, but

do not

A

good

strainer

made

of a piece

of gauze

sewn on

to a ring of wire a little larger

than the mouth of the pot.
tightly.

Keep

the pot covered

Gloria:

— Make
when

the

same
little

as
fine

cafe

noir.

Sweeten well and pour a
the spirit, and
fire

brandy over
Set
fire to

the bowl of a spoon, into each cup.
half

consumed blow out the

and drink.
it

A

good quality of brandy must

be used or

will not blaze.

Tea:

— Use a teaspoonful of tea to each cup.
the water boiling, and use fresh water.
in the pot

Have
it.

Put the tea
Let
it

and pour the water over
in a

set for a

few minutes,

warm

place,

to "

draw."

And now,

in the

hopes that these records of

camp experiences may save some unlucky wight, who spoils the dinner because he did not know how to cook, from the " cobbing " that he richly


CAMP COOKING
deserves,

in

we
just

will close

with the line of the poet

who had
"

had a square meal:
is

But where
dining."

the

man who

can

live

without

.

. .

INDEX.
PAGE

PAGE

Apple slump
Bacon, fried Bags, for holding food
sleeping

106

Camp, permanent
shelters

12

76 20
19 18 61

temporary night... Canvas clothing
Cat-fish, cleaning

Baker
Batter-cakes Barbecue, dressing.
.

Cereals,
fish

cooking

22 53 20 49 64
71

Chowder, clam

meat Beans boiled baked
soup Bean-hole

79 78 95
101

72
101

69 Southern style 69 Daniel Webster 70 Chanterelle, stewed. 104 Chimney to log house 32 Clams, baked 90
.

Bedding Beds
canvas

14

chowder
fried Clavaria,
,

71

browse
pole Beef, boiled Beets, boiled

Black flies Blankets Boots
Broiler

36 38 37 37 77 99 43
19

fried

Clothes
Coffee, black

89 104 14-20 109
17

can
Gloria
to

no
109 33 52 52 59
15

make
variation

20
15

Companions, choice of Compass, use of
local

Bread, baked frying-pan
Cakes, batter oatmeal
rice

60 40-61
61

Cooking

in utensils

camp

62 62
61

Coprinus, shaggy mane 104 Corn, boiled green... 98 meal mush 63 Curry of rabbit 82

spider

Camp
fire

beds

Desserts

making

37 38 33~35
I

105

Eggs, boiled
fricasseed

91 93

13

H4
Eggs, fried on hash omelette sandwiches scrambled

CAMPING
PAGE
91

PAGE
Fried rabbit
squirrel

81

79 92
91

sausages

80 77
17

Frypan

92

Game, cooking
dressing for food.
fricassee
.

Fils-d'une-chienne ... 65 Fire, camp 38-41 cooking 38 rainy day on 41

Grouse roasted in clay

79 80 82 83

Firearms
Fireplace

13

Fish balls

38-39 90
45

Ham and eggs Hashed, meat Hats
Hornpouts, cleaning. Hut, built of logs
Insect
repellent

76

78 20

86-88 boiled 85 broiled 87 care of 45 cleaning 44 cooking 84 fried 85 knife 46 planked 88 preparing 84 sauce 86 skewered 87 spoiled, danger from 49 Flapjacks 61 Food, cooking 59 preparation 21 quantity needed. .15-16 Fricassee partridge. .. 83 Fried bacon 76 bread 61 clavaria 104 eggs 79-91
.
. .

bag baked

Health, care of. .20-35-50 49 29

43
16

Kettle

Knife
fish

for

cleaning

46

Lean-to camps 27-28 Liquor in camp. ..... Lob-scouse 68 Lost in the woods... 51 searching for 54

^

Macaroni
Meat, barbecued cooking of dark, cooking white, cooking Mosquito netting
repellent

102

78
73

74 74 42 42-43
63 102 103 103 102-105
12

Mush
Mushrooms
broiled

fish

ham
meats

mush
potatoes

85 76 18-75 63

Elm
selection of

96
75

pork

Nessmuk

.

INDEX
PAGE
Omelette, egg
92 93 93
.

ii5
PAGE

Quail, roasted

81

ham
aux
fine

herbes

Outfits for camping.

11

for permanent camp 15 for trip on foot 14 Oven 18-41
fried Oysters bacon stew

with

89
J3 103

Rabbit, curry 82 fried 81 Rain, effect on tent. 23 building fire in 41 Rations for camp... 15-16 Rice, boiled 63 pudding 105 Roasting in the ashes 18

vegetable

Roast grouse

Paymaster
Perch, yellow, dressing white, dressing
fried Pickerel, dressing....

34
47

meat in clay Rubber blanket
Russula, broiled

82 82
19 103

48
85 48
19

Pillow Pork, broiled choice of chops
fried

76 76 75
75

Salad, vegetable potato Sausages, fried Shelters Size of party

100

Skunk stew
preparing for cooking Sleeping bag Soups, bean pea
turtle

97 77 22 34 67

68
19

and

greens

Potatoes, baked boiled boiled-fried lyonnaise

100 96 95 96 97

meat
Spider-cake
Squirrel Steaks, broiling vegetable Stew; beef

72 72 67 65
61

mashed
salad

stewed Preparing for camp.. Pudding, apple 106
corn-starch
fig

96 97 96 33

67-73-80 74
104 65 65 73

105

camp
oyster
rabbit

^ *^

flour

plum
rice

sauce tapioca
Puff-balls, fried

108 107 108 105 107 106 105

skunk tomato
venison Succotash

Cape Cod
Supplies,
list

style

66 67 100 66 98 99
15-21

" Punkey-dope "

43

of

n6
Tapioca pudding

CAMPING
PAGE
106

Tea
Tent,

23 26 effect of rain on... 23 pitching 24 shanty 24 wall 23 Toast, milk 64 Tomatoes, stewed.... 100

A

no

Trench around Trout cleaning

tent.

.

PAGE 24
49

dog

Vegetables, selection of required time to

94
95

cook
. .

Walking trips 12-14 Woodcock, roasted. 81

Wood,

choice of

40

APR

19 1909

iiil

Ill

;

i

II 11

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