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Parker O-Ring Handbook
ORD 5700

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Failure, improper selection or improper use of the products and/or systems described herein or related items can cause death, personal injury or property damage. This document and other information from Parker Hannifin Corporation, its subsidiaries and authorized distributors provides product and/or system options for further investigation by users having technical expertise. It is important that you analyze all aspects of your application and review the information concerning the product or system in the current product catalog. Due to the

variety of operating conditions and applications for these products or systems, the user, through his or her own analysis and testing, is solely responsible for making the final selection of the products and systems and assuring that all performance, safety and warning requirements of the application are met. The products described herein, including without limitation, product features, specifications, designs, availability and pricing, are subject to change by Parker Hannifin Corporation and its subsidiaries at any time without notice.

OFFER OF SALE
The items described in this document are hereby offered for sale by Parker Hannifin Corporation, its subsidiaries and its authorized distributors. This offer and its acceptance are governed by the provisions stated on the separate page of this document entitled “Offer of Sale.” Copyright © 2007, Parker Hannifin Corporation, Cleveland, OH. All rights reserved.

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50

th

Anniversary Edition

Since its initial release in 1957, the Parker O-Ring Handbook has become a fixture on the reference shelves of engineers worldwide. This book contains extensive information about the properties of basic sealing elastomers, as well as examples of typical o-ring applications, fundamentals of static and dynamic seal design and o-ring failure modes. It also provides an overview of international sizes and standards, and compatibility data for fluids, gases and solids. Engineers in every industry choose o-rings made by Parker Hannifin to keep their equipment running safely and reliably. That’s because Parker’s O-Ring Division, a developer, manufacturer and supplier of precision-engineered o-rings, offers a unique combination of experience, innovation and support.

Value Added Services through Parker O-Ring Division: • Desktop seal design – InPhorm software • Free engineering assistance • Quality assurance – TS 16949 / ISO 9001 / AS 9100 registered • Premier customer service • Online tools - temperature/dimension converters - gland design recommendation charts - troubleshooting utility - pressure calculator • ParZap inventory management • Worldwide distribution • Extensive product literature, test reports and much more...

Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division
2360 Palumbo Drive, Lexington, KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.parkerorings.com

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Table of Contents
Introduction – Section I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1 Basic O-Ring Elastomers – Section II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 O-Ring Applications – Section III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1 Static O-Ring Sealing – Section IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1 Dynamic O-Ring Sealing – Section V . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1 Back-up Rings – Section VI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1 Compatibility Tables for Gases, Fluids, Solids – Section VII . . . . . . . 7-1 Specifications – Section VIII . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1 Sizes – Section IX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-1 Appendix – Section X . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-1 Index – Section XI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-1

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Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division
2360 Palumbo Drive, Lexington, KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.parkerorings.com

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Section I – Introduction
1.0 How to Use This Handbook. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2 1.1 What is an O-Ring? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2 1.2 What is an O-Ring Seal? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2 1.3 Advantages of O-Rings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2 1.4 Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3 1.5 O-Ring Characteristics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3 1.6 Limitations of O-Ring Use. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4 1.7 Scope of O-Ring Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.7.1 Static Seals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.7.2 Reciprocating Seals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.7.3 Oscillating Seals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.7.4 Rotary Seals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.7.5 Seat Seals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.7.6 Pneumatic Seals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.7.7 Vacuum Seals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.7.8 Cushion Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.7.9 Crush Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.7.10 Rod Wiper Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4 1-5 1-5 1-5 1-5 1-5 1-5 1-6 1-6 1-6 1-6 1.8 O-Rings as Drive Belts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6 1.9 Custom Molded Shapes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6 1.10 Parker Engineering. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6

Introduction

1.11 Comparison of Common Seal Types . . . . . . . . . . . 1-7 1.12 Recommended Design Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-7 1.12.1 O-Ring Design Procedure Using inPHorm™ O-Ring Design & Material Selection Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-7 1.12.2 Recommended Manual Design Procedure . . . 1-7

inPHorm™ is a trademark of Parker Hannifin Corporation. Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division
2360 Palumbo Drive, Lexington, KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.parkerorings.com

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com . although O-rings are also made from PTFE and other thermoplastic materials. O-rings are used primarily for sealing. it is recommended to first study this introductory section. both hollow and solid. • Ease of service. • O-rings normally require very little room and are light in weight. • No critical torque on tightening. Even those who have designed many O-ring seals may profit by reviewing the basics from time to time. • The duration of life in the correct application corresponds to the normal aging period of the O-ring material.” O-rings are also used as light-duty. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. • Where differing amounts of compression effect the seal function (as with flat gaskets). generally molded from an elastomer. Lexington. as well as metals. Section III. • In many cases an O-ring can be reused. deals entirely with elastomeric O-rings.0 How to Use This Handbook For those who are unfamiliar with O-ring design. becoming familiar with the basic principles of O-ring seals. mechanical drive belts. More information.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Introduction Introduction 1. • O-ring failure is normally gradual and easily identified. An O-ring is a circular cross-section ring molded from rubber (Figure 1-1).1 What is an O-Ring? An O-ring is a torus. The gland — usually cut into metal or another rigid material — contains and supports the O-ring (Figures 1-2 and 1-3). O-ring and gland — constitute the classic O-ring seal assembly. no smearing or retightening. temperature and tolerance. an advantage over non-elastic flat seals and crush-type gaskets. 1. Those who are already familiar with O-ring seal design may simply refer to the appropriate design tables for the information needed.3 Advantages of O-Rings • They seal over a wide range of pressure. The various types of O-ring seals are described in this section under “Scope of O-Ring Use. therefore unlikely to cause structural damage. an O-ring is not effected because metal to metal contact is generally allowed for. including design criteria on O-ring drive belts and their application will be found in O-Ring Applications. This handbook.parkerorings. however. • They are cost-effective.2 What is an O-Ring Seal? An O-ring seal is used to prevent the loss of a fluid or gas. The combination of these two elements. The seal assembly consists of an elastomer O-ring and a gland. 1. Introduction 1. Groove Bore Piston Rod Figure 1-2: Basic Gland Figure 1-3: Gland and O-Ring Seal Figure 1-1: Basic O-Rng 1-2 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. or doughnut-shaped ring. their common uses and general limitations.

Figure 1-7 illustrates the result of further increasing pressure and the resulting extrusion failure. Seals may be arranged in series as a safety measure but the first seal exposed to pressure will take the full load. A single O-ring will seal with pressure applied alternately on one side and then on the other. There may be slight running leakage (a few drops per hundred strokes) depending on the filmforming ability of the hydraulic medium.4 Operation All robust seals are characterized by the absence of any pathway by which fluid or gas might escape. H. This compression may cause the seal to roll slightly in its groove under certain conditions of piston motion. Whether by mechanical pressure from the surrounding structure or by pressure transmitted through hydraulic fluid. but not into. this extremely viscous fluid is forced to flow within the gland to produce “zero clearance” or block to the flow of the less viscous fluid being sealed. but in cases of severe loading or usage under necessarily unfavorable conditions. G. The rubber absorbs the stack-up of tolerances of the unit and its internal memory maintains the sealed condition. D.A. the contacting surfaces should be polished for long seal life.E. Figure 1-6 shows the O-ring at its pressure limit with a small portion of the seal material entering the narrow gap between inner and outer members of the gland. of United Aircraft Corp. Dynamic seals may fail by abrasion against the cylinder or piston walls. (Limit of test pressure). and provides room for the compressed material to flow so that the seal is not solidly confined between metal surfaces. 1947 by Mr. The surface tension of the elastomer is no longer sufficient to resist flow and the material extrudes (flows) into the open passage or clearance gap. Extracts of the more general characteristics are listed as follows: Note: While Parker Seal generally agrees with the author on most of his statements. O-ring seals must be radially compressed between the bottom of the seal groove and the cylinder wall for proper sealing action. The seal material under mechanical pressure extrudes into the microfine grooves of the gland. seal hardness and strength. Therefore. before the application of pressure.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > 1. Figure 1-4 illustrates the O-ring as installed. soldering. a paper presented at the S. D.parkerorings. ground fits or lapped finishes — or the yielding of a softer material wholly or partially confined between two harder and stiffer members of the assembly. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. The O-ring seal falls in the latter class. A. F. exception will be taken to certain generalizations due to more recent developments in sealing geometry and improved elastomer technology. viscous fluid having a very high surface tension.5 O-Ring Characteristics A very early and historically prominent user of O-rings(1) cites a number of characteristics of O-ring seals which are still of interest to seal designers. has gained greater area and force of sealing contact. The pressure may be constant or variable. The seals can be made perfectly leak-proof for cases of static pistons and cylinders for fluid pressures up to 5000 psi.com 1-3 . E. The seal may be housed in a groove cut in the cylinder wall instead of on the piston surface without any change in design limitations or seal performance. The rubber seal should be considered as essentially an incompressible. C. Detail differences exist in the manner by which zero clearance is obtained — welding. seal life can be extended by designing the mechanism so that each seal is subjected to pressure in one direction only. B. O-rings can be used between rotating members with similar results but in all cases the surface rubbing speed must be kept low. The major factors effecting extrusion are fluid pressure. the narrow gap between the mating surfaces and in so doing. The shape of the seal groove is unimportant as long as it results in proper compression of the seal between the bottom of the groove and the cylinder wall. R. The seals can be made to seal satisfactorily between reciprocating pistons and cylinders at any fluid pressure up to 5000 psi. Moving seals that pass over ports or surface irregularities while under hydraulic pressure are very quickly cut or worn to failure. Figure 1-5 illustrates the application of fluid pressure on the O-ring. Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. Annual Meeting. Note that the O-ring is mechanically squeezed out of round between the outer and inner members to close the fluid passage. and piston-cylinder clearance. Lexington. Div. January. Pearl of Hamilton Standard Prop. but the rolling action is not necessary for normal operation of the seals. 1. Introduction Figure 1-4: O-Ring Installed Figure 1-5: O-Ring Under Pressure Figure 1-6: O-Ring Extruding Figure 1-7: O-Ring Failure (1) “O-Ring Seals in the Design of Hydraulic Mechanisms”. brazing. In either static or dynamic O-ring seals under high pressure the primary cause of seal failure is extrusion of the seal material into the piston-cylinder clearance. Note that the O-ring has been forced to flow up to.

Details of O-ring seal design in regard to particular situations are discussed in the following sections: Applications. and projected seal area exposed to pressure. (Note: This may not be true for all elastomer compounds. The effects of materials. developed friction compares favorably with. flat gaskets and pipe fittings all have their special places in hydraulic design. but at higher pressures.A. but where the design specifications permit the proper use of O-ring seals. R. The coefficient of thermal expansion of synthetic rubber is usually low enough so that temperature changes present no design difficulties. It has been brought out in the foregoing discussion that there are certain definite limitations on Introduction their use. i. the friction of equivalent lip type seals. O-ring seals are extremely dependable because of their simplicity and ruggedness. Static seals will seal at high pressure in spite of slightly irregular sealing surfaces and slight cuts or chips in the seals. Pearl.6 Limitations of O-Ring Use Again citing Mr. An environment completely incompatible with any elastomeric material. Synthetic rubber can be made for continual use at high or low temperatures.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook I. Even when broken or worn excessively. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.parkerorings. swelling. Elastomers. Figure 1-8: Static Seal Application (1) “O-Ring Seals in the Design of Hydraulic Mechanisms”. or for occasional short exposure to wide variations in temperature.) K. they should not be considered the immediate solution to all sealing problems. Disregard for these limitations will result in poor seal performance. These terms are common to the sealing industry. and is often less than. L. Irregular chambers can be sealed. softening. a paper presented at the S.E. Factors Applying To all O-Ring Types. M. lip type seals. lapped fits. depending upon the combination of seal material and fluid. O-ring seals may be stretched over large diameters for installation and no special assembly tools are necessary. C. Prolonged exposure to excessive heat causes permanent hardening and usually destroys the usefulness of the seal. seals may offer some measure of flow restriction for emergency operation and approaching failure becomes evident through gradual leakage. the O-ring merits consideration for most seal applications except: A. high temperature. fluids. Piston rings. fluid pressure. numerous exceptions.” While no claim is made that an O-ring will serve best in all conditions. The effects of temperature changes from +18°C to +121°C (-65°F to +250°F) on the performance of O-ring seals depends upon the seal material used. high rubbing speeds. Section X. Lexington. Friction of moving O-ring seals depends primarily on seal compression. 1-4 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. Static O-Ring Seals. Chemical interaction between the seal and the hydraulic medium may influence seal life favorably or unfavorably. N. Hamilton Standard Division of United Aircraft Corp. 1947 by Mr. R. although these variables have not been completely investigated. Pearl’s paper (1). especially FFKM. D. Insufficient structure to support anything but a flat gasket. Annual Meeting. B. Rotary speeds exceeding 1500 feet per minute contact speed. and speeds of motion are normally of secondary importance. Friction of O-ring seals under low pressures may exceed the friction of properly designed lip type seals. of course.com . cylinder ports over which seals must pass and large shaft clearances.3 for additional advantages. D.. and shrinkage must be avoided. Note: These points are general statements and there are. Note: See paragraph 1. both as fixed or moving-parts installations.e. limitations of O-ring use are given as: “Although it has been stated that O-rings offer a reasonable approach to the ideal hydraulic seal. The cost of O-ring seals and the machining expense necessary to incorporate them into hydraulic mechanism designs are at least as low as for any other reliable type of seal. they will be found to give long and dependable service. Definitions of commonly used terms connected with O-ring seals are provided in the glossary contained in the Appendix. 1. At extremely low temperature the seals may become brittle but will resume their normal flexibility without harm when warmed. 1. January.7 Scope of O-Ring Use Further discussion in this chapter and in the remainder of this handbook is based on specific types of O-ring seals and special applications. and Dynamic O-Ring Seals can be referenced as needed. Excessive hardening. surfaces. J.

6 Pneumatic Seals A pneumatic seal may be any of the previously described types of O-ring seals but is given a different classification because of the use of a gas or vapor rather than a liquid. This motion tends to slide or roll the O-ring.3 Oscillating Seals In an oscillating seal.parkerorings. in general. See Figure 1-11.4 Rotary Seals In a rotary seal. The motion of closing the passage distorts the O-ring mechanically to create the seal. back and forth with the reciprocal motion. Note that the seal should be defined as “pneumatic-rotary” etc. a plunger entering a chamber. the equivalent of a flat gasket. the mating gland parts are not subject to relative movement (except for small thermal expansion or separation by fluid pressure). A sub-classification is closure with impact as compared with non-impact closure.7. Vibrational movement is present in vitrually all static applications. there is relative reciprocating motion (along the shaft axis) between the inner and outer elements. Examples of static seals are: a seal under a bolt head or rivet. either the inner or outer member of the sealing elements turn (around the shaft axis) in one direction only. 1.7. Examples of a seat-seal include O-ring as a “washer” on the face of a spiral threaded valve. for complete identification. and a seal on the end of a solenoid plunger. a seal on the cone of a floating check valve. Introduction Figure 1-10: Oscillating Seal Note that groove size prevents rotation of O-ring Figure 1-11: Rotary Seal Figure 1-9: Reciprocating Seal Application Figure 1-12: Seat Seal Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. in contrast to conditions of sealing in previously defined types. Where the arc of motion exceeds 360°. 1. or a wheel on a fixed axle. any longitudinal motion (as caused by a spiral thread) involved in what is classed as an oscillating seal is not important. or sealing surface at the O-ring.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > 1. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. a seal at a pipe or tubing connection. a seal under a cover plate. See Figure 1-12. Except for very special cases. the O-ring serves to close a flow passage as one of the contact members. Figure1-8 illustrates a typical static seal. and a hydraulic actuator with the piston rod anchored. as contrasted from seals in which one of the gland parts has movement relative to the other.com 1-5 . Examples of a rotary seal include sealing a motor or engine shaft. as in multiple turns to operate a valve handle.7. This has a vital affect on the lubrication of the O-ring and thus influences all moving (or dynamic) seal installations. See Figure 1-10. Consult a Parker Territory Sales Manager for more information on special seals to meet this requirement. 1. Figure 1-9 illustrates a typical reciprocating seal. Note: True static seals are generally quite rare. the return arc in the opposite direction distinguishes the oscillating seal from a rotary seal. An example of an oscillating seal is an O-ring seal for a faucet valve stem.7. but does not allow for starting and stopping after brief arcs of motion. Lexington. the inner or outer member of the seal assembly moves in an arc (around the shaft axis) relative to the other member.1 Static Seals In a truly static seal. This motion tends to rotate one or the other member in relation to the O-ring.2 Reciprocating Seals In a reciprocating seal.5 Seat Seals In a seat seal. Note: O-ring seals are generally not recommended for reciprocating installations in which the speed is less than one foot per minute. which is classed as an oscillating seal. 1. A further point is that pneumatic seals may be affected by the increase in gas temperature with compression. plug or similar arrangement or. This applies when rotation is reversible. 1. Examples of a reciprocating seal would be a piston in a cylinder.7.7.

Multiple O-rings are useful in a vacuum seal to reduce permeation. See O-ring Applications. in many cases — as in custom designed molded shapes — a special quality assurance procedure will be developed for each individual molded shape with emphasis on the importance of the actual working area (or sealing interface) of the seal. sudden contact between moving metal parts is prevented. the problem of pressure trapped between multiple O-rings. the space between the two must be vented.7.B. While it is an effective seal.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Introduction 1. etc. 1. gland design. study all factors involved such as temperatures. 1.9 Crush Installation This use of an O-ring is a variation of the static seal. 1. Compound Development Although the geometric configuration of the seal is critical.10 Rod Wiper Installation In this case.10 Parker Engineering Parker’s Application Engineering Department personnel are prepared to help you solve your sealing problems in several ways: Design Assistance Our engineers will review your application. An example is the use of an O-ring to prevent metal-to-metal bottoming of a piston in a cylinder.7. Contact the Parker Engineered Seals Division for more specific information on the availability of custom molded shapes.” The initials “C. In addition. pressures. Parker has designed a control system called “C. in most cases. the O-ring is permanently deformed and therefore generally considered non-reusable. 1. Total Quality Management The Parker Seal Group employs a TS16949/AS9100 based system to assure a continuing standard of quality that is commensurate with good manufacturing practices. Lexington. The O-ring must be properly held in place as otherwise it might shift and interfere with proper operation of the mechanism. Relying on Parker custom designed seals can mean total sealing. They will work with you in researching and testing those selected until the best possible seal is achieved. bolt torque. Additional information on the use of O-rings for sealing in a vacuum environment may be found in Parker Catalog 5705A.parkerorings.9 Custom Molded Shapes Molded shapes consist of homogenous rubber parts functioning as sealing devices in both dynamic and static applications.B. It is essentially a mechanical device.com 1-6 . The O-ring is crushed into a space having a cross-section different from that of a standard gland — for example.. Vacuum Sealing.I. Section III for additional information on drive belt design. both terms applicable to the seal should be given for complete identification. fast service. based on performance and low manufacturing cost. triangular.7. Thus. If there is a possibility of trapping liquid between the wiper and sealing O-rings. This is a system of batch numbering and traceability developed by Parker Seal Group which ties the quality assurance system together from the masterbatch to the finished seals. and suggest several alternate designs. Pressure Wiper O-ring O-ring Seal Vent Cut in two to prevent pressure trap O-ring volume is usually 90-95% gland volume Figure 1-13: Crush Installation Figure 1-14: Wiper Installation Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. dusty areas. 1. does not apply.” stand for “Controlled Batch Identification”. Even though Parker has many compounds available. we are always ready to develop a special compound having its own distinct properties tailored to the needs of a particular application.I. However. 1. See Figure 1-13 and Design Chart 4-6 in Section IV for further information. O-Ring Applications. it is also very important to select the most appropriate compound for the specific application. forcible. the O-ring is used to keep a reciprocating shaft or rod clean to prevent damaging an O-ring seal located inboard from the wiper. This installation is effective on actuating cylinders of machinery used in dirty.7 Vacuum Sealing A vacuum seal confines or contains a vacuum environment or chamber. See also Section III. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. The wiper O-ring does not necessarily seal. To insure that these physical properties are achieved with each batch of material.8 O-Rings as Drive Belts O-rings make superior low-power drive belts. The vacuum seal may be any of the previously defined types (except a pneumatic seal) and as in the case of “pneumatic seals”.7. and quality assurance to you. See Figure1-14. which increases the load on a single O-ring. the leakage tolerance is less than for pressure seals.8 Cushion Installation Such an application requires that the O-ring absorb the force of impact or shock by deformation of the ring. surface finish. cost reduction. This classification is given primarily because.

3. V-Packing and other devices. 1.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > 1. learn the effects of various environments on them. order the O-rings by the Parker compound number followed by the size number. but allows the user to custom design O-ring glands and seals specifically for their application.1 • Recommended Manual Design Procedure described in paragraph 1. order the O-rings by the Parker compound number followed by the appropriate size number. Parker recommends utilizing our inPHorm design software to guide the user through the design and selection of an O-ring and corresponding seal gland. these other seal types may show one or more design disadvantages which might be overcome by use of an O-ring. For industrial use. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.1 O-Ring Design Procedure using inPHorm O-Ring Design & Material Selection Software. Lexington. Find the recommended O-ring size and gland dimensions in the appropriate design table in Static O-Ring Sealing or Dynamic O-Ring Sealing. Section X.2 1. For industrial use. 3. AMS. To obtain inPHorm software. If it is not AN shrinkage. have been. it may be necessary to compensate in the gland design for best sealing results. respectively.parkerorings. respectively. If it is not AN shrinkage. Example: N0674-70 2-325 When ordering parts made with a military. for the compound shrinkage class tables. respectively) to see how a compound is selected. T-Seals. U-Cups.11 Comparison of Common Seal Types A number of common seal types. fill out a copy of the “Statement of Problem” sheet.12. contact Parker Product Information at 1-800-C-PARKER or download from www. Sections IV and V. Study the Basic O-Ring Elastomers and O-Ring Applications Sections (II and III.12. or NAS specification material. 4. com. Table 1-2. see the Specifications Section VIII. (a) If the fluid medium or its specification is known. Sections IV and V. Table1-1 lists several of the important factors that must be considered in the selection of any effective seal geometry. as completely as possible. refer to Table 8-2. refer to the Fluid Compatibility Tables in Section VII or to the various material or other specifications listed in Section VIII. 2. If inPHorm is not readily available manual calculations can be performed using the following guidelines.12. Determine the gland design for best sealing results.2 Recommended Manual Design Procedure 1. Example: M83248/1-325 5. As an aid in assessing the relative merits of an O-ring seal. for the compound shrinkage class tables. and become familiar with those considerations that apply to all O-ring seal glands.12. Table 8-3 or Table 8-4 in Section VIII as applicable.parkerorings. Check the Appendix. For a design problem that cannot be resolved using the information in this reference guide. When compared with an O-ring seal. Example: N0674-70 2-325 For the experienced O-ring seal designer: 1. 1. Section X. it may be necessary to compensate in the gland design for best sealing results.12 Recommended Design Procedure The following design steps are recommended for the designer/ engineer who is not familiar with O-ring seals: • O-Ring Design Procedure using inPHorm O-Ring Design & Material Selection Software described in paragraph 1. and are still used for both dynamic and static seals. 2. Check the Appendix.com 1-7 . Parker’s inPHorm not only addresses standard O-ring sizes. Find the recommended O-ring size and gland dimensions in the appropriate design table in Static O-Ring Sealing or Dynamic O-Ring Sealing. (b) If the compound specification is known. 4. Introduction Comparison of Seal Types Applications Static Moving X X — — — X X X X X X X — X Type O-Ring T-Seal U-Packing V-Packing Cup Type Packing Flat Gasket Compression or Jam Packing Periodic Adjustment Required No No No Yes No Yes Yes Moving Friction Medium Medium Low Medium Medium — High Tolerances Required (Moving Seals) Close Fairly Close Close Fairly Close Close — Fairly Close Gland Adapters Required No No No Yes Yes No Yes Space Requirements Small Small Small Large Medium Large Large Table 1-1: Comparison of Seal Types Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. then Contact the Parker O-Ring Division for problem analysis and design recommendations.

By Fluid Sealed Protected And Parker Compound No. Friction Tolerance 14. Gland Dimensions (If separate. Bad Breakaway Running Max.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Statement of Problem 1. NOTE: For O-rings molded of compounds having other than standard shrinkage. Assembly Problems Dirt Twisted Over Threads Lint Blind Corners. D. Cleanliness O-Ring Size No.com . Lubrication 16. Max. Arc of Travel (Oscillating) Frequency (Oscillating or Reciprocating) 17. Please include a drawing or sketch if needed to clarify the assembly. Low Low Steady Fluctuating Finish Finish Finish Material Spec. No Eccentricity Min. Pressure 5. B. External Open Or Military Part No. Lube Pinching Moving Seals 9. Fluid Sealed (In sequence if multiple) A. groove wall) OD ID 7. Lexington. Seal Type 2. Shaft Bearings Side Loading Effect 11. Applied Pressure High High Uni-Directional Bi-Directional 6. Anticipated Overhaul Period Ease of Access and Replacement 15. Length of Stroke (Reciprocating) Surface Speed (Rotary) 10. and add any other pertinent information. Holes. Working Working Surge Frequency Material Material Material Introduction 3. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. Operating Clearance 12. Temperature 4. Leakage Tolerance 13. Table 1-2: Statement of Problem 1-8 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.parkerorings. determine the finished dimensions and tolerances as described in the Appendix (Section X). Stretch at Installation 8. C. Etc.

. . . . . . . . . . .19 Electrical Properties . .1 Test Specimens. 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Joule Effect. . . . .13 Operating Conditions . . . 2-30 2. . . . . . . . . . 2-22 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Thermal Effects . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . 2. .14 Tetrafluoroethylene-Propylene (AFLAS®) (FEPM). . . . . . . . . . . 2. . . . . .15 Compound Similarity.7 Modulus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Permeability . . . . . . . . . . . 2-21 2. . . . 2. . .com 2-1 . . . .18. . . . . . . . . . . .13 Resilience . . . . . .2 Basic Elastomers for O-Ring Seals . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-13 2. . . .4. . .4. . . . .5 Butyl Rubber (IIR) . .2. . . . .4. . . . 2. . . . . . . . . . 2-10 2. . . . . . . .20 Coefficient of Thermal Expansion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. .4. . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Perfluoroelastomer (FFKM).9 Age Control . . . . . . . . . 2-13 2. . 2-18 2. . 2-8 2. . . 2.2. . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . .4. .4. EPDM) . . . . . . . . . . 2-14 2. . . . . . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. 2-9 2. . . 2-18 2-19 2-19 2-19 2-20 2-20 2-20 2-20 2-20 Basic O-Ring Elastomers 2. . . . . . . .18. . . . . . 2-7 2. 2-29 2. . . . . . .12. . . .2 Pioneering Design . . Vamac®) . . . . . . . .2 Aged Physical Control . . . .13. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13. . . . . . . .2 Rubber . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Temperature . . . . . . . . . .4. .18 Coefficient of Friction . . . . . . 2-22 2. .1 Fluid . . . . . . .3 Ethylene Acrylate (AEM. 2. . 2-10 2. . . . 2-21 2. .8 Tear Resistance. . . . 2-31 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.5 Elongation . . 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Polymer . . . . 2-7 2. . . . . . . . . . .2. . . .5. . . . . . 2. .1 Acrylonitrile-Butadiene (NBR) . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Chloroprene Rubber (CR) . 2. .8 Cure Date . . . . . 2-28 2. . . . . 2-10 2. . . . .4 Pressure . . . . .4. . . . . 2-18 2. .4 Physical and Chemical Characteristics . . . . . . . .14 Deterioration . . . . . . . . . . .2 Carboxylated Nitrile (XNBR) . . . . . . . . 2-2 2-2 2-3 2-3 2-3 2-3 2-3 2-4 2-4 2-4 2-4 2-5 2-5 2-5 2-5 2-6 2-6 2-6 2-6 2-6 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . .5. . . . 2-13 2. . 2.2 Hardness. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. . . . . . . . . . .2. du Pont de Nemours & Co. . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-22 2.1. . . 2-2 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. . . . . .1 Aniline Point Differences . . . . . . . . . . .. 2. . . 2-22 2. . . . 2-21 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.9 Abrasion Resistance . . . . .3 Time .2. . . FPM) . . . . 2-24 2-24 2-25 2-26 2-26 2-28 2.2. . . . . .1 Selection of Base Polymer . . 2-28 2. 2-13 2. . . VMQ. . .3 Toughness. . . . . . . .13. . . . .7 Storage . . . . .13. . . . . . . . . .16 Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Original Physical Properties. . . . . . . . .6 O-Ring Compression Force .3. . 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. . . .11 Compression Set. . . . 2-8 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Ethylene Propylene Rubber (EPR. .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . 2.1. 2-18 2. . . . . .2. . . . . . . .12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Test Method Variables . . .4. . . 2. . . . . . . . . . . 2-18 Vamac® is a registered trademark of E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . .12 Polyurethane (AU. 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MQ.10 Volume Change . . . . . 2. . . . . . . . . . . 2. . . . . . .3 Effects of Environment on Testing. . . . . . . . . . . . .4.4 Tensile Strength . . . . . .11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Polyacrylate (ACM) . . . 2. . . 2. . . . . .21 Effects on Properties . . . . . . . . PVMQ) . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .parkerorings. . . .I. . 2. . . . .4. . . . . . . EU) . 2-30 2. . .4. . . . . .4. . . . . . . . .13 Silicone Rubber (Q. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. . . . . . 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ltd. . . . . . . . . . .4. . . .8 Fluorosilicone (FVMQ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13. . . . . . . . . .1 Non-Pioneering Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Rapid Methods for Predicting the Compatibility of Elastomers with Mineral Based Oils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.6 Aging . . . . .17 Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 Elastomers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-30 2. . .1 Resistance to Fluid . . . . . 2. . . . . .1. . . . . . .3 Compound Selection and Numbering Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-23 2. . . . . . . . . . . .< Back Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Section II – Basic O-Ring Elastomers 2. . . . . . . . 2. . . . . . . . .9 Hydrogenated Nitrile (HNBR). . . .14 Selecting a Compound . 2. . .7 Fluorocarbon (FKM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. . . .5 Mechanical Requirements . . . . . 2-10 2. 2-28 2. . . . . . . . . . .11 Compound Selection . . Lexington.3 Elastomer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-21 2. . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-17 2.1 Introduction to Elastomers. . . .11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Process Control . . . . 2. 2-22 2. .2 Elastomer Compatibility Index . AFLAS® is a registered trademark of Asahi Glass Co. . . .15 Corrosion . . . . . . . 2-21 2. . . . . . .18 Qualification Testing . .5 Standard Test Procedures . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Compound . . . .10 Shrinkage . . .

0 Elastomers The basic core polymer of an elastomeric compound is called a rubber. but a few polymers account for the majority of O-rings produced.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Basic O-Ring Elastomers Basic O-Ring Elastomers 2. will the optimum degree of curing be reached. the most important ones are listed in Table 2-1. see Figure 2-1. and particularly those used in O-rings. O-rings are made from many polymers. it is necessary to fully understand the terms “polymer. 2.com . vulcanizing agents. oxygen and nitrogen in the main chain): Polyester Urethane Polyether Urethane AU EU AU EU Table 2-1: The Most Important Types of Synthetic Rubber. including any required “post-cure. “Cross-linking” between the polymer chains is formed during the vulcanization process. Synthetic Rubber Abbreviation DIN/ISO ASTM Chemical Name 1629 D1418 M-Group (saturated carbon molecules in main macro-molecule chain): Polyacrylate Rubber Ethylene Acrylate Chlorosulfonated Polyethylene Rubber Ethylene Propylene Diene Rubber Ethylene Propylene Rubber Fluorocarbon Rubber Tetrafluorethylene Propylene Copolymer Perfluorinated Elastomer ACM — CSM EPDM EPDM FPM FEPM — ACM AEM CSM EPDM EPM FKM FEPM FFKM O-Group (with oxygen molecules in the main macro-molecule chain): Epichlorohydrin Rubber Epichlorohydrin Copolymer Rubber CO ECO CO ECO R-Group (unsaturated hydrogen carbon chain): Butadiene Rubber Chloroprene Rubber Isobutene Isoprene Rubber (Butyl Rubber) Chlorobutyl Rubber Isoprene Rubber Nitrile Butadiene Rubber Styrene Butadiene Rubber Hydrogenated Nitrile Carboxylated Nitrile BR CR IIR CIIR IR NBR SBR — XNBR BR CR IIR CIIR IR NBR SBR HNBR XNBR Q-Group (with Silicone in the main chain): Fluorosilicone Rubber Methyl Phenyl Silicone Rubber Methyl Phenyl Vinyl Silicone Rubber Methyl Silicone Rubber Methyl Vinyl Silicone Rubber FMQ PMQ PMVQ MQ VMQ FVMQ PMQ PVMQ MQ VMQ U-Group (with carbon. For this reason. As with all chemical reactions. Cross-linking of the molecules changes the rubber from a plastic-like material to an elastic material.” an elastomer compound attains the physical properties required for a good sealing material.” Both plastics and elastomers are classified as polymers. 2. Lexington. will usually provide reliable. Elastomers used in producing seals. aging retardants and other chemical additives which modify and improve the basic physical properties of the base polymer to meet the particular requirements of a specific application. Their Groupings and Abbreviations Elastomer no cross-links Elastomer cross-linked Figure 2-1: Schematic Representation of Polymer Chains Before and After Vulcanization 2-2 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. EPDM and Neoprene. Today.” “rubber. members of which have similar chemical and physical properties. temperature is responsible for the speed of reaction. on commercial rubber plantations or manufactured synthetically by the chemical industry. polymer generally refers to a basic class of elastomer. In this handbook.” “elastomer” and “compound” as they are used in this handbook. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. Modern elastomeric sealing compounds generally contain 50 to 60% base polymer and are often described simply as “rubber. Only when the ideal process temperature is constant during the entire vulcanization time. produced either as natural gum rubber in the wild. After vulcanization.1.1 Introduction to Elastomers Before reviewing the available elastomers and their general properties. namely Nitrile. accelerators. more than 32 synthetic rubbers are known.parkerorings. the conditions of vulcanization are closely controlled and recorded as part of the Parker quality assurance process.” The balance of an elastomer compound consists of various fillers.1 Polymer A polymer is the “result of a chemical linking of molecules into a long chain-like structure. leak-free function if fundamental design requirements are observed.

Cold flexibility • Depending on individual compound. The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) uses these criteria to define the term “elastomer.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > 2.2.” 2.” 2. Note: Extremely high hardness/modulus materials generally do not exhibit these properties even though they are still considered elastomers. In view of these opposing realities. or antiozonants) to the elastomer mixture to tailor it into a seal compound with its own distinct physical properties. N0674-70 or V1164-75. This handbook uses the broader meaning of the word “rubber. The basis of compound development is the selection of the polymer type. diesel fuel.” This distinguished them from natural gum rubber. alkali and salt solutions at low temperatures. B. a compromise is often drawn. antioxidants.com Decrease Increase 2-3 . Section X. Chemical resistance • Aliphatic hydrocarbons (propane. Heat resistance • Up to 100°C (212°F) with shorter life @ 121°C (250°F). nearly complete recovery from an extending or compressing force. NBR is not resistant to weathering and ozone. This usage usually references a particular type or class of materials such as “nitrile compounds” or “butyl elastomers. More precisely. activators. the better the resistance to oil and fuel. mineral oil and grease.3 Elastomer Though “elastomer” is synonymous with “rubber. it seems reasonable to visualize two. between -34°C and -57°C (-30°F and -70°F). When the basic high molecular weight polymer.4 Compound A compound is a mixture of base polymer and other chemicals that form a finished rubber material. For example.1. For more comprehensive and specific information on this important subject. it must retract to within 10% of its original length within five minutes of release. a compound refers to a specific blend of chemical ingredients tailored for particular required characteristics to optimize performance in some specific service. NBR has good mechanical properties when compared with other elastomers and high wear resistance. three. Basic O-Ring Elastomers cold flexibility Sw ell ing 20 30 40 Acrylonitrile Content in % 50 Figure 2-2: Influence of the Acrylonitrile Content Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.” Please remember that when one specific compound is under discussion in this handbook. see the Fluid Compatibility Tables in Section VII. Service recommendations mentioned in this section are necessarily abbreviated. • Dilute acids. At the same time. petroleum oil. to a state exhibiting little plastic flow and rapid.1 Acrylonitrile-Butadiene (NBR) Nitrile rubber (NBR) is the general term for acrylonitrile butadiene copolymer. plasticizers. fuel oils) vegetable and mineral oils and greases. it is a blend of various compounding ingredients (including one or more base elastomers) with its own individual characteristics and identification in the form of a unique compound number. • Water (special compounds up to 100°C) (212°F).parkerorings. • HFA.” it is formally defined as a “high molecular weight polymer that can be. 2.2 Basic Elastomers for O-Ring Seals The following paragraphs briefly review the various elastomers currently available for use in O-rings and other elastomeric seals. After being held for five minutes at 100% stretch. Since compounders have thousands of compounding ingredients at their disposal. The acrylonitrile content of nitrile sealing compounds varies considerably (18% to 50%) and influences the physical properties of the finished material. Since then. usage in the industry has broadened the meaning of the term “rubber” to include both natural as well as synthetic materials having rubber-like qualities. It must not break when stretched approximately 100%. is converted by appropriate means to an essentially non-plastic state and tested at room temperature. consult the “Glossary of Seal and Rubber Terms” in the Appendix.1. HFB and HFC hydraulic fluids. or has been modified. Lexington. without the addition of plasticizers or other dilutents. 2.1. accelerators. and a medium acrylonitrile content selected.2 Rubber Rubber-like materials first produced from sources other than rubber trees were referred to as “synthetic rubber. curing or Influence of the Acrylonitrile Content Swelling in IRM 903 oi l IR M 90 3o il lity ibi lex df l co vulcanizing agents (such as sulfur or peroxide. yet exhibiting marked performance differences in the O-ring seal. The terms “compound” and “elastomer” are often used interchangeably in a more general sense. or even one hundred-plus compounds having the same base elastomer.” In most instances we call such material before modification “uncured” or “unprocessed” rubber or polymer. butane. If any of the rubber terms used in the descriptions are confusing. The higher the acrylonitrile content. elasticity and resistance to compression set is adversely affected. The rubber compounder may then add various reinforcing agents such as carbon black. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. See Figure 2-2. it usually meets the following requirements in order to be called an elastomer: A. There may be a dozen or more different ones to choose from.

• Salt solutions.com . aging and weather resistant. • Ozone. sodium and potassium alkalis. • Ozone. between -18°C and -48°C (0°F and -55°F).2. 2. • Brake fluid with glycol base. • Fuels.parkerorings. ethylene-ester). IIR) has a very low permeability rate and good electrical properties. acetone. aging and weather resistant. • Aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene). • Brake fluid with glycol base.2. alcohols. fuel oils) vegetable and mineral oils and greases. • Many diluted acids. Not compatible with: • Fuels of high aromatic content (for flex fuels a special compound must be used). Lexington. • Oxidizing media. acetone. • Chlorinated hydrocarbons. Not compatible with: Mineral oil products (oils. Chemical resistance • Hot water and steam up to 149°C (300°F) with special compounds up to 260°C (500°F). 2. • Poly-glycol based hydraulic fluids (HFC fluids) and phosphate-ester bases (HFD-R fluids).5 Butyl Rubber (IIR) Butyl (isobutylene. diesel fuel. • Ozone. • Many acids (see Fluid Compatibility Tables in Section VII). Not compatible with: • Ketones. Ethylene acrylate rubber is not to be confused with polyacrylate rubber (ACM). 2-4 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. acetic acid. • Polar solvents (ketone.2. • Chlorinated hydrocarbons (trichloroethylene). Chemical resistance • Hot water and steam up to 121°C (250°F). • Cleaning agents. Vamac) Ethylene acrylate is a terpolymer of ethylene and methyl acrylate with the addition of a small amount of carboxylated curing monomer. Heat resistance • Up to 149°C (300°F) with shorter life up to 163°C (325°F). • Moderate resistance to mineral oils. • Many organic and inorganic acids. HFB and HFC hydraulic fluids. • Polar solvents (ketone. ketones. butane. • Strong acids. weather and atmospheric aging. Cold flexibility • Depending on individual compound. Not compatible with: • Mineral oil and grease. greases and fuels). • Ozone. weather and atmospheric aging. 2. Chemical resistance • Ozone. • Fuels. acetic acid. petroleum oil. XNBR based materials are often specified for dynamic applications such as rod seals and rod wipers. • Silicone oil and grease. • HFA.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Basic O-Ring Elastomers Not compatible with: • Fuels of high aromatic content (for flex fuels a special compound must be used). • Glycol based brake fluids (Dot 3 & 4) and silicone-basaed brake fluids (Dot 5) up to 149°C (300°F). esters).4 Ethylene Propylene Rubber (EPR. 2. Chemical resistance • Aliphatic hydrocarbons (propane. • Chlorinated hydrocarbons (trichloroethylene). • Brake fluids with glycol base (Dot 3 & 4). alkali and salt solutions at low temperatures. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. Cold flexibility • Down to approximately -57°C (-70°F). • Brake fluids. 204°C (400°F)) in water and/or steam). mineral oil and grease. • Aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene). (e. • Polar solvents. isoprene rubber.2 Carboxylated Nitrile (XNBR) Carboxylated Nitrile (XNBR) is a special type of nitrile polymer that exhibits enhanced tear and abrasion resistance. • Many polar solvents (alcohols. • Strong acids. ketones and esters).3 Ethylene Acrylate (AEM. Heat resistance • Up to 150°C (302°F) (max. Heat resistance • Up to 100°C (212°F) with shorter life @ 121°C (250°F). Heat resistance • Up to approximately 121°C (250°F). Cold flexibility • Between -29°C and -40°C (-20°F and -40°F).2. ethylene-ester). For this reason. • Silicone oil and grease. EPDM) EPR copolymer ethylene propylene and ethylene-propylenediene rubber (EPDM) terpolymer are particularly useful when sealing phosphate-ester hydraulic fluids and in brake systems that use fluids having a glycol base.g. • Phosphate-ester based hydraulic fluids (HFD-R). Cold flexibility • Down to approximately -59°C (-75°F ).

synthetic hydraulic fluids. ethers). aromatics and many organic solvents and chemicals. weathering and aging resistance compared with nitrile. • Very good ozone.g. • Vegetable and animal fats and oils. helps reduce extrusion and wear. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. Cold flexibility • Down to approximately -73°C (-100°F). ozone.9 Hydrogenated Nitrile (HNBR. • Chlorinated hydrocarbons (trichloroethylene and carbon tetrachloride). Chemical resistance • Paraffin based mineral oil with low DPI. • Water and water solvents at low temperatures. Limited compatibility • Naphthalene based mineral oil (IRM 902 and IRM 903 oils).6 Chloroprene Rubber (CR) Chloroprene was the first synthetic rubber developed commercially and exhibits generally good ozone. toluene). • Silicone oil and grease. • High vacuum. Lexington.8 Fluorosilicone (FVMQ) FVMQ contains trifluoropropyl groups next to the methyl groups. butane. ASTM oil No. • Polar solvents (ketones. • Ammonia gas. ASTM oil No. toluene). and IRM 902 and IRM 903 oils. the lowest service temperature is between -15°C and -18°C (5°F and 0°F). Heat resistance • Up to approximately 121°C (250°F). esters. alkalis. oxygen.2. Chemical resistance • Mineral oil and grease.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > 2. • Strong acids. Gas permeability is very low and similar to that of butyl rubber. Heat resistance • Up to 204°C (400°F) and higher temperatures with shorter life expectancy. It has good mechanical properties over a wide temperature range. weather and aging resistance.7 Fluorocarbon (FKM) Fluorocarbon (FKM) has excellent resistance to high temperatures.2. Heat resistance • Up to 150°C (300°F) Cold flexibility • Down to approximately -48°C (-55°F) Chemical resistance • Aliphatic hydrocarbons. • Refrigerants • Ammonia • Carbon dioxide • Improved ozone. 2. • Mineral and vegetable oil and grease. Not compatible with: • Glycol based brake fluids. fuels. HSN) Hydrogenated nitrile is a synthetic polymer that results from the hydrogenation of nitrile rubber (NBR). Special FKM compounds exhibit an improved resistance to acids and fuels. Heat resistance • Up to 177°C (350°F) max. Cold flexibility • Down to approximately -40°C (-40°F). Under dynamic conditions. Cold flexibility • Down to -26°C (-15°F) (some to -46°C) (-50°F).com . • Silicone oil and grease. mineral oil. Superior mechanical characteristics. • Fuels. aging and weathering. However. • Water and steam up to 149°C (300°F). aging and chemical resistance.2. fuel). The mechanical and physical properties are very similar to VMQ. bases and salt solutions at moderate temperatures. Not compatible with: • Chlorinated hydrocarbons. Chemical resistance • Aromatic mineral oils (IRM 903 oil).2. Not compatible with: • Aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene). • Chlorinated hydrocarbons (trichloroethylene). e. 1. Low temperature resistance is normally not favorable and for static applications is limited to approximately -26°C (-15°F) although certain compounds are suitable down to -46°C (-50°F). • Low molecular weight organic acids (formic and acetic acids). • Dilute acids. • Glycol based brake fluids. • Aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene. esters and ethers). • Ozone. HFB and HFC hydraulic fluids. 1. • Non-flammable hydraulic fluids (HFD). • Aliphatic hydrocarbons (butane. particularly high strength. • Superheated steam. • Low molecular weight aliphatic hydrocarbons (propane. • Gasoline (including high alcohol content). propane. 2. • HFA. natural gas). amines. 2. FVMQ offers improved fuel and mineral oil resistance but poor hot air resistance when compared with VMQ.parkerorings. • Polar solvents (ketones. Basic O-Ring Elastomers 2-5 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. • Low molecular weight aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene.

< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook 2. ethers). steam. have excellent wear resistance. poor tear strength and little wear resistance. toluene). alcohols. MQ. • Aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene.13 Silicone Rubber (Q. VMQ. • Hot water. • Ozone. have relatively low tensile strength. steam. 12. • Chlorinated hydrocarbons. • Low molecular weight chlorinated hydrocarbons (trichloroethylene). amines. Lexington. • Pulp and paper liquors. 13. Chemical resistance • Mineral oil (engine. Heat resistance • Up to 320°C (608°F). • Water up to 50°C (125°F).12 Polyurethane (AU. weather and aging. Heat resistance • Up to approximately 232°C (450°F).2. acids. jet engines and chemical processing equipment. • Inorganic and organic acids.2. • Ozone. • Aromatics and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Basic O-Ring Elastomers 2-6 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. 114. etc. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. 2. Heat resistance • Up to approximately 204°C (400°F) special compounds up to 260°C (500°F). • Engine Oils. amines. • Chlorinated hydrocarbons.11 Polyacrylate (ACM) ACM (acrylic rubber) has good resistance to mineral oil.2. esters. • Diluted salt solutions. EU) Polyurethane elastomers. and the lowest off-gassing and extractable levels of any rubber material. ATF oil). • Silicone oil and grease. • Phosphate Esters. • High vacuum with minimal loss in weight. • High molecular weight chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons (including flame-resistant insulators. Permeability is good and comparable with butyl. alkalis. Not compatible with: • Aromatic Fuels. Heat resistance • Up to approximately 82°C (180°F). butane). Not compatible with: • Glycol based brake fluid (Dot 3 and 4). • Acids. Not compatible with: • Fluorinated refrigerants (R11. Chemical resistance • Pure aliphatic hydrocarbons (propane. Cold flexibility • Down to approximately -40°C (-40°F). silicone elastomers as a group.) • Perfluorinated lubricants (PFPE) 2.parkerorings. Parker's proprietary formulations deliver an extreme performance spectrum that make them ideal for use in critical applications like semiconductor chip manufacturing.10 Perfluoroelastomer (FFKM) Perfluoroelastomer (FFKM) currently offers the highest operating temperature range. Compatible with • Bases. high tensile strength and high elasticity in comparison with any other elastomers. as a class. glycols.2. • Acids and alkalis. 113. esters.14 Tetrafluoroethylene-Propylene (AFLAS) This elastomer is a copolymer of tetrafluoroethylene (TFE) and propylene. ethers. • Hydrocarbon based fuels. oxygen and ozone. Cold flexibility • Down to approximately -9°C (15°F).2. and coolant for transformers). Not compatible with: • Superheated water steam over 121°C (250°F). However. Cold flexibility • -18°C to -26°C (0°F to -15°F). Chemical resistance • Aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. Chemical resistance • Animal and vegetable oil and grease. • Ketones. • Steam and hot water. alkalis. Water compatibility and cold flexibility of ACM are significantly worse than with nitrile. gear box. • Hot water. Not compatible with: • Ketones. Heat resistance • Up to approximately 177°C (350°F). • Water and steam. Cold flexibility • Down to approximately -54°C (-65°F) special compounds down to -115°C (-175°F). • Amines. • Moderate water resistance. PVMQ) Silicones have good ozone and weather resistance as well as good insulating and physiologically neutral properties. Cold flexibility • Down to approximately -21°C (-5°F ). • Low molecular weight silicone oils. aging and weather.com . 2. 2. • Polar solvents (ketones. the most comprehensive chemical compatibility. • Mineral oil and grease. Its chemical resistance is excellent across a wide range of aggressive media.

sealing grade materials and cheaper commercial products (which usually contain less base polymer and more inexpensive fillers). Only when these two factors are identified (including any lubricants and potential cleaning fluids). and with excessive temperature.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > 2. swelling or shrinkage of the elastomer seal. new crosslink sites may be formed between the polymer chains and lead to a loss of seal flexibility. The stiffness in the polymer chains may be observed as excessive compression set in highly filled (loaded) compounds. elastic memory loss in the elastomer seal element can cause leakage. For static seals. For the seal designed. and in particular. The degree of volume change depends on the type of medium. Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.e. the base polymer of the compound is identified by the prefix letter: A = Polyacrylate B = Butyl or chlorobutyl C = Neoprene E = Ethylene-propylene or ethylene propylene diene F = Parofluor Ultra H = Hifluor K = Hydrogenated nitrile L = Fluorosilicone N = Acrylonitrile butadiene (nitrile).g.1 Selection of Base Polymer System operating temperatures and compatibility with the media to be sealed are the two most important parameters which must be considered when selecting a base polymer. chemical and other physical influences. Plasticizers and other components of the compound are dissolved and extracted or leached out by the media. This condition prevents an O-ring cross-section from returning to its original. In dynamic applications. rubber. The individual sequential compound number is shown between the suffix and the prefix. swells significantly less than in free state (up to 50%) due to a number of factors including lessened surface area in contact with the medium. system temperature. “70” means that the material’s hardness is 70±5 Shore A. a volume change of 25% to 30% can be tolerated. a seal changes its original shape to effect a seal and over time. swelling leads to increased friction and a higher wear rate. When deformed and exposed to a medium. Exceeding the normal maximum temperature limit for a given compound always results in reduced service life. Physical changes are caused by three mechanisms which can work concurrently when: a. The Parker compound code contains all the essential information needed to identify the polymer family as well as the special property description and hardness.3 Compound Selection and Numbering Systems The base elastomer and the hardness of the finished product are the main factors which enable a given compound to resist heat. hydrogenated nitrile and carboxylated nitrile P = Polyurethane S = Silicone V = Fluorocarbon. a maximum swell of 10% should generally not be exceeded. Practically all elastomers undergo a physical or chemical change when in contact with a sealed medium. At higher temperatures. Therefore. The result is often volume change. can a reliable recommendation be given concerning selection of the proper elastomer base. During compression. pre-compressed shape after deformation forces are removed. Parofluor and Hifluor Z = Exotic or specialty blends In the Type II numbering system.com 2-7 Basic O-Ring Elastomers . i. b. and the stressed condition of the rubber part (compression or stretch). AFLAS. The application temperatures given in Figure 2-3 refer to long-term exposure to non-aggressive media. molecular structure of the rubber compound. The limit of permissible volume change varies with the application. a compromise often has to be made between specifying high quality. The elastomer absorbs a medium. In the Type I numbering system. e. Lexington. Swelling leads to some deterioration of the mechanical properties. The degree of change depends on the chemistry of the medium and on the system temperature. Shrinkage should also be avoided because the resulting loss of compressive force will increase the risk of leakage. the special property description is identified by a second letter: A = General purpose B = Low compression set E = Ethylene acrylate F = Fuel resistant or fully fluorinated G = High fluorine content J = NSF/FDA/WRAS approvals L = Internally lubed M = MIL/AMS approvals P = Low temperature or AFLAS W = Non-black compound S = Carboxylated The shore hardness range of a compound is indicated by the suffix numbers. Type I Example: N0674-70 where N = Acrylonitrile-butadiene or simply nitrile 0674 = Individual sequential compound identifier -70 = Nominal Shore A hardness Type II Example: NA151-70 where N = Acrylonitrile-butadiene or simply nitrile A = General purpose 151 = Individual sequential compound identifier -70 = Nominal Shore A hardness 2. those properties which improve extrusion resistance. c.3. geometrical seal shape (material thickness). when confined in a gland. An aggressive medium becomes more active with increasing temperature.parkerorings. Chemical reactions between the elastomer and the sealed medium.

Figure 2-3: Temperature Range for Common Elastomeric Materials 2-8 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.1 Resistance to Fluid As used throughout this handbook. The smallest chemical change in an elastomer can lead to significant changes in physical properties. Among the more basic physical properties that have to be considered are: 2. The fluid must not alter the operational characteristics or reduce the life expectancy of the seal significantly. If a particular seal material suits a medium. This situation however. it is referred to as being “compatible” with that medium. A chemical reaction between sealed or excluded medium and the elastomer can bring about structural changes in the form of further crosslinking or degrading. 2.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Basic O-Ring Elastomers The extraction of plasticizer from a seal material is sometimes compensated for by partial absorption of the contact medium. can still lead to unexpected shrinkage and resultant leakage when an elastomer dries out and the absorbed fluids evaporate. Lexington. a vapor or a mixture of all.4 Physical and Chemical Characteristics In addition to the basic elastomer descriptions.com . FVMQ Fluorosilicone-Rubber Fluorosilicone-Rubber FVMQ) TFE/Propropylene Rubber (FEPM) TFE/Propropylene (FEPM Fluorocarbon Rubber (FKM) Fluorocarbon (FKM Perfluorinated Elastomer (FFKM) Perfluorinated Perfluor nated Silicone-Rubber (VMQ Silicone-Rubber (VMQ) ilicone-Rubber °C -100 °F -148 -75 -103 -50 -58 -25 -13 0 32 25 77 50 122 75 167 100 212 125 257 150 302 175 347 200 392 225 437 250 482 300 572 Temperature °C Normal recommended temperature range Extended temperature range for short term only. EU (IIR Butyl Rubber (IIR) Butyl (NBR (NBR) Low Temperature Nitrile Low Temperature Nitrile Rubber (NBR) Hydrogenated Nitrile Rubber (HNBR) (HNBR) Hydrogenated Nitrile High Te perature Nitrile High Temperature Nitrile Rubber (NBR) (NBR (NBR) Chloroprene Rubber (CR) Chloroprene (CR) Polyacrylate Rubber (ACM) Polyacrylate Polyacrylate (ACM (ACM) Ethylene-Propylene-Diene-Rubber (EPDM) Ethylene-Propylene-Diene-Rubber Ethy ene-Propylene-Diene-Rubber Fluorosilicone-Rubber (FMQ.parkerorings. a gas. This information is needed to provide a clearer picture of how physical and chemical properties interact and affect the proper selection of an effective seal material. such as embrittlement. The suitability of an elastomer for a specific application can be established only when the properties of both the medium and the elastomer are known under typical working conditions. (The term “medium” — plural “media” — is often used with this same meaning intended. A significant amount of volume shrinkage usually results in premature leakage of any Temperature Range for Common Elastomeric Materials Styrene-Butadiene (SBR Styrene-Butadiene Rubber (SBR) Polyurethane Polyurethane Rubber (AU.) The chemical effect of the fluid on the seal is of prime importance. to be misled on this point. See Table 2-2 for a comparison of the properties of commonly used elastomers. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. the term “fluid” denotes the substance retained by the seal. however. It may be a solid. It is easy. Excessive chemical deterioration of the seal must be avoided. EU) (AU.4. a liquid. it is helpful have more information on the important physical and chemical properties of various elastomer compounds.

K N V. D. Micro Hardness Testing is recommended). The durometer has a calibrated spring which forces an indentor point into the test specimen against the resistance of the Comparison of Properties of Commonly Used Elastomers (P = Poor – F = Fair – G = Good – E = Excellent) Parker Compound Prefix Letter rubber. On the other hand. It should be noted that there are other hardness scales used to describe elastomers (B. will often continue to serve well for a long time as a static seal in spite of such undesirable conditions. there is not a direct correlation between the readings of Shore A and IRHD Scales.com Weather Resistance E F GE E E E E E E E F F E G F E E E E F E Dynamic Properties Electrical Properties 2-9 . 2.2 Hardness Throughout the seal industry. as on a flat glass or steel surface. C. whether static or dynamic. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. OO) but these are typically not used by the rubber seal industry. tensile strength. O.parkerorings. the scale will read 100. Basic O-Ring Elastomers Tensile Strength Heat Resistance Tear Resistance Set Resistance Impermeability Oil Resistance Water/Steam Resistance GE FG G F F F PF E F F FG FG F E FG GE P F P FG F Abrasion Resistance Acid Resistance Chemical Resistance Cold Resistance Flame Resistance Ozone Resistance Elastomer Type (Polymer) AFLAS (TFE/Prop) Butadiene Butyl Chlorinated Polyethylene Chlorosulfonated Polyethylene Epichlorohydrin Ethylene Acrylic Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Fluorosilicone Isoprene Natural Rubber Neoprene HNBR Nitrile or Buna N Perfluorinated Fluoroelastomer Polyacrylate Polysulfide Polyurethane SBR or Buna S V GE E E FG G F G FG F G E FG FG FG FG E F E P P P F FG E FG E FG E G FG E E E FG FG FG FG FG E P G FG FG GE P G G PF FG GE G GE PF GE G G FG G G PF P G G G E G F F G F G F GE GE P F E F GE GE F F F E G P E G G G F F F G F E G G F F F E F F FG G E E P P GE G FG P P E G P P G P P E P P P P F E F G G G FG E G E E F F G E G E E P F FG E G F E G G GE E G G P F F G G G G E E G F P E P P FG F E F P E G P P FG E E E E E G P FG E P GE E E E E E E E P P GE G P E E E E P E PF G FG F F PF G GE E G G G F GE GE G F P F G GE PF GE G FG G G F GE F P GE GE FG FG FG PF FG P GE FG P FG E G G F G G GE GE F E E G E GE FG F F E GE P B FG G G Y A E V L G F GE G P E E C N. is the standard instrument used to measure the hardness of most rubber compounds. F A G G G P G P P E G Silicone S P Table 2-2: Comparison of Properties of Commonly Used Elastomers Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. The scale is IRHD (International Rubber Hardness Degrees). If there is no penetration. DO. The indicating scale reads the hardness of the rubber. (For specimens that are too thin or provide too small an area for accurate durometer readings. Lexington. The size and shape of the indentor used in IRHD readings is much smaller. or elongation. or develops a large increase or decrease in hardness. the Shore A type durometer scale. thus allowing for more accurate measurements on curved surfaces such as an O-ring cross-section. manufactured by a variety of manufacturers. a compound that swells excessively in a fluid. Unfortunately. In the O-ring industry.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > O-ring seal.4. another hardness scale is used due to the curved surface of the O-ring cross-section causing problems with accurately reading Shore A.

Conversely.6 O-Ring Compression Force O-ring compression force is the force required to compress an O-ring the amount necessary to maintain an adequate sealing line of contact. will flow more easily into the microfine grooves and imperfections of the mating parts (the gland. In dynamic applications.4.4 mm (1") Table 2-3: O-Ring Compression Force 2-10 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. This is particularly important in low-pressure seals because they are not activated by fluid pressure. and extrude very quickly.e.4. 2. O-Ring Compression Force Durometer Range Less than normal Over normal Over normal Diameter Compression Load Middle third of range Lower half of range Upper third of range Upper half of range Less than normal Less than 25. particularly in face-type seals where the available compression load is limited. have a lower coefficient of friction than a softer material. like tensile strength.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Basic O-Ring Elastomers Softer sealing materials. is used throughout the industry as a quality assurance measure on production batches of elastomer materials. Figures 1-4 through 1-7. Exceptions to this rule do occur. It is also a measure of the ability of a compound to recover from peak overload. If fluid contact results in only a small reduction in tensile strength. the hardness of the O-ring is doubly important because it also affects both breakout and running friction. It is very important in some applications. This property primarily determines the stretch which can be tolerated during the installation of an O-ring. Tensile strength is not a proper indication of resistance to extrusion.000 psi (7 MPa) is normally necessary to assure good strength characteristics required for long-term sealability and wear resistance in moving systems. nor is it ordinarily used in design calculations. O-Ring Applications. 70±5. 65±5. it can be seen that a harder O-ring will have greater resistance to extrusion into the narrow gap between the piston and bore. It is generally reported as ultimate elongation.parkerorings. 66 durometer or 73 durometer. and describe the “toughness” of a compound. for example. 75 durometer. This small difference is to be expected and is considered to be within acceptable experimental error and the accuracy of the testing equipment. Normally durometer hardness is referred to in increments of five or ten. However. Elongation increases in importance as the diameters of a gland become smaller. wear. It is used as a relative term in practice. compounds having a Shore A durometer hardness of 70 to 80 is the most suitable compromise. 2. rod or seal flanges).4.5 Elongation Elongation is defined as the increase in length. See Table 2-3 and Figures 2-4 through 2-8. yet if a large reduction of tensile strength occurs. An adverse change in the elongation of a compound after exposure to a fluid is a definite sign of degradation of the material. On a 70-durometer stock. Elongation.3 Toughness Toughness is not a measured property or parameter but rather a qualitative term frequently used to summarize the combination of resistance to physical forces other than chemical action. and (3) The human variance encountered in reading durometer hardness.com .9) are major indicators of. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. This practice is based on: (1) The fact that durometer is generally called out in specifications with a tolerance of ±5 (i. etc. Lexington. in dynamic applications a minimum of 1. seal life may be relatively short. Although a harder compound will. in general. the increase over the original dimension at break. — not as 62 durometer. or a force localized in one small area of a seal. 2. For most applications.4 mm (1") Over 25.4 mm (1") Over 25. (2) The inherent minor variance from batch to batch of a given rubber compound due to slight differences in raw materials and processing techniques. as a percent of initial length. one person might read 69 and another 71. providing compression load requirements for O-rings of different hardnesses. The following six terms (paragraphs 2. Referring back to the O-ring seal diagrams. Figures 2-4 through 2-8 are helpful.4 through 2. seal life may still be relatively long. the actual running and breakout friction values are actually higher because the compressive load required to achieve the proper squeeze and force the harder material into a given O-ring cavity is so much greater. In these situations. as 60 durometer. and a method of finding its approximate magnitude are explained in Section III. bore.4 mm (1") Less than 25. the harder materials offer greater resistance to extrusion. There are certain applications in which the compressive load available for assembly is limited. with lower hardness readings. 2. This is particularly true of dynamic applications where 90 durometer or harder compounds often allow a few drops of fluid to pass with each cycle.4. when considered in conjunction with tensile strength. It is also useful as an indication of deterioration of the compound after it has been in contact with a fluid for long periods. and 50 durometer compounds tend to abrade.4. The factors that influence compression force for a given application.4 Tensile Strength Tensile strength is measured as the psi (pounds per square inch) or MPa (Mega Pascals) required to rupture a specimen of a given elastomer material when stressed.4. 90±5). for each of the five standard O-ring cross-sections. Tensile strength is one quality assurance measurement used to insure compound uniformity. expressed numerically..

< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > .91 2 80 70 Sh or e A 70 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 100 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1000 Compression Load per Linear Inch of Seal — Pounds Figure 2-5: . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.2 .91 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 100 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1000 80 70 80 70 Compression Load per Linear Inch of Seal — Pounds Figure 2-4: .103 Cross Section Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.070 Cross Section .6 .parkerorings. Lexington.070 Cross Section 90 80 40% 60 50 90 80 30% 60 70 70 Basic O-Ring Elastomers Percent Compression Ha rd ne ss 50 90 80 70 20% Sh or e A 60 50 90 10% 60 50 90 5% 60 50 .3 .103 Cross Section 90 80 40% 60 50 90 80 30% 60 70 70 Percent Compression Ha rd ne ss 50 90 80 70 60 50 90 80 20% 10% 60 50 90 5% 60 50 .com 2-11 .4 .5 .7.4 .1 .7.6 .2 .1 .3 .8.5 .8.

3 .2 .1 .< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook .4 .91 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 100 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1000 70 5% Compression Load per Linear Inch of Seal — Pounds Figure 2-6: .6 .6 .com . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.210 Cross Section 2-12 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.5 .9 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 100 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1000 80 70 70 Compression Load per Linear Inch of Seal — Pounds Figure 2-7: .2 .7.parkerorings.8.8.7. Lexington.1 .210 Cross Section 90 80 40% 60 50 90 80 30% 70 70 Percent Compression Ha rd ne ss 60 50 90 80 70 20% Sh or e A 60 50 90 80 10% 60 50 90 5% 60 50 .139 Cross Section 90 80 40% 70 60 50 90 80 30% 70 Basic O-Ring Elastomers Ha rd ne ss Percent Compression 60 50 90 80 70 20% 60 50 Sh or e A 90 80 10% 60 50 90 80 70 60 50 .3 .139 Cross Section .4 .5 .

275 Cross Section 90 80 40% 60 50 90 80 30% 60 70 70 Basic O-Ring Elastomers Percent Compression Ha rd ne ss 50 90 80 70 20% Sh or e A 60 50 90 80 10% 60 50 90 5% 60 50 . Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > .8 Tear Resistance Tear strength is relatively low for most compounds. up to 90 durometer. usually 100%. refers to stress at a predetermined elongation. the more apt it is to recover from peak overload or localized force.7 Modulus Modulus. are normally more resistant to abrasion than softer compounds.3 . “abrasion resistance” concerns scraping or rubbing of the surface. However. Modulus normally increases with an increase in hardness. 10 or 15% swell is a reasonable maximum unless special provisions are made in the gland design itself.4 . and the better its resistance to extrusion. all other factors being equal. This is of major importance for dynamic seal materials. abrasion resistance must be considered in conjunction with other physical and chemical requirements. It is probably the best overall indicator of the toughness of a given compound.4. Where “tear resistance” essentially concerns cutting or otherwise rupturing the surface. Compounds with poor tear resistance will fail quickly under further flexing or stress once a crack is started.com 2-13 . measured in percent (%).parkerorings.1 . there is increased danger of nicking or cutting the O-ring during assembly. if it is extremely low (less than 100 lbs. This is actually the elastic modulus of the material. As might be surmised./in. This condition will lead to reduced abrasion and tear resistance.4. For dynamic applications.7. In dynamic seal applications. as used in rubber terminology.4. Swell or increase in volume is almost always accompanied by a decrease in hardness. Lexington. The higher the modulus of a compound.) (17. 2.5 .275 Cross Section 2. Of course.10 Volume Change Volume change is the increase or decrease of the volume of an elastomer after it has been in contact with a fluid. excessive swell will result in marked softening of the rubber. 2.5 kn/m) . Only certain elastomers are recommended for dynamic O-ring service where moving parts actually contact the seal material.4. Harder compounds.91 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 100 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1000 80 70 70 Compression Load per Linear Inch of Seal — Pounds Figure 2-8: . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. For static O-ring applications volume swell up to 30% can usually be tolerated. especially if it must pass over ports. as with all sealing compromises. Usually however.8. It is expressed in pounds per square inch (psi) or MPa (Mega Pascals). This is a rule-of-thumb and there will be occasional exceptions to the rule. inferior tear strength of a compound is also indicative of poor abrasion resistance which may lead to premature wear and early failure of the seal. sharp edges or burrs.6 . 2.2 .9 Abrasion Resistance Abrasion resistance is a general term that indicates the wear resistance of a compound. this property need not be considered for static applications. and may permit extrusion of the seal under high pressure.

In the fluid that caused a 20% swell. Compression set may also be stated as a percent of original thickness. Although it is generally desirable to have low compression set properties in a seal material. even if the seal does re-swell there is the danger that it may not properly reseat itself. Also. The usual 70-hour ASTM immersion test will indicate a swelling effect. depending on its magnitude. shrinkage will intensify the compression set effect causing the seal to pull away from sealing surfaces.7 Table 2-4: Compression Set vs. For instance. Shrinkage or decrease in volume is usually accompanied by an increase in hardness.200 . this is not so critical as it might appear from a practical design standpoint. causing the seal to shrink when the fluid is temporarily removed and the seal is allowed to dry out.4 20. percent of original deflection is more common. It is apparent then. Compression Set vs. The condition most to be feared is the combination of high compression set and shrinkage. See Figure 2-9. Remember that a good balance of all physical properties is usually necessary for optimum seal performance. For instance.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Basic O-Ring Elastomers Swell may actually augment seal effectiveness under some circumstances.190 = 0.0. as mentioned previously. swelling caused by contact with the service fluid may compensate for compression set. Also.4 Temperature: 74°C (165°F) Deflection used: 25% Fluorolube +19. These “potential” good effects however. Awareness of these facts is of interest as they can and frequently do contribute to enhanced seal performance. If any shrinkage is a possibility in an application.150 0. fluids may extract plasticizers.200 .parkerorings. Zero percent (0%) indicates no relaxation has occurred whereas 100% indicates total relaxation.050 Figure 2-9: Compression Set 2-14 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. Lexington. (1) swell may compensate for compression set.11 Compression Set Compression set is generally determined in air aging and reported as the percent of deflection by which the elastomer fails to recover after a fixed time under specified squeeze and temperature. whereas a long-term test shows shrinkage. Such shrinkage may or may not be serious.200 ts = 0. Volume Change Deflection = to-ts Return Compression Set = to-ti Original Thickness to Spacer Bar Example: to = 0. the compound took a set of approximately 20 to 25%.com . Note that in air and in the fluid that caused slight shrinkage. a seal may continue to seal after taking a 100% compression set provided temperature and system pressure remain steady and no motion or force causes a break in the line of seal contact. there was no measurable compression set. However. just as swell compensates for compression set. In some instances. gland design.150 ti = 0. thus providing a leak path. Table 2-4 shows the results of a laboratory test that illustrates this phenomenon. More than 3 or 4% shrinkage can be serious for dynamic seals. However. should not be relied upon when choosing a compound for an application.5 0 Fluoroester -0. This is the eternal sealing compromise the seal designer always faces. that shrinkage is far more critical than swell. This will always lead to seal failure unless exceptionally high squeeze is employed. the relaxation (compression set) tends to be canceled by the swell (see Table 2-4). Thus swell indicated by short-term testing may only be an interim condition.ti X 100 to . softening and thus providing more seal flexibility at the low temperature end of its operating range. (2) absorbed fluid may have somewhat the same effect on a compound as the addition of plasticizers. The amount of volume swell after longterm immersion — stabilized volume — is seldom reported because it takes several readings to identify.190 (ASTM normally requires deflection equal to 1/4 t o) Recovered Thickness ti Compression Set (As Percent of Original Deflection) C= to .ts C = 0. and the degree of leakage tolerable before the seal re-swells and regains its sealing line of contact. Air Volume Change % Set % of Original Deflection 0 25.0. Volume Change Parker Compound: Butyl Time: 168 hrs. It is easy to go overboard on this property from a theoretical standpoint. 2.010 X 100 =20% Compression Set 0. If a seal relaxes 15% and swells 20%. the seal just contacts mating surfaces but no longer exerts a force against those surfaces.4. it must be considered thoroughly and carefully. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. See Figures 2-10 through 2-17. because of actual service variables.

07 in.28 in.00 mm (.00 mm (. Polymer Family Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Compression Set VMQ 70 100 Relationship between Compression set. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.55 mm (.14 in.14 in.55 mm (.) ^ 2 = 3.55 mm (.parkerorings.) 80 70 NitrileButadiene NBR 70 Compression Set Test at T = 100°C (212°F) t = 70 h Cross-Section ^ 1 = 1. Lexington.80 mm (.) 10 °C °F 100 125 150 212 257 302 Test Temperature Figure 2-12: Compression Set vs.com 2-15 . NBR 70 Compounds Compression Set (%) °C °F 100 212 125 150 175 257 302 347 Test Temperature 200 392 Figure 2-13: Compression Set vs. deformation and cross-section 90 90 100 Compression Set NBR 70 Relationship between Compression set.80 mm (. deformation and cross-section Basic O-Ring Elastomers 80 Silicone VMQ 70 70 1 60 Compression Set Test at T = 100°C (212°F) t = 70 h Cross-Section ^ 1 = 1.07 in.) ^ 2 = 7.) 60 Compression Set (% ) 2 50 Compression Set (% ) 50 1 40 2 30 40 30 20 20 3 10 10 10 20 30 40 Cross-Section Deformation (%) 10 20 30 40 Cross-Section Deformation (%) Figure 2-10: Compression Set VMQ 70 Figure 2-11: Compression Set NBR 70 Compression Set 50 Compression Set Test at t = 70 h Compression Set 100 Compression Set Against Temperature 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 3 20 10 2 4 1 Compression Set (%) 40 1 30 2 20 NBR 70-1 (Normal Temperature NBR) NBR 70-2 (High Temperature NBR) O-Ring Cross-Section Deformed by 25% Cross-Section = 3.) Compression Set Test at t = 70 h FKM — 1 ACM — 2 EPDM — 3 VMQ — 4 O-Ring Cross-Section Deformed by 25% Cross-Section = 3.14 in.28 in.) ^ 3 = 7.

Lexington.275 Cross Section 2-16 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.070 W=0.parkerorings. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.139 100 200 300 400 500 100 200 300 400 500 Temperature Degrees Fahrenheit 22 Hours Temperature Degrees Fahrenheit 22 Hours Figure 2-14: Compression Set .070 Cross Section Figure 2-15: Compression Set .< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook 0 Si lic on e 0 Si lic on e Basic O-Ring Elastomers 20 20 e len hy Et Compression Set – Percent Compression Set – Percent bon car oro Flu e icon rosil ene Flou pyl Pro ne yle Eth bon car oro Flu ne yle op Pr 40 e e tril Ni ren op Ne 40 e ren op Ne Acrylate 60 60 one silic uro Flo Nitrile 80 te Acryla 80 W=0.210 Cross Section Figure 2-17: Compression Set .139 Cross Section 0 Sil ico ne 0 on rb ca ro uo Fl n rbo ca oro Flu 20 20 e len py e Pro icon ne rosil yle Flou late Eth Acry ile Nitr Compression Set – Percent Compression Set – Percent Ne op re ne le tri Ni one Silic 40 Ethylene Propylene 40 Ne op re ne 60 60 e icon rosil Flou Acrylate 80 W=0.275 100 200 300 400 500 100 200 300 400 500 Temperature Degrees Fahrenheit 22 Hours Temperature Degrees Fahrenheit 22 Hours Figure 2-16: Compression Set .210 80 W=0.com .

It is possible that a 70 durometer compound at room temperature might harden to 85 durometer at -34°C (-30°F) and fail to respond to low pressure at this temperature. An elastomer will almost completely regain its original properties when warmed. we have found that most compounds will provide effective sealing at 8°C (15°F) below their TR-10 temperature values. Lexington. Crystallization is another side effect of low temperature operation that must be considered. These generally cause an increase in hardness. careful study of the paragraphs on “temperature” later in this section and in Section III should be made before selecting a compound for low temperature service. hardness should be considered along with the low temperature properties of the compound. low temperature hardness increase is seldom of consequence. The first effect of increased temperature is to soften the compound. something is being extracted from the compound. along with volume and compression set changes as mentioned above. With increasing time at high temperature. compression set and brittleness are perhaps more basic criteria for sealing at low temperature than measured hardness. Any changes induced by low temperature are primarily physical and. hardness increases. but there does not seem to be much correlation among them. chemical changes slowly occur. allowing the seal to remain more flexible at low temperature than was possible before the absorption of the fluid. From experience. On the other hand. With the exception of the cryogenics field. on succeeding exposures to low temperature. If low pressures are anticipated at low temperature. If the seal swells. This may be demonstrated by reference to Figure 2-18 that shows the variation in hardness for several elastomers at low temperatures. it must be considered in high pressure applications because a compound that is sufficiently hard to resist extrusion at room temperature may begin to flow and extrude through the clearance gap as the temperature rises. Volume change and compression set are both greatly influenced by heat. Initially. are reversible. Hardness is influenced in a rather complex way. However. not only for assuring low temperature performance but occasionally as a quality assurance measure as well. the same type of compound with 40 durometer hardness at room temperature may register only 75 durometer at -34°C (-30°F) and provide somewhat better response. However. The flatness will gradually disappear and the seal will regain its original resilience upon warming. This phenomenon manifests itself as a flat spot on the O-ring and is sometimes misinterpreted as compression set. Perhaps the best of the low temperature tests is TR-10 or Temperature Retraction Test. the seal may now lose some of its original flexibility at low temperature. As temperature decreases. There are several tests that are used to define low temperature characteristics of a compound. The greater part of the leached material is usually the plasticizer provided by the compounder for low temperature flexibility. it is absorbing fluids which may act in much the same way as a low temperature plasticizer. and will reverse when the temperature drops. This being the case. When a compound crystallizes it becomes rigid and has none of the resilience that is so necessary for an effective seal. especially for dynamic applications. The swelling or shrinkage effect of the fluid being sealed must also be taken into account. However. If the seal shrinks. Flexibility. resilience. the tendency is to overlook the effects of low temperatures on elastomeric seal compounds as they are generally reversible as the temperature rises. It may become stiff at a temperature 2°C to 5°C (5°F to 10°F) higher than that at which it is rated.parkerorings. crystallization sets in much more rapidly. Effect of Low Temperature on Rubber Hardness 100 95 Nitrile Fl uo ro ca rb on Ethy lene -Pro pyle ne Silicone Nitr ile Neopre ne Basic O-Ring Elastomers Hardness. hardness is only one of several factors to consider when low temperature performance is involved. it may take two or three months for a compound to crystallize at a low or moderate temperature. In moderate pressure service. It is significant that many of the materials for which hardness is plotted in Figure 2-18 are considered good for seal service at temperatures considerably below that at which durometer hardness tends to reach a maximum. (Crystallization is the re-orientation of molecular segments causing a change of properties in the compound). KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. This is a physical change.12 Thermal Effects All rubber is subject to deterioration at high temperature. these changes are not reversible. The TR-10 test results are easily reproducible and are used extensively in many different specifications.4. Shore A Scale 90 85 80 75 70 65 60 55 Nit rile Fluorosilicone 50 °F -70 -60 -50 -40 -30 -20 -10 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 °C -57 -51 -46 -40 -34 -29 -23 -18 -12 -7 -1 4 10 16 21 27 Temperature Figure 2-18: Effect of Low Temperature on Rubber Hardness Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. This clearly illustrates that durometer measurements alone are not reliable determinants of low temperature seal performance. as stated. Changes in tensile strength and elongation are also involved. due to this softening effect.com 2-17 . Low pressures require a soft material that can be easily deformed as it is forced against mating surfaces. Being chemical in nature.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > 2. However.

This handbook is primarily concerned with corrosive effects caused by the compound alone. However. B. have failed during storage because the system was not turned on to pressurize the seals through a long.4. temperature and humidity. The temporary condition is due to physical permeation of fluid without chemical alteration. Further. Therefore.14 Deterioration This term normally refers to chemical change of an elastomer resulting in permanent loss of properties. it can be degraded or even destroyed by poor compounding techniques. However a smaller portion of the sulfur remains free and not fixed in the elastomer structure. Compounds in the CR.g. Hydrochloric acid also can be formed around compounds which are free from chloride (e. Conversely. although it should be noted that fluid corrosion of the gland metal will cause a change of surface finish that can seriously affect the seal. silver.4. SBR. Refer to O-Ring Applications. state of the metal. Lexington. 2. the strip will contract and lift the load. A galvanic cell is formed across two dissimilar metals. an O-ring) does not necessarily mean that the elastomer is always the cause. It should be understood that permeability increases as temperatures rise. One way to test for the crystallization effect is to use a double temperature drop. It is very difficult to create a laboratory test which properly relates this property to seal performance. 2. the greater its resistance to permeability. Electrochemical corrosion in the zone of a sealing element (e. A. compounding expertise. Alloys made up from different metal phases or crystals can be damaged when small local cells are formed. lead) tends to form metal sulfides which cause discoloring and corrosion damage. Section III for additional information on permeability and vacuum service.16 Permeability Permeability is the tendency of gas to pass or diffuse through the elastomer.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Basic O-Ring Elastomers The end result of crystallization is seal leakage. Certain elastomer compounding ingredients.15 Corrosion Corrosion is the result of chemical action of a fluid and/or the elastomer compound upon the metal surfaces of the seal gland cavity. Corrosion Caused by the Formation of Hydrochloric Acid — Hydrochloric (HCl) acid can be formed in certain environmental conditions when free chloride is present in an elastomer. C. Certain types of polychloroprene (Neoprene) have a pronounced tendency to crystallize. metal oxides) which retard free chloride. It is not to be confused with reversible or temporary property losses.13 Resilience Resilience is essentially the ability of a compound to return quickly to its original shape after a temporary deflection. This should not be confused with leakage which is the tendency of a fluid to go around the seal. NR) if they contain chloro-paraffin combinations which are used as flame retardants.g.17 Joule Effect If a freely suspended rubber strip is loaded and stretched and subsequently heated. Free sulfur in contact with many metals and alloys (e. a reaction between metal and sulfur can lead to the failure of a dynamic seal if rubber adheres to the metal surface after a long downtime. especially in a dynamic application.parkerorings. cold winter. 2. such as uncombined sulfur or certain types of carbon black were found to cause the problem. Springloading the seal can compensate for crystallization. An electrolyte is required for the function of a galvanic cell. After conditioning at a moderately low temperature for a long period — say two months — temperature is lowered another 30°C (86°F) or so and leakage checked at .g. More important. together with other impurities.4 Bar (10 to 20 psi) pressure. For example. It is generally assumed that condensate accumulates between the rubber and the metal which. When rubber seals were first used. Resilience is primarily an inherent property of the elastomer. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. there were numerous instances in which the compound itself did act adversely upon metal causing actual pitting of the gland surface.4. A large percentage of the sulfur under the influence of heat (vulcanization) forms bridges (crosslinks) between the elastomer molecule chains. Reasonable resilience is vital to a moving seal.7 to 1. In all cases where there is dynamic action expected at the seal interface. Currently.com 2-18 . that different gases have different permeability rates. 2. The propensity to corrode depends on the type of metal alloy(s). causes electrochemical corrosion. ECO.4. due to frequent introduction of new and improved compounding ingredients. It can be improved somewhat by compounding. modern chemicals and supplier testing has made reports of this type of corrosion rare. This sulfur remains chemically fixed and cannot be extracted. Corrosion Caused by Free Sulphur — Rubber compounds often are vulcanized using an accelerator containing the element sulfur. seals which have been known to function satisfactorily in an air conditioning unit through the first summer.4. Both permanent and temporary property losses may be accompanied by swell. and that the more a seal is compressed. surface roughness. Permeability may be of prime importance in vacuum service and some few pneumatic applications involving extended storage but is seldom consequential in other applications. an unloaded strip when heated expands to the Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. CO and to a lesser extent in ACM polymer groups tend to cause corrosion if the formula does not contain sufficient amounts of inhibitors and stabilizers (e. It is very difficult to say how far electrochemical corrosion depends on the elastomer. compounding experience and functional testing under actual service conditions are used to insure adequate resilience. use of a sulfur-free compound is recommended.g. copper. Electrochemical Corrosion — The formation of small galvanic cells is the main mechanism responsible for corrosion of metals. 2. continuous attention to potential corrosive effects is necessary.

and where minimal friction is essential. When only the hardness is changed. In practice an O-ring of larger inner diameter must therefore be selected. respectively.parkerorings.0 x 10-4 1. The result is increased friction and temperature. thus changing the electrical properties. As a rough approximation.047 . See Figure 2-19. In those instances where seal external lubrication is impossible.6 x 10-5 1. brittle O-ring surface. EPDM. This varies with several factors. Generally.3 x 10-5 8.320 . Many elastomers must be minimally conductive to prevent electrostatic charging. Sections III and V./ft. compounds filled with conductive-particles have been developed with a volume resistivity of < 10-2 Ohm. 2. 2.20 Coefficient of Thermal Expansion Coefficient of linear expansion is the ratio of the change in length per °C to the length at 0°C. See Parker Chomerics Division.299 . Basic O-Ring Elastomers Specific Electrical Resistance (according to DIN 53596) NBR FKM VMQ EPDM CR 10 2 10 4 10 6 10 8 10 10 Ohm-cm 10 12 10 14 10 16 10 18 10 20 Figure 2-19: Specific Electrical Resistance (According to DIN 53596) Linear Thermal Expansion of Typical Elastomers and Common Materials Contraction 24°C to -54°C Expansion (75°F to 24°C to 191°C Coefficient -65°F) (75° to 375°F) of Expansion (in. Electrically conductive: < 105 ohms-cm .< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > coefficient of expansion for that rubber. The type of material and compound (electrically conductive carbon black) are selected to electrical requirements criteria: Electrically insulating: > 109 ohms-cm . The O-ring with an inner diameter smaller than the shaft is fitted under tension.035 .7 x 10-6 6.) (in. Lexington. medical equipment.8 x 10 -4 9. The O-ring always should be fitted into the bore and never on to the shaft.4. drive belts.174 . IIR.108 .132 . semiconductors or conductors. care should be taken to ensure that conductive parts of the compound formula will not be dissolved or extracted by the medium being sealed. as semiconductor: 105 to 109 ohms-cm . VMQ. See Table 2-5. or at low temperature if squeeze is marginal. primarily hardness of the seal material.cm.396 N/A .3 x 10-5 9.18 Coefficient of Friction Coefficient of friction of a moving elastomer seal relates to a number of factors including material hardness. fuel tank seals. CR. FKM.024 . elastomers have a coefficient of expansion ten times that of steel (an exception to this is perfluoroelastomer). e. For more in-depth information on conductive elastomers and EMI shielding.017 . Example: O-ring as radial shaft seal. This can be a critical factor at high temperature if the gland is nearly filled with the seal. breakout friction is many times that of running friction. Please contact Parker regarding any special compound requirements and specific physical properties when contemplating the use of conductive elastomers. Failure of the O-ring is characterized by a hard.224 .com 2-19 ./in.0 x 10-7 Material Nitrile — General Purpose Neoprene Parofluor Fluorocarbon Elastomer Kel-F Ethylene Propylene Silicone Low-Temperature Type Silicone Fluorosilicone High-Temperature Type Aluminum.9 x 10-5 1.0 x 10-5 8.6 x 10-6 6. These compounds are also desirable where continuous presence of a lubricant is uncertain. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. The O-ring heats up due to friction and contracts. Coefficient of volumetric expansion for solids is approximately three times the linear coefficient.5 x 10-4 1.001 . When special conductive compounds are required.) (in.023 . Parker offers several compounds having self-contained lubricants./°F) .SBR.012 . This phenomenon of contraction is termed the Joule effect and occurs only when heating a stretched rubber object.274 6. etc. An inner diameter between 1% to 3% larger than the shaft is recommended and the outer diameter of the gland should ensure that the O-ring is compressed on the shaft surface.4.19 Electrical Properties Elastomers may be good insulators. For more friction data see O-Ring Applications and Dynamic O-Ring Sealing. 2.155 .156 .193 N/A .g.NBR.360 .002 Table 2-5 : Linear Thermal Expansion of Typical Elastomers and Common Materials Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.144 . 2017 Stainless Steel.4.1 x 10-4 1. Type 302 Steel./ft.2 x 10-5 7. Anti-static. The width of the gland should be slightly less than the crosssection diameter. Mild Invar . For shielding purposes against electromagnetic interference (EMI).Special Compounds. lubrication and surface characteristics of surrounding materials. see Parker Chomerics product information. an increase in hardness will increase breakout friction while a decrease will lower breakout friction.324 .

they will sometimes order compression set buttons from the same batch as the O-rings for purposes of conducting hardness tests. but results from the different specimens will seldom agree. In gauging the hardness of an O-ring. In testing for durometer hardness. as the cross-section increases. Knowledge of some of these pitfalls may avoid misunderstandings. the effect may be quite pronounced even at larger gland void conditions.” Different operators will often disagree on the hardness of a compound because they use different speeds and different amounts of pressure. Elongation and modulus values decreased also. it has been mentioned that various factors can alter the properties of rubber materials. When customers wish to monitor the Shore A hardness of O-rings they purchase.21 Effects on Properties In some of the foregoing paragraphs. Depending on the interaction between the rubber and the fluid being sealed. to include both a description of the test specimens used as well as describing the test method itself in detail.5. states. while results after 30 or 40% compression were sometimes smaller and sometimes greater than at 25%. the smaller cross-sections had much better resistance to high-pressure gases. Lexington. Often. They vary according to the conditions under which they are tested. Force 2-20 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.08 mm (0. high temperatures may cause reversible and non-reversible changes of many kinds. “The percentage of compression employed shall be approximately 25%. Any different rate will result in somewhat different readings. for example.5. The only industry recognized test for hardness of an O-ring is IRHD (see “Hardness” in this section). in reporting test results. two or more specimens are required.1 Test Specimens ASTM test methods include descriptions of standard specimens for each test. In one test. Low temperatures cause reversible hardening of compounds. If the seal is completely confined and the gland is 100% filled.2 inches) per minute. nitrile O-rings produce lower values of tensile strength. ASTM D412 requires a uniform rate of pull of 508 mm (20 inches) per minute. Changes in a fluid medium can occur in service due to the effect of heat and contaminants.” We have found significantly higher compression set values after compressing less than 25%. A rubber that is virtually unaffected by new fluid may deteriorate in the same fluid after it has been in service for a month. and modulus values. and exposure to fluids can effect all the properties of a rubber material.5. There have been instances where a seal has ruptured a steel gland due to expansion when heated. It is important to follow these procedures carefully in conducting tests if uniform and repeatable results are to be obtained. the point that gives the most reliable reading. In conducting the TR-10 low temperature test. Figure 2-20: Relative Force Produced by O-ring Swell There are certain reactions that in some circumstances cause a seal to exert relatively high forces against the sides of a groove.8 mm (2 inches) per minute. but by smaller amounts. This is because durometer hardness readings taken on actual O-rings are notoriously variable. The way that properties vary with the size of the specimen is not consistent. For instance. In observing explosive decompression tests. the cold bath should be warmed at the rate of 1°C (34°F) per minute. These are but a few examples to illustrate the fact that the properties of rubber compounds are not constant. These forces are generated by thermal expansion of the rubber and/or swelling effect of a fluid. operators may vary in the accuracy with which they apply the indentor to the actual crown of the Oring. Effective force exerted by the seal due to fluid swell is another potentially large factor if the gland volume exceeds that of the seal by only 5 to 10% (see Figure 2-20). 2. while in fluorocarbon compounds only the elongation shows this trend. rings with smaller cross-sections have been found to swell more than larger rings.2 Test Method Variables More difficult to avoid are differences in test results due to differences introduced by the human equation. Ethylene propylene rings produce a similar pattern for tensile and elongation values but not compression set.parkerorings.com . and some of the variables may be rather subtle. and compression set. tensile strength was found to decrease 5% when the speed was reduced to 50.3 Effects of Environment on Testing High humidity in the air will reduce the tensile strength of some compounds. and it decreased 30% when the speed was further reduced to 5. the presser foot of the instrument is applied to the specimen “as rapidly as possible without shock — Apply just sufficient pressure to obtain firm contact between presser foot and specimen. elongation.4.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Relative Force Produced by O-ring Swell for Different Compounds Basic O-Ring Elastomers 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 Gland Void After Seal Compression — Percent 50 2. For instance. 2. which has no flat surface. Tests are sometimes run in previously used fluid for this reason.5 Standard Test Procedures There are standard ASTM procedures for conducting most of the tests on rubber materials. 2. In fluid immersion tests. elongation. Besides these more-or-less obvious effects. there are many additional ways in which the properties of a compound may be modified so that results by two different laboratories may not agree. It is important. in pulling specimens to find tensile strength. ASTM Compression Set D395 Test Method B. therefore. 2. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. the dominating force is the force of thermal expansion of the rubber.

These include controlled laboratory studies of many years duration in addition to evaluation of seals recovered from salvaged World War II aircraft and other sources after exposure to widely varying conditions over many years. the quarter of manufacture (cure) is not counted. May. butyl. Lexington. Cure dates are shown by a number indicating the quarter of cure followed by the letter Q (for quarter). ARP 5316 places elastomers into three groups according to “Age resistance generally associated with products fabricated from various rubbers. 2.com 2-21 Basic O-Ring Elastomers . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. Heat and oxygen are principle causes of this type of aging process. is an Aerospace Recommended Practice. dividing the chain into smaller segments. in normal warehousing conditions. or in the wasteful destruction of perfectly good seals. b. Exclusion of radiation Generally. not a standard that must be met. Controlling storage time only serves to de-emphasize the need for adequate control of storage conditions. Bond sites and certain other areas may be particularly susceptible to chemical reaction.” Realize that this document. It required that the age of certain military nitrile O-rings shall not exceed 40 quarters from the cure date at the time of acceptance by the Government acquiring activity. life of even the relatively age-sensitive elastomers is considerable. Refer to ARP 5316 as a guide (ARP 5316 is available through SAE). Note: all mechanisms by which rubber deteriorates with time are attributable to environmental conditions. Points at which individual molecules join are called bonds. This standard shrinkage factor is often called “AN” shrinkage. different designs. ultra-violet light. for example. fluorosilicone. silicone. or June). individual shrinkage factors can lead to different tolerances and. parts cured in January. Field experience has demonstrated that the current STORAGE CONDITIONS are much more important in determining the useful life of elastomeric seals than is TIME. polyurethane. 2Q06 indicates the second quarter of 2006 (April. For example. c. and has been documented through a number of investigations concerned with effects of longterm storage of elastomeric materials undertaken in the recent past. As a result. thus. specification MIL-STD-1523A was the age control document for O-rings. It is a long chain-like structure consisting of many smaller molecules joined or linked together. It is standard practice throughout the industry to indicate the cure date by quarter and calendar year. Adhering to this time-based storage philosophy may result in deteriorated seals. Although cure date records are maintained for all Parker Seal elastomer products. 2. Exclusion of air (oxygen) 3. Ozone. considerable storage life without detectable damage is common even under adverse conditions. ARP 5316. Exclusion of contamination 4. Crosslinking — An oxidation process whereby additional intermolecular bonds are formed. When determining the age of a part. The age control requirements of MIL-STD-1523A did not apply to any other polymer classes. both in storage and actual service.9 Age Control Prior to ARP 5316.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > 2.parkerorings. Ambient temperature not exceeding 49°C (120°F) 2. etc. Exclusion of light (particularly sunlight) 5. which are subject to age deterioration. While selection and application of synthetic rubber seals to provide acceptable service life is the primary subject of this handbook. nor to nitrile compounds not covered by the specification. February. If. Moisture. MIL-STD-1523A has been cancelled. However. 2. Scission — The molecular bonds are cut. or March of a given year are not considered to be one quarter old until July 1 of that same year. with the Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. Modification of Side Groups — A change in the complex. ethylene propylene. At least three principle types of such reactions are associated with aging.6 Aging Deterioration with time or aging relates to the basic nature of the rubber molecule. For other compounds. could promote this activity. it has become the standard or “measuring stick” for shrinkage variations between polymer families. It is environment and not age that is significant to seal life.10 Shrinkage All rubber compounds shrink to some extent during the molding process. Where non-age sensitive elastomers are involved. weaker fringe areas of the molecular construction due to chemical reaction. not all of these products were subject to the age control limitations of MIL-STD-1523A. For materials falling into the 15 year category.” The basic nitrile polymer was one of the first synthetic polymers produced. The finished elastomeric part will be smaller than the mold cavity from which it was formed. This is due to major improvements in modern compounding technique. but in varying degrees: a. our concern in the next paragraph will be with seal life as it relates to storage conditions. For example. Parker Seal supplies the cure date on all packaging. It is included here for historical reference only. 2.7 Storage The effective storage life of an O-ring varies with the inherent resistance of each individual elastomer to normal storage conditions. and radiation cause degradation of this type. such as fluorocarbon. They usually occur concurrently. the following conditions are suggested for maximum life: 1. Note:As of this printing. sealed polyethylene bags stored in larger cardboard containers or polyethylene lined craft paper bags ensure optimal storage life.8 Cure Date To facilitate proper stock rotation on the shelves of Parker distributors and customers. Exclusion of ozone generating electrical devices 6. Exactly how much smaller the part is we call the “shrinkage factor. This process may be a regenerative one.

11 Compound Selection This section gives background information to help in understanding the factors involved in the process. Each foregoing category is based on successful practice under similar service conditions. 2. and no problems should arise. When using the same fluid. 2. the ability to fall within expected dimensional tolerances is compromised. it would be possible to skip all the other sections of this handbook and select the proper compound for an application from the tables.11. For such design conditions. Lexington. gland design presents nothing new. this may reduce the problem to “minor pioneering. Three such cases come to mind immediately: 1. the previous design data will certainly apply as a starting point.”) Each designer makes his own choice of how to test a new design and his decision should be based on how far the application deviates from known successful usage.1 Aniline Point Differences In view of the ever increasing number of operating oils and sealing materials. The most likely example is the use of a new fluid. If the fluid’s chemical nature can be related to another fluid with known effect on a compound. Minor Pioneering applies when only a slight departure from previous practice is involved. since these also have a silicate ester base. MLO8515. Section X. established by widespread field contact developed from years of experience with O-rings.” A. There are at least two recognizable levels in this area that we elect to call “minor pioneering” and “major pioneering.com . the same compounds utilized in past design may be trusted to give successful results. the answer is at hand. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. In summary. foreign to anyone’s past experience. the problem has suddenly become “major pioneering.2 Pioneering Design This implies that there is something new and therefore unknown or at least unproven about the design. This is the heart of the non-pioneering approach. By use of such specifications. The sections on Static and Dynamic O-Ring Sealing (Sections IV and V. 3. In similar fashion. but is listed in the Fluid Compatibility Table in Section VII. Compound selection may be classified in two categories — the pioneering type and the non-pioneering type.1 Non-Pioneering Design The term “non-pioneering design” refers to reapplication of proven design. 2. It is fortunate that major engineering problems constitute only a very small percentage of the total work. see “Shrinkage” in the Appendix. selecting an applicable compound is a matter of finding a “reasonable” starting point and proving the adequacy of such a selection by functional testing. it can be surmised that its effect on the seal will be similar to MLO-8200. When the military service or other customer requires the use of some specific compound by citing a formulation. compound designation. or OS 45 type III and IV. Major Pioneering applies when there is radical departure from previous practice. In the case of petroleum base fluids. For more information on shrinkage. a more accurate analysis and a better compound selection may be made based on test results. influence of the fluid retains “minor pioneering” status. If no pioneering were ever encountered.12.12 Rapid Methods for Predicting the Compatibility of Elastomers with Mineral Based Oils 2. respectively) provide gland design data based on “average” operating conditions. the designer must locate the compound that meets such criteria and no option exists as to compound choice. Provided operating conditions are within specified limits.parkerorings. 2. Tables 8-3. whatever they may be. the problem becomes “non-pioneering” in that known successful solutions are relied on. If new operating conditions apply or some change in gland design is made but neither is radically different from the past design conditions. (If the new fluid is foreign to the user’s experience and not listed in the table. 2. If performance is satisfactory.” For example. Basic O-Ring Elastomers 2-22 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. B. or specification. this category will be discussed first. and provide some guidance when recommended limits must be exceeded or when unlisted fluids are encountered. many stock compounds have proven to be very satisfactory in certain fluids when used in glands of normal design. it is desirable that a means be established to enable interested parties to employ suitable combinations of oil and rubber without the need for carrying out lengthy immersion tests on each combination. comparison of the aniline point of the fluid with that of standard test fluids gives a fair estimate of the fluid’s effect on a seal material. The Fluid Compatibility Tables in Section VII provide specific seal compound recommendations for service with a variety of fluids. 8-4 and 8-5 list the most used specifications and indicate applicable Parker compounds. by using the Fluid Compatibility Tables in Section VII it should be relatively simple to select one or two compounds for trial. However. There is a third case of “non-pioneering design” in which the designer can use past successes of others as a basis for a design foreign to his own experience. Since non-pioneering applications will include the greater part of all design work normally encountered. is necessary to manufacture compensating mold tooling in order to remain within the specified tolerances.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook variation of compound and hardness. if the fluid is a silicate ester. If not. for they do not normally offer a direct and immediate answer. and operating conditions.11. The most likely compound should then be put on simulated service test. gland design practices. If a fluid is new to the user.

com 2-23 . The effect depends not only on the construction of the elastomer. with NBR.2 10.7 8. Conversely.9 35. changes in physical properties are the result of two different processes: A.7 15. the better the compatibility with oil. 1 — Percent Volume Change Figure 2-21: Swelling Behavior (SB) for Compound “X” Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.6 14.7 6. Figure 2-21 gives an example of such a graph. if equilibrium percentage changes in the volume of different commercial nitrile rubbers in different mineral oils are plotted against those of standard elastomer NBR 1. The base elastomer contains between 15% and 50% acrylonitrile (ACN).2 Elastomer Compatibility Index A rapid and more accurate method for predicting the compatibility of commercial rubbers in mineral based oils involves the use of a representative reference compound called standard NBR 1. as in paraffin based oils. 3) has a low aniline point 70°C (157°F) and causes high or extreme swelling of seal compounds. Previous work has shown that there is an approximate linear relationship between the equilibrium percentage volume changes of NBR 1 in a range of mineral oils and those of any commercial nitrile in the same oils. aromatic based oils cause ECI for Various Oils Type of Oil ASTM Oil Number 1 BP Energol HLP 100 Esso Nuto H-54 (HLP 36) Houghton HD 20W/20 Esso Nuto H-44 (HLP 16) DEA Rando Oil HDC (HLP 36) Fina Hydran 31 Shell Tellus 923 (HLP 16) ASTM Oil Number 2 (IRM 902) Esso-Trafo oil 37 Agip F.5 10.4 13. The ASTM reference oils cover a range of aniline points found in lubricating oils.0 32. which for some elastomers does not tend to reach equilibrium.9 34. the percentage volume change of NBR 1) is known.6 15. which is the lowest temperature at which a given amount of fresh aniline dissolves in an equal volume of the particular oil. Oils with the same aniline points usually have similar effect on rubber.9 7. The straight-line graph for a particular compound is called the swelling behavior.3 17.7 5.0 33. IRM 903 (formally ASTM Oil No.g. B.7 9.0 16. Table 2-6 lists the ECI for various oils. Lexington.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > A well-known rapid method for material selection is based on the aniline point of the oil.0 17.1 7.4 12. The action of mineral oils can be evaluated against this standard rubber in terms of the Elastomer Compatibility Index or ECI. it has been found that the aniline point method is not always reliable.12.2 9.0 14.7 16. This enables interested parties to predict the volume change of a particular rubber material in any mineral oil if the compatibility index of this oil (i. Some commercial oils of the same aniline point can differ significantly in their swelling power because they contain different sorts and amounts of additives.e. ASTM Oil No. IRM 902 (formally ASTM Oil No.1 8.5 13. A high ACN content is necessary to resist swelling resulting from naphthalene based oils. The processes can be concurrent and the resulting volume change may not be noticeable. 2.g. e.5 9.parkerorings. leads to a low tendency to swell (also with low ACN content). In other words.3 16.5 20. 1 has a high aniline point 124°C (225°F) and causes slight swelling or shrinkage. In the same way.9 7.2 4. However.9 6. Any other commercial oil with the same or similar aniline point can be expected to have a similar effect on a particular sealing material as the corresponding ASTM oil. The lower the aniline point.0 24. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. With mineral oil as a medium. the more severe is the swelling action.5 swelling. Chemical components of the elastomer can be dissolved or extracted from the compound resulting in shrinkage.5 Volume Change — Compound “X” in Mineral Oil (%) +20 +15 +10 +5 (+2) 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 -5 -10 Elastomer Compatibility Index (ECI) for Mineral Oils — Based on Standard Elastomer NBR No. or SB of the compound. Swelling Behavior (SB) For Compound “X” Basic O-Ring Elastomers ECI 3. Oil diffuses into the rubber causing swelling which is usually limited and differs from one elastomer to another. but also on the sealed fluid itself.5 19. 1 Rotra ATF Mobil Vac HLP 16 Shell Tellus 15 Essocis J 43 Shell oil 4001 Texaco Rando Oil AAA BP Energol HP 20 ASTM Oil Number 3 (IRM 903) Shell Tellus 11 Shell Oil JYO Table 2-6: ECI for Various Oils 2. a straight line can be obtained for each nitrile compound.0 23. a high content of aliphatics.5 12. e.2 3. The higher the ACN content. 2) has a medium aniline point of 93°C (200°F) and causes intermediate swelling.9 8.0 15.

used in compounds that cause chemical deterioration of fluorinated refrigerants. the seal compound must be resistant to all fluids involved including any lubricant to be used on the seal. has been standardized under International Standard ISO 6072. in pipelines it is common practice to pump a variety of fluids in sequence through a line with a pig (floating plug) separating each charge. Compounds for food and breathing applications should contain only non-toxic ingredients. eliminating one variable. Time. Consideration must also be given to the effect of the compound on system fluids. a decision can be made regarding elastomer compatibility with given oils. then. Seals used in meters or other devices that must be read through glass. is measured after immersion in the respective oil for 168 hours at 100°C (212°F). or plastic. For example: A.13 Operating Conditions The practical selection of a specific Parker compound number depends on adequate definition of the principle operating conditions for the seal. By using the ECI. raw gasoline. 2. D. can all be expected to contaminate the engine oil. 2 = N 674-70 24 24 Volume Change (%) 20 16 12 8 4 0 -4 -8 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 ECI 2 1 Volume Change (%) 20 16 12 8 4 0 -4 -8 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 ECI 1 2 Figure 2-22: Swelling Characteristics of Parker Compounds Figure 2-23: Swelling Characteristics of Parker Compounds Figure 2-24: Weight Change on Test Elastomer NBR 1 (%) 2-24 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. Once this is done. Pressure and Mechanical Requirements. any lubricant. or an occasional cleaning or purging agent to be used in the system.g. In both these cases.13. Weight Change on Test Elastomer NBR 1 (%) Volume Change in Test Elastomer NBR 1 (%) ECI 52 48 44 40 36 32 28 24 20 16 12 8 4 0 4 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 Weight Change on Test Elastomer NBR 1 (%) 8 ^ ^ 1 = A 607-70. For example. thus saving valuable laboratory time. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. gaseous products of combustion. because the sulfur will promote corrosion of the metal or cause chemical change of the fluid. such as magnesium oxide or aluminum oxide. 2. whenever possible. the volume change of the above materials can be predicted in a mineral oil media. originally developed by Parker. C. B. In this way. Sound judgment. The ECI for an oil is initially determined in the laboratory (see Table 2-6). Lexington. must not discolor these materials and hinder vision. acids formed in service. diesel fuel. Compound “X” will have a volume swell of approximately 2% in that oil.com .< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Basic O-Ring Elastomers Example using Figure 2-21: To find the volume change of Compound “X” in a mineral oil having an ECI of 10 for volume. it is a simple matter to check the Fluid Compatibility Tables in Section VII to find a compound suitable for use with all the media. The weight change of a test elastomer.1 Fluid Fluid includes the fluid to be sealed. The procedure. Temperature. outside air. NBR 1 to ISO 6072. dictates that all fluids involved in an application be considered. these conditions are Fluid. The ECI is then simply read from Figure 2-24 plotting the weight change. 2 = N 3570-70 ^ ^ 1 = N 741-75. a liquid. Compounds containing large amounts of free sulfur for vulcanization should not be used in contact with certain metals or fluids. it should not contain any of the ingredients that cause this breakdown.parkerorings. The ECI values can be plotted on a compound specific graph (Figures 2-22 and 2-23) and the expected volume change can be read directly from the vertical axis. Therefore. In a crankcase. When choosing a compound for use with fluorinated refrigerants. and water from condensation. Some rubber compounding ingredients. Follow the horizontal line from that point to the vertical axis. In approximate order of application. follow the 10% vertical ECI line until it intersects the slanted line. it is a good practice to use the fluid being sealed as the lubricant. Thus far only the effects of fluids on seal compounds have been discussed. e.

combined with low thermal conductivity of the seal. If it is subjected to this temperature continuously. Since some fluids decompose at a temperature lower than the maximum temperature limit of the elastomer. Lexington. Currently.13. the temperature limits of both the seal and the fluid must be considered in determining limits for a system. For O-rings and other compression seals. FVMQ) TFE/Propropylene Rubber (FEPM) Fluorocarbon Rubber (FKM) Perfluorinated Elastomer (FFKM) Silicone-Rubber (VMQ) °C -100 °F -148 -75 -103 -50 -58 -25 -13 0 32 25 77 50 122 75 167 100 212 125 257 150 302 175 347 200 392 225 437 250 482 300 572 Temperature °C Normal recommended temperature range Extended temperature range for short term only. it should perform reliably for 1. the tanks of gas being sealed may be located a good distance from this heat source and the actual ambient temperature at the seal might be as low as 121°C to 149°C (250°F to 300°F). the TR-10 value per ASTM D1329 provides a better Temperature Range for Common Elastomeric Materials Styrene-Butadiene Rubber (SBR) Polyurethane Rubber (AU. a torch or burner might reach temperatures of 400°C to 540°C (750°F to 1000°F). However. A specification for aircraft landing gear bearing seals might call out -54°C to 760°C (-65°F to 1400°F). the high temperature limit for many compounds is shown as a range rather than a single figure. EU) Butyl Rubber (IIR) Low Temperature Nitrile Rubber (NBR) Hydrogenated Nitrile Rubber (HNBR) High Temperature Nitrile Rubber (NBR) Chloroprene Rubber (CR) Polyacrylate Rubber (ACM) Ethylene-Propylene-Diene-Rubber (EPDM) Fluorosilicone-Rubber (FMQ. Figure 2-25: Temperature Capabilities of Principal Elastomers Employed in Seals Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.000 hours. Similarly. For example.com 2-25 . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. yet the bearing grease to be sealed becomes so viscous at -54°C (-65°F) it cannot possibly leak out. Method D2137 is in wide use. Basic O-Ring Elastomers The high temperature limits assigned to compounds in Figure 2-25 are conservative estimates of the maximum temperature for 1. Parker has applied a realistic temperature range with a margin of safety when setting the general operating temperature range for seal compounds. Time at less than maximum temperature will extend life. limits heat input to the seal so that temperature may never exceed 71°C (160°F).2 Temperature Temperature ranges are often over-specified. higher temperature will reduce it.parkerorings. At the high end. This range may be reduced or extended in unusual fluids. there is a timetemperature relationship in the landing rollout that allows rapid heat dissipation through the magnesium wheel housing on which the seals are mounted. The present ASTM D2000 SAE 200 specification calls for the ASTM D2137 low temperature test. however. Low temperature service ratings in the past have been based on values obtained by ASTM Test Methods D736 and D746.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > 2. a more realistic temperature range would be -34°C to 82°C (-30°F to 180°F). As a result. This. The maximum temperature recommendation for a compound is based on long term functional service. Since the top limit for any compound varies with the medium.000 hours of continuous service in the media the compounds are most often used to seal.

sealing may not be accomplished below the TR-10 temperature. These have little bearing on actual long-term service of the seal in either static or dynamic applications. See Figure 2-27. Second is at-rest vs operating conditions and requirements for “leakless” at rest conditions which would suggest due consideration be given to the long-term compression set properties of a given material. TR Test According to ASTM-D 1329/ISO S 2921 for a NBR 70 Shore A Compound 100 90 80 70 60 With decreasing temperature. Some manufacturers use a less conservative method to arrive at low temperature recommendations. an industrial nitrile (Buna-N) compound. It may be necessary to add as much as 22°C (40°F) to the low temperature shown in the tables for this type of service. elastomers shrink approximately ten times as much as surrounding metal parts. or approximately 8°C (15°F) higher than the low-limit recommendation in the Parker Handbook. and the pressure is in the low range. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. A few degrees may sometimes be gained by increasing the squeeze on the O-ring section. Rather. The low temperature limit on an O-ring seal may be compromised if the seal is previously exposed to extra high temperature or a fluid that causes it to take a set. The narrower temperature range does not imply that the compounds discussed are inferior to others. This is the formula that has been used. as may be required to resist extrusion in dynamic designs or where there is a large gap between sealed members in static applications. with a few exceptions.parkerorings. leakage may occur at temperatures 5°or 8°C (10°or 15°F) above the TR-10 value. See Figure 2-26. 2. Up to this point. temperature limits. whether static or dynamic. is recommended to only 121°C (250°F). is time. 2. cumulative time at a given temperature for specific elastomers used as static seals. A comparison of the temperature limits of individual compounds in this guide with previous literature will reveal that for comparable materials the upper temperature limit is more conservatively expressed.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Basic O-Ring Elastomers means of approximating the low temperature capability of an elastomer compression seal. both high and low. Lexington.000°F) and at 149°C (300°F) for 300 hours. This is the lowest temperature normally recommended for static seals. temperature. The curves show the safe. As illustrated by the graph (Figure 2-28). have been published at conventional short-term test temperatures. These recommendations are based on Parker tests. The sealing ability of a compound deteriorates with total accumulated time at temperature. Conversely. N067470. In a rod type assembly. In dynamic use. Retraction % 50 40 30 20 10 °C -60 °F -76 -50 -58 -40 -40 -30 -22 -20 -4 -10 -14 0 32 10 50 20 68 Temperature Test results: TR10 = -31. short term or intermittent service at higher temperatures can be handled by these materials. The low temperature sealing limit is generally about 8°C (15°F) below the TR-10 value.000 hours are being recommended. Therefore.13.0°C (-4°F) Figure 2-26: TR Test According to ASTM-D 1329/ISO S2921 for a NBR 70 Shore A Compound 2-26 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. when the application requires a temperature higher than that recommended in the compound and fluid tables. but easily overlooked. but similar compounds with the same TR-10 temperature would be expected to have the same actual low temperature limit regardless of catalog recommendations.com .4 Pressure The system operating pressure is always a consideration as it effects the choice of seal materials in several ways. or to a fluid that causes the seal compound to shrink. those high temperature values based on continuous seal reliability for 1. When excessive side loads are encountered on maximum tolerance rods or glands. to establish the recommended low temperature limits for Parker Seal Group compounds shown in Figure 2-25 and the Fluid Compatibility Tables in Section VII. The fourth dimension. First is hardness. this effect causes the sealing element to hug the rod more firmly as the temperature goes down.5°C (-25°F) TR50 = -24. and pressure. an O-ring may seal below the recommended low temperature limit when used as a rod type seal. or in static applications with pulsing pressure. while insufficient squeeze may cause O-ring leakage before the recommended low temperature limit is reached. For example. check the temperature curve to determine if the total accumulated time at high temperature is within the maximum allowable limit.0°C (-11°F) TR70 = -20. temperatures as much as 14°C (25°F) below those indicated may be more realistic. For dynamic seal applications. the limit may be lowered significantly if the fluid swells the compound. equally important.13.3 Time The three obvious “dimensions” in sealing are fluid. yet it is known to seal satisfactorily for five minutes at 538°C (1. Therefore.

0 10 Exposure Time — Hours 50 Fluo roela stom er Silicone Ethy lene Prop ylen e& Neo pren e Nitrile (High Temperature Type) Nitrile (Low Temperature Type) 100 500 1000 Figure 2-28: Seal Life at Temperature Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. Lexington.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Change in Characteristics According to Temperature on NBR 80 100 Basic O-Ring Elastomers 80 60 Compound: NBR 80 40 20 0 °C -50 °F -58 -40 -40 -30 -22 -20 -4 -10 14 0 32 Shore A (pts) hardness Rebound elasticity (%) Compression set (%) 10 20 50 68 Temperature 30 86 40 40 50 104 60 122 70 140 80 176 Figure 2-27: Change in Characteristics According to Temperature on NBR 80 Seal Life at Temperature 649 (1200) 593 (1100) 538 (1000) 482 (900) General Temperature Limits of Basic Elastomer Compounds Temperature °C (°F) 427 (800) 371 (700) 316 (600) 260 (500) 204 (400) 149 (300) 93 (200) 38 (100) 0 0.0 5.5 1.com 2-27 .parkerorings.1 0.

14 Selecting a Compound Having discussed the major aspects of seal design that affect compound selection. Different parts made from the same batch of compound under identical conditions will give varying results when tested in exactly the same way because of their difference in shape. and time) previously discussed. The prime requisite of a static seal compound is good compression set resistance. Static applications require little additional compound consideration. chlorosulfonated polyethylene.15 . low temperature flexibility to compensate for thermal contraction of the seal.6 .parkerorings. it is the misapplication of data. here is a summary of the necessary steps to follow. always keeping in mind that standard compounds should be used wherever possible for availability and minimum cost. static) and temperature-time requirements of the application.25 7. compound E0540-80 is an 80-durometer material. Butadiene. natural rubber. The one exception is compound 47-071. thickness. The usual compression. Yet seals of such a compound confined in a gland having volume only 10% larger than the seal. Select a compound suitable for service in all fluids. considering the mechanical (pressure.20 Cross Section (W) 6. not the measurements. 2. select the compound from Table 8-2 or 8-3 in Section VIII. or static.5 3. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. Note that the last two digits of Parker O-Ring compound numbers indicate this type A hardness.1 . all result in a different physical response from what is measured on an identical but unconfined part. oscillating.10 . For all other applications.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Basic O-Ring Elastomers 2.com . 4. such Relative Effect of O-Ring Cross Section on Area Exposed to Fluid Attack (Total Immersion) 60 50 Ratio — Surface to Mass 40 30 20 10 0 mm 0 Inch 0 1. The service could involve only occasional splash or fume contact with the fluid being sealed.5 Mechanical Requirements An important consideration in selecting the proper seal material should be the nature of its mechanical operation. However. due to movement. lack of tension. Complete immersion may be much more severe than an actual application where fluid contact with the seal is limited through design. 2. pressure. isoprene. 2. extrusion resistance to compensate for wider gaps which are encountered in dynamic glands. may well perform satisfactorily. Specifications. For example. i. it is an industry-wide problem.8 5. and a few other elastomers do not generally perform as well as the listed polymers in seal applications.30 Figure 2-29: Relative Effect of O-ring Cross Section on Area Exposed to Fluid Attack (Total Immersion) 2-28 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. Dynamic applications.05 2. dynamic. rotating. are more involved. temperature. which causes difficulty. 3.16 Testing An elastomer is seldom under the same confinement conditions when laboratory physical property tests are made as when installed as a seal. All properties must approach the optimum in a dynamic seal compound.e. and Parker does not normally offer O-rings in these materials.15 Compound Similarity General purpose O-ring compounds are listed by polymer and Shore A durometer hardness for ease of selection. Lexington. with data in some other form. If military fluid or rubber specifications apply. 1. How the seal functions will influence the limitations on each of the parameters (fluids. See Table 2-2 for comparison of similar properties by polymer family.3 . resilience to assure that the seal will remain in contact with the sealing surface. Correlation between test data and service conditions is not a simple problem. In essence. contact the O-Ring Division for a harder or softer compound in the same base polymer. locate all fluids that will come in contact with the seal in the Fluid Compatibility Tables in Section VII. Humidity alone has been found to affect the tensile strength of some compounds. If a compound of different durometer from that listed in the Fluid Compatibility Tables in Section VII must be used. and limited room for expansion when installed. and abrasion resistance to hold to a minimum the wearing away or eroding of the seal due to rubbing.4 . 2. manufacturers and users must use the available data to the best of their ability. which is a 70-durometer compound. Example: A silicone compound tested in hydrocarbon fuel in the free state may exhibit 150% swell.13. Until improvement can be made. reciprocating. and surface to volume relationship (see Figure 2-29).

275 Volume Change — Percent 6 8 Volume Change — Percent MIL P-5516 Nitrile Immersed in MIL-H-5606 (J-43) 4 W 0. 2. a brief discussion of the main points that should be considered when preparing the physical and chemical test portions of a specification follows. It is not only possible. call for a particular size O-ring if the standard ASTM 6" x 6" x 0. This problem has plagued the industry for years and is acknowledged in both specification and test standards. A delayed Basic O-Ring Elastomers Variance in O-Ring Volume Change with Cross-Section W W 0. However. For example. Different size parts give different results (see Figure 230). These are: 1. a performance specification is recommended. but so is progress. = 1 in² by 1/4" thick) or 6" x 6" x 0. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.” 3. Avoid specifying how to compound materials or process compounds.com 2-29 . paragraph 6-1 states: “A suitable hardness determination cannot be made on a rounded. this accelerated test may not give any direct correlation with service performance.” 2.075" sheets plied up to a minimum thickness of 1/4" to determine durometer hardness.17 Specifications Specifications are important.parkerorings. These properties also permit control of a material after it has proven satisfactory for an application. fifteen or thirty second delayed durometer readings are specified. or rough surface. Therefore.060 0.070 0. ASTM Designation D471 (Standard Method of Test for Change in Properties of Elastomeric Vulcanizates Resulting from Immersion in Liquids) states: “In view of the wide variations often present in service conditions.139* 4 0 0. Therefore.210 6 2 0.070* 2 Butyl Rubber Immersed in Skydrol 500A -2 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Immersion Time at 70°C (158°F) — Weeks Figure 2-30: Variance in O-ring Volume Change With Cross-Section W *Averages of many samples Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.210 0. Lexington.075" test sheet.139 10 0. It must be recognized that physical properties provide a means of screening new materials for an application by setting realistic minimums. Occasionally. but also probable that a well-qualified supplier knows of materials and/or processes that will solve the problem and one should be permitted to use them. All parts with varying cross section or shape will not meet specific properties set up on another particular part or on test specimens cut from a standard 6" x 6" x 0. For example: ASTM Method D2240. Let the seal manufacturer examine the performance desired. This allows new developments and improvements to be adopted without any appreciable effect on the specification.28" dia.103 0. Therefore. It is recommended that standard test methods be used whenever possible. uneven. These can be established when experience with certain properties gives a good indication of the suitability of a new material for the application. It has been almost impossible to obtain reliable and reproducible hardness readings on seals with curved surfaces and variable cross sections (such as O-rings).< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > misapplication might be greatly reduced. the method yields comparative data on which to base judgment as to expected service quality and is especially useful in research and development work. A vendor should be allowed to supply his best solution to a problem. Always use standard hardness discs (1.103* 0. There are three major points that must always be considered when preparing any specification. always designate the actual parts on which the tests are to be conducted for both qualification and control.075" test platens are not to be used. The discussion is in the order that specifications are usually written and tests carried out. Consider the case of the deviation from the standard methods of taking instantaneous durometer readings. even though it may be more difficult to prepare.

a. 3). Each individual fluid dictates its own specific limits. Tensile Strength Change Tensile strength change can limit a compounder severely.000 psi x 1. Recommended times. These methods are widely used and help to assure correlation among laboratories. good extrusion resistance. lack of resilience. and leakage).” This value will then be used in the control section. This fluid variation accounts for some of the differences in test results.18 Qualification Testing Functional requirements should always be given first.5 to 62. a 10% tolerance is never considered realistic since this much variance in tensile strength can be experienced on two test specimens cut from the same sample. A reasonable plus or minus limit is usually set as insurance against excessive deterioration and early seal failure. Keep in mind the original tensile and elongation figures established in (b. e. at 100°C (212°F). However. This does. Correlation of results is perhaps the hardest thing to assure when preparing a specification. For example. Elongation Investigate and determine the maximum amount of stretch a seal must undergo for assembly in the application. b. Determine the durometer best suited for the application and round off (50. 70.8 Bar (1. chemical or physical results. however.) and (c. Where feasible. These properties are: a. Once the minimum tensile strength has been set. therefore. It is usually desirable to use the actual service fluid. Durometer Durometer or Hardness is measured in points with a Shore A instrument. Multiply this figure by 1. 2-30 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. These are in addition to the functional tests.18. Experience will probably dictate the limits. This usually causes widespread confusion and enlarges the problem of correlation. A standard ±5 point tolerance is established to allow the vendor a realistic working range and permit normal variations experienced in reading durometer. Thus the first step is to set the original physical property limits that will assure that the mechanical properties desired in the seal are present. One functional test is worth more than a thousand physical and chemical property tests. 2. Specific Gravity A value for specific gravity should not be set in the qualification section of the specification but the value should be reported “as determined. designate a standard test method for each test required by a specification (either ASTM or ISO Test Method). they are discussed separately. This is done by measuring change in volume and physical properties of test samples after exposure to various conditions for a specified time at a specified temperature (i. Tensile Strength Determine the minimum tensile strength necessary for the application. it would be foolhardy to specify a minimum tensile strength requirement of 138 Bar (2. Lexington. b. The following discussion will lead to a specification for qualification of new seal compounds after the known functional requirements appear to correlate with field or laboratory. Hardness Change This is usually controlled to avoid excessive softening (causing extrusion) or hardening (causing cracking. 85). c. Certain of these properties are also used in quality assurance testing to maintain batch control and assure consistency between individual manufacturing lots of compound.20 (for example: 69 Bar x 1. This is the minimum limit set for tensile strength in the qualification section.25 to allow a safety factor and to provide for normal production variation of ±20%.000 psi) for a silicone material).18. adhering to the procedures described above minimizes this problem. 2. Modulus is directly related to these two properties.e.1 Bar (500 to 900 psi).1 Original Physical Properties Original Physical Properties (before exposure to service conditions) are those measurable attributes of an elastomer formulation which define certain physical parameters used in determining the suitability of a given elastomer material for a given class of service. add another variable to the tests since commercial fluids are not as tightly controlled as test fluids.Modulus Choose a minimum modulus that will assure a good state of cure. Original Physical Properties are also used in limiting/delimiting rubber specifications. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. a nitrile compound tested in petroleum based IRM 903 (formerly ASTM oil No.20 = 1200 psi)).). Always take into consideration the inherent strength of the elastomers most likely to be used to meet the specification (most silicones have tensile strengths in the range of 34.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Basic O-Ring Elastomers durometer reading results in a lower durometer value than would be obtained with the standard instantaneous reading.. Although these two sections may be combined in the actual specification. and good recovery from peak loads. 70 hours at 100°C (212°F). multiply it by 1. d. 2.com . temperatures and test fluids for accelerated tests can be found in ASTM D471. . can be expected to lose a maximum of 35% tensile strength and the same compound tested in MIL-L-7808 (di-ester base fluid) can be expected to lose a maximum of 70% tensile strength.parkerorings.20 = 82. Every well-written specification should contain both qualification and control sections. It provides for the normal tensile strength variation of ±15% experienced between production batches of a compound.2 Aged Physical Control The second step is to determine the resistance of the seal to the anticipated service environment. 65. However.

A realistic value for compression set is all that is necessary to assure a good state of cure and resilience of a compound. Excessive hardening. Parker believes that the Temperature Retraction Test (TR-10) is the best method for determining a compound’s ability to seal at low temperatures. For more information. is very unlikely to reflect mean values Basic O-Ring Elastomers 2-31 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. e. Remember that every designer should set limits for the control of all of these properties based on his past experience in the same or similar application. Functional tests indicate that O-rings will usually provide reliable dynamic sealing at or below the TR-10 value. Compression set varies with the elastomer. and gain of elongation are good indications of reversion toward the original state before cure. Any single set of tests made on a particular batch. Volume Change 1. One should be careful not to be trapped by writing a specification based on one test report having only a single set of values. Both of these methods have inherent weaknesses. This is not the case with TR-10 that consists of stretching 3 or 4 samples 50%. Expecting all size seals from a given compound to fall within a set volume swell limit at the most critical time period (70 hours) is unrealistic. an O-ring with cross-section of . This only tells at what low temperature the compound is most likely to be completely useless as a seal in a standard design. When a material is qualified to a specification close to the specification limits. Determine the maximum amount of shrinkage that can be tolerated in the application (usually 3-4% for both dynamic and static). the type and amount of curing agents. Most low temperature tests are designed to indicate the brittle point of a material. This temperature (TR-10) then is the lowest temperature at which the compound exhibits rubber-like properties and therefore relates to low temperature sealing capabilities.e.210 section O-rings and that the reverse is true with the butyl compound. Compression Set Compression set is usually measured as the amount that a material fails to recover after compression.4). other compounding ingredients in the compound. This could result in unnecessary rejection of good parts. It sometimes requires longer to approach equilibrium value. 2.. Static O-rings normally function satisfactorily to about -8°C (15°F) below this. gain of tensile strength. The low temperature test method that most nearly simulates the actual service requirement should be chosen to give the best possible assurance that the seal which passes this test will function in the application. Besides the extreme variation among different cross-section O-rings in the first two weeks of testing. d. Therefore it is suggested that control be based on actual test results of the material in question. 3.19 Process Control The purpose of process control is to ensure uniformity of purchased parts from lot to lot. depending on time and temperature. Excessive softening. freezing them. Remember that shrinkage is a prime cause of failure. Take into consideration dry-out cycles that may be encountered in service and include a dry-out test after the immersion test to provide a control for dry-out shrinkage. The lowest temperature at which the seal is expected to function should be determined. then warming them gradually at a constant rate. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. f. loss of tensile strength. see “Physical and Chemical Characteristics” earlier in this section (paragraph 2. For instance. For these reasons. notice that . Lexington. Once again it is necessary to stress the difference between test results on different size seals.210 cross-section when tested under the same conditions.070 section nitrile O-rings swell much less than the . normal production variation may cause the material to fall outside the limits. Low Temperature Resistance Low temperature resistance is measured by determining the flexibility of an elastomer at a given low temperature. Once limits are set. tolerances will apply as discussed in the Control Section on Elongation. Furthermore. or laboratory samples. qualification volume swell testing must be limited to definite test samples. Figure 2-30 shows two graphs that depict these phenomena. and the thickness of the test specimen. Process control may be based on the requirements of the qualification section or actual qualification test results. Normally neither the customer nor the manufacturer can afford such time for prolonged testing. Set the minimum and maximum limits necessary for control of the volume change of the compound in each fluid that will be encountered in the application. and finally recording the temperature at which the samples have returned to 9/10 of the original stretch (1/10 return). the temperature of the test. Short-term test results are quite useful. 1. 4. but very little about the temperature at which it is useful.070 inch will not have the same volume swell as will an O-ring of the same compound with a . 2. and loss of elongation after immersion are indications of over aging. Determine the maximum amount of swell that can be tolerated in the application (usually 15% to 20% for dynamic and 50% for static). or a representative test fluid. this difference is at its peak during the first 70 hours (a popular standard test time) and most accelerated testing is specified within this time period. but only if their inherent limitations are understood. four or eight weeks depending on the fluid and the elastomer) would give results much more indicative of the stabilized swelling characteristics of a material. A more realistic time (i.com .< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > c. 2.parkerorings. Elongation Change Experience will dictate this limit as noted under tensile change.

Discussion will be limited to only those properties really pertinent to the control section of the specifications. or platen plies. This tolerance was taken into consideration when establishing the tensile strength qualification limit of 1200 psi for dynamic seals (see qualification section. Lexington. It is more desirable to keep the original qualification hardness and tolerance remain in effect (i.e. the control section would specify 68 ± 5. This practice is less likely to result in unnecessary rejection of usable parts. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. tensile strength).0 (1000) 34. b. both qualification and control values of 70 ± 5). and the control tolerance is applied. Tensile Strength. It is frequently problematic because of inherent difficulties in measuring durometer with seal specimens rather than standard hardness discs.. Many of the typical tests for determining a compound’s physical and chemical properties that are specified in the qualification section are unnecessary to provide good control of an approved material.5 (500) Original After Immersion 0 0 24 48 72 96 120 Immersion Time in MIL-L-7808 at 100°C (212°F) — Hours 144 168 Figure 2-31: Physical Property Change from Immersion 2-32 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. This information is available from Parker on request. it Physical Property Change from Immersion 172. Seal manufacturers have accumulated years of test experience on popular. If a part qualified at the minimum. a tolerance of ±15% is standard for any given compound. Hardness is often specified as a control. if the qualification section specified 70-durometer ±5 and the qualification value was a 68-durometer reading. a. A tolerance of ±5 points is the standard allowance for experimental error caused by reading techniques and production variance from batch to batch of the same compound.8 Bar (1200 psi).< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Basic O-Ring Elastomers that can be duplicated day-in and day-out in production. successful compounds. as well as compound statistical capability and history.5 (2500) Compound Per MIL-P-25732 138. 82.parkerorings.com . With Parker’s CBI program it is practical to refer to the batch from which any seal was made.5 (1500) -5% Compound Per MIL-R-7362 -10% 69. This tolerance is sometimes erroneously applied to the original qualification results. For example.0 (2000) -57% -46% Tensile Strength — Bar (psi) 103.

Only the more common physical and chemical property tests have been discussed. Specific Gravity of a compound having been established during qualification. Remember. manufacturing costs will increase due to higher scrap rates.4 Bar (1020 psi). In many applications. a compound in accordance with MIL-R-7362 has outperformed MIL-P-25732 material at both high and low temperature. (1) a controlled test fluid is used or control of the commercial fluid eliminates its variance. A combination of variance in commercial fluids and sample size gives such an accumulation of negative factors that it is not always feasible to use volume swell as a control. They will be more than happy to help you.02 may be applied.000 psi) minimum that is usually required for dynamic applications as previously stated. If the compounder is forced to develop a material that is extremely difficult to process. building in too much of a safety factor in the specification can lead to costs that are prohibitive because the best looking laboratory reports are desired. a plus or minus tolerance on this property is frequently unrealistic. a tolerance of ±20% is standard. thus minimizing inaccuracy (for example: if the balance being used is accurate to . a tolerance of ±20% is standard but is seldom used for control.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > c. Again this must be taken into consideration as part of the safety factor. please call on a Parker Seal representative in your area.com . It is also the most accurate if the stringent ±. f. The customer ultimately bears these costs. Each seal supplier has developed numerous nitrile compounds to meet various specifications. d. When preparing a specification and in need of assistance.4 Bar (1020 psi). Volume Change. (3) a volume swell history over a long period of time is established on every seal on which a check is desired. all written to accomplish the same thing — to obtain a seal suitable for use with a petroleum base hydraulic fluid. when setting a limit for elongation for qualification. Guard against specifying unrealistically high physical properties that may in reality be detrimental to a seal due to the greater percentage drop-off of these properties after short periods of exposure to fluids (see Figure 2-31). Specific gravity is the easiest and quickest control test available to the industry today.02 tolerance is applied. Elongation. and (4) when testing small size seals multiple samples are used for each weighing. Lexington.01 gram and a small seal with a weight of . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. Specific gravity is the only test some purchasers use. If controls are established for the above properties and a compound complies. remains above the (69 Bar (1. is possible to receive a part with a tensile strength of 70. 70. (2) time of the test is extended. It can be done if. specifying additional tests is not necessary. The result is different compounds available for the same service. Basic O-Ring Elastomers 2-33 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.parkerorings. it is easy to see where a result on this size seal can be extremely inaccurate). e. any one of which would perform satisfactorily in almost all the applications. This value. a tolerance of ±.03 gram is being tested. Modulus.

parkerorings. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. Lexington.com .< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Basic O-Ring Elastomers 2-34 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.

. . . . . . 3.14. . . . 3-22 3-22 3-22 3-22 3-22 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . 3-17 3. .4 Synthetic HFA Concentrates (Solutions) . . . . . . . 3. .17.2 Concentrates Containing Mineral Oils (Oil-in-Water-Solutions) . .4 Other Friction Reduction Methods. . .3 Pressure . . . . . . . .1 Plastic Contact Surfaces.4 Extrusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . . .3 Brake System . . . . . . . . .3 Available Drive Belt Compounds . . . . . . . . . 3. . . . . . . 3. . . . . . . .11. . .1 Leak Rate Approximation . . . . 3. .17 Hydraulic Fluids .9. . . .1 Vacuum Weight Loss . . . . . . . 3. . . . 3-2 3-2 3-3 3-3 3-3 3-4 3-4 3-4 3-5 3-5 3-5 3-6 3-6 3-6 3-6 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 Introduction . . . . .3 Assembly . . . . . . . . . 3-9 3.10 Temperature Extremes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . .12. . . . . . . . . .12 Gases-Permeability . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Introduction . . . . . . . . .5. . 3. . .1 Parker O-Lube .9. . . . . . . . 3. . . . . . . . . . .17 Drive Belts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17. . 3. . .3 Underwriters’ Laboratories . . . . 3. . . . . . . .9. 3. . . . .5 Fuels for Automobile Engines . . . 3. . .9. 3. . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Aerospace Technology . .2 Low Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. .13 Nuclear Technology . . . . .11 Vacuum Applications . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . . . .4 Fuel System . . . 3-25 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . . . . .17.17. . . . . . . . . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. . . . . . .14 Acids . . . . . . . . . . .9. . . .1 Factors Applying to All O-Ring Types. . . . . . . 3-20 3. . . .2 Silicone Fluids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Fungus-Resistant Compounds . .11. . . .2 Engine .15 Energy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 inPHorm Seal Design and Material Selection Software . . . . .1. . .2 O-Ring Sizing Cone .9. . .9. . . .11 Food. . . . . . .1 Automotive . . 3. . . . . . . . .6 Accessories. . 3. 3. . . . . . Lexington.9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . 3. . . .9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Refrigeration and Air Conditioning . . . . 3. . . .13 Gases-High Pressure . . . . 3-17 3. . . . 3. . .14 Radiation . .9. . . . . . 3-10 3-10 3-10 3-10 3-10 3-11 3-11 3-11 3-12 3-12 3-12 3-12 3-13 3-13 3-13 3-14 3.18 Applications Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Transmission . 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . .9. . . . . . . .17. . . . . . . . . . .14. . . . . . 3. . . . . . . . .1 Fire-Resistant Hydraulic Fluids . . . . . . . . . .1 Extraction Tools . . . . . . 3-24 3-24 3-24 3-24 3-24 3. . . . . .7 Cooling & Heating Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . . . . . .6. .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-14 3-14 3-15 3-15 3-15 3-15 3-17 3-17 3-17 3-17 3-17 O-Ring Applications 3. . . . . . . 3-7 3. . . . . . .9. . 3. . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Squeeze . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . .17. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. 3-7 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . . . 3-21 3. . . . 3. . . . . . . . . 3. . . . . . . . . . . .1 Jet Fuels . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Liquid Rocket Propellants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Water and Steam Resistance. . 3-19 3-19 3-19 3-20 3. .3 Micro-Emulsions . . . 3. 3. . . . . . . 3. .10.17. . . .9.3 Vacuum Leak Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . 3-9 3. . .1. . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . .9. . 3-18 3. . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Air Conditioning. . . . . . . .17.7 Gland Fill .15 Semiconductor . . 3. . . . . . . .17. . . . .parkerorings. . . . . . . . . . . . .6. . .3 PTFE Coatings . . . . . . . . 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9.12. . . 3-9 3. . . Beverage and Potable Water. . . . . . . . .3 O-Ring Kits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Lubrication . .14. . . . . . . .1. . . . 3. . . . . . . . . .9. . . .1 High Temperature. . . . .com 3-1 . . . . . . . 3-8 3.9. . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10. . . . . . .9. .2 Parker Super O-Lube . . . . .4 Selecting the Best Cross-Section . . . . . . 3. . . . . . . . Oil and Gas . . . . . . . . 3. . . . . . . .14. . . . . . . .9. . . . . . .5 Stretch . . . . . . . . . 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17. . . 3. . . . .8 O-Ring Compression Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-24 3. 3. . .9 Power Steering Systems . . .1. . . . 3. . . . . . . . 3.< Back Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Section III – O-Ring Applications 3. . 3. 3. . . .9. . .2 Vacuum Seal Considerations .9. . . . .6 HFD Fluids . .9 Specific Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. . 3. . . . . . . .9.5 Internal Lubrication . . . . . . .2 Cleanliness . . . . . . . 3-21 3. .1. . . . . . 3.5 HFC Fluids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12. . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Drive Belt Compound Selection . . 3-2 3. . . . . . . . .1. . . . .1 HFA Fluids . . . . . . . . . . .9. .9. . . . . . . . . . . . .11. . . . . . . . . . 3. . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . .2 Temperature . .1 Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

a “2” rating is usually acceptable. Normally. in all cases. If the anticipated seal motion is infrequent. The following paragraphs discuss the more important design factors that generally apply to all O-ring seals. The value of making a detailed comparison between previously satisfactory installations and a new one cannot be over-emphasized. or other marked change in physical properties) resulting in shortened seal life. compounds of other hardnesses in the same polymer are available. Lexington. Parker O-Ring Distributor or contact the Application Engineering Department of the Parker O-Ring Division at (859) 269-2351. or if the seal can be replaced often. Current piece-price and in-stock availability can be obtained from your nearest Authorized Parker O-Ring Distributor. If. Specific design and dimensional data applicable to static seals is provided in the Static O-Ring Sealing Section (IV). When a compound rated “3” is selected. but it should. but many will not. fluids and solids. the application determines the rubber compound. Where a “2” rated compound must be used. 3. The temperatures shown in Table 7-1 are general temperature ranges. and the application is dynamic. Bear in mind that “Static only” compounds are not as tough and abrasion resistant as other materials. be certain it is first thoroughly tested under the full range of anticipated operating conditions. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. the selected material must also have the toughness and abrasion resistance so important in reciprocating and rotary seals. The Fluid Compatibility Tables in Section VII suggest potential Parker Compounds for over two thousand different gases. The elastomer however. In dynamic applications. refer the problem to your Parker Field Engineer.1 Factors Applying to All O-Ring Types For the majority of standard applications. but the presence of a particular fluid may modify the published limits. the design of the O-ring seal has generally already been accomplished. and information on dynamic seals is contained in the Dynamic O-Ring Sealing Section (V). it is best to determine the O-ring compound first. loss of strength.0 Introduction In designing an O-ring seal. both the sequence of exposure and time of contact with the O-ring need be considered. Following this introduction are discussions on a number of special applications that require additional attention.parkerorings. If a compound designated “Static only” is the only compound recommended for the fluids. respectively. or to obtain improved performance from the seal will also be found in this section. be tested. 3-2 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. It may have degraded enough that it cannot safely be reinstalled.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook O-Ring Applications O-Ring Applications 3. Whenever possible this should be a compound rated “1” for all the fluids under consideration.1 Compatibility Compatibility between the O-ring and the fluid or fluids to be sealed must be the first consideration in the design process.com . the compound may nevertheless be suitable in some unique situations. degradation. Note the operating temperature range of the chosen compound. It is recommended that the designer consult the applications listed and read carefully any of those paragraphs which apply to his application. a “Static only” compound will probably be satisfactory.1. only appropriate testing can safely determine an acceptable O-ring seal material. and would normally wear more rapidly in a dynamic environment. If the fluid will have an immediate adverse effect (chemical reaction resulting in surface destruction. Such comparison should disclose any weak points where modification may be desireable or required. In some instances. For a static seal application. for some reason a compound of different shore hardness from the one suggested in the Fluid Compatibility Table is needed. where there are two or more fluids to be sealed. Contact the O-Ring Division. it may be necessary to compromise on a seal material having the best overall resistance to all the fluids involved. as the selected compound may have significant influence on gland design parameters. When two or more compounds are suitable for a given application. Some of these 3-rated compounds may prove to be satisfactory as static seals. If more than one fluid is involved. do not expect to re-use it after disassembly. there is little advantage to be gained by proceeding further with the design until this basic problem is resolved. thus simplifying the process and facilitating the design effort. Remember. the “Recommended Parker O-Ring Compound” indicated in the tables should be the one specified for initial testing and evaluation. The necessary data for gland dimensions are simply selected from the tables in the sections on Static and Dynamic O-Ring Sealing. If compatibility cannot be determined from specific data in this section or the Fluid Compatibility Tables in Section VII. Essentially. must also resist extrusion when exposed to the maximum anticipated system pressure and be capable of maintaining good physical properties through the full temperature range expected. the primary factor being the fluid to be sealed. Data and procedures enabling the designer to depart from the standard designs in order to meet peculiar requirements. price and stock availability may become determining factors. 3. Sections IV and V.

4 No Extrusion Extrusion 1. Total diametral clearance must include cylinder expansion due to pressure. which lists the approximate rate of linear thermal expansion for typical elastomers and other materials.” or expansion of the cylinder bore that may be anticipated due to pressure. may require some minor modification of the gland design.6 20.0 414. Although based on data obtained from O-rings.0 .5 .parkerorings. Basis for Curves 1. Nylon and other similar materials.0 138. Apply a reasonable safety factor in practical applications to allow for excessively sharp edges and other imperfections and for higher temperatures.000 3. Figure 3-1 illustrates another possible type of design to improve low temperature sealing capability by spring loading the O-ring.000 8.9 mm 0 In. If the operation is only to be at a high temperature. Figure 3-2 may be used as a guide in determining whether or not anti-extrusion rings should be used. and the degree of “breathing” of the metal parts which will be encountered. 6. the ninety durometer curve can also be used as a guide to back-up ring performance. 100. No back-up rings. Failure Modes). for operation only at low temperature.1. Parker Parbaks® are elastomer back-up rings and are generally recommended based on their proven functional superiority. 2.1.com 3-3 . or more properly.000 2.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > 3. a better seal may result by reducing the gland depth.0 55. Also see “Patterns of O-Ring Failure” in Section IX for more information on extrusion. test temperature) 71°C (160°F). 0 . however.0 552.000 6.e.1. include in the diametral clearance any “breathing. With higher pressures.000 800 600 400 Figure 3-1: Spring-Loading for Low Temperature 27. Cyclic fluctuation of pressure can cause local extrusion of the O-ring resulting in “nibbling” (see Section X. the range of system temperature. At very low pressures. 3.000 O-Ring Applications Garter Spring O-Ring 276. They are available in hard elastomer compounds. the combination of pressure and material shore hardness determine the maximum clearance that may safely be tolerated (see Figure 3-2). and provides size and part number data. may be utilized to calculate compensated gland dimensions. These are thin rings of much harder material fitted into the gland between the seal and the clearance gaps. 4.8 . particularly if peak system pressures are high enough to cause expansion of the cylinder wall. Figure 3-2: Limits for extrusion Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.7 13. Table 2-4. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.3 . 3.030 100 1. PTFE.040 Total Diametral Clearance* (Radial Clearance if Concentricity Between Piston and Cylinder is Rigidly Maintained) *Reduce the clearance shown by 60% when using silicone or fluorosilicone elastomers. leather.4 Extrusion Extrusion of O-rings may also be prevented by the use of anti-extrusion (back-up) devices. thereby obtaining the proper squeeze on the contracted O-ring. One remedy may be to stiffen the cylinder to limit the expansion so that the bore to piston clearance does not exceed a safe value.0 10.8 Hardness Shore A 70 80 90 300 200 3.020 . Limits for Extrusion 690.3 Pressure Pressure has a bearing on O-ring seal design as it can affect the choice of compound shore hardness.0 207. type of elastomer being used. describes in greater detail Parker Parbak back-up rings.000 pressure cycles at the rate of 60 per minute from zero to the indicated pressure. When using the data.000 4.010 . The minimum squeeze values for the various O-ring cross-section diameters given in the design charts of the static and dynamic seal design sections are generally satisfactory. The exact point at which it becomes necessary to use anti-extrusion devices will depend on the pressure. proper sealing may be more easily obtained with lower durometer hardness (50-60 shore A).2 Temperature Operating temperature. the size of the clearance gap.2 41. Lexington. For either high or low temperature seal designs. its Shore hardness.0 Fluid Pressure (Bar) Fluid Pressure (psi ) Soft Metal Wedge 69. Maximum temperature (i. there must normally be sufficient squeeze to prevent leakage at room temperature. Gland dimensions given in the static and dynamic seal design sections are calculated for the temperature ranges listed for standard compounds. Such special designs for high and low temperature environments are seldom required. Conversely. which essentially provide zero clearance. The Parbak Back-Up Rings Section (VI). gland volume may need to be increased to compensate for thermal expansion of the O-ring. 5.

tube ¼ oz. Using a suitable grease or oil during assembly helps protect the O-ring from damage by abrasion.1. Aviation Fluid Service Co. appropriate lubricants help reduce the overall leak rate by filling the microfine inclusions of the gland’s metal surfaces and lowering permeation rates of the elastomer.2 Parker Super-O-Lube Parker Super-O-Lube is an all-purpose O-ring lubricant. The useful temperature is from -29°C to 82°C (-20°F to 180°F). Parker Super- Lubricants Type of Elastomer Type of Service Hydraulic Oils & Fuels Extreme Service Pneumatic Vacuum Best O-Lube Petrolatum Barium Grease Super O-Lube DC-55 Celvacene O-Lube Petrolatum Celvacene MCS-352 Super O-Lube DC4. tube 35 lb. Parker Dow Corning Co. including silicones. the assembly may be subject to higher temperatures. 2. tube 2 oz. DC-7.25OZ SLUBE 884-. Parker Seal offers two lubricants that will satisfy most service needs: Parker O-Lube and Parker Super-O-Lube.5 SLUBE 884-2 SLUBE 884-8 SLUBE 884-40 2 gr. speeds up assembly operations. Skydrol® is a registered trademark of Solutia Inc. The general rule for use of lubrication is: The greatest benefit in using a lubricant is obtained during the initial installation of the O-ring.com Table 3-2: O-Ring Lubricants 3. tube ½ oz. Many Parker Dow Corning Temp Range °F -20 to 180 -20 to 180 -20 to 300 -65 to 400 -65 to 275 -40 to 200 -20 to 180 -20 to 180 -40 to 200 -65 to 300 -65 to 400 +32 to 350 -20 to 300 -20 to 400 -20 to 180 -65 to 350 -65 to 400 +32 to 350 -20 to 180 -65 to 400 -65 to 400 NBR. tube 8 lb. When only a thin film of O-Lube is used for assembly purposes. Nitrile CR. with limits determined by the fluid and elastomer being used. In vacuum applications. It is especially useful as a seal lubricant.1.parkerorings. Neoprene Hydraulic Oils & Freon® Vacuum Skydrol® Steam & Hot Water General High Temperature Oil or Fuel High Temperature Hydraulic Vacuum & High Temperature EPDM Silicone Fluorosilicone Fluorocarbon Notes: Assembly lubricants should always be used sparingly during application. Table 3-1 lists their key properties along with others used in specific types of services. Proper lubrication also helps protect some polymers from degradation by atmospheric elements such as ozone and its presence helps extend the service life of any O-ring. Lexington. DC55 Petrolatum FS1292 Mil P 37649 Petrolatum Super O-Lube DC 4 or DC-7 Petrolatum Super O-Lube DC-55 Manufacturer Parker Many Many Parker Dow Corning Co. It is not a grease.I. A lubricant is almost essential in pneumatic applications requiring dynamic service. It can also be used in pneumatic service. Table 3-2 provides part number information for O-Lube and Super O-Lube. Consolidated Vacuum Corp. This is doubly important in cases 1 and 2 below.1 Parker O-Lube Parker O-Lube is an outstanding general-purpose grease intended for use with O-ring and other seals in hydrocarbon service. Lubricants are commonly used on O-rings and other elastomeric seals. A light film is all that is required. Parker O-Ring Lubricants O-Lube Super-O-Lube Part Number Description Part Number Description OLUBE 884-2GRAMS OLUBE . The temperature range is -54°C to 204°C (-65°F to 400°F). Parker Super-O-Lube can be used as an assembly lubricant on all rubber polymers.1. 3-4 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. tube ¼ oz.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook O-Ring Applications 3. It also helps to seat the O-ring properly. du Pont de Nemours & Co. 1.) In addition.5 Lubrication Lubrication of O-ring seals is extremely important for installation and operation of dynamic seals as well as proper seating of static seals.com . Table 3-1: Parker O-Ring Lubricants Freon® is a registered trademark of E. and makes automated assembly line procedures possible. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. Use only a thin film of Super-O-Lube on silicone rubber if the temperature will exceed 149°C (300°F). These two lubricants are described in the following paragraphs.5. 3.5. Many Many Parker Dow Corning Co. (Note: Silicones require special consideration. Parker Many Consolidated Vacuum Corp.25OZ OLUBE 884-. drum Note: MSDS are available at www. pinching. but rather a high-viscosity silicone oil. tube 4 oz. An additional benefit is the protection that the lubricant provides as a surface film. or cutting. tube ½ oz. can 40 lb pail OLUBE 884-400 400 lb.50 OLUBE 884-4 OLUBE 884-35 2 gr. pail SLUBE 884-Grams SLUBE .parkerorings. Many Dow Corning Co.

clear. Because the lubricant is dispersed throughout the body of an O-ring. white. Internal lubricants consist of organic materials such as graphite. Fluids.parkerorings.1. be used in contact with stainless steel surfaces because graphite tends to cause corrosive pitting of stainless materials. It takes a long time to degrade a significant portion of the coating when it is lost only through the mechanical action of the mating surface. powdered PTFE or. Since there are no organic fillers. Parker Super-O-Lube gives protection to rubber polymers that are normally age sensitive when exposed to the atmosphere. Graphite-impregnated compounds are commonly used to seal rotary shafts. a proprietary Parker organic lubricant. 3. prolonging its lubricating effectiveness. and some solvents can leach out much of the internal lubricant in a short time. This is a typical concern with ozone sensitive polymers that require age control. 5. are available from the O-Ring Division. however. It can be used for high pressure systems or in hard vacuum environments. orange. 2. It should be capable of forming a thin. molybdenum disulfide. where applicable. It clings tenaciously to rubber or metal surface helping to prevent it from being flushed away by action of the system fluid. or a lubricant that would be especially suited to phosphate ester service. Internally lubricated compounds. keep in mind that there are certain systems in which lubricants would introduce unacceptable contamination. brown umber. there may be a need for a special high vacuum grease.3 PTFE Coatings PTFE coatings of O-rings is an ideal low-friction coating where operational flexibility is a major consideration. O-Ring Applications 3-5 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. but to a somewhat lesser degree. 4.1. and may also be used in many types of applications to reduce friction in service. 3. compounds containing molybdenum disulfide are often a successful alternative. For instance. red. tend to dissolve it. Super-O-Lube’s inert nature lends itself to a wide variety of fluid systems. strong (high surface tension) film over the metal being lubricated that the O-ring’s dynamic motion cannot wipe away. For such applications. black. Parker’s internally lubricated materials are assigned unique compound numbers to differentiate them from their non-lubricated counterparts. In addition to its outstanding performance in internal service. grey.5. 3. Note: While it is always preferable to use a lubricant.5. These may include internal lubrication and Parker’s Proprietary Lube Treatment. pink and green/gold. For guidance in handling these unique situations consult a Parker O-Ring Division Application Engineer.com . There are special situations that may exist where one of the two Parker lubricants would not be the best recommendation. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. there can be no clogging of microfilters. more commonly. such as semiconductor fabrication and processing equipment or medical and food processing devices. PTFE migrates through the O-ring and gradually blooms to the surface.5. It should not however. Compounds containing this organic lubricant have become quite popular. medium blue. It should pass through any filters used in the system. It has one of the widest temperature ranges of any seal lubricant available. 3. yellow. light blue. Compound V0848-75 contains powdered PTFE to reduce friction.5 Internal Lubrication Internal lubrication involves the incorporation of friction reducing ingredients into the elastomer formula. Parker Seal can supply O-rings that have received various friction reducing treatments. medium green. this method of friction reduction generally functions longer in service than external lubrication. It or any additives that it contains. PTFE also offers additional benefits such as: • Positive identification at the assembly line • Ease of installation • Lower break-in torques • Reduces costly “hang-ups” on automatic systems • Lower initial running friction • Eliminates sticking of components after long storage • Reduces twisting of rings during installation The following colors are available: standard blue.4 Other Friction Reduction Methods Besides O-Lube and Super-O-Lube. Since this process alters the material’s chemistry. It should not excessively soften or solidify over the anticipated service temperature range. dark green. purple. determine that it meets the following requirements: 1.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > O-Lube has some unique advantages.1. or show any adverse chemical reaction with the primary fluid being sealed. Before selecting a lubricant (other than the primary fluid being sealed) for use with O-rings. Lexington. It should not break-down and leave gummy or gritty deposits after cycling. Both are valuable aids for automated assembly operations. should not cause shrinkage or excessive swelling of the O-ring compound being used.

364 x . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.046 x .00 x 2. 3.00 x 2.00 x 3.50 36.50 31.737 x .103 0.00 x 3.984 x .50 41.50 Quantity 14 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 Table 3-3: Extraction Tools and Cone Part Numbers O-Ring Kits Part Number Plastic Std.00 x 2.00 x 3.600 x .424 x .00 x 3.50 50.50 20.139 1. We’ll even build custom kits using any of our 200-plus compounds.070 0. AS568 Kit #1 Sizes Size 2-006 2-007 2-008 2-009 2-010 2-011 2-012 2-110 2-111 2-112 2-113 2-114 2-115 2-116 2-210 2-211 2-212 2-213 2-214 2-215 2-216 2-217 2-218 2-219 2-220 2-221 2-222 2-225 2-226 2-227 Dimensions 0.1.070 0.50 16.103 0.50 Table 3-6: Parker Metric Kit #1 Sizes Note: Boxes and plugs are available as separate items.103 0.00 x 2.00 x 3.50 28.171 x .796 x .00 x 3.00 x 2.parkerorings.070 0.6 Accessories 3.139 1.139 1.00 x 2.50 18.50 25.139 1.6.139 0.674 x . Kit E0515 Plastic Std. They are available in brass or plastic with or without a convenient carrying case. 3.210 1. O-Ring Extraction Tools and Cone Part Numbers Part Number Brass Extraction Kit Plastic O-ring Pick Plastic Sizing Cone Notes: Private labeling is available.50 12.139 0.103 0. Please note: the cone and tape do not measure actual dimensions of a part and cannot be used for pass/fail inspections.00 5.00 x 2.070 0.00 x 3.00 x 2. 2 in 37 popular AS568 sizes / 513 O-rings Compound N0552-90 NBR 90 durometer O-rings in 37 popular AS568 sizes / 513 O-rings Compound N0674-70 NBR 70 durometer O-rings in 37 popular AS568 sizes / 513 O-rings Compound V0747-75 FKM 75 durometer O-rings in 37 popular AS568 sizes / 513 O-rings Compound V0884-75 FKM (brown) 75 durometer O-rings in 37 popular AS568 sizes / 513 O-rings Compound N1470-70 NBR 70 durometer in 30 popular sizes / 382 O-rings Compound N1470-70 NBR 70 durometer in 32 popular metric sizes / 372 O-rings Compound N1490-90 NBR 90 durometer in 20 standard tube fitting sizes 10.00 10.00 x 2.00 x 3.362 x .00 8.103 0.210 1.139 1.549 x . these o-ring kits can save the day.00 x 2. Kit V0884 N1470 AS568 Kit #1 N1470 Metric Kit #1 N1490 Boss Kit Description Compound E0515-80 EPR 80 durometer O-rings per NAS 1613 rev.00 Quantity 20 20 18 18 18 14 14 18 14 14 14 14 10 14 10 14 Dimensions 22.00 x 3.50 13.00 x 2.139 1.6.50 23.296 x .50 18.484 x .50 15. and the parts themselves are unavailable from the equipment OEM.612 x .00 x 3.139 1.00 6.103 0.00 x 3.070 0.6.234 x .00 14.103 0.176 x .109 x . Lexington.487 x .00 x 3.208 x .359 x .50 22.210 Quantity 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 7 7 7 O-Ring Applications Description Brass extraction pick and spat in plastic pouch Plastic extraction pick O-ring sizing kit Table 3-5: AS568 Kit #1 Sizes Parker Metric Kit #1 Sizes Dimensions 3.50 21.50 27. See table 3-3 for part number information. Kit N0674 Plastic Std. seal dimensions are unknown.50 44. Please see table 3-4 through table 3-7 for detailed kit information.145 x . Kit V0747 Plastic Std.070 0.421 x .00 x 3.239 x .114 x .50 38.50 30.1. not to mention hours of downtime.734 x .139 0.725 x .< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook 3.1.921 x .com . More than eight different standard kits give you a choice of compounds and o-ring sizes for a wide range of sealing applications.00 x 2.239 x .00 x 3.50 20.1.070 0.139 1.00 x 2.00 x 3.139 0.2 O-Ring Sizing Cone A unique measuring cone and circumference “Pi” tape provide quick and easy o-ring sizing information to determine the nearest standard Parker o-ring size.00 x 3. The end result? Multiple sealing solutions for the same cost as a single OEM replacement part.3 O-Ring Kits When part numbers are missing. Table 3-4: O-Ring Kits 3-6 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.00 x 2.50 32.50 46. Kit N0552 Plastic Std.00 x 2.139 1.475 x .859 x .1 Extraction Tools These unique double-ended tools make life easier for those who have to frequently install or remove O-rings from hydraulic or pneumatic cylinders and equipment.50 34.00 x 3.

116 1.118 2. there is still some choice as to cross-section. 3.2 Cleanliness Cleanliness is vitally important to assure proper sealing action and long O-ring life. This leads to early O-ring spiral failure and leakage.4 Selecting the Best Cross-Section In designing an O-ring seal.D. ports. it may be necessary to exceed this rule of thumb. If impossible to avoid by proper design. threads.239 x .D. 5. tending to twist in the groove when reciprocating motion occurs. and the larger cross-sections will prove to be the more stable. reciprocating application.064 0. for many dynamic applications.097 0.097 0. (2) Applies to tensile and elongation of nitriles. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. Lexington. reducing its life. More likely to leak due to dirt. metal chips.355 x .116 0. Every precaution must be taken to insure that all component parts are clean at time of assembly. It is equally important to maintain clean hydraulic fluids during the normal operation of dynamic seal systems. scratches. Gland closure should be accomplished by straight longitudinal movement.116 1. to cross-section diameter. etc. Excessive stretch will shorten the life of most O-ring materials. All Seals Requires larger supporting structure Better compression set (1) Less volume swell in fluid Less resistant to explosive decompression Allows use of larger tolerances while still controlling squeeze adequately Less sensitive to dirt.924 x .118 Tube OD ⁄32 1 ⁄8 3 ⁄16 ¼ 5 ⁄16 3 ⁄8 7 ⁄16 ½ 9 ⁄16 5 ⁄8 11 ⁄16 ¾ 13 ⁄16 7 ⁄8 1 11⁄8 1¼ 1½ 1¾ 2 3 Quantity 10 10 10 10 12 12 12 12 12 12 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 4. keyways. expansion needed to reach the groove during assembly ordinarily does not exceed 25-50% and should not exceed 50% of the ultimate elongation of the chosen compound. Nevertheless.986 x .072 0. Doubtful for ethylene propylenes and silicones. In a dynamic. stretch.468 x .D. slots. the choice is automatically narrowed because the design charts and tables do not include all the standard O-ring sizes.3 Assembly Assembly must be done with great care so that the O-ring is properly placed in the groove and is not damaged as the gland assembly is closed. 3. dimension are therefore omitted in the reciprocating seal design tables. If so. The I.082 0. is the reduced breakaway and running friction obtainable with a smaller cross-section O-ring. However. 3. Some of the more important design features to insure this are: 1.414 x .755 x . see Figure 3-3 for data on the flattening effect produced by installation stretch.— in the gland may cause leakage and can damage the O-ring.056 0. 6. lint. O-rings should never be forced over unprotected sharp corners.475 x . Better physical properties(2) O-Ring Applications Table 3-7: Parker Boss Kit Sizes 3. scratches. See Figure 3-4.116 1. Costly shut downs necessitated by excessive seal wear and requiring early seal replacement may be prevented by the use of effective filters in the fluid power system as well as installing wiper rings on actuating rods exposed to external dust. should not be more than 5%. The O-ring should not be twisted.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Parker Boss Kit Sizes Size 3-901 3-902 3-903 3-904 3-905 3-906 3-907 3-908 3-909 3-910 3-911 3-912 3-913 3-914 3-916 3-918 3-920 3-924 3-928 3-932 Dimensions 0. Rotary or oscillatory motion is undesirable since it may cause bunching. dirt.078 0. The I. as installed in the groove. The smaller cross-sections for each O-ring I. etc. For any given piston or rod diameter. there are usually several standard cross-section diameters available. Also. Effects of Cross Section Larger Section Smaller Section Dynamic Reciprocating Seals More stable More friction Less stable Less friction Requires less space — reduces weight Poorer compression set (1) More volume swell in fluid More resistant to explosive decompression Requires closer tolerances to control squeeze. for small diameter O-rings. (1) Particularly true for nitrile and fluorocarbon elastomers.644 x .047 x .301 x .118 1. There are a number of factors to consider in deciding which one to use. Twisting during installation will most readily occur with O-rings having a large ratio of I. Table 3-8: Effects of Cross Section Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.116 0. sufficient time should be allowed for the O-ring to return to its normal diameter before closing the gland assembly.706 x .parkerorings. etc. lint.337 x . These and other factors to be considered are tabulated on Table 3-8.171 x .185 x . grit.072 0. Poorer physical properties (2) Cost and availability are other factors to consider.720 x . or other sharp edges. O-rings with smaller cross-section diameters are inherently less stable than larger cross-sections.090 x .087 0.com 3-7 .351 x . and these would need to be determined for the particular sizes being considered.116 1. splines. misalignment and pinching or cutting of the seal. supports.118 2. elongation of fluorocarbons. then thimbles.530 x . Counterweighing this factor. Closure of the gland assembly must not pinch the O-ring at the groove corners.D. Foreign particles — dust.863 x .064 0. and some of these factors are somewhat contradictory. dirt and other contaminants. 2. or other shielding arrangements must be used during assembly to prevent damage to the seal.

Extra stretch may be necessary when a non-standard bore or rod diameter is encountered. When the centerline diameter is stretched more than two or three percent. more recent research has been done for the low stretch cases (i.56 + .” i.com .001X3 + 0.005 + 1. X = 5) Y = percent reduction in cross section diameter. refer to inPHorm seal design and material selection software. Stretch: Y = .19X2 . an O-ring cross section is no longer circular. Empirical formulas for observed curve: 0 to 3% Inside Dia. The “observed” curve shown in Figure 3-3 indicates how much the compression diameter is reduced..0.0. but then the gland depth must be reduced as indicated above because the stretch may approach five percent. in a location where the seal cannot be watched and manually guided into the bore. reducing the gland depth below the recommended dimensions shown in the standard design charts. its cross-section is reduced and flattened. It is often necessary to compensate for the loss in squeeze resulting from the reduced “compression diameter.e.19X .59X . for 5% stretch. Lexington. In male gland (piston type) assemblies of large diameter. the gland depth must be reduced to retain the necessary squeeze on the reduced and flattened cross-section. The necessary percentage of squeeze should be applied to this corrected compression diameter.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook O-Ring Applications 3. This curve is based on a statistical analysis of a much larger volume of experimental data than has been available previously. Stretch: Y = -0. Note: Figure 3-3 is valid for approximation purposes and even the majority of O-ring applications. For large diameter assemblies of this kind. 0 – 5%) where the observed values conform to a more complex hyperbolic function.parkerorings.0046X2 Where X = percent stretch on inside diameter (i. There is then the danger of pinching if the O-ring enters the bore “blind.e.008X4 3 to 25% Inside Dia. In the stretched condition. The calculated curve is based on the assumption that the O-ring section remains round and the volume does not change after stretching. the recommended stretch is so slight that the O-ring may simply sag out of the groove.e. However.. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. Michigan. it is well to use an O-ring one size smaller than indicated. Free Diameter Free O-ring Compression Diameter Stretched O-ring Loss of Compression Diameter (W) Due to Stretch Percent Reduction in Cross Section Diameter (Flattening) 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 Percent of Diametral Stretch on O-ring Inside Diameter at Time of Assembly Observed Calculated Proper Designs for Installation of O-rings (X Greater Than Y) X Free O-ring Y Chamfer Angle 10° to 20° Chamfer to Serve as Shoe Horn Cylinder Bore 10° to 20° 10° to 20° Direction of Installation The “observed” curve is reproduced by courtesy of the Research Laboratories of General Motors Corporation at the General Motors Technical Center in Warren. For more information. Formula: Y = 100 1 - Piston Rod Bore Cross Drilled Port See View "A" to Eliminate Sharp Edge Pinched O-ring Chamfer Hole Junction or Undercut Bore (Preferred) View A Enlarged ( 10 100 + X ( Figure 3-4: Proper Designs for Installation of O-rings Figure 3-3: Loss of Compression Diameter (W) Due to Stretch 3-8 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.” Dimensional changes in the “free diameter” do not affect the seal.5 Stretch When an O-ring is stretched.

and the amount of compression desired. 3. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.007 inches). fluorocarbon. and the seal may function at a somewhat lower temperature. 3. Exceptions include low-pressure air valves. Refer to Figure 3-6 for the following information: The dotted line indicates the approximate linear change in the cross section (W) of an O-ring when the gland prevents any change in the I.2 mm (. Lexington. Hence this curve indicates the change in the effective squeeze on an O-ring due to shrinkage or swell. O-ring volume swell and possible thermal expansion of the seal. Most O-ring seal applications call for a gland fill of between 60% to 85% of the available volume with the optimum fill being 75% (or 25% void). whichever material has the necessary resistance to the temperatures and fluids involved. See the Dynamic ORing Sealing. In compound N0552-90 the compression force decrease was 22% through the same temperature range. When used as a static seal. or the O. The reason for the 60% to 85% range is because of potential tolerance stacking.005 inches). Yet the compression force decreases very little except for the hardest compounds. representing three nitrile compounds.010 Compression 0.D. The reason is that with a very light squeeze almost all elastomers quickly take 100% compression set.7 Gland Fill The percentage of gland volume that an O-ring cross-section displaces in its confining gland is called “gland fill”. if a shorter useful life is acceptable. Therefore.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Compression Recovery of Three O-Ring Compounds When Light Squeeze is Applied 100 Recovery Percent of Original Delection 75 50 Recovery After Compression of 70 Hours at 100°C (212°F) Recovery is Essentially Independent of Sample Thickness recovery when the squeeze is less than . Of the commonly used O-ring seal elastomers. though this amount may cause assembly problems in a radial squeeze seal design. Figure 3-5 illustrates this lack of Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.015 0.1 mm (.5 0. 0 0. however.6 Squeeze The tendency of an O-ring to attempt to return to its original uncompressed shape when the cross-section is deflected is the basic reason why O-rings make such excellent seals. the reduction in useful life is probably greatest with nitrile materials. the maximum recommended squeeze is approximately 16%.1 0. with swell. The three curves. it is best to use ethylene propylene. and Tables A6-6 and A6-7 for more information on pneumatic and rotary O-ring seal design. with shrinkage. its cross-section. It is essential to allow at least a 10% void in any elastomer sealing gland.4 0.005 inch). the compressive force per linear inch for two rings will still vary if the rings are made from different compounds or if their inside diameters are different. a 30% squeeze is often beneficial because recovery is more complete in this range. Over five percent stretch may sometimes be used. Obviously then.parkerorings. There is a danger in squeezing much more than 30% since the extra stress induced may contribute to early seal deterioration. Section V. In a face seal situation. the compression force for O-rings in compound N0674-70 decreased only 10% as the temperature was increased from 24°C (75°F) to 126°C (258°F). the table for O-ring compression force. Increased service temperatures generally tend to soften elastomeric materials (at least at first). regardless of cross-section should be about . though smaller cross-sections may be squeezed as much as 25%. The values obtained from a large number of tests are expressed in the bar charts of Figures 2-4 through 2-8 in Section II. A volumetric shrinkage of six percent results in only three percent 25 0 mm 0 In. where high stretch is necessary. If the hardness of the compound is known quite accurately.1 mm (. due to friction and wear considerations. squeeze is a major consideration in O-ring seal design. Even if all these factors are the same.. however.8 O-Ring Compression Force The force required to compress each linear inch of an O-ring seal depends principally on the shore hardness of the O-ring. The anticipated load for a given installation is not fixed. but is a range of values. show very clearly that a good compression set resistant compound can be distinguished from a poor one only when the applied squeeze exceeds . for which the floating pneumatic piston ring design is commonly used. 3. and some rotary O-ring seal applications. Note that volumetric change may not be such a disadvantage as it appears at first glance. For instance.020 Figure 3-5: Compression Recovery of Three O-ring Compounds When Light Squeeze is Applied An assembled stretch greater than five percent is not recommended because the internal stress on the O-ring causes more rapid aging. polyurethane or neoprene. Table 2-3 may be used to determine which portion of the bar is most likely to apply. O-Ring Applications Most seal applications cannot tolerate a “no” or zero squeeze condition. the maximum recommended squeeze for most elastomers is 30%. In dynamic applications.com 3-9 . Somewhat higher squeeze may be used if the seal will not be exposed to high temperatures nor to fluids that tend to attack the elastomer and cause additional swell.3 0.D. The minimum squeeze for all seals.005 0.

however.com . 3-10 3. fuel. The critical temperature often is bridged when the seal warms quickly in service. Dot4. The demands made on an elastomer at high and low temperatures are even greater than normal while compatibility with new chemical additives which improve the physical properties of automotive fuels and oils.4 Fuel System Gasoline and diesel fuels are used in normal commercial vehicles.9. leakage at low temperatures may not occur because of O-ring deformation and the high viscosity of the sealed medium.3 Brake System General requirements: Temperature: -40°C to 150°C (-40°F to 302°F) Medium: Synthetic brake fluid (Dot3.2 Engine See Table 3-9.9. O-Ring Applications O-Ring Linear vs. The low temperature requirements for many automotive applications are often below the brittleness point for elastomers like FKM. Lexington. Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. This represents a reduction of only .parkerorings. Each group of elastomers have a working range of temperatures.9.003" of squeeze on an O-ring having a . The solid lines indicate linear change in both I. Dot5) with glycol or glycol-ether base to Department of Transportion and SAE recommendations Compound: E0667-70. Fuels are more aggressive than mineral oils and cause higher swelling of the elastomer which increases with temperature. hot air and mixtures of these media Engine Applications Temperature Range °C (°F) -35°C to 110°C (-31°F to 230°F) Application Medium Volume Swell — Percent 70 60 Free O-Ring 50 40 30 20 Linear Shrinkage 10 Percent 15 10 5 Fixed I. generally reversible when the absorbed fuel vaporizes completely. When parts of a compound are dissolved or leached out of the elastomer however. E1022-70 3. Volume Change Relationship 100 90 80 3. shrinkage takes place which is permanent. a compound must be selected which contains minimum amounts of plasticisers.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook linear shrinkage when the O-ring is confined in a gland.103" cross-section (W) dimension. General requirements: Temperature: -40°C to 125°C (-40°F to 250°F) (sometimes higher) Medium: Engine oil. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.D. However. ACM and NBR. By careful selection of the seal compound. The following examples can be viewed as a brief analysis of the problems found in the automotive industry. Compounds ASTM D1418 Parker NBR NBR FKM ACM NBR FKM NBR VMQ N0674-70 N0951-75 V1164-75 AA150-70 N0951-75 V1164-70 N0674-70 S1224-70 Fixed O.D. Swelling of an elastomer in fuel is. cooling water. static applications. and cross-section for a free-state (unconfined) O-ring. If a nitrile-based compound is required.D.9. anti-aging or anti-ozone additives.9 Specific Applications 3.1 Automotive The types of elastomer compound required by this industry are numerous and the variety of applications quite extensive. The selection of the proper O-ring compound depends on the temperature at the sealing interface and of the contact medium. the tendency to shrinkage or cold brittleness is avoided. require continuous improvement in elastomeric compounds for automotive service. Motor oil Oil filter SAEOils -30°C to 120°C (-22°F to 248°F) -25°C to 200°C (-13°F to 392°F) -25°C to 150°C (-13°F to 392 °F) Wet cylinders (Diesel) Water/ Oil -30°C to 100°C (-22°F to 212°F) -25°C to 120°C (-13°F to 248°F) -35°C to 90°C (-31°F to 194°F) -60°C to 210°C (-76°F to 410°F) 5 10 20 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 Air-filter Air/Fuel Linear Expansion — Percent Volume Shrinkage Percent Table 3-9: Engine Applications Figure 3-6: O-ring Linear vs. Volume Change Relationship 3.

The results will not be precise because the effect of volume swell on the TR-10 value is not precise. N0552-90. An O-ring can swell only until it completely fills the cavity. the low temperature capability (TR-10) was improved between 0. whether in a static or a dynamic application. swell can sometimes be tolerated. and also because the composition of the fuels themselves is not uniform. it was found that for each percent of volume swell in a fuel. diesel and biodeisel are the most common. In automotive fuel applications. In dynamic applications. can be used to approximate the low temperature capability of a given compound in a given automotive fuel. Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. an O-ring will generally function to a temperature approximately 8°C (15°F) lower than the TR-10 temperature.9. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. With these factors in mind. gasoline (which can contain 10-20% ethanol). AA150-70. i. please contact Parker’s O-Ring Division. Most of the compounds recommended for use in fuel have rather poor low temperature capability in air.5 Fuels for Automobile Engines There are several automotive fuels on the market. 3. but in a fluid that swells them the low temperature capability improves. therefore. V1164-75.com 3-11 . In static applications.parkerorings. Further increase in volume is not possible. In studying the effects of volume swell on low temperature. Parker is at the forefront in testing elastomer materials for use in traditional and alternative fuels.9. The volume swell chart that follows.6 Transmission General requirements: Temperature: 90°C (158°F) (short periods up to 150°C) (302°F) Medium: Gear oil (reference oil SAE 90) For automatic transmission: Medium: ATF oil (Automatic Transmission Fluid) Compound: N0674-70. Lexington. ethanol/E85. but also on the temperature range anticipated and the type of usage. The best rubber compound to use depends not only on the fuel itself. AE152-70 (Vamac). however.9.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > 3. regardless of how much volume swell is observed in a full immersion test. If the free state swell exceeds 50 percent. but higher values are likely to increase friction and reduce toughness and abrasion resistance to the point that use of the particular compound is no longer feasible.e. Table 3-10: Volume Swell of Compounds Prestone® is a registered trademark of Prestone Products Corporation. even in most extreme volume cases. For the latest information and test data regarding this rapidly changing industry. but in northern climates. Generally available off-the-shelf. V0884-75 (brown) 3. the data in Table 3-10 can be helpful in finding a suitable compound to use in a given automotive fuel application. The TR-10 value is a good indicator of the low temperature limit of a dynamic seal or a static seal exposed to pulsating pressure. (3) The “gasohol” mixture most commonly used in the United States consists of unleaded gasoline plus 10% ethanol (ethyl alcohol).5°C and 1°C (1°F and 2°F). a radial squeeze assembly may be almost impossible to take apart because of the osmotic forces generated. In a static steady pressure application. temperatures as low as -40°C (-40°F) or even -54°C (-65°F) are sometimes encountered. TR-10 in air FUEL Unleaded gasoline Unleaded +10% ethanol (3) Unleaded +20% ethanol Unleaded +10% methanol Unleaded +20% methanol 12% 26% 24% 35% 32% 14% 24% 24% 33% 30% 36% 53% 56% 66% 67% 1% 5% 4% 14% 26% 1% 2% 5% 16% 36% 47-071(2) -40°F N0497-70 -23°F N0674-70(2) -15°F V0747-75(2) +5°F V0834-70 +5°F (1) Volume swell of 2-214 O-ring immersed in the fuel for 70 hours at room temperature.7 Cooling and Heating Systems General requirements: Temperature: -40°C to 100°C (-40°F to 212°F) (short periods up to 120°C (257°F)) Medium: a) Water-glycol mixture 1:1 (with 1 to 2% corrosion retarding additives) Medium: b) Water-ethylene glycol mixture 1:1 (Prestone® antifreeze) Compound: E0803-70 O-Ring Applications Volume Swell of Compounds Compound No. (2) Stock standard compounds. volume swell up to 15 or 20 percent is usually acceptable. extremely high temperatures are not anticipated.

Refrigerants often are coded “R” and consist of fluids based on fluorinated and chlorinated hydrocarbons. The requirements of the two specifications are essentially identical. E-3A Sanitary Standards. Lexington. V0884-75 (brown) Compound Recommendation for Refrigerants Fluorinated Hydrocarbons Refrigerant (R) 11 12 12 and ASTM oil no. Kaltron® are used together with the type number. Benckiser GMBH Joint Stock Company. Frigen 13 B1 and Kaltron 13 B1 Fire extinguishers are propelled with Halon R1301 corresponding to Freon 13 B1. Frigen®.com . 3-12 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. 2 (mixed 50:50) 31 32 112 113 114 114 B2 115 502 134a BF (R112) C318 K-152a K-142b MF (R11) PCA (R113) TF (R113) ASTM D1418 NBR CR FKM FKM CR CR CR CR CR CR CR CR FKM CR CR CR CR CR CR FKM CR CR CR NBR CR CR Parker N0674-70 C0873-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 C0873-70 C0873-70 C0873-70 C0873-70 C0873-70 C0873-70 C0873-70 C0873-70 V1164-75 C0873-70 C0873-70 C0873-70 C0873-70 C0873-70 C0873-70 V1164-75 C0873-70 C0873-70 C0873-70 N0674-70 C0873-70 C0873-70 Table 3-11: Compound Recommendation for Refrigerants Frigen® is a registered trademark of Canadian Hoechst Limited Corporation. A similar document. Further information on compounds can be found in the Fluid Compatibility Tables in Section VII. the intent in each case being to determine whether rubber materials are capable of being cleaned and receiving an effective bactericidal treatment while still maintaining their physical properties after repeated applications of the cleaning process chemicals. Rubber compounds produced entirely from these ingredients and which also pass the FDA extraction tests are said to “meet the FDA requirements” per 21 CFR177. the International Association of Milk Food and Environmental Standards. and the Dairy and Food Industries Supply Association.10 Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Seals used in cooling systems should be fully compatible with the refrigerant. Beverage and Potable Water The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has established a list of rubber compounding ingredients which tests have indicated are neither toxic nor carcinogenic (cancer producing).2600. Freon.9.8 Air Conditioning Automotive A/C units are almost exclusively charged with refrigerant R134a. e. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. It is the responsibility of the manufacturer to compound food grade materials from the FDA list of ingredients and establish whether they pass the necessary extraction requirements. General requirements: Temperature: -40°C to 80°C (-40°F to 175°F) Medium: refrigerant R134a refrigerant R12 polyalkylene glycol oil mineral oil Compound: C0873-70.9 Power Steering Systems General requirements: Temperature: Up to 120°C (-40°F to 257°F) (short periods up to 150°C (302°F)) Medium: Power steering fluid Compound: N0674-70. The FDA does not approve rubber compounds.9. AA150-70. whereas R12 systems employ mostly mineral oils. See Table 3-11. Examples: • R13 corresponds to Freon 13 and Kaltron 13 • R13 B1 corresponds to Freon 13 B1. 3. N1173-70 3. whereas existing units are generally filled with the older (and now banned in US) R12 Freon refrigerant. 3.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook 3. FKM or ACM based materials are often are preferred when high operating temperatures are involved. while the E-3A standards are intended for elastomers used as product contact surfaces in egg processing equipment. The 3-A standards are intended for elastomers to be used as product contact surfaces in dairy equipment. Kaltron® is a registered trademark of Joh A.11 Food.g.9. AE152-70 (Vamac). 2 (mixed 50:50) 12 and Suniso 4G (mixed 50:50) 13 13 B1 14 21 22 22 and ASTM oil no. 3-A Sanitary Standards have been formulated by the United States Public Health Service. Oils are preferred which tend to have a constant viscosity over a wide temperature range. These highly developed oils can be very aggressive.9. V1164-75. Trade names. N0552-90. was later formulated by this same group plus the United States Department of Agriculture and the Institute of American Poultry Industries.parkerorings. O-Ring Applications Special oils are added to the refrigerant in order to lubricate the compressor: R134a systems use mostly polyalkylene glycol oils. Several of these refrigerants also are used as propellants in aerosol containers.

Parker Seal has developed a number of compounds. This extra space greatly reduces the pressures that can be generated by a confined elastomer and avoids damaging any but the very lightest type of structure.e.12. plastic.com 3-13 . Aerozine 50) does not pose as difficult a sealing problem as does the oxidizer.12. Meat and Poultry Inspection Program. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. and JP-5. metal or other materials. has been realized through special design practices. Food and Beverage..4 (1) NT = Not tested (2) USDA = Declared “chemically acceptable” by United States Department of Agriculture. The expected life of a seal of conventional design immersed in N2O4 is limited. Most currently available elastomeric compounds are degraded by the extremely vigorous N2O4 oxidizer.2 Liquid Rocket Propellants (Nitrogen Tetroxide/Aerozine 50) Rocket propulsion systems utilizing oxidizer and fuel combinations such as nitrogen tetroxide (N2O4) and Aerozine 50 (50/50 mixture of UDMH and hydrazine) prompted development of an elastomeric compound to seal against these fluids. 1B. technical and quality requirements.9. O-Ring Applications Polymer Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Nitrile 3A and E3A Classes NT(1) 1. but its low temperature capability does not normally extend below -29°C (-20°F).2..3. In the older jet fuels. Some of these are listed below. In JP-9 and JP-10.9. In the Gask-O-Seal rubber/metal configuration.3. Parker developed a number of compounds which demonstrate markedly improved resistance to N2O4 in both liquid and vapor phases. Additionally many special requirements must be met during the production of finished parts.4 1. Information on some of these and other Parker food grade compounds is contained in Table 3-12 to assist the user in selecting the most suitable compound for their particular food application. In dynamic applications. which meet NSF 51 and NSF 61 requirements.2. Special materials often must be developed to meet specification requirements.3. and NSF 61. 2B/USDA Rust Rust/USDA(2) Silicone S1138-70 S0355-75 NT(1) 1. Parker Compounds that Meet FDA Requirements FDA Compound Number E1028-70 V0680-70 N1069-70 N1219-60 N1220-70 N0508-75 S0802-40 S0317-60 3.4 Color/Other Features Black Red/USDA Black Black Black Black. Lexington. Considerable useful seal life with the material however.2. allowing the O-rings to swell this amount before they are contained.” Table 3-12: Parker Compounds That Meet FDA Requirements National Sanitation Foundation Additional requirements have been imposed upon seal manufacturers regarding food. deal with indirect additives that may arise by migration into food. In a standard O-ring cavity. Potable Water. The standard cavities have at least 10% excess void. where only a minute portion of the sealing element is exposed to the fluid.parkerorings.2. and the most popular of these have been tested to the 3-A and E-3A standards. 3. Parker’s V1164-75 fluorocarbon elastomer may be used because it swells less than 2% in these fluids. Parker compounds have sealed nitrogen tetroxide at room temperature for more than a year. “They may be used in processing or storage areas for contact with meat or poultry food product prepared under Federal inspection.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Parker Seal produces a number of compounds that meet FDA requirements. Classes 1A. the rubber is confined. However. NSF 51 Certified Materials N1219-60 N1220-70 V0680-70 E3609-70 NSF 61 Certified Materials N0757-70 E3609-70 E1244-70 E1512-70 E1549-70 E1561-60 E1571-70 E1570-70 E1583-70 EJ273-70 EJ274-70 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. such as JP-3.3. jet fuels can generally be sealed with nitrile O-ring materials such as Parker’s N0602-70. 3. the normal volume swell is 24 to 40%. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. JP-4. beverage and potable water service. 2A. and the later JP-8 and RJ-4. The fuel system (i. beverage and potable water from rubber.9.12 Aerospace Technology The aerospace industry demands the most from elastomeric compounds. not least to meet safety.3.4 NT(1) NT(1) NT(1) 1. USDA(2) White Rust/ZZ-R-765.1 Jet Fuels In static applications. NSF 51. the swell seldom exceeds 20%.4 2. Our experience in aerospace sealing has been gained by working with a variety of global airframe and jet engine customers and as well as being represented on a number of standardization committees. and cannot swell to this extent.

Working conditions vary greatly to location and function. Because effects vary with the individual compound. use only at lower dosage level.3% 149°C (300°F) OK to 49°C (120°F) Good N0741-75 Nitrile 24. the effects on all compounds were minor. Temp.6% 204°C (400°F) Poor Good (1) Compression set after exposure to 107 rads of gamma radiation at room temperature. Typical nuclear operating conditions are: Temperature: 180°C (350°F) Irradiation: 107 rad 3.13 Nuclear Technology Elastomers which are compounded for exposure to radiation must satisfy stringent quality and material qualification tests. that an O-ring compound must be selected with care. The total effect is probably greater than a simple addition of the indi- vidual effects. etc). silicone fluids or other influences in addition to the radiation. all elastomers tested had taken over 85% set. pressure. At 1 x107 rads. Table 3-13 gives data to aid in selecting the most promising compounds to test for many combinations of conditions.14 Radiation One of the most important properties if an elastomer used as an O-ring seal is its resistance to compression set. it is important that the exact compound be specified. and at lower levels factors other than radiation will be more significant. In addition to resisting radiation. On exposure to gamma radiation.9. etc.parkerorings.com . sour gas. rinsing water.6% 149°C (300°F) Good Good P0642-70 Polyurethane 55. seals are often exposed to hot water.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook O-Ring Applications 3. while at higher levels they should not be considered.4% 177°C (350°F) Poor Poor E0515-80 Ethylene Propylene 46. In a reactor. Water and steam are common media in nuclear applications.9. steam. If over 40%. Table 3-13: Data on Radiation Resistant Compounds 3-14 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. 3. oil.6% 177°C (350°F) Good Good S0455-70 Silicone (Hi Temp) 31. while at 1 x 106 rads. data presented represents family of materials. enough loss of “memory” that leakage would be expected. (2) Temperature at which .(2) Steam & Water Resistance Silicone Fluid Resistance S0604-70 Silicone 20. ground water). Lexington. steam. Working conditions are very difficult involving: • Aggressive contact media • High pressures • Wide range of temperatures Critical conditions occur in connection with: • Oil additives causing chemical attack • Explosive decompression • Clearance gap extrusion at high pressure • High and low temperatures Contact media are gas.9. Parker has developed compounds with resistance to radiation levels of 107 rad. a level normally attained after years of operation. Note: Some of these compounds may no longer be available. Set at 107 Rads(1) Max. it is compression set that is most severely affected. and not merely the type of polymer. water (sea water. It is therefore in the range of 1 x 107. Oil and Gas Applications in the offshore industry pose new and unique problems for seal manufacturers.0% 204°C (400°F) Poor Poor N0674-70 Nitrile 24. the elastomer also must be compatible with the contact medium under the working environment (temperature.5% 149°C (300°F) Poor Good V0747-75 Fluorocarbon 66. (3) Material is obsolete. lubricants (additives in lubricants as rust inhibitors). CO2. The lower values are preferred. hot air.15 Energy.7% 204°C (400°F) Poor Good L0677-70(3) Fluorosilicone 67.139 cross section ring takes a 90% compression set after 1000 hours when not exposed to radiation or fluids. the radiation dosage level remains below 106 rad. and it is therefore important to test a seal in conditions similar to those it will encounter in service. Practically all elastomers suffer no change of their physical properties at radiation levels up to 1 M rad (= 106 rad = 104 J/kg). After experiencing 1 x 108 rads. drilling mud. there were big differences between compounds. Temperatures: up to 225°C (450°F) plus peaks Working pressures: 100 to 1000 Bar and higher (1450 psi to 14500 psi and higher) Contact our Application Engineering Department regarding the above and more difficult conditions.2% 82°C (180°F) Poor Good A0607-70(3) Polyacrylate 61. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.3% 149°C (300°F) OK to 49°C (120°F) Good E0740-75 Ethylene Propylene 28. Data on Radiation Resistant Compounds Compound Polymer Comp. In the majority of these applications.

By studying all the ingredients of a particular compound. the balance being “concentrates” which improve wear and corrosion resistance. it is important to select a seal compound having a temperature range that is suitable for the application. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. Fungus is a problem in tropical regions such as southeast Asia.5(1) Non-Nutrient to Fungus Growth (Rating = 0) Butyl B0612-70 Neoprene C0873-70 C1124-70 Ethylene Propylene E0692-75 E0740-75 E0515-80 E0540-80 Nitrile N0545-40 N0299-50 N0406-60 N0525-60 N0506-65 47-071 N0103-70 N0497-70 N0602-70 N0674-70 N0818-70 N0304-75 N0951-75 N0507-90 N0552-90 3. Working temperatures are limited to between 50°C and 65°C (120°F to 150°F) because water easily evaporates at higher temperatures. The results of this study document that the Parker compounds shown in Table 3-14 are non-nutrient to fungus as defined by MIL-STD-810F. Of course.17 Hydraulic Fluids There are so many types of hydraulic fluids that only the highest performance O-ring compounds can be used to seal all of them. fire-resistant hydraulic fluids are used. Method 508. Fungus Tests on Compounds Fungus testing per MIL-STD-810F. without conducting a test. contact Parker’s Application Engineering Department to determine whether the compound is a good candidate for the application.16 Fungus-Resistant Compounds Both the extreme environmental conditions experienced by the military and efforts in space have focused attention on many previously overlooked facets of hardware. a chemist can predict quite accurately whether it will support fungus growth. HFA. All fluids containing water have one common feature: they have a negative effect upon bearings. fungal species only. 60°C at low pressure For fire risk systems at high temperatures and pressures 3.17. if it is desirable to use some compound not listed below in an application that requires a non-nutrient material. Method 508. there are compounds that will support fungus growth because they contain nutrient type ingredients.5. The operating solution is mixed by the user and not by the manufacturer. a good candidate O-ring material can be selected from Table 3-15 if the type of the hydraulic fluid is known. Fluids containing water rely on their water content to prevent fire. Nevertheless. Among these is the ability of materials to resist degradation caused by fungus. The local water supply is not only different from one area to the next.g. With the possible exceptions of natural rubber and polyurethane.1 HFA Fluids HFA fluids contain more than 80% water. If a specific fluid is not listed in Section VII. Table 3-17: Types of Non-Flammable Hydraulic Fluids Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. To remain effective.9. 3.parkerorings. Lexington.9. for hydraulic presses Hydraulic fluid e.1. such fluids must be regularly checked and their water concentration maintained. Therefore. HFA concentrates can have mineral oil or synthetic oil bases. A number of Parker compounds have been submitted to an independent laboratory for fungus resistance exposure tests. for hydraulic presses Fire risk systems to max.com 3-15 . Note: Some of these compounds may no longer be available Table 3-14: Fungus Tests on Compounds Types of Non-Flammable Hydraulic Fluids Type of Hydraulic Fluid Hydraulic fluid HFA Hydraulic fluid HFB Hydraulic fluid HFC Hydraulic fluid HFD Content Oil in water emulsion Water in oil emulsion Water polymer solutions Waterless synthetic fluid Application Hydraulic fluid e. According to ISO Specification 6071. M. the base polymers for elastomers are normally non-nutrient to fungi.g.9.9. HFB and HFC hydraulic fluids are differentiated further by the suffix letters C. O-Ring Applications Supports Fungus Growth (Rating >0) Silicone S0595-50 S0317-60 S0613-60 S0455-70 S0604-70 S0355-75 S0614-80 Fluorocarbon V0680-70 V0747-75 V1164-75 V0709-90 Fluorosilicone L1120-70 Neoprene C0267-50 Ethylene Propylene E0603-70 E0652-90 Nitrile N1069-70 N0756-75 Polyurethane P0642-70 (1) Testing performed on U.1 Fire-Resistant Hydraulic Fluids When mineral oils represent a high fire risk.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > 3. The plasticizer used is of particular importance in this respect. E and S: • C indicates that no wear inhibitor is present • M indicates that a wear inhibitor is present • E indicates a mineral oil based HFA fluid • S indicates a synthetic HFA fluid Table 3-17 shows a comparison of the most important properties of the four groups of non-flammable fluids together with the recommended type of elastomer. The relationship between water content and concentrate offers the greatest threat to the proper function of HFA fluids. but its various constituents may cause the hardness to vary. In practice 95% to 98% water is more common. Three groups of such fluids are: • Water emulsions (HFA and HFB groups) • Water solutions (HFC) • Water-free synthetic fluids (HFD) The types of fire-resistant hydraulic fluids are presented in Table 3-16.17.S.

fluorocarbon (-65°F to 550°F) -54°C to 149°C (-65°F to 300°F). N0674-70. nitrile (for higher temperature coolant use) -12°C to 49°C N0674-70. gravity seal material NBR. nitrile (10°F to 120°F) O-Ring Applications Note: Due to variations in each type of fluid. V0884-75. nitrile -54°C to 149°C -54°C to 135°C (-65°F to 275°F). Users must test under their own operating conditions to determine the suitability of any compound in a particular application. fluorocarbon -26°C to 204°C (-15°F to 400°F). fluorocarbon -54°C to 149°C E1267-80. nitrile (limited life as dynamic (But wider range seal anticipated (0°F to 140°F) above 43°C (110°F)) as a coolant) N0951-75. FKM NBR FKM. ethylene propylene (-100°F to 550°F) -26°C to 204°C (-15°F to 400°F). V1164-75. nitrile (-65°F to 300°F) -26°C to 204°C (-15°F to 400°F). N0756-75.: dilution pH-level concentration water hardness micro-organisms HFC 20 to 70 very good 1. Lexington. V1226-75. N0951-75. ethylene propylene -34°C to 93°C V1164-75. fluorocarbon -26°C to 204°C (-15°F to 400°F).3 to 2 good ca. V1226-75. Range High-Water-Base Fluids (95-5 Fluids) 4°C to 49°C (40°F to 120°F) O-Ring Compounds Hydrocarbon Base Hydraulic Fluids (including petroleum base) Phosphate Esters Aircraft types (alkyl phosphate esters) Phosphate Esters Industrial types (aryl phosphate esters) Phosphate Ester-Petroleum Oil Blends Silicate Esters Silicone Hydraulic Fluids Water-Glycol Water-in-Oil Emulsions (“Invert” emulsions) N0674-70. ethylene propylene (-65°F to 300°F) (NAS1613) E0540-80.15 to 1. fluorocarbon -1°C to 100°C V1164-75. fluorocarbon (brown Chromassure) E0540-80. Table 3-15: Compounds for Hydraulic Fluids Properties of the Four Groups of Non-Flammable Fluids Reference Properties kinematic viscosity (mm2/s) to 50°C (122°F) viscosity/temperature relationship density at 15°C (59°F) temperature range water content (weight %) stability life of bearings heat transfer lubrication corrosion resistance combustion temperature environmental risk regular inspection HFA/HFB 0. neoprene -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F). fluorocarbon -26°C to 204°C (-15°F to 400°F). E0540-80.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Compounds for Hydraulic Fluids Temp. and the many variables possible in the application of O-rings. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. 600°C (1112°F) special waste viscosity neutral pH spec.com . ethylene propylene -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F). fluorocarbon (30°F to 212°F) V1226-75. fluorocarbon (-30°F to 200°F) V1226-75. V1164-75.09 -25°C to 60°C (-13°F to 140°F) 35 to 55 very good 6 to 15% good good good after vaporizing of water under 1000°C (1832°F) special waste viscosity water content pH-level HFD 12 to 50 bad 1. fluorocarbon -54°C to 288°C -26°C to 204°C (-15°F to 400°F). nitrile E0540-80. LM159-70 fluorosilicone (static only) -73°C to 288°C -54°C to 149°C (-65°F to 300°F).parkerorings. 0.04 to 1. C0873-70. nitrile -29°C to 135°C (-20°F to 275°F). EPDM(1) (1) only for pure (mineral oil free) phosphate-ester (HFD-R) Table 3-16: Properties of the Four Groups of Non-Flammable Fluids 3-16 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.99 3°C to 55°C (37°F to 131°F) 80 to 98 emulsion poor solution very good 5 to 10% excellent acceptable poor to acceptable not possible emulsion: used oil synth. V1164-75. ethylene propylene -18°C to 60°C N0674-70.45 -20°C to 150°C (-4°F to 302°F) none very good 50 to 100% poor excellent excellent ca. these compound listings are intended only as general guides.

can be brought under control without difficulty by adding a biocide to the mixture.com . the residual fluid has a high pH value. industrial robots.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > 3.10 Temperature Extremes 3. On the down side however. have been developed which form micro-emulsions when mixed by 5% with water. In general. water-free fluid and does not suffer from most of the previously mentioned difficulties.10.parkerorings. these materials have a very steep viscosity/temperature relationship curve which makes the working range of temperature very narrow. which are similar to oils. Under these conditions. As described above. The two glycols behave differently. Certain FKM compounds are not compatible with HFC fluids. both synthetic and natural. but can be better described as a highly stable colloidal suspension of high viscosity oil drops in water. HFD fluids can be used at temperatures between -20°C and 150°C (-5°F and 300°F). 3. Mineral oil concentrates can contain practically all types of chemical additives that have thus far been developed. and have a useful life of more than one year. 3. HFC fluids are regarded as special refuse and should be handled accordingly. The level of concentrates is limited by the stability of the emulsion. wear resistant additives which form a high-pressure resistant film with good lubricating properties. The effect of the environment must be carefully assessed. wear and lubricating properties can be greatly improved by the addition of suitable concentrates. They are not prone to the micro-biological attack.5 HFC Fluids HFC hydraulic fluids consist of a solution of polyethylene and polypropylene glycols in a proportion of between 35% and 55%. In a 1000 hour air age test at 204°C (400°F). etc.9. The working temperature ranges from 5°C to 55°C (42°F to 130°F).9. Parker’s fluorocarbon compound V0747-75 took a 66% set. In spite of this. At 232°C (450°F). which are essentially non-toxic. O-Ring Applications 3-17 While polyethylene glycols exhibit relatively high resistance to shear.17.17. this means that more cooling capacity is necessary to avoid overheating the system. 3. The earliest developments in HFD fluids have disappeared from the market because they were extremely poisonous.2 Concentrates Containing Mineral Oils (Oil-in-Water-Solutions) Oil is not soluble in water. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.17. Oil based hydraulic systems are increasingly being replaced by HFA fluids.4 Synthetic HFA Concentrates (Solutions) Recently a number of synthetic HFA concentrates have been developed which form a stable solution in water and are also suitable carriers of semi-soluble additives whose purpose is to protect metal components such as brass and copper. the anticipated useful life is reduced to approximately 336 hours.3 Micro-Emulsions Recently. the fluorocarbons tend to harden and take a premature set. still remain very susceptible to corrosion due to high water content and the working life of equipment is thereby shortened. Most elastomer compounds that are compatible with mineral oils also can be used in HFC fluids (NBR for example). The most important physical properties of HFA fluids depend on their water proportion and vary greatly from mineral oils. These fluids can be filtered finely as required because they are in complete solution. Their place has been taken by pure phosphate esters. containing all required anti-corrosion additives. The tendency to leakage of these low-viscosity fluids has caused a search for additives that would increase the fluid’s viscosity. The temperature range is an improvement over mineral oil based fluids. Working temperature ranges from -25°C to 60°C (-14°F to 140°F). which may cause corrosion. tests have shown that they suffer damage by shearing of the chains after only 2000 to 3000 working hours. mineral oil remains behind. Concentrates currently available at this time are limited to 100 Bar (1450 psi) working pressure and are mostly used in automated production lines.1 High Temperature The fluorocarbons are the most useful for high temperature sealing applications. The concentrates are mostly based on naphthenic oils and can cause problems with certain O-ring compounds. In the presence of hot water or steam. the working life of a hydraulic system using HFA fluid is significantly shorter than of a system using conventional hydraulic oils. The wear resistant properties and viscosity of HFC fluids is good and corrosion may be controlled by additives. Such growth however. Disposal is problem-free but must still be classified as special refuse. This is especially true with working pressures over 200 Bar (2900 psi). The fluid can be used at pressures in the range of 300 to 350 Bar (4350 to 5075 psi) and represents the most expensive hydraulic fluid on the market. compatibility with most seal materials is rather limited. When the water evaporates. Only by employing emulsifiers it is possible to bring about a stable oil-in-water-solution. ethylene propylene is generally superior to fluorocarbon. bringing about a wide variation in the fluid’s properties.17. 3. Such emulsions have been used as hydraulic press fluids for decades.9. Should the water evaporate however.17. Exposed bearings however. however.6 HFD Fluids This group of hydraulic fluids consists of pure synthetic. 3. Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. new synthetic concentrates. emulsions take longer to filter.9. Lexington. The concentrate contains both water and oil soluble. This is neither a true solution nor an emulsion.9. With these kinds of fluids there is a great risk of micro-bacteriological growth which can lead to problems. leaving enough recovery to continue sealing for many additional hours at that temperature. Although much easier to handle.

These compounds have poor wear resistance properties and are recommended only for static applications. the condition being fully reversible. For applications requiring moderately high temperatures as well as low. the answer may be a fluorosilicone. showing compression set values of this compound at various temperatures. fluorosilicone O-rings have served well as springs to activate a U-type shell of fluorocarbon elastomer or other wear resistant material.com . however. demonstrates its fine high temperature capabilities. giving it limited usefulness as a dynamic seal. assuming a correctly designed gland. (4) Medium to high swelling according to temperature. In practice. As a direct comparison. is usable up to 177°C (350°F) or higher in many applications. Figure 3-7. When air or other gases must be contained at temperatures below -54°C (-65°F) (the low temperature limit recommended for most silicones) compound S0383-70 may be used to reach temperatures to -115°C (-175°F) or lower. This procedure.139 Cross-Section O-ring 70 Hours @ Temperature 120°C (248°F)(2) 200°C (392°F) 150°C (302°F) EPDM not compatible 150°C (302°F) 200°C (392°F)(5) VMQ not compatible 100°C (212°F) 210°C (410°F) FVMQ 175°C (347°F)(1) 100°C (212°F) 175°C (347°F) ACM 150°C (302°F)(1) —–––(3) 150°C (302°F) 90°C (194°F) CR 100°C (212°F) 80°C (176°F)(4) (1) At these temperatures lubricants degrade after a short time. Its recommended low temperature limit is -32°C (-25°F). 3. Temperature at the TR-10 point should be taken for all elastomers to determine a minimum functional temperature. good tensile strength. (3) High swelling at room temperature. At very low temperatures they harden and have glasslike brittleness. yet in certain dynamic applications. bear in mind that the rate decreases as the temperature goes down. If a low temperature seal must have resistance to a fluid that attacks silicone. Among the nitrile compounds that provide good resistance to petroleum fluids. Its primary disadvantage is its lack of toughness. Table 3-18: Comparison of Elastomers in a Compatible Contact Medium and Maximum Allowable Temperatures Figure 3-7: Compression Set Resistance of Compound N0951-75 High temperature silicones. Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. silicone (S1224-70) and fluorosilicone (L1120-70) should be selected for low temperature applications. The low temperature flexibility of a given compound can be slightly improved if a contact medium causes swelling and softening. and will often seal at temperatures as low as -73°C (-100°F). they remain intact. elastomer compounds lose their elasticity. hydrolysis at high temperatures. and good abrasion resistance for dynamic applications. it is sometimes feasible to use two O-rings. adequate low temperature properties. regain their original properties. If the permeability rate of silicones is thought to be too high for the application. Other compounds will often seal at temperatures below their normal low temperature limit by increasing the squeeze. This material has excellent resistance to a wide range of fluids. a static seal may have a minimum functional temperature of about 15°C (-8°F) lower than the TR-10 point. is generally limited to static face type designs. compound N0951-75 has the best high temperature properties. such as Parker’s S0455-70. Lexington. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.2 Low Temperature When cooled. As long as they are not mechanically disturbed. and upon return to normal temperatures. appear superior to the fluorocarbons in air aging tests. 3-18 The Fluid Compatibility Tables can be used only as a guideline. (2) Special compound. as a heavy squeeze makes a radial seal difficult to assemble. Softening can occur through adsorption of fluid that acts like a plasticizer. S0383-70 to maintain the seal at the extreme low temperature plus a butyl or fluorocarbon to reduce permeability when the seal is warmer.parkerorings. (5) In water/steam. It is recommended for temperatures up to 135°C (275°F) in air or petroleum oil. elevated temperatures are additionally dangerous. and may shatter if struck a sharp blow.10.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Compression Set Resistance of Compound N0951-75 100 90 Conventional Nitrile Compound Comparison of Elastomers in a Compatible Contact Medium and Maximum Allowable Compound DIN/ISO 1629 NBR High temperature NBR FKM 80 O-Ring Applications % of Original Deflection 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 100°C (212°F) 125°C (257°F) 150°C (302°F) Compound N0951-75 Temperatures in °C (°F) Lubrication with mineral oil base Water 110°C (230°F) 120°C (248°F) 200°C (392°F)(1) 70°C (158°F) 100°C (212°F) Air 90°C (194°F) 100°C (212°F) ASTM D395 Method B 25% Deflection . EPDM and special NBR compounds. As indicated by the Fluid Compatibility Tables in Section VII. Other elastomer types with good cold flexibility are CR. Table 3-18 shows the maximum long-term temperature limits in a compatible contact medium. Where media compatibility is not optimum. The actual lifetime of a seal at low temperature depends on the application and on the medium to be sealed. but this is true only when the test specimen is exposed to circulating air.

The need for special environmental considerations in addition to low permeability will often change the recommendation. Parker’s V1289-75 should be considered.2 Vacuum Seal Considerations The rate of flow of gases from the pressure side to the vacuum side of an elastomeric seal depends to a great extent on how the seal is designed. In X 10-7 Dry Compound Number Polymer Percent Weight Loss 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 15 30 Squeeze — Percent 50 Lubricated With Dow Corning DC11 Vacuum Grease B0612-70 Butyl .070. For temperatures down to -45°C (-50°F).1 Vacuum Weight Loss It is particularly important in many space and other vacuum applications that optical surfaces and electrical contact surfaces remain clean to serve their intended purpose. has established this preferred position.31 V0747-75 Fluorocarbon . It is not likely to deposit on nearby surfaces. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. = .11.parkerorings.25 N0406-60 Nitrile 3. At 50% squeeze the effect of the grease was not detectable.com 3-19 . Lubricating the O-rings with a high vacuum grease also reduced the leakage of the lightly squeezed (15%) rings significantly. The vacuum grease aids the seal by filling these microscopic pits and grooves. = 4. W. and thus prevents leakage around the seal.850.075" thick Vacuum Level: Approximately 1 x 10-6 torr Time: 336 hours (two weeks) Room Temperature 10 9 O-Ring Leak Rate Helium Leak Rate CC/SEC/LIN.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Where temperatures do not go below -40°C (-40°F). 3.18 C0873-70 Neoprene .06 P0648-90 Polyurethane 1. This low temperature benefit is most likely to occur in fluids that swell the elastomer.07 Note: Some of these compounds may no longer be available. and at the same time it may be changing the surface tension favorably with the effect of a reduced rate of surface absorption. Increased O-ring squeeze reduces permeability by increasing the length of the path the gas has to travel (width of ring) and decreasing the area available to the entry of the gas (groove depth).76 L0449-65 Fluorosilicone .13 E0515-80 Ethylene Propylene . keeping the elastomer soft and flexible below its normal low temperature limit.28 L0677-70 Fluorosilicone . but the effect of the grease was considerably less at 30% squeeze.45 N0674-70 Nitrile 1. radiation resistance.03 S0604-70 Silicone . Table 3-19: Weight Loss of Compounds in Vacuum O-ring I.1 Bar (60 psi) Figure 3-8: O-ring Leak Rate Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. see Figure 2-3. This.29 S0455-70 Silicone .07 V0894-90 Fluorocarbon . 30% and 50% squeeze. and good moisture resistance. 3. Increasing the squeeze also tends to force the rubber into any small irregularities in the mating metal surface. Lexington.11. using grooves that provided 15%. long term exposure to water or combinations of fluid media may take a careful study to determine the proper recommendation. the small amount of volatile material that is indicated is primarily water vapor. it has one of the lowest permeability rates for gases. the higher weight loss compounds should be avoided. Several other compounds were tested in this way with similar results. together with the fact that butyl compounds have low outgassing or weight loss characteristics. Compound B0612-70 has been tested in face type O-ring seals. In those compounds which show low weight loss. For normal low temperature limits of several Parker Seal compounds. CPD = B0612-70 (Butyl) Temperature = 25°C (77°F). VM835-75. Service requirements such as high temperature.11 Vacuum Applications Butyl rubber has long been the preferred material for vacuum applications.39 E0529-60 Ethylene Propylene . O-Ring Applications Weight Loss of Compounds in Vacuum Test Samples: Approximately . The fluid medium often assists a low-temperature seal by acting as a plasticizer.D. Among the rubber polymers used for seals. good physical properties for a seal. a useful temperature range of -59°C to 121°C (-75°F to 250°F). Its other properties are similar to the standard fluorocarbon compounds. can be utilized. Where sensitive surfaces are involved.09 V0884-75 Fluorocarbon . 3. It will be seen from the results plotted in Figure 3-8 that increasing the squeeze reduced the leak rate dramatically. O-rings in Parker’s low temperature fluorocarbon compound. Some rubber compounds contain small quantities of oil or other ingredients that become volatile under high vacuum conditions and deposit as a thin film on all the surrounding surfaces.92 E0692-75 Ethylene Propylene . Table 3-19 indicates the weight loss of several Parker Seal compounds due to vacuum exposure. Pressure Differential = 4. thus reducing leakage around the ring.

low compression set • Compatibility of medium • Temperature compatibility • Low weight loss in vacuum For more detailed information see Rate of gas leakage. but 32 RMS finishes have been used successfully also. • The total leakage rate is reduced using a suitable vacuum grease. As an example of the benefit of high squeeze. An additional benefit of high percentage confinement is the fact that increased temperatures do not increase the leak rate as much as normally expected with a lesser confinement. and though the rate increases with increasing temperature. In sealing gases and vacuum.4 0.10 3.12 Gases-Permeability All elastomers are permeable to some extent. Design Chart 4-1 and Design Table 4-1 are generally followed. two seals can be fitted in tandem in separate glands.40 Surface roughness of the gland surfaces is more critical in sealing pressurized gases or vacuum. it must be wide enough to receive the full O-ring volume. In fact. it is quite feasible to use two O-ring seals in tandem.3 6. use the “Leak Rate Approximation” method in the section on Gases.parkerorings. among other things. therefore. however.6 6.e. using a silicone grease as a seating lubricant and surface coating in addition to a heavy squeeze of the O-ring cross section. Figure 3-9). Surface finishes of 16 RMS are quite common. surfaces against which an O-ring must seal should have a surface roughness value smoother than usual. other gases under pressure or volatile liquids to penetrate into the seal material and gradually escape on the low pressure side. is sufficiently heavy that a male or female gland assembly with the same dimensions may be very difficult to assemble. Requirements for the O-ring compound are: • Low gas permeation rate • Good. the pressure differential across the seal (P) is 14. there is no easily defined relationship between these two variables. B Gland Flanks Ra Rmax 1. that face type O-ring grooves be used whenever possible for static vacuum seals. For these. Gask-O-Seals have the added advantage of a high percent fill of the groove together with a shallow depth which reduces the seal area that can be exposed to the effects of vacuum. When a radial seal is required. as a gas will find its way through extremely minute passages.com . unlike reciprocating applications that seal a liquid. For most purposes. Larger contact areas are thereby created and the diffusion rate through the elastomer is slowed. the permeability of a given base polymer will vary according to the proportions of the copolymer. Lexington.11. 3.2 1. Figure 3-10 shows this very clearly for one class of butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymers. and prevents the rubber sealing element from moving due to vibration or pressure changes.6 1.8 0. we have found that Gask-O-Seals and Integral Seals both make effective vacuum seals because of the generous squeeze that is built into them. Surface Finish of Vacuum Gland Surface Roughness of Vacuum Gland Load Area tp > 50% A Contact Area Rmax Ra Vacuum to 10-8 Torr to 10-11 Torr 0. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. Table 3-24 (found at the end of this section) lists some permeability rates at various temperatures that may be helpful in approximating leak rates through O-ring seals. • The surfaces to be sealed and the gland must have a significantly better surface finish than for “normal” seals Table 3-20. then. There is very little data available on dynamic vacuum seals. The permeability rate of various gases through different rubber materials varies in an unpredictable way. 3.3 6. the gland design shown for vacuum and gasses in Design Chart 4-2 is a reasonable compromise in a face seal situation. Many parameters should be observed to seal a vacuum. The permeability also varies with temperature. but reasonably low leak rates have been reported using two O-ring seals designed according to Design Chart 5-2 and Design Table 5-2. Although a very heavy squeeze is necessary to reduce leakage to an absolute minimum in an O-ring seal.3 Table 3-20 Surface Finish of Vacuum Gland (See also Figure 3-9) Atmosphere A B A B Vacuum Figure 3-9: Vacuum O-ring Gland 3-20 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. • The O-ring should fill the gland (nearly 100%. • To increase efficiency.6 1.6 0. it becomes more important to use a vacuum grease. or when a heavy squeeze is not possible for some other reason.7 psi. i. this kind of design may require heavy construction. When such a shallow gland is desirable. where pressure traps are often a problem.3 Vacuum Leak Rate To determine approximate leak rate for a vacuum seal. In general apply the following recommendations: • Select correct O-ring compound. Note that where the external pressure is one atmosphere. Therefore.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook O-Ring Applications It is recommended. The squeeze recommended in that design chart. allowing air.

6 . The following formula is useful for this approximation: L = 0. When gas pressure around a seal is released after a soak period. std.2 1. 2.com 3-21 . The cross section area of a squeezed O-ring is the same as its area in the free condition.4 1.. Some of these may rupture. although any pressurized gas may cause the condition. We rarely see problems when the pressure is below 27. such as pressure drop rate. gas trapped inside the seal expands and may escape harmlessly into the atmosphere.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Effects of Acrylonitrile Content on Permeability of Butadiene-Acrylonitrile Copolymers at 25°C (77°F) 10. the gas. P = Pressure differential across the seal. it may help to use a small cross section O-ring. S = . as mentioned. Naturally.20) This formula gives only a rough order of magnitude approximation because permeability varies between compounds in the same polymer.1 Leak Rate Approximation The leak rate of a gas through an O-ring seal may be roughly approximated when the permeability of the gas through the particular elastomer is known for the temperature at which the seal must function. and for variations between samples. For convenience. As mentioned.7 factor resolves these inconsistencies. The cross section of a squeezed O-ring is rectangular. for a 20% squeeze. F = Permeability rate of the gas through the elastomer at the anticipated operating temperature. cc cm/ cm² sec bar (Many of these permeability rates are listed in Table 3-18. as smaller cross sections are less subject to explosive decompression problems than are large ones. as does a rapid rate of pressure drop. the formula contains mixed units. The permeability rate of a gas through an O-ring is proportional to the pressure differential across the seal.12. presumably because the oil permeates the rubber and reduces the amount of gas that can enter.8 . Lexington. the greater the pressure.e.0 1. elevated temperature increases the damage. It was set up this way because in the United States O-ring diameters are usually given in inches. and other factors. and because the assumptions on which it is based are not all exact. This phenomenon is called explosive decompression. Where problems due to explosive decompression are anticipated.6 1. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.6 Bar (400 psi). Factor Q For helium leak rate. Goodrich Company 3.0 .13 Gases-High Pressure Because all elastomers are permeable. 3. cc/sec. inches. Figure 3-11: Effect of Squeeze and Lubricant on O-Ring Leak Rate 3. (i. In laboratory tests. a variation of ±50% from the predicted value should be anticipated to allow for limitations in the accuracy of test equipment and available standards. The 0.4 . This principle should be helpful in many applications.8 1.7 F D P Q (1-S)² where L = Approximate leak rate of the seal.parkerorings. or it may form blisters on the surface. Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. std. the rubber compound.9 10 20 Acrylonitrile Content (%) 30 40 Figure 3-10: Effect of Acrylonitrile Content on Permeability of Butadiene-Acrylonitrile Copolymers at 25°C (77°F) from “Gas Permeability of Hycar Polymers” by B. The severity of the damage varies with pressure. found at the end of this section) D = Inside diameter of the O-ring. the size of the cross section. and generally carbon dioxide causes more swelling and damage than does nitrogen. F.6 Effect of Squeeze and Lubricant on O-ring Leak Rate 2. gases under pressure penetrate into the seal material. These assumptions are: 1. and pressures in pounds per square inch while permeability figures are usually shown in metric units. lb/in² Q = Factor depending on the percent squeeze and whether the O-ring is lubricated or dry (from Figure 3-11) S = Percent squeeze on the O-ring cross section expressed as a decimal. it was found that soaking compound N0304-75 in MIL-H-5606 oil for 24 hours at 135°C (275°F) prior to testing dramatically curtailed the severity of the damage.2 0 10 20 30 Percent Squeeze 40 50 Lubricated Ring Dow Corning DC11 Vacuum Grease Dry Ring Permeability Rate – CC/SEC/ATM 10-7 CO 2 H2 He O2 O-Ring Applications 10 -8 N2 10. leaving cracks or pits. the larger the quantity of gas forced into the rubber.

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Parker O-Ring Handbook

3.14 Acids Resistance of elastomeric compounds to acids often changes dramatically with temperature and with concentration. In strong solutions, the acid resistant fluorocarbon compound often maintains its properties rather well, particularly at room temperature. In the Fluid Compatibility Table in Section VII, it is shown as the only compound that is likely to withstand the effects of concentrated nitric and hydrochloric acids at room temperature. At higher temperatures in these acids, only a perfluoroelastomer can be expected to maintain a seal on a long term basis. In dilute solutions, an ethylene propylene compound is usually preferred, particularly if there is any elevated temperature involved, because ethylene propylene has excellent resistance to water as well as quite good acid resistance. It is particularly important to test seal compounds under service conditions when a strong acid is to be sealed at elevated temperatures. 3.14.1 Plastic Contact Surfaces Sometimes when an O-ring is used in contact with a plastic material, the plastic will develop a series of fine cracks that weaken it. This “crazing” has been noticed most frequently with polycarbonate resins, such as General Electric’s Lexan, but it has also been found in other plastic materials. This effect is most severe when the plastic material is under the greatest stress, and may be caused by stress alone. For instance, compounds E0515-80, N0522-90 and V0709-90 were rated “marginal,” but we feel that the problem with these elastomers may have been caused by their hardness, as we would not expect a chemical effect between them and a polycarbonate resin. General Electric Company has tested a number of Parker Seal Compounds with Lexan and found that the following materials are generally acceptable in contact with Lexan. See Table 3-21.
Compounds for Use Against Lexan(1) Surfaces
Ethylene Propylene
E0692-75 (marginal) E0515-80 (marginal)

O-Ring Applications

3.14.2 Silicone Fluids Silicone fluids are chemically very stable. Reference to the Fluid Compatibility Table in Section VII, for instance, shows that all types of seal polymers except silicone rubber may be used for silicone oils and greases. There are some individual compound exceptions. Silicone fluids have a great tendency to remove plasticizer from compounds, causing them to shrink. The effect is most severe with the combination of low viscosity silicone fluids in high temperature environments. Because of this, military nitrile compounds, and any other nitriles with a low temperature limit below -40°C (-40°F) should not be used to seal silicone fluids as such low temperature nitriles must contain large amounts of plasticizers. Other compounds, including the high temperature nitriles, should be tested before use to be certain they will not shrink more than one or two percent. Silicone rubber is rated 3 (doubtful) in contact with silicone fluids. The poor rating is given because silicone rubber tends to absorb silicone fluids, resulting in swelling and softening of the rubber. Occasionally, however, it is desirable to seal a silicone fluid with a silicone rubber O-ring. This combination is generally acceptable if the viscosity of the silicone fluid is 100,000 centistokes or more, and if the maximum temperature will not exceed 149°C (300°F). 3.14.3 Underwriters’ Laboratories Common Parker compounds are listed by Underwriters’ Laboratories (UL) under their “Recognized Compound Program.” The listing is based on UL testing of compound for specific service requirements as shown in Table 3-22. 3.14.4 Water and Steam Resistance Water seems like such an innocuous fluid; people are often surprised to learn that it can bring problems if it is not sealed with the proper O-ring material. After a long period of water immersion, many compounds will swell quite drastically. In a static seal, this may be quite acceptable. Such a seal surely will not leak, and if it can be replaced with a new one after disassembly, the fact that it has become too large to put back into the gland cavity becomes only an interesting curiosity. In situations where the O-rings are routinely replaced before they have swelled more than a few percent, the user may not even be aware of their strange behavior. Used as a long-term dynamic seal, however, this gradual swelling of many compounds in water can cause a slow but very annoying increase in both breakout and running friction. Figure 3-12 and Figure 3-13 illustrate this gradual swelling of a number of Parker Seal compounds when exposed to water at two different temperatures. From these curves it will be seen that E0540-80 ethylene propylene rubber is the single compound tested that had virtually no swell. This is our recommended compound for water and steam for temperatures up to 149°C (300°F). Where exposure to steam and hot air alternate, as in tire presses, it serves better than in either one alone.

Fluorocarbon
V0680-70 V0747-75 V0709-90 (marginal)

Nitrile
N0602-70 N0674-70 N0304-75 N0508-75 N0741-75 N0506-65 (marginal) 47-071 (marginal) N0552-90 (marginal)

Neoprene
C0267-50 C0557-70

Polyurethane
P0642-70

Silicone
S0317-60 S0469-40 S0604-70

(1) General Electric Trademark Note: Some of these compounds may no longer be available.

Table 3-21: Compounds for Use Against Lexan Surfaces

3-22

Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division
2360 Palumbo Drive, Lexington, KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.parkerorings.com

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Underwriters’ Laboratories Approved Services
Suitable use in UL262 applications Diesel Fuel, Fuel Oil, Lubricating Oil MFG or Natural Gas Suitable for UL25 gasket applications Dry Chemical Carbon Dioxide Water Laundry Detergent Fire Extinguishing Agents

Gasoline/Alcohol Blends*

Heated Fuel Oil

Suitable use in UL 1081

Dishwashing Detergents

O-Ring Applications

Anhydrous Ammonia I

Naptha or Kerosene

MPS Gas

Gasoline

Service

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

LP-Gas J

L

M

EA454-50 (3575) KA170-55 (21105) LM159-70 N0299-50 N0497-70 N0674-70 N1499-70 N1585-70 N1500-75 N1591-75 (67357) NF162-65 (1106) N1565-75 (67027) N1527-70 (67147) V0747-75 VA151-75 (19357) V0884-75 V1163-75 V1226-75 V1262-65 V1263-75 V1436-75 *Contact factory for specific ratios of alcohol (methyl and/or ethyl) and gasoline. Note: Material certifications are subject to change. Please contact Parker’s O-Ring Division for more information. Table 3-22: Underwriters’ Laboratories – JMLU2 – Gaskets and Seals

For even greater resistance to steam, Parker has developed compound E0962-90. This ethylene propylene compound showed very little change in physical properties after 70 hours exposure to steam at 288°C (550°F).

With sealing steam or water with ethylene propylene rubber, it is important to remember that it will deteriorate when exposed to petroleum lubricants. When lubrication is required, silicone oil, glycerin, or ethylene glycol are suggested.

Room Temperature
30 25 300 250

70°C (158° F)
N0406-60 N0398-70 N0103-70

Percent Swell

15 10 5 0 1 Time — Years

C0557-70 N0219-70 N0103-70 N0398-70 E0540-80

Percent Swell

20

200 150 100 50 C0557-70 0 Time — Years

N0406-60

E0540-80

2

3

Figure 3-12: Water and Steam Resistance at Room Temperature

Figure 3-13: Water and Steam Resistance at 70°C (158°F)

Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division
2360 Palumbo Drive, Lexington, KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.parkerorings.com

3-23

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O-Ring Applications

3.15 Semiconductor The semiconductor industry is utilizing increased levels of toxic fluids and gases, which place extreme demands upon seal design and materials. Not only to prevent system contamination from the external environment, but they must not contribute any contaminates to the system in their own right. Specific needs are required by each of the four primary environments employed by the semiconductor industry: • Gases & Vacuum • Thermal • Plasma • Wet Processing Working conditions: Temperatures: up to 300°C (572°F) Pressures: vacuum to 10-9 Contact our Application Engineering Department regarding Semiconductor sealing applications. 3.16 inPHorm Seal Design and Material Selection Software Parker recommends utilizing our inPHorm design software to guide the user through the design and selection of an O-ring and corresponding seal gland. Parker’s inPHorm not only addresses standard o-ring sizes, but will allow the user to custom design O-ring glands and seals specifically for their application. To obtain inPHorm software contact the O-Ring Division, Parker Product Information at 1-800-C-PARKER or download from www.parkerorings.com. If inPHorm is not readily available manual calculations can be performed. 3.17 Drive Belts 3.17.1 Introduction O-rings and lathe-cut rings are being used extensively as low power drive belts because they are inexpensive and simple to install. Due to their resilient nature, they do not require the use of belt tensioning devices, and pulley locations do not need to be extremely accurate. For most elastic drive belt applications, O-rings are preferred over lathe-cut rings for a number of reasons: (a) Ease of installation. (b) Uniform stress distribution. (c) Ready availability of many standard sizes. (d) Flexibility of usage. (e) No sharp corners on the belt. Lathe-cuts are often completely adequate for the task, but they are more likely to require special tooling, making the cost prohibitive when only a small quantity is needed. For large quantities, the tooling cost becomes insignificant, and overall cost savings are generally realized in using lathe-cut rings. Due to the special manufacturing techniques employed, all lathe-cut applications are reviewed by the O-Ring Division’s Application Engineering Department. Parker Seal is conducting a continuing program of testing compounds for drive belt service, and developing new drive belt compounds to optimize the properties that are most needed in a drive belt. Minimum stress relaxation and maximum flex

PSI Bar 34.5 500

Modulus Curves for Drive Belt Compounds

27.6 400
0 4-7 60 S0 70 42P06 7-70 5 C05 5 51-6 E07

20.7 300

13.8 200 10.4 150 8.3 120 6.9 100 6.2 90

0

10

20 30 Percent Stretch

40

50

Figure 3-14: Modulus Curves for Drive Belt Compounds

life are especially important in a drive belt, but several compounds must be available to provide resistance to the various fluids and temperature ranges that may be encountered. 3.17.2 Drive Belt Compound Selection An O-ring compound intended for drive belt service should be selected for minimum stretch relaxation (tensile set) and maximum dynamic properties. The choice of elastomer is determined by the physical environment: • Contact medium, ozone, oil, grease. • Service temperatures. The general requirements for elastomer drive belt materials are: • Good aging resistance. • Wear resistance. • Relatively low tendency to return to original shape under tension and temperature caused by friction; this means a higher resistance to the Joule effect. • Good flexibility. 3.17.3 Available Drive Belt Compounds The information below describes the most suitable drive belt compounds available. The Application Engineering Department should be contacted for additional information. E0751-65 has been developed specifically for drive belt use. Performance data from production samples show that it has properties superior to O-ring compounds recommended formerly, and E0751-65 has become the “standard’’ drive belt compound as a result. The most important of its properties are low stress relaxation combined with reliability and resistance to high temperature. A limitation that prevents its use in a few applications is its lack of resistance to petroleum fluids.
Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division
2360 Palumbo Drive, Lexington, KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.parkerorings.com

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Parker Seal Elastic Drive Belt Compound Data(1)
Compound Number Specific Gravity, G
Dynamic Stress Relaxation(2) Initial Stress, 120 PSI DBA(5) E0751-65 1.13 13% DBA(5) P0642-70 1.29 19% 21% 29% 36% Excellent 54 (130) 70±5 302.2 (4380) 535 29 (420) Excellent Excellent Fair Excellent Excellent DBA(5) C0557-70 1.47 14% 14% 19% 22% Acceptable 82 (180) 70±5 138.0 (2000) 250 38.0 (550) Good Excellent Good Good Good DBA(5) S0604-70 1.43 21%

Temp °C (°F)
Static Stress Relaxation(3) Initial Stress, 120 PSI Flex Life Rating Maximum Temperature, °C (°F) Hardness, Shore A, Durometer Tensile Strength, Bar (PSI) Elongation, % Modulus @ 100%, Elongation, Bar (psi) Resistance to:(4) Petroleum Fluids Silicone Fluids Water Ozone Abrasion 24 (75) 66 (150) 82 (180) 14% 18% 20% Good 82 (180) 65±5 135.9 (1970) 385 30.4 (440) Poor Excellent Excellent Excellent Good 2% 5% 2% Excellent 149 (300) 70±5 62.1 (900) 160 41.1 (600) Poor Poor Good Excellent Poor

O-Ring Applications

(1) All values shown are typical. Do not use for specification limits. Specimens: 2-153 O-rings. (2) After three days dynamic testing at room temperature Motor pulley pitch diameter: .611", speed: 1740 rpm. Cast iron driven pulley pitch diameter: 2.623". Duty cycle 3 minutes on, 15 seconds off. Load: inertia of cast iron pulley. (3) After 48 hours static testing at temperature indicated. Two ½" diameter pulleys. (4) For information on resistance of these materials to other fluids, see Fluid Compatibility Table in Section VII. (5) When ordering parts for drive belt applications, the letters “DBA” precede the part number. Example: DBAS0604-70 2-250.

Table 3-23: Parker Seal Elastic Drive Belt Compound Data

Some O-ring seal compounds have been used successfully in many drive belt applications. The three materials described below have been evaluated specifically for this type of use and gave superior performance under the conditions stated: P0642-70 has been a very successful material for drive belt applications. It is recommended for severe conditions where extra abrasion resistance, long life, and high stress values are required and service temperatures do not exceed 54°C (130°F). Its major attribute is reliability, which is due to the excellent flow characteristics of polyurethane that minimize the possibility of poor knitting. It is a particularly tough material, having high tensile strength and excellent resistance to abrasion, wear, and fatigue. C0873-70 is recommended where the service temperature exceeds 54°C (130°F) and there is a possibility of contact with petroleum fluids. It has outstanding resistance to stress relaxation at temperatures as high as 82°C (180°F), though its resistance to fatigue is not as good as other Parker drive belt compounds. S0604-70 is the compound generally selected for high temperature use or for applications where the black color of the other drive belt compounds is not permissible. Being a silicone, however, it does not have the tensile strength or resistance to wear and abrasion of the other compounds. The user, therefore, should not sacrifice these important properties by specifying an unrealistically high temperature to provide a “safety factor”. Usually some excess temperature can be tolerated if the exposure time is of short duration and is repeated only a few times during the life of the drive belt. It should be remembered that the physical properties of any compound will be poorer at elevated temperature. Table 3-23 compares the important properties of these rubber materials. Specific gravity and stress relaxation are listed first

because these data are needed in drive belt design. When drive belts may contact fluids not listed in Table 3-23, refer to the Fluid Compatibility Tables in Section VII. In any case, contact of elastomeric drive belts with any liquid must be kept to an absolute minimum. Almost any liquid on the belt will reduce friction, causing slippage. Since contact with fluids is seldom encountered in drive belt practice, this becomes a minor consideration. 3.18 Applications Summary In the foregoing discussions on special applications, there are necessarily many references to problems and failures, but the object of pointing out possible pitfalls is to indicate to the designer the steps he can take to avoid them. The object of this whole reference manual, then, is the very positive one of showing how to produce reliable, economical, effective O-ring seals for a diversity of uses. An important factor in most O-ring seals is the rubber compound from which it is made. For the special applications presented in this chapter, many specific compound recommendations are included. Parker Compound recommendations based on fluid type alone will be found in the Fluid Compatibility Tables in Section VII. It is an excellent practice, after selecting one or more likely materials, to study those portions of the Elastomers section that apply to that material. Background information is given there that will give the designer a better understanding of the general properties of each of the major polymers, and help him select wisely when a choice or compromise must be made. The explanations of physical properties and how they are tested are also necessary for an adequate understanding of rubber materials and their behaviour in different operating environments.
Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division
2360 Palumbo Drive, Lexington, KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.parkerorings.com

3-25

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Parker O-Ring Handbook

Gas Permeability Rates
Temperature Gas or Liquid
Acetone Acetylene Acetylene Acetylene Acetylene Acetylene Acetylene Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Air Ammonia Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon

Elastomer
Silicone Butyl Butyl Natural Natural Nitrile Nitrile Butyl Butyl Fluorosilicone Natural Natural Silicone Silicone Polyurethane Silicone Butyl (B0318-70) Butyl (B0318-70) Butyl (B0318-70) Ethylene Propylene Ethylene Propylene (E0529-65) Ethylene Propylene (E0692-75) Ethylene Propylene Ethylene Propylene (E0529-65) Ethylene Propylene (E0692-75) Ethylene Propylene Ethylene Propylene (E0529-65) Ethylene Propylene (E0692-75) Fluorocarbon-Viton(4) Natural Neoprene Neoprene Neoprene Neoprene Nitrile Nitrile (N0741-75) Nitrile Nitrile (N0741-75) Nitrile Nitrile (N0741-75) Polyacrylate (A0607-70) Polyacrylate (A0607-70) Polyacrylate (A0607-70) Polyurethane (P0642-70) Polyurethane (P0648-90) Polyurethane (P0642-70) Polyurethane (P0648-90) Polyurethane (P0642-70) Polyurethane (P0648-90) SBR SBR (G0244-70)

°C
25 25 50 25 50 25 50 Room 200 Room Room 200 Room 200 Room 25 35 82 124 38 40 38 93 94 93 149 155 149 93 25 36 38 52 86 38 39 79 80 121 118 38 91 153 39 39 66 67 94 94 38 38

°F
77 77 122 77 122 77 122 392

Permeability (1) x 10-8
14,850 1.26 5.74 74.5 192 18.7 67.4 0.2 100 48.4 6.7 262 18.0 to 25.6 74 0.5 4396 1.19 9.04 36.1 11.3 to 22.9 22.9 15.58 57.0 to 108.7 105 77 170 to 375 375 280 31 17.2 0.67 18 1.42 6.46 1.60 to 3.88 2.06 6.39 to 16.7 7.36 13.7 to 62.3 34 8.28 40.66 327 1.5 0.99 5.45 4.07 20.8 7.3 1.09 to 5.24 5.24

Source (2)
I I I I I I I DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC I A A A A A A A A A A A A A I I A I I A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A

O-Ring Applications

392 392 77 95 180 255 100 104 100 200 202 199 300 311 300 200 77 97 100 126 187 100 103 175 176 250 245 100 195 307 103 102 151 152 202 201 100 101

(1) Std cc cm/cm2 sec. bar (2) “I” denotes information from “Permeability Data for Aerospace Applications” funded by NASA and prepared by IIT Research Institute, March 1968. “A” denotes information from Atomics International Division, Energy Systems Group, Rockwell International publication AI-AEC-13145, “Design Guide for Reactor Cover Gas Elastomer Seals” March 7, 1975, and addendum, report ESC-DOE-13245, September 30, 1978. “DC” denotes information from Dow Corning Bulletin 17-158, October 1972. “P” denotes information from Parker Seal tests. (3) “NR” Temperature not reported. (4) Registered trademark E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. Note: Some of these compounds may no longer be available.

Table 3-24: Gas Permeability Rates

3-26

Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division
2360 Palumbo Drive, Lexington, KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.parkerorings.com

0 to 18.5 197. Rockwell International publication AI-AEC-13145. September 30.95 2.51 4.8 255 52500 Source (2) A A A A A A A A I A I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I DC I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I O-Ring Applications (1) Std cc cm/cm2 sec.3 to 103. du Pont de Nemours & Co.63 47.9 to 19.parkerorings. “DC” denotes information from Dow Corning Bulletin 17-158. Lexington. Energy Systems Group. 1978.0 7.37 10.0 1028 to 1530 2280 1025 to 1545 1043 to 1538 92.I.8 47. October 1972. bar (2) “I” denotes information from “Permeability Data for Aerospace Applications” funded by NASA and prepared by IIT Research Institute.4 to 30. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. (3) “NR” Temperature not reported.8 93. “Design Guide for Reactor Cover Gas Elastomer Seals” March 7. March 1968. (4) Registered trademark E.98 13.5 5.6 103. “A” denotes information from Atomics International Division.6 5. and addendum. “P” denotes information from Parker Seal tests.3 218 9. report ESC-DOE-13245.2 14.64 11.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Gas Permeability Rates Temperature Gas or Liquid Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Argon Benzene Butane Butane Butane Butane Butane Butane iso-Butane iso-Butane iso-Butane iso-Butane iso-Butane Carbon Dioxide Carbon Dioxide Carbon Dioxide Carbon Dioxide Carbon Dioxide Carbon Dioxide Carbon Dioxide Carbon Dioxide Carbon Dioxide Carbon Dioxide Carbon Dioxide Carbon Dioxide Carbon Dioxide Carbon Dioxide Carbon Dioxide Carbon Dioxide Carbon Dioxide Carbon Dioxide Carbon Dioxide Carbon Dioxide Carbon Dioxide Carbon Dioxide Carbon Dioxide Carbon Dioxide Carbon Dioxide Carbon Monoxide Carbon Monoxide Carbon Monoxide Carbon Tetrachloride Elastomer SBR (G0244-70) SBR (G0244-70) Silicone Silicone (S0684-70) Silicone Silicone (S0684-70) Silicone Silicone (S0684-70) Silicone PTFE Silicone Silicone Silicone Silicone Silicone Silicone Silicone Silicone Silicone Silicone Silicone Silicone Butadiene Butadiene Butadiene Fluorosilicone Fluorosilicone Natural Natural Natural Neoprene Neoprene Neoprene Neoprene Nitrile Nitrile Polysulfide Polysulfide Polyurethane Polyurethane Silicone Silicone Silicone Silicone SBR SBR FEP PTFE Butadiene Natural Silicone Silicone °C 84 122 38 38 93 91 149 156 Room 149 25 25 30 40 50 60 70 30 40 50 60 70 25 30 50 Room 26 25 30 50 22.com 3-27 .3 to 116 98.3 25 30 50 20 30 23 25 20 30 20.4 514 444 98. Table 3-24: Gas Permeability Rates Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.7 7.5 25 30 25 25 25 Room Room °F 183 251 100 101 200 195 300 313 300 77 77 86 104 122 140 158 86 104 122 140 158 77 86 122 79 77 86 122 72 77 86 122 68 86 73 77 68 86 69 77 90 110 77 86 77 77 77 Permeability (1) x 10-8 25.5 138 230 to 487 347 454 to 1500 454 566 to 2840 1020 450 12 14300 6750 12980 12380 11630 11030 11330 7250 to 12980 7058 to 12380 6861 to 11630 6691 to 11030 6541 to 11330 36. 1975.5 25 32 43. Note: Some of these compounds may no longer be available.

3 36.0 240 19. September 30.5 187 7.5 353 225 11. Rockwell International publication AI-AEC-13145.8 6.5 5.7 .8 26.5 14.3 to 5. 1978.0 19. March 1968. “Design Guide for Reactor Cover Gas Elastomer Seals” March 7.97 1875 1013 8830 11250 1. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. bar (2) “I” denotes information from “Permeability Data for Aerospace Applications” funded by NASA and prepared by IIT Research Institute.0 51.3 65. report ESC-DOE-13245.55 1035 3.7 131 490 143 461 973 17.05 to 55.3 150 25 25 50 80 150 NR3 °F 77 77 Permeability (1) x 10-8 11250 24.0 57 19.5 6.5 52.0 43. 1975.I. du Pont de Nemours & Co.4 41.parkerorings.6 1. (4) Registered trademark E.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Gas Permeability Rates Temperature Gas or Liquid Carbonyl Chloride Ethane Ethane Ethylene Formaldehyde Freon 11 Freon 12 Freon 12 Freon 12 Freon 12 Freon 12 Freon 12 Freon 22 Freon 22 Freon 22 Freon 22 Freon 22 Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Elastomer Silicone Butadiene Silicone Silicone Silicone Silicone Butyl Fluorocarbon Neoprene Nitrile Polyurethane Silicone Butyl Fluorocarbon Neoprene Nitrile Polyurethane Butadiene Butyl (B0612-70) Butyl (B0612-70) Butyl (B0612-70) EP (E0515-80) EP (E0515-80) EP (E0515-80) Fluorocarbon Fluorocarbon (V0747-75) Fluorocarbon (V0747-75) Fluorocarbon (V0747-75) Fluorosilicone (L0449-65) Fluorosilicone (L0449-65) Fluorosilicone (L0449-65) Natural Natural Natural Natural Neoprene Neoprene Neoprene (C0557-70) Neoprene Neoprene Neoprene Neoprene Neoprene (C0557-70) Neoprene Neoprene (C0557-70) Nitrile Nitrile (N0674-70) Nitrile Nitrile (N0674-70) Nitrile (N0674-70) Nitroso °C Room 25 25 Room Room 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 80 150 25 80 150 30 25 80 150 25 80 150 25 30 34 50 0 25 25 30. and addendum. Table 3-24: Gas Permeability Rates 3-28 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.0 320 12. “DC” denotes information from Dow Corning Bulletin 17-158.9 11. October 1972. “P” denotes information from Parker Seal tests.com .5 2. “A” denotes information from Atomics International Division.8 12.6 to 7.5 57 73 80 101.0 59.4 to 63 8.9 252 1050 Source (2) I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I P P P P P P I P P P P P P I I I I I I P I I I I P I P I P I P P I O-Ring Applications 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 176 302 77 176 302 86 77 176 302 77 176 302 77 86 93 122 32 77 77 87 107 135 163 176 214 302 77 77 122 176 302 (1) Std cc cm/cm2 sec. Lexington. Note: Some of these compounds may no longer be available.7 61.40 8. (3) “NR” Temperature not reported. Energy Systems Group.25 to 32.3 27.6 70.78 .

0 128 30. “P” denotes information from Parker Seal tests.1 46. “A” denotes information from Atomics International Division.6 174 927 1.5 94. report ESC-DOE-13245.3 4.1 68.3 263 238 173 560 1250 523 (sic) 90.6 76.1 Source (2) P P P P P I I P I P P I I I I I I I I I I I A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A I A A A A A I O-Ring Applications (1) Std cc cm/cm2 sec. March 1968. du Pont de Nemours & Co.2 19.8 to 330 49.0 to 125 88.9 47.3 187 to 544 544 252 599 to 1730 1730 591 160 180 10.2 98. October 1972.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Gas Permeability Rates Temperature Gas or Liquid Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Helium Hexane Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Elastomer Polyacrylate (A0607-70) Polyacrylate (A0607-70) Polyacrylate (A0607-70) Polyurethane (P0642-70) Polyurethane (P0642-70) SBR Silicone Silicone (S0604-70) Silicone Silicone (S0604-70) Silicone (S0604-70) TFE PTFE TFE PTFE TFE PTFE FEP PTFE FEP PTFE FEP PTFE FEP PTFE FEP PTFE Silicone Butadiene Butadiene Butyl (B0318-70) Butyl (B0318-70) Butyl (B0318-70) Ethylene Propylene Ethylene Propylene (E0529-65) Ethylene Propylene (E0692-75) Ethylene Propylene Ethylene Propylene (E0529-65) Ethylene Propylene (E0692-75) Ethylene Propylene Ethylene Propylene (E0529-65) Ethylene Propylene (E0692-75) Fluorocarbon-Viton4 Neoprene Nitrile Nitrile (N0741-75) Nitrile Nitrile (N0741-75) Nitrile Polyacrylate (A0607-70) Polyacrylate (A0607-70) Polyacrylate (A0607-70) Polysulfide Polyurethane (P0642-70) Polyurethane (P0648-90) Polyurethane (P0642-70) Polyurethane (P0648-90) Polyurethane (P0642-70) SBR °C 25 80 150 25 80 25 25 25 30 80 150 25 30 50 25 30 50 75 100 25 25 50 35 82 124 38 40 38 93 94 94 152 155 151 93 38 38 39 79 80 121 38 91 153 25 39 39 66 67 94 25 °F 77 176 302 77 176 77 77 77 86 176 302 77 86 122 77 86 122 167 212 77 77 122 95 180 255 100 104 100 200 202 201 306 311 304 200 100 100 103 175 176 250 100 195 307 77 103 102 151 152 202 77 Permeability (1) x 10-8 16. “DC” denotes information from Dow Corning Bulletin 17-158. Table 3-24: Gas Permeability Rates Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.I.4 157 7050 31.5 17.89 70.5 58.6 33.2 273 28. 1978. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. (4) Registered trademark E.9 to 111 111 45. “Design Guide for Reactor Cover Gas Elastomer Seals” March 7. Energy Systems Group. Rockwell International publication AI-AEC-13145. 1975. and addendum. bar (2) “I” denotes information from “Permeability Data for Aerospace Applications” funded by NASA and prepared by IIT Research Institute. (3) “NR” Temperature not reported. Note: Some of these compounds may no longer be available.4 21.parkerorings.1 11.3 110 310 3.3 to 32. September 30.com 3-29 . Lexington.0 16.3 155 30.

“P” denotes information from Parker Seal tests.0113 .2 245 539 188 to 488 495 1010 1570 to 2070 2070 3300 to 8760 4300 . Lexington.8 to 86. “Design Guide for Reactor Cover Gas Elastomer Seals” March 7.7 22.0 63. 1975.82 10. 1978.3 54.9 17.parkerorings. September 30. Table 3-24: Gas Permeability Rates 3-30 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. March 1968.1 11.05 3. “DC” denotes information from Dow Corning Bulletin 17-158.180 1.8 32 . Note: Some of these compounds may no longer be available.89 10.783 6.6 184 91.7 to 30. du Pont de Nemours & Co. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.8 42. Rockwell International publication AI-AEC-13145. “A” denotes information from Atomics International Division.I.7 38.5 89.35 31. October 1972.4 464 2. (3) “NR” Temperature not reported.935 to 4.5 49.com . Energy Systems Group.1 24.6 16.6 48.8 90.2 324 289 25 47.9 14. bar (2) “I” denotes information from “Permeability Data for Aerospace Applications” funded by NASA and prepared by IIT Research Institute.8 4870 75000 1.06 .39 10. report ESC-DOE-13245.6 27.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Gas Permeability Rates Temperature Gas or Liquid Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Hydrogen Sulfide Iodine Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Elastomer SBR (G0244-70) SBR (G0244-70) SBR (G0244-70) Silicone Silicone Silicone (S0684-70) Silicone Silicone (S0684-70) Silicone Silicone (S0684-70) FEP PTFE FEP PTFE FEP PTFE FEP PTFE FEP PTFE FEP PTFE FEP PTFE FEP PTFE FEP PTFE FEP PTFE TFE PTFE TFE PTFE TFE PTFE Silicone Silicone Butyl (B0318-70) Butyl (B0318-70) Butyl (B0318-70) Ethylene Propylene (E0529-65) Ethylene Propylene (E0692-75) Ethylene Propylene (E0529-65) Ethylene Propylene (E0692-75) Ethylene Propylene (E0529-65) Ethylene Propylene (E0692-75) Fluorocarbon-Viton(4) Natural Neoprene Nitrile Nitrile (N0741-75) Nitrile Nitrile (N0741-75) Nitrile Nitrile (N0741-75) Polyacrylate (A0607-70) Polyacrylate (A0607-70) Polyacrylate (A0607-70) Polyurethane (P0642-70) Polyurethane (P0648-90) Polyurethane (P0642-70) Polyurethane (P0648-90) Polyurethane (P0642-70) °C 38 84 122 Room 25 39 93 91 149 156 -74 -46 -18 10 25 38 50 66 75 100 25 30 50 25 Room 35 82 124 40 38 94 94 155 151 93 35 38 38 39 79 80 121 118 38 91 153 39 39 66 67 94 °F 101 183 251 77 103 200 195 300 313 -101 -51 0 50 77 100 122 151 167 212 77 86 122 77 95 180 255 104 101 202 201 311 304 200 95 100 100 103 175 176 250 245 100 195 307 103 102 151 152 202 Permeability (1) x 10-8 46.40 1.53 4. (4) Registered trademark E.90 9. and addendum.9 Source (2) A A A I I A A A A A I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I A A A A A A A A A A I A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A O-Ring Applications (1) Std cc cm/cm2 sec.

3 .702 to . Energy Systems Group.244 . October 1972.975 40 5.99 1.5 450 3. bar (2) “I” denotes information from “Permeability Data for Aerospace Applications” funded by NASA and prepared by IIT Research Institute.I. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.9 19. “Design Guide for Reactor Cover Gas Elastomer Seals” March 7.77 .12 22.02 4.35 43.13 3.25 .6 2. March 1968.9 6.234 1. September 30.8 7.0 to 82. Note: Some of these compounds may no longer be available.50 8.05 2.1 43. 1975.8 7.com 3-31 .04 to 9.56 .0 144 to 276 144 735 521 to 708 708 749 1440 1030 to 3190 2320 24 9.0 10430 8.35 Source (2) A A A A A A A I A A A A A A A I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I DC I I DC I I I I I I O-Ring Applications (1) Std cc cm/cm2 sec.8 6. (3) “NR” Temperature not reported.83 1.1 . and addendum.8 4.885 4.7 2.3 16.parkerorings. du Pont de Nemours & Co.4 705 443 .< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Gas Permeability Rates Temperature Gas or Liquid Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Krypton Methane Methane Methane Methane Methane Methane Methane Methane Methane Methane Methane Methane Methane Methane Methane Methanol Neon Nitric Oxide Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Elastomer Polyurethane (P0648-90) SBR SBR (G0244-70) SBR SBR (G0244-70) SBR SBR (G0244-70) Silicone Silicone Silicone (S0684-70) Silicone Silicone (S0684-70) Silicone Silicone (S0684-70) PTFE Butadiene Butyl Fluorocarbon Natural Neoprene Nitrile Silicone Silicone FEP PTFE FEP PTFE FEP PTFE FEP PTFE FEP PTFE TFE PTFE TFE PTFE Silicone Natural Silicone Butadiene Butadiene Butadiene Butyl Butyl Butyl Fluorocarbon Fluorocarbon Fluorosilicone Isoprene Isoprene Natural Natural Natural Natural Neoprene Neoprene Neoprene °C 94 38 38 82 84 121 122 Room 38 38 93 91 149 156 149 25 25 30 25 25 25 25 30 25 30 50 75 100 30 50 Room 35 Room 25 25 50 25 30 50 30 50 Room 25 50 Room 25 30 50 25 30 54 °F 201 100 101 180 183 250 251 100 101 200 195 300 313 300 77 77 86 77 77 77 77 86 77 86 122 167 212 86 122 95 77 77 122 77 86 122 86 122 77 122 77 86 122 77 86 129 Permeability (1) x 10-8 36. “DC” denotes information from Dow Corning Bulletin 17-158. Lexington.85 14.233 . Rockwell International publication AI-AEC-13145. 1978. “P” denotes information from Parker Seal tests. Table 3-24: Gas Permeability Rates Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.01 to 2 .06 to 7.35 to 30. (4) Registered trademark E. “A” denotes information from Atomics International Division.0 4. report ESC-DOE-13245.

7 4. and addendum. “Design Guide for Reactor Cover Gas Elastomer Seals” March 7. March 1968. Energy Systems Group.9 13.48 46.parkerorings. 1975. Rockwell International publication AI-AEC-13145.com .4 108 4.I.3 14.2 18. 1978.5 78 13.2 .< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Gas Permeability Rates Temperature Gas or Liquid Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Nitrogen Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Nitrogen Oxides Nitrogen Tetroxide Nitrogen Tetroxide Nitrogen Tetroxide Nitrous Oxide Octane Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Elastomer Neoprene Nitrile Nitrile Nitrile Nitrile Nitrile Nitroso SBR SBR Silicone Silicone Silicone Silicone TFE PTFE TFE PTFE TFE PTFE FEP PTFE FEP PTFE FEP PTFE FEP PTFE FEP PTFE Silicone TFE PTFE FEP PTFE TFE PTFE TFE PTFE TFE PTFE Silicone Silicone Butadiene Butadiene Butadiene Butadiene Butyl Butyl Butyl Butyl Fluorocarbon Fluorosilicone Fluorosilicone Fluorosilicone Natural Natural Natural Natural Neoprene Neoprene Neoprene Neoprene Neoprene Nitrile °C 85 20 25 30 50 79 NR3 25 30 Room Room 30 50 25 30 50 25 30 50 75 100 Room NR3 NR3 25 28 28 Room 25 25 25 30 50 Room 25 30 50 26 Room Room 26 Room 25 30 50 23 25 25 38 50 25 °F 185 68 77 86 122 174 77 86 Permeability (1) x 10-8 16.07 to 6.5 14.1 3.98 1.72 to 6.4 3.15 Source (2) I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I DC I I DC I I I I I I A I I O-Ring Applications 86 122 77 86 122 77 86 122 167 212 77 82 82 77 77 77 86 122 77 86 122 79 79 77 86 122 73 77 77 100 122 77 (1) Std cc cm/cm2 sec.4 9.177 to 1. September 30. du Pont de Nemours & Co.98 3. (3) “NR” Temperature not reported. (4) Registered trademark E. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. October 1972.795 1. Table 3-24: Gas Permeability Rates 3-32 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.050 to 1.0 1.7 81.05 . “A” denotes information from Atomics International Division.7 .176 to .13 13 4. bar (2) “I” denotes information from “Permeability Data for Aerospace Applications” funded by NASA and prepared by IIT Research Institute.5 1.5 5701 3475 485 0.0 17. “P” denotes information from Parker Seal tests.89 to 4.5 17.3 35.9 4.46 .73 . “DC” denotes information from Dow Corning Bulletin 17-158. Note: Some of these compounds may no longer be available.00 12.89 .9 7.5 .76 75 to 120 210 113 to 188 240 2.3 82.44 1. report ESC-DOE-13245.4 3. Lexington.4 3.9 3263 6450 8.98 to 1.

du Pont de Nemours & Co.3 to 4. Note: Some of these compounds may no longer be available.com 3-33 .2 to 44.5 3.80 12.5 44.4 1. October 1972. “DC” denotes information from Dow Corning Bulletin 17-158.parkerorings.73 38. March 1968. 1978.28 126 5.22 1.45 to 18.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Gas Permeability Rates Temperature Gas or Liquid Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Oxygen Pentane Pentane Pentane Pentane Pentane Pentane Phenol Propane Propane Propane Propane Propane Propane Pyridene Sulfur Dioxide Toluene Water Vapor Water Vapor Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Elastomer Nitrile Nitrile Nitrile Polysulfide Polysulfide Polyurethane Polyurethane SBR Silicone Silicone Silicone Silicone Silicone TFE PTFE FEP PTFE FEP PTFE FEP PTFE FEP PTFE Silicone Silicone Silicone Silicone Silicone Silicone Silicone Butadiene Butyl Natural Neoprene Polysulfide Silicone Silicone Silicone Silicone Ethylene Propylene Ethylene Propylene (E0692-75) Butyl Butyl (B0318-70) Butyl (B0318-70) Butyl (B0318-70) Ethylene Propylene Ethylene Propylene (E0529-65) Ethylene Propylene (E0692-75) Ethylene Propylene (E0692-75) Ethylene Propylene (E0529-65) Ethylene Propylene (E0692-75) Ethylene Propylene Ethylene Propylene (E0529-65) Ethylene Propylene (E0692-75) Fluorocarbon Natural °C 30 50 20-30 23 25 32 Room 25 Room 21 32 34 44 25 25 50 75 100 25 30 40 50 60 70 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 Room 25 Room Room 25 35 82 124 38 40 38 93 94 94 149 155 151 93 25 °F 86 122 68-86 73 77 90 77 70 90 93 111 77 77 122 167 212 77 86 104 122 140 158 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 Permeability (1) x 10-8 . Rockwell International publication AI-AEC-13145.37 9.72 to 6.70 6.2 Source (2) I I I I I I DC I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I A A I A A A A A A A A A A A A A I O-Ring Applications 77 95 180 255 100 104 100 200 202 201 300 311 304 200 77 (1) Std cc cm/cm2 sec.2 5. 1975.3 to 32.99 31. Table 3-24: Gas Permeability Rates Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. “Design Guide for Reactor Cover Gas Elastomer Seals” March 7. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.I.5 1.48 15000 32600 28900 25700 22900 20700 8100 22 to 40.0 .78 .09 3080 1580 11250 6850 550 to 3700 550 . report ESC-DOE-13245. “P” denotes information from Parker Seal tests. and addendum.8 112 to 214 195 167 260 to 520 520 460 10 17. bar (2) “I” denotes information from “Permeability Data for Aerospace Applications” funded by NASA and prepared by IIT Research Institute.8 330 to 450 195 to 443 234 346 257 to 384 7. (3) “NR” Temperature not reported. September 30.72 3.5 37.1 12.83 to 3. (4) Registered trademark E.22 17.0 .9 . “A” denotes information from Atomics International Division. Energy Systems Group. Lexington.

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Gas Permeability Rates
Temperature Gas or Liquid
Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon Xenon

Elastomer
Natural Neoprene Neoprene Nitrile Nitrile Nitrile (N0741-75) Nitrile Nitrile (N0741-75) Nitrile Polyacrylate (A0607-70) Polyacrylate (A0607-70) Polyacrylate (A0607-70) Polyurethane (P0642-70) Polyurethane (P0648-90) Polyurethane (P0642-70) Polyurethane (P0648-90) Polyurethane (P0642-70) Polyurethane (P0648-90) SBR (G0244-70) SBR (G0244-70) SBR (G0244-70) Silicone Silicone Silicone (S0684-70) Silicone Silicone (S0684-70) Silicone (S0684-70) Silicone Silicone (S0684-70) PTFE

°C
35 25 38 25 38 38 79 81 121 38 91 153 39 39 66 67 94 94 38 84 122 Room 38 38 93 91 148 149 144 149

°F
95 77 100 77 100 101 175 178 250 100 195 307 103 102 151 152 202 201 101 183 251 100 101 200 195 299 300 291 300

Permeability (1) x 10-8
72.5 3.4 to 7.5 40 .60 to 2.85 .94 3.31 7.83 to 36.8 13.2 38.5 to 101 10.9 108 549 2.57 1.03 9.58 6.58 43.0 24.5 14.9 66.2 173 1523 109 to 1220 1220 1290 to 2180 2180 700 1110 (sic) to 2200 2200 5.3

Source (2)
I I A I A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A I A A A A A A A A

O-Ring Applications

(1) Std cc cm/cm2 sec. bar (2) “I” denotes information from “Permeability Data for Aerospace Applications” funded by NASA and prepared by IIT Research Institute, March 1968. “A” denotes information from Atomics International Division, Energy Systems Group, Rockwell International publication AI-AEC-13145, “Design Guide for Reactor Cover Gas Elastomer Seals” March 7, 1975, and addendum, report ESC-DOE-13245, September 30, 1978. “DC” denotes information from Dow Corning Bulletin 17-158, October 1972. “P” denotes information from Parker Seal tests. (3) “NR” Temperature not reported. (4) Registered trademark E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. Note: Some of these compounds may no longer be available.

Table 3-24: Gas Permeability Rates

3-34

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Section IV – Static O-Ring Sealing
4.0 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2 4.1 Surface Finishes for Static O-Ring Seals. . . . . . . . . 4-2 4.2 Static Male and Female O-Ring Design . . . . . . . . . 4-2 4.3 Face Type O-Ring Seals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2 4.4 Dovetail and Half-Dovetail Grooves . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3 4.5 Boss Seals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3 4.6 Failures and Leakage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3 4.7 O-Ring Glands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.7.1 O-Ring Glands for Aerospace Hydraulic Packings and Gaskets . . . . . . . . . . . . . Design Chart 4-1 A & B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Design Table 4-1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3 4-3 4-4 4-5 Face Seal Glands Design Chart 4-3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-18

Static O-Ring Sealing

Dovetail Grooves Design Chart 4-4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-19 Half Dovetail Grooves Design Chart 4-5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-20 Static Crush Seal Grooves Design Chart 4-6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-21 Tube Fitting Boss Seals — AS5202 Design Table 4-3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-22 Tube Fitting Boss Seals — AS4395 Design Table 4-4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-23 Design Table 4-5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-24 Vacuum Seal Glands Design Chart 4-7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-25

4.7.2 O-Ring Glands for Industrial Static Seals Design Chart 4-2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9 Design Table 4-2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-10

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Static O-Ring Sealing
Static O-Ring Sealing
4.0 Introduction It has been said that O-rings are “the finest static seals ever developed.” Perhaps the prime reason for this is because they are almost human proof. No adjustment or human factor comes into play when O-rings are assembled originally or used in repairs if the gland has been designed and machined properly. O-rings do not require high bolting forces (torque) to seal perfectly. O-rings are versatile and save space and weight. They seal over an exceptionally wide range of pressures, temperatures and tolerances. Once seated, they continue to seal even though some feel that they theoretically should not. In addition, they are economical and easy to use. Therefore, we agree that the O-ring is “the finest static seal ever developed.” 4.1 Surface Finish for Static O-Ring Seals The design charts indicate a surface roughness value not to exceed 32 micro-inches (32 rms) on the sealing surfaces for static seals with a maximum of 16 rms recommended for face-type gas seals. These figures are good general guidelines, but they do not tell the whole story. Equally important is the method used to produce the finish. If the surface is produced by turning the part on a lathe, or by some other method that produces scratches and ridges that follow the direction of the groove, a very rough surface will still seal effectively. Some methods such as end milling or routing, however, will produce scratches that cut across the O-ring. Even these may have a rather high roughness value if the profile across them shows rounded “valleys” that the rubber can readily flow into. Usually, these tool marks have sharp, deep, angular valleys that the O-ring material will not penetrate or fill completely. For this type of surface, the recommended roughness values should not be exceeded. 4.2 Static Male and Female O-Ring Seal Design Design Chart 4-2 and its accompanying Design Table 4-2 give one set of dimensions for static O-ring seals when the configuration is similar to a piston or rod application with no motion involved. Aerospace Design Standard AS5857 is shown in Design Chart 4-1 and Design Table 4-1 for aerospace and military applications. For applications requiring more than two or three percent stretch on the inside diameter of the O-rings, refer to Figure 3-3 to determine the effective “W” dimension for the stretched ring. The desired percent squeeze should be applied to this cross section diameter. In large male gland assemblies, it may be desirable to use an O-ring one size smaller than indicated in the design chart. The design stretch is so small in these large sizes, that the O-ring tends to sag out of the groove before it is assembled. Using the next smaller size simplifies assembly, but requires a reduced gland depth to attain the proper squeeze. The need for back-up rings should be investigated for pressures exceeding 103.5 Bar (1500 psi) (for all seal types). If there is no extrusion gap, back-up rings are not required. Very high pressures can be sealed without back-up rings if metal-to-metal contact (practically zero clearance) of the gland parts can be maintained. Instances have been reported of sealing pressures of 13,600 Bar (200,000 psi) with a 70 Shore A durometer Oring without back-up rings. Vibration or pressure fluctuation sometimes will produce “breathing” which requires back-up rings at average pressures below 103.5 Bar (1500 psi). When using silicone O-rings, the clearances given in the design charts and tables should be reduced 50%. For examples of static seals, see Figure 4-1 (female gland) and Figure 4-2 (male gland).

O-ring

Pressure

Use the system pressure to close clearance gap.

Added wall support on plug seal minimizes breathing. External threads prevent O-ring damage during assembly.

Figure 4-1: End Cap Seal

Figure 4-2: Plug Seal

4.3 Face Type Seals Design Chart 4-3 explains how to design an O-ring seal when the groove is cut into a flat surface. Note that when the pressure is outward, the groove outside diameter (OD) is primary, and the groove width then determines the inside diameter. Conversely, when the pressure is inward, the groove inside diameter is primary. This design technique minimizes movement of the O-ring in the groove due to pressure, thereby virtually eliminating wear and pumping leakage. If this principle is used, groove diameters larger or smaller than indicated may be used. Two possible groove widths are shown in this chart, one for liquids, and the other for vacuum and gases, the extra width for liquids allows for some minimal volume swell. In vacuum applications, the narrower width allows for faster pump down and reduces dead volume in which gas can be trapped. In sealing a liquid that is known to cause no swelling of the O-ring elastomer, the narrower groove would be suitable. Design Chart 4-3 is preferred over Design Chart 4-2 for static face seals because it calls for a heavier squeeze in all but the smallest (.070) cross-section rings, thus improving reliability at low temperatures. In a male or female gland design, the amount of squeeze required by Design Chart 4-3 is quite difficult to assemble.

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The 4-3 and 4-7 design charts are often used for vacuum seals. See O-Ring Applications, Section III, for assistance in finding the best rubber material and calculating the approximate leak rate for a face type static seal used for a vacuum or a gas. Face type seals are sometimes rectangular. In designing such a seal to receive a standard O-ring, the inside corner radii of the groove should be at least three times (ideally six times) the cross-section diameter of the O-ring to avoid over-stressing the ring or causing corner creases that would potentially leak. 4.4 Dovetail and Half-Dovetail Grooves It is sometimes necessary to mount an O-ring in a face type groove in such a way that it cannot fall out. The dovetail groove described in Design Charts 4-4 and 4-5 will serve this function. This groove is difficult and expensive to machine, and the tolerances are especially critical. It should be used only when it is absolutely necessary. 4.5 Boss Seals The AS568-901 through -932 O-ring sizes (Parker’s 3- series) are intended to be used for sealing straight thread tube fittings in a boss. Design Table 4-3 and Design Table 4-4 show the two standard boss designs that are used for this purpose. Both of these bosses use the same O-ring, but Parker Seal Group recommends the Design Table 4-4 design when there is a choice. It is the newer design, and it has not been fully accepted yet by industry or by the military though there is a military standard for it. The 4-4 dimensions provide for closer tolerance control of the O-ring cavity and distort the O-ring less when assembled. The improved tolerance condition assures much less trouble due to leakage resulting from insufficient squeeze or extrusion when the older cavity is too small. The reduced distortion gives a longer life. 4.6 Failures and Leakage By far the most common type of failure in static O-ring seals is extrusion. This is relatively easy to prevent if the curves of Figure 3-2 are used when the seal assembly (groove and seal element) is designed. “Pulsing” or “pumping” leakage occasionally occurs when system pressure alone causes the O-ring to rotate in the groove and the resilience of the seal returns it to its original position. To avoid pumping leakage, design the gland so that the normal position of the seal cross-section will be on the low-pressure side of the gland or use a narrower groove. Porous castings, eccentric grooves, out-of-tolerance parts, tool marks, and distorted or breathing glands are also frequent contributors to static O-ring seal malfunctioning and failure. Cast housings and parts fabricated from powdered metal are commonly vacuum impregnated with an epoxy to seal minute pores. In this impregnation process, it is standard procedure

to wash excess epoxy from the surface with acetone before the parts are given an oven cure. This washing process may be overdone to the point where small fissures on the surface are re-opened causing leakage under the seal in spite of the epoxy impregnant. It is advisable, after the acetone bath, to paint the sealing surface with a thin film of epoxy and wipe off the excess before oven curing. Leakage due to breathing, distortion, and incorrect machining requires a careful analysis of the problem and a consideration of the possible alternatives to find the most economical solution. When one of these causes is suspected, however, the possibility of porous metal should also be considered. For additional information on O-ring failures, see Section VIII, Failure Analysis, in this handbook. 4.7 O-Ring Glands 4.7.1 O-Ring Glands (Per SAE AS5857) for Aerospace Hydraulic (Static and Reciprocating) Packings and Gaskets The SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) 5857 provides standardized gland (groove) design criteria and dimensions for elastomeric seal glands for static applications. The glands have been specifically designed for applications using SAE AS568 size O-rings at pressures exceeding 1500 psi (10.3 MPa) utilizing one or two anti-extrusion (backup) rings and applications at pressures under 1500 psi (10.3 MPa) without backup rings. The glands have been sized to provide increased squeeze as compared to AS4716 (shown in Section V) for more effective sealing at low temperatures and low seal swell conditions. These glands are not recommended for dynamic use. Primary usage is for static external sealing. The rod dimensions are the same as AS4716. The cylinder bore dimensions are the same as AS4716 except for sizes -001 through -011 and -104 through -113. For additional information on SAE AS4716, see Section V, O-Ring Glands (Per AS4716) For Aerospace Hydraulic (Reciprocating) Packings And Gaskets. 4.7.2 O-Ring Glands for Industrial Static Seals Design Chart 4-2 provides the basis for calculating gland dimensions. For standard O-ring sizes, these dimensions have been calculated and are listed in Design Table 4-2. The procedures for the use of Design Table 4-2 are outlined in the guide below. After selecting gland dimensions, read horizontally to determine proper O-ring size number. Refer to Basic O-ring Elastomers and O-Ring Applications, Sections II and III respectively, for help in the selection of the proper compound. Remember, the effective part number for an O-ring consists of both a size number and a compound number. Refer to Appendix, Section X for installation information.

Static O-Ring Sealing
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Gland Design, O-Ring and Other Elastomeric Seals (SAE AS5857)
Standard Gland Width for Zero, One, and Two Backup Rings in Inches

Gland and AS568 Dash Number

O-Ring Cross Section W Min. Max.
.037 .047 .057 .067 .067 .100 .100 .135 .205 .269 .043 .053 .063 .073 .073 .106 .106 .143 .215 .281

Backup Ring Width Max.
---.056 .056 .060 .060 .065 .090 .130

Gland Width G No Backup Ring Min. Max.
.090 .095 .105 .115 .105 .150 .140 .185 .270 .345 .095 .100 .110 .120 .110 .160 .150 .195 .280 .355

Gland Width G One Backup Ring Min. Max.
---.174 .164 .210 .200 .250 .360 .475 ---.184 .174 .220 .210 .260 .370 .485

Gland Width G Two Backup Rings Min. Max
---.230 .220 .275 .265 .320 .455 .610 ---.240 .230 .285 .275 .330 .465 .620

Static O-Ring Sealing

001 002 003 004 to 007 008 to 028 104 to 109 110 to 149 210 to 247 325 to 349 425 to 460

Design Chart 4-1 A: Gland Design, O-Ring and other Elastomeric Seals (SAE AS5857)

Gland Design, O-Ring and Other Elastomeric Seals (SAE AS5857)
Standard Gland Diametral Clearance Dimensions in Inches

Gland and AS568 Dash Number
001 002 003 004 to 012 013 to 029 104 to 109 110 to 126 127 to 129 130 to 132 133 to 140 141 to 149 210 to 222 223 to 224 225 to 227 228 to 243 244 to 245 246 to 247 325 to 327 328 to 329 330 to 345 346 to 349 425 to 438 439 to 445 446 447 to 460

O-Ring Cross-Section W Min. Max.
.037 .047 .057 .067 .067 .100 .100 .100 .100 .100 .100 .135 .135 .135 .135 .135 .135 .205 .205 .205 .205 .269 .269 .269 .269 .043 .053 .063 .073 .073 .106 .106 .106 .106 .106 .106 .143 .143 .143 .143 .143 .143 .215 .215 .215 .215 .281 .281 .281 .281

Diametral Clearance D Max. Exterior Interior
.004 .004 .004 .004 .005 .004 .004 .005 .006 .006 .007 .005 .006 .006 .007 .008 .008 .006 .006 .007 .008 .009 .009 .010 .011 .004 .004 .004 .004 .005 .004 .004 .006 .006 .007 .007 .005 .006 .007 .007 .007 .008 .006 .007 .007 .007 .009 .010 .010 .010

Design Chart 4-1 B: Gland Design, O-Ring and Other Elastomeric Seals (SAE AS5857)

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Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division
2360 Palumbo Drive, Lexington, KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.parkerorings.com

051 0.170 1.116 1.219 0.437 0.808 0.263 0.795 0.358 0.115 0.123 0.438 0.185 0.482 0.922 0.927 0.217 0.066 0.063 0.185 0.482 0.323 0.303 1.563 0.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Gland Design.106 1. (F Min.290 0.219 0.232 0.621 0. Piston or Cylinder Cylinder Bore OD ID C A Gland OD F Rod or Gland Sleeve OD B Rod Bore ID H Gland ID E 63 P G No Parbak Ring G1 One Parbak Ring G2 Two Parbak Rings 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 0.623 0.754 0.812 0.151 0.441 0.003 Typ. O-Ring and Other Elastomeric Seals (SAE AS5857) Gland and AS568 Dash No.378 0.797 0.486 0.083 0.293 0.043 1.354 0.933 0.305 1.327 0.485 0.187 0.196 1.248 0.363 0.217 0. (E Max.218 0.250 0.com 4-5 .300 1.009 1.045 1.918 0.186 0.294 0.291 0.818 0.568 0.243 1.566 0.366 0. Lexington.055 1.154 0. -2 L Max.357 0.111 0.168 1. H Dia.220 0.685 0.185 1.324 0.183 1.863 0.417 0.433 0.310 0.856 0.149 0.738 0.180 1.152 0.691 0.421 0.418 0.063 0.923 0.860 0.629 0.368 1.051 1.058 1.075 0.241 1.613 0.035 0.005 Typ.078 0.000 1.615 0.683 0.935 0. +2 L Max.501 0.065 0.687 0.007 1.062 0.184 0.813 0.861 0.185 0.993 0.107 0.356 Design Table 4-1: Gland Design.543 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025 026 0.) Section W-W Pressure Pressure Pressure 32 63 Gland Detail Finishes are RMS values. Gland Design.153 0.356 0.358 1.125 1.560 0.231 1.176 1.258 0.552 0. Piston or Cylinder Cylinder Bore OD ID C A Gland OD F Rod or Gland Sleeve OD B Rod Bore ID H Gland ID E Gland and AS568 Dash No.238 1.550 0.865 0.376 0.036 0.087 0.625 0.793 0.944 1.562 0.247 0.858 0.608 0.251 0. W I.750 0.183 0.693 0.946 0.153 0.125 0.802 0.215 0.050 1.938 0. .443 0.325 0.420 0.123 0.672 0.481 0.063 1.069 1.121 1.062 1.357 0.673 0.246 0.050 0.231 0.326 0. (e) 0° to 5° (Typ.312 0.250 0. = A Max.871 0.545 0.047 0.126 1.677 0.216 0.989 0.301 1.110 0.626 0.086 0.D.740 0.313 0. E Dia.152 0.731 0.816 0.558 0.114 1.) B Dia.418 0.733 0.920 0.233 1.925 0.506 0.983 0.239 1. A Dia. .119 0.498 0.048 0.122 0.312 0.035 0.154 0.034 0.372 0.001 1.250 0.151 0.309 0.178 1. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.186 0.157 0.048 0.) Break Corners Approx.610 0.214 0.132 1.748 0.231 0.937 1.118 0.126 0. D 32 R W L Gland Depth W W .262 0.047 0.262 0.188 1.188 0.230 0.116 0.798 0.148 0.032 0.076 0.194 1.parkerorings.981 1.249 0.998 0.261 0.134 1.736 0.187 1.611 0.079 0.110 0.259 1.228 0.364 1.108 1.295 1.377 0.548 0.875 0.375 0.109 0.087 0.156 0.033 0.257 0.876 0. O-Ring and Other Elastomeric Seals (SAE AS5857) Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.504 0.108 0.227 0.800 0.078 0.631 0.216 0.053 1.988 1.086 0.119 0.668 0.756 0.435 0.670 0.005 RAD.483 0.751 0.606 0. G P Groove Depth (Ref.293 1.419 0.184 0.122 0.373 0.688 0.217 0.991 1.251 1.735 0.326 0.248 1.547 0.123 1.500 0.118 1.118 0. Male Gland Female Gland Static O-Ring Sealing D D F Dia.185 0.218 0.077 0.884 0.496 0.313 0.060 1.084 0.182 0.996 1.675 0.113 1.071 1.746 0.) C Dia.810 0.294 0.873 0.355 0.062 0.293 0. O-Rings and Other Elastomeric Seals (SAE AS5857) Standard gland dimensions in inches.882 0.175 1. = B Min.259 0.

550 2.738 1.998 1.502 1.927 2.852 1.689 2.180 2.000 1.125 0.496 0.264 2.495 2.123 1.383 0.315 0.440 0.666 0.826 1.313 0.892 0.347 0.413 0.864 1.286 0.685 1.685 0.663 0.665 2.177 2.800 2.501 0.620 2.426 2.363 1.038 1.439 1.139 2.852 0.239 1.688 0.003 2.759 0.812 0.493 1.220 0.998 0.952 1.435 1.975 2.349 0.055 1.538 1.101 2.503 2.375 0.829 2.887 0.686 2.748 0.475 0.319 0.805 2.923 0.861 0.988 2. Piston or Cylinder Cylinder Bore OD ID C A Gland OD F Rod or Gland Sleeve OD B Rod Bore ID H Gland ID E Static O-Ring Sealing 027 028 029 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 1.452 2.827 0.418 1.187 1.428 1.123 0.478 0.726 2.750 1.053 1.290 1.425 1.364 2.216 0.913 2.915 2.126 2.875 0.621 1.115 2.952 2.753 2.121 2.704 2.871 0.475 1.289 0.739 1.320 0.217 0.178 1.038 2.570 0.555 1.553 1.701 1.266 2.564 1.577 1.873 0.391 2.952 0.766 2.303 1.380 0.350 0.867 1.541 0.540 1.176 1.974 1.180 1.314 0.496 1.623 2.426 1.766 1.283 0.189 2.491 1.184 0.813 1.913 1.995 2.058 1.154 0.639 2.352 1.871 0.991 1.389 1.751 2.413 2.100 1.454 2.188 0.827 0.415 2.498 0.438 0.243 1.751 0.932 2.165 2.425 1.801 1.311 0.476 2.077 1.441 2.889 0.938 0.175 1.175 1.378 2.501 2.680 2.187 0.301 1.382 0.373 0.477 1.915 1.113 1.414 0.748 2.876 1.677 2.371 0.118 1.312 0.627 1.428 1.743 2.253 2.988 1.248 0.616 1.178 1.200 1.370 2.439 2.977 1.290 2.300 1.141 2.922 0.377 0.327 1.663 2.118 1.075 1.927 1.865 0.560 1.601 0.561 2.702 2.052 2.247 0.989 0.978 2.813 0.933 0.051 1.745 2.863 1.746 2.625 0. Lexington.761 0.114 1.001 2.993 0.055 1.675 2.559 2.476 0.809 0.850 1.727 1.996 2.496 2.725 0.498 2.996 1.217 0.161 1.432 2.014 1.125 0.parkerorings.807 2.876 0.891 1.483 1.118 2.243 1.989 1.602 0.566 2.120 0.329 2.120 2.813 0.683 1.310 0.808 0.937 1.com .228 2. O-Ring and Other Elastomeric Seals (SAE AS5857) (Continued) Gland and AS568 Dash No.930 1.437 0.500 0.182 2.939 2.550 1.790 2.040 1.976 0.932 1.373 1.992 2.312 1.040 2.539 0.734 0.240 2.062 1.2564 2.308 1.815 1.079 2.878 1.988 0.288 2.991 1.740 2.202 2.305 2.055 2.618 2.540 2.488 1.151 0.865 2.639 1. O-Ring and Other Elastomeric Seals (SAE AS5857) 4-6 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.204 2.251 2.288 0.764 1.327 2.382 0.810 0.684 2.563 0.807 1.243 2.287 0.239 1.262 1.615 2.993 0.116 1.988 1.498 1.750 0.102 1.976 0.752 1.811 2.560 0.053 1.185 1.736 0.123 2.283 0.288 1.890 0.289 0.699 0.246 2.613 1.016 2.687 1.373 1.163 1.636 0.375 0.051 2.575 1.814 0.287 0.186 2.937 1.430 1.436 2.930 2.077 2.000 1.489 1.250 1.249 0.989 0.936 1.488 2.415 0.512 1.156 0.514 2.601 2.680 1.368 1.808 0.433 0.376 1.366 1.913 0.123 0.248 1.438 0.163 2.114 1.869 1.126 1.538 0.318 0.121 0.871 1.226 1.310 1.101 1.302 2.558 1.305 1.430 1.743 1.411 0.665 0.562 0.226 2.063 1.626 2.925 2.176 1.579 2.802 0.051 1.353 2.066 2.012 1.682 2.870 2.245 2.184 2.014 2.687 0.383 0.827 0.389 2.738 2.634 0.060 1.121 0.248 0.602 0.371 2.251 0.603 2.284 0.036 1.489 1.364 1.351 2.420 1.113 1.477 0.478 2.488 0.788 0.351 0.993 0.750 0.990 2.934 1.748 1.623 1.375 1.126 0.668 0.202 1.851 2.264 1.577 2.746 0.412 0.152 0.825 0.994 1.309 0.103 2.224 Design Table 4-1: Gland Design.621 2.802 1.122 0.311 2.810 1.001 1.239 2.474 0.552 2.675 1.926 1.941 1.625 1.188 1.925 0.829 0.765 0.185 0.602 1.350 1.805 1.157 0.191 2.180 1.321 1.689 1.568 0.313 1.452 1.504 0.248 2.251 1.350 0.697 0.139 1.555 2.061 2.238 1.641 1.437 1.379 0.057 2.938 0.376 0.038 1.798 0.691 2.368 2.516 2.628 2.797 0.099 1.314 2.670 0.137 1.219 0.413 1.863 2.557 2.975 1.741 1.996 1.116 1.600 0.126 0.475 0.683 0.238 1.312 1.678 1.889 1.415 1.868 2.309 2.376 1. Piston or Cylinder Cylinder Bore OD ID C A Gland OD F Rod or Gland Sleeve OD B Rod Bore ID H Gland ID E Gland and AS568 Dash No.727 0.064 2.227 1.764 2.562 1.613 2.426 1.500 1.434 2.790 0.800 0.122 0.540 0.373 2.860 0.114 2.165 1.319 1.935 0.312 0.604 0.365 2.850 0.316 2.935 0.414 0.728 2.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Gland Design.853 2.241 1.998 0.490 2.873 1.641 2.184 0.802 2.748 0.788 2.286 0.308 1.606 0.927 0.427 2.558 0.663 1.746 0. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.225 1.163 1.371 1.873 0.665 0.176 2.153 0.435 0.614 1.384 1.514 1.790 1.183 1.125 1.493 1.812 0.382 0.665 1.703 1.241 1.876 0.600 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 210 211 212 213 214 1.828 1.875 0.120 0.128 2.001 1.621 0.059 2.732 0.725 1.301 2.538 0.551 1.502 0.731 0.746 1.915 0.050 1.288 0.954 0.493 2.313 1.808 1.788 1.954 1.307 2.284 0.977 0.618 1.481 0.767 0.376 2.538 2.623 0.433 1.430 2.325 1.250 0.121 1.950 1.676 1.310 1.346 0.863 0.751 0.216 0.810 0.183 0.387 1.015 1.933 0.626 0.050 1.246 1.317 0.543 0.017 1.450 1.491 0.816 2.375 0.371 0.

623 2.113 1.626 2.120 4.220 4.392 1.272 3.996 2.523 1.002 3.600 3.183 1.642 3.988 4.878 1.622 4.433 1.863 2.899 1.726 1.274 3.752 3.598 4.989 1.490 3.620 3.223 3.062 1.865 3.122 3.892 1.976 2.550 1.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Gland Design.425 1.495 3.501 1.766 1.250 1.118 1.364 2.627 3.493 2.750 3. Piston or Cylinder Cylinder Bore OD ID C A Gland OD F Rod or Gland Sleeve OD B Rod Bore ID H Gland ID E Gland and AS568 Dash No.002 4.503 2.226 2.267 4.250 3.372 3.848 2.750 3.862 1.519 4.017 2.310 1.738 1.622 3.897 4.601 2.726 2.118 3.865 2.871 1.348 2.623 1.988 2.774 1.993 4.498 1.648 1.363 4.347 3.120 4.620 2.375 4.519 2.392 2.125 3.748 2.345 3.997 2.063 1.377 4.127 3.724 1.327 1.239 2.370 3.473 3.120 3.286 1.488 3.501 2.743 4.971 3.721 2.753 2.723 2.368 4.599 2.376 2.100 4.245 4.363 1.625 1.868 2.265 1.308 1.com 4-7 .894 1.988 4.863 3.995 3.114 2.871 2.997 3.245 2.126 2.122 4.868 3.267 3.parkerorings.240 3.551 1.869 1.750 1.616 1.642 1.848 3.060 1.490 3.243 2.376 2.147 2.599 1.140 1.519 3.850 4.864 1.745 3.313 1.767 3.127 3.625 3.614 1.746 1.622 3.738 2.846 1.748 1.435 1.096 2.245 3.098 242 243 244 245 246 247 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 4.115 3.675 1.502 1.892 2.375 3.126 2.988 3.851 1.301 1.238 3.995 3.240 4.870 3.876 2.497 4.723 3.864 1.870 4.740 2.147 3.752 3.269 3.123 2.372 3.498 2.596 2.245 3.975 3.349 2.740 3.394 4.365 3.368 1.390 1.238 4.615 2.743 3.274 2.248 2.125 3.973 2.720 3.489 4.613 1.878 2.378 2.096 3.745 3.363 4.245 3.000 3.019 2.876 3.392 4.613 2.620 3. O-Ring and Other Elastomeric Seals (SAE AS5857) (Continued) Gland and AS568 Dash No.873 1.995 2.399 3.738 3.115 3.553 1.598 3.753 2.628 2.120 3.487 4.748 2.849 1.870 2. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.377 3.863 2.536 1.868 3.612 4.870 3.375 3.871 1.620 3.620 3.246 2.626 1.517 4.370 4.125 1.768 1.873 2.438 1.348 4.101 2.878 2.620 2.848 1.725 3.373 1.223 3.995 3.118 2.642 2.120 4.649 3.993 3.204 1.618 1.994 1.722 3.644 3.490 2.267 1.474 1.488 3.127 4.399 2.243 3.644 4.142 4.997 3.243 3.364 2.522 3.613 2.128 2.877 3.500 1.869 1.738 3.022 2.676 1.641 1.202 1.123 2.017 4.644 2.739 4.122 3.496 1.680 1.428 1.437 1.394 2.221 3.996 2.877 3.990 3.475 3.521 1.003 2.350 4.500 1.363 3.971 2.997 2.613 3.372 4.113 3.144 4.628 2.187 1.618 2.240 3.493 4.368 2.647 2.623 1.621 2.149 2.000 3.126 1.863 1.473 2.870 3.224 2.370 3.253 2.743 1.368 4.496 2.515 1.627 1. Lexington.120 2.351 2.488 2.502 3.990 2.876 3.772 3.430 1.303 1.351 1.500 3.745 4.849 2.366 1.863 3.000 4.598 2.870 1.974 3.476 2.489 1.647 3.992 2.128 2.371 1.497 3.748 1.472 3.993 3.024 3.899 2.741 1.245 2.497 3.992 2.870 2.118 2.471 2.247 4.517 1.115 4.496 2.894 2.488 1.370 3.503 4.868 2.745 3.253 2.114 2.495 2.022 3.988 2.329 1.498 2.626 2.113 3.368 2.305 1.347 4.185 1.892 3.752 1.247 3.769 3.517 3.101 3.115 2.240 2.251 1.495 4.739 1.243 4.501 2.973 4.623 2.373 2.614 4.364 1.767 2.993 4.222 4.769 2.503 2.001 2.725 4.123 1.851 2.125 4.098 3.024 2.743 2.745 3.627 1.245 4.600 4.995 4.243 2.392 3.502 3.247 3.751 2.115 4.221 2.272 2.615 3.850 3.615 3.238 4.024 4.019 4.225 3.223 4.495 3.238 3.747 3.746 2.873 2.017 3.493 2.618 3.120 2.490 2.251 2.867 1.772 1.998 1.348 3.751 2.142 3.495 3.142 1.370 2.628 4.846 2.995 2.976 1.524 2.097 4.118 4.746 2.774 3.847 3.493 3.243 4.995 4.000 4.239 2.077 1.864 4.252 3.746 1.368 3.121 1.345 Design Table 4-1: Gland Design.079 1.121 2.500 3.493 3.875 1.615 2.522 2.251 2.743 2.371 2.897 3.003 2.678 1.470 3.618 4.371 2.225 4.621 2.288 1.495 2.998 1.475 4.740 2.994 1.223 2.871 2.995 3.248 1.095 4.661 1.312 1.144 3.894 3.495 3.865 2.643 1.373 2. O-Ring and Other Elastomeric Seals (SAE AS5857) Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.394 3.745 2.772 2.375 1.876 2.144 2.524 3.240 4.972 3.250 4.370 2.245 4.875 4.872 3.099 2.621 1.620 1.370 4.368 3.848 1.491 1.873 1.149 3.474 2.878 1.752 1.897 2.488 2.743 3.454 1.120 3.723 4.365 4.188 1.120 3.363 3.269 2.413 1.750 1.774 2.738 2.001 2.625 1.142 2.099 3.377 3.476 1.252 4.426 1.597 3.346 2.098 2.349 1.618 3.745 2.113 4.365 4.397 3.601 1.740 3.863 1. Piston or Cylinder Cylinder Bore OD ID C A Gland OD F Rod or Gland Sleeve OD B Rod Bore ID H Gland ID E Static O-Ring Sealing 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 1.378 2.724 2.002 3.411 1.473 4.370 3.555 1.974 2.250 3.300 1.493 1.350 3.002 4.620 4.646 1.538 1.990 2.269 4.118 3.365 3.496 1.370 4.019 3.058 1.246 2.737 4.248 2.498 1.872 3.613 3.989 1.747 3.845 3.252 3.988 3.970 4.376 1.899 3.865 3.990 3.501 4.397 2.365 2.595 3.022 3.625 3.246 1.649 2.627 3.663 1.621 1.240 2.115 2.495 4.517 2.121 2.973 1.618 2.452 1.365 2.868 1.867 1.267 2.245 3.

494 7.994 9.956 14.504 10.718 5.706 6.974 15.345 6.628 5.956 12.497 11.144 5.709 6.501 15.493 4.497 12.517 14.960 15.252 4.626 5.894 5.497 6.494 9.519 8.847 4.967 15.977 7.020 14.266 6.970 10.247 7.977 4.997 9.017 14.470 9.744 4.753 5.459 7.751 4.845 5.751 4.706 7.516 4.959 8.495 4.224 5.970 12.959 5.478 13.970 14.501 7.478 15.474 14.970 8.870 4.com .272 4.250 4.004 14.520 12.218 4.494 14.501 10.974 13.878 5.020 10.474 8.520 13.997 7.727 5.209 6.003 5.467 11.494 11.372 5.470 14.831 5.119 5.769 7.497 15.016 5.001 8.626 4.644 4.504 9.343 5.004 7.004 11.478 10.474 12.456 6.869 4.744 4.960 12.997 14.084 6.956 11.516 7.149 4.994 8.618 4.334 5.959 4.968 6.266 5.709 5.718 6.754 6.017 9.994 11.504 12.247 4.970 15.269 5.220 7.460 10.369 5. O-Ring and Other Elastomeric Seals (SAE AS5857) (Continued) Gland and AS568 Dash No.147 4.017 8.206 6.974 8.520 14.472 4.501 11.960 13.001 15.375 4.868 4.967 10.244 7.494 12.494 15.470 8.599 5.974 6.524 4.456 9.220 6.253 6.474 10. O-Ring and Other Elastomeric Seals (SAE AS5857) 4-8 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.956 10.500 4.766 7.378 5.456 5.977 5.520 11.878 4.331 5.956 6.977 6.747 4.595 4.619 4.997 8.960 10.001 6.220 5.753 4.495 4.739 4.628 4.017 11.001 13.099 6.391 5.614 4.517 10.456 14.504 11.460 15.519 4.254 7.709 7.494 5.516 8.004 9.519 5.349 5.206 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 7.349 6.218 6.017 12.459 6.994 13.218 5.501 12.967 7.994 12.397 4.467 12.960 11.456 15.269 7.120 4.977 8.519 6.956 Design Table 4-1: Gland Design.503 5.997 12.470 15.456 11.467 9.016 6.019 6.747 7.727 6.956 15.612 4.227 5.504 8.869 5.517 12.619 5.209 5.478 12.459 8.460 11.891 5.003 6.956 7.102 6.517 15.967 13.517 9.766 5.970 6.004 15.970 4.644 5.876 6.747 6.251 6.502 4.224 4. Lexington.477 7.468 8.020 11.477 6.376 5.001 12.501 5.956 13.516 5.722 4.020 9.503 4.501 7.960 14.224 6.487 4. Piston or Cylinder Cylinder Bore OD ID C A Gland OD F Rod or Gland Sleeve OD B Rod Bore ID H Gland ID E Gland and AS568 Dash No.845 4.864 4.460 13.020 113.520 9.206 5.209 8.754 7.497 9.470 12.504 13.497 8.001 5.978 11.474 9.997 10.497 4.468 7. Piston or Cylinder Cylinder Bore OD ID C A Gland OD F Rod or Gland Sleeve OD B Rod Bore ID H Gland ID E Static O-Ring Sealing 346 347 348 349 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 4.345 5.095 5.994 6.504 14.769 5.227 8.967 12.968 7.843 5.016 6.352 5.620 4.501 9.622 4.093 6.489 4.001 7.001 10.218 8.766 4.894 4.494 4.622 5.720 6.001 9.141 5.494 6.244 5.477 5.004 8.747 5.519 7.974 7.377 4.334 6.769 4.974 5.597 4.706 5.978 10.978 15.593 5.227 6.501 13.266 7.852 5.126 5.247 5.019 7.956 8.751 8.876 5.468 6.0147 13.970 11.978 12.209 7.956 5.020 8.970 13.001 14.parkerorings.468 5.269 6.459 5.968 8.470 5.478 9.501 6.467 15.501 14.727 7.470 11. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.456 10.960 9.994 10.084 5.251 7.467 10.751 5.474 11.974 10.470 4.127 4.595 5.470 6.724 5.956 9.095 6.504 15.745 4.004 12.504 6.474 7.997 5.959 6.720 4.968 5.004 13.517 11.497 10.497 4.718 7.099 5.460 9.720 7.504 7.477 8.744 7.019 5.872 4.959 7.994 14.849 5.974 11.470 7.125 4.769 6.004 10.581 5.997 4.245 4.478 11.460 14.978 14.102 5.399 4.128 5.456 13.494 10.460 12.994 7.766 4.497 14.372 4.724 7.474 5.994 15.019 6.737 4.862 4.997 13.641 5.520 15.081 5.497 7.974 14.834 5.122 5.743 4.967 14.467 14.274 4.343 6.474 13.470 13.978 13.602 5.253 5.122 4.352 6.974 9.522 4.970 9.251 5.970 7.720 5.017 10.978 9.370 4.244 6.517 13.497 5.520 10.478 14.394 5.967 9.456 8.470 10.891 6.227 7.474 6.724 6.974 12.001 11.016 7.744 5.974 7.516 6.220 8.494 13.093 5.206 8.020 12.467 13.641 4.997 15.456 12.081 6.997 11.224 8.584 5.872 5.967 11.474 15.456 7.994 5.494 8.331 6.501 4.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Gland Design.970 5.497 13.247 6.

8√ 004 through 050 102 through 178 201 through 284 309 through 395 425 through 475 1/16 3/32 1/8 3/16 1/4 .229 .316 . (female gland) Throat Dia. (d) For ease of assembly. G F Groove Depth (Ref.055 22 to 32 17 to 24 16 to 23 15 to 21 15 to 20 . male gland Tube OD female gland Throat Dia.035 .410 to .050 to .004 .003 Typ.281 to .083 .) Section W-W B Dia.032 .040 to .com 4-9 .005 to .408 to .002 .78 mm) . = A Max.004 (3. when Parbaks are used.143 . Refer to Design Chart 4-2 (below) and Design Table 4-2 for dimensions Industrial O-Ring Static Seal Glands O-Ring 2-Size AS568BW Cross-Section Nominal Actual L Gland Depth Squeeze Actual % E(a) Diametral Clearance G .138 to .210 ±.020 to .070 ±. female gland Design Guide 4-2: Guide for Design Table 4-2 Select Closest Dimension in Column A C B D Read Horizontally in Column B-1 C G A B-1 G A-1 D G A-1 B G To Determine Dimension for Groove Dia.140 to .99 mm) .187 to .208 to .238 to .) Pressure Pressure Pressure 32 63 Gland Detail Finishes are RMS values.025 .005 .010 to .023 .003 (1.) C Dia.015 . A-1 Dia.111 to .006 . A Dia.33 mm) . (b) Total indicator reading between groove and adjacent bearing surface.006 (6.003 to .171 to .275 ±. 1/2 E 32 R W L Gland Depth W W .003 to .093 to . +2 L Max.210 .538 to .002 to . (female gland) Tube OD (female gland) Groove width Static O-Ring Sealing Industrial Static Seal Glands Male Gland Female Gland 1/2 E 1/2 E (e) 0° to 5° (Typ.081 to .145 . (male gland) Groove width Bore Dia. (c) Reduce maximum diametral clearance 50% when using silicone or fluorosilicone O-rings.380 .) B-1 Dia.Groove Width One No Two Parbak Parbak Parbak Ring (G) Ring (G1) Ring (G2) Max.020 to . (male gland) Groove (male gland) Groove width Groove Dia.005 to .007 .415 .015 to .139 ±. R Groove Eccentricity Radius (b) 63 F G No Parbak Ring G1 One Parbak Ring G2 Two Parbak Rings metric conversion 32√ = . = B Min.045 .017 to .243 .005 (5.543 .005 Typ.002 to .375 to .005 RAD.002 .015 . Lexington.275 to . Design Chart 4-2: For Industrial O-Ring Static Seal Glands Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.025 . (male gland) Plug Dia.052 . gland depth may be increased up to 5%.103 ±. male gland Plug Dia.192 .113 .286 . Break Corners Approx.170 to .311 to .022 to . (B-1 Min.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Guide for Design Table 4-2 If Desired Dimension is Known for Bore Dia.280 . W I.213 .62 mm) .176 .205 to . D Dia. .003 (2.004 to . (female gland) Groove width Groove Dia. (A-1 Max.005 .D.098 . .413 .003 .226 to .035 .53 mm) .006 .parkerorings. -2 L Max.173 .005 (a) Clearance (extrusion gap) must be held to a minimum consistent with design requirements for temperature range variation.032 to . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.

375 2.691 .005 .400 2.350 .810 .379 .003 Mean +.437 1.500 .220 .125 1.489 ± .254 2.754 1.002 .025 1.900 3.875 3.625 .625 1.504 .010 .106 .562 .275 2. 4-10 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.172 .489 .020 . use a compound having higher elongation or use a two-piece piston.837 .900 2.375 1.005 .067 .005 .787 .314 1.127 2.462 .685 .623 1.000 .239 1.239 2.000 3.498 .018 .475 1.750 2.379 1.002 3.502 2.551 .310 1.000 1.937 1.879 1.748 2.000 2.900 .941 .002 2.437 .189 .412 .005 .187 1.083 .525 – .312 1.056 .400 .070 .009 .625 2.037 1.150 2.029 .850 .627 2.998 1.435 1.138 .623 .739 .5 Bar (1500 psi).013 .275 .687 .018 .100 2.256 .250 3.212 .775 .018 .864 .060 1.176 .364 2.875 .243 .312 .050 .239 3.137 .725 .435 .504 2.623 .254 .629 .373 3.629 3.614 2.600 2.176 1.005 .250 .373 2.864 2.441 .< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Gland Dimensions for Industrial O-Ring Static Seals.562 .064 1. * These designs require considerable installation stretch.975 1.254 1.212 1.059 . 103.364 1.537 .114 .024 W .712 .489 2.005 .750 .011 .150 1.935 .241 .754 .400 1.018 .114 1.316 .125 1.005 .066 1.754 2.350 3.252 1. 22-001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025 026 027 028 029 030 031 032 033 034 035 036 037 038 039 040 041 042 043 Dimensions ID .739 2.350 1.020 . (Female Gland) B Tube OD (Female Gland) B-1 Groove Dia.189 1.879 2.001 .060 .062 1.301 .748 1.176 .150 .248 1.877 .502 1.129 2.502 G† Groove Width +.077 .662 .489 1.185 1.587 .127 .055 .337 .375 3.005 .252 .127 1.101 .206 .752 1.373 .042 .013 .081 .000 1.248 2.001 -.105 .004 .627 1.348 .873 2.650 1.218 .937 1.093 Static O-Ring Sealing O-Ring Size Parker No.009 .101 .375 2.011 .600 1.377 .125 2.500 .123 2.parkerorings.318 .248 .816 .500 2.725 2.125 .181 .252 3.158 .341 .373 1.009 .100 3.750 .564 .162 .814 .5 Bar (1500 psi) Max.375 .525 2.279 .250 .225 2.142 .053 .975 3.687 .864 1.010 .475 .156 .750 1.100 1.002 * * * * * * * * * * * * +.000 -.191 1.812 .525 .125 3.879 .010 .123 3.013 .350 2.062 1.912 .040 .235 .873 .004 .187 1.011 .275 1.004 1.750 2.337 1.379 2.500 2. Design Table 4-2: Gland Dimensions for Industrial O-Ring Static Seals.625 2.566 .005 . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. 103.070 .926 .025 2.689 .877 3.181 .650 . Lexington.000 3.025 3.998 3.498 1.123 1.145 .042 .004 2. (Female Gland) +.500 1.225 .623 2.208 .739 1.250 1.204 .040 .500 1.252 2.187 .000 .002 .004 3.129 3.005 -.629 2.070 ±.775 1.875 .437 .103 .316 1.114 .812 .225 1.498 2.000 .170 .112 .002 +.962 1.004 .250 2.005 .625 -.375 1.504 1.875 2. consult Design Chart 4-2 for groove widths where back-up rings must be used.162 1.051 1.301 1.614 1.850 1.312 .002 1.989 3.873 1.018 .287 1.275 3.069 .083 .748 .998 2.000 .625 1.801 . (Male Gland) A-1 Groove Dia.com .002 OD (Ref) -.000 2.875 3.441 1.287 .009 .412 1.129 1.009 .310 .5 Bar (1500 psi) Max.343 .377 1.377 2.676 . For pressures above 103.114 2. If assembly breakage is incurred.237 .250 1.002 † This groove width does not permit the use of Parbak rings.989 1.600 + .005 .750 1.285 .752 2.975 2.250 2.439 .239 .136 .125 2.109 .087 1.210 . (Male Gland) C Plug Dia.525 1.939 1.989 2.627 .379 3.560 .312 1.314 .000 .375 .752 .† A Bore Dia.875 2.024 .600 .281 .725 1.500 +.000 .850 2.650 2.877 2.044 .024 .212 .775 2.055 .475 2.364 .629 1.015 .614 .009 .132 .007 .015 .426 .625 .502 . (Male Gland) D Throat Dia.020 .

010 .812 1.463 .924 .739 4.814 1.562 .505 .025 1.064 +.010 .000 1.099 2.818 .127 .350 4.125 1.989 5.009 .099 1.560 1.849 .724 .818 1.900 .562 1.372 .015 .009 .500 4.375 1.375 4.287 1.625 .000 2.599 1.342 .017 .912 .880 1.131 2.148 .030 .140 † This groove width does not permit the use of Parbak rings.340 .474 .443 .987 1.877 .400 1.123 4.439 1.129 5.752 5.502 .010 .000 4.437 1.123 5.314 .002 OD (Ref) -.278 .737 .937 2.877 1.005 .050 ± .100 5.373 4.937 1.312 1.377 .parkerorings.424 .500 1.012 .338 .875 1.375 1.125 2.500 1.001 3.880 .362 1.015 .088 – .850 4.349 .600 4. consult Design Chart 4-2 for groove widths where back-up rings must be used.943 .000 3.380 .250 -.502 1.005 .037 2.873 4.963 1.568 .724 1.875 .752 1. (Male Gland) A-1 Groove Dia.224 .002 5.689 .005 .com 4-11 .525 1.193 2.588 1.250 4.049 1.064 .775 4.005 .312 1.224 + .750 1.060 1.374 .862 .623 4.000 2.017 W .002 .250 1.025 2.748 .003 .127 1.862 1.693 .010 .873 1.873 5. 103.5 Bar (1500 psi) Max.625 .879 4.713 .439 .062 .687 1.027 .850 5.030 .974 1.310 .812 1.062 1.879 3.755 .003 Mean +.599 .838 1.068 2.379 4. Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.000 3.070 ±.487 1.443 1. (Male Gland) C Plug Dia.674 1.810 .487 .123 2.002 4.987 2.424 1.463 1.143 .212 .525 .000 5.812 .349 1.787 1.350 .687 1.112 .255 1.873 .787 .739 3.252 .015 .500 .505 1.002 2.799 1.025 4.005 .005 .275 .017 .250 .674 .912 1.239 .049 .012 .000 .005 .412 .775 .925 1.875 .252 1.103 ±. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.250 1.015 .338 1.252 .015 .437 .299 1.403 .662 .630 1.537 1.435 .379 5.405 .116 .250 .623 .900 1.248 1.625 1.081 .775 5. (Male Gland) D Throat Dia.564 .010 .187 2.010 .412 1.112 1.025 5. 2044 045 046 047 048 049 050 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 Dimensions ID 3.838 .627 .243 .318 .219 .213 1.256 .560 .750 .005 .158 .310 1.750 1.502 4.287 .275 .630 .814 .015 .064 1.662 1.755 1.185 1.180 .005 -.500 .012 .000 3.373 1.224 1.012 . use a compound having higher elongation or use a two-piece piston.095 .435 1.001 -.5 Bar (1500 psi) Max.689 1.939 2. Lexington.750 4.255 .564 1.221 .100 4.005 .437 .174 .412 .005 .012 .939 1.189 .650 .068 1.125 1.000 3.000 .005 2.125 5.625 1.474 1.693 1.060 2.998 1.989 4.489 4.650 1.275 4.537 .088 1.362 .† (Continued) A Bore Dia.318 .027 .312 .125 4.150 1.037 .525 4.308 .009 .187 .248 +.629 4.498 .130 1.125 .252 4.002 +.287 . For pressures above 103.974 2.748 1.588 .687 .007 .129 4.549 .943 1.094 .437 1. * These designs require considerable installation stretch.568 1.156 .377 1.375 .239 4.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Gland Dimensions for Industrial O-Ring Static Seals.875 1.935 1.685 .002 . 103.935 .123 1.810 1.162 1.380 1.185 2.189 1.612 1.085 .775 1.093 * * * * * * * * * * * * .963 2.062 2.062 1.318 1.752 .000 1.162 2.5 Bar (1500 psi).206 .750 5.849 1.875 4.498 1.314 1.373 .612 .875 5.400 .062 +.256 2.276 .037 .187 1.737 1.005 1.623 1.002 1.187 1.752 4.247 .193 1.000 -.685 1.937 1.625 4.713 1.037 1.174 1.998 2.349 .002 +.549 1.562 .275 1.937 2.799 . Design Table 4-2: Gland Dimensions for Industrial O-Ring Static Seals.687 .237 .562 1.005 .012 .245 . (Female Gland) G† Groove Width Static O-Ring Sealing O-Ring Size Parker No.002 3.750 .812 . If assembly breakage is incurred.627 1.381 . (Female Gland) B Tube OD (Female Gland) B-1 Groove Dia.237 1.030 .375 .299 .

437 4.912 5.040 .689 2.412 7.687 3.435 6.187 7.187 5.937 6.487 8.500 6.412 4.443 5.045 .687 2.463 2.213 2.750 .500 5.443 2.127 2.409 .162 4.237 7.193 4.937 5.775 2.875 2.parkerorings.377 2. 103.002 6.662 9.775 8.812 2.068 3. 4-12 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.437 7.750 2.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Gland Dimensions for Industrial O-Ring Static Seals.525 4.035 .030 .000 6.275 2.002 9.312 2.139 ±.662 3.187 8.025 6.275 6.912 2.500 2.472 .974 3.002 2.252 6.040 .650 2.296 ± .187 .662 7. Lexington.987 7.017 .849 2. If assembly breakage is incurred.713 2.5 Bar (1500 psi) Max.062 3.185 3.685 6.035 .237 9. * These designs require considerable installation stretch.443 3.685 9.937 4.800 2.028 .000 2.685 3.412 2.000 4.775 .612 2.750 2.750 7.022 .487 3.693 2.185 9.275 7.750 5.312 2.040 .487 4.234 .862 2.875 3.252 7.943 9.315 G† Groove Width +.275 9.500 .412 3.185 8. (Male Gland) C Plug Dia.737 7.412 9.020 .312 +.437 9.987 4.437 2.250 6.190 .912 7.810 2.502 3.050 . (Male Gland) D Throat Dia.362 2.187 9.937 .935 6.187 3.662 2.252 5.435 2.250 8.237 4.987 8.693 9.987 6.045 .752 4.5 Bar (1500 psi) Max.025 9.275 3.693 3.037 3.189 2. Design Table 4-2: Gland Dimensions for Industrial O-Ring Static Seals.318 2.020 .125 2.434 .035 .425 2.002 * * * † This groove width does not permit the use of Parbak rings.623 2.237 8.750 6.752 2.237 3.278 .002 3. use a compound having higher elongation or use a two-piece piston.250 7.502 7. 103.375 2.487 9.050 .873 2.752 .002 5.com .437 8.912 6.022 .250 3.935 8.000 -.625 2.935 5.025 4.004 Mean +.237 2.935 7.662 8.737 3.935 .020 .252 4.193 7.737 2.487 2.060 3.525 9.497 .112 2.502 6.562 2.525 5.140 .443 9.162 5.437 .185 6.162 3.937 9.002 .687 9.685 4.171 .500 8.750 8.685 2.237 5.193 9. (Male Gland) A-1 Groove Dia.937 7.250 4.022 .502 9.000 .687 5.001 2.506 2.935 2.752 7.500 2.315 2.187 Static O-Ring Sealing O-Ring Size Parker No.000 2.877 3.564 2.187 4.437 6.045 .005 .185 4.375 2.693 7.525 6.443 6.534 + +.818 2.943 6.000 2.055 .340 – +.625 2.987 3.937 3.900 3.025 8.250 5.752 9.814 2.000 3.737 .912 9.252 3.025 7.775 5.030 .035 .006 3.001 -.687 7.025 5.500 9.000 9.252 9.005 .435 4.373 2.750 4.500 3.002 4.550 2.300 2.435 9.024 .275 8.937 8.756 2.000 8.185 5.030 .474 2.987 5.193 6.748 2.449 .775 4.185 7.024 .525 7.412 5.437 2.287 2.437 3.568 2.943 7.435 5.943 3.175 2.000 5.881 2.017 .687 6.252 2.935 9.943 2.253 .685 5.435 7.000 3.187 2. (Female Gland) +.487 6.025 3.443 8.737 4.035 . For pressures above 103.693 5.687 4.412 6.338 2.237 6.005 W .250 2.502 2.987 9.252 8.500 4.912 8.162 8.443 4.487 7. 2138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 201 202 203 Dimensions ID 2.812 2.250 9.752 8.737 8.250 .838 2.† (Continued) A Bore Dia.525 3.502 8.775 7.055 .193 3.737 5.662 6.537 2.400 2.000 2.574 .162 9.150 2.045 .675 2.502 5.943 4.443 7.040 .020 .935 4.998 3.412 8.162 6.737 6.525 2.002 .500 7.912 .752 6.943 8.775 6.562 2.002 .215 .050 .002 8.693 6.627 2.310 2.525 8.003 .750 9.498 2.724 2.487 5.787 2.752 5.050 .687 8.275 5.437 5.055 .662 4.439 2.017 .435 8.588 2.693 8.022 .562 -.349 2.020 .599 2.028 .502 4.024 .512 . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. consult Design Chart 4-2 for groove widths where back-up rings must be used.693 4.002 7.631 2.662 5.685 8.000 .187 6.685 7.020 .943 5.193 8.000 7.381 2.193 5.162 7.002 OD (Ref) -.560 2.103 ±. (Female Gland) B Tube OD (Female Gland) B-1 Groove Dia.5 Bar (1500 psi).687 2.912 4.775 9.435 3.559 .275 4.005 -.

com 4-13 .809 .015 .359 3.247 4.347 3.125 2.622 1.parkerorings.000 2.028 2.028 3.153 2. (Male Gland) A-1 Groove Dia.625 1.359 2.500 4.503 3. If assembly breakage is incurred.747 2.847 .018 .122 3.253 1.340 1.187 † This groove width does not permit the use of Parbak rings.875 2.387 1.687 .097 2.375 .247 3.122 4.262 1.012 .378 3.010 .375 2.528 4.012 4.375 4.715 .878 .875 4.687 .747 4.859 2.503 4.097 4.875 2.012 3.875 4.449 1.028 .500 2.375 1.5 Bar (1500 psi).250 1.347 4.109 1.734 2.† (Continued) A Bore Dia.012 .750 .671 .372 4.687 1.653 .012 .750 3.171 1.628 2.512 3.153 4.097 1. use a compound having higher elongation or use a two-piece piston.784 .949 .000 1.002 .778 3.972 2.253 4.003 4.497 3.609 3.753 1.762 3.659 .359 4.247 2.125 3.187 1.597 2.387 4.500 .875 3.030 .030 W .847 1.528 2.250 4.024 . Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.125 2.528 1.753 3.984 3.278 1.020 . consult Design Chart 4-2 for groove widths where back-up rings must be used.278 2.887 4.234 2.002 OD (Ref) -.859 1.253 3.090 1.003 3.137 3.722 3.002 .375 4.253 2.324 1.403 3.109 3.403 4.878 3.440 .503 1.262 3.375 3.840 .653 3.024 .597 4.015 .637 .750 1.625 . For pressures above 103.497 4.512 2.997 1.009 .128 1.184 1.000 2.187 1.847 3.887 2.625 .747 .378 1.122 1.609 .378 . Design Table 4-2: Gland Dimensions for Industrial O-Ring Static Seals.222 2.734 1.909 .028 .003 2.465 .122 2. Lexington.590 .125 1.018 . (Female Gland) B Tube OD (Female Gland) B-1 Groove Dia.199 1.778 .972 4.997 2.984 4.762 2.024 .015 .940 1.437 .020 .597 1.747 1.403 .284 1.887 3.347 1.997 4.125 1.750 3.000 3.250 2.000 3.472 1.125 3.012 .005 .753 .903 3.359 .500 1.421 .012 1.484 2.128 2.137 2.403 1.903 4.010 .137 1.609 ± .859 3. (Male Gland) D Throat Dia.484 1.847 + +.812 .528 3.625 3.528 .622 2. 103.010 .937 1.497 2.020 .387 3.722 .659 1.046 1.010 .609 1.125 4.625 +.637 3.622 4.484 4.065 1.222 1.378 4.762 .250 1.296 1.215 1.222 3.250 4. (Male Gland) C Plug Dia.128 3.565 .378 2.015 .000 .653 2.722 2.028 .500 4.5 Bar (1500 psi) Max.009 .278 3.750 4.972 3.887 .000 4.372 3.628 .309 1.472 3.003 1.625 4.000 .684 1.024 .872 +.699 .005 .234 1.012 .872 2.001 .637 4.5 Bar (1500 psi) Max.024 .700 1.562 .030 .247 1.747 3.128 4.628 1.847 2.312 1.437 1.559 1.250 3.062 1.824 . (Female Gland) G† Groove Width Static O-Ring Sealing O-Ring Size Parker No.562 1.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Gland Dimensions for Industrial O-Ring Static Seals.139 ±.030 .875 3.546 .637 2.375 2.421 1.997 3. 2204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 Dimensions ID .024 .000 -.125 4.028 .872 3.609 2.074 1.012 2.815 .503 2.347 2.762 1.153 1.465 1.028 4.007 .872 .109 2.722 4.937 1.020 . * These designs require considerable installation stretch.222 4.778 2.262 4.625 2.000 .375 3.500 3.012 .597 3.734 .875 -.878 2.028 1.497 1.859 . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.750 2.005 .512 4.984 1.887 1.000 .372 1.690 .034 1.878 4.574 1.875 .000 4.005 -.278 4.722 1.153 3.934 .921 .512 1.500 3.972 1.062 1.625 2.097 3.234 4.984 2.750 2.653 – +.472 2.628 3.250 3.190 1.534 1.750 1.872 1.024 .734 3.500 2.109 4.004 Mean +.312 1.010 .472 4.778 1.028 .359 1.484 3.753 2.010 . 103.903 .002 .059 1.622 .965 1.875 .625 3.315 1.234 3.372 2.437 1.262 2.000 1.628 +.597 .250 2.000 .762 4.500 1.750 .409 1.000 .622 3.434 1.375 1.796 .001 -.812 .503 .159 1.403 2.903 2.637 1.440 1.387 2.137 4.653 1.625 1.684 .484 .

065 .878 6.020 1.253 6.503 11. For pressures above 103.parkerorings.753 5.778 9.278 5.253 5.895 .247 10.762 7.122 5.250 5.000 10.597 5.812 .734 7.122 .503 .262 9.028 10.097 5.055 .747 8.250 8.222 5.750 12.5 Bar (1500 psi) Max.040 .997 6.125 6.625 5. If assembly breakage is incurred.750 9.472 9.475 .035 .222 11.750 8.222 9.997 7.000 7.000 4.500 8.003 8.725 ± .000 6.512 6.859 4.750 11. Lexington.653 5.262 11.762 9.747 11.262 7.262 6.984 8.484 11.997 9.055 .003 7.222 10.012 8.059 1.137 6.247 5.957 1.250 8.003 5.250 10.785 – +.003 16.045 .050 .278 9.250 7.005 .065 . (Male Gland) C Plug Dia.035 .222 8.045 .080 . (Male Gland) A-1 Groove Dia.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Gland Dimensions for Industrial O-Ring Static Seals.250 17.660 .003 13.484 10.000 1.359 5.984 5.565 .012 6.472 8.262 16.984 7.440 .503 6.065 .955 .262 8.528 9.109 5.000 10.762 10.722 .387 5.050 .747 7.247 18.472 .250 14.902 .622 5.028 16.247 6.778 4.500 5.000 5.503 7.000 8.000 16.500 7.125 5.045 .247 17.000 9.375 5.139 ±.247 11.247 .† (Continued) A Bore Dia.028 17.035 .500 7.128 5.040 .003 14.009 .484 8.000 5.984 9.097 6.012 5.503 9.040 .984 6. * These designs require considerable installation stretch.690 .028 13.065 .600 . (Female Gland) B Tube OD (Female Gland) B-1 Groove Dia.000 5.028 15.028 8.497 8.028 7.250 .003 6.125 -.372 5. 103.972 7.222 14.004 .003 . (Female Gland) +.003 11.000 9.5 Bar (1500 psi) Max.984 14.778 5.984 10.222 15.762 5.234 6.609 5.000 15.500 8.012 9.500 12.537 .512 8.955 16.222 16.035 .347 5.497 7.003 9.528 12.035 .662 .734 6.145 +.997 1.250 9.722 5.875 6.000 11.955 17.222 .012 10.000 8.500 .055 .253 8.903 6.687 .000 4.028 6.247 9.778 7.872 . 103.762 12.625 .278 8.000 18.035 .222 13.247 13.472 6.887 6.734 9.984 15.250 16.472 7.937 1. 4-14 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.262 13.747 5.278 6.753 7.972 10.278 7.484 9.262 10.859 5.722 7.484 5.153 5.233 .777 .222 17.000 7.722 6.250 6.778 10.628 .250 5.005 .222 7.005 Mean OD (Ref) 5.734 4.000 4.000 .055 .002 .210 ±.500 11.503 5.035 .972 8.997 8.253 9.597 .002 .875 6.847 5.997 10.965 1.484 6.734 5.375 5.750 5.065 .734 8.222 18.528 7.250 6.753 8.028 .003 18.045 .753 G† Groove Width +.722 11. consult Design Chart 4-2 for groove widths where back-up rings must be used.002 -.250 15.004 .500 5.040 .010 W .412 .222 6.233 17.497 9.437 .5 Bar (1500 psi).247 7.484 7.028 18.972 9.722 12.747 12.250 7.234 5.035 .562 .065 .500 6.247 8.234 9.000 14.250 18.809 .000 .750 10.000 17.050 .497 6.878 5.500 6.035 .903 5.247 16.750 4.250 9.762 8.250 11.055 .778 8.028 14.747 9.984 12.528 5.528 6.934 .234 8.722 9.832 .262 14.528 8.030 .875 5.984 13.750 10.000 .750 7.528 11.500 9.512 5.512 9.003 15.085 .497 5.503 8.000 -.750 5.750 8.125 5.625 5.253 7.972 5.035 .281 Static O-Ring Sealing O-Ring Size Parker No.027 1. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.750 +.002 4.840 .512 7. 2248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 309 310 311 312 313 314 Dimensions ID 4.262 5.637 5.378 5.001 4.262 15.403 5.com .984 11.472 5.004 * * * † This groove width does not permit the use of Parbak rings.997 5.090 + +.234 7.028 5.000 13.747 6.247 15.535 .028 9.872 5.028 11. Design Table 4-2: Gland Dimensions for Industrial O-Ring Static Seals.233 18.012 7.003 10.972 6.082 1.628 5.187 .722 8.753 9. use a compound having higher elongation or use a two-piece piston.250 13.001 -.750 9.007 .137 5.075 .875 .009 .050 .003 17.062 1.750 7.122 6.762 11. (Male Gland) D Throat Dia.753 4.000 6.247 14.005 -.500 9.753 10.503 12.

497 3.875 4.012 . Design Table 4-2: Gland Dimensions for Industrial O-Ring Static Seals.600 3.895 1.003 3.222 1.840 5.747 3.770 2.340 2.122 5.850 3.997 2.562 1.840 2.247 5.645 3.225 1.875 2.000 .000 .910 4.497 2.395 1.503 4.372 2.535 5.717 4.375 2.395 5.010 .622 4.020 .160 3.395 2.037 .785 4.785 1.652 1.com 4-15 .975 5.912 .965 + +.375 3.215 2.465 4.372 1.715 1.037 W .520 3.005 Mean +.012 .012 .207 1.000 -.250 5. 103.725 3.872 5.500 4.035 5.410 2.625 4. Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.750 4.872 3.270 2.5 Bar (1500 psi).277 1. (Female Gland) B Tube OD (Female Gland) B-1 Groove Dia.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Gland Dimensions for Industrial O-Ring Static Seals.128 1.520 5.910 .035 1.037 .020 5.770 5.030 .660 4. (Male Gland) D Throat Dia.037 .378 1.645 5.020 3.372 5.250 3.875 .247 4.628 1.878 3.840 4.750 3.145 2.028 .628 +.785 2.332 1.030 .162 1.003 2.750 5.500 1.372 3.247 3.878 4.590 4.434 1.378 5.937 1.010 .128 2.312 1.012 .940 1.347 1.215 5.100 5. (Female Gland) G† Groove Width Static O-Ring Sealing O-Ring Size Parker No.090 5.437 1.215 3.004 .590 1.† (Continued) A Bore Dia.247 1.028 . 2315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 Dimensions ID . use a compound having higher elongation or use a two-piece piston.005 -.465 2.253 1.281 † This groove width does not permit the use of Parbak rings.787 .622 2.000 .378 4.250 1.378 2.215 4.285 2.590 2.500 2.965 3.965 4.125 4.250 4.872 2.128 4.975 3.000 5.850 4.520 1.707 1.878 5.parkerorings.125 3.895 4.497 1.895 5.285 5.502 3.975 4.004 .225 5.625 1.210 ±.875 5.128 5.535 2.000 1.600 4. If assembly breakage is incurred.628 2.747 1.037 .997 +.312 1.253 4.840 1.122 3.350 2.125 2.037 1.465 3.001 -.625 1.128 3.100 1.965 5.001 1.340 5.160 4.250 1.395 4.018 .503 5.520 2.020 .378 3.500 5.972 1.910 5.020 4.035 4.003 4.035 3.000 .975 2.520 4.253 3.097 1.125 4.340 1.190 1.725 1.024 .475 4.000 -.475 2.747 5.997 4.878 .028 .590 3.600 1.100 3.750 2.145 3.872 1.997 3.003 5.535 1.535 3.002 .090 4.785 3.600 2.895 2.375 1.625 2.628 3.315 1.020 .028 .850 2.309 1.770 1.750 3. consult Design Chart 4-2 for groove widths where back-up rings must be used.018 .020 2.250 2.878 2.287 1.015 .375 4.850 1.028 .875 4.030 .410 1.350 1.350 5.753 4.160 1. 103.253 5.660 1. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.497 4.012 .250 3.375 4.024 .250 4.503 1.910 2.015 .215 1.875 3.350 4.660 3.002 OD (Ref) -.645 2.015 .125 2.000 1.410 3.018 .015 .500 5.000 3.125 1.475 5.000 2.037 .875 6.910 3.815 .503 2.375 2.062 1.024 .875 3.270 1.628 4.715 5.750 1.747 2.010 .625 2.770 4.535 4.715 2.660 – +.010 .457 1.247 2.187 1.750 2.225 4.997 5.850 .020 .010 .622 3.270 4.000 5.500 3.122 2.840 3.410 4.500 2.684 1.125 3.753 2.035 2.625 +.160 5.090 2.100 2.125 5.559 1.622 1.625 3.000 4.250 5.270 5. (Male Gland) A-1 Groove Dia.645 4.500 4.660 2. Lexington.872 4.475 3.5 Bar (1500 psi) Max.090 3.372 4.395 3.582 1.020 6. * These designs require considerable installation stretch.497 5.030 .145 4.125 5.152 1.253 2. For pressures above 103.018 .350 3.003 1.500 3.000 1.122 4.225 2.065 1.475 1.753 3.030 .500 1.625 5.590 5.770 3.465 5.625 4.465 1.965 2.527 1.747 4.000 2.410 5.187 1.340 3.285 4.184 1.402 1.725 2.375 3.160 2.812 .645 1.375 5.753 1.750 1.622 5.5 Bar (1500 psi) Max.000 4.847 .024 .375 1.285 3. (Male Gland) C Plug Dia.725 4.625 3.225 3.285 1.875 5.875 2.375 5.750 4.030 .270 3.000 3.687 1.250 2.024 .600 ± .975 1.100 4.715 3.340 4.895 3.145 5.

955 19.372 25.590 9.115 .395 10.000 5.340 6.003 19.253 7.375 7.753 8.496 5.879 5.145 7.247 6.085 .003 14.035 20.725 6.372 4.725 9.975 5.000 25.000 21.395 16.375 24.955 21.373 21.372 23.003 8.975 9.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Gland Dimensions for Industrial O-Ring Static Seals.500 4.037 .090 .003 24.895 8.225 9. (Female Gland) +.475 4.000 15.340 17.003 11.955 17.006 Mean OD (Ref) 6.060 . If assembly breakage is incurred.090 9.225 6.125 10.395 6.785 9.372 11.035 15.100 .035 18.075 .004 .875 12. 4-16 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.975 11. (Female Gland) B Tube OD (Female Gland) B-1 Groove Dia.095 .503 7.372 14.622 6.003 25.875 7.372 8.340 22.246 5.840 10. 103.125 5.002 -.500 11.975 8.003 7.035 7.035 4.250 6.281 .452 5.225 ± .004 .375 17.875 11. (Male Gland) C Plug Dia.375 17.000 24.372 18.105 .975 13.285 8.725 5.475 6.090 10.840 9.340 15.037 . Design Table 4-2: Gland Dimensions for Industrial O-Ring Static Seals.650 5.590 8.340 4.375 5.875 9.372 13.372 10.375 5.parkerorings.725 7.090 7.940 25.003 9.645 7.035 23.895 7.033 .360 26.372 26.340 18.673 4.045 .003 6.535 12.125 7.298 – +.000 14.785 8.535 9.100 5.750 7.060 .725 4.090 8.625 6.340 19.975 10.622 7.035 24.372 21.000 .250 5.371 5.373 22.000 7.000 19.270 6.145 6.033 .035 19.000 20.003 20.940 23.003 23.372 9.000 17.003 10.500 7.004 . 2359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 Dimensions ID 5.375 26.055 .500 5.340 26.033 .035 26.250 9.798 4.340 24.285 9.375 13.535 8.395 14.840 12.037 W .340 8.878 6.340 10.872 9.048 5.253 6.375 10.395 9.003 22.910 6.548 4.004 5.975 7.003 17.622 8.145 10.com .372 19.590 6.045 . Lexington.625 5. (Male Gland) A-1 Groove Dia.895 12.225 7.215 6.340 7.035 10.753 5.000 11.070 .250 6. consult Design Chart 4-2 for groove widths where back-up rings must be used.725 8.952 5.746 .850 4.002 5.503 12.475 10.210 ±.122 10.375 11.000 4.285 6.875 6.360 5.375 19.872 7.001 6.250 +.895 11.035 14.504 4.000 5.622 9.503 11.600 4.035 22.003 26.035 6.5 Bar (1500 psi) Max.375 9.375 Static O-Ring Sealing O-Ring Size Parker No.621 5.025 5.055 .225 8.090 6.† (Continued) A Bore Dia.940 24.340 23.975 15.372 17.040 .375 23.375 16.035 17.840 8.110 .340 11. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. For pressures above 103.340 20.503 6.037 .000 5.625 7.775 +.475 8.975 14.754 4.850 5.375 22.005 -. use a compound having higher elongation or use a two-piece piston.500 12.040 .250 7.285 7.045 .996 5.375 19.475 7. 103.004 † This groove width does not permit the use of Parbak rings.395 8.785 10.000 .000 18.000 22.629 4.625 8.003 13.253 8.001 -.000 26.955 20.202 5.275 ±.035 9.340 16.785 7.372 22.122 8.503 8.340 21.125 6.250 8.895 9.033 .095 .065 .372 20.360 24.645 6.000 -. * These designs require considerable installation stretch.875 5.535 7.955 22.050 .375 18.625 9.923 5.375 25.003 18.125 5.525 5.955 18.373 20.080 .840 11.035 13.129 5.065 .003 4.840 7.375 18.253 9.750 9.050 .000 6.395 11.040 .753 7.173 5.035 16.375 21.375 14.000 6.340 14.895 10.372 16.000 8.035 8.395 7.000 23.120 .145 9.050 .872 8.045 .275 5.503 9.150 5.500 6.000 13.121 5.077 5.055 .055 .327 5.122 6.373 23.475 11. (Male Gland) D Throat Dia.975 6.037 .372 24.375 6.003 15.875 8.500 8.005 .750 10.645 9.125 8.340 9.254 G† Groove Width +.360 25.872 11.750 -.5 Bar (1500 psi).872 10.750 5.872 12.750 8.125 9.035 21.050 .400 5.003 16.955 16.122 9.750 4.975 12.535 11.000 6.000 16.535 6.040 .375 8.372 7.577 5.645 8.753 9.940 4.475 9.590 7.035 11.375 15.702 + +.070 .145 8.065 .037 .340 13.035 25.122 7.000 9.372 15.785 5.500 9.375 20.753 10.340 25.000 10.875 10.395 13.000 5.395 15.372 6.5 Bar (1500 psi) Max.625 4.003 21.

455 16.000 11. (Female Gland) B Tube OD (Female Gland) B-1 Groove Dia.955 22.371 6.005 18.500 14.004 19.048 16.452 19.048 24.504 12.500 19.725 6.004 9.875 6.500 13. Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.996 11. use a compound having higher elongation or use a two-piece piston.879 6.525 12.504 13.952 9.048 14.500 15.004 24.006 Mean OD (Ref) 5.000 25.496 8.250 7.048 12.000 12.955 16.298 7.496 11.750 5.000 7.070 .525 14.505 22.955 20.† (Continued) A Bore Dia.298 6.115 .452 12.940 25.475 9.000 23. consult Design Chart 4-2 for groove widths where back-up rings must be used.975 13.500 10.827 5.955 19.004 .090 .952 15.452 7.505 17.452 23.085 .250 6.496 26.004 13.754 7.004 .500 6.000 10.775 7.5 Bar (1500 psi) Max.004 6.000 6.070 .246 8.025 13.750 7.004 16.000 17.548 10.037 .500 15. * These designs require considerable installation stretch.004 21.000 11.500 11.000 19.000 .496 6.048 7. 103.025 7.225 7.798 5.952 16.004 8.452 18.996 20.025 11.125 6.004 7.525 15.040 .5 Bar (1500 psi).452 + +.496 9.952 17.040 .952 8.500 12.004 11.500 26.000 26.004 25.004 +.775 8.952 12.452 6.525 16.105 .045 .452 14.525 10.702 6.060 .002 -.000 13.000 9.625 5.525 6.000 14.004 23.005 19.004 26.500 9.500 17.000 6.275 ±.500 21.048 6.000 15.025 8.060 .095 . (Male Gland) C Plug Dia.005 20.025 15.100 .996 14. (Female Gland) G† Groove Width Static O-Ring Sealing O-Ring Size Parker No.548 5.475 11.500 7.060 .000 14.548 19.923 6.475 12. 2432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462 463 464 465 466 467 468 469 470 471 472 473 474 475 Dimensions ID 5.070 .975 8.040 .000 8.500 22.996 19.120 W .000 20.037 .952 7.000 12.375 5.475 5.350 5.025 10.798 8.500 24.996 12.952 19.504 9.455 19.496 +.048 21.037 .629 5.452 15.548 16.955 17.254 6.505 20.452 17.475 10.000 17.955 18.048 11.000 16.548 20.496 21.048 13.500 20.000 5.548 15.500 19.952 14.095 .246 7.496 14.504 5.940 ± .048 23.000 22.327 6.504 11.048 17.952 18.871 5.275 7.048 22.940 24.500 13.000 .000 10.048 8.040 .000 13.548 13.548 11.996 17.975 11.496 15.548 6.750 8.952 11.004 17.725 7. 103.500 18.500 -.000 5.850 5.000 8.725 5. Lexington.452 16.048 9.490 25.060 .055 .504 18.500 14.5 Bar (1500 psi) Max.996 18.455 18.952 6.504 17.500 16.496 17.500 6.475 13.150 6.000 19.975 7.475 14.055 .246 6. Design Table 4-2: Gland Dimensions for Industrial O-Ring Static Seals.400 6.048 – +.475 6.025 16.037 .452 8.496 7.110 .952 13.000 -.496 23.375 6.375 † This groove width does not permit the use of Parbak rings.055 .504 7.080 .202 6.000 7.004 14.548 18.000 10.085 .504 20.975 6.504 10.452 9.475 7.250 6. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.077 6.548 12.045 .496 12.000 5.475 15.975 12.996 10.121 6.500 11.000 +.500 23.490 26.525 13.504 15.996 7.525 9.996 13.952 10.490 +.025 9.505 21. (Male Gland) A-1 Groove Dia.048 15.000 16.025 14.452 11.048 26.225 6.500 18.548 14.275 6.075 .900 6.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Gland Dimensions for Industrial O-Ring Static Seals.500 17.505 19.001 5.500 20.496 22.525 7.000 5.496 16.048 10.parkerorings.004 15.045 .500 10.490 24.996 16.000 21.452 22.746 6.045 .500 9.500 5.505 18.452 13.048 19.996 8.500 16. For pressures above 103.000 18.048 25.005 -.254 7.500 25.754 8.070 .955 21.002 5.com 4-17 .000 9.504 16.975 15.996 15. If assembly breakage is incurred.975 10.525 11.000 18.475 8.025 6.504 6.746 7.496 25.496 10.504 19.060 .504 14.975 9.496 13.202 7.037 .060 .275 8.496 24.452 10.500 7.750 8.875 6.055 .452 21.423 5.452 24.379 5.250 7.496 18.996 6.975 14.005 17.996 9.455 17.004 22.548 9.750 7.702 7.250 8.452 26.952 20.037 .505 23.500 12.075 .496 19.085 .001 -.025 12.452 25.000 24.548 7.548 17.754 5.000 15.070 .090 .798 7.673 5.004 18. (Male Gland) D Throat Dia.600 5.940 23.004 12.202 8.048 18.

030 to .com .164 .030 to .D.D.375 ±.380 Squeeze Actual % . O-Ring Size Parker No..< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Face Seal Glands For Internal Pressure (outward pressure direction) dimension the groove by its outside diameter (HO ) and width: (HO ) = Mean O.107 .parkerorings. Static O-Ring Sealing L Section W-W W W .142 .045 1/8 3/16 1/4 3/8 1/2 Design Chart 4-3: Design Chart for O-Ring Face Seal Glands 4-18 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.) Break Cor ners Approx.008 (12. of O-ring i (see Table 4-1) Tolerance = Plus 1% of Mean I.52 mm) .082 to .275 ±.112 to .010 to .239 to .005 Max.D.201 to .003 (2.043 to .074 to . .007 (9.138 19 to 32 20 to 30 20 to 30 21 to 30 21 to 29 22 to 28 22 to 27 G Groove Width Vacuum Liquids and Gases .015 .309 to .136 to .362 .003 (1.042 .158 to .020 to .032 .187 .244 .063 .565 R Groove Radius .035 .025 .33 mm) . of O-ring (see Table 4-1) Tolerance = Minus 1% of Mean O.162 .177 to .005 (5. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.004 (3.152 to .7 mm) L Gland Depth .53 mm .286 .270 to .058 to .62 mm) .013 to .314 .015 .070 ±. X R 63 Groove Depth (= Gland Depth) W I.210 ±.003 Max.050 to .485 .035 .101 to .645 .060 0° to 5°* (Typ.101 to .120 to .060 For External Pressure (inward pressure direction) dimension the groove by its inside diameter (Hi) and width: (H) = Mean I.005 to .028 to .107 .006 (6.211 .D.106 .78 mm) .475 to . Lexington.089 .045 .054 .084 to ..020 to . but not more than -. 2 004 through 050 102 through 178 201 through 284 309 through 395 425 through 475 Special Special W Cross Section Nominal Actual 1/16 3/32 .080 .D.080 .500 ±.005 to . 63 Surface finish X: 32 for liquids 16 for vacuum and gases L X G Gland Detail Finishes are RMS values (Refer to Design Chart 4-3 below) O-Ring Face Seal Glands These dimensions are intended primarily for face type O-ring seals and low temperature applications.139 ±.424 .125 .560 to .342 to .290 .005 RA D.020 to .638 to . but not more than +.99 mm) .419 to .370 to .276 to . .103 ±.023 .

053 to . modifications of the design recommendations shown above are necessary.234 .210 ±. however.006 . Insufficient radius will potentially cause damage to the O-ring during installation. deviation from these recommendations may be necessary.315 to . O-Ring Size AS568A004 through 050 102 through 178 201 through 284 309 through 395 425 through 475 Special W Cross Section Nominal Actual 1/16 3/32 .319 R .375 ±. This is an expensive groove to machine.070 ±.103 ±.005 . G Static O-Ring Sealing L It should be noted that although this method has been used successfully. An undercut or dovetail groove has proven beneficial in many applications to keep the O-ring in place.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Dovetail Grooves It is often necessary to provide some mechanical means for holding an O-ring in a face seal groove during assembly and maintenance of equipment.003 .015 1/16 3/8 16 .parkerorings.003 .113 .007 L Gland Depth .087 .061 . one should take into consideration that perfluorinated elastomers may require more squeeze than an FKM material to obtain optimum sealing performance.081 to . 66° R R1 Mean Groove Diameter Coincides With Mean O-ring Diameter.055 .005 .117 . In special applications. it is not generally recommended. while excessive radius may contribute to extrusion. To increase squeeze. wide service temperature ranges.com 4-19 .010 R1 1/64 1/64 1/8 20 .235 .315 to . Lexington. and fluid media that cause high swell of the elastomer are conditions that cannot be tolerated in this type of groove design.004 . When designing with Parofluor elastomers.083 . Normally acceptable tolerance extremes.083 to .015 1/32 1/4 16 .113 to .010 1/32 3/16 18 .171 to . for example in the semiconductor industry. Finishes are RMS values O-Ring Dovetail Grooves Radius “R” is CRITICAL.020 3/32 NOTE: These design recommendations assume metal-to-metal contact.171 to .057 to . and thus should be used only when absolutely necessary.319 Squeeze % 23 21 G Groove Width (To sharp corner) .173 .139 ±.231 to .111 to . The inherent characteristics of the groove design limit the amount of void area. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.175 .231 to .275 ±. Design Chart 4-4: Dovetail Grooves Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.

319 to .375 ±.095 to .< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Half Dovetail Grooves G Static O-Ring Sealing L 66° R Mean Groove Diameter Coincides With Mean O-ring Diameter.015 . When designing with Parofluor elastomers. To increase squeeze.020 R1 1/64 1/64 1/32 1/32 1/16 3/32 NOTE: These design recommendations assume metal-to-metal contact.083 to .097 . modifications of the design recommendations shown above are necessary. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. R1 Finishes are RMS values O-Ring Half Dovetail Grooves Radius “R” is CRITICAL.004 .006 .com .005 .007 L Gland Depth .103 ±.193 .parkerorings. Design Chart 4-5: Half Dovetail Grooves 4-20 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.064 to .255 to .173 to .053 to .070 ±.015 .128 .139 ±.234 to . one should take into consideration that perfluorinated elastomers may require more squeeze than an FKM material to obtain optimum sealing performance.003 . while excessive radius may contribute to extrusion.275 ±.323 Squeeze % 23 19 18 17 15 14 G Groove Width (To sharp corner) .350 to .176 .005 .257 .066 .010 .210 ±.085 .115 .010 . for example in the semiconductor industry.113 to . Lexington.003 . O-Ring Size AS568A004 through 050 102 through 178 201 through 284 309 through 395 425 through 475 Special W Cross Section Nominal Actual 1/16 3/32 1/8 3/16 1/4 3/8 .124 to .190 to . Insufficient radius will potentially cause damage to the O-ring during installation.358 R .238 . In special applications.055 . deviation from these recommendations may be necessary.

139 0.18 0.08 0 . The same sealing principle applies to crush type seals used in recesses of straight thread tubing bosses.136 0.28 6.13 0.78 Size Number 004 through 050 102 through 178 201 through 284 309 through 395 425 through 475 in 0.00 4.08 0.38 0.89 0.006 0.277 0.04 0.25 0.50 2.18 0.015 0.00 9.18 0.00 0.99 1.00 6. Pressures are limited only by clearances and the strength of the mating parts.15 0.236 0.003 0.00 5.354 Design Chart 4-6: Static Crush Seal Grooves Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.22 1.10 0.363 0.13 0.0.312 0.08 0.078 0.007 0.118 0.260 0.003 0.38 Various Sizes 0.33 0.004 0.25 0.000) mm 0.13 0.08 in 0.104 0.53 0.45 0.25 0.157 0.103 0.468 0.003 0.184 0.08 0.007 4.005 3.98 2.156 0. The O-Ring is confined in a triangular recess made by machining a 45 degree angle on the male cover.006 0.08 0.130 0.098 0.13 0.208 0.005 0. The OD of the ring should be about the same as the recess diameter.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Triangular Grooves This type of crush seal is used where cost and ease of machining are important.092 L Gland Depth + (.005 0.38 0.003 2.64 3.416 0.078 0.57 11.000) 0.com 4-21 .13 0.96 5.30 3.315 0.007 0.004 3.00 8.93 10.parkerorings.010 0.197 0.0.015 9.007 6. Static O-Ring Sealing Static Crush Seal Grooves W O-Ring CS Actual +/mm 0.005 0.210 0.005 5.010 0.003 0.005 0.13 0.18 0.010 7.50 3.08 0.003 0.015 0.003 1.61 7.08 0.15 0.10 0. The O-Rings are permanently deformed.62 0.67 0. Lexington.275 0.34 + (.059 0.00 2. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.070 +/0.003 2.

709 0.800 2.852 0.844 0.675 1.004 .475 ± .665 1.005 .362 1.517 0.482 0.524 0. PD must be concentric with G Dia.336 1.094 0. 0.078 1.072 ± .656 0.500 0.003 .6250-18UNJF-3B .577 0.023 1.118 ± .003 0.438 .015 -.547 0.769 0.116 ± .414 ± . flat boss face.000 Thread T Per Mil-S-8879 .2500-12UNJ-3B 2.097 ± .568 0.643 0.056 ± .580 0.004 .010R E To G Surf.602 0. across G Dia.116 ± .171 ± .009 1.8750-14UNJF-3B 1. +.5625-18UNJF-3B .012 1.312 1.062 0.005 .4375-20UNJF-3B .3125-12UNJ-3B 1.086 1.003 .714 0.3750-24UNJF-3B .730 0.250 1.188 .665 0.004 .040 1.072 ± .125 .706 ± . 0.524 1.004 .547 1.468 ± .064 N 0. to E Depth Concentric to D Within .834 0.6250-12UNJ-3B 1.116 1.I.118 ± .047 ± .030 T.I.116 ± .530 ± .000 0. K within N T.000 1.004 .005 0.063 0. Dia.614 0.8750-12UNJ-3B 2.003 .004 .010 1.625 0.014 2.875 1.7500-16UNJF-3B . wrench.009 .328 0.907 *Parker dash numbers correspond with those of AS568A Design Table 4-3: Boss Dimensions for Military Straight Thread Tube Fitting O-ring Gaskets per AS5202 (Supersedes AND10049.877 0.688 0.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Tube Fitting Boss Seals (Note 1) G A D 120° ±0° 30' Thread T — PD must be square with Surf. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. and with D Dia.438 0.896 1.538 0.359 0.I. Min.083 0.116 ± .750 2.390 0.005 T.009 .014 1.454 0. K 32 C Height to Suit Design Detail A B J .010 0.228 2.211 1.415 1.003 .425 2.I.8125-16UNJ-3B .500 .125 1. Clearance Envelope for Fitting C Min.000 1. AND10050 and MS33649) Parker O-ring Size No.734 0.009 .107 G Dia. Full +. 45° ± 5° Min.5000-20UNJF-3B .562 0.063 0.355 ± .852 J Min.924 ± .790 0.015 Thd.487 1.005 +. for unrestricted flow of fluid may be any size or shape provided clearance is maintained to J depth for fitting.725 0.312 .875 0.075 0.1875-12UNJ-3B 1.790 1.2500-28UNJF-3B .898 2.018 2.0000-12UNJF-3B 1.003 .009 .005 . Clearance provisions for fitting.003 . -.675 0.040 .000 Depth Dia. 0.004 .960 1.648 1.953 1.368 0.005 .609 0.352 1.090 ± .5000-12UNJ-3B C B A Dia.005 T.018 Equiv.402 0. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 14 16 18 20 24 28 32 Tube OD Min.850 0.020R Max.R.097 ± .273 2.125 1. fitting installation and tool fillet radii must be added as required. Detail A Note 1: Min.234 0.172 0.007 .391 0.802 0.005 .234 1.118 ± .781 E D Dia.978 2.078 ± .118 ± . Static O-Ring Sealing 125 32 D Dia.004 0.720 ± .330 0.239 ± .0625-12UNJ-3B 1.478 0.000 -.062 0.688 .125 0.750 0.004 .008 0.598 0.010 1.003 .484 0.625 . – .755 ± .562 . within .003 .R.185 ± .116 ± .com .064 ± .351 ± .165 1.500 1. Min.parkerorings.005 . Lexington.360 0.750 .250 .375 .264 0.915 1.583 0.644 ± .127 1.337 ± . .003 .938 1.050 2.002 0.602 2.102 1. within .087 ± .R.863 ± .728 0. Note 2: Tube fittings per AS5202 Boss Dimensions for Military Straight Thread Tube Fitting O-ring Gaskets per AS5202 (Supersedes AND10049.064 ± .832 0.156 1.003 .R.5000-12UNJF-3B 1.004 .243 1.297 0.438 0.540 1.301 ± .3125-24UNJF-3B . AND10050 and MS33649) 4-22 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. Tube Dash No.* 3-901 3-902 3-903 3-904 3-905 3-906 3-907 3-908 3-909 3-910 3-911 3-912 3-914 3-916 3-918 3-920 3-924 3-928 3-932 Actual O-Ring Dimensions W ID .082 ± .

125 2. but the dimensions shown here follow the same pattern.364 .010 . 3-902 3-903 3-904 3-905 3-906 3-908 3-910 3-912 3-914* 3-916 3-920 3-924 3-932 Tubing OD 1/8 3/16 1/4 5/16 3/8 1/2 5/8 3/4 7/8 1 1 1/4 1 1/2 2 Thread T 5/16-24 3/8-24 7/16-20 1/2-20 9/16-18 3/4-16 7/8-14 1 1/16-12 1 3/16-12 1 5/16-12 1 5/8-12 1 7/8-12 2 1/2-12 UNJ-3A UNF-3A E Dimension Across Hex Flats .015 -.075 .813 1.250 .com 4-23 .111 1.004 F +.070 1.016 RAD K Thread T Full threads to this point thread T Squareness between thread T and face of hex shall not exceed H at measured at diameter K Fitting End AS4395 Used with J1926/1 and AS5202 Bosses (Supercedes MS 33656) (Only the dimensions that define the O-ring Cavity are shown below.549 .375 1.195 1.063 .426 .625 .599 1.000 1.799 . ±.000 .015 RAD.095 2.075 .125 *No fitting end for the 3-914 O-ring size is included in AS4395.020 ±. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.063 .312 .625 1.003 .094 .005 .016 +. K Dia. Lexington.750 ±.736 .773 .688 .507 1.500 1.750 . Design Table Table 4-4: Fitting end AS4395 used with J1926/1 and AS5202 bosses (only the dimensions that define the O-ring cavity are shown.945 1.756 2.002 -.381 H Max.481 . for thread runout Chamfer relief to hex flats shall be within the 15° ± 5° angle and K dia.563 .008 1.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Tube Fitting Boss Seals Use fitting end per AS4395 F .986 1.107 .875 2.) Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.660 .611 .879 2.) Parker O-ring Size No.674 G +.125 1. limitations Q 45° ± 5° Static O-Ring Sealing .parkerorings.475 .361 1.083 .031 .718 .003 -.

118 ± .672 .< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Tube Fitting Boss Seals This surface shall be square with the thread P within .297 .713 1.625 .765 1.616 . Boss Height D Dia.962 2.875 1.421 .924 ± .D.656 . .093 .960 .116 ± .I.097 .484 .375 1.906 1.004 ID .005 .018 Tube OD 1/8 3/16 1/4 5/16 3/8 1/2 5/8 3/4 13/16 7/8 1 1 1/8 1 1/4 1 1/2 2 Thread T 5/16-24 3/8-24 7/16-20 1/2-20 UNF-2B 9/16-18 3/4-16 7/8-14 1 1/16-12 1 3/16-12 1 5/16-12 1 5/8-12 1 7/8-12 2 1/2-12 B Min.010 Rad.130 .906 .005 J E THD.015 -.550 .171 ± .811 . . .003 .078 ± .781 .132 .parkerorings.000 .560 3.072 ± .014 1.454 .004 .468 .010 1.118 ± .390 .116 ± .074 .644 ± .000 . Min.475 ± .188 1.074 . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.116 ± .130 . .014 2. L .468 .005 .239 ± .078 1.844 1.906 .906 .116 ± .750 UN-2B Design Table 4-5: Boss Dimensions for Industrial Straight Thread Tube Fitting O-ring Gaskets Per SAE J1926 4-24 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.064 ± . applies only when tap drill can not pass thru entire boss Detail A 45° ± 5° Finished tapered counterbore (Detail A) shall be be free from longitudinal and spiral tool marks.003 .414 ± .337 ± .072 ± . Boss Dimensions for Industrial Straight Thread Tube Fittings O-Ring Gaskets per SAE J1926 Parker O-Ring Size 3-902 3-903 3-904 3-905 3-906 3-908 3-910 3-912 3-913 3-914 3-916 3-918 3-920 3-924 3-932 Actual O-Ring Dimensions W .351 ± .000 1.468 ± .100 .009 .500 .500 1.688 . Lexington.688 .132 F Min.R.097 ± .062 .390 .750 .875 2.358 .438 .100 .273 1.563 .250 1.270 2.719 .064 ± . Thread Depth .906 .454 .720 ± .500 .547 . Annular tool marks up to 100 micro-inches maximum will be permissible.910 2.750 . F Diameter D shall be concentric with thread P within .005 .004 .004 .130 .132 .750 . .487 .004 .003 .562 .125 2.116 ± .009 .986 ± .com .750 .750 .755 ± .004 .R.005 . .004 .009 .750 .I.003 .391 .750 C Min.012 1.003 .118 ± .301 ± .005 T.D.125 .625 1.398 1.148 1.010 1.087 ± .355 ± .005 -.004 .234 .906 .047 ± .609 . this dim.906 K ±1° 12° 12° 12° 12° 12° 15° 15° 15° 15° 15° 15° 15° 15° L Min.172 .344 1.609 .003 .480 J Min. .010 T.005 .312 1.942 1.781 D +.587 E +. T B E K 100 Static O-Ring Sealing Minimum Spotface Diameter L Detail "A" C Dia.093 .003 . when measured at Dia.010 1.828 .547 .

025 .) Break Corners Approx.083 .032 to .017 to .081 to .003 to .002 .003 .004 1/4 .005 Typ.035 Max.) Refer to Design Chart 4-7 (below) for dimensions.005 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.004 .< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > For Static Vacuum Seal Glands Male Gland Female Gland ½E Static O-Ring Sealing ½E Gland Detail 0° to 5° (Typ.040 to .187 to .D.140 to .281 to .032 .005 to . L Gland Depth . .070 ±.111 to .173 .093 to .020 to .229 Squeeze Actual % . W .015 .006 3/32 3/16 *Total indicator reading between groove and adjacent bearing surface.002 to .022 to .192 .005 Rad.380 R Groove Radius .226 to .015 .com 4-25 .020 to .005 to .035 .003 . 1/2E Gland Depth W 16 W .023 .015 to .* Eccentricity .parkerorings.113 .375 to .003 Typ. Lexington.055 22 to 32 17 to 24 16 to 23 15 to 21 15 to 20 E Diametral Clearance .005 . R 16 32 Finishes are RMS values Design Chart Static Vacuum Seal Glands O-Ring Size AS568A004 through 050 102 through 178 201 through 284 309 through 395 425 through 475 W Cross-Section Nominal Actual 1/16 .004 to .050 to .286 .002 1/8 .170 to .210 ±.025 .103 ±.145 .005 .002 to .098 .275 ±.006 .005 .003 to .052 .139 ±.006 .003 . Section W-W G F Groove Depth (Ref. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.010 to .045 .007 G Groove Width . Design Chart 4-7: Design Chart for Static Vacuum Seal Glands 32 F L W I.

KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. Lexington.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Static O-Ring Sealing 4-26 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.parkerorings.com .

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Section V – Dynamic O-Ring Sealing
5.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2 5.2 Hydraulic Reciprocating O-Ring Seals . . . . . . . . . . 5-2 5.3 Surface Finishes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3 5.4 Temperature Effects on Dynamic Seals . . . . . . . . . . 5-5 5.5 Side Loads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5 5.6 Direction of Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5 5.18 Floating Glands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-15 5.7 Shock Loads and Pressures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5 5.19 Pneumatic Reciprocating O-Ring Seals. . . . . . . . 5-16 5.8 High Frequency Motion or Vibration. . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6 5.20 Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-16 5.9 Squeeze . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6 5.21 Silicone Compounds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-16 5.10 Stretch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6 5.22 High-Pressure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-16 5.11 Friction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7 5.11.1 Break-Out Friction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7 5.11.2 Running Friction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7 5.12 Calculate Rubbing Surface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8 5.13 Methods to Reduce Friction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8 5.14 Friction and Wear. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8 5.14.1 Friction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8 5.14.2 Pneumatic Seals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-11 5.14.3 Wear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-12 5.14.4 Interdependence of Friction Wear and an Effective Seal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-12 5.15 Spiral Failure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.15.1 Speed of Stroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.15.2 Lack of Lubrication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.15.3 Pressure Differential and Direction . . . . . . . 5.15.4 Squeeze . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.15.5 Shape of Groove and Split Groove. . . . . . . . 5.15.6 Temperature of Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.15.7 Length of Stroke. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.15.8 Surface Finish. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.15.9 Back-Up Rings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-13 5-14 5-14 5-14 5-14 5-14 5-14 5-14 5-14 5-14 5.23 Lubrication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-16 5.24 Gland Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-16 5.25 Floating Seal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-16 5.26 Uni-Directional Gland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-17 5.27 Rotary Seal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-17 5.28 Oscillating Seal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-19 5.29 Seat Seal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-19 5.30 Drive Belts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-20 5.30.1 Calculation of Drive Belt Open Design . . . . 5-20 5.30.2 Calculation of Drive Belt Crossed Design . . 5-21 5.31 O-Ring Glands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.31.1 O-Ring Glands for Aerospace Hydraulic Packings and Gaskets . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.31.2 O-Ring Glands for Industrial Reciprocating Seals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.31.3 O-Ring Glands for Pneumatic Floating Piston Ring Seals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.31.4 O-Ring Glands for Rotary Seals . . . . . . . . . 5-21 5-21 5-30 5-35 5-39 5.16 Modifications for Special Applications . . . . . . . . 5.16.1 Small Amount of Leakage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.16.2 Early Stress-Aging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.16.3 Low Temperature Leakage. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.16.4 Excessive Swell (above 20%) . . . . . . . . . . . 5-14 5-15 5-15 5-15 5-15

Dynamic O-Ring Sealing
5-1

5.17 Gland Dimensions for Reciprocating Hydraulic O-Ring Seals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-15

5.32 Dynamic Vacuum Sealing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-44

Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division
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Dynamic O-Ring Sealing
Dynamic O-Ring Sealing
5.1 Introduction Dynamic O-ring sealing applications are considerably more involved than static applications due to the implied motion against the O-ring seal interface. Resistance to fluids must be more carefully scrutinized than in conventional static seal designs since a volumetric increase in the O-ring in excess of approximately 20% may lead to friction and wear difficulties, and only a minimum of shrinkage (at most 4%), can be tolerated. The metal or other surface over which the O-ring will move also becomes critical. It must be hard and wear resistant. It also must be sufficiently smooth so that it will not abrade the rubber, and yet there must be small microfine “pockets” on the moving surfaces to hold lubricant. The greatest dynamic use of O-rings is in reciprocating hydraulic rod and piston seals. These are discussed first, but many of the ideas expressed are also applicable to other dynamic applications. Considerations applying only to other types of dynamic seals are discussed in greater detail later in the section. 5.2 Hydraulic Reciprocating O-ring Seals O-rings are best when used on short-stroke, relatively smalldiameter applications. Millions of O-rings however, are used very successfully in reciprocating hydraulic, pneumatic, and other fluid systems which employ long stroke, large diameter seals. If designed properly, an O-ring seal will give long, trouble-free service. The following discussion is presented so that common troubles and misuses can be avoided. If the engineer or designer is to become his own seal expert, he must learn the basic types and causes of seal failure. In this section we present a discussion of failures and causes of various seal failure modes even though it may overemphasize the problems. Reciprocating seals are affected by extrusion, breathing, surface finish of the metal, and hardness of the seal as discussed in O-Ring Applications, Section III. These factors should therefore be considered in any reciprocating gland design. There are also additional factors discussed in this chapter that must be considered in order to avoid future difficulty. Materials for the surface(s) over which moving O-rings slide should be chosen carefully. Those that give the maximum life to moving O-ring seals are: Cast iron or steel for bores, hardened steel for rods, or hard chrome plated surfaces. Soft metals such as aluminum, brass, bronze, monel and some stainless steels should be avoided in most dynamic applications, although they may be used in low-pressure pneumatics. If the cylinder bore surface can be hardened, as by carburizing, cylinder life will be increased. Hardness of the piston should always be lower than the cylinder walls to minimize the possibility of damage to the cylinder bore surface. Preferably, metallic moving surfaces sealed by an O-ring should never touch, but if they must, then the one containing the O-ring groove should be a soft bearing material. It is impossible to run a highly polished piston rod through a hard bearing without inflicting scratches on the rod. It is likewise impossible to slide a hard piston in a highly polished cylinder and not inflict scratches on the cylinder wall. The scratches are usually caused by small hard particles that are loosened and picked up by the oil which sooner or later become jammed between the moving surfaces and score them. Though they may be hairlines, they are longitudinal scratches and will therefore reduce sealing efficiency and life of the O-ring. The most satisfactory bearing material tried for this purpose is babbitt metal. Babbitt makes an excellent bearing and the hard particles become imbedded and captured in it without damage to the hardened rod. In fact after millions of cycles, the babbitt imparts a glass-like finish to the rod. Nylon may also be used as a bearing material, but the bearing may need to be split in some fashion to allow for nylon’s relatively high coefficient of thermal expansion. In a suggested design, Figure 5-1, the piston is surfaced with babbitt. The gland is also lined with babbitt. The O-ring may be located in the babbitt lining or in the supporting metal which should be relieved 0.051 or 0.076 mm (0.002 or 0.003 inches) so there will be no chance of the hard metals running together. Lubrication, as explained in O-Ring Application, Section III, is useful in all O-ring seals. It is doubly important in dynamic applications where a lubricating film between the O-ring, and the surface it slides over, will protect the ring from abrasion, frictional heating and rapid wear. In pneumatic applications, a back-up ring will trap some lubricant, and extend the useful life of seals that are lubricated infrequently. It will also help retain oil in applications powered with lubricated air.

O-Ring Seals with Parbak Rings

Babbitt Bearings

Figure 5-1: O-ring Seals with Bearings

5-2

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When a cylinder rod extends out into a dirty environment where it can pick up dirt, lint, metal chips, etc., this foreign material can nullify the effect of the best lubricant and cause rapid abrasive wear of both the O-ring and the rod. Equipment exposed to such conditions should be fitted with a wiper/scraper ring to prevent the dirt from reaching the O-ring seal. It is also good practice to install a felt ring between the scraper and the seal to insure proper lubrication of the rod on its return stroke. Figure 5-2 illustrates this concept. A felt ring may cause corrosion in some installations, as felt also tends to collect moisture. A second O-ring may be used for the wiper, but it must not actually seal because a pressure trap condition is likely to develop between two reciprocating
Enlarged View of Felt Wiper Gland with Felt Installed in Groove in Squeeze Condition

O-ring seals. This can be prevented by cutting the outer O-ring so it cannot seal. Since this can easily be forgotten, it is preferable to provide a vent hole between the two O-rings. It should vent downward so it will not become clogged with dirt. The sample problem provided in Table 5-1 explains how to design the gland for such an O-ring wiper. 5.3 Surface Finishes Finishes of contact surfaces have much to do with the life of dynamic O-ring seals. Limits of maximum roughness for glands are given on the drawings accompanying the design charts in this section and represent accepted practice for military and industrial use. Surface roughness values less than 5 micro-inches are not recommended for dynamic seals, however, as an extending rod will be wiped completely dry and will not be lubricated when it retracts. The surface must be rough enough to hold small amounts of oil. Ideally, a microscopic “orange peel” type of surface is best, presenting smooth rounded surfaces for the O-ring to slide on, with small crevices between to act as oil reservoirs. This kind of surface may be approximated by peening the rod with metal shot or glass beads. An even better surface can be obtained by electropolishing. The most desirable surface roughness value is from 10 to 20 micro-inches. The roughness of a surface as measured comprises several elements which can be handled separately according to DIN 4760: Level 1 — dimensional deviations within tolerance band Level 2 — surface undulations (waves) Levels 3 to 5 — range of roughness All these deviations from the ideal finish are superimposed as measurements are carried out and represent the surface roughness (see Figure 5-3). Surface finish is often quantified in terms of Rt and Ra (see Figure 5-4). Rt is the vertical distance between the highest and the lowest peaks in a roughness profile over a test length lm. Rt is increasingly being replaced by the maximum depth of roughness, Rmax. Rmax is the greatest single roughness found in five consecutive single trace lengths lm.

Dynamic O-Ring Sealing

1/8 Ref.

Cut Wiper O-ring in Two to Prevent Pressure Trap

3/18 Ref.

Felt Ring

Cylinder End Cap

Alternate Design One Hole in Top of Cylinder Prefered Design Oiling Hole Direct to Felt Snap Ring Washer Scraper Felt Wiper O-ring Packing Piston Rod Bearing

Figure 5-2: Lubrication Between Scraper and Seal Rings

Problem: To design a wiper gland for a 25.4 mm (1.000 in.) OD piston rod.
Procedural Steps:
(A) Select O-ring with actual ID slightly smaller than Rod OD, B. (B) Divide the actual minimum squeeze given in Design Chart A6-5 for this O-ring size by two (the same squeeze is permissible in most cases). (C) Add this amount to both max. and min. gland depth, L, given in Design Chart A6-5 to get proper gland depth for wiper, LW. (D) Calculate balance of gland dimensions same as for piston rod seal. Table 5-1: Wiper Gland Design Example

Example:
(A) Parker No. 2-214 (ID = 0.984) (B) Squeeze 0.012/2 = 0.006 (C) LW min = 0.121 + .006 = 0.127 LW max = 0.123 + .006 = 0.129

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5-3

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a b

Rt = Vertical Distance Between Highest and Lowest Point Rt

Dynamic O-Ring Sealing

c d

lm

a) Dimensional Deviations b) Surface Undulations (Waves) c) Roughness d) Superimposition (with a or b)

Rmax and Rz Z1 Z2 Z3 Z4 = Rmax Z5

Figure 5-3: Surface Finish Structure

This is given in Figure 5-4 by the roughest profile Z4. In this case Z4 = Rmax does not include extreme roughness peaks as is the case of Rt. The medium roughness value Ra is an arithmetic mean of all components of the roughness trace within the trace length lm. The average roughness value Rz of five consecutive trace lengths often is preferred to Re. If Ra is known, Rz can be taken from Figure 5-5 and vice versa. Figure 5-5 is taken from DIN 4768, part 1, attachment 1. Should Rz reach the upper portion of the graph, it can be assumed that the specified Ra values will not be exceeded. The lower limits would be taken if an Rz value should be specified. Finally, the depth of roughness Rp also is of interest and is the vertical distance between the highest point on the roughness trace and the center line of that trace. Values for Rt are of very little assistance in reaching a conclusion regarding the suitability of a surface roughness from the sealing point of view. Table 5-1 shows that for a similar Rt all levels of roughness can be produced. Ra values are unsuitable for comparison because profiles 6 and 7 have the same Ra value. Rp values without reference to the load area tp also gives a false impression of roughness. A static sealing surface Rt ≤ 6.3 µm (VVV roughness DIN 3141) is rougher than the dynamic surface requirements. Seal manufacturers recommend a roughness Rt ≤ 2.5 µm for a dynamic sealing surface (Ra = 0.25 to 0.5 mm) (VVV roughness DIN 3141) when the load area is over 50%, or when the surface finish roughness Rp is under 50%. These limitations often are overlooked, nevertheless the connection between surface finish and load area is very important because an “open” profile can have sharp edges (e.g., profiles 2 through 6 in Table 5-2). These open profiles are a product of cutting processes such as turning or grinding. A much larger load area is produced by cold forming processes such as rolling, drawing or sinking.

e lm = 5 x le Rz = 1 (Z1 + Z2 + Z3 + Z4 + Z5) 5 Rp = Depth of Roughness Ra = Middle Roughness Value Ra

Rp

lm

Figure 5-4: Roughness Terminology

Relationship Between Ra and Rz
2000 1000 500 250 125 63 50.000 31.500 20.000 12.500 8.000 5.000 3.150 Ra Upper limit for Rz when transposing from Ra to Rz

Deviation

Ra Value in μ m

2.000 1.250 0.800 0.500 0.315 0.200 0.125 0.080 Ra

Ra-Value in μ inch

32 16 8 4 2 1

Upper limit for Ra when transposing from Rz to Ra

0.050 0.032 0.020 Rz

Rz

0.16 0.40 1.0 2.5 6.3 16 40 100 250 10 25 63 160 1.6 4.0 0.25 0.63

Rz Value in μ m

Figure 5-5: Relationship Between Ra and Rz

5-4

Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division
2360 Palumbo Drive, Lexington, KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.parkerorings.com

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It can be clearly seen from Figure 5-6 that surfaces produced by roller burnishing have no sharp peaks which can cause damage to a seal. Further, the valleys form potential lubrication reservoirs which improve the dynamic behavior of a seal. Surface finish values obtained in a single test are possibly not typical. For this reason several readings should be taken. When several results are to be compared, the length of the test surface must be stated — for different trace lengths, results are not comparable because they result from other profile heights. 5.4 Temperature Effects On Dynamic Seals High Temperatures — It should be remembered that the higher the temperature (above 38°C) (100°F) in and around a reciprocating gland, the more critical the application becomes. The higher the interface temperature, the greater the tendency of the lighter fractions of the oil to evaporate from an exposed surface. Lack of lubrication will cause greatly accelerated seal wear. If the temperature is high enough, the tacky residue (resins) which remains after oil evaporation will char and create a hard, abrasive surface which, if not removed, will quickly abrade away the seal until leakage or complete seal failure occurs. Low temperatures — Low temperature environments are most troublesome, especially if the seal has been operating at a high temperature for some time. This is because the elastomer in the seal will take a compression set at high temperature. When the seal is then subjected to low temperature, there may be insufficient elastic memory to overcome the relatively high coefficient of shrinkage (10 times that of steel) at low temperatures.
Rt
Rp 1. Rt Rp 2. Rt Rp 3. Rt Rp 4. Rt Rp 5. Rt Rp 6. Rt Rp 7. Rt Rp 8. Rt

Once unseated from a spot on a given metal surface, the seal must be reseated by internal seal resilience or system pressure. Therefore, it is much easier to seal a hydraulic system that goes from zero-pressure to high-pressure almost instantaneously. Low-pressure fuel, pneumatic, oil, and similar fluid systems are prone to leak if an O-ring is used as a dynamic seal at -54°C (-65°F) because there is insufficient pressure to keep the O-ring tightly seated during and immediately after motion of the gland. Remember that the -54°C (-65°F) compound is flexible and capable of acceptable seal performance at -54°C (-65°F) but may not be resilient below -43°C (-45°F). 5.5 Side Loads Side loads on a piston or rod can cause the clearance in the gland to be on one side only. If excess clearance is created by side-loading, extrusion will result. If adequate squeeze has not been applied, leakage will result. The higher unit load on the opposite side causes uneven friction on the seal, and if high enough, the rod or barrel will be galled or scored. 5.6 Direction of Pressure The placement of a groove can be determined from the direction of the system pressure in relation to the direction of the moving friction force. If the friction of the moving metal surface across the O-ring is in the same direction as the direction of pressure, the O-ring will tend to be dragged into the gap more readily and thus extrude at only 30 to 40% of the pressure normally necessary to cause extrusion. By placing the groove in the opposite metal part, any friction will work against pressure. Snubbing cylinders, in which the motion and force create the pressure, are the usual culprits. 5.7 Shock Loads and Pressures Shock pressures, such as those created by the sudden stopping of a rapidly descending hydraulic hoist cylinder on which there is a heavy load, are often far in excess of the pressure for which the seal and the system were designed. The same could be said about the whip of a gun barrel, of a tank on rough roads, or a truck tailgate and others if they

Dynamic O-Ring Sealing

Rp

Ra

tp (%)

µm µm µm 0.25 0.50 0.75 Rt 1 0.5 0.5 50 50 50

1

0.5

0.5

50

50

75

1

0.5

0.5

50

50

75
Rp1

1

0.75 0.28 12.5 25

37.5
Rt1

1

0.25 0.28 62.5 75

87.5
a) Cold Formed Surface Rp2

1

0.785 0.188 3.5

14

35
Rt2

1

0.215 0.188 65

86

96.5
b) Machined Surface

1

0.5 0.39 43

50

57 Figure 5-6: Surfaces Produced by Roller Burnishing (a) and by Normal Machining (b)

Table 5-2: Diagramatic Representation of Surface Profiles

Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division
2360 Palumbo Drive, Lexington, KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.parkerorings.com

5-5

Transient pressures of 690 Bar (10. If the O-ring is made in a compound that will shrink in the fluid. min = 0.003 (see Figure 3-3) Wmin.432 mm (0. min = 0. The nitrile (buna-N) base compounds are recommended whenever possible because they are more extrusion-resistant.007 (from 1. Yet much less than this amount of squeeze will allow leakage at low temperature.334 mm (0.R.501 .0. Since this will likely cause a stretch close to five percent.10 Stretch When an O-ring must be stretched more than two or three percent as installed in a piston groove. With maximum radial displacement (piston tangent with bore) squeeze.I.501 .< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Dynamic O-Ring Sealing are designed to ride on the hydraulic system during transit.0045 min possible 3.000 psi) are not uncommon in these cases. max = 0. and occasionally spiral failure.0010 squeeze. Normally. Lexington.496 = 0. above) squeeze. max = 0.003"). the hydraulic cylinder is intended as an actuator and not as a locking device or a snubber. Wmin = . and a road scraper blade. more wear-resistant. Large diameter O-rings may fit the piston so loosely that they must be carefully stuffed into the groove as the piston enters the cylinder to prevent damage.0045 (from 2. between piston and groove OD squeeze. min. Some rubber compounds require more squeeze than others in order to seal.9 Squeeze The best squeeze for a reciprocating O-ring seal must be a compromise of all the factors involved.057 2 Radial clearance. With maximum eccentricity of 0. The percent of stretch should therefore be checked whenever the catalog gland dimensions are not used.210") cross section makes an O-ring prone to spiral failure. and require less squeeze to seal.017") squeeze (per side) on a 5. For example: the tilt cylinder of a lift truck. it will usually be necessary to adjust the gland depth as mentioned above. A mechanical lock is also recommended as a cure in this case. too much squeeze will cause excessive friction. Therefore. installed = 0.0035 with adverse tolerance build-up.057 (from 1.002 T. the greater the squeeze that is needed. the minimum possible squeeze under adverse conditions then must be at least . The same is true if low pressure or vacuums are encountered. With perfect concentricity Gland Depth.0. the clearance gap. The hydraulic cylinder should be used only to raise and lower the load if it does not have a relief valve within it to prevent excessive pressure build-up by shock loads. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. The greater the temperature range to be sealed. 5-6 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.067 Reduction of W. Squeeze is actually necessary only during periods of very low or no pressure sealing because at high pressures the O-ring seeks the path of least resistance. the reduction in the squeeze diameter that results should be allowed for in determining the gland depth so that the desired percent squeeze will be applied to the reduced section. 5. min = 0. It will be noted that brick pavements and dirt roads cause the most trouble when this type of effect is encountered. than any other oil-resistant rubber developed to date.064 less Lmax = 0. due to installation stretch = 0. Enough squeeze must always be provided to offset the great difference in coefficient of shrinkage of the rubber and the metal.0025 squeeze = 0. The design tables in this chapter are generally satisfactory. See Figure 3-3 for the reduction in squeeze diameter with stretch. 5. A mechanical lock or brake should be provided to hold a position once it is attained. 5.com .076 mm (. above) radial piston shift.0025 2 Cross section. = 0.8 High Frequency Motion or Vibration O-rings or other seals can be worn excessively by small frequent motions which are usually encountered when equipment is in transit.007 2. Lmax = 0. the amount of squeeze is a vital factor in friction. and tends to seal tighter and tighter as the pressure is increased. As discussed before. max = 0. On the other hand. and compensate for the shrinkage (if any) of the rubber in the fluid. the danger of damage is reduced if the next smaller size O-ring is used.parkerorings. The military services have found that more than 0.387 = 0. a hydraulic tailgate lift. For these. above) radial piston shift. take up the tolerances of the metal and rubber parts. wear. one should carefully consider the squeeze applied to the O-ring in any gland design. The following example illustrates how the squeeze can vary in a typical piston installation: Consider Parker size 2-012 and Design Table 5-2: 1.

The following formulas may be used for estimating the running friction of O-rings. FC = Total friction due to seal compression. running. fluid pressure/ temperature. Lr = Length of seal rubbing surface in inches for rod groove applications. RMS Glass Running Friction with 15 Feet per Minute Stroke Speed 300 Hrs. The other variables listed are much more important in the practical solution to problems.75 FH = 48 x 0. the amount of break-out friction that a system will generate depends on the length of time the surfaces of the metal and the seal element have been in physical contact at rest. type of surface.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > 5. Coefficient of friction has little bearing on lubricated rubber’s break-out and running friction. This is especially true if high pressures are involved. 40 Min. FH = Total friction due to hydraulic pressure on the seal. Figure 5-8: Flow of O-Ring into Metallic Surfaces Table 5-3: Friction Factors Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.93 = 2. 10% compression. The theory has been proposed and generally accepted that the increase of friction on standing is caused by the rubber O-ring flowing into the microfine grooves or surface irregularities of the mating part. brass or aluminum can be rapidly worn away by a moving O-ring. Piston Groove Rod Groove FC = f c x L p FC = fc x Lr FH = fh x Ap Fh = fh x Ar F = F C + FH F = Fc + FH Ap = Projected area of seal for piston groove applications. 40 Min.44 = 20.7 x 3. either break-out. Example: Parker 2-214 rubbing against OD of O-ring at 103.11. fh = Friction due to fluid pressure obtained from Figure 5-10. Lexington. there are anomalies and difficulties in the prediction of developed friction. If unexplained leakage occurs with these or other soft metals. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. 5.90 F = FC + FH = 23. This ratio can be reduced by the use of a softer rubber. Ar = Projected area of seal for rod groove applications. can become troublesome in some applications. As a general rule for a 70 durometer rubber against an 8 micro-inch surface. Metals such as copper. An understanding of the principles may prove helpful in the solution of specific problems.2 Running Friction High running friction may cause difficulty by wearing soft metal parts. it is good practice to check the metal dimensions for signs of wear. fc = Friction due to O-ring compression obtained from Figure 5-9. squeeze on the O-ring. with Lubrication 300 Hrs. the maximum break-out friction that will develop in a system is 3 times the running friction.5 Bar (1500 psi). or both. 2-1/2 Sec. surface finish.11.65 pounds Data for the coefficients (fc and fh) are given in Figures 5-9 and 5-10.parkerorings. F = Total seal friction in pounds. These are accentuated if one of the surfaces involved is deformable as in O-ring piston or shaft seals. Delay Between Cycles Factor Unit Load (squeeze) Surface Finish (metal) Durometer Speed of Motion Cross Section of O-Ring Pressure Lubrication Temperature Groove Width Diameter of Bore or Rod Surface Finish (O-Ring) Joule Effect* Coefficient of Friction# To Decrease Friction Decrease Decrease RMS Decrease Increase Decrease Decrease Use Lubrication Increase Increase Decrease Increase Compress O-Ring Increase Durometer Figure 5-7: Change of O-ring Friction with Time at Rest 2-1/2 Sec. Friction Factors (In Order of Importance) To Increase Friction Increase Increase RMS Increase Decrease Increase Increase Omit Lubrication Decrease Decrease Increase Decrease Stretch O-ring Lower Durometer of O-ring Dynamic O-Ring Sealing Pounds of Friction Steel 8 Micro-In. See Figures 5-7 and 5-8. Projected areas and lengths of rubbing surface are given in Table 5-4.com 5-7 . * Refer to rotary seals.1 Break-Out Friction In addition to the usual causes of running friction: hardness of the rubber. At any given time.11 Friction Friction. 70 durometer: FC = 0. amount and type of lubrication. # A minor factor and should be ignored in design work other than for ultra high speeds. Lp = Length of seal rubbing surface in inches for piston groove applications. Table 5-3 shows some of the factors which may be used to adjust friction. 5.

Lr = 0.76 in. frictional forces are set up producing two effects: one leads to wear and the other reduces the useful load which a cylinder can transmit. Related to the hydraulic fluid: • Tendency to build up a lubricating film and its distribution. Using MIL-H-5606 Hydraulic Oil 4 — Speeds in Excess of 1 Ft.12 Calculate Rubbing Surface The areas and lengths given in Table 5-4 are based on the dimensions given in Design Table 5-2 at the end of this section. These include internally lubricated rings and Lube Treated rings. When the surface to be sealed moves relative to the O-ring.(B-1)²min] Ar = (π / 4) [(A-1)²max . 5.13 Methods To Reduce Friction The foregoing formulas for estimating O-ring friction are intended for applications in which standard O-ring compound types are to be used in systems lubricated with hydraulic oil.14 Friction and Wear O-rings load a sealing surface due to their own resilience compounded with any system pressure. Break-out friction must be overcome at the beginning of movement and also is known as start-up friction.559)²] = 0. per Inc h Length of Rubbing Surface 4 A re ho °S 90 ss ne rd Ha f h — Friction Lb.571 Bmax = 0. The following example illustrates the procedure: Projected Area: Ap = (π /4) [A²max . The running friction of seals depends on countless factors making a mathematical analysis practically impossible.000 Cycles Room Temperature.751π = 2. Lexington.751 )². and O-rings may be ordered that have received special friction reducing treatments.(0.571)²] = 0. 100. Table Design 5-1 for aerospace. • Hardness and surface finish.561π = 1. O-Lube and SuperO-Lube greases are available from Parker distributors.739 B-1min = 0. per Square Inch of Seal Projected Area 70 3 50 2 80° ° 70 30 1 0 5 10 15 20 25 10 0 1000 2000 3000 Percent Seal Compression Figure 5-9: Friction Due to O-ring Compression Fluid Pressure PSI Figure 5-10: Friction Due to Fluid Pressure Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.1 Friction In dynamic applications difference must be made between break-out and running friction. 5. In pneumatic or other dynamic applications. i.184 sq.com 5-8 . If the application differs. Ar = (π/4) [(0. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. in.739)² . 2-113: Amax = 0. f c — Friction Lb. The most important factors are: Related to the seal: • Geometrical form including production tolerances and resulting deformation. per Min. This can be clearly seen in reciprocating cylinders.559 A-1max = 0. and calculate the area and length. • Friction values for dry and lubricated compound.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Dynamic O-Ring Sealing 5. use dimensions from the applicable table. Rubbing Surface Length: Lp = 0. Parker Seal can help reduce friction in several ways. 100.751 Bmin = 0. Basis for Curves 1 — Running Friction Due to Pressure Only 2 — 15 Micro-Inch Finish Chrome Plated Surface 3 — AN6227 O-rings.36 in. 5. Basis for Curves 1 — Running Friction Due to Squeeze and Hardness (Durometer) Only 2 — 15 Micro-Inch Finish Chrome Plated Surf ce a 3 — AN6227 O-rings. • Viscosity and temperature/viscosity relationship.(0.e. • Swell and temperature characteristics. For this reason it is difficult to make exact statements regarding the level of friction which can be expected.B²min] Rubbing Surface Length: Lp = π Amax Lr = π Bmax For Parker Size No.000 Cycles Room Temperature. Using MIL-H-5606 Hydraulic Oil 4 — Speeds in Excess of 1 Ft. per Min. Once movement is established the frictional forces drop to a lower level and gliding begins.14.parkerorings. in.187 sq.561 Projected Area: Ap = (π/4) [(0.

87 7.21 6.48 .26 .11 .05 .54 14.34 3.68 .36 25.98 1.98 1.58 .05 8. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.70 5.32 4.08 .65 7.46 7.19 .98 10.76 1. .08 1.23 6.58 12.61 2.14 .11 11.04 .51 1.19 .51 4.34 7.50 5.06 .25 19.29 6.06 7.12 4.24 8.23 .14 37.73 1.24 .16 .04 .41 .22 .13 4.87 3.86 19.84 9.70 . Lexington.68 18.95 13.58 .75 11.22 1.92 4.26 7.12 37.75 2.05 8.96 2.90 6.33 3.47 2.27 17.12 8.25 8.07 .26 .12 .16 2. 2215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 Piston Groove Ap Lp Sq.05 .47 8.18 .18 1.70 4.24 .54 3.07 7.46 2.37 1.10 .86 8.85 3.38 11.36 2.14 1.09 6.73 3.51 16.76 1.18 12.59 .54 .00 10.53 .69 39.34 .38 .14 4.93 15.62 10.20 .54 47.14 3.28 6.67 7.34 . In.47 18.13 4.91 5.84 31.32 15.39 2.87 9.25 2.46 5.34 .07 7.22 10.68 6.80 .94 3.95 3.51 4.58 .71 4.15 .16 .07 1.29 5.49 .96 2.29 .10 5.38 .55 36.31 5.25 .73 .71 39.65 9.04 9.08 5.93 4.57 1.52 4.31 .35 2.68 2.36 13.83 6.31 2.69 2.71 . In.29 29.57 24.13 4.09 8.94 3.29 .63 1.44 .70 .11 48. In.95 4.63 9.41 32.29 1.52 14.53 3.51 1.07 .13 14.42 9.44 8.40 .27 .71 50.20 .57 .04 20.08 6.45 .14 O-Ring Size Parker No.27 7.99 1.72 4.94 3.11 .61 .13 .10 2.31 4.57 1.44 4.05 .38 10.09 .48 .93 4.61 11.72 16.03 9.13 .85 8.68 .54 2.90 17.32 4.29 1.36 10.34 25.10 .68 .48 .30 5.35 2.09 16.15 25.08 18.73 1.89 5.93 Rod Groove Ar Lr Sq.42 4.23 9.98 7.16 2.33 .91 5.34 13.73 3.17 .30 5.36 .16 2.72 3.64 5.73 3.89 .38 .40 11.39 .90 5.88 7.63 .13 11.76 3.29 17.24 2.05 .69 Dynamic O-Ring Sealing Table 5-4: Projected Areas and Lengths of Rubbing Surface for O-rings Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.24 .77 .39 2.50 .98 22.74 2.11 5.20 .82 10.36 .55 24.22 9.45 7.02 2.04 9.23 4.26 .10 5.32 4.85 42.42 .37 1.74 3.46 7.79 12.51 .43 .12 26.36 .75 2.39 .49 5.83 2.36 1.85 6.28 6.34 3.69 3.57 36.50 .10 5.07 1.85 8.32 4.99 45.67 6.10 2.85 9.26 29.68 7.14 1.86 31.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Projected Areas and Lengths of Rubbing Surface for O-Rings O-Ring Size Parker No.80 .15 3.00 34.57 47.88 17.60 9.16 4.14 3.14 .35 4.86 8.95 2.75 .28 Rod Groove Ar Lr Sq.47 6.70 16.22 .77 .77 12.47 .97 2.04 .97 45.11 5.58 .43 9.53 . In.29 6.12 4.14 3.56 .86 3.78 .72 4.com 5-9 .43 21.17 1.36 1.46 .99 11.67 5.49 .06 4. In.82 .75 2.55 2.79 .03 .61 .16 2.04 6.97 4.66 7.16 12.60 .66 .25 .45 8.33 4.00 1.46 .parkerorings.66 1.00 22.80 1.14 3.22 .48 5.49 11.19 .20 .35 .32 .72 8. In.65 20.95 3.81 1.27 5.53 3.52 .43 .73 14.58 1.81 10.91 15.03 2.56 .51 11.31 15.17 .40 .24 .17 1.53 4.32 1.35 2.15 14.47 7.43 .25 8.47 .93 26.77 23.55 .32 2.24 8.89 6.09 .97 13.45 18.72 1.17 .57 3.76 3.49 5.22 22.41 .75 14.52 4.78 .20 10.41 21.56 2.62 2.28 40.54 .50 . In.66 .21 .48 16.21 1.45 .72 .64 .65 .31 .59 6.52 4.36 2.48 6.15 .55 .34 3.05 18.54 3.08 .96 7.00 11. .77 1.20 21.22 .82 .95 2.25 9.72 28.63 .73 3.44 1.64 8.66 3.13 .26 40.15 .88 6.98 34.51 4.12 4.43 1.69 28.17 2.78 3.42 43.73 .57 1.12 .59 .58 1.18 .89 6.33 3.74 8.61 6.59 3.83 42.54 3.88 1.89 4.17 .72 4.79 .36 7.92 4.84 19.14 48.56 12.71 5. .75 2. 2006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025 026 027 028 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 210 211 212 213 214 Piston Groove Ap Lp Sq.56 2.77 1.65 1.40 43.63 20. .11 16.53 3.38 1.49 8.36 .55 2.69 5.17 2.07 7.54 2.50 5.28 .43 3.25 4.79 23.21 .92 4.59 10.52 .91 5.13 14.64 8.03 .71 4.54 2.41 .61 .61 4.66 18.18 .63 4.76 3.75 . In.33 3.02 6.97 2.04 4.87 1.43 33.73 11.63 .

• Type of material and surface finish of surfaces. Friction is proportional to the working pressure and therefore it is necessary to keep seal friction low.8 b) 0. a wiper seal scrapes a shaft dry. tendency to adhesion. for example. Apart from compound type and seal geometry. 1 mo. On the other hand lubrication can cause leakage amounting to the thick lubricating film with every stroke. This shows that the geometry of a seal directly affects the amount of friction. especially at low pressures.2 a) Break-out friction Coefficient of Friction μ Mixed friction Hydro-dynamic friction Coefficient of Friction 0. the down-time and the surface finish play a role in increasing break-out friction. to the system pressure. but not strictly proportional. Lexington. As in many other areas break-out friction of elastomers is significantly higher than running friction. Friction depends on a compound's sliding properties.3. The optimum condition is a relatively thin lubricating film with sufficient adhesive properties. • Working tolerances. At the beginning of a stroke the seal goes through three friction phases. the more the contact surface consists of metallic “islands” and therefore again mixed friction occurs.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Dynamic O-Ring Sealing Related to the working conditions: • Working pressure.. reduction of the sealing force also results in an increased tendency to leakage. the more lubrication is squeezed from between the seal and the running surface resulting in a non-lubricated vacuum. Velocity V Downtime Compounds: a) Polyurethane b) NBR Figure 5-11: Stribeck Diagram Figure 5-12: Level of Starting Friction Dependant Upon Time and Compound 5-10 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. These factors cannot be quantified because they overlap and act cumulatively. The dynamic piston actually causes less friction with increasing velocity. Initially the seal is in direct contact with the sealing face with few lubricated fields. Unfortunately. e. At low pressures the friction varies to the piston speed.g. Swelling means increase sealing force and increased friction. Hardness and deformation of the seal influence the seal pressure. Leakage at a wiper seal will not occur until the seal wears. The greater the metal surface roughness. In this condition the level of starting friction approaches that for dry friction and is up to 10 times that found in running friction (Figures 5-12 and 5-11). Specific seal pressure is in general related to. the seal geometry once again plays a role when. At high pressures friction is seen to be more or less constant. an unstable seal geometry due to swelling in the medium plays a role. • Axial loads and wear bands on pistons. friction increases quicker than with seals without a lip. The working pressure controls the width of clearance gaps and thereby the thickness of the lubricating film. Friction caused by Orings increases with increasing pressure. deformation.08 according to the proportion of lubrication/non-lubricated areas (Figure 5-11).4 10 sec. loss of fluid from a system increases. µ = 0. Level of Starting Friction Dependant Upon Time and Compound 1. Lip seals are more sensitive to pressure. This is also true for harder compounds. Friction is directly influenced by the seal diameter because the wear-area is greater. 1 day 1 wk. • Velocity of movement. The reduction of friction with increasing velocity stems from the hydrodynamic properties of the lubricating fluid. Additionally. However. pure hydrodynamic friction which does not allow direct contact between the seal and the running surfaces is rarely reached.com . The longer the down-time. 1 hr. Finally. When the medium is mineral oil it would seem that sufficient lubrication is assured.06 to 0. This relationship can be modified within certain limits by selection of the seal geometry. 1 min. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. As complete lubrication (= flooding) occurs.parkerorings. In absolute terms there are very large discrepancies according to the thickness of the lubricating film. V μ min. Stribeck diagram Normally the decision must be made between lower friction and high leakage. Then follows a wider area of mixed friction where the coefficient of friction can drop as low as 0. The result depends on the geometry of the seal.

The stick-slip effect also is related to the friction at the sealing face. The friction. This makes the seal move in the mixed friction range. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. Lubricated air gives more or less the same results as in a hydraulic application.0 μ μH 0. Figure 5-13 is valid only for a specific seal in a particular application. To accelerate a mass m from zero to maximum velocity. The lubricating film therefore must be protected by rounding of the seal wiper edges and complete wiping of grease from the running surface must be prevented.14. plays an important role in evaluation and selection of a suitable elastomer. This is particularly the case when lubrication is poor. The effectiveness of lubrication with grease depends on the thickness of the original film and the running velocity of the seal (Figure 5-15). • The running velocity is Vµ min. Running velocity is a product of seal friction. the break-out friction µH must be overcome by F1. When the stored energy is used. Break-out friction occurs when the three following conditions are present: • When the break-out friction is higher than the running friction a running velocity Vµ min (see Figure 5-11). only friction can be influenced and makes for a better relationship between sealing surface finish. Conversely oils with strong film building properties do not break down under the same working conditions using the same seals.5 Coefficient of Friction μ Ve loc μG 3 ity V 200 (m /m m) 2 1 0 100 su es Pr re P ) ar (b V μmin. The spring element is loaded with F1 and with increasing velocity the friction value µH reduces to µG and the force to F2. Of all these factors. With an O-ring seal the loss of grease can lead to total breakdown of the hydrodynamic lubricating film after only a few slow strokes. or better expressed the difference between break-out and running friction. the piston mass and the load. F Velocity (V) m Figure 5-13: Frictional Force is Dependent Upon Pressure and Velocity – Compact Rod Seal 90° Shore A Figure 5-14: System Diagram for Stick-Slip Effect Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. lubricating film and surface finish. This requires once again an increase in force level of F1. Dynamic O-Ring Sealing 1.2 Pneumatic Seals In principle the same conditions apply here as for the hydraulic seal. as found when lubricated air is not available. The lower the velocity the thinner will become the lubricating film. The most important factors can be seen in Figure 5-13. the mass is decelerated by the increasing friction in direction µH.5 Frictional Force F (kN) 1. the increase in friction causes high wear.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > For the same conditions. this means the smallest possible oil volume under pressure on the hydraulic side. Breakdown of the lubricating film after long operation also results in contact between the seal and the metal surfaces. For other seals and applications the interdependence varies. please refer to Figure 5-14. When lubricating grease is not continually replaced. Lexington. • The power is transmitted through the elastic body of the “compressible” oil.parkerorings. it can eventually be removed by a seal lip. 5. except that the effects of certain extreme conditions are more serious. friction at high temperature (= low viscosity) is high because the lubricating film is often interrupted. To assist in the explanation of the term stick-slip. Here friction is shown as a function of pressure and velocity. Radial oscillation of the piston will occur when the lubricating film breaks down. and the procedure repeats again. Certain improvements can be made making the system stiffer. The potential energy stored in the spring accelerates the mass even further.com 5-11 .

harder compounds help form a lubricating film whereas a soft compound will hinder this by strong adhesion to the running surface. However.14. Figure 5-15: Change in Original Film Thickness as a Function of Running Speed During a Single Stroke (Border Line Δ Theoretical maximum Values) This action has little effect upon the starting friction but brings a noticeable improvement in running friction levels. Hardness. Other factors are. friction can be anticipated and taken into consideration in the design stage. 5-12 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. Hard and soft compounds behave differently at high velocities. The lubricating film is very important but only one of the factors affecting seal friction. lifetime and leakage it is necessary to know the width of the gap and how it varies under working conditions. It is still not known which factors influence the lubricating film and which mechanisms act in the clearance gap. in dynamic applications particularly these wear conditions can cause the seal to fail through abrasion. However. This means the seal always functions in semidry condition and for this reason wear resistance depends on: • properties of the compound. Often many of these factors are difficult to measure or reproduce. High Performance Lubricating (HPL) oils help to prevent this contact because of their additives. • running surface roughness. If slow pneumatic piston velocities are achieved by throttling the pressurizing air.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook 4 Seal — O-ring Single Stroke (Not Pressurized) Dynamic O-Ring Sealing Film Thickness (δ2) 3 Bo rd er 2 • Corrosion wear manifests itself in the form of rust and can normally be reduced by suitable oil additives. 5. and changes in direction. General assumptions from a few tests are not acceptable because laboratory tests never can reproduce real working situations.0 m/s. stability is difficult to achieve because the relevant parameters often work conversely. A soft compound favors a thicker film. However. 1 lin e 0 1 4 2 3 Original Film Thickness (δ0) v = 0. To keep friction as low as possible the lubricating film should be fairly substantial. An extremely rough or fine polished metallic running surface both cause equally higher stick-slip. Stickslip is effected directly and negatively by long seal lips and sharp seal edges.3 Wear Friction causes wear.2 m/s. together with the width and length of a clearance gap is very important.6 m/s. It is therefore quite understandable that seal manufacturers cannot give customers fixed figures regarding friction and wear for an individual seal. 5. Seals are not directly affected by the above types of wear. The hardness determines the elasticity of the seal and assures that the seal gives way to the lubricating film under pressure. A rough metal surface normally is the cause of elastomer abrasion.com . The wear rate however is difficult to predict but directly governs the lifetime of an O-ring and the frequency of maintenance. In the other extreme a lack of lubricating film causes problems due to high friction. Information about seal lifetimes only can be made when all parameters affecting the seal are known and reproducible. Lexington. The instantaneous viscosity of the fluid also plays an important role in resisting the wiping effect of the seal. To estimate friction. pressure. for example. It is therefore recommended to consult the manufacturer about details of all extreme application conditions so that the correct seal can be offered. can result in leakage because the “thick” film is wiped off the rod surface during the return stroke. • Abrasive wear can affect both metallic and seal areas. the seal compound.14. seal shape. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. The first consideration is the lubricating film in the clearance gap. the risk of high stick-slip increases.4 m/s. This. • lubricating properties of the medium. velocity. μm 5 v = 0.4 Interdependence of Friction Wear and an Effective Seal In order to obtain a problem-free seal it is necessary to have stability with regard to the clearance gap to avoid possible extrusion. v = 1.parkerorings. v = 1. The seal user normally has no profound knowledge of seal wear characteristics. however. • Fatigue wear becomes evident when particles are released from the metal structure and is usually the result of pulsating loads. • working conditions. The effectiveness of a seal and friction therefore are inversely proportional. Wear in fluid solutions can be divided into four groups: • Scuff wear develops with metal-to-metal contact in the semidry condition where both materials tend to form mixed crystals. Metals are abraded by hard compounds or by hard foreign matter in the medium. These additives have no influence in rubber/steel or rubber/metal combinations. Today’s high precision machinery tends in most cases to eliminate hydrodynamic lubrication because of the increased wipe-off effect.

and then subjected to relatively high Shaft Small Area pressure. Squeeze 5. delta. Pressure differential and direction 4. Side loads 11. Square. in relation to the groove surface-finish. but not broken. Sometimes the seal is twisted in two without evidence of the spiral pattern. the O-ring usually seals satisfactorily until a complete break or separation occurs at one place. Type of metal surface 10. Lack of back-up rings 18. when excessive. Figure 5-17: Ring Cross-Sections for Reciprocating Seals Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. A properly used O-ring slides during all but a small fraction of any reciprocating stroke. ID to W ratio of O-ring 12. It should be remembered that before spiral failure can occur. The conditions which cause spiral failure are those that simultaneously cause segments of the ring to slide and others to roll. and other cross sectional shapes (see Figure 5-17) are also prone to fail by twisting if the proper conditions exist. four-leaf clover. Contamination or gummy deposits on metal surface 13. When the O-ring is removed from the gland.com 5-13 . The torsional resistance of the O-ring tends to resist twisting. produces less friction. 3. it returns to its original shape and the rupture appears as a tight spiral around the cross section. Temperature of operation 7. or stress above the elastic limit of the rubber. Torsional or spiral failure is not limited to the O-ring or torus type of seal. Surface finish of gland 9. acting through the O-ring. The O-ring usually seals until complete failure occurs. Concentricity of mating metal parts 16. True spiral failure occurs after the seal has been excessively twisted. Shape of groove or split grooves 6. produces a greater holding force within the groove (friction on a larger area) than that produced by the sliding surface (rod or cylinder wall) opposite the groove (see Figure 5-16). causes a rupture of the O-ring to start adjacent to the clearance gap. motion. Length of stroke 8. Breathing 15. Some of the other seal designs will leak excessively when twisted. Poor installation of O-rings Only the very important or less obvious factors which contribute to spiral failure will be discussed. A small amount of twisting is not detrimental but. Stretch of O-ring (see rotary shaft seals) 17. The hydraulic pressure. Type of metal rubbing surface 14. Oddly enough. The design and operational factors which contribute to spiral failure of a seal are listed below in the order of their relative importance: 1. The twisted seal is forced into the sharp corner at the clearance gap by the pressure which puts an additional stress on this portion of the seal. several factors combine to produce any failure that develops.15 Spiral Failure A unique type of failure sometimes occurs on reciprocating O-rings which is called spiral failure. Lexington. Usually. or working of the O-ring apparently causes the rupture to penetrate about half way through the cross section. This name was given to this type of failure because when it occurs the seal looks as if it had been cut about halfway through the O-ring cross section in a spiral or corkscrew pattern. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. Slight flexing. Some of those which have been discussed elsewhere will also be omitted here.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > 5. the same factors cause the break. Dynamic O-Ring Sealing Fluid Pressure Large Area Figure 5-16: Action of Fluid Pressure to Prevent Rolling of O-ring O-Ring Delta-Ring Square-Ring X-Ring All are subject to torsional or spiral failure. The smoother finish of the sliding surface.parkerorings. Running friction is lower than break-out friction. Rapid stress-aging. but in general. Speed of stroke 2. 4. torsional failure or spiral failure will occur. 2. an O-ring must be twisted by one or more of the above interrelated factors. Lack of lubrication 3. This type of seal does not normally tend to roll or twist because: 1.

d. the greater the eccentricity. and non perfect machining. bending.15. the seals are more prone to fail. chips or other foreign material. Excessive wear will normally occur.210") cross section (W) O-ring will make some long stroke applications prone to spiral failure. 5. 5. therefore.com 5-14 . Use lubricating (or lubricated) wiper rings. to the exposed surface. and other factors that contribute to wear and/or spiral failure. In other words. that will not evaporate. 5. or scratching of the surface over which the seal must slide (refer to metals and floating glands). Use a metal or surface plating that will produce less friction. it creates an uneven friction condition and thus can contribute to spiral failure and/or uneven. Apply a suitable grease. or lose their. O-ring seals are not recommended. the seal becomes softer.3 mm (0. Spiral failure is more likely to occur if the pressure and seal friction are both in the same direction. for speeds less than one foot per minute when the pressure differential is less than 27. e.parkerorings. the squeeze is increased due to the rubber expansion. seals in a pump are more likely to spiral than are those in an actuator. and/or lose some of their lubricity. excessive wear. the following modifications will help solve specific problems: • Small Amount of Leakage • Early Stress-Aging • Low Temperature Leakage • Excessive Swells (above 20%) Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. it is evident that the hydraulic holding force is reduced because the area on the side of the V-groove is less than at the bottom and side of a square groove. 5. 5.4 mm (6")) applications.8 mm (12") unless extra precautions are taken to avoid trouble. 5.3 Pressure Differential and Direction As explained earlier.15. side loads. If not applicable. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. in a relatively few (about 200) cycles if the temperature is above 39°C (100°F).8 Surface Finish When a cylinder or rod is actuated. Even though it may be very slight.017 in. “light ends”. bending. 5. or make it an operational practice to quickly exhaust the system after the day’s work. Normally an O-ring will not twist when the pressure differential across the seal is greater than 27. the roughness is unevenly distributed around the circumference or periphery. galling.5 Shape of Groove and Split Groove If a V-shaped groove is used.7 Length of Stroke As a general rule. b. It appears that at this slow speed.043 mm (0. the sliding or running seal friction created is very high and comparable to break-out friction.6 Bar (400 psi). spiral failure of the O-ring very probably will result. Lubricate metal surface prior to assembly. and the metal clearances may become greater. the longer the stroke of a cylinder or rod. If the system pressure is slowly lost.15.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Dynamic O-Ring Sealing 5. V-grooves are much more prone to produce spiral failures. twisting of the seal and spiral failure can result if the unlubricated surface is actuated through the seal with little or no pressure on the seal to hold it and prevent it from rolling. Split grooves give trouble if the hydraulic holding force on the O-ring against both the side and the bottom of the groove is not maintained. This applies primarily to long stroke (greater than 152.15. side load. It can be easily seen that more rolling force is created on the cross section with an increase in squeeze. the direction of pressure and seal friction should oppose each other. This is especially true if any of the other factors are out of balance. drilling and finishing all in some way tend to contribute to scoring.4 Squeeze The aerospace industry has generally found that more than 0.16 Modifications for Special Applications Normally.) of squeeze on the side of a 5. such as hydraulic accumulators. Other factors are normally involved when failure occurs with the standard squeezes recommended for reciprocating seals. We do not recommend an O-ring for service when the stroke is greater than 304. marring. 5.6 Bar (400 psi) during operation. as through slow valve leaks. 5.15. Use a fluid that will not tend to evaporate or become tacky at the operating temperature. Extreme twisting will occur on low or balanced pressure components.2 Lack of Lubrication The lack of lubrication on a surface exposed to the atmosphere is one of the prime contributors to spiral failure. Lexington. The remedy for this situation is to: a.15.6 Temperature of Operation When the temperature in and around a system is substantially increased. For further information see the discussion on back-up rings in Section VI. When this occurs. This is because lubricants are more likely to evaporate.9 Back-Up Rings Back-up rings sometimes provide enough extra lubrication on the return stroke to assist in the prevention of spiral failure. The obvious remedy here is to provide good maintenance of the system so that slow leaks are prevented.15. However. c. Great care should be used when designing glands which have an opening in the bottom in order to make sure the normal holding force will be maintained (see Figure 5-16).15. the gland dimensions given in Design Tables 5-1 and 5-2 are adequate and give trouble-free service. and a sealed piston moves slowly through a cylinder a number of times.15.1 Speed of Stroke Investigations have disclosed that one of the primary causes of spiral failure is by reciprocating speeds of less than one foot per minute.

An O-ring that does not by-pass a little fluid at each stroke is running dry and high friction and rapid seal wear will result.16.com 5-15 . such as babbitt).17 Gland Dimensions for Reciprocating Hydraulic O-Ring Seals For most reciprocating applications in which an O-ring is sealing a liquid of any kind (the design is not limited to hydraulic oils). Lexington. to pivot. Eccentricity (lack of concentricity) is allowable. For piston seals. Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.3). For rod seals. 2. 3.parkerorings.3 Low Temperature Leakage 1. In all reciprocating seals. 5. The object of this gland is to allow the piston or rod bearing (containing the O-ring groove). Reduce the groove length. The military dimensions cause less stretch on the O-rings. Improve the surface finish of metal rubbing surface. Increase the squeeze on the cross-section of O-ring. Make certain O-ring is not being twisted during dry assembly. adjust. 5. the dimensions of either Design Table 5-1. Increase groove length. that the effect cannot be significant. 5. desirable. 2. Parker Seal Group normally recommends the Table 5-2 dimensions because these industrial designs. If the volume of the groove is too small. true holes. 5. In order to reduce or eliminate the high bearing loads. but ID stretch should not exceed 5% as installed for optimum design. A wide groove may cause leakage because of pumping action of the O-ring. as well as reducing the maintenance cost. E To prevent extrusion 2 refer to Figure 3-2 or Table 5-1 or 5-2 Figure 5-18: Floating Gland sizes and standard boring tools. The percent reduction is so slight.16. in most cases. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.4 Excessive Swell (above 20%) 1. the following procedure may be used to find gland dimensions. 5.18 Floating Glands Since it is impossible to bore. Examine the O-ring for signs of cutting during installation. or Design Table 5-2. Note: Minute leakage is to be expected and is in fact. select on O-ring having an ID closest to the rod diameter.16. the relatively inexpensive floating gland should be used whenever possible. or float a small amount. This is especially possible when the piston is cycled rapidly. 4. 6. offsetting misalignment. Use larger O-ring to reduce stretch. Make sure all gland surfaces are smooth enough (see paragraph 5. and to machine perfect parts providing perfect alignment. 3. Make sure O-rings are not closer than six feet from an electric motor (operating) during shelf storage. Check for eccentric machining of gland. but it does cause high unit loads on small portions of bearing surfaces. the military design. Coefficient of contraction of rubber is about 10 times that of steel and several times greater than aluminum.2 Early Stress-Aging 1.) This gland design increases the life of the O-ring and eliminates many of the spasmodic or unscheduled failures.1 Small Amount of Leakage 1. In turn.006 in. the industrial design. drill or tap perfect. select an O-ring having an OD near to or preferably slightly larger than the cylinder bore diameter. while the cost of the special machined rods and boring tools that are required could be high. make sure minimum squeeze recommendations are considered. this causes minute scratches on the metal surface on which the O-ring must rub (with the possible exception of very soft bearing materials. 2.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > 5. except in the smallest sizes. 5. 2. 3. The dimensions in this table are actually in good agreement with early versions of the aerospace table. 4. It may be slightly larger or smaller. would be suitable. 2. 5. Redesign groove to reduce squeeze of the O-ring. 4. the engineer should consider the floating gland. 1.16. Redesign groove to reduce stretch of the O-ring. allow for the use of standard drill rod E 2 Snap Ring Dynamic O-Ring Sealing X X X Washer must be tight against shaft shoulder Clearance: X = 0. Increase squeeze of the O-ring.003 to 0. (See Figure 5-18. when an O-ring is used as a reciprocating seal. increased friction and excessive stress may cause premature failure of the O-ring (refer to discussions of friction and spiral failure). Make certain that O-ring compound was designed for operation at low temperatures. 3. Use a more heat-resistant rubber compound. Spring load the O-ring (see Figure 3-1). In reciprocating applications for which neither table applies because of a predetermined dimension that does not agree. Replace O-ring with one made from a compound more resistant to the fluid being sealed. Ozone causes rapid deterioration of most elastomers. Of the two.

and overall cost. For pneumatic seal applications it is especially important that adequate lubrication be provided. The choice depends on temperature extremes. Figure 5-19: Floating O-Ring Seal 5-16 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.24 Gland Dimensions Normally. Light weight. 3.19 Pneumatic Reciprocating O-Ring Seals The past few years have shown a rapid increase of interest in pneumatic systems.parkerorings.22 High-Pressure The most difficult gland to seal for any type of packing is that in a high-pressure pneumatic system because. All organic materials are permeable. Oxygen in the air comes in direct contact with the seal and causes rapid aging and/or deterioration. the following must be considered: 1. (See Table 3-19. fluorocarbon. and will pass into and through (permeate) materials and openings which liquids will not. Leakage is less critical and does not contaminate the surrounding area. extra attention is necessary to make sure that all foreign material and sharp edges or corners are removed from the gland. successful designs are in service which vary between the relatively high-squeeze hydraulic gland recommendations and the no-squeeze floating seal design discussed below. Much lower squeeze designs are permissible and used frequently in low pressure pneumatic applications (i. System fluid is not decomposed by high temperature. some liberties can be taken with soft metals. 2. 5. 5. holding devices. so the gas cannot be kept out of the seal.com . This is necessary because of the relatively poor resistance to cutting and abrasion which is characteristic of silicone compounds. It should be remembered. 5. This is especially true at high temperatures above 71°C (160°F) and high pressure (69 Bar to 207 Bar) (1000 psi to 3000 psi). 5.) Since the temperature range is very moderate and a little leakage is not critical.25 Floating Seal It has been found possible to modify the standard gland design for moving seals and reduce breakout friction as much as 60%.23 Lubrication Most conventional pneumatic applications that fail prematurely do so because of inadequate lubrication. Lexington. 5. however. and similar applications.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Dynamic O-Ring Sealing 5.21 Silicone Compounds If silicone compounds are used. consider ethylene propylene. a lubricant must be selected that will not cause deterioration of the O-ring.e. 5. (More oxygen is present due to the compression of the air. The large change in volume which a gas undergoes with fluctuations in pressure often make necessary very special rubber seal materials so gases that have entered the seal can be rapidly expelled. (See Figure 5-19.) 4. that it is less resistant to dry heat than it is to hot oils or other liquids. In fact. internal lubricant. Of course. Rubber has an inherently high coefficient of friction with all metals and most non-metallic surfaces. blisters. Otherwise. but as a replacement for some existing hydraulic components. Gaseous molecules are very small. severity of service. surface finish and other design criteria without seriously reducing the life expectancy of this type of seal (low pressure cases). and chunks will be blown out of the seal when decompression of the system occurs. but they are still far short of many other synthetic rubbers. Disregarding the necessity for lubrication will result in high friction. the static and reciprocating gland dimensions given at the end of the Static Seals section and this section are adequate and give trouble-free pneumatic service. Nitrile compounds are used for pneumatic applications more than any other polymer. Because of this leakage and other considerations. Some of the more general reasons are: 1.8 Bar (200 psi)) air service only. It is the hardest type seal to keep lubricated.20 Temperature Nitrile rubber is generally the first compound considered for a seal. This problem is amplified as system pressures and temperatures increase. Each application seems to have an optimum design depending on what is desired. Compounds other than those used in hydraulic systems are often necessary because the requirements are entirely different. not only for new equipment. using shop air pressure for machine tools. excessive abrasion or rapid wear of the rubber O-ring and heat build-up.) 3. 5. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. 2. 5. but in this kind of use. In pneumatic applications above 104°C (220°F) for extended periods of time. By allowing the O-ring to float. ruptures. Increased non-flammability. temperatures are usually low. the design is recommended for a temperature range from -23°C to 82°C (-10°F to 180°F) and for low pressure (up to 13. in addition to the problems encountered with liquids.) There is a slight increase in leakage at the beginning of a stroke which for most pneumatic applications is undetectable. 4. the frictional forces are greatly reduced and longer life can be expected from the seal. The atmosphere acts as a giant reservoir. or even silicone or fluorosilicone. Recent developments have improved the abrasion resistance and oil resistance of the silicones.

The “floating” feature of this design is the virtual lack of squeeze on the O-ring cross-section. and end-play are critical in designing effective rotary O-ring seals. The design conditions are most critical for rotary seals. or stretched condition will contract. the squeeze recommended in Design Chart 5-2 may be used. With the correct design. initial leakage of frozen seals may be tolerable until heat build-up occurs in higher speed shafts. This design has been used for some hot water and steam applications as a method of increasing O-ring life. Even at low surface speeds. the O-ring tends to contract when heated and seize the high speed rotating shaft. 5.27 Rotary Seal An O-ring has proved to be a practical rotary shaft seal in many applications. until the O-ring is destroyed. However. When it is installed in more than a minimum of tensional stress. Hardened steel shafts in the range of 55 Rockwell are desirable. Shaft seal applications where the O-ring is installed in a groove in the shaft are not recommended if the shaft rotates. as would be expected. 5. the gland dimensions given in Design Table 5-3 are suggested and the holes should be drilled into the pressure side of the outside grooves on the piston and the inside of the rod glands. Spring loading may be helpful in some situations. Parker O-Ring rotary seal compound N1090-85. opening the clearance and allowing leakage. The friction between the O-ring and the rotating shaft creates heat. it will be seen that when the direction of pressurized air is reversed. This is the cross section squeeze design used for hydraulic piston and rod seals. For speeds below 200 feet per minute. side thrust. use Design Chart 4-1 and Design Table 4-1. a stretched O-ring tends to rotate with the shaft and leak. Floating seals are not recommended for pneumatic rods. an O-ring should not be installed in a gland that holds it in more than a minimum of tensional stress. Furthermore. occurs only if the rubber is under tensile stress. The O-rings on either end.26 Uni-Directional Gland This design modification utilizes a uni-directional floating seal groove and more than one O-ring (see Figure 5-20). This is of practical importance in a rotary seal because it results in a tendency for the O-ring to seize the high-speed rotating shaft. Sealing is accomplished by the peripheral squeeze applied to the outside diameter of the O-ring as it is assembled into the bore.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Recommended dimensions for floating pneumatic piston seal glands are tabulated in Design Chart 5-3 and Design Table 5-3 at the end of this section. the seal is effective long after a single O-ring would have failed. since thermal shrinkage and loss of resilience tend to cause loss of contact with the shaft. Attention to clearances. and minimum cross section are required. For static pneumatic seal designs. This is due to the centrifugal action which causes the O-ring to rotate and rub on all surfaces which generally causes early seal leakage or failure. Consequently. a stretched O-ring in this situation would be subject to the Gow-Joule effect described in the rotary seal discussion. Relatively high durometer compounds. Five or six O-rings are used in adjoining floating seal glands. When this principle is understood. Lexington. alternately seal and release trapped pressure. This phenomenon. High-speed shafts of soft metal should be avoided since they will normally wear more rapidly than the rubber. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. The full effect of the hot steam is brought to bear on the inner rings and a lesser amount on the outer rings. In some cases. a puff of air escapes between the inside diameter of the O-ring and the bottom of the groove during the small fraction of a second it takes the O-ring to move to the other side of the gland. where heating is not a problem. and air pressure moving the ring into facial contact with the wall of the groove. For the design of pneumatic reciprocating rod seals. the shaft diameter should be no larger than the free state ID of the O-ring. Whenever it can be avoided. as they would require stretching the O-ring. use Design Chart 5-2 and Design Table 5-2. Most elastomers when heated in the stressed. This is the primary reason for the slight increase in leakage mentioned for this design. preventing a pressure trap of non-compressible liquid between the O-rings. causing early aging. close control of tolerances. will provide satisfactory service at surface speeds up to 1500 feet per minute. The three piston O-rings and the two rod O-rings are never all sealing at the same time. since pneumatically actuated shafts often move rapidly. This contraction causes more friction which in turn causes more heat and the process becomes self-perpetuating. When using this design. but not mandatory. Dynamic O-Ring Sealing Figure 5-20: Use of Multiple O-Rings in a Floating O-Ring Design Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.com 5-17 .parkerorings. As many individual seals as required may be used as long as each groove is vented. known as the Gow-Joule effect. The floating seal will not trap pressure between two O-rings in separate grooves unless considerable rubber swell is encountered. The addition of drilled holes in the grooves causes each O-ring to seal in one direction only. This principle is especially important to consider when designing for an O-ring rotary shaft seal. Rotary seals usually should not be used at temperatures below -40°C (-40°F) even though flexibility to -54°C (-65°F) is claimed. The vents are not necessary in pneumatic designs.

001) (E) (F) 0. Because of the limited interference that must be used to avoid frictional heat. Experience has proven that it is desirable to use the O-ring with the smallest “W”.000) (G) Determine diametral clearance. A-1 max. Lexington.075 . The O-ring gland in a rotary shaft application should not be used as a bearing surface. (D) Add 0.203 mm (0. (See Table 5-5.002 = 2. actual shaft OD. + E min. A-1 A-1 min = B max.070 Bearings of all types cause considerable local heat and seals placed too close to them will fail prematurely.103 be considered maximum for all speeds over 600 feet per minute. G from Design Chart 5-4. Example: (A) (B) Speed = 0. The shaft should be contained by bearings that will permit the O-ring to operate under the lowest possible heat and load.012 = 3. E from Design Chart 5-4. 2-041 (D) B max. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. + 2L min.079 Table 5-6: Rotary Seal Design Example 5-18 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.26 X 3 X 1750 = 1365 fpm . the longer the O-ring will seal.067) = 3.013 mm (0. Check Figure 3-2 to make sure design is extrusion safe. available for the ID required. since most rotary seal compounds contain graphite as a compound ingredient. The nearer to room temperature the seal interface.0005") T. There are two methods commonly used to prevent high bearing heat build-up: Preferred: Provide a clearance of 0. the O-ring will not compensate for shafts that are out of round or rotate eccentrically.070 (larger cross sections are eliminated due to speed) (C) Select .008") on a side between the rotating shaft and the O-ring housing. B. + 2L max. D max.070 cross section O-ring with actual ID closest to desired shaft OD from Design Table 5-4.991 (TOL: + .parkerorings.006 = 3.124 = 3. (C) Parker No. D max. the 10 times “W” rule also applies.. = 2. To ensure maximum O-ring life.26 X Shaft Diameter (inches) X rpm.2 Bar (800 psi). L from Design Chart 5-4. (G) 0. . Problem: To design a rotary seal gland for a 76.103 0. This provides for a greater area for heat transfer.065) = 3.) All metals and plastics suitable for the housing or gland construction of seal assemblies requiring rotary shaft seals can be used with O-rings.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook O-Ring Sections for Rotary Seals Speed (fpm*) Maximum Recommended “W” Dimension Usually not critical (Use chart 5-2) 0.991 + 0. such as stainless steel.003 (TOL: + . Calculate Gland Groove ID. use an O-ring compound that has been specially developed for rotary seal applications and provides the required characteristics that are necessary Dynamic O-Ring Sealing 0 to 200 200 to 400 200 to 600 200 to 1500 *Feet per minute = 0.003. . = B max.991 + 2(0.990 + 0. (I) (J) Determine groove width.990 + (0.121 = 2. However. Shafts should remain concentric within . any metal. If the clearance must be kept to a minimum to prevent high pressure extrusion.065 to 0. Alternate: The bearing length should be at least 10 times the “W” dimension of the O-ring used.969 + 0. or cross-section diameter.003. A-1 max.0.2 mm (3") (desired) shaft running at 1750 RPM with oil pressure at 6.003 = 2. (E) (F) Determine gland depth. Procedural Steps: (A) (B) Calculate surface speed. or surface treatment that may be adversely affected by this material should be avoided. Make sure that the shaft does not rub the housing. A-1 = 2. Determine O-ring cross section that may be used from Table 5-5. + E max.016 (H) D min.139 0. Table 5-5: O-Ring Sections for Rotary Seals Rotary Seal O-Ring 80 Durometer Soft Rubber Ring Soft O-Ring Figure 5-21: Spring-Loading for Rotary Seal The use of O-rings as high speed rotary shaft seals is usually not recommended for applications requiring lower than -40°C (-40°F) or higher than 121°C (250°F) operating temperatures.067 A-1 min.002 to O-ring ID to determine max.012 + 0. D (I) = 2. = B min. Provision should be made for the dissipation of any heat that may be generated because of friction.9 Bar (100 psi). = B min. decrease the diametrical clearance per Figure 3-2.000) 0. (H) Calculate shaft bore D D min. It is recommended that a “W” dimension of 0. -.121 (TOL: + ..com .016 = 3.R. For pressures exceeding 55. A floating gland (see Figure 5-18) is preferred to avoid high unit load at a local point or area.000.I.

) The ballooning effect that can occur at very low pressure usually pops the O-ring out of the groove the same as blow-out. use Design Table 5-4 for O-ring sizes and gland dimensions. Constantly oscillating shafts. LPG. With release of pressure. Groove width — 1. With this type of groove.parkerorings. alter the dimensions as follows: Groove depth — 0. the gas inside the O-ring can cause the seal to “balloon” or swell momentarily.29 Seat Seals A properly designed check or poppet type valve. valve design and the physical properties of the O-ring when a non-retaining or conventional type groove is used.com 5-19 . etc. See Section II. the space between the two faces becomes increasingly larger. Basic O-Ring Elastomers. “blow-out’’ will normally occur when the valve is unseated.10 times the O-ring cross section diameter. Either of these should only be used when absolutely necessary to obtain the desired seal. The pressure opening the valve is also acting on the O-ring. CO2. Groove side angle — 0°. causing it to continue to seal the opening until it is stretched completely out of the groove and is blown out or forced into another part of the system. Gases such as air. for more information on rotary seal compounds. Standard Groove O-Ring Pressure O-Ring Pressure Figure 5-22: Valve Seat Seal.” O-ring blow-out may be prevented by using a groove design which encloses more than 180° of the O-ring cross section or by venting the groove. Lexington. “Blow-out” is a type of seal failure caused by the action of the pressure in the system on the side of the O-ring.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > for this service.015 to 0. See Table 5-6 for a rotary seal design example. but that it occurs at considerably lower pressures. if possible.5 Bar (80 psi). It should be kept in mind that blow-out is similar to extrusion. reducing space requirements and eliminating the need for adjusting or take-up devices. Dynamic O-Ring Sealing O-Ring Pressure Figure 5-23: O-Ring Blow-Out. O-Ring Figure 5-23 illustrates a valve opening above “blow-out” pressure. will give an exceptionally long. such as those used on timing and metering devices. 5. 5. if the speed is under 200 feet per minute.28 Oscillating Seal In this guide. with an O-ring on the seat. Figure 5-22 shows an O-ring on the seat of a check valve in a conventional groove. two types of oscillating seals are considered: 1. forcing it out of the groove into some other part of the valve or system.00 to 1. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. “Ballooning” and “blow-out” often combine to cause valve seal failure. Faucet or valve stems are excellent examples of assemblies that can be simplified by the use of an O-ring seal. Another term often used to describe this phenomenon is “explosive decompression. The exact pressure will depend on the gas or fluid. Compression type or multiple-lip packing can be eliminated. Standard Groove Figure 5-24: Groove Designs to Prevent Blow-Out Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. As the valve opens. Many designers and engineers make the costly mistake of trying to use a conventional groove (square or rectangular) design to hold the O-ring. use Design Table 5-2 for selecting O-ring sizes and gland dimensions. Figure 5-21 shows two methods of “spring loading” the hard rotary seal. If a rectangular groove must be used. enter or permeate the O-ring. “Blow-out” usually occurs at differential pressures above 5. 2. Typical methods used are shown in Figure 5-24.025 less than O-ring cross section diameter. can be sealed satisfactorily with O-rings. (The amount depends on the pressure. If the motion is continuous for long periods of time. non-leaking service. The seal is satisfactory as long as the valve is not opened at or near the pressure necessary to cause blow-out. For applications of this type.

If a size is required between the sizes then the smaller size should be taken. ozone. e.14 x d1 x (S + 1) – 1.g.0 + S) c) O-ringis selected according to the O-ring size list. Lexington. An O-ring compound is selected for minimum stretch relaxation (tensile set) and maximum dynamic properties.parkerorings. 10% = 0.30. diameter of pulleys a) Calculation of drive belt L: (see above.g.g. • The elongation of the O-ring inner diameter d1 is a maximum of 15% (average elongation between 8% and 12%). 10% = 0.57 x (D1 + D2) + (D1 + D2)2 4 xC b) Calculation of O-ring inside diameter d1: d1 = L 3. 10% = 0. paragraph 3.1) a) Calculation of drive belt L: L = 2 x C + 1.30 Drive Belts O-rings can be used as low power transmission elements. oil grease. Calculation of O-Ring size d1: Known – D1 and D2.14 x (1.1) d1 O-ring inner diameter (mm) d2 O-ring cross-section (mm) L Length of drive belt (mm) B Calculation factor Open Design Crossed Design Compound Selection Please see Section III.62mm. Calculation of center line distance C of pulley: Known – d1 inside diameter of O-ring S elongation as a decimal (e. this means a higher resistance to the Joule effect. • Freely available in standard compounds and sizes • Greatest possible tolerances in positioning of pulleys.17 for information about drive belt compound selection Design Information • Direct contact with fluids should be avoided. • Tension when fitted approximately 0.14 x d1 3. 5. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.57 x (D1 + D2) b) Thereafter calculation of center line distance C: C = B+√B2 – (D1 – D2)2 4 5-20 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. O-rings ordered for this application are to be coded as follows: “E0540 DBA2-250”.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Dynamic O-Ring Sealing 5. Calculation of elongation S: Known – d1 inside diameter of O-ring C center line distance of pulleys D1 and D2. 1a) b) Calculation of elongation S as a decimal: S= L -1 3. • Cross section d2 should be greater or equal to 2. They are not only an economic solution but also offer many advantages: • Simple installation • Constant tension • Flexible fitting • Because of their elastic properties. • The smaller pulley minimum diameter is D2 mm = 6 x d2 (cross section). diameter of pulley C center line distance of pulleys S elongation as a decimal (e. For contact medium see medium Compatibility Table.10) D1 and D2. diameters of pulleys a) Calculation of factor B: B = 3. • Good bending flexibility D1 D2 C Abbreviations: C Center line distance of pulleys (mm) D1 Diameter of driven pulley (mm) D2 Diameter of drive pulley (mm) S Elongation as a decimal (e. 2. Ordering Detail All O-rings which are used as drive belts are subject to additional quality inspection procedures and inspection for surface defects under elongation.0 N/mm2.1 Calculation of Drive Belt Open Design 1.g. • Extreme temperatures The general requirements are: • Good aging resistance • Wear resistance • Relatively low tendency to return to original shape under tension and temperature caused by friction.com .6 to 1. The choice of elastomer is made to the environment: • Contact medium. O-ring compounds require no adjustment.

1 3.D Piston or Cylinder O. read horizontally to determine proper O-ring size number per AS568A.60 + 0. Each of these and other less accepted documents have slight dimensional variations from those found in this Handbook. 1233 and 1234. If a size is required between the sizes then the smaller size should be taken.D. 10% = 0.D.D.25 + 0.70 + 0. Select Closest Dimension in Column A Read Horizontally in Column G C F G A F G J H To Determine Dimension for Groove Width* Piston or Cylinder O.parkerorings.D. Lexington. After selecting gland dimension.D.14 x d1 x (S + 1) – 1.0 + S) c) O-ring is selected according to the O-Ring size list. *For information on groove width refer to Design Chart 5-1A B H G J B Design Guide 5-1: Guide For Design Chart 5-1 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.4 Flash free For other cross-sections r1 = 0.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > 5.D. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. There are a number of various O-ring gland design specifications in use throughout industry.50 + 0.D.99 r1 in mm Dynamic O-Ring Sealing 1. diameters of pulleys a) Calculation of factor B: B = 3.g. Rod or Gland Sleeve O. These dimensions have been calculated and are listed in Design Table 5-1.6 µm Pulley gland radius 5.10) D1 and D2. The procedures for the use of Design Table 5-1 are outlined in Design Guide 5-1.3 µm Ra < 1.1 O-Ring Glands (Per SAE AS4716) for Aerospace Hydraulic (Reciprocating) Packings and Gaskets Design Chart 5-1 provides the basis for calculating gland dimensions for standard O-ring sizes.1) a) Calculation of drive belt L: L = 2 x C + 1.g. Guide For Design Table 5-1 If Desired Dimension is Known for Cylinder Bore or Male Gland Cylinder Bore I.33 6. These include Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) 1232.D.15 r2 0. diameter of pulleys a) Calculation of drive belt L: (see above.d1 inside diameter of O-Ring C center line distance of pulleys D1 and D2.D.D.57 x (D1 + D2) b) Thereafter calculation of center line distance C: C = B+√B2 – (D1 – D2)2 4 r1 d2 in mm O D1 Or O D2 2.31. 1a) b) Calculation of elongation S as a decimal: S= L -1 3.com 5-21 .30.31 O-Ring Glands 5. Rod Bore or Female Gland Housing Bore I.2 Calculation of Drive Belt Crossed Design 1) Calculation of O-Ring size d1: Known – D1 and D2.53 5. 10% = 0. Calculation of center line distance C of pulley: Known – d1 inside diameter of O-ring S elongation as a decimal (e.14 x (1.2 – 0.D. Groove Width* Groove I.14 x d1 3.62 3. Groove Width* Cylinder Bore or Male Gland Cylinder Bore I. There also is the International Standards Organization (better known as ISO) Specification 3601/2.49 x d2 Surface roughness: Rmax < 6.) Calculation of O-Ring inside diameter d1: d1 = L 3.57 x (D1 + D2) + (D1-D2)2 4xC b. C Rod or Gland Sleeve O.1 1. Groove Width* Groove I. Groove O. Rod Bore or Female Gland Housing Bore I. 2) Calculation of elongation S: Known . diameter of pulley C center line distance of pulleys S elongation as a decimal (e.1 2. Groove O.

006 .006 .006 .143 .143 .007 .154 .215 . .100 .215 .314 .207 .291 .215 .281 .093 .220 .063 . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.047 .106 .005 .281 .151 .007 .007 . .485 Gland Width G Two Backup Rings Min.205 .434 .006 .100 . O-Ring and Other Elastomeric Seals (SAE AS4716) Standard Gland Width for Zero.006 .006 .255 .385 Gland Width G One Backup Ring Min.006 .106 .005 . O-Ring and Other Elastomeric Seals (SAE AS4716) Gland Design.106 .099 .334 .143 .047 .< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Gland Design.008 .053 .005 .135 .106 . O-Ring and Other Elastomeric Seals (SAE AS4716) 5-22 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.007 .281 .067 .100 .100 .269 .210 .057 .135 .375 . — — — .073 .143 .150 .205 .063 .193 .004 .005 .004 .004 .037 .269 .053 .043 .082 .073 .073 .135 .070 .281 .245 .007 .com .010 .205 .098 . .141 .088 .067 . Max.057 .164 .106 . Max.004 .075 .589 Design Chart 5-1A: Gland Design.217 .009 .043 .269 .037 .344 .135 .007 .143 .006 . and Two Backup Rings Dynamic O-Ring Sealing Gland and AS568 Dash Number 001 002 003 004 to 009 010 to 028 110 to 149 210 to 247 325 to 349 424 to 460 O-ring Cross Section W Min.007 .067 .009 .183 .160 .281 Gland Width G No Backup Ring Min.004 .004 .304 .135 .143 .106 . — — — .006 .008 .205 .094 .135 .215 .215 .269 Diametral Clearance E Max.010 .579 — — — .parkerorings. O-Ring and Other Elastomeric Seals (SAE AS4716) Standard Gland Diametral Clearance Dimensions Gland and AS568 Dash Number 001 002 003 004 to 012 013 to 028 110 to 126 127 to 129 130 to 132 133 to 140 141 to 149 210 to 222 223 and 224 225 to 227 228 to 243 244 and 245 246 and 247 325 to 327 328 and 329 330 to 345 346 to 349 425 to 438 439 to 445 446 447 to 460 O-ring Cross Section W Min.143 .424 .067 .100 .073 .011 Max. Max. Exterior .004 .077 .135 .009 .205 .005 .103 .010 Design Chart 5-1B: Gland Design.100 . Lexington.005 .008 .006 .235 .008 .281 Interior .007 . Max.188 .475 — — — .198 .004 . .005 .010 .007 .245 . One.007 .007 .269 .

298 0.0194 – 0...187 0.0178 – 0.154 0.248 0.076 0.500 0.498 0.483 0.311 0.0199 Design Table 5-1: Gland Design...422 0.. B Rod O...0176 – 0.484 0.266 0.0/-0.312 0.D..373 0.108 0.. O-Ring and Other Elastomeric Seals (SAE AS4716) Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. A Cylinder Bore Dia.360 0.0 +5..310 0.0145 – 0.107 0.550 0.249 0.159 0.122 0.110 0...357 0.218 0.....) X: Dynamic Seals .0192 – 0...126 0.236 0.221 0..153 0.D..32 X: Dynamic Seals.294 0..047 0.0192 0.219 0.615 Gland OD F 0.0193 – 0...0050 – 0..188 0..000 1/2 E Gland L Depth Dynamic O-Ring Sealing 16 H Dia.32 Static Seals.5 Break Edge Pressure (PSIG) ≤ 4000 > 4000 Groove Edge Break 0.129 0.128 0.0191 – 0....0189 – 0.156 0.421 0...0000 – 0.0197 – – 0.0032 – 0...0139 – 0.250 0.0050 – 0.....438 0.048 0.. O-Ring and Other Elastomeric Seals (SAE AS4716) 0° to 5° (Typ.548 0.000 Gland Design.157 0...435 0.187 0... Lexington.0057 – 0.0052 – 0.125 0.328 0.. R X G Groove Depth (Ref...613 0.0023 – 0. F Piston Groove Dia.184 0.078 0...422 0.) +.295 0.330 0...D Y: Dynamic Seals Gland Detail No Back-Up Ring ....107 0.189 0.0052 – – 0.0/-0.050 0...123 0. C Piston O.0193 – 0..502 Rod or Gland Sleeve OD B 0..032 0.0 +2..547 0....376 0.076 0..0050 – 0..0 ±0.236 0.327 0.0051 Actual Maximum Squeeze Piston Rod 0.485 0.0054 – 0.153 0....0000 – 0.079 0.267 0..0 0.437 0..051 0....035 0.0139 – 0.358 0. A Dia.188 0..036 0....220 0.005/-0.608 0.326 0.095 0....0052 – 0.375 0.420 0.154 0. 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 0.0178 – 0.251 0.092 0.002 +0.128 0....63 F Dia.0196 – 0.126 0.191 0.295 0.552 0....419 0.125 0... 1/2E B Dia..266 0..0196 – 0.005 Break Edge ....047 0.157 0.0000 – 0.375 0...63 Y Finishes are RMS values Pressure Pressure Pressure G No Back-up Ring G One Back-up Ring G Two Back-up Rings Groove Wall Angle (X) Pressure (PSIG) X (Degrees) ≤ 3000 4000 to 6000 >6000 to 8000 0...250 0..075 0..610 Actual Minimum Squeeze Piston Rod 0.188 0.160 0. O-Ring and Other Elastomeric Seals (SAE AS4716) Piston or Gland Cylinder and OD AS568 C Dash No.32 Gland Detail Y Static Seals .< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Gland Design.0000 – 0.0003 – 0.233 0..222 0.0052 – 0..032 0.033 0..441 0. H Rod Bore Dia.095 0.221 0.....000 0.0003 – 0..063 0.309 0...219 0.0000 – 0.093 0.610 Cylinder Bore OD A 0.190 0.0020 – 0.066 0...267 0.329 0.0190 – 0... 1/2 E 1/2 E J Dia.005 +0.545 0.0 0..374 0..156 0..0000 – 0...423 0..160 0.0060 – 0.222 0.0193 – 0.063 0..190 0.0176 – 0.219 0.0032 – 0.0154 – 0. C Dia.547 0.361 0..217 0.191 0.433 0.075 0.263 0...159 0..232 0..0154 – 0..297 0....033 0.611 0.096 0.501 Gland ID J 0.0179 – 0.111 0..247 0.482 0.0053 – 0..485 0...parkerorings.065 0.0023 – 0..486 0.185 0...108 0...372 0..062 0...327 0...048 0..0050 – 0.. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.312 0.122 0.0177 – 0.129 0.005 — ..062 0..504 0.359 0.360 0..0020 – 0.0057 – 0.096 0.313 0..0177 – 0.0198 0.32 Dynamic Seals or Dynamic Seals with Back-Up Ring ..0179 – 0.235 0. J Rod Gland Groove I..264 0.008/-0.220 0...496 Rod Bore ID H 0.com 5-23 .123 0.0145 – 0..216 0..439 0.63 Y: Dynamic Seals No Back-Up Ring .294 0.235 0.

751 0.748 0.001 1. O-Ring and Other Elastomeric Seals (SAE AS4716) (Continued) Piston or Gland Cylinder and OD AS568 C Dash No.988 1.191 1.375 1.118 1.0203 – 0.438 0.047 1.922 0.428 1.0052 – 0.425 1.0209 – 0.303 1.547 0.0212 – 0.175 1.673 0.0050 – 0.187 1.003 1.368 1.256 1.170 1.558 0.858 0.610 0.0203 – 0.051 1.050 1.989 0.674 0.548 0.123 1.0051 – 0.235 1.0204 – 0.0207 – 0.685 0.687 0.876 0.738 0.881 0.126 1.006 1.0053 – 0.813 0.491 1.0200 – 0.672 0.193 1.0201 – 0.993 1.673 0.239 1.565 0.500 0.923 0.0055 – 0.131 1.735 0.876 0.991 0.com .0052 – 0.935 0.384 1.050 1.360 1.795 0.0050 – 0.053 1.001 1.300 1.922 0.672 0.241 1.376 0.812 0.627 0.748 0.736 0.0052 – 0.0052 – 0.691 0.0203 – 0.0056 – 0.736 0.0051 – 0.0211 – 0.943 0.062 1.0052 – 0.048 1.688 0.797 0.0205 – 0.0202 – 0.0204 – 0.0052 – 0.0053 – 0.0052 – 0.0052 – 0.0209 – 0.927 0.0203 – 0.248 1.923 0.316 1.799 0.800 0.0053 – 0.863 0.933 0.0206 – 0.863 0.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Gland Design.110 1.498 0.815 0.985 0.063 1.501 0.0205 – 0.0204 – 0.740 0.563 0.800 0.0053 – 0.050 1.813 0.927 0.051 1.0200 – 0.998 0.180 1.933 0.0209 – 0.502 0.121 1.0200 – 0.0205 – 0.625 0.871 0.925 0.0050 – 0.938 1.566 0.0202 – 0.861 0.548 0.0205 – 0. 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025 026 027 028 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 0.parkerorings.233 1.110 1.371 0.237 1.379 0.746 0.0055 – 0.0050 – 0.358 1.860 0.0054 Actual Maximum Squeeze Piston Rod 0.0052 – 0.611 0.0206 – 0.740 0.0205 – 0.746 0.118 1.815 0.0051 – 0.0050 – 0.736 0.983 0.808 0.0210 Design Table 5-1: Gland Design.183 Rod Bore ID H 0.172 1.488 0.243 1.189 Rod or Gland Sleeve OD B 0.064 1.0054 – 0.0051 – 0.0198 – 0. Lexington.055 1.496 0.0199 – 0.941 1.308 1.751 0.129 1.0205 – 0.441 0.687 0.621 0.552 0.303 1.0052 – 0.188 Gland ID J 0.563 0.239 1.0209 – 0.627 0.045 1.609 0.0204 – 0.318 1.0205 – – 0.0052 – 0.877 0.175 1.802 0.0053 – 0.991 0.0204 – 0.0200 – 0.860 0.0207 – 0.493 0.0055 – 0.126 1.817 0.373 1.004 1.935 0.813 0.0051 – – 0.938 1.180 1.360 1.123 1.873 0.113 1.0056 – 0.859 0.733 0.875 0.313 1.376 0.379 0.0050 – 0.0205 – 0.797 0.873 0.677 0.550 0.430 1.121 1.0051 – 0.300 1.688 0.675 0.672 0.683 0.0053 – 0.068 1.925 0.185 1.381 1.670 0.114 1.989 0.625 0.988 1.183 1.000 1.126 1.366 1.0053 – 0.751 0.173 1.753 0.0207 – 0.920 0.808 0.250 1.623 0.362 Actual Minimum Squeeze Piston Rod 0.0205 – 0.558 0.000 1.0204 – 0.112 1.738 0.058 1.238 1.0056 – 0.562 0.750 0.751 0.735 0.879 0.063 1.689 0.191 1.922 0.435 0.0053 – 0.871 0.0205 – 0.114 1.0056 – 0.0055 – 0.301 1.865 0.363 1.113 1.0051 – 0.0050 – 0.546 0.625 0.987 1.433 0.810 0.812 0.802 0.305 1.483 1.420 1.297 1.364 1.246 1.066 1.060 1.373 0.925 0.108 1.0054 – 0.295 1.861 0.797 0.562 0.310 1.560 0.363 Dynamic O-Ring Sealing Cylinder Bore OD A 0.489 1.437 0.629 0.996 1.305 1.0052 – 0.879 0.626 0.500 0.810 0.865 0.060 1.178 1.0205 – 0.923 0.675 0.0056 – 0.797 0.300 1.176 1.0209 – 0.749 0.116 1.188 1.0209 – 0.0205 – 0.125 1.993 1.371 0.626 0.0201 – 0.368 Gland OD F 0.187 1.613 0.0053 – 0.062 1.940 1.875 0. O-Ring and Other Elastomeric Seals (SAE AS4716) 5-24 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.0208 – 0.422 1.734 0.0205 – 0.235 1.564 0.677 0.175 1.001 1.689 0.426 1.0202 – 0.0052 – 0.687 0.798 0.053 1.176 1.621 0.0052 – 0.058 1.0200 – 0.0053 – 0.683 0.055 1.0210 – 0.937 0.238 1.560 0. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.998 0.241 1.0054 – 0.254 1.798 0.0053 – 0.0205 – 0.0201 – 0.243 1.672 0.623 0.116 1.0050 – 0.128 1.860 0.0201 – 0.0200 – 0.298 1.485 0.251 1.0054 – 0.937 0.439 0.563 0.942 0.735 0.685 0.0205 – 0.125 1.312 1.366 1.750 0.0050 – 0.377 0.301 1.985 1.066 1.0053 – 0.861 0.996 1.375 0.615 0.185 1.611 0.178 1.

745 2.194 2.0225 – 0.672 2.985 2.441 2.812 0.com 5-25 .756 1.432 2.623 2.684 2.682 2.182 2.0225 – 0.0052 – 0.375 1.006 2.0218 – 0.069 2.810 0.993 1.0225 – 0.932 2.686 2.0053 – 0.550 1.422 2.0225 – 0.860 1.441 1.0219 – 0.430 2.0217 – 0.493 1.501 2.0055 – 0.316 2.550 1.676 1.988 2.240 2.620 2.487 2.0210 – 0.552 2.610 2.0225 – 0.172 2.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Gland Design.626 2. Lexington.0225 – 0.493 2.496 2.305 2.693 1.748 0.988 1.991 1.061 2.805 1.360 2.881 1.0052 – 0.989 1.0225 – 0.423 1. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.427 2.0210 – 0.627 1.191 2.612 2.618 2.863 1.050 Cylinder Bore OD A 1.302 2.312 1.253 2.362 2.051 2.504 2.873 1.737 1.738 2.0054 – – 0.110 2.811 2.128 2.675 2.435 1.673 1.310 1.490 2.0053 – 0.944 1.0053 – 0.748 0.800 2.746 1.0054 – 0.049 2.737 2.001 2.308 1.0054 – 0.0215 – 0.752 1.498 2.381 2.564 2.564 1.0225 – 0.376 1.0054 – 0.807 2.798 1.0055 – 0.0056 – 0.621 2.993 2.314 2.425 1.437 1.996 2.802 1.819 2.555 1.246 1.0225 – 0.0225 – 0.815 1.371 2.0207 – 0.424 2.923 1.0055 – 0.939 1.810 Rod or Gland Sleeve OD B 1.485 2.248 2.299 2.186 2.442 2.862 1.942 2.0225 – 0.878 1.177 2.562 1.750 0.0053 – 0.927 1.0056 – 0.558 1.867 1.984 1.550 2.0225 – 0.0054 – 0.365 2.675 1.0247 – 0.120 2.754 2.003 2.0244 – 0.631 2.495 2.871 1.251 1.625 1.629 1.685 1.0051 – 0.0207 – 0.930 1.616 1.995 0.748 2.0052 – 0.694 2.496 1.0051 – 0.0054 – 0.503 2.0055 – 0.932 1.689 2.0225 – 0.0051 – 0.0051 – 0.567 2.735 2.118 2.991 0.307 2.739 1.0053 – 0.0053 – 0.808 Rod Bore ID H 1.313 1.314 1.487 1.756 2.618 1.566 2.309 2.319 2.818 1.316 1.561 2.808 1.0052 – 0.809 0.0215 – 0.0054 – 0.748 1.052 2.0054 – 0.922 2.0225 – 0.371 1.180 2.297 2.0248 Dynamic O-Ring Sealing Design Table 5-1: Gland Design.549 2.986 2.256 2.994 2.800 1.566 1.998 1.434 2.378 2.0225 – 0.0052 – 0.869 1.0206 – 0.501 1.0051 – 0.813 Gland ID J 1.0218 – 0.376 2.813 1.868 2.689 1.753 2.488 1.805 2.802 2.936 1.807 1.989 0.816 1.751 0.059 2.799 2.311 2.439 2.428 1.0054 – 0.053 1.560 1.569 2.0054 – 0.876 1.0053 – 0.0215 – 0.129 2.066 2.0054 – 0.055 2.691 2.506 2.0052 – 0.0210 – 0.743 2.425 1.491 1.691 1.0225 – 0.115 2.0054 – 0.0052 – 0.610 1.123 2.047 2.0050 – 0.0219 – 0.548 1.0225 – 0.0206 – 0.253 1.675 1.0053 – 0.631 1. O-Ring and Other Elastomeric Seals (SAE AS4716) Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.176 2.741 1.678 1.990 2.0052 – 0.301 2.489 1.692 2.131 2.0219 – 0.559 2.0225 – 0.0054 – 0.426 2.488 2.parkerorings.0225 – 0.864 1.373 1.064 2.057 2.250 1.629 2.879 1.680 2.746 0.246 2.797 2.683 1. 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 210 211 1.924 2.743 1.121 2.0217 – 0.674 2.801 1.925 2.364 2.370 2.500 1.927 2.0051 – 0.677 2.0225 – 0.750 0.485 1.816 0.754 1.126 2.740 2.245 2.614 1.0215 – 0.376 1.623 1.0053 – 0.860 2.862 2.055 Gland OD F 1.555 2.192 2.254 2.934 1.051 1.0054 – 0.557 2.112 2.0052 – 0.751 2.502 1.930 2.0055 Actual Maximum Squeeze Piston Rod 0.067 2.114 2.243 2.547 2.444 2.251 2.0225 – 0.0225 – 0.0244 – – 0.0054 – 0.613 2.426 1.812 0.992 1.317 2.184 2.687 1.613 1.0055 – 0.439 1.735 1.628 2.865 2.251 1.0225 – 0.430 1.0206 – 0.863 2.0053 – 0.0219 – 0.439 1.379 2.0225 – 0.004 2.051 1.810 1.870 2.941 2.925 1.814 2.0052 – 0.433 1.817 0.0056 – 0.989 0.0051 – 0.987 0.926 1.189 2.564 1.368 2.750 1.0215 – 0.378 1.0052 – 0.0225 – 0.551 1.621 1.0215 – 0.498 1.0219 – 0.503 1.0225 – 0.0053 – 0.746 2.0052 – 0.615 2.237 2.248 1.553 1.738 1.0208 – 0. O-Ring and Other Elastomeric Seals (SAE AS4716) (Continued) Piston or Gland Cylinder and OD AS568 C Dash No.680 1.235 2.239 2.436 2.0055 – 0.0219 – 0.373 2.174 2.053 Actual Minimum Squeeze Piston Rod 0.0217 – 0.988 0.612 1.

0254 – 0.365 1.250 1.2060 – 0.0254 – 0.0054 – 0.242 2.989 1.001 1.0056 – 0.0055 – – 0.238 3.245 2.937 0.0247 – 0.0260 – 0.495 3.121 2.0056 – 0.751 2.617 2.865 2.679 1.122 1.0260 Design Table 5-1: Gland Design.175 1.993 2.126 1.938 1.623 1.0255 – 0.0260 – 0.0053 – 0.001 2.249 1.863 2.430 1.870 2.0050 – 0.243 3.251 3.0260 – 0.118 2.0260 – 0. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.com .750 1.124 3.613 3.499 3.0053 – 0.365 3.0246 – 0.125 1.0057 – 0.308 1.058 1.0053 – 0.366 3.184 1.372 1.746 1.0260 – 0.240 2.618 2.0056 – 0.878 3.249 3.366 1.622 3.0055 – 0.0260 – 0.995 3.625 1.0247 – 0.0244 – 0.677 1.0054 – 0.871 1.118 1.0052 – 0.739 3.0055 – 0.177 1.496 1.0053 – 0.495 2.999 2.438 1.994 2.0051 – 0.188 1.865 3.117 3.128 2.302 1.988 2.488 3.0056 – 0.876 2.0242 – 0.176 1.115 2.0051 – 0.374 2.0260 – 0.0056 – 0.878 2.118 3.0059 – 0.876 1.748 1.0247 – 0.0260 – 0.120 2.187 1.313 1.0054 – 0.739 1.370 3.490 2.0247 – 0.001 1.363 1.0260 – 0.429 1.503 2.0260 – 0.745 3.626 2.738 3.0059 – 0.304 1.368 2.0248 – 0.378 2.364 1.0260 – 0.997 1.115 1.245 3.239 2.115 2.0260 – 0.935 0.863 1.240 3.428 1.997 2.377 3.554 1.750 1.434 1.251 2.301 1.616 3.998 1.179 1.000 3.990 1.0055 – 0.933 0.0054 – 0.623 2.0255 – 0.498 2.499 1.364 2.741 1.555 1.0052 – 0.992 3.114 1.367 1.876 2.247 3.0246 – 0.426 1.249 2.740 2.311 1.370 2.245 3.493 2.500 3.003 2.0248 – 0.0054 – 0.375 1.992 1.238 1.0054 – 0.990 2.427 1.0246 – 0.0260 – 0.551 1.123 1.368 1.626 3.180 1.490 1.614 1.121 1.618 1.0255 – 0.251 2.376 1.251 1.875 0.0260 – 0.489 3.364 3.0243 – 0.062 1.0242 – 0.996 1.501 2.615 1.625 3.117 2.627 1.738 2.0067 – 0.186 1.373 2.0052 – 0.867 1.125 3.312 1.0260 – 0.370 3.0058 – 0.738 1.0260 – 0.376 3.501 1.0260 – 0.239 3.490 3.374 1.0057 – 0.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Gland Design.120 3.867 2.740 2.490 2.865 2.871 0.0059 – 0.497 1.874 2.934 0.998 0.126 2.742 2.115 3.433 1.751 2.252 3.115 3.863 Dynamic O-Ring Sealing Cylinder Bore OD A 1.492 1.876 1.743 1.365 2.122 3.621 1.0244 – 0.0244 – 0.0056 Actual Maximum Squeeze Piston Rod 0.618 3. O-Ring and Other Elastomeric Seals (SAE AS4716) (Continued) Piston or Gland Cylinder and OD AS568 C Dash No.0052 – 0. O-Ring and Other Elastomeric Seals (SAE AS4716) 5-26 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.242 1.365 2.872 0.0243 – 0. 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 1.371 1.495 3.500 1.0052 – 0.0054 – 0.0054 – 0.501 3.743 2.000 1.496 2.0260 – 0.248 1.243 2.864 1.678 1.425 1.676 1.493 3.871 2.0248 – 0.874 3.615 2.002 3.628 2.0255 – 0.616 1.625 1.615 3.367 2.062 1.0260 – 0.373 1.376 2. Lexington.620 Rod Bore ID H 0.0260 – 0.0055 – 0.0053 – 0.240 2.0250 – 0.0260 – 0.746 2.0254 – 0.375 3.627 Gland ID J 1.992 2.310 1.376 2.183 1.874 0.0055 – 0.243 1.675 1.745 2.117 1.493 1.246 2.0246 – 0.185 1.999 3.0058 – 0.120 3.866 Actual Minimum Squeeze Piston Rod 0.126 2.0055 – 0.253 2.497 3.0056 – 0.740 3.0250 – 0.0260 – 0.0255 – 0.0058 – 0.501 2.488 2.0051 – 0.124 1.620 3.368 3.624 2.124 2.246 1.873 2.247 1.626 2.0054 – 0.309 1.113 1.865 1.502 3.492 2.0054 – 0.873 1.0057 – 0.437 1.parkerorings.248 2.489 1.753 2.868 2.0057 – 0.742 1.250 2.743 3.615 2.623 1.620 2.499 2.435 1.870 Gland OD F 0.488 1.0052 – 0.0053 – 0.0260 – – 0.363 3.001 2.498 1.614 3.624 Rod or Gland Sleeve OD B 0.613 2.240 1.740 1.241 3.491 1.300 1.988 3.123 2.995 3.374 3.748 1.996 2.864 3.0055 – 0.0055 – 0.372 3.0053 – 0.680 1.748 2.990 2.113 3.305 1.126 3.0051 – 0.868 3.0247 – 0.239 1.613 1.063 1.550 1.060 1.0260 – 0.116 1.749 2.936 0.741 3.867 1.127 3.303 1.371 2.241 1.178 1.752 1.617 1.0260 – 0.114 2.0056 – 0.064 1.873 0.491 3.552 1.553 1.436 1.869 1.621 2.876 0.999 0.

487 4.621 2.0083 – 0.243 4.0087 – 0.0085 – 0.503 2.0052 – 0.990 3.0265 – 0.116 4.496 2.118 2.0330 – 0.365 4.127 4.0265 – 0.246 Actual Minimum Squeeze Piston Rod 0.0335 – 0.377 3.619 2.622 2.0085 – 0.613 2.370 3.870 Rod Bore ID H 3.614 4.995 2.865 3.0090 – 0.0091 – 0.745 3.115 4.746 3.0056 – 0.500 1.0052 – 0.993 3.0335 – 0.0335 – – 0.245 Gland OD F 3.988 4.0088 – 0.245 4.366 4.0057 – 0.0083 – 0.618 4.496 3.118 4.115 2.868 3.0081 – 0.372 4.619 3.614 4.0318 – 0.369 3.489 4.245 2.628 1.000 4.870 2.370 2.623 2.496 1.120 2.125 3.119 3.0089 – 0.620 2.115 3.992 1.121 2.0335 – 0.491 4.113 4.752 1.752 3.002 4.376 4.0091 Actual Maximum Squeeze Piston Rod 0.620 4.997 3.751 2.376 2.0079 – 0.748 1.240 4.495 4.251 2.746 2.746 1.996 2.497 3.868 4.0260 – 0.625 3.493 4.122 3.618 2.490 3.0089 – 0.871 2.503 4.739 4.872 3.0332 – 0.0083 – 0.243 3.500 3.627 3.871 3.863 1.995 1.745 2.750 1.737 4.365 2.0058 – 0.870 3.240 3.0265 – 0.752 3.118 4.870 3.0260 – 0.239 4.0086 – 0.497 2.741 4.0335 – 0.618 1.620 1.743 4.378 2.751 2.994 2.0319 – 0.743 2.001 3.0265 – 0.245 4.620 2.245 2.128 2.739 4.363 3.496 3.122 1.989 1.370 4.373 2.747 2.122 2.0334 – 0.0322 – 0.991 4.113 4.0320 – 0.995 3.995 4.364 2.0090 – 0.868 2.994 3.747 3.0325 – 0.990 3.746 2.243 4.252 3.0332 – 0.244 3.622 4.0083 – 0.873 1.744 3.364 4.124 4.0090 – 0.0057 – 0.245 3.626 2.240 4.999 4.996 1.372 3.371 3.0335 – 0. O-Ring and Other Elastomeric Seals (SAE AS4716) (Continued) Piston or Gland Cylinder and OD AS568 C Dash No.363 4.247 4.871 1.365 3.0051 – 0.0323 – 0.745 3.875 3.878 2.872 3.114 2.244 2.490 2.0055 – 0.0056 – 0.121 4.745 2.864 4.612 4.877 Gland ID J 3.0335 – 0.125 4.494 2.501 2.0087 – 0.250 4.993 2.0332 – 0.620 1.877 4.0260 – 0.0084 – 0.123 2.988 4.872 2.988 2.624 1.749 3.377 4.740 3.121 3.627 1.245 3.994 3.0088 – 0.0081 – 0.864 4.113 3.246 2.997 3.247 3.502 3.0335 – 0.0085 – 0.616 4.0332 – 0.875 3.747 3.495 4.115 4.870 1.371 2.615 2.247 3.0322 – 0.249 4.878 3.241 4.748 2.750 3.368 2.0260 – 0.746 3.996 2.502 1.0260 – 0.122 3.120 3.375 3. 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 3.744 2.239 2.0265 – 0.120 4.238 4.869 1.0265 – 0.369 3.0332 – 0.253 2.0091 – – 0.622 3.0260 – 0.240 2.996 4.618 3.0080 – 0.0332 – 0.0056 – 0.370 3.370 2.0335 – 0.626 4.0330 – 0.740 2.0087 – 0.0332 – 0.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Gland Design.863 2. Lexington.869 3.864 1.0335 – 0.862 1.872 1.244 4.495 2.874 4.0334 – 0.0334 – 0.613 3.745 3.744 3.372 2.615 3.0334 – 0.0088 – 0.0056 – 0.119 2.0260 – 0.118 3.499 4.497 4.0088 – 0.998 1.243 2.0085 – 0.753 2.0329 – 0.126 4.369 2.121 2.871 3.0084 – 0.0260 – 0.0084 – 0.120 3.494 3.993 3.621 3.997 2.989 3.0090 – 0.489 4.493 2.495 1.750 3.0057 – 0.743 3.869 2.620 3.0087 – 0.625 1.114 4.493 3.628 2.501 4.866 1.parkerorings.738 3.251 4.488 3.744 1.495 3.0081 – 0.501 4.869 1.876 2.002 3.0335 – 0.245 3.746 1.995 4.0057 – 0.com 5-27 .620 3.997 2.495 2.120 3.871 2.001 2.498 1.127 3.988 3.621 1.995 4.873 2.745 4.250 3.0330 – 0.0335 – 0.0260 – 0.870 2.238 3.496 2.371 3.375 4.120 4.495 3.493 1.0260 – 0.0335 – 0.0051 – 0.865 2.488 2.738 2.374 4.0053 – 0.494 3.876 3.990 2.0087 – 0.248 2.238 Cylinder Bore OD A 3.0089 – 0.370 4.0335 – 0.0335 – 0.246 3.876 1.0090 – 0.0335 Dynamic O-Ring Sealing Design Table 5-1: Gland Design.498 2.126 2.119 4.871 1.623 1.863 3.0053 – 0.0089 – 0. O-Ring and Other Elastomeric Seals (SAE AS4716) Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.870 1.626 4.246 2.995 3.621 3.252 4.000 3.120 4.0326 – 0.003 2.994 2.869 Rod or Gland Sleeve OD B 3.120 2. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.0323 – 0.621 2.371 2.867 1.0090 – 0.368 3.247 2.619 3.368 4.0080 – 0.

997 3.876 5.994 6.0176 – 0.868 4.0480 – 0.0485 – 0.494 5.0092 – 0.497 4.251 7.0176 – 0.876 4.0480 – 0.349 5.496 4.970 5. Lexington.994 7.747 4.849 5.872 4.244 6.0177 – 0.220 5.247 4.0480 – 0.251 6.0091 – 0.247 7.0177 – 0.504 7.120 4.244 5.125 4.602 5.852 5.997 8.244 5.994 5.739 4.227 8.119 5.345 6.970 6.977 5.970 4.501 4.593 5.com .128 5.250 4.628 4.494 4.977 5.099 6.0340 – 0.994 8.968 7.253 6.0180 – 0.000 4.753 4.497 8.968 8.372 4.001 9.997 5.500 4.0480 – 0.720 5.0177 – 0.477 5.622 5.253 5.977 6.0485 – 0.227 6.974 5.0480 – 0.003 5.371 4.0480 – 0.001 5.494 8.977 7.869 4.0480 – 0.974 7.0176 – 0.224 7.744 4.0480 – 0.503 5.254 7.0480 – 0.599 5.997 6.997 7.247 5.474 7.377 4.503 4.218 6.977 9.470 6.977 6.0480 – 0.352 6.0177 – 0.119 5.720 6.751 6.003 6.737 4.220 8.0485 – 0.995 4.0183 – 0.0182 – 0.369 4.727 6.872 5.494 8.0175 – 0.0480 – 0.365 4.974 4.754 8.0480 – 0.343 5.501 7.0485 – 0.718 6.0335 – 0.372 5.977 8.477 7.224 5.0480 – 0.619 4.977 7.0168 – – 0.0177 – 0.468 6.0485 – 0.375 4.626 5.227 6.751 5.994 8.872 4.970 7.744 4.747 5.468 5.0179 – 0.099 6.747 7. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.0179 – 0.470 8.001 7.470 5.727 7.489 4.0177 – 0.246 4.974 8.0480 – 0.622 4.0179 – 0.994 6.0485 – – 0.478 Gland OD F 3.487 4.102 5.0093 – 0.0178 – 0.0176 – 0.218 8.974 8.0092 – 0.218 7.477 5.997 4.622 5.744 6.368 4.376 5.747 6.474 9.369 4.0092 – 0.227 5.0480 – 0.0178 – 0.370 4.477 6.0176 – 0.495 4.745 4.0480 – 0.0335 – 0.004 7.751 7.0480 – 0.0340 – 0.494 4.720 7.001 8.997 5.0176 – 0.126 5.0087 – 0.869 4.0088 – 0.753 5.349 5.349 6.747 6.004 8.0179 – 0.0182 – 0.467 Dynamic O-Ring Sealing Cylinder Bore OD A 4.974 6.864 4.001 6.0480 – 0.002 4.244 4.843 5.0180 – 0.0176 – 0.496 4.0176 – 0.497 7.227 7.977 9.0335 – 0.0480 – 0. 345 346 347 348 349 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 4.744 7.977 8.095 6.0485 – 0.620 4.878 5.724 5.470 9.746 4.494 4.0340 – 0.497 6.619 5.994 4.218 5.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Gland Design.744 6.754 7.0178 – 0.497 6.997 7.501 5.0180 – 0.0335 – 0.626 4.869 4.974 4.0177 – 0.849 5.621 4.220 7.497 8.0480 – 0.224 7.477 8.0180 – 0.224 5.595 5.744 4.0485 Design Table 5-1: Gland Design.0480 – 0.614 4.845 5.724 5.718 5. O-Ring and Other Elastomeric Seals (SAE AS4716) (Continued) Piston or Gland Cylinder and OD AS568 C Dash No.0485 – 0.724 7.0178 – 0.862 4.974 6. O-Ring and Other Elastomeric Seals (SAE AS4716) 5-28 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.724 6.997 4.744 5.0480 – 0.227 5.468 7.0176 – 0.974 7.727 7.494 7.744 5.997 8.0485 – 0.497 5.474 5.497 4.224 8.727 5.628 5.349 6.0480 – 0.247 7.619 4.474 8.0480 – 0.095 5.474 5.495 4.119 4.0177 – 0.220 6.494 5.497 5.966 3.968 6.602 5.870 4.0340 – 0.0480 – 0.0335 – 0.343 6.493 4.0175 – 0.494 4.0480 – 0.869 5.224 6.718 7.747 7.352 5.970 8.0335 – 0.0480 – 0.474 9.994 7.122 5.352 5.0480 – 0.0485 – 0.parkerorings.474 6.370 4.477 7.619 4.0173 Actual Maximum Squeeze Piston Rod 0.244 7.121 4.751 4.743 4.852 5.468 8.363 4.0087 – 0.474 8.252 4.619 5.224 8.0088 – 0.994 Rod or Gland Sleeve OD B 3.0480 – 0.004 Gland ID J 4.0182 – 0.994 Rod Bore ID H 4.247 6.0183 – 0.727 6.0480 – 0.0480 – 0.0176 – 0.352 6.227 7.497 7.872 5.245 4.0180 – 0.0181 – 0.093 6.102 6.502 4.724 6.372 5.869 5.122 5.0177 – 0.0178 – 0.093 5.974 5.369 5.0092 – 0.994 5.224 6.747 4.244 7.747 5.099 5.504 9.0480 – 0.477 8.0178 – 0.501 6.247 5.622 4.227 8.0480 – 0.470 7.612 4.478 Actual Minimum Squeeze Piston Rod 0.474 6.099 5.0181 – 0.968 5.967 9.477 6.494 6.122 4.494 6.378 5.0180 – 0.494 7.618 4.997 6.244 6.102 6.744 7.0480 – 0.474 7.251 5.599 5.497 4.345 5.102 5.369 5.127 4.871 4.371 4.727 5.878 6.501 8.724 7.0480 – 0.247 6.504 6.

0171 – 0. 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 9.004 10.478 15.997 9.0170 – 0.0179 Actual Maximum Squeeze Piston Rod 0.504 15.467 14.0178 – 0.494 13.978 11.478 14.978 11.474 11.0173 – 0.0485 – 0.0485 – 0.0485 – 0.470 13.497 14.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Gland Design.478 10.497 11.0169 – 0.978 14.001 13.978 Actual Minimum Squeeze Piston Rod 0.478 15.497 13.501 13.494 9.0485 – 0.0485 – 0.0485 – 0.970 14.974 9.497 11.0485 – 0.970 12.474 13.474 12.494 14.970 15.470 14.974 13.474 12.497 12.997 12.494 13.494 11.0174 – – 0.994 13.0176 – 0.0173 – 0.978 13.997 14.494 9.974 11.997 13.997 13.978 Gland OD F 9.497 9.501 10.001 10.0174 – 0.0485 – 0.978 10.994 14.467 11.497 12.494 Rod or Gland Sleeve OD B 9.0170 – 0.497 15.997 14.0485 – 0.967 15.974 13.474 14.974 14.0485 – 0.978 12.com 5-29 .0485 – 0.494 12.967 Cylinder Bore OD A 9.967 14.478 13.978 10.967 11.974 10.001 12.0485 – 0.997 10.494 Rod Bore ID H 9.967 10.504 10.0485 – 0.497 15.504 12.001 11.0485 – 0.0485 – 0.474 11.0175 – 0.parkerorings.001 14.004 11.974 12.474 15.501 15.994 13.501 12.994 12.0178 – 0.001 15.974 15.004 14.497 10.501 14.470 11.0173 – 0.467 12.997 11.494 14.978 14.997 11.978 15.970 10.0485 – 0.974 15. O-Ring and Other Elastomeric Seals (SAE AS4716) Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.0485 – 0.0485 – 0. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.478 13.497 10.478 11.004 15.0170 – 0.478 14.0485 Dynamic O-Ring Sealing Design Table 5-1: Gland Design.0178 – 0.970 13.0172 – 0.0173 – 0.0174 – 0.970 11.004 13.967 13.978 15. O-Ring and Other Elastomeric Seals (SAE AS4716) (Continued) Piston or Gland Cylinder and OD AS568 C Dash No.994 10.478 10.474 10.978 13.504 13.470 12.470 10.0485 – 0.0485 – 0.0485 – 0.994 10.467 10.974 10.501 11.470 15.997 9.0178 – 0.994 12.504 14.970 9.467 13.497 13.0485 – 0.967 12.974 9.004 12.997 10.478 12.974 11.0179 – 0.994 11.994 14.997 12.978 12.474 10.994 15.501 9.467 15.504 Gland ID J 9. Lexington.504 11.0177 – 0.497 14.0172 – 0.0485 – – 0.494 10.974 12.994 15.494 11.0175 – 0.474 13.994 11.0177 – 0.494 10.494 12.478 12.0485 – 0.474 15.497 9.974 14.0176 – 0.478 11.0485 – 0.474 14.

185 to .003 . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. it is often desirable.176 .188 .022 16 .543 R Groove Radius . Design Table 5-2.275 to to to .004 .31.410 to to to .187 .090 .171 .017 8 to to .103 ± .145 .002 for sizes 2-006 through 2-324 . The major difference from the military gland dimensions (Design Table 5-1) is the use of standard cylinder bore and standard rod dimensions.035 Max.139 ± .005 to .005 (a) Clearance (extrusion gap) must be held to a minimum consistent with design requirements for temperature range variation..000 for all sizes .003 to .005 .006 .004 for sizes 2-325 through 2-460 Design Guide 5-2a: Gland Dimensions for Industrial Reciprocating O-Ring Seals Select Closest Dimension in Column A Read Horizontally in Column B-1 C G A B-1 G A-1 D G A-1 B G To Determine Dimension for Groove Dia of piston OD of piston Groove width Bore Dia of cylinder Groove Dia of piston Groove width Groove Dia for rod Bore ID for rod Groove width Groove Dia for rod OD of rod Groove width OD of piston C OD of rod B Bore Dia for rod Design Guide 5-2b: Guide For Design Table 5-2 D After selecting gland dimensions.002 3/32 1/8 3/16 1/4 Squeeze Actual % .004 . Specify compound.005 .030 14 .240 E(a) Diametral Clearance .311 .035 .002 to .213 .123 .006 .286 .018 25 .093 .< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Dynamic O-Ring Sealing 5. See Section X.237 to .140 .208 .005 .280 . Although these dimensions are suitable for most reciprocating designs.010 to .004 for sizes 2-325 through 2-460 Groove Diameter (Piston) Tolerance + .275 ± .238 to to to .003 .020 to .015 .com . Industrial Reciprocating O-Ring Packing Glands O-Ring 2-Size AS568A006 through 012 104 through 116 201 through 222 309 through 349 425 through 460 W Cross-Section Nominal Actual .192 .004 to .098 . read horizontally to determine proper O-ring size number. contains recommended gland dimensions for the standard AS568A O-ring sizes.243 .002 for sizes 2-006 through 2-324 + .029 11 to to .143 .205 to to to .375 .018 17 .003 1/16 . to deviate from them.121 to .parkerorings.. Procedures for using Design Table 5-2 are outlined in Design Guide 5-2.055 to .007 G-GrooveWidth No One Two Parbak Parbak Parbak Ring(G) Ring(G1) Rings(G2) .538 to to to .010 15 to to .020 to .210 ± .044 16 .002 to . Lexington.005 to .000 for all sizes + .015 .380 . Guide for Design Table 5-2 If Desired Dimension is Known for Bore Dia of cylinder Gland Dimensions for Industrial Reciprocating O-Ring Seals Groove Diameter (Rod Gland) Tolerance .415 .408 .070 ± . Other portions of this handbook on Basic O-Ring Elastomers (Section II) and O-Ring Applications (Section III) are helpful in determining when such special designs are indicated and provide useful data for such modified designs.316 .012 9 to to .2 O-Ring Glands for Industrial Reciprocating Seals Design Chart 5-2 provides a reasonable basis for calculating reciprocating O-ring seal glands..210 .413 . Eccentricity (b) .057 .088 to . or even necessary. Table 10-6 for installation guidelines. which follows it. (b) Total indicator reading between groove and adjacent bearing surface.006 L Gland Depth . Design Chart 5-2-a: Design Chart for Industrial Reciprocating O-Ring Packing Glands 5-30 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.003 to .010 10 to to .281 .025 .002 .138 .

65 5.40 0.90 4.60 3.80 0.80 5. W . – 2 L Max.90 2.40 2.10 2.00 5.20 to 0.00 (a) Dimensions are in mm.00 5.D.70 7. A Cylinder Bore Dia. Pressure Pressure Pressure R 32 W I.30 6. (A-1 Max.40 to 0.50 1.30 3. X Surface Finish X: 32 Without Parbak Ring 63 With Parbak Ring Finishes are RMS values Industrial Dynamic Metric Cross-Sections Industrial Dynamic Metric Cross-Sections W Cross-Section 1. (b) Parbaks are not available in standard for metric sizes.) W 16 .00 7.70 2.30 6.55 4.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Industrial Reciprocating O-Ring Packing Glands Piston Gland Rod Gland Dynamic O-Ring Sealing B-1 Piston Groove Dia.40 to 0.D.20 2.50 2.80 0.40 to 0.com 5-31 .50 4. = B Min.05 3.40 0.45 1.) C Piston O.80 0. .65 3.40 to 0.80 0.D.005 Typ.50 R Groove Radius 0. Lexington.40 0.20 to 0. 1/2E Gland Depth W B Rod O. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.40 to 0.20 to 0.parkerorings.10 8. Gland Detail 0° to 5° (Typ. A-1 Rod Gland Groove I.20 to 0. D Rod Bore Dia.) Break Corners Approx.80 2.D.40 0.00 9.60 3.20 to 0. = A Max. (B-1 Min.60 3.80 0.80 0.30 1.00 2.003 Typ.45 4.40 6.005 Rad.40 to 0.00 3. L Gland Depth 1.) Section W-W Refer to Design Chart 5-2 (below) and Design Table 5-2 for dimensions. + 2 L Max.20 G-Grove Width No Parbak Ring (G) 1.80 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.40 0. Design Chart 5-2-b: Design Chart for Industrial Dynamic Metric Cross-Sections X F L G No Parbak Ring G1 One Parbak Ring G2 Two Parbak Rings G F Groove Depth (Ref. The ISO/DIN recommendations are preferred.40 to 0.

484 ± .000 +.570 .174 .139 .115 1.747 .501 .126 .318 .220 .880 .359 .675 .005 .† A-1 B B-1 Groove Groove Dia.747 .796 .695 .497 *.188 1.406 .624 .622 .157 .750 .550 .685 .761 .005 .688 .005 .145 .220 .002 Mean -.573 .234 .341 *.372 *.372 1. (Rod (Cylinder) Gland) OD (Rod) *(Piston) +.005 .687 .261 .000 O.687 1.562 .249 .005 .438 1.278 *.394 .313 1.561 .348 .000 -. Width OD (Rod) (Piston) Groove +.012 .934 .126 .201 .359 1.005 .500 .003 .012 .945 1.316 .615 1.499 .615 . Design Table 5-2: Gland Dimensions for Industrial Reciprocating O-Ring Seals.372 *.552 .505 .373 .935 .313 .574 1.009 .747 .296 1.070 1.233 .740 .155 .122 1.685 *.010 .188 .637 1.005 .438 .755 .499 .622 *.199 1.009 .624 .872 .311 .093 * These designs require considerable installation stretch.185 .487 .508 .188 .362 .437 .437 .302 1.187 .421 .874 .497 *.935 *.376 .331 .375 1.441 .499 .186 .921 .737 .512 1.937 .434 *.126 1.com .010 .687 .000 *.123 1.002 +.310 *.574 .559 1.296 .296 .137 1.005 .938 1.435 .749 .008 1.813 .376 1.427 . .448 .012 .005 .247 *.820 .187 1.239 .070 ±.698 .005 .684 .421 1.749 .750 .751 .812 .490 1.247 1.436 .421 .498 .484 .364 .046 1.000 1.005 .511 .265 .609 .445 1.009 .005 .251 .240 1.562 1.208 .140 .234 .010 . consult Design Chart 5-2 for groove widths where Parbak rings must be used.177 1.552 1.751 .762 .389 .559 .693 . For pressures above 103.876 .362 .699 1.009 .758 .005 .012 .434 1.810 . Dia.862 .449 .262 1.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Gland Dimensions for Industrial Reciprocating O-Ring Seals.002 -.005 .737 .630 .001 +.251 .326 .626 .010 .810 .5 Bar (1500 psi) Max.762 .136 .487 .312 .437 1.249 .310 .parkerorings. † This groove width does not permit the use of Parbak rings.D.320 .365 1.374 . (Ref) .249 .015 W Bore Dia.184 1.990 1.310 1.412 .324 1.435 1.005 .740 .802 .376 .500 1.359 .927 .501 .568 .285 .424 .563 .188 .343 .497 *.925 .563 .264 .301 .612 .427 1.626 .622 1.498 .103 ±.007 .373 1.171 1.311 .124 .374 .157 .258 1.443 .155 .438 .497 1.859 .887 . 2006 007 008 009 010 011 012 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 Dimensions I.818 .504 .D.010 .309 *.124 .512 .883 .109 1.435 *.671 .139 ±.074 1.010 .309 1.445 .000 -.434 *.5 Bar (1500 psi).865 .943 .167 .937 1.562 .873 .005 .686 .258 .508 A C D G Dynamic O-Ring Sealing O-Ring Size Parker No.560 *. Lexington.323 .004 1.114 .198 .112 .251 1.383 1.060 1.218 .005 -.734 .748 .872 .001 1.380 .206 .560 .186 .809 .002 -.005 .312 1.677 1.009 .425 .237 .005 .484 .251 .171 .230 .001 -.007 .637 .170 .374 .059 1.185 1.005 .376 .623 . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. If assembly breakage is incurred use a compound having higher elongation or use a two-piece piston. 103.349 .404 *.† 5-32 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.012 .812 .625 .052 1.313 .005 .387 1.998 1.5 Bar (1500 psi) Max.699 .218 .633 .984 1. Bore Dia.328 .280 .549 .063 1.000 +. 103.012 .449 1.343 .684 1.003 .300 .125 1.341 *.299 .374 .949 1.195 1.176 .490 .625 1.311 .012 .436 .379 .677 .688 .386 .612 .254 .195 .000 +.875 .248 1.005 .636 .143 .062 1.501 .800 .248 .234 1.250 1.674 .997 1.546 .383 .320 1.313 .005 .824 .133 1.

000 -.875 1.248 1.748 1.020 .251 2.880 2.005 -.957 1.024 .250 4.207 1.225 3.350 4.010 .012 W Bore Dia.375 3.645 4.812 .868 .755 1.520 1.875 .876 4.243 4.000 +.626 .555 1.493 1.876 3.876 2. 103.270 4.430 1.100 2.938 1.875 4.880 3.748 3.395 3.500 2.747 4.380 +.368 1.751 .912 .497 2.005 1.747 3.563 .225 4.037 1.943 .560 .623 1.162 1.005 1.250 3.125 2.600 2. Lexington.868 1.501 .373 2.015 .520 3.5 Bar (1500 psi) Max.010 .395 2.501 1.622 4.630 .372 3.255 3.537 .122 2.625 3.873 3.975 3. Bore Dia.872 3.002 Mean -. .438 .725 .009 .505 1.000 3.648 1.376 2.305 1.020 .184 1.505 3.873 .497 3.002 +.332 1.501 .028 .493 4.748 .† (Continued) A-1 B B-1 Groove Groove Dia.993 1.750 4.998 3.630 2.024 .082 1.251 1.850 2.645 1.868 1.255 1.† Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.872 1.773 4.5 Bar (1500 psi).750 2.475 3.000 1.500 3.630 1.145 4.520 4.012 . Design Table 5-2: Gland Dimensions for Industrial Reciprocating O-Ring Seals. If assembly breakage is incurred use a compound having higher elongation or use a two-piece piston.998 2.618 2.850 3.380 2.375 4.024 .895 4.376 3.D.100 3.997 4.395 4.787 .020 .373 3.935 .895 3.880 .997 3.180 1.498 3.993 3.743 2.457 1. 103.873 1.600 1.622 2.505 .251 3.750 .005 .725 1.063 1.622 3.281 A C D G O-Ring Size Parker No. Dia.020 2.187 1.020 1.000 2.755 .312 1.005 4.251 4.123 4.645 2.118 4.030 .028 .501 2.876 .997 2.243 2.192 1.118 3.250 1.373 4.118 1.225 2.626 2.372 4.475 2.618 3.942 1. (Ref) .004 1.623 2.623 3.380 3.000 -.5 Bar (1500 psi) Max.623 .247 4.020 3.024 .059 1.442 .748 2.248 3.270 2.930 .028 .126 3.145 3.002 -.005 3.001 +.372 2.030 .435 .010 .007 .770 2.055 1.875 2.130 3.247 2.743 3.130 1.750 3.188 1.015 .287 1.505 1.020 4.600 3.123 3.000 -.809 *.975 1.067 1.310 1.com 5-33 .001 3.707 1.725 3.130 4.317 1.875 3.498 2.895 .010 .493 3.012 .817 .501 3.123 2.498 1.850 1.060 1.024 .018 .993 4.500 1.028 .434 1.185 1.993 2. 2309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 Dimensions I.118 2.062 1.692 .520 2.000 O.562 1.350 2.805 .880 4.000 *.247 1.122 1.122 4.368 2.020 .126 2.247 3.225 1.937 1.125 1.000 4.412 .100 4.626 3.630 3.243 1.747 2.872 2.625 2.125 3.122 3.559 1.498 .313 1.493 2.582 1.004 -.000 +.395 1.368 3.368 4.D.622 1.375 1.005 2. consult Design Chart 5-2 for groove widths where Parbak rings must be used.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Gland Dimensions for Industrial Reciprocating O-Ring Seals.248 4.270 1.645 3.868 3. For pressures above 103.997 1.372 1.625 4.255 2.parkerorings.850 . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.505 2.018 .810 .743 4.895 2.680 1.350 ± .001 1.743 +. (Rod (Cylinder) Gland) OD (Rod) *(Piston) +.125 4.500 4.270 3.015 .005 .688 .380 4.618 4.373 .001 -.770 .895 1.009 .248 2.751 1.350 3.872 1.002 -.475 1.210 ±.662 .376 4.012 .030 .998 1.309 1.028 .567 .751 2.998 4.475 .498 .832 .755 2.123 1.018 .018 .975 2.243 3.751 3.497 1.126 1.475 .868 2.255 4.625 1.437 1.813 .001 4.001 2.497 4.626 1.010 .755 3.600 .376 Dynamic O-Ring Sealing * These designs require considerable installation stretch.725 2. † This groove width does not permit the use of Parbak rings.873 2.012 .000 +.010 .872 *.770 3.130 2.000 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 1.685 .747 .015 .100 1.126 4.250 2.375 2.618 1. Width OD (Rod) (Piston) Groove +.975 4.145 2.687 1.145 1.

037 .060 . Dia.872 4.475 4.025 12.998 11.872 5.778 4.877 6.070 .040 .028 12.846 5.471 9.002 6.623 5.721 6.150 6.001 12.037 .471 4.627 5.528 14.998 6.971 10. Lexington.252 6.060 .498 14.528 10.221 6.247 7.000 4.747 7.040 .975 8.248 7.747 5.502 15.997 15.060 .028 15.D.346 5.748 7.† (Continued) A-1 B B-1 Groove Groove Dia.975 9.998 14.225 5.037 .251 6.471 10.721 5.596 5.501 11.525 9.350 5.278 6.037 .275 8.501 4.002 4.525 11.525 12.850 4.373 6.998 7.850 5.626 4.502 10.622 4.501 12.475 14.247 5.502 9.471 5.000 +.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Gland Dimensions for Industrial Reciprocating O-Ring Seals.497 14.278 5.502 7.528 12.725 5.471 14.998 13.251 7.501 9.502 11.501 .998 8.653 4.498 9.002 5.502 6.001 7.971 6.525 16.002 -.975 13.775 7.525 10.275 7.471 12.501 7. (Rod (Cylinder) Gland) OD (Rod) *(Piston) +.971 13.002 13.497 10.000 +.502 13.501 6.475 12.025 10.002 15.025 13.748 5.903 6.045 .055 .752 5.497 5.971 9.498 12.127 5.498 10.001 8.033 .997 14.501 5.221 8.373 5.528 15.475 13.com .498 7.096 5.775 5.971 11.060 . (Ref) 5.528 4.001 11.025 5.5 Bar (1500 psi).900 6.123 5.070 W Bore Dia.001 13.150 5.975 5.376 5.040 .622 5.471 11.971 14.475 6. consult Design Chart 5-2 for groove widths where Parbak rings must be used.060 .971 5.725 6. Design Table 5-2: Gland Dimensions for Industrial Reciprocating O-Ring Seals.225 7.372 5.033 .497 13.002 9.971 4.025 9.751 4.028 9.600 5.971 15.400 6.497 7.751 5.060 .275 6.975 15.002 11.096 6.275 5.997 8.475 5.975 6.001 10.502 12.037 .028 10.000 +.122 5. If assembly breakage is incurred use a compound having higher elongation or use a two-piece piston.001 15.070 .001 +.498 6.471 6.525 .100 5.028 6.998 12.252 8.975 10.997 10.471 13. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.002 7.037 .971 7.045 .123 6.055 . For pressures above 103.parkerorings.497 8.006 7. Bore Dia.498 5.247 6.525 6.752 8.497 12.033 .028 13.377 5.475 10. 103.002 -.975 11.5 Bar (1500 psi) Max.127 6.497 4.778 5.400 5.346 6.721 7.028 11.025 5.653 5.997 13.997 12.000 O.975 14.497 4.153 5.528 7.528 5.997 5. 103.025 15.497 6.5 Bar (1500 psi) Max.998 5.475 7.252 7.998 15.037 .528 11.251 5.002 8.225 6.001 -.475 8.525 13.626 5.028 14.498 15.025 11.528 13.725 7.475 ± .248 5.028 5.747 6.778 8.252 5.502 16.000 -.998 10.997 9.501 14.751 7.751 8.001 14.528 A C D G Dynamic O-Ring Sealing O-Ring Size Parker No.028 8.005 -. 2425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 Dimensions I.998 9.403 5.002 +.600 4.971 12.001 6.501 10.033 .045 .000 -.475 9.775 8.471 8.278 7.778 7.126 5.528 9.248 6.525 5.650 5.028 7.001 5.747 4.502 14.375 * These designs require considerable installation stretch.971 8.997 11.998 4.501 15.525 14.025 6.070 .045 .748 6.221 7. 4.055 .497 11.997 6.997 7.002 12.725 4.497 9.D.752 7.248 8.002 Mean -.025 8.876 5.471 15.501 13.498 13.975 12.025 7.502 5. Width OD (Rod) (Piston) Groove +.055 .873 5.876 6.377 6.† 5-34 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.498 8.475 11.275 ±.002 10.070 .040 .001 9.037 . † This groove width does not permit the use of Parbak rings.498 11.528 6.903 5.221 5.525 15.002 14.037 .025 14.975 7.

For standard O-ring sizes.275 ± . (b) Total indicator reading between groove and adjacent bearing surface. = (O-Ring Mean O. The procedures for the use of Design Table 5-3 are outlined in Design Guide 5-3.105 to .005 to .025 .103 ± . Lexington. (c) Use to calculate Amin diameter.) Section W-W Floating Pneumatic Piston Ring Seal Glands O-Ring Size (a) Parker No.062 . (b) .003 3/16 . Military Fluid Specification Description.parkerorings.005 to .020 to . Gland Detail Finishes are RMS values 32 . R 32 32 F L Gland Depth W Refer to Design Chart 5-3 (below) and Design Table 5-3 for dimensions.175 L Gland Depth .002 1/8 .003 Typ.151 to .038 to . Rod Seal Gland Use Data in Chart 5-2 and Table 5-2 for Industrial Reciprocating Seals. – 2 L Min.229 to .8 Bar (200 psi) Max. read horizontally to determine proper O-ring size number. .282 to .079 .com 5-35 . B-1 Piston Groove O.218 .147 .003 to .004 .115 .155 .004 1/4 .011 .D.072 to . I. these dimensions have been calculated and are listed in Design Table 5-3.140 to .286 G Groove Width .005 Rad.002 to . 2006 through 012 104 through 116 201 through 222 309 through 349 425 through 460 W Cross Section Nominal Actual 1/16 .233 .111 to .109 . Dynamic O-Ring Sealing Dimension in Column A Select Closest Horizontally in Column B-1 C G A B-1 G Read to Determine Dimension for Groove Dia of piston OD of piston Groove width Bore Dia of cylinder Groove Dia of piston Groove width OD of piston Design Guide 5-3: Guide For Design Table 5-3 C Floating Pneumatic Piston Ring Seal Glands 13. Refer to 8-2. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.003 .143 to .082 .D. Floating O-ring Design Does Not Apply to Rod Seals.061 to .070 ±.011 .3 O-Ring Glands for Pneumatic Floating Piston Ring Seals Design Chart 5-3 provides the basis for calculating gland dimensions. = A Min.020 to . (B-1 Max.301 to .< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > 5.015 .003 to .010 .) C Piston O. [A Min. The effective part number for an O-ring consists of both a size number and a compound number.003 .31. Guide for Design Table 5-3 If Desired Dimensionis Known for Bore Dia of cylinder After selecting gland dimensions.010 . 1/2 E A Cylinder Bore Dia.139 ± .002 R Groove Radius . Break Edges (0° Preferred) Approx.035 3/32 .D G F Groove Depth (Ref.005 (a) Only sizes listed are recommended for this design.042 .) — P] 0° to 5° Typ. Fluid Compatibility Tables. Specify compound. Design Chart 5-3: Design Chart for Floating Pneumatic Piston Ring Seal Glands Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.005 . or Table 3-1 to select the proper compound.084 to .D.035 .015 .004 to .006 P (c) Peripheral Squeeze (Variable) . 1/2 E 16 W W . W .076 .035 to .124 .305 E Diametral Clearance .005 Typ.075 to .210 ± .002 to .010 to .012 Eccentricity Max.214 to .

630 .126 1.112 .505 .005 .012 .301 .296 .570 .637 1.005 .671 .397 .005 .762 .044 .037 .174 .877 .816 .012 .219 .005 .318 .395 *.369 1.237 .000 -.099 .697 .135 .400 .285 .631 .249 .824 .079 .005 .449 1. If assembly breakage is incurred use a compound having higher elongation or use a two-piece piston.807 .010 .942 1.737 .280 .004 -.105 .171 1.004 .075 .072 .004 1.058 .084 .082 .339 .311 1.412 .949 1.349 .085 .902 .005 .005 .615 1.005 .005 .062 .071 .012 .234 .680 .308 .574 1.492 1.009 .394 .362 .185 1.410 .003 1.086 * These designs require considerable installation stretch.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Floating Pneumatic Piston Ring Seal Gland Dimensions O-Ring Size Parker No.246 1.277 *.188 1. (Piston) +.471 .612 .819 .457 .674 .114 .324 1.254 .859 .557 1.068 .171 .046 .832 .042 .533 . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.656 .009 .208 .610 .699 .450 . (Cylinder) +.879 *.338 .com .210 ±.007 W Mean O.887 .443 C OD (Piston) +.000 -.046 1.880 .359 1.102 .109 1.758 .103 ±.368 .005 .000 .508 .810 .484 .005 .880 .010 .671 .249 1.818 .010 .039 .455 *.077 .637 .337 *.063 .609 .164 .359 .550 .307 *.372 1.003 .818 .060 .076 .717 .009 .757 .005 .434 1.957 .176 .489 .368 .388 .287 .007 .036 .336 *.895 .431 1.015 .187 .984 1. 2006 007 008 009 010 011 012 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 309 310 311 Dimensions I.065 1.748 . Lexington.005 .075 .005 .639 .820 .568 .734 .206 .105 .parkerorings.796 .412 .229 .137 1.041 .040 . Design Table 5-3: Floating Pneumatic Piston Ring Seal Gland Dimensions 5-36 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.009 .871 B-1 Groove Dia.271 1.070 ±.447 *.012 .443 .549 .308 1.070 .064 .762 .067 .309 .D.075 .421 1.035 .078 .148 1.005 .634 .382 .012 .296 1.441 .429 .332 1.511 .000 1.255 .012 .745 .066 .693 .195 .052 .512 .111 .754 .009 .939 1.086 1.050 .217 *.677 .379 .578 .065 .081 .299 .755 .007 .380 .209 1.074 .475 .594 .348 .005 .000 P Peripheral Squeeze .010 .424 .495 1.449 .005 .005 .042 .554 1.518 .012 .318 .696 .943 .256 .158 .699 1.576 .398 .080 .262 1.316 A Bore Dia.073 .010 .005 .048 .005 .921 .123 1.279 .573 .320 .278 *.069 . (Ref) .145 .512 1.537 Dynamic O-Ring Sealing ± .366 *.868 G Groove Width +.348 .005 .139 ±.574 .387 1.040 .247 .010 .504 .005 .460 *.779 .307 *.516 *.487 .247 *.421 .165 .364 .D.074 1.128 .038 .004 *.309 .061 .484 .199 1.234 1.151 .062 .693 .143 .963 1.618 1. .637 .056 .239 .881 .003 .025 1.005 .546 .070 .760 .462 .385 *.699 .054 .005 .840 .004 -.026 1.

030 .381 5.010 .219 4.159 3.545 1.111 .098 .028 .229 .360 1.D.164 2.486 1.270 4.975 5.253 5.225 2.037 .024 .094 .030 .102 .005 5.270 A Bore Dia.291 2.113 .636 1.010 .520 3.108 .660 2.895 2.912 .900 .020 3. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.971 4.625 5.167 2.787 .855 2.100 5.com 5-37 .725 3.505 5.991 1.028 .148 4.114 1.768 4.817 4.275 ±.009 .145 2.004 -.919 2.900 4.916 2.012 .881 5.103 3.037 1.025 5.040 2.101 .930 .566 .395 2.012 .091 .301 .445 4.975 4.176 1.275 4.582 1.396 4.117 .116 .600 4.092 .850 4.751 .779 3.652 3.539 2.028 .784 2.142 .863 1.895 4.144 .097 .655 3.145 4.056 1.004 .225 1.395 4.124 .399 4.020 .006 5.350 3.520 4.987 2.028 .100 1.010 .015 .997 1.110 .089 .235 2.120 1.018 .975 3.475 2.095 4.037 . (Ref) 1.275 .457 1.689 .004 .707 1.015 .121 .033 .100 2.020 .151 4.422 1.812 .117 1.663 2.000 .024 .895 3.528 3.723 3.425 1.628 .935 .787 2.975 1.096 .225 5.525 5.020 2.225 4.179 1.600 .099 .749 G Groove Width +.941 5.377 5.189 C OD (Piston) +.299 1.104 .105 .133 5.015 .350 1.647 4.520 1.847 3.120 .000 -.475 3. .671 1.404 3.210 ±.012 .112 .088 .776 3.644 4.350 ± .010 .731 2.018 .412 2.911 3.114 .536 2.548 1.237 1.725 1.773 4.020 .668 1.156 3.000 P Peripheral Squeeze .903 4.024 .283 3.090 .140 .123 .475 4.115 .645 1.162 1.257 5.033 .363 1.475 3.145 3.141 .739 1.725 .100 4.501 5.018 .350 4.parkerorings.350 2.207 1. Design Table 5-3: Floating Pneumatic Piston Ring Seal Gland Dimensions Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.032 3.415 2.895 5.850 .122 .874 .407 3.043 2.850 3.753 B-1 Groove Dia.270 3.395 3.020 1.600 3.629 5.093 .321 4.933 .024 4.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Design Table 5-3 — Floating Pneumatic Piston Ring Seal Gland Dimensions (Continued) O-Ring Size Parker No.020 .650 5.087 .483 2.615 1.065 5.770 3. Lexington.181 1.569 4.012 .531 3.095 .795 1.146 .024 .850 1.033 .053 1.004 -.771 4.012 .037 .475 4.491 1.607 2.662 .243 1.009 .975 2.270 1.106 .645 2.520 2. 2312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 Dimensions I.599 3.725 2.645 4.908 3.645 3.100 .035 3.033 .359 2.885 5.010 .332 1.343 4.020 4.010 .770 2.288 2.009 5. If assembly breakage is incurred use a compound having higher elongation or use a two-piece piston.082 1.287 1.015 .770 1. (Piston) +.100 3.027 4.118 .272 4.520 4.600 1.270 3.523 4.979 3.103 Dynamic O-Ring Sealing .143 .150 5.D.725 4.351 3.792 1.609 1.018 .302 1.147 * These designs require considerable installation stretch.994 1.483 1.028 .111 2.129 5.850 2.109 .693 4.119 .280 3.600 2.775 5.145 1.000 -.058 1.367 1.037 W Mean O.400 5.240 1.475 1. (Cylinder) +.005 2.024 .505 .107 .395 1.145 .030 .225 3.

225 6.275 8.004 -.795 11.475 6.856 11.155 .301 .862 10. 2433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 Dimensions I.561 5.150 .025 10.975 8.001 6.355 13.975 11.475 12. Lexington.000 -. (Cylinder) +.060 .037 .361 10. D Design Guide 5-4: Guide For Design Table 5-4 5-38 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.313 5.863 8.877 6.475 13.290 13.475 14.025 9.854 14.475 9. (Ref) 6.347 15.525 13.121 6.873 5.789 14.170 .355 11.858 12.045 .775 8.369 6.060 .153 .parkerorings.303 7.037 .004 5.116 7.349 14.353 12.004 5.975 6.171 . 5.797 10.286 C OD (Piston) +.725 7. Groove width Groove Dia.850 B-1 Groove Dia.D.685 5.860 9. (Piston) +.307 6.298 9.275 ±.164 .614 7.055 .997 6.040 .159 .725 5. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.809 6.975 12. for shaft OD of shaft Groove width Throat Dia.525 12.622 6.475 10.070 .357 10.525 14.799 9.054 7.173 .161 .846 G Groove Width +.000 P Peripheral Squeeze .037 .852 15.112 8.365 8.361 8.852 13.060 .867 8.060 .070 W Mean O.793 12.163 .275 6.801 8.363 9.858 10.158 .871 7.850 5.174 .600 5.249 6.860 11.025 11.156 .975 7.854 12.025 13.168 .294 11.373 6.037 .< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Design Table 5-3 — Floating Pneumatic Piston Ring Seal Gland Dimensions (Continued) O-Ring Size Parker No.162 .275 7.300 8.120 7.618 6.525 9.152 .525 10.D.437 5.070 .359 11.850 14.025 8.045 .975 15.169 .225 7.864 9.165 .475 7.365 7.867 7.148 .357 12.040 .com .525 A Bore Dia.552 7.167 .055 .245 6.055 .045 .975 14.556 6.151 .475 11.040 .154 .975 10.725 6.070 .791 13.060 .475 Dynamic O-Ring Sealing ± .353 14.351 13. Design Table 5-3: Floating Pneumatic Piston Ring Seal Gland Dimensions Guide For Design Table 5-4 If Desired Dimension is Known for OD of shaft Select Closest Dimension in Column B Read Horizontally in Column A-1 D G A-1 B G To Determine Dimension for Groove Dia.000 -.037 .369 7.150 6.025 15.475 8.160 .060 .025 7.172 .025 .175 * These designs require considerable installation stretch.775 7.025 12.525 15.525 6.525 11.166 .296 10.040 .025 14.025 6.975 13.006 7.045 .055 .856 13.787 15.288 14.004 -.058 6.351 15.618 7.848 15.292 12.475 5.149 .975 9.525 16.116 8.359 9. If assembly breakage is incurred use a compound having higher elongation or use a two-piece piston.400 6.157 . for shaft Throat Dia.805 7.000 5.070 .125 6.

and adjacent bearing surface.015 0.700 R Groove Radius 0. After selecting gland dimensions. 1/2 E 16 32 16 Max. (A-1 Min. + E Min.) G Gland Detail 32 Pressure R F L Gland Depth Finishes are RMS values 32 F Groove Depth (Ref. (b) Total indicator reading between groove OD.) I.079 0.025 3/32 1-8 1/2 0.112 0.065 to 0. read horizontally to determine proper O-ring size number. + . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.2 Bar (800 psi). Rotary O-Ring Seal Glands. W . For standard O-ring sizes.067 0.012 to 0.003 0. Clearances given are based on the use of 80 shore durometer minimum O-ring for 55. See Figure 3-2 for recommended clearances when pressures exceed 55.015 0.108 to 0.003 1. = B Max. The procedures for the use of Design Table 5-4 are outlined in Design Guide 5-4 below. W . . = O-ring I. 1/2 E A-1 Dia.012 to 0.103 ±.005 to 0. Section W-W Note: Due to effect of centrifugal force. 2004 through 045 102 through 163 201 through 258 W Cross Section Nominal Actual 1/16 0.139 ±.2 Bar (800 psi) max.002 1.016 0. Lexington.016 to 0. (c) (Below 200 FPM. + 2L Min.002 D Dia. (c) If clearance (extrusion gap) must be reduced for higher pressures.003 Typ. 55.133 to 0. Refer to Design Chart 5-4 (below) and Design Table 5-4 for dimensions.004 Maximum Speed Squeeze FPM (a) % 200 to 1500 200 to 600 200 to 400 0-11 L Gland Depth 0. Design Chart 5-4: Design Chart for Rotary O-Ring Seal Glands Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > 5.005 Typ.com 5-39 .135 G Groove Width 0.144 to 0.070 ±.030 1/8 0-7 0.2 Bar (800 psi) Max.020 0. bearing length M must be no less than the minimum figures given.parkerorings.2 Bar (800 psi) Max. do not locate groove in shaft.003 0.097 to 0.4 O-Ring Glands for Rotary Seals Design Chart 5-4 provides the basis for calculating gland dimensions.010 to 0.005 Rad.31.D. Specify compound. 55. (c) Clearance Max (b) 0. Use Design Chart 5-2) O-Ring Size Parker No. Break Edges (0° Preferred) Approx.D. = B Max.016 0.002 0. (D Min.390 (a) Feet per minute = 0. Refer to the discussion on rotary seals earlier in this chapter for the selection of the proper compound The effective part number for an O-ring consists of both a size number and a compound number. Dynamic O-Ring Sealing Rotary O-Ring Seal Glands.005 to 0.099 0. shaft. these dimensions have been calculated and are listed in Design Table 5-4.075 to 0.) W M W B Dia. See Rotary Seal discussion in Dynamic Seals section before using this chart.148 M Bearing E (c) Diametral Eccentricity Length Min. Locate Seal as Close as Possible to Lubricating Fluid 0° to 5° Typ.26 X Shaft Diameter (inches) X rpm.

116 .070 ±.989 2.005 .678 .241 .433 . consult Design Chart 5-4 and the design sections of this Handbook.741 1.489 2.121 2.009 .378 1.121 3.878 .103 .114 1.366 2. 2004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025 026 027 028 029 030 031 032 033 034 035 036 037 038 039 040 041 042 043 044 045 102 103 104 105 106 Dimensions I.308 1.005 W Mean O.741 .013 .070 .128 1.315 1.005 .277 .503 .000 .366 .315 .301 1.491 3.128 .489 1.441 .940 1.157 .003 3.005 .683 .440 .129 3.253 1.871 1.010 .871 2.753 .178 1.009 .253 .428 .176 .003 -.003 2.188 G Groove Width +.095 .496 2.491 .989 1.116 1.551 .879 2.001 .parkerorings.239 3.254 1.066 1.053 1.629 1. (Ref) .101 .426 .com .011 .741 3.933 .371 3.063 .378 2.000 .989 .491 2.083 .753 4.208 . Design Table 5-4: Rotary O-Ring Seal Gland Dimensions 5-40 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.301 .005 .116 2.349 .803 .003 .003 .112 . Lexington.496 .866 .693 .739 3.621 .496 1.287 .024 .629 3.159 .491 1.246 . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.020 .370 D Throat Dia.005 .871 .121 1.866 1.433 1.018 .371 .815 .005 .010 .191 1.018 .115 .746 1.864 1.303 1.176 A-1 Groove Dia.628 2.000 -.553 .504 .027 .005 .621 3.000 .239 1.015 .996 3.864 .739 .489 .058 1.005 .108 † For pressures over 55.176 1.241 .233 .210 .364 2.254 2.103 ±.128 2.629 .005 .379 2.316 .364 1.072 .308 .308 .504 2.628 1.379 1.065 1.866 2.129 2.183 1.285 .878 2.015 .504 1.379 .879 .018 .871 4.616 1.020 .024 .024 .754 2.991 .989 3.340 .005 .754 1.816 B OD (Shaft) +.011 .254 .691 .147 .202 .005 .081 .007 .503 3.009 .190 1.318 .129 .D.621 1.565 .739 1.239 .004 1.239 2.114 .253 2. .020 .558 .441 1.371 2.003 1.005 .245 .808 .746 .366 1.145 .741 2.879 4.049 .489 3.628 .114 .614 1.926 .004 3.178 .210 .241 1.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Rotary O-Ring Seal Gland Dimensions O-Ring Size Parker No.371 1.277 . +.009 .753 1.005 . (Gland) +.027 .246 2.739 2.075 .996 2.879 3.991 3.145 .174 Dynamic O-Ring Sealing ± .018 .753 2.616 .241 2.991 2.348 .018 .801 .616 2.010 .991 1.566 .339 .621 2.503 2.503 1.004 -.246 1.143 .316 1.084 .241 3.190 .378 .009 .303 .051 .380 .121 .D.051 1.003 .004 2.005 .996 1.005 .754 .676 .614 .878 3.126 .928 .253 3.614 2.941 1.629 2.379 3.011 .746 2.114 2.013 .255 .003 -.364 .013 .2 Bar (800 psi).222 .864 2.129 1.009 .

426 1.689 2.126 2.114 1.438 1.551 1.005 .058 3.com 5-41 .050 2.239 3.739 1.000 .551 .183 1.876 3.251 .881 2.005 . +.876 1.237 1.568 2.000 Dynamic O-Ring Sealing .313 .489 2.251 1.001 .995 2.064 2.620 .927 1.022 .183 3.299 1.501 1.015 .318 2.001 1.024 .301 1.251 2.676 .017 .255 1.006 3.012 .558 2.237 3.003 1. 2107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 Dimensions I.010 .612 2.308 2. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.631 2.015 .433 3.674 .626 2.412 .058 2.112 1.674 1.620 1.818 1. .208 .003 -.015 .808 1.675 2.433 1.052 2.756 2.051 1.495 .433 2.799 .239 1.433 .487 1.237 .022 .120 1.506 2.864 1.568 1.630 .189 2.549 .012 .237 2.004 -.301 .193 2.245 1.739 .739 2.996 3.870 .parkerorings.114 2.487 2.D.183 2.020 .177 2.022 .751 1.425 2.501 .009 .943 1.020 .068 1.402 .626 .443 2.933 2.814 2.239 2.010 .068 2.063 1.005 .443 3.614 1. (Ref) .175 2.496 2.626 1.015 .009 .621 2.489 A-1 Groove Dia.424 1.813 .012 .246 2.755 .130 B OD (Shaft) +.017 .308 1.220 .443 1.239 .924 .020 .381 2.176 1.987 2.818 .693 .427 2.012 .362 .443 .487 .801 .313 1.751 .015 .926 .755 1.501 G Groove Width +.000 -.808 .876 .103 ±.371 2.299 .880 .017 .737 1.314 2.693 2.630 1.495 1.802 2.745 1.009 .614 2. consult Design Chart 5-4 and the design sections of this Handbook.989 3.558 .864 .558 1.693 .024 .683 1. (Gland) +.987 1.364 .426 . Design Table 5-4: Rotary O-Ring Seal Gland Dimensions Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.505 .737 .995 1.193 1.737 2.376 1.362 1.017 . Lexington.068 3.688 1.380 1.677 2.799 1.370 1.683 .745 .862 1.989 2.058 1.015 .987 3.174 1.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Rotary O-Ring Seal Gland Dimensions (Continued) O-Ring Size Parker No.005 .614 .933 .012 .256 2.003 -.563 1.010 .206 .108 † For pressures over 55.549 1.010 .489 .121 2.568 .020 .550 2.010 .376 2.007 .376 .439 2.489 1.2 Bar (800 psi).251 3.487 ± .302 2.746 2.501 2.188 1.688 .808 2.364 2.925 1.010 .862 2.612 .751 2.871 2.D.933 1.870 1.939 2.862 .112 2.989 1.300 2.131 2.024 W Mean O.005 .020 .813 1.126 1.683 2.001 3.022 .801 1.001 2.880 1.943 3.318 1.005 .000 .424 .017 .193 3.676 1.693 1.683 D Throat Dia.552 2.005 1.020 .612 1.049 1.012 .505 1.005 2.564 2.938 1.364 1.864 2.438 .800 2.017 .818 2.943 2.563 .362 2.

627 2.003 4.2 Bar (800 psi).137 1.252 3.028 .193 .734 1.001 5.010 .689 .234 1.736 .064 1.861 2.361 1.359 Dynamic O-Ring Sealing ± .251 5. (Ref) 3.637 2.314 1.377 G Groove Width +.433 5.877 .009 .189 1.030 .859 .234 2.005 .734 2.512 1.002 2.002 3.943 5.923 .010 .127 1.251 4. consult Design Chart 5-4 and the design sections of this Handbook.739 4.564 1.762 2.943 6. Design Table 5-4: Rotary O-Ring Seal Gland Dimensions 5-42 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.193 4.939 1.796 .739 5.683 4.739 3.671 .109 2.127 2.001 .262 1.007 .< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Rotary O-Ring Seal Gland Dimensions (Continued) O-Ring Size Parker No.252 .020 .989 .751 6.002 3.986 1.000 -.989 4.127 3.003 -.004 -.035 .449 1.751 4.234 3.501 4.015 .377 1.502 1.137 3.433 4.004 1.361 A-1 Groove Dia.012 .986 3. (Gland) +.048 1.627 D Throat Dia.005 .877 2.887 2.189 1.736 1. +.010 .234 .024 .877 .024 .020 .012 2.439 1.298 .074 1.262 2.814 .489 5.236 2.502 .005 .173 .183 4.877 3.486 2.627 .564 .377 2.103 ±.parkerorings.921 .024 .015 .139 ±.699 .002 1.359 2.359 .001 3.814 .035 .035 .111 3.003 -.699 1.015 .512 2.502 3.933 4.239 5.012 .377 .108 .018 .020 .173 1.030 .443 B OD (Shaft) +.012 3.752 1.377 2.989 5.933 6.752 2.012 .564 .611 .000 .324 1.252 1.887 3.443 5.012 1.421 1.943 4.752 .861 .737 5.486 .484 2.449 .877 3.987 4.609 .501 5.673 .012 .627 . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.018 .423 1.001 4.574 1.984 3.377 3.005 .484 1.887 .237 4.109 3.236 3.489 4.296 .009 .387 1.109 1.752 1.611 2.512 3.314 .609 1.486 1.423 . Lexington.171 .020 .183 5.861 1.487 4.002 1.010 .361 2.987 .127 3.984 2.000 3.252 3.487 5.012 .574 .236 1.798 .611 1.421 .035 .548 .752 .736 2.949 1.752 2.064 1.024 W Mean O.002 2.939 1. 3.484 .030 .546 .018 .127 1.762 1.637 .035 .D.512 .171 1.824 .737 3.296 1.361 .189 .144 † For pressures over 55.693 4.637 .627 2.359 1.877 2.298 1.199 .502 2.111 1.439 1.236 .239 4.010 .689 1.314 1.933 5.127 2.005 .762 .502 2.627 1.com .005 .252 2.439 .734 .387 2.986 2.387 3.111 2.237 5.609 2.689 .012 .028 .984 1.627 1.683 5.046 1.637 1.502 .024 .183 .737 4.252 1.252 2.000 3.859 2.502 1.751 5.010 .024 .693 5.D. 2154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 Dimensions I.439 .987 5.193 5.137 2.859 1.262 3.377 1.

002 4.035 . 3.035 . consult Design Chart 5-4 and the design sections of this Handbook.484 4.252 D Throat Dia.035 .2 Bar (800 psi).109 4.002 4.030 .035 . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.252 4.035 W Mean O.627 5.137 6.484 3.359 4.611 5.736 3.984 5.028 .861 3.252 5.986 5.361 4.030 .com 5-43 .262 4.752 3.137 5.035 .030 .252 4.877 4.637 5. Lexington.003 -.000 -.377 5. 2238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 Dimensions I.111 5.234 5.377 5.887 5.484 5.D.877 6.028 .752 5.502 5. Design Table 5-4: Rotary O-Ring Seal Gland Dimensions Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.512 4.030 .736 4.262 .752 5.609 5.002 5.000 Dynamic O-Ring Sealing .parkerorings.734 5.627 3.762 5.752 4.986 A-1 Groove Dia.877 5.035 .262 5.762 4.486 5.859 3.611 4.004 4.611 3. (Gland) +.028 .028 .137 4.637 B OD (Shaft) +.877 6.234 4.028 . +.734 3.002 6.377 4.030 .236 4.012 5.877 5.486 3.109 5.609 3.361 5.252 5.752 3.003 -.502 4.377 4.502 5. (Ref) 3.512 5.734 4.752 4.859 4.035 .609 4.111 4.887 6.004 -.D.502 4.984 ± .627 5.127 4.502 3.127 6.387 5.127 5.859 5.627 4.035 .035 .< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Rotary O-Ring Seal Gland Dimensions (Continued) O-Ring Size Parker No.139 ±.486 4.984 4.024 .012 6.000 3.000 3.144 † For pressures over 55.236 5.001 3.877 4.359 5.762 3.002 5.387 4.861 4.627 4.887 4.002 G Groove Width +.127 5.986 4.127 4.861 5.736 5.012 4.

.030 .parkerorings. such redundant seals are not recommended because of the danger of creating a pressure trap between the two seals. however.010 to .121 to . Refer to Design Chart 5-5 (below) for dimensions.015 .003 .) Piston Glands Rod Glands 16 16 Break Corners Approx. Design Chart 5-5: Design Chart for Reciprocating Vacuum Packing Glands 5-44 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.088 to .210 ±.005 .006 .055 to .003 to .004 . Piston O.025 . but reasonably low leak rates have been reported using two O-rings seals designed according to the standard radial dynamic design dimensions for reciprocating seals which are shown in Design Chart 5-5.com .D.380 R Groove Radius .018 .005 Typ.140 to .< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Dynamic O-Ring Sealing 5.123 .035 .003 to .002 1/8 .004 to .098 . W .192 .005 to .022 .145 .187 to .002 to . it is quite feasible to use two O-ring seals in separate grooves.240 Squeeze Actual % .010 to .005 to .005 .103 ±.005 *Total indicator reading between groove and adjacent bearing surface.237 to .004 1/4 .057 .185 to . Rod Gland Groove I. Rod O.012 to .D. Section W-W W I.) Finishes are RMS values .375 to .* Eccentricity .) For Reciprocating Vacuum Packing Glands Gland Detail 0° to 5° (Typ.005 Rad.D.035 Max.018 .007 G Groove Width . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.139 ±.020 to .003 .32 Dynamic Vacuum Sealing There is very little data available on dynamic vacuum seals. Lexington. W W 16 F L F Groove Depth (Ref.281 to . (In reciprocating hydraulic applications. Cylinder Bore Dia.015 . In sealing gases and vacuum. Reciprocating Vacuum Packing Glands O-Ring Size AS568A006 through 012 104 through 116 201 through 222 309 through 349 425 through 460 W Cross-Section Nominal Actual 1/16 .002 to .002 3/32 .006 .090 .286 .006 L Gland Depth .003 3/16 .029 to .003 Typ. Rod Bore Dia.044 15 to 25 10 to 17 9 to 16 8 to 14 11 to 16 E Diametral Clearance . 1/2E Gland Depth R 32 G Piston Groove Dia.093 to .020 to .010 to .005 .070 ±.D.017 to .188 .275 ±.

. .3 Parbak® Elastomer Back-Up Rings . . . . . . . . .com 6-1 . . . .3 Leather Back-Up Rings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2 6.4. . . 6. . 6-2 6. .1 Introduction . . . . .2 Anti-Extrusion Device Design Hints . . . . . . . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. . . 6-2 6. . . . 6. . . . . . . . . . . Lexington. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Other Back-Up Ring Materials . . . . . . . . . . .5 Parbak Compound Information . . . .parkerorings. . . . Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. . . . . . . 6-2 6-2 6-3 6-3 Back-Up Rings 6. . .2 Metal Non-Extrusion Rings . . . . . . . .< Back Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Section VI – Back-Up Rings 6. . . . . . . . . .4. . 6-3 Parbak® is a registered trademark of Parker Hannifin Corporation. .6 Parker Parbak 8-Series Dimensions . . 6-3 6.1 Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) Back-Up Rings . . . . .4. . . . . . 6. . . . . . .

6. Hence they contact the mating O-ring uniformly. Parbak rings help trap lubricant. PTFE may be used over a wide temperature range. 5. and they cannot fall out of the O-ring groove. a Parbak is required on both sides of the O-ring.parkerorings. but reversal does no harm. Parbaks should be installed with the contoured face against the O-ring. preserving the O-ring and reducing friction. Thus. Features of Parbak Rings 1. Hardening of this material due to high or low temperatures often improves performance as a back-up ring. Besides their advantages as anti-extrusion devices. By specifying one on each side of the O-ring. minimizing assembly costs. the curves will indicate wider permissible clearances than those given in the design charts. it must be remembered that cylinders tend to expand when pressurized. If only one back-up ring is used. Parker’s Parbaks will not “collapse” or cold flow if used with proper groove designs.1 Introduction Parker’s Parbak® back-up rings help prevent extrusion in high pressure service and compensate for loose fitting parts. At assembly.4. 4. Parbak rings are continuous. The clearance that the Parbak will see is the clearance between the piston and the expanded cylinder. they have been in use for a number of years. it is too easy to place a single Parbak on the wrong side of the O-ring. The use of loose fitting parts makes for cost reduction in the machining of unit components. are generally usable through a temperature range of -40°C to 121°C (-40° to 250°F). In low pressure seals. PTFE can also impair seal lubrication by plating rubbing surfaces with PTFE resin to which lubricating oil will not adhere. Parbaks are quick and easy to assemble. In high pressure applications. one on each side of the O-ring. where it is needed. Unlike many PTFE back-up rings. 3.1 Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) Back-Up Rings Anti-extrusion rings made from tetrafluoroethylene are impervious to oils and solvents. PTFE back-up rings are supplied either scarf or spiral cut as shown in Figure 6-1. Refer to the appropriate Design Chart for recommended groove width. 2.2 Anti-Extrusion Device Design Hints 1. Lexington. 3. Wherever possible use two back-up rings. depending on the application. PTFE back-up rings may be used with most elastomeric O-ring seals. Lubrication is enhanced by rubber which absorbs system fluid and does not plate out on rubbing surfaces.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Back-Up Rings p g Back-Up Rings 6. In addition to its good chemical resistance. they do not have a cut because they can be stretched over the end of a piston during assembly. one must check to be sure that squeeze values do not become too high or too low. there will be one on the low pressure side. 6-2 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. The standard sizes are listed in Table 6-1. and do not cause localized wear spots. The 90 durometer curve in Figure 3-5 may be used to find the maximum recommended clearance at a given pressure for temperatures up to 74°C (165°F) when standard Parbak rings in Parker’s N1444-90 nitrile compound are used to protect an O-ring from extrusion. Special sizes are also made to order. from below -73°C to over 204°C (-100°F to over 400°F). Parbaks in Parker Seal Group’s standard nitrile compound. Elastic memory permits Parbak rings to be stretched into place for assembly without preconditioning or cutting.3 Parbak Elastomer Back-Up Rings Hard rubber back-up rings combine most of the best features of both leather and PTFE anti-extrusion devices. and the extra Parbak does no harm. Parbak® is a registered trademark of Parker Hannifin Corporation. Although no industrial or military standards have been issued for rubber back-up rings. In using these curves.com . 6. The extrusion curves can be used in two different ways to reap the benefits of Parbaks. however. Use groove widths given in the Static O-Ring Sealing and Dynamic O-Ring Sealing Sections. For installation. 2. the curves will indicate whether adding a Parbak will permit the use of standard catalog gland dimensions or whether the clearance will need to be reduced further. In double acting seal assemblies. the O-ring should be placed between it and the source of pressure. These discontinuities may contribute to seal damage due to biting and pinching.4 Other Back-Up Ring Materials 6. When tolerances are increased. It is cheap insurance to use two Parbaks even in single acting installations. 6. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. These are special devices designed to satisfy a specific problem. resulting in substantial machining economies. Tolerances on these can be opened up until they permit these larger clearances to occur. yet the orientation of the contoured face is immaterial to the proper function of the part because it is flexible. N1444-90. Parbaks are contoured on one face to minimize distortion of the O-ring when under pressure. Continuous construction prevents damage to the O-ring seal. Acids and inorganic salts have very little effect on PTFE resin.

Lexington. Adequate gland volume should be allowed. showing their tremendous superiority over the older types of back-up rings.5 Parbak Compound Information Some back-up ring materials tend to leave deposits in the micro fine grooves of the surface on which they rub. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. The standard compound for Parbaks is N1444-90. Back-Up Rings Scarf Cut Spiral Parbak Figure 6-1: Typical Back-Up Rings Thin Metal Section Will Expand Due to Pressure and Maintain Metal-to-Metal Fit 7° to 10° Soft Metal AntiExtrusion Wedge Ring Figure 6-2: Clearance Control for High Pressure Seals Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. If there is any question concerning the suitability of leather for the application. They do not leave a deposit on the metal surface. and are quickly and easily installed.e. Because an O-ring may wipe all lubrication from such a surface.3 Leather Back-Up Rings Leather was a standard back-up ring material for many years.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > 6. in keeping with assembly tolerances. toward or away from the O-ring. In addition to N1444-90. Leather back-up rings should never be cut to facilitate installation. After installation. 6.4. Less damage will be incurred to the back-up rings if they are soaked in oil before installation. consult the supplier. Manufacturers of these rings developed special processing methods and impregnations for different types of applications. They may be installed with the concave face in either direction. 6. Leather back-up rings are manufactured as continuous rings and in most cases must be stretched during installation. Parker Seal has developed other compounds for installations requiring special characteristics. Two designs that have been helpful in alleviating extrusion in ultra high pressure applications are shown in Figure 6-2. proper hardness.4. Careful engineering and research has produced N1444-90 which has the best combination of characteristics for the majority of back-up ring installations — broad temperature range.parkerorings. An ultra smooth. thus lubrication remains.6 Parker Parbak 8-Series Dimensions Parbaks will stretch up to 50%. tending to reduce rather than increase seal extrusion clearance as pressure increases. Standard sizes were established for use with all standard O-rings. Functional tests have proven that millions of cycles can be obtained with Parbaks. i. Table 6-1 provides Parker Parbak 8-Series Dimensions.com 6-3 . Additional assistance in specifing and using Parbak rings is available upon request by calling your Parker Seal representative. 6. and resistance to a great number of fluids.000 psi) to design bolt and rivet seal glands that are self-tightening. Parbaks of N1444-90 and other rubber compounds solve this problem. reverse stroking is dry and greatly reduces seal life. It is resistant to nearly all hydraulic fluids except certain non-flammable types such as Skydrol.2 Metal Non-Extrusion Rings In most cases it will be impracticable and unnecessary (under 1380 bar 20. long sealing life. wax-like surface results. a short exposure to heat will shrink the leather rings back to size. Present capabilities include service at continuous temperatures as high as 204°C (400°F). Advantages of the contour design are obtained regardless of how Parbaks are installed. It is also resistant to air and water..

765 .045 Tol.171 . Advantages of the contour design are obtained regardless of how Parbaks are installed — they may be installed with the concave face in either direction.018 1.893 Tol. Compounds for use in other fluids and for temperatures up to 204°C (400°F) are available upon request.393 1.268 2.053 .003 . Example: N1444-90 8-009.515 .086 .640 .< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Parker Parbak 8-Series Dimensions T Ref. Max.018 .053 Tol.D.010 (Ref.D. I. (in.455 .768 4.005 .202 .577 .018 .com .086 . 3-xxx and AS568A series O-ring with which they are used.087 .893 . and are quickly and easily installed.018 4.268 3.234 .009 .518 3. ± .049 .053 .893 .018 3.127 . Table 6-1: Parker Parbak 8-Series Dimensions 6-4 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.518 4.010 (Ref.049 .037 . ± .893 2.020 .955 1.020 .003 W (in.) .003 Notes: 1.143 1.) .053 .024 .010 .077 .580 .012 .327 . ± .768 2.003 W (in.140 . Parbak sizes are designed to correspond with the Parker 2-xxx. Parker’s standard Parbak compound N1444-90. 2.015 . Complete call-out consists of the digit 8.768 .518 .) .705 .010 .) . ± .265 .096 . Parker Parbak 8-Series Dimensions Dash No.005 R T ±.143 2. toward or away from the O-ring.007 .003 .015 . 041 042 043 044 045 046 047 048 049 050 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 I.027 .518 1.013 .053 .268 .) .009 . provides the maximum benefits in back-up ring service.009 .010 .129 .643 1.027 .005 .003 .) .030 .768 1.087 .234 .049 A (in.143 1. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.109 .171 .268 1. ± .081 1.011 .393 2. 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025 026 027 028 029 030 031 032 033 034 035 036 037 038 039 040 Parbaks will stretch up to 50%.011 .390 .018 1.205 1.330 1.) 3. ± .518 2.956 1.) .129 .018 5.parkerorings.080 1. at -4°C to 121°C (-40°F to 250°F).206 1. (in.268 1.024 .003 .020 . Section W-W Parker Parbaks were developed primarily for service in petroleum based hydraulic fluids.831 .053 Tol.030 .393 1. the dash number for the size wanted and the rubber material.037 .045 . R Back-Up Rings .830 .643 .010 .702 .045 Tol.049 A (in.331 1.045 .018 2.452 .024 . Lexington.010 .010 R.005 .202 .003 Dash No.518 Tol.265 .390 .327 .009 .012 .030 .011 .005 R T ±.087 .009 .643 2.268 4.013 .087 . A A W I.007 .768 5.D.140 .013 .456 1.

768 1.022 2.017 .050 A (in.203 1.174 .706 2.381 4.078 1.768 9.050 .024 .010 R T ±.040 .003 .893 1.768 6.004 Notes: 1.005 .705 .003 .581 1.390 .518 4.020 .020 .381 3.174 .) 1. 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 I.118 .015 .018 .035 .266 1.256 3.024 .053 A (in.050 .518 9.518 6.055 .006 4.268 6.118 Tol.518 5.018 6.881 3.040 .040 .< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Parker Parbak 8-Series Dimensions (Continued) Dash No.086 Tol.768 4.828 .003 .643 1.015 .003 W (in.003 W (in.016 1.459 1.009 .268 7.045 .050 . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.174 .580 .040 .004 .015 R T ±.028 .015 .030 .010 .017 .024 . Table 6-1: Parker Parbak 8-Series Dimensions Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.005 .131 3.040 .518 6.018 8. Example: N1444-90 8-009.522 1.com 6-5 .706 1.143 2.004 Back-Up Rings .766 .035 .518 3.050 . Parbak sizes are designed to correspond with the Parker 2-xxx.881 4.129 .893 6.040 .022 .028 . ± .) .022 .010 (Ref.268 2.643 2.055 .) .045 Tol.018 .147 2.631 4.030 .518 .053 .768 5.768 4.141 1.028 .956 2.643 5.397 2.020 .118 .893 5.020 .268 3. ± .643 .206 2.647 1.018 2.768 .506 3.015 .768 7.024 .268 9.756 3.012 .081 2.012 .D.831 1.028 . 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 201 202 203 204 205 I.131 4.018 4.768 Tol.393 2.018 7.018 5. 2.) . Complete call-out consists of the digit 8.631 3.331 2.268 5.050 .003 Dash No.055 .030 .018 9.518 8.768 5.268 8.030 .143 5. ± .040 Tol.parkerorings.772 1.268 6.897 2.518 7.017 .018 3.768 8.020 .118 .018 6.045 .581 2.174 .518 2.756 2.018 5.256 4.009 .455 Tol.397 1.) .) . ± .953 1.030 .035 . (in.334 1.040 .018 .010 .020 .024 .891 .272 2. ± .035 . 3-xxx and AS568A series O-ring with which they are used.004 .268 4.045 .) .831 2.268 5.202 .086 .005 .129 .040 . Lexington.506 4.007 .631 2.) .010 (Ref.D.265 .768 2.522 2.456 2. ± .393 5.006 3.017 .518 5.893 3. (in. the dash number for the size wanted and the rubber material.327 .

004 .768 10.278 4.010 (Ref.153 4.005 .020 .638 .183 Tol.773 3.118 Tol.005 Back-Up Rings .010 (Ref.004 .518 2.) .778 7.778 5.040 .070 .024 . 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 I.778 10. 3-xxx and AS568A series O-ring with which they are used.403 5.009 .085 .030 .518 8.450 .028 11.638 1.528 8.055 .262 .518 9.020 .028 14.065 .268 2.004 Dash No.778 8.) . ± .138 1. Complete call-out consists of the digit 8. 2.060 .004 .080 .050 A (in.076 .008 18.) .076 .085 .009 . the dash number for the size wanted and the rubber material.183 .030 .398 Tol.075 .065 .060 .060 .004 W (in.D.262 .763 1.037 .153 5.763 .528 4.095 .518 12.105 .268 9.055 .) 7.040 .018 11.008 17.018 15. Table 6-1: Parker Parbak 8-Series Dimensions 6-6 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.518 7.993 23.037 .903 6.005 .513 . ± . Lexington.D.018 .050 .018 8.076 .278 8.528 11.993 25.893 3.028 4. Example: N1444-90 8-009. ± .778 9.045 .028 10. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.) .903 5.768 9.018 .040 .090 .018 9.055 .012 . Parbak sizes are designed to correspond with the Parker 2-xxx.007 .055 .278 5.006 20.115 .138 2. ± .100 .393 2.055 .028 R T ±.028 5.528 6.278 6.003 W (in.278 9.183 .028 15.065 .018 3.) .045 .028 .174 .018 10.050 .388 1.010 .005 .076 A (in.060 .950 1. (in.528 7.262 .028 9.015 .055 . ± .028 13.888 .528 12.316 1.183 .778 4.648 3.012 .050 .143 3.004 .989 16.653 4.403 4.070 .013 1.065 .050 .518 11.268 8.028 7.993 Tol.018 13.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Parker Parbak 8-Series Dimensions (Continued) Dash No.060 Tol.060 .005 .028 16.006 22.020 .com .012 .700 .018 15.012 .989 17.040 Tol.513 1.024 .028 6.050 .528 9.parkerorings.110 .575 .037 .) 3.523 3.888 2.898 4.) .065 .278 7.095 .008 19.005 Notes: 1.263 1.075 .040 .003 .015 .037 .006 21.528 5. ± .010 .120 .174 .020 .993 24.768 2.200 1.118 .653 5.045 R T ±.055 .006 22.075 1.013 2.012 .825 .037 .028 8.268 7.018 7.643 2.262 . 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 I.018 14.024 .768 8. (in.045 .989 .080 .273 3.

080 .070 .parkerorings.004 Tol.004 21.010 (Ref. the dash number for the size wanted and the rubber material.801 4.344 .060 .774 7.024 9.096 .120 .344 .040 .051 5.524 15.236 .004 17.524 13.004 18.) 11.926 6.105 .085 .024 11.301 5.005 .524 10.551 4.055 .926 5.274 7.D.024 13.040 . ± .024 12.) .085 .075 .524 12.060 .096 Tol.006 Dash No.060 R T ±.004 22.com 6-7 . (in.010 (Ref. (in. Parbak sizes are designed to correspond with the Parker 2-xxx.551 5. Complete call-out consists of the digit 8. ± .096 .236 Tol.075 .095 . 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 I.) .176 5. ± .033 .024 7.115 .504 18.004 24. ± .110 .) .024 15.117 .236 Tol.096 Tol.) .801 5.006 Notes: 1.117 .005 .676 4.524 16.006 .236 . ± .) .D.117 A (in.524 6.006 . 2.045 .055 .524 9.344 .774 8.037 .524 7. Lexington.033 R T ±. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.095 .524 14.085 . 3-xxx and AS568A series O-ring with which they are used.100 .< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Parker Parbak 8-Series Dimensions (Continued) Dash No.004 25.037 Back-Up Rings . 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462 463 464 465 466 467 468 469 470 471 472 473 474 475 I. Table 6-1: Parker Parbak 8-Series Dimensions Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. Example: N1444-90 8-009.024 10.024 8.274 6.524 Tol.117 A (in.504 19.024 14.504 17.) .004 26.504 20.) 4.005 W (in.051 6.005 W (in. ± .045 .070 .426 5.004 16.344 .090 .004 19.676 5.090 .004 23.

but they are intended for use with O-rings of the same dimensions.*1 8-130 8-131 8-132 8-133 8-134 8-135 8-136 8-137 8-138 8-139 8-140 8-141 8-142 8-143 8-144 8-145 8-146 8-147 8-148 8-149 8-210 8-211 8-212 8-213 8-214 8-215 8-216 8-217 8-218 8-219 8-220 8-221 8-222 8-223 8-224 8-225 8-226 8-227 8-228 8-229 8-230 8-231 8-232 8-233 8-234 MIL-W-5521 Leather AN62441 AN62461 AS8791 PTFE MS275951 MS287742 Dash No. Example: N1444-90 8-009. AN6246-1 AN6246-2 AN6246-3 AN6246-4 AN6246-5 AN6246-6 AN6246-7 MS28782-1 MS28782-2 MS28782-3 MS28782-4 MS28782-5 MS28782-6 MS28782-7 -6 -7 -8 -9 -10 -11 -12 AN6246-8 AN6246-9 AN6246-10 AN6246-11 AN6246-12 AN6246-13 AN6246-14 MS28782-8 MS28782-9 MS28782-10 MS28782-11 MS28782-12 MS28782-13 MS28782-14 -110 -111 -112 -113 -114 -115 -116 AN6246-15 AN6246-16 AN6246-17 AN6246-18 AN6246-19 AN6246-20 AN6246-21 AN6246-22 AN6246-23 AN6246-24 AN6246-25 AN6246-26 AN6246-27 AN6244-1 AN6244-2 AN6244-3 AN6244-4 AN6244-5 AN6244-6 AN6244-7 AN6244-8 AN6244-9 AN6244-10 AN6244-11 AN6244-12 MS28782-15 MS28782-16 MS28782-17 MS28782-18 MS28782-19 MS28782-20 MS28782-21 MS28782-22 MS28782-23 MS28782-24 MS28782-25 MS28782-26 MS28782-27 MS28783-1 MS28783-2 MS28783-3 MS28783-4 MS28783-5 MS28783-6 MS28783-7 MS28783-8 MS28783-9 MS28783-10 MS28783-11 MS28783-12 -210 -211 -212 -213 -214 -215 -216 -217 -218 -219 -220 -221 -222 -223 -224 -225 -226 -227 -228 -229 -230 -231 -232 -233 -234 *Add Parker compound number N1444-90 to complete the call out. Parbak sizes with no corresponding military part number are not shown. Parker N1444-90 Parker Parbak Size No.parkerorings. -130 -131 -132 -133 -134 -135 -136 -137 -138 -139 -140 -141 -142 -143 -144 -145 -146 -147 -148 -149 -210 -211 -212 -213 -214 -215 -216 -217 -218 -219 -220 -221 -222 -223 -224 -225 -226 -227 -228 -229 -230 -231 -232 -233 -234 AS8791 PTFE MS287823 MS287833 MIL-W-5521 Leather MS358031 Dash No.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Back-Up Rings Cross Reference This cross reference chart is to be utilized when considering the use of Parker’s Parbak back-up rings as a retrofit for a Back-Up Rings Cross Reference Parker N1444-90 Parker Parbak Size No. Table 6-2: Back-Up Rings Cross Reference 6-8 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. -004 -005 -006 -007 -008 -009 -010 -011 -012 -013 -014 -015 -016 -017 -018 -019 -020 -021 -022 -023 -024 -025 -026 -027 -028 -110 -111 -112 -113 -114 -115 -116 -117 -118 -119 -120 -121 -122 -123 -124 -125 -126 -127 -128 -129 AS8791 PTFE MS287823 MS287833 MIL-W-5521 Leather MS358031 Dash No. Continuous back-up ring. Lexington. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. This chart is intended as a retrofit guideline only. Double turn. scarf cut. Single turn.com . Keep in mind. 3. there is not a military specification that pertains to Parker’s Parbak series back-up rings. 1. MIL-W-5521 Leather AN62441 AN62461 Back-Up Rings AS8791 PTFE MS275951 MS287742 Dash No. 2.*1 8-004 8-005 8-006 8-007 8-008 8-009 8-010 8-011 8-012 8-013 8-014 8-015 8-016 8-017 8-018 8-019 8-020 8-021 8-022 8-023 8-024 8-025 8-026 8-027 8-028 8-110 8-111 8-112 8-113 8-114 8-115 8-116 8-117 8-118 8-119 8-120 8-121 8-122 8-123 8-124 8-125 8-126 8-127 8-128 8-129 PTFE or leather back-up. Note: These corresponding part numbers do not have identical dimensions.

2. Double turn.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Back-Up Rings Cross Reference (Continued) Parker N1444-90 Parker Parbak Size No.parkerorings. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. but they are intended for use with O-rings of the same dimensions. -336 -337 -338 -339 -340 -341 -342 -343 -344 -345 -346 -347 -348 -349 -425 -426 -427 -428 -429 -430 -431 -432 -433 -434 -435 -436 -437 -438 -439 -440 -441 -442 -443 -444 -445 -446 -447 -448 -449 -450 -451 -452 -453 -454 -455 -456 -457 -458 -459 -460 AS8791 PTFE MS287823 MS287833 MS28782-39 MS28782-40 MS28782-41 MS28782-42 MS28782-43 MS28782-44 MS28782-45 MS28782-46 MS28782-47 MS28782-48 MS28782-49 MS28782-50 MS28782-51 MS28782-52 MS28782-88 MS28782-53 MS28782-54 MS28782-55 MS28782-56 MS28782-57 MS28782-58 MS28782-59 MS28782-60 MS28782-61 MS28782-62 MS28782-63 MS28782-64 MS28782-65 MS28782-66 MS28782-67 MS28782-68 MS28782-69 MS28782-70 MS28782-71 MS28782-72 MS28782-73 MS28782-74 MS28782-75 MS28782-76 MS28782-77 MS28782-78 MS28782-79 MS28782-80 MS28782-81 MS28782-82 MS28782-83 MS28782-84 MS28782-85 MS28782-86 MS28782-87 MIL-W-5521 Leather MS358031 Dash No. -235 -236 -237 -238 -239 -240 -241 -242 -243 -244 -245 -246 -247 Parker N1444-90 Parker Parbak Size No. Table 6-2: Back-Up Rings Cross Reference Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. Parbak sizes with no corresponding military part number are not shown. Single turn.*1 8-235 8-236 8-237 8-238 8-239 8-240 8-241 8-242 8-243 8-244 8-245 8-246 8-247 8-248 8-249 8-250 8-251 8-252 8-253 8-254 8-255 8-256 8-257 8-258 8-259 8-260 8-261 8-262 8-263 8-264 8-265 8-266 8-267 8-268 8-269 8-270 8-271 8-272 8-273 8-274 8-325 8-326 8-327 8-328 8-329 8-330 8-331 8-332 8-333 8-334 8-335 MIL-W-5521 Leather AN62441 AN62461 AN6244-13 AN6244-14 AN6244-15 AN6244-16 AN6244-17 AN6244-18 AN6244-19 AN6244-20 AN6244-21 AN6244-22 AN6244-23 AN6244-24 AN6244-25 AN6244-26 AN6244-27 AN6244-28 AN6244-29 AN6244-30 AN6244-31 AN6244-32 AN6244-33 AN6244-34 AN6244-35 AN6244-36 AN6244-37 AN6244-38 AN6244-39 AN6244-40 AN6244-41 AN6244-42 AN6244-43 AN6244-44 AN6244-45 AN6244-46 AN6244-47 AN6244-48 AN6244-49 AN6244-50 AN6244-51 AN6244-52 AN6246-28 AN6246-29 AN6246-30 AN6246-31 AN6246-32 AN6246-33 AN6246-34 AN6246-35 AN6246-36 AN6246-37 AN6246-38 AS8791 PTFE MS275951 MS287742 Dash No. Note: These corresponding part numbers do not have identical dimensions. Example: N1444-90 8-009. scarf cut. Lexington. -235 -236 -237 -238 -239 -240 -241 -242 -243 -244 -245 -246 -247 AS8791 PTFE MS287823 MS287833 MS28783-13 MS28783-14 MS28783-15 MS28783-16 MS28783-17 MS28783-18 MS28783-19 MS28783-20 MS28783-21 MS28783-22 MS28783-23 MS28783-24 MS28783-25 MIL-W-5521 Leather MS358031 Dash No.*1 8-336 8-337 8-338 8-339 8-340 8-341 8-342 8-343 8-344 8-345 8-346 8-347 8-348 8-349 8-425 8-426 8-427 8-428 8-429 8-430 8-431 8-432 8-433 8-434 8-435 8-436 8-437 8-438 8-439 8-440 8-441 8-442 8-443 8-444 8-445 8-446 8-447 8-448 8-449 8-450 8-451 8-452 8-453 8-454 8-455 8-456 8-457 8-458 8-459 8-460 MIL-W-5521 Leather AN62441 AN62461 AN6246-39 AN6246-40 AN6246-41 AN6246-42 AN6246-43 AN6246-44 AN6246-45 AN6246-46 AN6246-47 AN6246-48 AN6246-49 AN6246-50 AN6246-51 AN6246-52 AN6246-88 AN6246-53 AN6246-54 AN6246-55 AN6246-56 AN6246-57 AN6246-58 AN6246-59 AN6246-60 AN6246-61 AN6246-62 AN6246-63 AN6246-64 AN6246-65 AN6246-66 AN6246-67 AN6246-68 AN6246-69 AN6246-70 AN6246-71 AN6246-72 AN6246-73 AN6246-74 AN6246-75 AN6246-76 AN6246-77 AN6246-78 AN6246-79 AN6246-80 AN6246-81 AN6246-82 AN6246-83 AN6246-84 AN6246-85 AN6246-86 AN6246-87 AS8791 PTFE MS275951 MS287742 Dash No.com 6-9 . Continuous back-up ring. -336 -337 -338 -339 -340 -341 -342 -343 -344 -345 -346 -347 -348 -349 -425 -426 -427 -428 -429 -430 -431 -432 -433 -434 -435 -436 -437 -438 -439 -440 -441 -442 -443 -444 -445 -446 -447 -448 -449 -450 -451 -452 -453 -454 -455 -456 -457 -458 -459 -460 Back-Up Rings -325 -326 -327 -328 -329 -330 -331 -332 -333 -334 -335 MS28782-28 MS28782-29 MS28782-30 MS28782-31 MS28782-32 MS28782-33 MS28782-34 MS28782-35 MS28782-36 MS28782-37 MS28782-38 -325 -326 -327 -328 -329 -330 -331 -332 -333 -334 -335 *Add Parker compound number N1444-90 to complete the call out. 3. 1.

Continuous ring with no loose particles or sections. Deposits on rubbing surface making it extremely smooth. Tends to soften and extrude at temper atures around (149°C) 300°F. Leather Back-Up Rings Continuous ring. Maintains lubrication. Does not cause overly smooth rubbing surface. no scarf cut. Resists cold flow and tendency to extrude under high pressure. Coefficient of thermal expansion comparable to O-ring material. The O-ring then wipes the surface dry. then pounded into place.com . Tends to absorb moisture. Uniform dimensions. Absorbs slight amount of oil. Lexington. Difficult to assemble over piston. Resists cold flow and tendency to extrude under high pressure. Standard material satisfactory up to (121°C) 250°F.parkerorings. Can be made in compound having even better resistance when required. Will cold flow and extrude at room temperature and high pressure.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Comparison of Parbak vs. Continuous ring. aiding lubrication. High temperature expansion may overlap scarf cut causing damage to O-ring. Variable dimensions. Uniform dimensions. Almost completely non-absorbent. PTFE and Leather Back-Up 6-10 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. Low temperature shrinkage may open up scarf cut. Continuous ring. no scarf cut. No information available. Back-Up Rings Easiest and quickest to assemble in either piston or cylinder groove. This discontinuity is often a cause of leaks or damage to the O-ring. stretched. Continuous ring. No scarf cut to open. Maintains lubrication. Does not cause overly smooth rubbing surface. Continuous ring. PTFE and Leather Back-Up Parker Parbaks PTFE Back-Up Rings Spiral or scarf-cut for most applications. Good resistance to radiation. Table 6-3: Comparison of Parbak vs. Other compounds available for temperatures as high as (204°C) 400°F. increasing possibility of corrosion. for assembling over piston or doubled over itself for assembly into cylinder groove. Tends to harden and crack at high temperature. Fair resistance to radiation. Less difficult to assemble into cylinder groove. Scarf or spiral cut can be opened. Loose leather fibers may become lodged under O-ring causing leakage. Moderately simple to assemble. causing temperature leakage. Must be soaked in oil. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. Thin sections of spiral may become lodged under O-ring causing leakage. Good resistance to extrusion. will not hold enough oil to aid lubrication.

< Back Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Compatibility Tables for Gases. . . . . Lexington. . . . . Solids Fluid Compatibility Table . . . Fluids. .com 7-1 . . . .parkerorings. Fluids. . Solids Section VII – Compatibility Tables for Gases. . . . . . . . 7-2 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.

Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Hypalon CSM X X X 3 2 1 X 1 3 3 2 1 3 1 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 X X 4 X X X X 1 4 3 X 1 1 Hifluor FKM Recommended — A — A-A-52624 A-A-59290 Abietic Acid Acetaldehyde Acetamide Acetanilide Acetic Acid. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS.com Silicone MQ. Glacial Acetic Acid. Fluids. Solids Compatibility Tables for Gases. Non-organic Acids.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 . With some media however.Unsatisfactory x . EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM . Organic Aconitic Acid Acridine Acrolein Acrylic Acid Acrylonitrile Adipic Acid Aero Lubriplate Aero Shell 17 Grease E1267-80 E1267-80 V3819-75 E0540-80 C0873-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 FF200-75 C0873-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 FF500-75 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 X X X 3 1 3 X 2 2 4 3 3 4 3 3 2 4 2 4 4 4 1 4 4 2 X X X X 3 2 4 1 1 1 X X X 3 1 3 X 2 2 4 4 3 4 3 3 2 4 2 4 4 4 1 4 4 2 X X X X 3 2 4 1 1 1 X X X 2 1 1 1 1 1 3 2 1 1 1 1 4 1 4 1 1 4 1 1 1 4 X X X X 1 4 4 2 4 4 X X X 4 3 3 X 1 2 4 4 3 4 3 3 1 4 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X X X 3 1 3 X 1 1 X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X X 3 2 X X 1 3 3 2 X 2 X 1 X 2 X 2 2 2 1 1 1 X X X X X X X 3 2 2 2 X X X 3 1 1 X 1 4 4 2 1 4 1 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 2 2 4 X X X X 1 4 4 X 1 2 X X X 3 4 1 X 2 2 4 2 1 4 1 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 4 4 4 X X X X 1 4 3 X 2 4 X X X 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X X 4 X X X X 4 4 4 X 1 1 X X X 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 3 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 X X X X 4 3 4 X 1 1 X X X 2 2 1 X 1 2 4 2 1 1 1 X 4 2 4 1 1 4 1 1 1 4 X X X X 1 4 4 X 4 4 X X X 2 4 1 X 2 2 4 2 1 4 1 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 X X 4 X X X X 1 4 X X 4 4 Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 . 5% Acetic Acid.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended. VMQ. the service temperature range may be significantly different. 7-2 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.parkerorings. Fluids.Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 . PVMQ X X X 2 2 2 X 1 1 3 2 2 4 2 X X 4 X 4 4 4 2 X X X X X X X 2 X 4 X 2 2 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring I 5700 Handbook Compatibility Tables for Gases. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. Hot.Satisfactory 2 .Insufficient Data X X X 2 4 1 X 2 2 4 2 1 4 1 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 X X 4 X X X X 1 4 3 X 4 4 X X X 2 4 1 X 2 2 4 2 1 4 1 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 X X 4 X X X X 1 4 3 X 4 4 X X X 4 1 1 X 2 2 4 4 1 4 1 X 2 4 2 4 4 1 X X X 2 X X X X 1 2 4 X 1 1 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. 30% Acetic Acid. High Pressure Acetic Anhydride Acetoacetic Acid Acetone Acetone Cyanohydrin Acetonitrile (Methyl Cyanide) Acetophenetidine Acetophenone Acetotoluidide Acetyl Acetone Acetyl Bromide Acetyl Chloride Acetylene Acetylene Tetrabromide Acetylene Tetrachloride Acetylsalicylic Acid Acids. Lexington.

400° F Air. Fluids. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Aero Shell 560 Aero Shell 750 Aero Shell 7A Grease ( MIL-G-23827) Aero Shell IAC Aerosafe 2300 Aerosafe 2300W Aerozene 50 (50% Hydrazine 50% UDMH) Air. Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended.Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 .< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Compatibility Tables for Gases. PVMQ X 4 2 2 3 3 4 1 1 1 2 X 2 2 4 X 2 2 2 2 2 X X X X 2 X 2 2 4 1 2 2 X 2 X 2 2 2 2 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU. VMQ.Unsatisfactory x .500° F Aliphatic Dicarboxylic Acid Alkanes (Paraffin Hydrocarbons) Alkanesulfonic Acid Alkazene Alkenes (Olefin Hydrocarbons) Alkyl Acetone Alkyl Alcohol Alkyl Amine Alkyl Aryl Sulfonates Alkyl Aryl Sulfonics Alkyl Benzene Alkyl Chloride Alkyl Lithium Alkyl Sulfide* Alkylnaphthalene Sulfonic Acid Allyl Chloride Allylidene Diacetate Alpha Picoline Aluminum Acetate Aluminum Bromide Aluminum Chlorate Aluminum Chloride Aluminum Ethylate Aluminum Fluoride Aluminum Fluorosilicate* Aluminum Formate Aluminum Hydroxide Aluminum Linoleate Aluminum Nitrate VM835-70 V1164-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 S0604-70 S0604-70 S0455-70 V1164-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 FF500-75 V1164-75 N0674-70 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 N0674-70 V3819-75 N0674-70 V3819-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 X 2 2 1 4 4 3 2 3 4 4 2 1 1 4 2 3 1 1 1 1 2 2 X 2 1 2 3 3 2 1 3 1 X 1 X 3 2 1 1 X 2 2 1 4 4 3 2 3 4 4 2 1 1 4 2 3 1 1 1 1 2 2 X 2 1 2 3 3 2 1 3 1 X 1 X 3 X 1 1 X 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 X 1 1 4 1 X 1 1 1 4 4 4 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 2 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 3 3 4 1 3 1 X 1 X 3 2 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 2 3 X X X 2 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 2 1 X 1 X 1 X X 1 X 1 X 4 2 2 4 4 4 1 2 4 4 4 2 2 4 4 1 2 2 2 2 4 4 X 4 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 X 1 X 1 X 2 1 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 X 1 1 2 1 1 1 X 1 X 1 X 4 1 X 2 1 1 4 4 X 1 2 4 4 4 1 1 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 4 4 X 4 1 X 4 4 4 1 4 1 X X X 4 X 1 X X 4 1 1 4 4 4 2 3 4 4 3 1 1 4 3 4 1 1 1 1 3 3 X 3 1 X 4 4 4 3 4 3 X 3 X 4 X 1 3 X 4 4 4 2 2 1 1 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 X 1 X 4 1 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 X 1 1 4 1 1 1 X 1 X 1 X 4 1 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 X 1 X 4 1 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 2 X 1 X 4 1 Hypalon CSM X 4 1 1 4 4 4 1 2 4 4 4 2 2 4 4 1 2 2 2 2 4 4 X 4 2 X 1 1 4 1 1 1 X 1 X 1 X 2 1 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 .Satisfactory 2 .parkerorings. Below 200° F Air. the service temperature range may be significantly different. 300 . 200 . With some media however. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS.com Silicone MQ. EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM 7-3 . Lexington.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 .300° F Air.Insufficient Data X 2 1 1 3 3 4 1 1 2 4 2 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 X 2 1 X 1 1 4 1 1 1 X 1 X 1 X 1 X Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. 400 .

Hot Ammonia. With some media however. Cold Ammonia.Satisfactory 2 .Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 . Gas. 2N Ammonium Citrate Ammonium Dichromate Ammonium Diphosphate Ammonium Fluoride Ammonium Fluorosilicate* Ammonium Formate Ammonium Hydroxide. EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM . the service temperature range may be significantly different.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Compatibility Tables for Gases.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended.parkerorings. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Aluminum Oxalate Aluminum Phosphate Aluminum Potassium Sulfate Aluminum Salts Aluminum Sodium Sulfate Aluminum Sulfate Alums-NH3 -Cr -K Ambrex 33 (Mobil) Ambrex 830 (Mobil) Amines-Mixed Aminoanthraquinone Aminoazobenzene Aminobenzene Sulfonic Acid Aminobenzoic Acid Aminopyridine Aminosalicylic Acid Ammonia (Anhydrous) Ammonia and Lithium Metal in Solution Ammonia.com Silicone MQ. Fluids.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 . ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS. Lexington. Gas. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. VMQ. PVMQ 2 2 2 1 2 1 1 4 2 2 X X X X X X 2 4 1 X 2 2 2 2 2 2 X 2 X X 2 2 2 X X 2 1 1 X 2 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU.Unsatisfactory x . Concentrated Ammonium Iodide Ammonium Lactate E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 C0873-70 V3819-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 C0873-70 E0540-80 C0873-70 C0873-70 C0873-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 C0873-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 V3819-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 3 1 3 1 3 1 1 1 1 4 X X X X X X 2 2 1 4 2 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 4 1 3 3 3 1 X 3 1 4 1 3 3 1 3 1 3 1 1 1 1 4 X X X X X X 2 2 1 4 2 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 4 1 3 3 3 1 X 3 1 4 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 3 2 X X X X X X 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 4 1 1 4 X X X X X X 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 1 1 3 3 3 1 X 3 3 4 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 4 2 3 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 4 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 X 1 X 1 X 1 2 2 2 3 X X X X X X 2 3 2 2 2 X X X X X 1 X 1 1 X X X 1 X X 2 2 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 X X X X X X 1 X 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 2 1 4 4 2 X X X X X X 4 4 1 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 2 3 1 1 4 X 4 1 4 4 4 1 1 4 X X X X X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 X 4 4 4 X X 4 4 4 X 4 4 X 4 3 4 4 X 2 1 4 X X X X X X 4 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 1 4 4 4 1 X 4 4 4 1 4 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 4 3 2 X X X X X X 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 2 X X X X X X 4 4 1 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 X X 1 1 1 X X 1 2 3 X 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 2 X X X X X X 4 4 1 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 X X 1 1 1 X X 1 2 3 X 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 2 X X X X X X 4 4 1 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 2 3 1 1 Hypalon CSM 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 3 2 4 X X X X X X 4 4 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 .Insufficient Data 1 X 1 1 1 1 4 3 1 4 X X X X X X 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 X X 1 1 1 X X 1 1 1 X 1 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. Liquid (Anhydrous) Ammonium Acetate Ammonium Arsenate Ammonium Benzoate Ammonium Bicarbonate Ammonium Bisulfite Ammonium Bromide Ammonium Carbamate Ammonium Carbonate Ammonium Chloride. 7-4 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. 3 Molar Ammonium Hydroxide.

com Silicone MQ.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Compatibility Tables for Gases.parkerorings.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 . VMQ. EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM 7-5 .Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 . the service temperature range may be significantly different.Insufficient Data 1 1 X X 1 1 X X X X X X X 1 1 1 1 3 1 X X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 X 1 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS. Mono-Basic Ammonium Phosphate.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended.Unsatisfactory x . PVMQ 2 2 X 2 2 2 X X X 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 1 2 X X X 2 2 2 2 2 2 4 4 X 2 4 4 X X X 4 2 2 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Ammonium Metaphosphate Ammonium Molybdenate* Ammonium Nitrate. Tribasic Ammonium Phosphite Ammonium Picrate Ammonium Polysulfide Ammonium Salicylate Ammonium Salts Ammonium Sulfamate Ammonium Sulfate Ammonium Sulfate Nitrate Ammonium Sulfide Ammonium Sulfite Ammonium Thiocyanate Ammonium Thioglycolate Ammonium Thiosulfate Ammonium Tungstate Ammonium Valerate Amyl Acetate Amyl Alcohol Amyl Borate Amyl Butyrate Amyl Chloride Amyl Chloronaphthalene Amyl Cinnamic Aldehyde Amyl Laurate Amyl Mercaptan Amyl Naphthalene Amyl Nitrate Amyl Nitrite E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 V3819-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 3 3 1 1 3 3 X 4 4 1 1 1 1 3 3 3 3 1 3 1 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 2 1 1 X 4 2 2 2 4 3 3 3 3 1 1 3 3 X 4 4 1 1 1 1 3 3 3 3 1 3 1 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 2 1 1 X 4 2 2 2 4 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 3 3 X X 3 3 X X X 4 X X X 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X 2 2 X X X 2 2 2 2 2 2 X X X X 2 X 2 2 2 X X X X X X 3 1 2 X 2 2 X X X 2 X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 2 1 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 4 2 X 4 4 X 4 4 X X X X 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 1 4 4 4 4 4 2 4 4 4 4 X X 4 4 X 4 4 X X X X 4 4 4 4 X 4 X X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 1 X X 3 3 3 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 X X X X X X X 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 Hypalon CSM 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 2 1 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 . 2N Ammonium Nitrite Ammonium Oxalate Ammonium Perchlorate Ammonium Perchloride Ammonium Persulfate 10% Ammonium Persulfate Solution Ammonium Phosphate Ammonium Phosphate. Fluids. Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. Lexington.Satisfactory 2 . Dibasic Ammonium Phosphate. With some media however.

the service temperature range may be significantly different.Satisfactory 2 .< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Compatibility Tables for Gases.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 .Insufficient Data X 1 2 2 2 2 2 3 2 2 3 1 1 X 1 X X 1 1 1 3 2 X X 1 1 1 X X 1 1 1 1 1 X X 1 X 2 2 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. L. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Amyl Phenol Amyl Propionate Anderol. 1248 Aroclor.Unsatisfactory x . Fluid Aqua Regia Arachidic Acid Argon Armor All Aroclor. With some media however.826 (di-ester) Anderol. L. VMQ. Lexington.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended. 7-6 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. Fluids. L-774 (di-ester) ANG-25 (Di-ester Base) (TG749) ANG-25 (Glyceral Ester) Aniline Aniline Dyes Aniline Hydrochloride Aniline Oil Aniline Sulfate Aniline Sulfite Animal Fats Animal Oil (Lard Oil) Anisole Anisoyl Chloride AN-O-3 Grade M AN-O-366 AN-O-6 Ansul Ether 161 or 181 Anthracene Anthranilic Acid Anthraquinone Anti-freeze Solutions Antimony Chloride Antimony Pentachloride Antimony Pentafluoride Antimony Sulfate Antimony Tribromide Antimony Trichloride Antimony Trifluoride Antimony Trioxide AN-VV-O-366b Hydr.parkerorings.Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 . ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS. EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM . PVMQ X 2 4 4 4 2 2 4 3 3 4 2 2 X 2 X X 2 4 4 4 X X X 2 4 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 X X 1 X 2 3 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU. 1254 V3819-75 N0674-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 V3819-75 V3819-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 V3819-75 V1164-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 V3819-75 V3819-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 V3819-75 V3819-75 B0612-70 N0674-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 X 1 2 2 2 2 2 4 4 2 4 3 3 1 1 X X 1 1 1 3 2 X X 3 1 1 X X 1 1 1 1 1 4 X 1 X 3 4 X 1 2 2 2 2 2 4 4 2 4 3 3 1 1 X X 1 1 1 3 2 X X 3 1 1 X X 1 1 1 1 1 3 X 1 X 3 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 1 2 2 2 2 1 1 2 2 X X 4 4 4 3 4 X X 1 4 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 3 X 1 X 2 2 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 2 2 3 3 3 1 1 X X 1 1 1 4 1 X X 3 1 1 X X 1 1 1 1 1 2 X 1 X 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 X 1 1 X X 2 2 2 2 1 2 2 2 2 X X 1 2 X X 1 2 1 3 X X X X 1 1 X X 1 1 1 1 1 3 X 1 X 1 1 X 2 4 4 4 4 2 4 2 4 4 1 1 2 2 X X 2 2 2 4 4 X X 1 2 2 X X 2 2 2 2 2 4 X 1 X 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 2 4 2 3 4 1 1 X 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 X X 1 4 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 X X 1 X 4 4 X 1 2 2 2 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 1 X X 1 1 1 4 4 X X 4 1 1 X X 1 1 1 1 2 X X 1 X 4 4 X 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 2 X X 1 1 1 2 3 X X 4 1 1 X X 1 1 1 1 2 X X 1 X 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 X 2 X X 4 4 4 3 4 X X 1 4 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 X X 1 X 2 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 2 4 2 4 4 1 1 X 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 X X 1 4 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 X X 1 X 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 2 4 2 2 4 1 1 X 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 X X 1 4 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 X X 1 X 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 2 4 2 2 4 1 1 X 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 X X 1 4 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 X X 1 X 4 4 Hypalon CSM X 2 4 4 4 4 2 4 2 4 4 1 1 X 2 X X 2 2 2 4 4 X X 1 2 2 X X 2 2 2 2 2 X X 1 X 4 4 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.com Silicone MQ.829 (di-ester) Anderol.

VMQ. 1260 Aromatic Fuel -50% Arsenic Acid Arsenic Oxide Arsenic Trichloride Arsenic Trioxide Arsenic Trisulfide Arsenites Arsine Aryl Orthosilicate Ascorbic Acid Askarel Transformer Oil Aspartic Acid Asphalt ASTM Oil. Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. 3 ASTM Oil. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS. No. With some media however.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 . No.parkerorings.Unsatisfactory x . 2 ASTM Oil. No. 4 ASTM Oil.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Compatibility Tables for Gases. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Aroclor.Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 . No. No.com Silicone MQ. Lexington.Insufficient Data 1 2 1 X X X X X X X 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 2 X 1 1 2 X 2 1 X 1 4 X X 4 X X 2 1 1 1 1 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. Fluids. PVMQ 1 4 1 X X X X X X X 2 4 2 4 1 4 3 4 X 4 4 4 X 4 4 X 4 4 X 4 3 X X 4 2 2 1 1 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU. 1 ASTM Oil.Satisfactory 2 . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. 5 ASTM Reference Fuel A ASTM Reference Fuel B ASTM Reference Fuel C ASTM Reference Fuel D ATL-857 Atlantic Dominion F Atlantic Utro Gear-e Atlantic Utro Gear-EP Lube Aure 903R (Mobil) AUREX 256 Automatic Transmission Fluid Automotive Brake Fluid AXAREL 9100 Azobenzene —B— Bardol B Barium Carbonate Barium Chlorate Barium Chloride Barium Cyanide V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 V3819-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 V3819-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 N0674-70 N1500-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 V1164-75 N0304-75 V3819-75 N0674-70 E0667-70 V3819-75 V3819-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 1 2 1 X 1 1 1 X X X 3 2 3 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 X 1 3 X X 4 3 3 1 1 1 2 1 X 1 1 1 X X X 3 2 3 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 X 1 3 X X 4 3 3 1 1 X 4 1 X 4 4 4 X X X 1 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 1 X X 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 4 4 X X X 3 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 4 X X 1 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 X X X X X X X X 2 X 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 2 1 2 2 X 2 2 X X 2 X X 1 1 1 4 1 X 1 1 1 X X X 1 4 1 2 1 2 4 4 2 2 4 4 4 4 2 2 2 2 X 2 2 X X 4 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 X X X X X X X 1 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 X 4 4 X 4 4 X 4 1 X X 4 1 1 1 1 4 4 3 X X X X X X X 4 4 4 2 1 1 1 2 X 2 4 4 X 2 1 X 1 1 X 1 4 X X 4 4 4 1 1 4 4 3 X X X X X X X 4 4 4 2 1 2 2 4 X 1 2 4 X 4 2 X 1 1 X 2 4 X X 4 4 4 1 1 1 4 1 X X X X X X X 1 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 X 4 4 X 4 4 X 4 2 X X 4 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 X X X X X X X 1 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 X 4 4 X 4 4 X 4 X X X 4 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 X X X X X X X 1 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 X 4 4 X 4 4 X 4 X X X 4 1 1 1 1 1 4 2 X X X X X X X 1 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 X 4 4 X 4 2 X 4 X X X 4 1 1 1 1 Hypalon CSM 1 4 1 X X X X X X X 1 4 1 2 2 4 4 4 X 2 4 4 X 4 4 X 4 4 X 3 2 X X 4 1 1 1 1 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 . the service temperature range may be significantly different. EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM 7-7 .5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended.

Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 .Satisfactory 2 .< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Compatibility Tables for Gases. EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM . PVMQ 1 1 2 1 2 2 1 X 1 4 4 1 X 1 2 X X X 4 X 4 X X X X 4 X X 4 X 2 X X X X X X X 2 2 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU. 7-8 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. Fluids. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Barium Hydroxide Barium Iodide Barium Nitrate Barium Oxide Barium Peroxide Barium Polysulfide Barium Salts Barium Sulfate Barium Sulfide Bayol 35 Bayol D Beer Beet Sugar Liquids Beet Sugar Liquors Benzaldehyde Benzaldehyde Disulfonic Acid Benzamide Benzanthrone Benzene Benzene Hexachloride Benzenesulfonic Acid 10% Benzidine Benzidine 3 Sulfonic Acid Benzil Benzilic Acid Benzine (Ligroin) Benzocatechol Benzochloride Benzoic Acid Benzoin Benzonitrile Benzophenone Benzoquinone Benzotrichloride Benzotrifluoride Benzoyl Chloride Benzoyl Peroxide Benzoylsulfonilic Acid Benzyl Acetate Benzyl Alcohol N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 E3609-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 FF200-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V3819-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 N0674-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V3819-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 1 1 3 1 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 X 2 2 4 X 4 2 2 2 2 1 2 4 4 2 3 X X 4 4 X X 2 3 4 1 1 3 1 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 X 2 2 4 X 4 2 2 2 2 1 2 4 4 2 3 X X 4 4 X X 2 3 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 1 1 1 1 X 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 1 2 2 1 1 X X 4 1 2 1 1 3 1 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 X 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 X X 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 2 X X X 2 X 2 X X X X 2 X 1 2 X X 2 2 1 1 X X X X 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 2 4 X 4 4 4 X 2 4 4 4 4 2 4 4 4 4 1 X X 4 4 4 X 4 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 2 4 4 1 1 4 X 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 X X 4 X 4 1 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 1 X 4 1 1 4 X 4 4 X 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X X 4 X 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 1 X 1 2 4 2 X 4 4 X 3 3 4 X 4 3 3 3 3 2 3 X 4 3 4 4 4 X X 3 X 3 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 4 4 1 X 1 1 X 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 4 4 1 2 2 X X 4 X 4 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 2 4 4 1 X 1 4 X 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 X X 4 X 4 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 4 4 1 X 1 4 X 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 X X 4 X 4 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 4 4 1 X 1 4 X 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 X X X X 4 X 4 1 4 Hypalon CSM 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 4 4 1 X 1 1 X 4 4 4 X 1 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 1 X X X X 4 X 4 1 2 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 .com Silicone MQ. VMQ. the service temperature range may be significantly different.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 .5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended.Unsatisfactory x .parkerorings. With some media however. Lexington.Insufficient Data 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 X 1 4 X 2 2 3 X 2 2 2 2 2 1 2 1 2 2 1 1 X X X 2 X 2 1 2 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS.

VMQ. the service temperature range may be significantly different. Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.Insufficient Data X 1 1 1 1 2 2 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 X X 3 2 2 X X 2 X 2 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 X X X X X X 4 4 4 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 .com Silicone MQ. EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM 7-9 . PVMQ X 4 4 2 4 X X 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 X X 3 1 2 X 2 2 X 2 1 2 X X X X 4 X X X X X X 4 3 3 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Benzyl Amine Benzyl Benzoate Benzyl Bromide Benzyl Butyl Phthalate Benzyl Chloride Benzyl Phenol Benzyl Salicylate Beryllium Chloride Beryllium Fluoride Beryllium Oxide Beryllium Sulfate Bismuth Carbonate Bismuth Nitrate Bismuth Oxychloride Bittern Black Liquor Black Point 77 Blast Furnace Gas Bleach Liquor Bleach Solutions Blood Borax Borax Solutions Bordeaux Mixture Boric Acid Boric Oxide Borneol Bornyl Acetate Bornyl Chloride Bornyl Formate Boron Fluids (HEF) Boron Hydride Boron Phosphate Boron Tribromide Boron Trichloride Boron Trifluoride Boron Trioxide BP Turbine Oil 2197 Brake Fluid DOT 3 (Glycol Type) Brake Fluid DOT 4 FF500-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V3819-75 E0540-80 N0674-70 S0604-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E3609-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 VM835-75 E0667-70 E0667-70 X 4 4 3 4 2 2 1 1 1 3 3 3 3 X 2 1 4 3 X 2 2 X 2 1 3 2 2 2 2 2 X X X X X X 4 3 3 X 4 4 3 4 2 2 1 1 1 3 3 3 3 X X 1 4 3 X 0 2 X 2 1 3 2 2 2 2 2 X X X X X X 4 3 3 X 4 4 1 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 X X X X X X 4 1 1 X 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 3 3 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 X X X X X X 3 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 2 2 X 2 X X 1 1 1 X X X X X 1 1 2 1 X 3 1 X 1 1 X X X X X 2 X X X X X X 2 2 2 X 4 4 1 4 4 4 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 X 1 3 4 2 X 1 4 X 2 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 X X X X X X 4 2 2 X 4 4 1 4 4 4 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 X X 3 4 3 X X 2 X 2 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 X X X X X X 4 1 1 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 X X 3 4 4 X X 2 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X X X X X X 4 X X X 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 X X 3 4 4 X X 1 X 4 1 4 3 3 3 3 4 X X X X X X 4 4 4 X 2 4 1 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X 1 4 1 X X 1 X 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 X X X X X X 4 2 2 X 4 4 1 4 4 4 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 X X 3 4 2 X X 2 X 2 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 X X X X X X 4 X X X 4 4 1 4 4 4 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 X X 3 4 2 X X 2 X 2 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 X X X X X X 4 X X X 4 4 1 4 4 4 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 X X 3 4 3 X X 2 X 2 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 X X X X X X 4 X X Hypalon CSM X 4 4 1 4 4 4 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 X X 3 4 1 X X 4 X 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 X X X X X X 4 2 2 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 .Unsatisfactory x .Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 . Fluids.parkerorings. With some media however. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS. Lexington. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.Satisfactory 2 .< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Compatibility Tables for Gases.

2. 2-Dimethyl Butane.113 Brom .Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 . the service temperature range may be significantly different. With some media however. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM .5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Brake Fluid DOT 5 Bray GG-130 Brayco 719-R (VV-H-910) Brayco 885 (MIL-L-6085A) Brayco 910 Bret 710 Brine Brine (Seawater) Brom .com Silicone MQ.parkerorings. Lexington.Satisfactory 2 . PVMQ 4 4 2 4 4 4 X X 4 4 2 4 4 4 4 4 2 4 X X X X 2 X 2 X 4 4 4 4 2 2 4 2 2 4 X 2 2 2 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU. 7-10 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. VMQ.Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 . 3-Dimethyl Butanedial Butanol (Butyl Alcohol) Butene 2-Ethyl (1-Butene 2-Ethyl) Butter Butter-Animal Fat Butyl Acetate or n-Butyl Acetate Butyl Acetyl Ricinoleate Butyl Acrylate Butyl Alcohol Butyl Alcohol (Secondary) E0667-70 V1164-75 E0603-70 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 V3819-75 V3819-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 Factory Factory V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 E0540-80 V3819-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 V1164-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 E1028-70 N0508-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 V1164-75 2 2 3 2 2 2 1 1 3 2 3 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 2 2 X X 3 X 1 1 4 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 4 2 4 1 2 1 2 3 2 2 2 1 1 3 2 3 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 2 2 X X 3 X 1 X 4 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 4 2 4 1 2 1 4 1 4 1 1 1 1 4 4 1 4 4 4 2 4 1 4 4 4 X X 1 X 4 X 4 4 4 4 1 2 4 1 1 2 1 1 2 2 1 1 4 1 4 4 1 1 X 2 3 1 4 4 1 1 3 1 1 1 X X 3 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 4 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 X 1 3 3 X 2 3 3 3 2 X 2 X 1 X X X X 2 X 2 2 2 2 X 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 1 2 4 2 4 2 2 X 2 4 2 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 X X 1 X 4 X 4 1 2 2 1 1 4 2 2 4 2 4 1 2 X 4 X 4 2 2 X X 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 X X 1 X 4 X 4 3 3 3 1 1 4 X 4 4 4 4 1 2 X 2 4 2 3 3 X X X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 X X 4 X 1 X 4 1 1 1 4 4 1 X 1 4 X 4 4 4 X 4 4 1 3 3 X X X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 X X X 4 X 2 X 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 4 X 4 4 1 4 2 4 1 1 X X 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 X X 1 X 4 X 4 4 4 4 1 2 4 3 2 2 1 4 2 2 X 4 2 4 1 1 X X X 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 X X 1 X 4 X 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 X 4 4 4 4 1 2 X 4 2 4 1 1 X X X 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 X X 1 X 4 X 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 X 4 4 4 4 1 2 X 4 2 4 1 1 X X X 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 X X 1 X 4 X 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 X 4 4 4 4 1 2 Hypalon CSM X 4 2 4 1 1 X X 4 2 1 4 4 4 1 4 1 4 4 4 X X 1 X 4 X 4 2 2 2 1 1 4 X 2 4 2 4 1 2 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 . 2. Fluids.114 Bromic Acid Bromine Bromine Pentafluoride Bromine Trifluoride Bromine Water Bromobenzene Bromobenzene Cyanide Bromochlorotrifluoroethane (Halothane) Bromoform Bromomethane (Methyl Bromide) Bromotrifluoroethylene (BFE) Bromotrifluoromethane (F-13B1) Brucine Sulfate Buffered Oxide Etchants Bunker Oil Bunker’s “C” (Fuel Oil) Butadiene (Monomer) Butane Butane.Unsatisfactory x .< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Compatibility Tables for Gases.Insufficient Data 3 2 2 2 4 4 X X X X 1 2 4 4 2 1 1 2 2 1 X X 1 X 1 X 1 3 3 3 1 1 3 X 1 4 2 4 1 2 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (.

EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM 7-11 . ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.Insufficient Data 2 4 1 1 X 1 4 4 1 2 1 3 1 1 1 X 1 2 1 2 2 2 4 X 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 2 1 1 3 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. Lexington. Fluids.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended.Unsatisfactory x . Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Butyl Alcohol (Tertiary) Butyl Amine or N-Butyl Amine Butyl Benzoate Butyl Benzoate or n-Butyl Benzoate Butyl Benzolate Butyl Butyrate or n-Butyl Butyrate Butyl Carbitol Butyl Cellosolve Butyl Cellosolve Acetate Butyl Cellosolve Adipate Butyl Chloride Butyl Ether or n-Butyl Ether Butyl Glycolate Butyl Lactate Butyl Laurate Butyl Mercaptan (Tertiary) Butyl Methacrylate Butyl Oleate Butyl Oxalate Butyl Stearate Butylbenzoic Acid Butylene Butyraldehyde Butyric Acid Butyric Anhydride Butyrolacetone Butyryl Chloride —C— Cadmium Chloride Cadmium Cyanide Cadmium Nitrate Cadmium Oxide Cadmium Sulfate Cadmium Sulfide Calcine Liquors Calcium Acetate Calcium Arsenate Calcium Benzoate Calcium Bicarbonate Calcium Bisulfide Calcium Bisulfite V1164-75 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 V3819-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 V3819-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 2 1 3 4 X 4 4 3 3 4 1 3 3 3 3 4 3 4 3 2 2 2 4 4 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 2 3 2 3 3 2 2 1 3 4 X 4 4 3 3 4 1 3 3 3 3 4 3 4 3 2 2 2 4 4 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 2 3 2 3 3 2 2 3 1 1 X 1 1 2 1 2 4 3 1 1 1 4 1 2 1 4 4 4 2 2 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 4 3 1 X 1 3 4 3 2 1 4 3 3 3 1 3 1 3 1 1 1 4 2 3 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 4 3 1 3 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 X X 2 2 X 2 X X X X X 2 X 2 X 2 2 1 X X X X X X X X X 1 2 X X X X 1 2 4 1 4 X 4 3 3 1 4 2 4 1 1 1 4 1 4 1 4 4 3 4 4 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 2 1 4 1 1 2 2 4 1 2 X 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 1 1 1 4 1 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 1 4 1 1 2 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 X X X X 4 4 4 1 3 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 X 3 4 4 X 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 3 2 4 1 1 X 1 1 2 1 2 4 3 1 1 1 4 1 2 1 4 4 4 2 2 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 2 4 1 4 X 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 1 1 1 4 1 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 1 4 1 1 4 2 4 1 4 X 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 1 1 1 4 1 X 1 4 4 4 4 X 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 4 1 1 4 2 4 1 4 X 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 1 1 1 4 1 4 1 4 4 4 4 X 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 4 1 1 4 Hypalon CSM 2 4 1 4 X 4 2 4 1 4 2 4 1 1 1 4 1 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 2 1 4 1 1 1 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 . the service temperature range may be significantly different. PVMQ 2 4 2 X X X 4 X 2 2 2 4 2 2 2 4 2 X 2 X X 4 4 X 2 2 X 2 2 2 2 2 2 X 4 2 X 2 2 3 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU. VMQ.com Silicone MQ.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Compatibility Tables for Gases. With some media however.Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 . Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.Satisfactory 2 .parkerorings.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 .

Satisfactory 2 .Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 . VMQ.Unsatisfactory x . Lexington.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Compatibility Tables for Gases. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS.Insufficient Data 1 X 1 1 1 1 X X 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 X 1 1 1 X X 1 X 1 1 X 1 X 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Calcium Bromide Calcium Carbide Calcium Carbonate Calcium Chlorate Calcium Chloride Calcium Chromate Calcium Cyanamide Calcium Cyanide Calcium Fluoride Calcium Gluconate Calcium Hydride Calcium Hydrosulfide Calcium Hydroxide Calcium Hypochlorite Calcium Hypophosphite Calcium Lactate Calcium Naphthenate Calcium Nitrate Calcium Oxalate Calcium Oxide Calcium Permanganate Calcium Peroxide Calcium Phenolsulfonate Calcium Phosphate Calcium Phosphate Acid Calcium Propionate Calcium Pyridine Sulfonate Calcium Salts Calcium Silicate Calcium Stearate Calcium Sulfamate Calcium Sulfate Calcium Sulfide Calcium Sulfite Calcium Thiocyanate Calcium Thiosulfate Calcium Tungstate Caliche Liquors Camphene Camphor N0674-70 V3819-75 N0674-70 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 V3819-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V3819-75 N0674-70 E0540-80 N0674-70 V3819-75 V3819-75 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 V3819-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 1 X 1 3 1 3 X 1 1 3 1 3 1 2 3 3 X 1 3 1 X X 3 1 3 3 X 1 1 2 2 3 1 1 3 2 3 1 2 2 1 X 1 3 1 3 X 1 1 3 1 3 1 2 3 3 X 1 3 1 X X 3 1 3 3 X 1 1 2 2 3 1 1 3 2 3 1 2 2 1 X 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 X X 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 1 X 1 3 1 3 X X 1 3 1 3 1 1 3 3 X 1 3 1 X X 3 1 3 3 X 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 3 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 X 1 X X 1 1 X 1 X 1 1 X X X 1 X 1 X X X 1 X X X 1 1 X X X 1 1 X 1 X 1 X X 1 X 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 X 1 1 1 X X 1 2 1 1 X 1 1 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 1 X 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 X 1 1 1 X X 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 4 4 1 2 2 1 2 1 1 4 4 1 X 3 4 1 4 X X 1 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 X 1 4 1 X X 4 1 4 4 X 1 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 1 X 3 4 1 4 X X 1 4 1 4 2 4 4 4 X 1 4 1 X X 4 1 4 4 X 1 X 3 3 4 1 1 4 1 4 1 3 3 1 X 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 X X 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 1 X 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 X 1 1 1 X X 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 4 4 1 2 2 1 2 1 1 4 4 1 X 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 X 1 1 1 X X 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 4 4 1 2 2 1 2 1 1 4 4 1 X 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 X 1 1 1 X X 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 4 4 1 2 2 1 2 1 1 4 4 Hypalon CSM 1 X 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 X X 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 . 7-12 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. the service temperature range may be significantly different.Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 . PVMQ 1 X 1 2 1 2 X 1 1 2 1 2 1 2 2 2 X 2 2 1 X X 2 1 2 2 X 2 X X X 2 1 1 2 1 2 2 X X Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU. Fluids.parkerorings. EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM . With some media however.com Silicone MQ.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended.

EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM 7-13 . Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Camphoric Acid Cane Sugar Liquors Capric Acid Caproic Acid Caproic Aldehyde Caprolactam Capronaldehyde Carbamate Carbazole Carbitol Carbolic Acid (Phenol) Carbon Bisulfide Carbon Dioxide Carbon Dioxide (Explosive Decompression Use) Carbon Disulfide Carbon Fluorides Carbon Monoxide Carbon Tetrabromide Carbon Tetrachloride Carbon Tetrafluoride Carbonic Acid Casein Castor Oil Caustic Lime Caustic Potash Caustic Soda (Sodium Hydroxide) Cellosolve Cellosolve.parkerorings. VMQ. Acetate Cellosolve.Insufficient Data 2 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 X 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 X 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 2 1 1 1 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (.Satisfactory 2 . Fluids.Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 . Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. With some media however. Butyl Celluguard Cellulose Acetate Cellulose Acetate Butyrate Cellulose Ether Cellulose Nitrate* Cellulose Tripropionate Cellulube (Phosphate Esters) Cellutherm 2505A Cerium Sulfate Cerous Chloride Cerous Fluoride V1164-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 V1164-75 V3819-75 E0540-80 V0494-70 V1164-75 N0674-70 E0962-90 V1164-75 V1164-75 N0674-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V3819-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 2 1 1 1 X 1 1 3 X 2 4 4 1 1 4 2 1 X 2 2 2 3 1 3 3 3 4 4 4 1 3 3 3 3 3 X 2 3 3 3 2 1 1 1 X 1 1 3 X 2 4 4 1 1 4 2 1 X 2 2 2 3 1 3 3 3 4 4 4 1 3 3 3 3 3 X 2 3 3 3 4 1 4 4 2 4 4 2 X 2 2 4 1 1 4 4 1 X 4 4 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 X 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 3 1 3 3 3 4 4 4 1 3 3 3 3 3 X 1 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 X X 3 X X 1 X 1 1 2 1 1 2 2 1 X 2 2 1 X 1 X X X 3 2 2 1 X X X X X X 2 X X X 4 1 2 2 X 2 2 2 X 2 4 4 1 1 4 4 2 X 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 1 1 1 4 1 4 4 X 4 4 4 X 2 4 4 1 1 4 4 2 X 4 4 2 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 1 1 1 4 4 1 1 4 1 1 4 X 4 4 3 1 1 3 4 X X 4 4 1 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 X 2 4 4 4 3 4 1 1 4 1 1 4 X 4 3 X 1 1 X 4 1 X 4 4 1 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 2 4 4 2 X 2 2 4 1 1 4 4 1 X 4 4 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 1 1 1 4 1 4 4 2 4 4 4 X 2 4 4 1 1 4 4 2 X 4 4 2 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 1 1 1 4 1 4 4 2 4 4 4 X 2 4 4 1 1 4 4 2 X 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 1 1 1 4 1 4 4 2 4 4 4 X 2 4 4 1 1 4 4 2 X 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 1 1 1 Hypalon CSM 4 1 2 2 X 2 2 2 X 2 4 4 1 1 4 4 2 X 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 1 1 1 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 . ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS. Lexington.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Compatibility Tables for Gases.com Silicone MQ. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. the service temperature range may be significantly different.Unsatisfactory x .5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended. PVMQ X 1 2 2 2 2 2 X X 2 4 4 1 1 4 4 1 X 4 4 1 2 1 2 2 2 4 4 4 1 2 2 2 2 2 X 4 2 2 2 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 .

Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 . the service temperature range may be significantly different. VMQ. 7-14 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.Satisfactory 2 .Insufficient Data 1 X 3 1 X 2 1 X 2 2 2 1 1 1 2 X X 2 2 4 X 4 X 2 1 4 4 X 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended.com Silicone MQ.parkerorings. Fluids. EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM . Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Cerous Nitrate Cesium Formate Cetane (Hexadecane) Cetyl Alcohol Chaulmoogric Acid China Wood Oil (Tung Oil) Chloral Chloramine Chloranthraquinone Chlordane Chlorextol Chloric Acid Chlorinated Solvents. Lexington.Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 . With some media however. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Compatibility Tables for Gases. Wet Chlorine (Dry) Chlorine (Plasma) Chlorine (Wet) Chlorine Dioxide Chlorine Dioxide. 8% Cl as NaClO2 in solution Chlorine Trifluoride Chlorine Water (Chemical Processing) Chloro 1-Nitro Ethane (1-Chloro 1-Nitro Ethane) Chloro Oxyfluorides Chloro Xylenols Chloroacetaldehyde Chloroacetic Acid Chloroacetone Chloroacetyl Chloride Chloroamino Benzoic Acid Chloroaniline Chlorobenzaldehyde Chlorobenzene Chlorobenzene (Mono) Chlorobenzene Chloride Chlorobenzene Trifluoride Chlorobenzochloride Chlorobenzotrifluoride Chlorobromo Methane Chlorobromopropane Chlorobutadiene E0540-80 E0962-90 N0674-70 N0674-70 V3819-75 N0674-70 E0540-80 E1257-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 Factory V1164-75 Factory V3819-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V3819-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 3 X 1 1 X 1 3 X 2 2 2 3 4 4 2 X X 4 4 4 3 4 X 2 3 4 4 X 3 3 3 4 4 2 2 2 2 4 2 4 3 X 1 1 X 1 3 X 2 2 2 3 4 4 2 X X 4 4 4 3 4 X 2 3 4 4 X 3 3 3 4 4 2 2 2 2 4 2 4 1 2 4 4 X 4 1 X 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 X X 3 4 4 2 4 X 4 1 2 1 X 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 4 4 3 4 1 1 X 1 3 X 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 X X 1 1 4 1 4 X 1 3 4 4 X 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X 2 X X 2 X X X 2 2 X 2 2 X X X 2 2 4 1 3 X X X 2 2 X X X X 2 2 X X X X 1 X 2 1 X 2 2 X 2 1 X 4 3 2 1 4 4 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 1 4 4 X 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 X 4 4 X 4 1 X 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 X X 4 4 4 X 4 X 4 1 4 4 X 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 1 1 X X 4 X 4 X 2 4 4 4 4 X X 4 4 4 X 4 X 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 1 X 3 4 X 3 X 4 4 4 4 3 X X 4 4 4 X 4 X 3 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 4 3 4 1 X 4 4 X 3 1 X 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 X X 3 4 4 X 4 X 4 1 2 2 X 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 4 4 1 X 4 4 X 4 1 X 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 X X 4 4 4 X 4 X 4 1 4 4 X 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 X 4 4 X 4 1 X 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 X X 4 4 4 X 4 X 4 1 4 4 X 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 X 4 4 X 4 1 X 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 X X 4 4 4 X 4 X 4 1 4 4 X 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 Hypalon CSM 1 X 2 2 X 3 1 X 4 3 4 1 4 4 4 X X 3 4 4 X 4 X 4 1 1 4 X 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 . PVMQ 2 X 4 2 X 4 2 X X 4 4 2 4 4 X X X X X 4 X 4 X X 2 X 4 X 2 2 2 4 4 X X X X 4 X 4 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU. Dry Chlorinated Solvents.Unsatisfactory x .

Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. the service temperature range may be significantly different. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Chlorobutane (Butyl Chloride) Chlorododecane Chloroethane Chloroethane Sulfonic Acid Chloroethylbenzene Chloroform Chlorohydrin Chloronaphthalene or o-Chloronaphthalene Chloronitrobenzene Chlorophenol or o-Chlorophenol Chloropicrin Chloroprene Chlorosilanes Chlorosulfonic Acid Chlorotoluene Chlorotoluene Sulfonic Acid Chlorotoluidine Chlorotrifluoroethylene (CTFE) Chlorox Chloroxylols Cholesterol Chrome Alum Chrome Plating Solutions Chromic Acid Chromic Chloride Chromic Fluorides Chromic Hydroxide Chromic Nitrates Chromic Oxide Chromic Phosphate Chromic Sulfate Chromium Potassium Sulfate (Alum) Chromyl Chlorides Cinnamic Acid Cinnamic Alcohol Cinnamic Aldehyde Circo Light Process Oil Citric Acid City Service #65 #120 #250 City Service Koolmoter-AP Gear Oil 140-EP Lube N0674-70 V1164-75 N0674-70 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V3819-75 Factory V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 V3819-75 E0540-80 V3819-75 V1164-75 N0674-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 V1164-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 V1164-75 V3819-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 N0674-70 C0873-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 1 4 1 3 2 4 3 4 3 4 2 2 X 4 4 3 2 X 2 X 2 1 4 4 X X X X 4 X X 2 X 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 3 2 4 3 4 3 4 2 2 X 4 4 3 2 X 2 X 2 1 4 4 X X X X 4 X X X X 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 1 4 4 1 4 1 4 4 4 X 4 4 1 4 X 1 X 4 1 2 2 X X X X 2 X X 2 X 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 1 1 1 3 1 1 3 1 3 1 1 1 X 4 1 3 1 X 1 X 1 1 1 1 X X X X 1 X X 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 2 X X X 2 X X X X X X X 4 2 X X X 1 X X 1 1 X X X X X 1 X X 2 X X X X 2 1 2 2 2 4 2 1 4 4 1 4 1 4 4 4 X 4 4 1 4 X 2 X 4 1 4 4 X X X X 4 X X X X 4 4 4 2 1 2 2 4 4 4 1 4 4 1 4 1 4 4 4 X 4 4 1 4 X 4 X 4 1 4 4 X X X X X X X X X 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 1 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 X 4 X 4 4 4 4 X X X X X X X X X 4 4 4 1 X 1 1 1 4 1 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 X 4 4 4 3 X 4 X 3 X 4 3 X X X X X X X X X 3 3 3 1 1 2 1 4 4 4 1 4 4 1 4 1 4 4 4 X 4 4 1 4 X 2 X 4 1 2 4 X X X X X X X X X 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 1 4 1 4 4 4 X 4 4 1 4 X 4 X 4 1 4 4 X X X X X X X X X 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 1 4 1 4 4 4 X 4 4 1 4 X 4 X 4 1 4 4 X X X X X X X X X 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 1 4 1 4 4 4 X 4 4 1 4 X 4 X 4 1 4 4 X X X X X X X X X 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 Hypalon CSM 2 4 2 1 4 4 1 4 1 4 4 4 X 4 4 1 4 X 2 X 4 1 4 4 X X X X X X X X X 4 4 4 2 1 4 2 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 .Satisfactory 2 . Fluids. Lexington. VMQ. PVMQ 2 4 2 2 X 4 2 4 2 4 X X X 4 4 2 X X X X X 1 2 X X X X X X X X X X X X X 4 1 4 4 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU.Insufficient Data 1 1 1 1 2 4 1 2 1 2 2 2 X 4 2 1 2 X 1 X 2 X 2 2 X X X X X X X X X 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM 7-15 .com Silicone MQ. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended.parkerorings.Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 .Unsatisfactory x . With some media however.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 .< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Compatibility Tables for Gases.

parkerorings. the service temperature range may be significantly different. Coal Tar Creosote. With some media however. Fluids. Lexington. 2N Cobaltous Acetate Cobaltous Bromide Cobaltous Linoleate Cobaltous Naphthenate Cobaltous Sulfate Coconut Oil Cod Liver Oil Codeine Coffee Coke Oven Gas Coliche Liquors Convelex 10 Coolanol 20 25R 35R 40& 45A (Monsanto) Copper Acetate Copper Ammonium Acetate Copper Carbonate Copper Chloride Copper Cyanide Copper Gluconate Copper Naphthenate Copper Nitrate Copper Oxide Copper Salts Copper Sulfate Copper Sulfate 10% Copper Sulfate 50% Corn Oil Cottonseed Oil Creosote. VMQ. Wood Cresol (Methyl Phenol) Cresols Cresylic Acid Crotonaldehyde Crotonic Acid N0674-70 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 N0674-70 V3819-75 V3819-75 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 V1164-75 N0508-75 V1164-75 C0873-70 Factory V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 V3819-75 V1164-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 V1164-75 V0834-70 V0834-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 1 2 1 1 1 3 1 X X 3 1 1 2 1 4 2 4 1 2 3 3 1 1 3 X 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 4 2 2 1 2 X 1 1 3 1 X X 3 1 1 2 1 4 2 4 1 2 3 3 1 1 3 X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 4 2 2 4 1 X 1 1 1 1 X X 1 3 1 4 1 4 2 X 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 2 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 X X 3 1 1 1 1 1 X X 1 4 3 3 1 1 3 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 X X 1 1 X 1 X X X 2 1 X 1 2 2 X 2 2 X X 1 1 X X 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 X 2 2 X X 2 X X 1 1 1 1 X X 1 3 2 4 1 4 1 4 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 X X 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 2 2 X 4 4 4 4 4 X X 1 1 1 1 X X 1 4 4 4 1 4 2 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 X X 1 1 2 2 2 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 1 X X 1 4 4 4 X X 4 1 1 4 4 4 X X 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 X X 1 1 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 X 4 4 4 4 2 X X 1 4 4 4 X X 4 3 1 3 4 4 X 2 1 4 4 4 1 1 4 X X 1 1 1 2 3 1 1 3 3 X X 4 3 3 4 X X 1 1 1 1 X X 1 3 1 4 1 4 2 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X 1 1 2 2 2 3 3 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 X X 1 1 1 1 X X 1 4 4 4 1 4 1 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 X X 1 1 2 2 2 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 X X 1 1 1 1 X X 1 4 4 4 1 4 1 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X 1 1 2 2 2 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 X X 1 1 1 1 X X 1 4 4 4 1 4 1 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X 1 1 2 2 1 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 Hypalon CSM 4 X X 1 1 1 1 X X 1 3 2 4 1 4 X 4 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 X X 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS.Unsatisfactory x . 7-16 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended City Service Pacemaker #2 Clorox Coal Tar Cobalt Chloride Cobalt Chloride. EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM .Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 .5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Compatibility Tables for Gases.Insufficient Data 1 X X 1 1 1 1 X X 1 1 1 2 1 2 X X 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 X X X 2 2 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. PVMQ 4 X X 2 1 2 1 X X 2 1 2 X 1 2 X 4 4 4 2 2 1 1 2 X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 X 4 4 X X Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU.Satisfactory 2 .Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 .com Silicone MQ.

Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 . EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM 7-17 .Satisfactory 2 .Insufficient Data 2 2 2 X X 1 X X X X X X 1 1 4 2 1 X 1 2 1 1 2 2 1 1 4 1 1 1 2 1 1 X 1 X 1 4 4 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. With some media however.parkerorings.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 . Water Solution Developing Fluids (Photo) Dexron Dextrin Dextro Lactic Acid Dextron Dextrose DF200 DI Water Diacetone Diacetone Alcohol V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V3819-75 V1164-75 N0674-70 V3819-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 V1164-75 N0674-70 FF500-75 N0674-70 V1164-75 N0674-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 N0674-70 E0667-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 2 2 4 X 2 1 X X X X X X 1 1 4 2 1 X 1 2 1 1 4 2 4 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 3 X 2 4 4 2 2 4 X X 1 X X X X X X 1 1 4 2 1 X 1 2 1 1 4 2 4 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 3 X X 4 4 4 4 4 X 2 4 X X X X X X 4 4 2 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 2 4 4 1 4 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 X X X X X X 1 1 4 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 3 X 2 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 2 X 2 X 2 2 X X X X X X 2 2 3 X X X X X 2 2 X X 2 2 2 1 1 1 2 X X 1 X X X 2 2 4 4 4 X X 2 X X X X X X 3 2 4 4 2 X 2 4 3 3 4 4 4 3 2 1 2 1 2 2 1 2 1 X 1 4 2 4 4 4 X X 4 X X X X X X 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 2 2 4 4 1 X 1 X 1 4 4 1 4 4 X X 1 X X X X X X 2 X 4 4 1 X 1 4 2 2 4 4 X 1 X 4 4 X 1 1 4 X 4 X 4 4 4 X 3 4 X X 1 X X X X X X 1 X 4 3 1 X 1 3 1 1 4 3 X 2 X 4 4 X 2 1 4 X 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 X X 4 X X X X X X 4 4 2 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 1 1 2 4 4 1 X 1 X 1 1 1 4 4 4 X X 4 X X X X X X 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 1 2 2 4 4 1 X 1 X 1 4 4 4 4 4 X X 4 X X X X X X 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 1 2 1 4 4 1 X 1 X 1 4 4 4 4 4 X X 4 X X X X X X 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 1 2 1 4 4 1 X 1 X 1 4 4 Hypalon CSM 4 4 4 X X 2 X X X X X X 4 2 4 4 2 X 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 2 1 2 1 4 2 1 X 1 X 1 4 2 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 .com Silicone MQ. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended. Fluids. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. the service temperature range may be significantly different.Unsatisfactory x .< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Compatibility Tables for Gases. Lexington. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Crude Oil Cumaldehyde Cumene Cumene Hydroperoxide Cupric Sulfate Cutting Oil Cyanamide Cyanides Cyanogen Chloride Cyanogen Gas Cyanohydrin Cyanuric Chloride Cyclohexane Cyclohexanol Cyclohexanone Cyclohexene Cyclohexylamine Cyclohexylamine Carbonate Cyclohexylamine Laurate Cyclopentadiene Cyclopentane Cyclopolyolefins Cymene or p-Cymene —D— DDT (Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane) Decalin Decane Delco Brake Fluid Denatured Alcohol Detergent. PVMQ 4 X 4 X X 4 X X X X X X 4 4 4 X 2 X 2 X 4 4 4 X 4 2 3 1 1 1 4 2 2 X 2 X 2 4 4 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU. Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. VMQ.

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Parker O-Ring Handbook

Compatibility Tables for Gases, Fluids, Solids

Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM

Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR

Neoprene/Chloroprene CR

Ethylene Propylene EPDM

Perfluoroelastomer FFKM

Polyacrylate ACM

Butadiene BR

Recommended
Dialkyl Sulfates Diallyl Ether Diallyl Phthalate Diamylamine Diazinon Dibenzyl (sym-Diphenylethane) Dibenzyl Ether Dibenzyl Sebacate Diborane Dibromoethane Dibromoethyl Benzene Dibutyl Cellosolve Adipate Dibutyl Ether Dibutyl Methylenedithio Glycolate Dibutyl Phthalate Dibutyl Sebacate Dibutyl Thioglycolate Dibutyl Thiourea Dibutylamine Dichloroacetic Acid Dichloroaniline Dichlorobenzene or o-Dichlorobenzene Dichlorobenzene or p-Dichlorobenzene Dichlorobutane Dichlorobutene Dichlorodiphenyl-Dichloroethane (DDD) Dichloroethane Dichloroethylene Dichlorohydrin Dichloroisopropyl Ether Dichloromethane Dichlorophenol Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid Dichloropropane Dichloropropene Dichlorosilane Dicyclohexylamine Dicyclohexylammonium Nitrate Dicyclopentadiene Dieldrin E0540-80 V3819-75 V3819-75 N0674-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 Factory V1164-75 V3819-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 Factory V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 Factory V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V3819-75 N0674-70 E0540-80 V3819-75 V1164-75

3 X X 1 3 2 4 4 X 2 4 3 4 2 4 4 2 2 4 2 3 4 4 2 2 2 2 2 3 4 2 2 2 2 2 X 1 3 X 2

3 X X 1 3 2 4 4 X 2 4 3 4 2 4 4 2 2 4 2 3 4 4 2 2 2 2 2 3 4 2 2 2 2 2 X 1 3 X 2

1 X X 4 4 4 2 2 X 4 4 1 3 4 2 2 4 4 1 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 3 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 1 X 4

3 X X 1 2 1 4 2 X 1 1 3 3 1 3 2 1 1 4 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 3 X 1

1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

X X X X 2 X 2 2 X X 2 X 3 X 3 2 X X 4 X X X X 2 X X X X X 3 X X X X X X 4 X X X

1 X X 2 3 4 4 4 X 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 1 X 4

1 X X 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 1 X 4

4 X X 1 X 4 X 4 X 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 X 4

4 X X 1 X 3 2 2 X 3 4 4 2 3 3 4 3 3 4 3 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 4 2 3 3 3 3 3 X 4 4 X 3

1 X X 4 4 4 2 2 X 4 4 1 3 4 3 2 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 1 X 4

1 X X 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 1 X 4

1 X X 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 1 X 4

1 X X 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 1 X 4

Hypalon CSM
1 X X 2 3 4 4 4 X 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 1 X 4

Hifluor FKM

Isoprene IR

Nitrile NBR

Butyl IIR

COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 - Satisfactory 2 - Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 - Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 - Unsatisfactory x - Insufficient Data

1 X X 1 2 2 X 3 X 2 2 1 3 2 3 2 2 2 4 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 3 2 2 2 2 2 X 4 1 X 2

Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types*
Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (- 5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)*

NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended. With some media however, the service temperature range may be significantly different. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS.

7-18

Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division
2360 Palumbo Drive, Lexington, KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.parkerorings.com

Silicone MQ, VMQ, PVMQ
2 X X 2 4 X X 3 X X 4 2 4 X 2 2 X X 3 X 2 4 4 4 X X X X 2 4 X X X X X X 2 2 X X

Styrene-Butadiene SBR

Fluorosilicone FVMQ

Polyurethane AU, EU

Natural Rubber NR

Fluorocarbon FKM

< Back

Section Contents
Parker O-Ring Handbook

Table of Contents

Search

Next >

Compatibility Tables for Gases, Fluids, Solids

Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM

Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR

Neoprene/Chloroprene CR

Ethylene Propylene EPDM

Perfluoroelastomer FFKM

Polyacrylate ACM

Butadiene BR

Recommended
Diesel Oil Di-ester Lubricant MIL-L-7808 Di-ester Synthetic Lubricants Diethanolamine (DEA) Diethyl Benzene Diethyl Carbonate Diethyl Ether Diethyl Phthalate Diethyl Sebacate Diethyl Sulfate Diethylamine Diethylaniline Diethylene Glycol Diethylene Glycol B Diethylenetriamine Difluorodibromomethane Difluoroethane Difluoromonochloroethane Diglycol Chloroformate Diglycolamine Diglycolic Acid Dihydroxydiphenylsulfone Diisobutyl Ketone Diisobutylcarbinol Diisobutylene Diisooctyl Sebacate Diisopropyl Ether (DIPE) Diisopropyl Ketone Diisopropylbenzene Diisopropylidene Acetone Dimethoxyethane (DME) Dimethyl Acetamide Dimethylaniline (Xylidine) Dimethyldisulfide (DMDS) Dimethyl Ether Dimethyl Formaldehyde Dimethyl Formamide (DMF) Dimethylhydrazine Dimethyl Phenyl Carbinol Dimethyl Phenyl Methanol N0674-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 Factory V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V3819-75 FF500-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 C0873-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 V3819-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75

1 2 2 3 X 3 4 2 2 4 2 3 1 X X 4 2 2 3 X 3 3 X 1 2 3 X 4 2 2 X 3 2 1 1 3 2 3 2 2

1 2 2 3 X 3 4 2 2 X X 3 1 X X 4 2 2 3 X 3 3 X 1 2 3 X 4 2 2 X 3 2 1 X 3 2 3 2 2

4 4 4 1 X 1 4 4 2 1 1 1 1 X X 2 4 4 1 X 1 1 1 4 4 3 X 1 4 4 X 1 4 4 2 1 1 1 4 4

1 1 1 3 1 3 4 1 2 3 4 3 1 X X X 1 1 3 X 3 3 X 1 1 2 X 4 1 1 X 3 1 1 2 3 4 3 1 1

1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 2 2 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

2 2 2 X X X 4 X 2 2 X X 1 X X 2 X X X X X X 1 X 2 2 X 2 X X X X X X 4 X 2 X X X

3 4 4 1 X 1 3 4 4 4 1 1 1 X X 4 4 4 1 X 1 1 X 2 4 4 X 4 4 4 X 1 4 2 3 1 3 1 4 4

4 4 4 1 X 1 4 4 4 X 1 1 1 X X 4 4 4 1 X 1 1 X 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 X 1 4 4 X 1 4 1 4 4

1 2 2 4 X 4 3 4 4 X 4 4 2 X X 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 X 1 4 4 X 4 4 4 X 4 4 1 X 4 4 4 4 4

3 4 4 4 X 4 1 3 4 X 4 4 4 X X 4 3 3 4 X 4 4 X 1 4 4 X 4 3 3 X 4 3 1 X 4 4 4 3 3

4 4 4 1 X 1 4 4 2 X 1 1 1 X X 2 4 4 1 X 1 1 1 4 4 4 X 1 4 4 X 1 4 4 X 1 2 1 4 4

4 4 4 1 X 1 4 4 4 X 1 1 1 X X 4 4 4 1 X 1 1 X 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 X 1 4 4 X 1 X 1 4 4

4 4 4 1 X 1 4 4 4 X 1 1 1 X X 4 4 4 1 X 1 1 X 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 X 1 4 4 X 1 X 1 4 4

4 4 4 1 X 1 4 4 4 X 1 1 1 X X 4 4 4 1 X 1 1 X 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 X 1 4 4 X 1 4 1 4 4

Hypalon CSM
3 4 4 1 X 1 4 4 4 X 1 1 1 X X 4 4 4 1 X 1 1 X 2 4 4 X 4 4 4 X 1 4 2 X 1 4 1 4 4

Hifluor FKM

Isoprene IR

Nitrile NBR

Butyl IIR

COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 - Satisfactory 2 - Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 - Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 - Unsatisfactory x - Insufficient Data

1 2 2 1 X 1 3 2 2 X 1 1 1 X X X 2 2 1 X 1 1 X 1 3 3 X 4 2 2 X 4 2 1 X 1 4 1 2 2

Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types*
Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (- 5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)*

NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended. With some media however, the service temperature range may be significantly different. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS. Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division
2360 Palumbo Drive, Lexington, KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.parkerorings.com

Silicone MQ, VMQ, PVMQ
4 4 4 2 X 2 4 X 2 2 2 2 2 X X 4 X X 2 X 2 2 X 2 4 3 X 4 X X X 2 X 2 X 2 2 2 X X

Styrene-Butadiene SBR

Fluorosilicone FVMQ

Polyurethane AU, EU

Natural Rubber NR

Fluorocarbon FKM

7-19

< Back

Section Contents

Table of Contents

Search

Next >

Parker O-Ring Handbook

Compatibility Tables for Gases, Fluids, Solids

Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM

Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR

Neoprene/Chloroprene CR

Ethylene Propylene EPDM

Perfluoroelastomer FFKM

Polyacrylate ACM

Butadiene BR

Recommended
Dimethyl Phthalate Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO) Dimethyl Terephthalate (DMT) Dimethylamine (DMA) Dinitrochlorobenzene Dinitrogen Tetroxide Dinitrotoluene (DNT) Dioctyl Phthalate Dioctyl Sebacate Dioctylamine Dioxane Dioxolane Dipentene Diphenyl Diphenyl Oxides Diphenylamine (DPA) Diphenylene Oxide Diphenylpropane Disilane Di-Tert-Butyl Peroxide D-Limonene Dodecylbenzene Dow Chemical 50-4 Dow Chemical ET378 Dow Chemical ET588 Dow Corning -11 Dow Corning 1208, 4050, 6620, F-60, XF-60 Dow Corning -1265 Fluorosilicone Fluid Dow Corning -200 Dow Corning -220 Dow Corning -3 Dow Corning -33 Dow Corning -4 Dow Corning -44 Dow Corning -5 Dow Corning -510 Dow Corning -55 Dow Corning -550 Dow Corning -704 Dow Corning -705 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 FF500-75 Factory V1164-75 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V3819-75 V1164-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 Factory E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80

4 3 2 2 2 X 4 4 4 1 4 4 2 4 4 2 X 2 X X X 2 X 4 3 2 1 2 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

4 3 2 2 2 X 4 4 4 1 4 4 2 4 4 2 X 2 X X X 2 X 4 3 2 1 2 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

2 1 4 1 4 X 4 2 2 4 2 2 4 4 4 4 X 4 X X X 4 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

2 3 1 4 1 X 4 2 2 1 4 4 1 1 1 1 X 1 X X X 1 4 X 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 3 X 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 2 X 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

2 X X 2 X X 4 2 2 X 3 3 2 2 2 X X X X X X X 2 X 2 1 1 1 1 1 X X X X X X X X X X

4 1 4 2 4 X 4 4 4 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 X X X 4 2 4 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

4 1 4 2 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 X X X 4 1 4 1 1 X 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 X X X 4 X 3 X 1 X 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

X 4 3 3 3 X 4 4 2 1 4 4 4 4 4 3 X 3 X X X 3 X 2 X 1 X 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

2 1 4 2 4 X 4 2 2 4 2 3 4 4 4 4 X 4 X X X 4 2 4 2 1 X 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

4 1 4 2 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 X X X 4 X 4 X 1 X 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

4 1 4 2 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 X X X 4 X 4 X 1 X 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

4 1 4 2 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 X X X 4 X 4 X 1 X 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Hypalon CSM
4 1 4 3 4 X 4 4 4 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 X X X 4 2 4 2 1 X 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Hifluor FKM

Isoprene IR

Nitrile NBR

Butyl IIR

COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 - Satisfactory 2 - Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 - Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 - Unsatisfactory x - Insufficient Data

2 1 2 4 2 X 4 2 3 1 4 4 2 2 2 2 X 2 X X X 2 4 X 4 1 X 3 2 X 1 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types*
Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (- 5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)*

NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended. With some media however, the service temperature range may be significantly different. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS.

7-20

Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division
2360 Palumbo Drive, Lexington, KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.parkerorings.com

Silicone MQ, VMQ, PVMQ
X 2 X 2 X X 4 3 3 2 4 4 4 4 3 X X X X X X X X 4 X 2 X 1 3 X 2 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Styrene-Butadiene SBR

Fluorosilicone FVMQ

Polyurethane AU, EU

Natural Rubber NR

Fluorocarbon FKM

< Back

Section Contents
Parker O-Ring Handbook

Table of Contents

Search

Next >

Compatibility Tables for Gases, Fluids, Solids

Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM

Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR

Neoprene/Chloroprene CR

Ethylene Propylene EPDM

Perfluoroelastomer FFKM

Polyacrylate ACM

Butadiene BR

Recommended
Dow Corning -710 Dow Corning F-61 Dow Guard Dowanol P Mix Dowtherm, 209 Dowtherm, A Dowtherm, E Drinking Water Dry Cleaning Fluids DTE 20 Series, Mobil DTE named series, Mobil, light-heavy —E— Elco 28-EP lubricant Epichlorohydrin Epoxy Resins Erucic Acid Esam-6 Fluid Esso Fuel 208 Esso Golden Gasoline Esso Motor Oil Esso Transmission Fluid (Type A) Esso WS2812 (MIL-L-7808A) Esso XP90-EP Lubricant Esstic 42, 43 Ethane Ethanol Ethanol Amine Ethers Ethoxyethyl Acetate (EGMEEA) Ethyl Acetate-Organic Ester Ethyl Acetoacetate Ethyl Acrylate Ethyl Alcohol Ethyl Ammonium Dichloride Ethyl Benzene Ethyl Benzoate Ethyl Bromide E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 V3819-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 E3609-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 V3819-75 E0540-80 N0674-70 V1164-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 V1164-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 V3819-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V3819-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75

2 1 1 X 3 4 4 1 3 2 1 1 4 X X X 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 2 4 3 4 4 4 3 X 4 4 2

2 1 1 X 3 4 4 1 3 2 1 1 4 X X X 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 2 4 3 4 4 4 3 X 4 4 2

1 1 1 X 1 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 2 1 X 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 3 1 2 2 2 1 X 4 4 4

1 1 1 X 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 X 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 4 3 3 4 4 4 3 X 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

X 1 X X X X X X X 2 2 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

1 1 1 X 2 4 4 2 4 1 2 3 4 1 X 2 2 4 3 2 4 2 2 2 1 2 4 1 4 4 4 1 X 4 4 4

1 X 1 X X 4 4 1 4 X 4 4 4 X X 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 2 4 1 4 3 4 1 X 4 4 X

1 X 3 X X 4 4 4 4 2 X 1 4 X X X 1 4 1 1 2 1 1 1 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 X

1 X 3 X X 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 4 X X X 4 4 4 3 4 1 2 3 4 3 2 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 X

1 X 1 X 2 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 2 1 X 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 2 4 1 2 2 2 1 X 4 4 4

1 X 1 X X 4 4 1 4 X 4 4 4 X X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 2 4 1 4 3 4 1 X 4 4 4

1 X 1 X X 4 4 1 4 X X 4 4 X X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 2 4 1 4 3 4 1 X 4 4 4

1 X 1 X X 4 4 1 4 2 3 4 4 X X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 2 4 1 4 3 4 1 X 4 4 4

Hypalon CSM
1 X 1 X X 4 4 1 4 2 1 4 4 X X 2 3 4 4 4 4 2 4 2 1 3 4 1 4 4 4 1 X 4 4 4

Hifluor FKM

Isoprene IR

Nitrile NBR

Butyl IIR

COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 - Satisfactory 2 - Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 - Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 - Unsatisfactory x - Insufficient Data

2 X 1 X 3 2 2 1 2 2 1 1 4 X X 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 4 3 1 4 4 4 1 X 1 1 1

Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types*
Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (- 5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)*

NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended. With some media however, the service temperature range may be significantly different. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS. Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division
2360 Palumbo Drive, Lexington, KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.parkerorings.com

Silicone MQ, VMQ, PVMQ
3 X 1 X 3 4 4 1 4 4 3 2 4 X X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 2 4 2 2 2 2 2 X 4 4 X

Styrene-Butadiene SBR

Fluorosilicone FVMQ

Polyurethane AU, EU

Natural Rubber NR

Fluorocarbon FKM

7-21

< Back

Section Contents

Table of Contents

Search

Next >

Parker O-Ring Handbook

Compatibility Tables for Gases, Fluids, Solids

Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM

Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR

Neoprene/Chloroprene CR

Ethylene Propylene EPDM

Perfluoroelastomer FFKM

Polyacrylate ACM

Butadiene BR

Recommended
Ethyl Cellosolve Ethyl Cellulose Ethyl Chloride Ethyl Chlorocarbonate Ethyl Chloroformate Ethyl Ether Ethyl Formate Ethyl Hexanol Ethyl Lactate Ethyl Mercaptan Ethyl Nitrite Ethyl Oxalate Ethyl Pentachlorobenzene Ethyl Pyridine Ethyl Silicate Ethyl Stearate Ethyl Sulfate Ethyl Tertiary Butyl Ether Ethyl Valerate Ethylacrylic Acid Ethylamine Ethylcyclopentane Ethylene Ethylene Chloride Ethylene Chlorohydrin Ethylene Cyanohydrin Ethylene Diamine Ethylene Dibromide Ethylene Dichloride Ethylene Glycol Ethylene Hydrochloride Ethylene Oxide Ethylene Oxide, (12%) and Freon 12 (80%) Ethylene Trichloride Ethyleneimine Ethylmorpholene Stannous Octotate (50/50 mixture) Ethylmorpholine Ethylsulfuric Acid E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 V1164-75 E0540-80 Factory V1164-75 N0674-70 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 V3819-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 V8545-75 V3819-75 V1164-75 V3819-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80

4 2 1 4 4 3 4 1 3 4 3 4 4 2 1 2 X X 2 4 3 1 3 4 4 2 1 4 4 1 4 4 3 4 X 4 2 3

4 2 1 4 4 3 4 1 3 4 3 4 4 2 1 2 X X 2 4 3 1 2 4 4 2 1 4 4 1 4 4 3 4 X 4 2 3

2 2 3 2 2 3 2 1 1 X 1 1 4 4 1 4 1 X 4 2 1 4 4 4 2 4 1 3 3 1 3 3 2 3 X 2 4 1

4 4 1 1 4 4 1 1 3 2 3 2 1 1 1 1 4 X 1 X 3 1 2 2 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 4 4 1 X 4 1 3

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

4 2 4 4 4 4 2 1 1 3 1 4 4 4 1 4 X X 4 2 1 3 4 4 2 4 1 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 X X 4 1

4 2 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 1 4 4 4 2 4 X X 4 4 1 4 4 4 2 4 2 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 1

4 4 3 4 4 4 X 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 X 4 X X 4 4 4 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X X 4 4

4 2 2 4 4 2 X 4 4 X 4 X 4 3 X 3 X X 3 4 4 1 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 2 4 4 4 4 X X 3 4

2 2 4 4 3 3 2 1 1 4 1 4 4 4 1 4 X X 4 2 1 4 4 4 2 4 1 3 3 1 3 3 2 3 X 2 4 1

4 2 2 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 1 4 4 4 2 4 X X 4 4 1 4 4 4 2 4 2 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 X X 4 1

4 2 1 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 1 1 4 4 2 4 X X 4 4 1 4 4 4 2 4 1 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 X X 4 1

4 2 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 1 4 4 4 2 4 X X 4 4 1 4 4 4 2 4 1 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 X X 4 1

Hypalon CSM
4 2 4 4 4 4 2 1 1 3 1 4 4 4 2 4 X X 4 4 1 4 4 4 2 4 2 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 X X 4 1

Hifluor FKM

Isoprene IR

Nitrile NBR

Butyl IIR

COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 - Satisfactory 2 - Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 - Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 - Unsatisfactory x - Insufficient Data

4 4 1 2 4 3 1 1 1 X 1 2 2 2 1 2 X X 2 4 1 1 2 2 2 2 4 3 3 1 3 4 4 3 X X 2 1

Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types*
Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (- 5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)*

NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended. With some media however, the service temperature range may be significantly different. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS.

7-22

Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division
2360 Palumbo Drive, Lexington, KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.parkerorings.com

Silicone MQ, VMQ, PVMQ
4 2 4 4 4 4 X 2 2 3 2 4 4 X X X X X X 4 2 4 4 4 3 X 1 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 X X X 2

Styrene-Butadiene SBR

Fluorosilicone FVMQ

Polyurethane AU, EU

Natural Rubber NR

Fluorocarbon FKM

parkerorings. 113 (Trichlorotrifluoroethane) Freon. With some media however. 113 + High and Low Aniline Oil E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 V3819-75 V3819-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 N0674-70 E0540-80 FF500-75 E0540-80 V3819-75 N0674-70 V3819-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V3819-75 V1164-75 C0873-70 N0674-70 1 1 2 1 1 3 3 1 3 3 1 1 1 3 3 3 X 3 3 3 2 X X X 4 2 1 X X 1 X 1 X 3 3 X 4 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 3 3 1 3 3 1 1 1 3 3 3 X 3 3 3 2 X X X 4 2 X X X 1 X 1 X 3 3 X 4 2 1 X 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 4 2 1 X 4 4 1 1 X 1 X 2 X 2 1 1 4 4 4 X 1 1 1 1 2 3 3 1 3 3 1 1 1 3 3 3 X 3 3 3 1 X X X 2 1 X X X 2 X 2 X 4 3 4 2 1 2 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 3 3 X X X X X X X X X X X 1 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 1 X X X 3 X X X 4 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 4 X X X X 4 X X X 1 X 1 X 3 1 1 4 2 1 X 1 1 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 4 X X X X 4 X X X 4 X X X 3 1 X 4 4 2 X 1 1 X X X 4 4 1 4 4 1 X X 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 X X X X 4 X X X X X X X 4 4 X 4 X X X 1 1 X X X 4 4 1 4 4 1 X X 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 3 X X X X 3 X X X X X X X 4 4 X X X 1 X 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 4 X X X X 4 X X X 1 X X X 2 1 X 4 4 4 X 1 1 4 X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 4 X X X X 4 X X X X X X X 2 1 X X X X X 1 1 4 X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 4 X X X X 4 X X X X X X X 2 1 X X X X X 1 1 4 X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 4 X X X X 4 X X X X X X X 2 1 X 4 4 4 X Hypalon CSM 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 X X 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 4 X X X X 4 X X X 1 X X X 2 1 X 1 2 1 X Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 .Unsatisfactory x .Insufficient Data 1 1 X 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 2 X X X X 2 X X X 2 X X X 4 3 X 2 X X X Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended.Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 . 11 (Trichlorofluoromethane) Freon. Lexington. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended —F— F-60 Fluid (Dow Corning) F-61 Fluid (Dow Corning) Fatty Acids FC-43 Heptacosofluorotri-butylamine FC75 & FC77 (Fluorocarbon) Ferric Acetate Ferric Ammonium Sulfate Ferric Chloride Ferric Ferrocyanide Ferric Hydroxide Ferric Nitrate Ferric Persulfate Ferric Sulfate Ferrous Ammonium Citrate Ferrous Ammonium Sulfate Ferrous Carbonate Ferrous Chloride Ferrous Iodide Ferrous Sulfate Ferrous Tartrate Fish Oil Fisher Reagent Fluorinated Cyclic Ethers Fluorine (Gas) Fluorine (Liquid) Fluorobenzene Fluoroboric Acid Fluorocarbon Oils Fluoroform (Trifluoromethane) Fluorolube Fluorophosphoric Acid Fluorosilicic Acid Fluorosulfonic Acid Formaldehyde Formamide Formic Acid Freon.Satisfactory 2 . VMQ.com Silicone MQ. PVMQ 4 4 3 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 X X 2 2 2 X 2 2 2 X X X X X X X X X 1 X X X 2 2 X 4 4 4 X Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU. Fluids.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Compatibility Tables for Gases. Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS. the service temperature range may be significantly different. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. 112 (Tetrachlorodifluoroethane) Freon.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 . EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM 7-23 .

401a Freon. 124 (Chlorotetrafluoroethane) Freon. the service temperature range may be significantly different. 7-24 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. 31 Freon. 115. 134a (Tetrafluoroethane) Freon. Lexington. 14 (Tetrafluoromethane) Freon. C316 Freon. K-142b Freon. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. 13 (Chlorotrifluoromethane) Freon. 502 Freon. 152a (Difluoroethane) Freon. 22 and ASTM Oil #2 (50/50 Mixture) Freon. 142b (Chlorotrifluorothane) Freon. 114B2 Freon. K-152a Freon. 12 and ASTM Oil #2 (50/50 Mixture) Freon. BF (R112) Freon. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS. 410a Freon. With some media however. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Freon. 507 Freon. 21 Freon. EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM . C318 Freon.Insufficient Data X X X 3 2 2 X X X 4 4 2 X X X X X X 4 2 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. 407c Freon. TA C0873-70 C0873-70 C0873-70 C0873-70 C0873-70 C0873-70 C0873-70 C0873-70 C0873-70 V1164-75 N0674-70 C0873-70 C0873-70 C0873-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 1 2 1 2 2 2 X X X 1 1 1 1 X 2 X 4 1 4 4 X 4 1 X X X X X X X 2 X 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 2 2 2 X X X 1 1 1 1 X 2 X 4 X 4 4 X 4 1 X 4 3 1 2 2 X 2 1 2 X 1 1 1 2 1 X 1 4 1 3 4 4 X X X 1 1 1 1 X 4 X 4 1 3 4 X 1 1 X 1 1 1 X 1 X 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 4 4 2 1 2 2 3 1 1 X X X 1 4 1 1 X 2 X 4 1 4 2 X 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 X 2 4 1 1 2 4 4 2 2 3 2 2 2 2 1 1 4 2 2 1 4 2 1 1 4 4 1 1 4 1 1 2 2 X X X X X X X 2 X 2 2 2 4 4 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 4 2 2 1 3 2 1 1 3 3 1 1 4 1 1 2 2 X X X X X X X 2 X 2 2 2 4 4 2 1 2 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 4 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 1 2 1 1 3 3 X X X 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 3 X 1 2 X 1 1 X 1 1 4 4 1 X 1 1 2 X 1 1 1 4 1 X 1 4 1 1 4 4 X X X 1 X 1 1 X X X 4 X 1 4 X 2 1 X X X X X X X 1 X 4 X 1 1 1 4 2 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 2 2 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 1 X X X X X X X X 1 X X X X X 4 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 3 1 X 1 4 1 3 4 4 X X X 1 X 1 1 X X X 4 X 3 4 X 1 1 X X X X X X X 1 X 4 X 1 1 1 4 4 X X X X 4 4 4 X X X X X X X X X X 4 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 4 4 4 X X X 1 X X X X X X 4 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 1 4 1 2 4 4 X X X 1 X 1 1 X X X 4 X 1 4 X 2 1 X X X X X X X 1 X 4 X 1 2 1 4 4 X Hypalon CSM X 1 X 1 2 2 X X X 1 X 1 1 X X X 4 X 1 X X 2 1 X X X X X X X X X 2 X 1 1 4 1 1 X Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 . 22 (Chlorodifluoromethane) Freon. 123 (Dichlorotrifluoroethane) Freon.parkerorings. 125 (Pentafluoroethane) Freon.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 . 23 (Fluoroform) (Trifluoromethane) Freon. 356mcf Freon. Fluids. PCA (R113) Freon. 12 and Suniso 4G (50/50 Mixture) Freon. 404a Freon. 218 Freon. 116 Freon.Satisfactory 2 . 32 C0873-70 C0873-70 C0873-70 C0873-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 C0873-70 C0873-70 V3819-75 C0873-70 C0873-70 N0674-70 C0873-70 Factory V1164-75 Factory Factory N0674-70 C0873-70 C0873-70 Factory C0873-70 C0873-70 Freon. 402a Freon.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Compatibility Tables for Gases. PVMQ 4 4 X 4 4 4 X X X 4 4 4 4 X X X 4 X 4 4 X X X X X X X X X X X X 4 X X X X 4 4 X Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU.com Silicone MQ. 12 (Dichlorodifluroethane) Freon. MF (R11) Freon.Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 .Unsatisfactory x . VMQ. 141b (Dichlorofluoroethane) Freon.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended. 114 (Dichlorotetrafluroethane) Freon. 410c Freon. 13B1 (Bromotrifluoromethane) Freon.

Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 . #6 Fuel Oil.parkerorings. the service temperature range may be significantly different.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Compatibility Tables for Gases.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Freon.com Silicone MQ. 1. Fluids. TC Freon. 500 Fyrquel A60 Fyrquel EHC —G— Galden Gallic Acid Gasoline Gelatin Germane (Germanium Tetrahydride) Girling Brake Fluid Glauber’s Salt Gluconic Acid Glucose Glue Glutamic Acid Glycerine (Glycerol) Glycerol Dichlorohydrin Glycerol Monochlorohydrin Glycerol Triacetate N0674-70 N0674-70 V1164-75 N0674-70 V1164-75 C0873-70 V1164-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V3819-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V3819-75 E0540-80 E0740-75 V1164-75 N1500-75 N0674-70 V3819-75 E0667-70 V1164-75 E0540-80 N0674-70 V3819-75 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 1 1 2 1 2 X 2 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 3 X 2 1 1 X 3 4 3 1 X 3 1 3 3 3 X 1 X X X X 2 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 1 X 2 1 1 X 3 4 3 1 X 3 1 3 3 3 2 4 3 1 2 X 4 4 4 2 4 2 3 2 2 2 X 2 1 1 2 1 X 2 4 1 X 1 2 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 4 4 X X X 1 1 4 1 X 1 1 1 X 4 1 3 1 X 3 1 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 X 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 X 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X X X X X X X X X X 4 X X X X X X X 1 2 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 1 X X X X 4 2 2 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 X 4 4 X 2 4 1 X 2 2 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 2 X X X X 4 4 4 2 4 X 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 X X X X 2 4 1 X 1 4 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X X X X X X 1 1 1 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 X X 4 X 4 4 4 X X 4 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 X 1 X X X X 2 2 2 X 4 X X 3 3 4 X 4 4 X X 4 X 4 2 4 X X X 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 X X X X 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 2 2 2 X 2 1 X X 1 X 2 4 1 X 2 2 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X X X X X X 4 4 4 2 4 X 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 X X X X X 4 1 X X 4 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X X X X X X 4 4 4 1 4 X 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 X X X X 1 4 1 X X 2 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 X X X X 4 4 4 3 4 X 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 X X X X 1 4 1 X X 2 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 Hypalon CSM X 1 X X X X 4 3 4 2 4 X 4 3 3 4 X 4 4 X X X X 2 4 1 X 2 2 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 .Unsatisfactory x . Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. Lexington. 100. With some media however.Insufficient Data X X X X X X 1 1 1 1 X X X X X 4 X 4 2 X X 3 X 1 1 1 X 4 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. T-P35 Freon. TMC Freon. T-WD602 Frick #3 Compressor Oil Fuel Oil. Acidic Fumaric Acid Fuming Sulphuric Acid (20/25% Oleum) Furaldehyde Furan (Furfuran) Furfural (Furfuraldehyde) Furfuraldehyde Furfuryl Alcohol Furoic Acid Furyl Carbinol Fyrquel 150 220 300 550 Fyrquel 90.Satisfactory 2 . TF (R113) Freon. and 2 Fuel Oil. EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM 7-25 .Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS. PVMQ X 4 X X X X 1 4 1 2 4 X X 4 4 4 X 4 1 X X 1 X X 4 1 X X X 2 1 X 2 1 2 2 2 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU. VMQ.

Unsatisfactory x . PVMQ 2 2 2 X 2 1 2 4 X 4 4 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 1 4 1 X X 2 4 2 2 X X X X X X X 2 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU. With some media however. 7-26 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. VMQ.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended. Lexington. EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM . Fluids.Satisfactory 2 . Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Glycerophosphoric Acid Glyceryl Phosphate Glycidol Glycol Monoether Glycolic Acid Glycols Glycoxylic Acid Grease Petroleum Base Green Sulfate Liquor Gulf Endurance Oils Gulf FR Fluids (Emulsion) Gulf FR G-Fluids Gulf FR P-Fluids Gulf Harmony Oils Gulf High Temperature Grease Gulf Legion Oils Gulf Paramount Oils Gulf Security Oils Gulfcrown Grease —H— Halothane Halowax Oil Hannifin Lube A Heavy Water HEF-2 (High Energy Fuel) Helium Heptachlor Heptachlorobutene Heptaldehyde (Heptanal) Heptane or n-Heptane Heptanoic Acid Hexachloroacetone Hexachlorobutadiene Hexachlorobutene Hexachloroethane Hexaethyl Tetraphosphate Hexafluoroethane (F-116) Hexafluoroxylene Hexafluoroxylene Hexaldehyde or n-Hexaldehyde E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V3819-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 V1164-75 B0612-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 E0540-80 3 3 3 X 3 1 3 1 2 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 1 1 2 1 2 2 1 1 1 3 2 2 2 X X X X 4 3 3 3 X 3 1 3 1 2 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 1 1 2 1 2 2 1 1 1 3 2 2 2 X X X X 4 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 4 1 4 4 1 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 X X X X 1 3 3 3 X 3 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 X X X X 4 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 3 2 2 2 1 4 2 2 2 2 2 2 4 4 1 2 4 1 4 4 2 2 2 1 4 4 4 X X X X 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 4 2 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 1 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 X X X X 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 1 4 1 1 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 X 1 4 4 1 4 4 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 X X X X X 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 1 4 1 1 2 4 1 1 1 2 2 1 4 X 1 4 4 1 3 3 1 2 1 4 3 3 3 X X X X 2 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 4 1 4 4 1 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 X X X X 2 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 4 2 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 X X X X 4 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 4 2 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 X X X X 4 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 4 2 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 X X X X 4 Hypalon CSM 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 4 2 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 1 4 4 2 2 2 1 4 4 4 X X X X 3 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. the service temperature range may be significantly different.com Silicone MQ.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 .Insufficient Data 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 2 2 1 3 1 1 2 2 2 X X X X 4 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS.parkerorings.Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 .< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Compatibility Tables for Gases.

U4 HiLo MS #1 Houghto-Safe 1010 phosphate ester Houghto-Safe 1055 phosphate ester Houghto-Safe 1120 phosphate ester Houghto-Safe 271 (Water & Glycol Base) Houghto-Safe 416 & 500 Series Houghto-Safe 5040 (Water/Oil emulsion) Houghto-Safe 620 Water/Glycol Hydraulic Oil (Petroleum Base.Insufficient Data X 1 2 1 1 3 4 1 1 2 1 2 X 2 2 3 2 2 2 2 X 2 2 1 2 4 4 1 1 2 X 3 3 1 X 2 3 X 4 2 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (.Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 .< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Compatibility Tables for Gases.parkerorings. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS. Hydrochloric Acid. Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.Satisfactory 2 . Fluids.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 . 3 Molar to 158°F Hydrochloric Acid.com Silicone MQ.Unsatisfactory x . VMQ.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended. Saturated Hydrochloric Acid (cold) 37% Hydrochloric Acid (hot) 37% Hydrochloric Acid. the service temperature range may be significantly different. Lexington. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Hexamethyldisilizane Hexamethylene (Cyclohexane) Hexamethylene Diammonium Adipate Hexamethylenediamine Hexamethylenetetramine Hexane or n-Hexane Hexene-1 or n-Hexene-1 Hexone (Methyl Isobutyl Ketone) Hexyl Acetate Hexyl Alcohol Hexylene Glycol Hexylresorcinol HFC-245fa High Viscosity Lubricant. With some media however. Concentrated to 158°F Hydrocyanic Acid V8545-75 N0674-70 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 V1164-75 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 V1164-75 C0873-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 V3819-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V0834-70 V1164-75 E0540-80 X 1 2 3 3 1 2 3 1 1 3 2 X 1 1 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 4 3 3 2 X 4 4 1 4 4 2 2 4 2 X 1 2 3 3 1 2 3 1 1 3 2 X 1 1 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 4 3 3 2 X 4 4 1 X X 2 2 4 2 X 4 4 1 1 4 4 1 4 3 1 4 X 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 4 1 4 4 1 2 1 1 4 X 1 1 4 3 3 1 2 4 1 X 1 1 3 3 1 1 3 1 1 3 1 X 1 1 4 1 1 1 2 X 1 2 1 1 4 4 3 3 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 2 X X X X X X X 1 X X X X X X 2 4 1 1 2 2 1 2 2 1 4 X 2 2 4 4 4 4 2 X 2 2 2 4 2 2 1 1 4 X 4 2 2 4 4 2 X 4 2 X 4 4 1 1 4 4 1 4 1 1 4 X 1 1 4 4 4 4 1 X 4 1 4 4 2 1 1 1 4 X 4 4 4 X 4 3 X 4 2 X 1 4 4 4 1 1 4 1 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 1 4 X 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 1 X 4 3 X 4 4 X 1 3 4 4 2 2 4 1 4 4 3 X 4 4 4 X X 4 4 X 4 4 1 3 4 4 4 4 3 X 4 4 2 X 3 4 X 4 X X 4 4 1 1 4 4 1 4 3 1 4 X 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 X 4 2 4 4 1 2 1 1 4 X 1 1 4 X 4 1 X 4 1 X 4 4 1 1 4 4 1 4 1 1 4 X 2 2 4 4 4 4 X X 4 X 4 4 X 4 1 1 4 X 4 4 4 X 4 X X X 2 X 4 4 1 1 4 4 1 4 1 1 4 X X X 4 4 4 4 X X 4 X 4 4 X 4 1 1 4 X 1 1 4 X 4 X X X 1 X 4 4 1 1 4 4 1 4 1 1 4 X X X 4 4 4 4 X X 4 X 4 4 1 4 1 1 4 X 1 1 4 X 4 3 X 4 1 Hypalon CSM X 2 4 1 1 2 2 1 2 2 1 4 X X X 4 4 4 4 X X 4 X 2 4 2 2 1 1 4 X 1 1 3 X 4 1 X X 1 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 . PVMQ X 2 X 2 2 4 4 2 2 2 2 X X 1 1 3 3 3 3 2 X 3 2 2 X 2 X 2 2 X X 4 4 4 X X 4 X 4 3 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU. EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM 7-27 . H2 High Viscosity Lubricant. Concentrated Room Temp. Industrial) Hydraulic Oils (Synthetic Base) Hydrazine Hydrazine (Anhydrous) Hydrazine Dihydrochloride Hydrazine Hydrate Hydriodic Acid Hydroabietyl Alcohol Hydrobromic Acid Hydrobromic Acid 40% Hydrocarbons.

EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM . Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Hydro-Drive MIH-10 (Petroleum Base) Hydro-Drive MIH-50 (Petroleum Base) Hydrofluoric Acid (Anhydrous) Hydrofluoric Acid (conc.Unsatisfactory x . ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS.) Hot Hydrofluorosilicic Acid Hydrogen Bromide (Anhydrous) Hydrogen Chloride (Anhydrous) Hydrogen Chloride gas Hydrogen Cyanide Hydrogen Fluoride Hydrogen Fluoride (Anhydrous) Hydrogen Gas. VMQ. Cold Hydrogen Sulfide.parkerorings. PVMQ 2 2 X X X 4 X X X X X X 3 3 X 1 2 X 3 3 3 3 2 X X X 2 4 X 4 X X X X 4 4 4 4 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU. With some media however. Fluids.Insufficient Data 1 1 X X X 4 X X X X X 4 3 3 X 1 2 X 3 3 3 3 2 2 X 2 1 4 X 4 X X X 2 1 1 1 1 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. Wet. Cold Hydrogen Gas. Hot Hydrolube-Water/Ethylene Glycol Hydrooxycitronellal Hydroquinol Hydroquinone Hydroxyacetic Acid Hydyne Hyjet Hyjet IV and IVA Hyjet S4 Hyjet W Hypochlorous Acid —I— Indole Industron FF44 Industron FF48 Industron FF53 Industron FF80 N0674-70 N0674-70 V3819-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 E0540-80 V3819-75 V3819-75 E0540-80 V3819-75 V3819-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V3819-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V3819-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E1267-80 E1267-80 E1267-80 E1267-80 V0834-70 V1164-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 1 1 X X 4 2 X X 4 X X 4 1 1 X 2 4 X 1 4 4 4 1 X 4 3 3 2 4 4 4 4 4 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X X 2 X X X X X 4 1 1 X 2 4 X 1 4 4 4 1 X 4 3 3 2 4 4 X 4 4 X 1 1 1 1 4 4 X X 4 1 X X 1 X X 1 1 1 X 1 3 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 X 4 4 4 4 1 1 X X 3 1 X X 1 X X 4 1 1 X 1 1 X 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 2 3 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X X X X X X X 1 X X 2 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 2 X 2 2 X X X X X X 2 2 X X X 2 X X 2 X X X 1 1 X 1 4 X 1 2 1 2 2 4 4 4 1 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 2 2 2 4 4 X X X 2 X X X X X 4 2 2 X 2 4 X 1 4 4 4 1 4 X 4 1 2 X 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 X X X X X X X X X 4 2 2 X 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 X 4 X X 4 4 1 1 1 1 2 2 X X X X X X X X X X 1 1 X X X X X X X X 4 3 X X 4 X X 4 X X X 3 2 2 2 2 4 4 X X X 1 X X X X X 1 1 1 X 1 3 X 1 1 1 1 2 4 X 4 1 2 X 2 X X 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X X X X X X X X X 4 1 1 X 2 4 X 1 4 4 4 X 4 X 4 1 2 X 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X X X 1 X X X X X 4 1 1 X 2 4 X 1 4 4 4 X 4 X 2 1 2 X 4 X X 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X X X 1 X X X X X 4 2 2 X 2 4 X 1 4 4 4 X 4 X 2 1 2 X 4 X X 2 4 4 4 4 4 Hypalon CSM 4 4 X X X 1 X X X X X X 1 1 X 2 3 X 1 3 2 3 X 4 X 4 1 X X 4 X X 1 4 4 4 4 4 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 .Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 .Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 .) Cold Hydrofluoric Acid (conc. Lexington.com Silicone MQ. the service temperature range may be significantly different. Dry. Cold Hydrogen Sulfide.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended. 7-28 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. Dry.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Compatibility Tables for Gases. Wet. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. Hot Hydrogen Sulfide.Satisfactory 2 . Hot Hydrogen Iodide (Anhydrous) Hydrogen Peroxide Hydrogen Peroxide 90% Hydrogen Selenide Hydrogen Sulfide.

Unsatisfactory x . Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Insulin Iodic Acid Iodine Iodine Pentafluoride Iodoform Isoamyl Acetate Isoamyl Butyrate Isoamyl Valerate Isoboreol Isobutane Isobutyl Acetate Isobutyl Alcohol Isobutyl Chloride Isobutyl Ether Isobutyl Methyl Ketone Isobutyl n-Butyrate Isobutyl Phosphate Isobutylene Isobutyraldehyde Isobutyric Acid Isocrotyl Chloride Isodecanol Isododecane Isoeugenol Isooctane Isopar K Isopentane Isophorone (Ketone) Isopropanol Isopropyl Acetate Isopropyl Alcohol Isopropyl Chloride Isopropyl Ether Isopropylacetone Isopropylamine —J— Jet Fuel A JP-10 JP-3 (MIL-J-5624) JP-4 (MIL-T-5624) (Jet A1) JP-5 (MIL-T-5624) E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 Factory V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 V3819-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 N0674-70 V1164-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 N0674-70 N0602-70 N0602-70 3 3 2 4 X 3 3 3 X 1 3 2 4 2 3 4 3 X 3 1 X 1 1 1 1 X 1 4 2 4 2 4 2 3 3 2 3 1 1 1 3 3 2 4 X 3 3 3 X 1 3 2 4 2 3 4 3 X 2 1 X 1 1 1 1 X 1 4 2 4 2 4 2 3 3 2 3 1 1 1 1 1 2 4 4 1 1 1 X 4 1 1 4 4 1 1 1 X 2 2 X 4 4 4 4 X 4 2 1 2 1 4 4 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 1 4 1 3 3 3 1 1 3 1 1 4 3 1 3 1 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 4 1 4 1 1 4 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X 4 4 X X X X 4 3 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 4 4 4 1 1 1 4 2 1 1 4 3 1 4 1 4 3 4 4 2 2 2 2 X 2 4 2 4 2 4 3 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 2 4 4 1 1 1 4 4 1 2 X X 1 4 1 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 2 4 2 4 4 1 1 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 X X 4 4 4 4 X X 4 1 4 1 1 X 1 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 X 2 2 4 4 X 4 3 4 4 4 3 1 4 4 X X 4 X 4 3 X X 3 1 X 1 2 X 1 4 4 4 4 4 2 4 4 3 3 X 2 2 1 1 2 4 4 1 1 1 4 4 1 1 X X 1 1 1 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 2 1 2 1 4 4 1 1 4 4 X 4 4 1 1 X 4 4 1 1 1 4 4 1 2 X X 1 4 1 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 2 4 2 4 4 1 1 4 X X 4 4 1 1 4 4 4 1 1 1 4 4 1 1 X X 1 4 1 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 1 4 1 4 4 1 1 4 X X 4 4 1 1 X 4 4 1 1 1 4 4 1 1 X X 1 4 1 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 1 4 1 4 4 1 1 4 4 X 4 4 Hypalon CSM 1 1 2 4 4 1 1 1 4 2 1 1 X X 1 4 1 4 X X 4 2 2 2 1 X 2 4 1 4 1 4 3 1 1 4 X X 4 4 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 .Satisfactory 2 .com Silicone MQ. Lexington. PVMQ 2 2 X 4 X 2 2 2 X 2 2 1 X X 2 X 2 X X 2 X 2 4 2 4 X 2 4 1 4 1 4 4 2 2 X 4 X 4 4 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU. EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM 7-29 . With some media however.parkerorings.Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 .< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Compatibility Tables for Gases. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.Insufficient Data 1 1 1 4 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 X X 1 1 1 2 X X 2 1 1 1 1 X 1 4 2 2 2 2 3 1 1 2 1 X 2 2 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended. the service temperature range may be significantly different. Fluids. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS. VMQ.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 .

the service temperature range may be significantly different. PVMQ 4 4 4 4 X X 1 4 4 4 4 X 1 2 2 2 2 X X X 4 2 X 2 2 2 2 2 2 X 2 2 2 4 4 X 4 X X Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU. Lexington. With some media however.parkerorings. Cold Lactic Acid. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended JP-6 (MIL-J-25656) JP-8 (MIL-T-83133) (Jet A) JP-9 (MIL-F-81912) JP-9 -11 JPX (MIL-F-25604) —K— Karl Fischer Reagent Kel F Liquids Kerosene (Similar to RP-1 and JP-1) Keystone #87HX-Grease —L— Lacquer Solvents Lacquers Lactams-Amino Acids Lactic Acid.com Silicone MQ. 7-30 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Compatibility Tables for Gases. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.Unsatisfactory x .Insufficient Data 2 2 2 2 X X 2 1 1 4 4 4 1 2 4 1 1 X X X 4 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 X 2 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 V3819-75 V3819-75 E0540-80 N0674-70 V1164-75 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 V1164-75 N0674-70 V3819-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 V3819-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V3819-75 N0674-70 E0540-80 C0873-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 V1164-75 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 .5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended.Satisfactory 2 . EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM .Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 . VMQ. Fluids. Hot Lactones (Cyclic Esters) Lard Animal Fat Lauric Acid Lavender Oil LB 135 Lead (Molten) Lead Acetate Lead Arsenate Lead Azide Lead Bromide Lead Carbonate Lead Chloride Lead Chromate Lead Dioxide Lead Linoleate Lead Naphthenate Lead Nitrate Lead Oxide Lead Sulfamate Lehigh X1169 Lehigh X1170 Light Grease Ligroin (Petroleum Ether or Benzene) Lime Bleach Lime Sulfur N0602-70 N0602-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 N0674-70 1 1 3 4 1 X 1 1 1 4 4 4 1 4 4 1 1 2 1 X 2 3 X 3 3 3 3 3 3 X 1 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 3 4 1 X 1 1 1 4 4 4 1 4 4 1 1 2 1 X 2 3 X 3 3 3 3 3 3 X 1 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 4 4 4 4 X 1 4 4 4 4 2 1 4 2 2 4 4 1 X 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 1 X 1 1 1 1 4 X 2 1 1 4 4 4 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 X 4 3 X 3 3 3 3 3 3 X X 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 X X X X X X X X X X X X 1 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 1 X 1 X 4 3 4 4 2 X X 2 4 4 4 2 1 4 4 2 2 4 1 X 2 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 2 2 4 2 1 4 4 4 4 4 X X 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 X X X 4 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 2 4 4 X 4 X 4 2 1 4 4 X X X 1 1 4 4 X 4 4 4 1 1 X X X 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 X X 4 4 1 1 X 1 X 4 2 1 3 4 X X X 1 1 4 4 X X X 4 1 1 X X X 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 X X 4 X 1 1 X 2 X 3 4 4 4 4 X X 1 4 4 4 4 2 1 4 2 2 4 X X X 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 4 4 X 4 X 4 4 X X X X X X 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 X X X 4 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 2 4 4 X 4 X 4 4 X X X X X X 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 X X X 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 2 4 4 X 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 X X X 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 X X X 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 2 4 4 X 4 X 4 Hypalon CSM 4 X X X X X 1 4 4 4 4 2 1 3 4 4 2 X X X 4 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 2 2 X 3 X 4 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 .

20. Di-ester Lubricating Oils. petroleum base Lubricating Oils. VMQ. SAE 10.Satisfactory 2 .com Silicone MQ.Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 . Fluids.parkerorings.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended. 50 Lye Solutions —M — Magnesium Chloride Magnesium Hydroxide Magnesium Salts Magnesium Sulfite and Sulfate Magnesium Trisilicate Malathion Maleic Acid Maleic Anhydride Maleic Hydrazide Malic Acid Mandelic Acid Manganese Acetate Manganese Carbonate Manganese Chloride Manganese Dioxide E0540-80 S0604-70 N0674-70 Factory N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 V3819-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 4 2 1 4 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 X 2 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 X 2 4 4 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 4 2 1 4 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 X 2 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 X 2 4 4 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 1 4 3 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 X 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 4 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 4 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 4 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 4 2 3 4 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 4 3 2 2 2 1 2 1 1 X X 4 4 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 4 4 4 2 1 2 1 2 X 4 4 4 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 4 X 1 4 3 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 2 1 1 4 X 4 1 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 2 4 1 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 3 X 2 2 4 1 4 1 X X X X X 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 3 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 4 2 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 4 4 4 2 1 2 1 2 X 4 4 4 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 4 4 4 2 1 2 1 2 X 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 4 4 4 1 1 2 1 2 X 4 4 4 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 Hypalon CSM 4 2 2 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 X 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 X X 4 4 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 . With some media however. 30.Unsatisfactory x . Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. the service temperature range may be significantly different. Lexington. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Lindol. 40. PVMQ 3 2 1 4 3 4 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 X X 4 4 4 2 1 X 1 1 X 4 X X 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU.Insufficient Data 3 X 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 2 2 1 1 2 1 X 1 1 X 2 X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 . EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM 7-31 . ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS. Hydraulic Fluid (Phosphate ester type) Linoleic Acid Linseed Oil Liquid Oxygen (LOX) Liquid Petroleum Gas (LPG) Liquimoly Lithium Bromide (Brine) Lithium Carbonate Lithium Chloride Lithium Citrate Lithium Hydroxide Lithium Hypochlorite Lithium Nitrate Lithium Nitrite Lithium Perchlorate Lithium Salicylate Lithopone Lubricating Oils (Crude & Refined) Lubricating Oils (Synthetic base) Lubricating Oils.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Compatibility Tables for Gases.

KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 . Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Manganese Gluconate Manganese Hypophosphite Manganese Linoleate Manganese Naphthenate Manganese Phosphate Manganese Sulfate Manganous Chloride Manganous Phosphate Manganous Sulfate Mannitol MCS 312 MCS 352 MCS 463 MDI (Methylene di-p-phenylene isocyanate) Mercaptan Mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT) Mercuric Acetate Mercuric Chloride Mercuric Cyanide Mercuric Iodide Mercuric Nitrate Mercuric Sulfate Mercuric Sulfite Mercurous Nitrate Mercury Mercury Chloride Mercury Fulminate Mercury Salts Mercury Vapors Mesityl Oxide (Ketone) Meta-Cresol Metaldehyde Meta-Nitroaniline Meta-Toluidine Methacrylic Acid Methallyl Chloride Methane Methanol Methoxychlor Methoxyethanol (DGMMA) E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V3819-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 E1267-80 E1267-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 V1164-75 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 N0674-70 E0540-80 V3819-75 E0540-80 3 3 3 X 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 3 1 X 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 3 1 4 X 3 3 X 3 X 1 4 X 3 3 3 3 X 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 3 1 X 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 3 1 4 X 3 3 X 3 X 1 4 X 3 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 4 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 X 1 1 X 1 X 4 1 X 1 3 3 3 X 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 4 4 3 1 1 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 3 1 4 1 3 3 1 3 1 1 4 X 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 1 2 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 1 1 4 1 4 2 1 X 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 1 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 1 1 4 1 4 4 1 X 1 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 X 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 1 3 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 X 4 3 4 4 3 4 3 3 4 X 4 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 2 2 1 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 4 1 1 4 1 4 4 1 X 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 1 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 1 1 4 1 4 4 1 X 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 1 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 1 1 4 1 4 4 1 X 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 1 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 1 1 4 1 4 4 1 X 1 Hypalon CSM 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 4 1 2 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 1 1 4 1 4 2 1 X 1 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 . With some media however. 7-32 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. VMQ. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended. Fluids.Insufficient Data 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 1 1 2 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 X 4 2 1 1 2 1 2 3 1 X 1 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. Lexington. the service temperature range may be significantly different.parkerorings. PVMQ 2 2 2 X 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 3 3 2 2 X 2 X 2 2 2 2 2 2 X 2 2 2 X 4 X 2 2 X 2 X 4 1 X 2 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU.com Silicone MQ.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Compatibility Tables for Gases. EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM .Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 .Unsatisfactory x .Satisfactory 2 .

Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Methyl Abietate Methyl Acetate Methyl Acetoacetate Methyl Acetophenone* Methyl Acrylate Methyl Alcohol Methyl Amylketone Methyl Anthranilate Methyl Benzoate Methyl Bromide Methyl Butyl Ketone Methyl Butyrate Cellosolve Methyl Butyrate Chloride Methyl Carbonate Methyl Cellosolve Methyl Cellulose Methyl Chloride Methyl Chloroacetate Methyl Chloroform Methyl Chloroformate Methyl Chlorosilanes Methyl Cyanide (Acetonitrile) Methyl Cyclohexanone Methyl Dichloride Methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) Methyl Ether Methyl Ethyl Ketone (MEK) Methyl Ethyl Ketone Peroxide Methyl Ethyl Oleate Methyl Formate Methyl Hexyl Ketone (2-Octanone) Methyl Iodide Methyl Isobutyl Ketone (MIBK) Methyl Isocyanate Methyl Isopropyl Ketone Methyl Isovalerate Methyl Lactate Methyl Mercaptan Methyl Methacrylate Methyl Oleate V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 N0674-70 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 V3819-75 E0540-80 N0674-70 V1164-75 N0674-70 E0540-80 S0604-70 V1164-75 C0873-70 E0540-80 N0674-70 Factory E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 V3819-75 V1164-75 X 4 4 X 4 4 3 X 4 2 4 3 3 4 3 2 4 3 4 4 X 3 1 X X 1 4 4 X 4 3 1 4 3 4 X 3 X 4 4 X 4 4 X 4 4 3 X 4 2 4 3 3 4 3 2 4 3 4 4 X 3 1 X X 1 4 4 X 4 3 1 4 3 4 X 3 X X 4 X 2 2 X 2 1 1 X 4 4 1 1 1 4 2 2 3 1 4 4 X 1 4 X X 4 1 4 X 2 1 4 3 1 2 X 1 1 4 2 1 4 4 1 4 4 3 1 1 1 4 3 3 1 4 4 1 3 1 1 X 3 1 1 X 1 4 4 1 X 3 1 4 3 4 1 3 X 4 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 4 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 4 2 4 4 2 1 1 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 3 2 4 1 4 4 X 1 2 4 X 3 4 4 4 2 1 2 4 1 4 4 1 X 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 1 1 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 4 2 4 1 X 4 X 1 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 1 4 4 1 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 X 4 1 4 X 4 4 4 4 X 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 X 3 4 4 3 4 4 4 3 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 2 4 4 X 4 X 4 1 3 X X 4 4 3 X 4 1 4 4 4 3 4 X X X 4 2 2 4 2 1 1 4 4 4 1 1 1 4 2 2 3 1 X 4 X 1 4 4 X 4 1 4 4 2 1 4 3 1 2 4 1 1 4 2 4 4 X 4 4 1 1 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 4 2 4 1 X 4 X 1 4 4 X 1 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 1 4 4 1 X 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 1 1 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 4 2 4 1 X 4 X 1 4 4 X 1 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 1 4 4 1 X 4 X 4 4 X 4 4 1 1 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 4 2 4 1 X 4 X 1 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 1 4 4 1 X 4 4 Hypalon CSM 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 2 2 4 1 X 4 X 1 2 4 X 4 4 4 4 2 1 2 4 1 4 4 1 X 4 4 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 . With some media however. VMQ.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 .parkerorings.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Compatibility Tables for Gases. the service temperature range may be significantly different. PVMQ X 4 2 X 4 1 2 X 4 X 4 2 2 4 4 2 4 2 X 4 X 2 2 X X 1 4 2 X X 2 2 4 2 4 X 2 X 4 X Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU.Unsatisfactory x .Satisfactory 2 .com Silicone MQ. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.Insufficient Data 2 4 4 2 4 1 1 2 1 1 4 1 1 2 4 4 2 1 X 2 X 1 1 2 X 1 4 4 2 X 1 1 4 1 4 2 1 X 4 2 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. Fluids. Lexington.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended. Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM 7-33 . ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS.Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 .

KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 .parkerorings. VMQ.Satisfactory 2 .< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Compatibility Tables for Gases. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Methyl Pentadiene Methyl Phenylacetate Methylphenyl Carbinol Methyl Salicylate Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) Methyl Valerate Methyl-2-Pyrrolidone or n-Methyl-2-Pyrrolidone Methylacrylic Acid Methylal Methylamine Methylamyl Acetate Methylcyclopentane Methylene Bromide Methylene Chloride Methylene Iodide Methylglycerol Methylisobutyl Carbinol Methylpyrrolidine Methylpyrrolidone Methylsulfuric Acid MIL-A-6091 MIL-C-4339 MIL-C-7024 MIL-C-8188 MIL-E-9500 MIL-F-16884 MIL-F-17111 MIL-F-25558 (RJ-1) MIL-F-25656 MIL-F-5566 MIL-F-81912 (JP-9) MIL-F-82522 (RJ-4) MIL-G-10924 MIL-G-15793 MIL-G-21568 MIL-G-23827 MIL-G-25013 MIL-G-25537 MIL-G-25760 MIL-G-3278 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 V3819-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 V3819-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 N0674-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 E1267-80 N0304-75 N0602-70 V1164-75 E1267-80 N0304-75 N0304-75 N0602-70 N0602-70 E1267-80 V1164-75 N0602-70 N0304-75 N0304-75 E1267-80 V1164-75 N0304-75 V1164-75 L1120-70 X X X 4 3 X X 4 X 3 3 4 X 4 X 3 1 X X 3 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 X X X 4 3 X X 4 X 3 3 4 X 4 X 3 1 X X 3 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 3 2 1 1 1 X 1 1 2 2 X X X 2 3 X 2 2 X 1 1 4 X 4 X 1 4 X X 1 1 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 1 4 1 4 4 4 1 1 X X 3 1 X 3 X 3 3 1 1 2 1 3 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X X X 2 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 4 4 X 4 3 4 X 2 X 1 1 4 4 4 4 1 2 4 4 1 1 4 2 4 1 3 2 2 4 2 4 4 2 2 1 3 2 2 2 4 4 4 X 3 X 4 X 4 X 1 1 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 1 1 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 2 4 4 4 4 1 X 1 4 4 4 4 4 X X X 4 X 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 1 2 3 4 1 1 1 2 4 4 1 2 1 1 3 1 2 2 1 3 3 X X X 3 X 4 X 4 4 4 3 4 3 4 1 3 3 4 4 1 1 4 4 3 3 1 2 2 3 1 1 1 1 3 3 1 2 2 4 4 X 2 X 4 X 2 X 1 1 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 1 1 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 1 3 1 4 4 4 4 4 X X X 4 X 4 X 1 1 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 1 1 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 2 X 1 4 4 1 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 X X X 4 X 4 X 1 1 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 1 1 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 1 X 1 4 4 1 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 3 X 4 X 4 X 1 1 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 1 1 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 1 4 1 4 4 1 X 2 4 4 4 Hypalon CSM 4 4 X 4 X 4 X 4 X 1 1 4 4 4 4 1 2 4 4 1 1 4 4 4 1 3 2 2 4 1 X X 2 2 1 X 2 2 2 4 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 .com Silicone MQ. EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM .5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended. With some media however. 7-34 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 . ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS. the service temperature range may be significantly different. Lexington.Insufficient Data 2 2 X X X 2 X 4 X 1 1 2 2 2 2 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 2 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. PVMQ X X X X X X X 4 X 2 2 4 X 4 X 2 2 X X 2 1 3 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU.Unsatisfactory x . Fluids.

parkerorings. VMQ.Insufficient Data 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 4 2 X 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 X 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 2 2 2 1 2 2 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (.Satisfactory 2 .< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Compatibility Tables for Gases.Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 .Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 . EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM 7-35 . Fluids.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended. Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. the service temperature range may be significantly different.com Silicone MQ. PVMQ 4 3 4 4 4 4 2 4 3 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 3 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended MIL-G-3545 MIL-G-4343 MIL-G-5572 MIL-G-7118 MIL-G-7187 MIL-G-7421 MIL-G-7711 MIL-H-13910 MIL-H-19457 MIL-H-22072 MIL-H-22251 MIL-H-27601 MIL-H-46170 -15°F to +400°F MIL-H-46170 -20°F to +275°F MIL-H-46170 -55°F to +275°F MIL-H-46170 -65°F to +275°F MIL-H-5606 -65°F to +235°F MIL-H-5606 -65°F to +275°F MIL-H-6083 MIL-H-7083 MIL-H-81019 MIL-H-8446 (MLO-8515) MIL-J-5161 Milk MIL-L-15016 MIL-L-15017 MIL-L-17331 MIL-L-2104 MIL-L-21260 MIL-L-23699 MIL-L-25681 MIL-L-3150 MIL-L-6081 MIL-L-6082 MIL-L-6085 MIL-L-6387 MIL-L-7808 MIL-L-7870 MIL-L-9000 MIL-L-9236 N0304-75 V1164-75 N0602-70 N0304-75 N0304-75 L1120-70 N0304-75 E1267-80 V1164-75 N0304-75 E1267-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 N0756-75 N0756-75 N0756-75 N0304-75 N0756-75 N0304-75 E1267-80 LM158-70 V1164-75 N0602-70 N0508-75 N0304-75 N0304-75 V1164-75 N0304-75 N0304-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 N0304-75 N0304-75 N0304-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 N0304-75 N0304-75 V1164-75 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 1 4 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 1 4 X 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 2 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 1 2 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 2 2 4 2 4 2 4 1 4 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 2 2 1 4 1 2 2 X 2 2 3 2 2 2 2 4 4 4 2 2 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 X 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 X 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 2 3 1 4 2 2 4 X X 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 4 1 3 1 4 1 1 X 1 1 3 2 2 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 3 1 2 1 4 4 4 X 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 4 2 4 2 4 1 1 X 1 1 3 3 2 1 1 3 1 4 2 3 2 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 X 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 X 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 2 X 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 Hypalon CSM 2 1 4 2 4 2 4 1 4 X 2 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 X X 4 1 2 2 X 3 2 3 2 2 2 2 4 4 4 4 2 4 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 .Unsatisfactory x . With some media however. Lexington.

Satisfactory 2 . Lexington. With some media however. Type II Fuel MIL-S-3136. 30 Mobil SHC 500 Series Mobil SHC 600 Series Mobil Therm 600 Mobil Velocite c Mobilgas WA200 ATF Mobilgear 600 Series Mobilgear SHC ISO Series Mobilgrease HP Mobilgrease HTS Mobilgrease SM Mobilith AW Series Mobilith SHC Series Mobiljet 291 N0304-70 N0304-70 N0304-70 N0674-70 N0602-70 N0602-70 N0602-70 N0602-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 E1267-80 N0602-70 N0602-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 N0674-70 V3819-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 VM835-75 1 2 X X 1 X 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 3 2 2 1 X 1 1 1 3 3 1 1 1 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 X 1 2 X X 1 X 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 3 2 2 1 X 1 1 1 3 3 1 1 1 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 X 4 1 X X 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 3 1 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 X 1 X X X 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 X X X 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 X X X 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X X X X 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 1 X 1 X 1 X X 1 1 1 X X X X X X X X 2 2 X X 2 X 2 2 4 4 4 1 2 1 4 3 2 1 4 4 1 1 2 X 2 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 3 X 4 2 X X 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 X X X X X X 4 X X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 2 X X X 1 X 1 1 3 3 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 4 3 3 X 3 X X X X X 1 1 X X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 X X X 1 X 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 4 3 3 1 1 X X X X X 2 1 X X X 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 1 X X 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 3 1 4 4 4 4 X X X X X 4 4 X X X 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 X X X 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 X 4 1 4 4 4 4 X X X X X X X X X X 3 3 X X X X X X 4 X X X 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 X 4 1 4 4 4 4 X X X X X X X X X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 X X X 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 X X X X X X X X X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X Hypalon CSM 2 2 X X X X 2 2 4 4 4 1 2 1 4 X 2 1 4 4 4 3 X X X X X 2 2 X X X 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 X Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 . JP-4.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended. Fluids. MLO-7557 MLO-8200 Hydr. 1130 Mobil HF Mobil Nivac 20. JP-5 MIL-T-83133 Mineral Oils Mixed Acids MLO-7277 Hydr. the service temperature range may be significantly different.com Silicone MQ. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. VMQ. 1110. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS. EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM .Unsatisfactory x . Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended MIL-O-3503 MIL-P-27402 N0304-75 E1267-80 MIL-PRF-17672 MIL-PRF-2105 MIL-PRF-81322 MIL-PRF-87252 MIL-R-25576 (RP-1) MIL-S-3136.Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 . 1120.Insufficient Data 1 X X X 1 X 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 3 3 2 1 X X X X X 2 2 X X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. Type IV Oil High Swell MIL-S-3136. Type III Fuel MIL-S-3136.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Compatibility Tables for Gases.parkerorings.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 . PVMQ 4 4 X X 3 X 4 4 4 4 2 3 2 3 4 4 2 2 4 4 4 4 X X X X X 2 3 X X X 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 X Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU. 7-36 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. MLO-8515 Mobil DTE 20 Series Mobil 254 Lubricant Mobil Delvac 1100. Type V Oil Medium Swell MIL-S-81087 MIL-T-5624. Type IV Oil Low Swell MIL-S-3136. Type I Fuel MIL-S-3136.

KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 . PVMQ X 1 X X X 2 2 2 4 X X 2 4 X X 2 2 2 2 X X 4 2 X 2 4 2 3 X 2 X X 4 X X X X Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU.parkerorings. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Mobiljet II Lubricant Mobilmistlube Series Mobiloil SAE 20 Mobilux Molybdenum Disulfide Grease Molybdenum Oxide Molybdenum Trioxide Molybdic Acid Monobromobenzene Monobromotoluene Monobutyl Paracresol Monochloroacetic Acid Monochlorobenzene Monochlorobutene Monochlorohydrin Monoethanolamine (MEA) Monoethyl Amine Monoisopropylamine Monomethyl Aniline Monomethyl Ether (Dimethyl Ether) Monomethyl Ether (Methyl Ether) Monomethyl Hydrazine Monomethylamine (MMA) Monomethylaniline Mononitrotoluene Mononitrotoluene & Dinitrotoluene (40/60 Mixture) Monovinyl Acetylene Mopar Brake Fluid Morpholine Motor Oils Mustard Gas Myristic Acid —N— Naphthalene Naphthalene Chloride Naphthalene Sulfonic Acid Naphthalenic Acid Naphthalonic Acid V3819-75 V1164-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 V3819-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 V3819-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V3819-75 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0667-70 V1164-75 N0674-70 E1267-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 X 3 1 1 1 3 3 3 4 X X 3 4 X X 4 3 3 4 X 1 2 3 4 3 4 1 3 X 1 X X 4 X X X X X 3 1 1 X 3 3 3 4 X X 3 4 X X 4 3 3 X X X 2 3 4 3 4 1 3 X 1 X X 4 X X X X X 3 4 4 4 1 1 1 4 X X 1 4 X X 2 1 1 1 X 4 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 X 4 X X 4 X X X X X 1 1 1 1 3 3 3 1 1 X 3 1 1 X 4 3 3 2 X 1 X 3 2 3 3 1 4 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X 1 1 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 1 2 2 4 1 1 1 4 4 X 1 4 4 X 4 1 1 1 X X 2 1 4 1 4 2 2 4 2 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 X X 1 1 1 4 4 X 1 4 4 X 2 1 1 1 X X 2 1 4 1 4 2 1 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 1 1 X X 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 X X X 4 4 4 4 X X 4 1 X 4 X 4 4 4 4 X 2 1 X X 4 4 4 4 3 X 4 4 3 X 4 4 4 4 X X X 4 4 4 4 X X 3 1 X 3 2 3 3 3 3 X 3 4 X X 1 1 1 4 4 X 1 4 4 X 2 1 1 1 X X 1 1 2 1 4 1 2 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 3 4 X X 1 1 1 4 4 X 1 4 4 X 2 1 1 1 X X X 1 4 1 4 2 X 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 X X 1 1 1 4 4 X 1 4 4 X 2 1 1 1 X X X 1 4 1 4 2 X 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 X X 1 1 1 4 4 X 1 4 4 X 2 1 1 1 X X X 1 4 1 4 2 X 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 Hypalon CSM X 2 X X X 1 1 1 4 4 X 1 4 4 X 4 1 1 1 X X 2 1 4 1 4 2 2 4 2 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 .com Silicone MQ.Insufficient Data X 1 1 X X 1 1 1 2 2 X 1 2 2 X 4 1 1 1 X X X 1 X 1 3 X 4 2 1 X 2 1 2 2 2 2 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM 7-37 . Fluids. the service temperature range may be significantly different.Unsatisfactory x .5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended.Satisfactory 2 .< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Compatibility Tables for Gases. Lexington.Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 . VMQ. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS. With some media however. Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.

Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 . Fluids. PVMQ 4 X 4 4 2 1 4 4 2 1 2 2 1 1 X 2 X 2 1 X X X X 4 X 4 4 2 4 2 2 2 2 2 X 4 2 1 2 2 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU.com Silicone MQ.100%) Nitric Acid 3 Molar to 158°F Nitric Acid Concentrated Room Temp. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS. VMQ.parkerorings. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.Unsatisfactory x . the service temperature range may be significantly different. White Fuming Nitric Acid (0 . Lexington. Red Fuming Nitric Acid. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Naphthenic Acid Naphthylamine Naptha Natural Gas Neatsfoot Oil Neon Neville Acid Nickel Acetate Nickel Ammonium Sulfate Nickel Chloride Nickel Cyanide Nickel Nitrate Nickel Salts Nickel Sulfate Nicotinamide (Niacinamide) Nicotinamide Hydrochloride Nicotine Nicotine Sulfate Niter Cake Nitric Acid. With some media however.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended.50%) Nitric Acid (50 .Insufficient Data 1 X 2 3 1 1 2 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 X X X X 4 X 4 X 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 1 1 1 1 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. 7-38 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 . EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM .Satisfactory 2 . Nitric Acid Concentrated to 158°F Nitric Oxide Nitroaniline Nitrobenzene Nitrobenzoic Acid Nitrocellulose Nitrochlorobenzene Nitrochloroform Nitrodiethylaniline Nitrodiphenyl Ether Nitroethane Nitrofluorobenzene Nitrogen Nitrogen Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides V1164-75 V3819-75 V1164-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 B0612-70 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 N0674-70 V3819-75 V3819-75 V1164-75 V3819-75 E0540-80 V0834-70 V3819-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V3819-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 B0612-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 2 X 2 1 1 1 4 2 3 1 3 3 1 1 X 3 X 3 1 4 X 4 4 4 X 4 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 X 4 3 1 3 3 2 X 2 1 1 1 4 2 3 1 3 3 1 1 X 3 X 3 1 4 X X X 4 X 4 X 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 X 4 3 1 3 3 4 X 4 4 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 X 1 1 4 X 2 4 2 4 4 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 2 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 4 3 1 3 3 1 1 1 3 1 3 1 2 X 1 3 3 2 4 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 X 4 3 1 4 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 3 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 2 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 3 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 4 X 4 1 4 1 4 2 1 2 1 1 2 1 4 1 4 1 1 4 X X X 4 X 4 3 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 X 2 1 1 1 1 4 X 4 2 4 1 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 2 4 1 4 1 1 X X X X 3 X 4 X 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 X 2 1 1 X 1 X X 2 2 1 1 4 4 4 3 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 X X X X 4 X 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 1 4 4 X X 2 2 1 1 X 4 4 3 4 4 3 3 3 4 3 4 1 X X X X 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 1 3 4 4 X 4 4 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 4 1 1 X X X X 2 X 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 2 1 1 2 1 4 X 4 2 4 1 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 2 4 1 4 1 1 X X X X X X X X 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 X 2 1 1 X 1 4 X 4 2 4 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 4 1 4 1 1 X X X X X X X X 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 X 2 1 1 X 1 4 X 4 2 4 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 4 1 4 1 1 X X X X X X 4 X 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 X 2 1 1 X 1 Hypalon CSM 4 X 4 1 4 1 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 4 1 1 X X X X 2 X X X 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 X 2 1 1 X 1 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 .< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Compatibility Tables for Gases.

EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM 7-39 . Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended.Insufficient Data 4 X 1 1 1 4 1 4 X X 1 1 1 X 1 X X X 2 1 1 2 1 2 1 2 2 X X 2 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (.Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 .Satisfactory 2 . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. PVMQ 4 X 2 2 2 4 2 4 X X 2 2 2 1 2 X X X 4 4 2 4 2 2 2 X X 4 4 4 X 3 4 4 4 2 2 2 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS.com Silicone MQ.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 . With some media however. Fluids.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Compatibility Tables for Gases. the service temperature range may be significantly different.parkerorings.Unsatisfactory x . VMQ. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Nitrogen Tetroxide (N2O4) Nitrogen Trifluoride Nitroglycerine Nitrogylcerol Nitroisopropylbenzene Nitromethane Nitrophenol Nitropropane Nitrosyl Chloride Nitrosylsulfuric Acid Nitrothiophene Nitrotoluene Nitrous Acid Nitrous Oxide Nonane Nonylphenoxy Polyethoxy Ethanol Noryl GE Phenolic Nyvac FR200 Mobil —O— Octachloro Toluene Octadecane Octanal (n-Octanaldehyde) Octane or n-Octane Octyl Acetate Octyl Alcohol Octyl Chloride Octyl Phthalate Olefins Oleic Acid Oleum (Fuming Sulfuric Acid) Oleum Spirits Oleyl Alcohol Olive Oil Oronite 8200 Oronite 8515 Ortho-Chloro Ethyl Benzene Ortho-Chloroaniline Ortho-Chlorophenol Ortho-Cresol Factory V3819-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V3819-75 V3819-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 V1164-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 N0674-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 V0834-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 N0674-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 4 X 3 3 3 4 3 4 X X 3 3 3 1 1 X 1 1 4 1 1 1 3 2 1 X X 3 4 2 X 1 2 2 4 3 3 3 3 X 3 3 3 4 3 4 X X 3 3 3 1 1 X 1 1 4 1 1 1 3 2 1 X X 3 4 2 X 1 2 2 4 3 3 3 4 X 1 1 1 2 1 2 X X 1 1 1 1 4 X 1 1 4 4 4 4 1 3 4 X X 4 4 4 X 2 4 4 4 1 1 1 4 X 3 3 3 4 3 4 X X 3 3 3 1 1 X X 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 3 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 4 X 1 1 1 3 1 4 X X 1 1 1 X 2 X X 2 4 2 2 4 1 2 2 4 4 4 4 3 4 2 1 1 4 1 1 1 4 X 1 1 1 3 1 4 X X 1 1 1 X 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 1 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 X X 4 4 4 X 1 X X X 4 2 1 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 X 4 1 X X 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 X X 4 4 4 X 1 X X X 4 1 1 4 4 4 1 3 3 2 4 3 3 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 3 X 1 1 1 2 1 2 X X 1 1 1 X 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 1 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 4 4 4 1 1 1 4 X 1 1 1 2 1 4 X X 1 1 1 X 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 1 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 4 X 1 1 1 2 1 4 X X 1 1 1 X 4 X X X 4 4 4 4 1 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 4 X 1 1 1 2 1 4 X X 1 1 1 X 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 1 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 Hypalon CSM 4 X 1 1 1 2 1 4 X X 1 1 1 X 2 X X 3 4 2 2 4 1 2 2 4 4 4 4 2 4 2 4 4 4 1 1 1 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 . Lexington.

Lexington. Liquid Ozonated Deionized Water Ozone —P— PAG Compressor Oil Paint Thinner. the service temperature range may be significantly different.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS.Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 . 200°-300°F (Evalute for specific applications) Oxygen. Cold (Evalute for specific applications) Oxygen.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Compatibility Tables for Gases.com Silicone MQ. 300°-400°F (Evalute for specific applications) Oxygen.Satisfactory 2 . Duco Palmitic Acid PAO Para-Aminobenzoic Acid Para-Aminosalicylic Acid Para-Bromobenzylphenyl Ether Para-Chlorophenol Paracymene Para-Dichlorobenzene Paraffins Para-Formaldehyde Paraldehyde Par-al-Ketone Para-Nitroaniline Para-Nitrobenzoic Acid Para-Nitrophenol Parathion Para-Toluene Sulfonic Acid Paraxylene Parker O Lube Peanut Oil Pectin (Liquor) Pelagonic Acid Penicillin (Liquid) V1164-75 E0540-80 V3819-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 S0604-70 C0873-70 V3819-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 N1173-70 V1164-75 N0674-70 V1164 -75 E0540-80 E0540-80 V3819-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 Factory E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 V1164-75 V3819-75 V1164-75 4 3 X 2 2 2 2 4 4 2 4 3 4 X 4 1 X 3 3 X 3 X 4 1 3 3 4 3 3 3 X 3 X 1 1 X X X 4 3 X 2 2 2 2 4 4 2 4 3 2 X 4 1 X 3 3 X 3 X 4 1 3 3 4 3 3 3 X 3 X 1 1 X X X 4 1 X 4 4 4 1 4 4 1 4 1 1 X 4 2 X 1 1 X 1 X 4 4 1 1 4 1 1 1 X 1 X 4 3 X X X 1 3 X 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 4 3 1 X 2 1 X 3 3 X 3 1 1 1 3 3 4 3 3 3 1 3 X 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 2 1 X 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 X 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X X X X X X X 1 X X 4 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 4 1 X 1 1 1 2 3 4 1 4 1 2 X 4 2 X 1 1 X 1 4 4 2 1 1 4 1 1 1 4 1 X 1 3 4 X 4 4 1 X 4 4 4 2 4 4 2 X 1 4 X 4 2 X 1 1 X 1 4 4 4 1 1 4 1 1 1 4 1 X 2 4 4 X 4 4 4 X X X X X 1 4 2 X 4 2 X 4 X X 4 4 X 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 1 1 4 X 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 X X 4 1 X 4 1 X 4 1 X 4 4 X 4 3 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 X 1 2 3 X 3 4 1 X 4 4 4 1 1 4 1 X 1 2 X 4 2 X 1 1 X 1 4 4 4 1 1 4 1 1 1 4 1 X 4 3 4 X 4 4 1 X 4 4 4 2 X 4 2 X 1 4 X 4 2 X 1 1 X 1 4 4 4 1 1 4 1 1 1 4 1 X 4 4 4 X 4 4 1 X 4 4 4 2 X 4 2 X 1 4 X 4 2 X 1 1 X 1 4 4 4 1 1 4 1 1 1 4 1 X 4 4 4 X 4 4 1 X 4 4 4 2 4 4 2 X 1 4 X 4 2 X 1 1 X 1 4 4 4 1 1 4 1 1 1 4 1 X 4 4 4 X 4 Hypalon CSM 4 1 X 2 2 2 2 X 4 1 X 1 1 X 4 3 X 1 1 X 1 4 4 2 1 1 4 1 1 1 4 1 X 1 2 4 X 4 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 . EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM . VMQ.parkerorings.Unsatisfactory x . Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Ortho-Dichlorobenzene Ortho-Nitrotoluene Orthophos Acid OS 45 Type III (OS45) OS 45 Type IV (OS45-1) OS 70 Oxalic Acid Oxygen. PVMQ 4 2 X 4 4 4 2 1 1 1 X 2 1 X 4 4 X 2 2 X 2 X 4 2 2 2 4 2 2 2 X 2 X 2 1 X X X Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU.Insufficient Data 2 1 X 2 2 2 1 1 4 1 X 1 1 X 2 1 X 1 1 X 1 2 2 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 2 1 X 1 1 2 X 2 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. With some media however. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 . 7-40 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. Fluids.

Satisfactory 2 . Crude Phenol Phenol.parkerorings. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Pentachloroethane Pentachlorophenol Pentaerythritol Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate Pentafluoroethane (F-125) Pentane or n-Pentane Pentane.Insufficient Data 2 1 1 1 X 3 3 3 3 X 1 1 1 2 X X X X 1 1 4 2 1 2 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 X 2 4 2 1 X 1 1 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. 3-Methyl Pentoxone Pentyl Pentanoate Peracetic Acid Perchloric Acid . PVMQ X 2 2 2 X 4 4 4 4 X 2 2 2 4 X X X X 4 2 4 2 4 4 4 4 2 2 X 2 2 4 X X 4 X 2 X 2 2 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU. Lexington.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended. 2-4 dimethyl Pentane.2N Perchloroethylene Perfluoropropane Perfluorotriethylamine Permanganic Acid Persulfuric Acid (Caro’s Acid) Petrolatum Petrolatum Ether Petroleum Oil. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 . EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM 7-41 .Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 . 2 Methyl Pentane. 85% / 15% H2O Phenolic Sulfonate Phenolsulfonic Acid Phenylacetamide Phenylacetate Phenylacetic Acid Phenylbenzene Phenylene Diamine Phenylethyl Alcohol Phenylethyl Ether Phenylethyl Malonic Ester* Phenylglycerine Phenylhydrazine Phenylhydrazine Hydrochloride Phenylmercuric Acetate V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V3819-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 V3819-75 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 FF200-75 V3819-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 V1164-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 FF500-75 V1164-75 FF200-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 X 3 3 3 X 1 1 1 1 X 1 3 4 2 X X X X 1 1 4 1 1 4 4 4 3 3 X 3 3 4 X X 4 X 3 4 3 3 X 3 3 3 X 1 1 1 1 X 1 3 4 2 X X X X 1 1 4 1 1 4 4 4 3 3 X 3 3 4 X X 4 X 3 4 3 3 X 1 1 1 X 4 4 4 4 X 4 1 1 4 X X X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 X 1 1 4 X X 4 X 1 2 1 1 1 3 3 3 X 1 1 1 1 X 1 3 1 1 X X X X 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 1 3 3 1 X 1 4 1 3 1 3 3 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 4 1 1 1 X 1 2 2 2 X 2 1 2 4 X X X X 2 2 4 2 2 4 4 4 1 1 4 1 1 4 X 4 4 4 1 4 1 1 4 1 1 1 X 3 4 4 4 X 4 1 4 4 X X X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 1 1 4 X 4 4 4 1 2 1 1 4 4 4 4 X 1 1 1 1 X 1 4 4 4 X X X X 1 1 4 2 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 X 1 4 4 4 X X X X 1 1 4 2 1 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 X 3 4 3 4 X 4 4 4 1 1 1 X 4 4 4 4 X 4 1 2 4 X X X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 1 1 4 X 4 4 4 1 4 1 1 4 1 1 1 X 4 4 4 4 X 4 1 4 4 X X X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 1 1 4 X 4 4 4 1 2 1 1 4 1 1 1 X 4 4 4 4 X 4 1 4 4 X X X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 1 1 4 X 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 X 4 4 4 4 X 4 1 4 4 X X X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 1 1 4 X 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 Hypalon CSM 4 1 1 1 X 2 2 2 2 X 2 1 2 4 X X X X 2 2 4 2 2 4 4 4 1 1 4 1 1 4 X 4 4 4 1 4 1 1 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Compatibility Tables for Gases. Fluids.Unsatisfactory x .com Silicone MQ. VMQ. 70% / 30% H2O Phenol. Below 250°F Petroleum Oil. Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. the service temperature range may be significantly different. With some media however. Above 250°F Petroleum Oil.

Zn) Plating Solutions Chrome Plating Solutions Others Pneumatic Service Polyetherpolyol Polyethylene Glycol Polyglycerol Polyglycol Polyolester (POE) Polyvinyl Acetate Emulsion Potassium (Molten) Potassium Acetate Potassium Acid Sulfate Potassium Alum Potassium Aluminum Sulfate Potassium Antimonate Potassium Bicarbonate Factory V3819-75 V3819-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V3819-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V0834-70 C0873-70 V0834-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V3819-75 N0674-70 V1164-75 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N1173-70 E0540-80 V3819-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 4 X X 1 2 4 X X X X 4 4 3 3 4 1 2 1 1 2 X 4 X 1 4 1 1 X 2 3 3 X X X 2 3 3 3 3 3 4 X X 1 2 4 X X X X 4 4 3 3 4 1 2 1 1 2 X 4 X 1 4 1 1 X 2 3 3 X X X 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 X X 1 1 1 X X X X 1 1 1 1 3 1 2 4 4 4 X 4 X 1 2 1 1 X 1 1 1 X 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 X X 1 1 1 X X X X 1 1 3 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 X 3 3 3 X X X 4 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 X 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 X 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X X X X X X X X X X 1 X X X X X X X X X X X 1 X X X X 1 X X X X X X X X X X X 4 X X 2 2 3 X X X X 4 4 1 1 4 1 2 4 2 3 4 4 X X 4 4 1 X 2 1 1 X 2 X 2 1 1 1 1 1 4 X X 2 1 2 X X X X 4 X 1 1 4 2 2 4 4 4 4 4 X X 4 4 4 X X 1 1 X 4 X 4 1 1 1 1 1 4 X X 3 2 3 X X X X X X 4 4 4 X X X 1 4 4 4 X X 4 X 4 X X 4 4 X X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X X 4 4 4 X X X X X X 4 4 4 X X X 1 2 3 3 X X 4 X 1 X X 4 4 X X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 X X 1 1 1 X X X X 1 X 1 1 3 1 2 4 4 4 4 4 X X 2 1 1 X X 1 1 X 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 X X X X X X X X X X X 1 1 4 2 2 4 4 4 4 4 X X 4 X 4 X X 1 1 X X X 4 1 1 1 1 1 4 X X X X X X X X X X X 1 1 4 2 2 4 4 4 4 4 X X 4 X 4 X X 1 1 X X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 X X X X X X X X X 4 X 1 1 4 1 2 4 4 4 4 4 X X 4 4 4 X X 1 1 X 2 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 Hypalon CSM 4 X X 1 1 1 X X X X 4 X 1 1 2 1 2 4 2 4 4 4 X X 4 1 1 X X 1 1 X 2 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 . EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM .Unsatisfactory x .parkerorings.Insufficient Data 4 X X 2 3 3 X X X X 1 X 1 1 4 2 2 1 1 1 2 2 X X 2 X 4 X X 1 1 X X X 4 1 1 1 1 1 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. 45% Phosphorus (Molten) Phosphorus Oxychloride Phosphorus Trichloride Phosphorus Trichloride Acid Phthalic Acid Phthalic Anhydride Pickling Solution Picric Acid (aq) Picric Acid Molten Pine Oil Pine Tar Pinene Piperazine Piperidine Piranha (H2SO4:H2O2)(70:30) Plating Solution (Co. 7-42 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Phorone Phosgene Phosphine Phosphoric Acid 3 Molar to 158°F Phosphoric Acid Concentrated Room Temp Phosphoric Acid Concentrated to 158°F Phosphoric Acid.Fe. Fluids. the service temperature range may be significantly different.Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 . Lexington.In.com Silicone MQ.Sn. PVMQ 4 X X 2 3 4 X X X X X X 2 2 4 X 4 4 2 4 X 4 X X 2 4 4 X X 2 2 X X X 4 2 2 2 2 2 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU.Pb. VMQ.Ni. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.Ag.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 .Cu.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Compatibility Tables for Gases. 20% Phosphoric Acid.Au. With some media however.Satisfactory 2 .5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS.

the service temperature range may be significantly different. EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM 7-43 . PVMQ 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 2 2 1 2 1 1 2 2 2 2 3 2 2 2 2 2 X 2 1 2 2 2 X 2 X 2 2 2 2 2 1 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU.Insufficient Data 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. VMQ. With some media however.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 .Unsatisfactory x . ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS. Lexington.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended.parkerorings. Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Compatibility Tables for Gases. Fluids.com Silicone MQ. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.Satisfactory 2 .Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 . Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Potassium Bichromate Potassium Bifluoride Potassium Bisulfate Potassium Bisulfite Potassium Bitartrate Potassium Bromide Potassium Carbonate Potassium Chlorate Potassium Chloride Potassium Chromates Potassium Citrate Potassium Cupro Cyanide Potassium Cyanate Potassium Cyanide Potassium Dichromate Potassium Diphosphate Potassium Ferricyanide Potassium Fluoride Potassium Glucocyanate Potassium Hydroxide 50% Potassium Hypochlorite Potassium Iodate Potassium Iodide Potassium Metabisulfate Potassium Metachromate Potassium Metasilicate Potassium Monochromate Potassium Nitrate Potassium Nitrite Potassium Oxalate Potassium Perchlorate Potassium Perfluoro Acetate Potassium Permanganate Potassium Peroxide Potassium Persulfate Potassium Phosphate (Acid) Potassium Phosphate (Alkaline) Potassium Phosphate (Di/Tri Basic) Potassium Pyrosulfate Potassium Salts E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V3819-75 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V3819-75 E0540-80 V3819-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 1 3 1 1 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 X 3 1 3 3 3 X 3 X 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 1 3 1 1 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 X 3 1 3 3 3 X 3 X 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 1 3 1 1 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 X 3 1 3 3 3 X 3 X 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 1 4 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 1 4 4 4 X 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 1 4 1 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 1 4 4 4 X 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 Hypalon CSM 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 .

50E. EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM .com Silicone MQ. 7-44 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.parkerorings.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Compatibility Tables for Gases. Fluids.Insufficient Data X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 X 4 4 1 4 1 1 2 3 2 2 2 1 2 4 X 4 3 4 1 1 2 4 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. 540C.Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 . 312C. With some media however. the service temperature range may be significantly different. 115E Pydraul. PVMQ X 2 2 2 1 2 1 2 2 2 2 1 2 2 4 2 2 X 4 4 1 4 2 2 X 4 X X X 2 X 4 X 1 4 4 1 4 X 4 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU.Satisfactory 2 .Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 . 230C. VMQ. 29ELT 30E.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Potassium Silicate Potassium Sodium Tartrate Potassium Stannate Potassium Stearate Potassium Sulfate Potassium Sulfide Potassium Sulfite Potassium Tartrate Potassium Thiocyanate Potassium Thiosulfate Potassium Triphosphate Prestone Antifreeze PRL-High Temp. A200 Pydraul.Unsatisfactory x . ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS. 10E Pydraul. 65E Pyranol Transformer Oil Pyridine Pyridine Oil V3819-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 V1164-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 N0674-70 V1164-75 E0540-80 X 3 3 3 1 3 1 3 3 3 3 1 2 1 1 3 3 1 4 4 1 4 3 3 X 3 X X X 3 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 X 3 3 3 1 3 1 3 3 3 3 1 2 1 1 3 3 1 4 4 1 4 3 3 X 3 X X X 3 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 1 1 4 2 1 1 2 1 1 X 4 X X X 1 X 2 1 1 1 4 1 4 2 2 X 3 3 3 1 3 1 3 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 3 3 1 4 4 1 4 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 4 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 1 X X X X X X X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 2 4 4 1 4 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 4 4 X 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 1 1 X 4 4 1 4 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 2 1 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 X 4 4 4 1 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 2 1 3 4 4 X 4 4 4 X 4 4 3 4 3 3 3 4 3 4 X 4 4 4 4 2 3 X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 1 1 X 2 1 1 2 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 2 X 1 1 4 1 4 4 2 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 1 1 X 4 4 1 4 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 1 1 X 4 4 1 4 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 1 1 X 4 4 1 4 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 Hypalon CSM X 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 4 2 2 1 1 X 4 4 1 4 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 2 4 4 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. Hydr. Oil Producer Gas Propane Propionaldehyde Propionic Acid Propionitrile Propyl Acetate Propyl Acetone or n-Propyl Acetone Propyl Alcohol Propyl Nitrate Propyl Propionate Propylamine Propylbenzene Propylene Propylene Chloride Propylene Chlorohydrin Propylene Dichloride Propylene Glycol Propylene Imine Propylene Oxide Pydraul 90e Pydraul. Lexington.

Fluids. 43. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.Satisfactory 2 .Unsatisfactory x .Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 . VMQ. 55 Pyrogard 53. EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM 7-45 . With some media however.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended.Insufficient Data 1 1 2 X 4 2 4 2 1 2 4 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 X X 4 2 1 1 1 1 X 2 2 1 1 2 1 Quintolubric 888 —R— Radiation (Gamma.0 E+07 Rads) Raffinate Rapeseed Oil Red Line 100 Oil Red Oil (MIL-H-5606) Resorcinol Rhodium Riboflavin Ricinoleic Acid RJ-1 (MIL-F-25558) RJ-4 (MIL-F-82522) Rosin RP-1 (MIL-R-25576) V1164-75 E0740-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 V3819-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 N0602-70 N0602-70 V1164-75 N0602-70 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. Lexington. the service temperature range may be significantly different. 1. Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Pyridine Sulfate Pyridine Sulfonic Acid Pyrogallol (Pyrogallic Acid) Pyrogard 42. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 .com Silicone MQ. Mobil Phosphate Ester Pyrogard D. PVMQ 2 2 X X 4 3 X 2 2 X 2 2 X X 2 2 2 2 X X X X X 2 X 4 4 4 2 X X X 4 4 X 4 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU.parkerorings. Mobil Water-in-Oil Emulsion Pyroligneous Acid Pyrolube Pyrosulfuric Acid Pyrosulfuryl Chloride Pyrrole Pyruvic Acid —Q — Quinidine Quinine Quinine Bisulfate Quinine Hydrochloride Quinine Sulfate Quinine Tartrate Quinizarin Quinoline Quinone Quintolubric E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 N0674-70 3 3 2 4 4 1 4 4 3 2 4 3 2 2 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 X 1 3 2 2 1 1 3 X 2 2 1 2 2 1 3 3 2 4 4 1 4 4 3 2 4 3 2 2 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 X 1 3 2 2 1 1 3 X 2 2 1 2 2 1 1 1 4 1 1 4 2 2 1 4 4 1 4 4 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 X 4 2 4 1 4 4 1 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 1 1 1 4 4 1 3 1 4 3 1 1 3 3 3 3 1 1 1 X 1 4 1 1 1 1 3 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X X 2 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X 1 1 4 4 4 2 2 4 1 4 4 1 4 4 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 X 2 X 4 2 2 2 1 X 4 4 2 4 4 2 1 1 4 X 4 4 4 4 1 4 2 1 4 4 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 X X X 4 4 4 4 1 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X X X 4 2 1 1 4 X 4 4 1 2 4 1 4 4 3 X 4 1 4 4 4 3 X 4 3 3 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 X 1 4 3 2 1 1 4 X 3 3 1 2 3 1 1 1 4 X 1 4 2 2 1 4 4 1 4 4 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 X 2 4 4 1 4 4 1 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 X 4 4 4 4 1 4 2 1 4 4 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 X X X 4 4 4 4 1 X 4 4 4 X 4 4 1 1 4 X 4 4 4 4 1 4 2 1 4 4 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 X X X 4 4 4 4 1 X 4 4 4 X 4 4 1 1 4 X 4 4 4 4 1 4 2 1 4 4 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 1 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 Hypalon CSM 1 1 4 X 4 1 2 4 1 4 2 1 4 4 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 X X X 4 2 2 2 1 X 4 4 2 X 4 2 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 .< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Compatibility Tables for Gases.

7-46 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. Base Shell Tellus #68 Shell Tellus 27 (Petroleum Base) Shell Tellus 33 Shell UMF (5% Aromatic) Shellac Silane Silicate Esters Silicon Fluoride Silicon Tetrachloride Silicon Tetrafluoride Silicone Greases Silicone Oils Silver Bromide Silver Chloride Silver Cyanide Silver Nitrate Silver Sulfate Sinclair Opaline CX-EP Lube Skelly. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended —S — Saccharin Solution Sal Ammoniac Salicylic Acid Santo Safe 300 Sea (Salt) Water Sebacic Acid Selenic Acid Selenous Acid Sewage SF 1154 GE Silicone Fluid SF1147 GE Silicone Fluid SF96 GE SIlicone Fluid Shell 3XF Mine Fluid (Fire resist hydr.Insufficient Data 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X 1 1 X 1 X X X 2 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. C.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Compatibility Tables for Gases. With some media however. Fluids.com Silicone MQ.parkerorings. the service temperature range may be significantly different.) Shell Alvania Grease #2 Shell Carnea 19 and 29 Shell Diala Shell Irus 905 Shell Lo Hydrax 27 and 29 Shell Macome 72 Shell Tellus #32 Pet. Lexington. PVMQ 2 2 X 1 1 2 2 2 1 4 4 4 X 2 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 X X 4 2 X 4 X X X 3 3 2 2 2 1 2 4 X 3 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU.Satisfactory 2 . VMQ. EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM .Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 .5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended.Unsatisfactory x . E Skydrol 500 B4 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0740-75 V1164-75 E0740-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 V3819-75 V1164-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 E1267-80 3 1 2 4 1 3 3 3 1 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 X 2 X X X 1 1 3 3 3 2 3 1 1 4 3 1 2 4 1 3 3 3 1 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 X 2 X X X 1 1 3 3 3 2 3 1 1 4 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 X 4 X X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 1 3 1 1 1 1 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 X 1 X X X 1 1 3 3 3 1 3 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 1 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 1 1 X 4 2 1 1 1 2 1 X 1 2 2 4 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 X 1 X X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 4 4 1 1 2 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X X 4 1 X 4 X X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 1 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 X 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X 1 4 X X X X X 1 1 4 4 4 1 4 1 X 4 4 1 X X 2 4 4 4 4 2 X 2 4 1 2 2 1 2 2 1 1 X X 1 4 X 1 X X X 1 1 4 4 4 1 4 1 X 4 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X X 4 1 X 4 X X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 2 1 1 2 4 1 1 1 1 1 X X 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X X 4 1 X 4 X X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X X 4 1 X 4 X X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X X 4 1 X 4 X X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 Hypalon CSM 1 1 X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X X 4 1 X X X X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 4 4 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. Solvent B.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 .

Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Skydrol 7000 Skydrol LD-4 Soap Solutions Socony Mobile Type A Socony Vacuum AMV AC781 (Grease) Socony Vacuum PD959B Soda Ash Sodium (Molten) Sodium Acetate Sodium Acid Bisulfate Sodium Acid Fluoride Sodium Acid Sulfate Sodium Aluminate Sodium Aluminate Sulfate Sodium Anthraquinone Disulfate Sodium Antimonate Sodium Arsenate Sodium Arsenite Sodium Benzoate Sodium Bicarbonate (Baking Soda) Sodium Bichromate Sodium Bifluoride Sodium Bisulfate or Bisulfite Sodium Bisulfide Sodium Bitartrate Sodium Borate Sodium Bromate Sodium Bromide Sodium Carbonate (Soda Ash) Sodium Chlorate Sodium Chloride Sodium Chlorite Sodium Chloroacetate Sodium Chromate Sodium Citrate Sodium Cyanamide Sodium Cyanate Sodium Cyanide Sodium Diacetate Sodium Diphenyl Sulfonate E1267-80 E1267-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 Factory E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 X 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 1 3 3 1 3 3 1 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 X 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 1 3 3 1 3 3 1 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 1 1 1 4 4 4 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 4 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 1 3 3 1 3 3 1 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 X 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 4 4 2 2 2 2 1 X 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 2 4 4 4 1 X 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 4 1 1 1 X X 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 X 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 X 4 4 2 2 1 X X 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 X 4 4 X 4 4 X 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 X 2 1 4 4 4 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 1 4 4 4 1 X 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 1 4 4 4 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 2 4 4 4 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Hypalon CSM Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 .Unsatisfactory x . Fluids.parkerorings. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS.Insufficient Data X 4 1 4 4 2 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 3 1 2 2 1 1 X 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 Silicone MQ.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM 7-47 .Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 .5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended.Satisfactory 2 . VMQ. Lexington. PVMQ X 3 1 4 4 4 1 X 4 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 2 2 1 2 2 1 2 2 1 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 2 2 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. With some media however.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Compatibility Tables for Gases.com Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU. the service temperature range may be significantly different.

5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended. EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Sodium Diphosphate Sodium Disilicate Sodium Ethylate Sodium Ferricyanide Sodium Ferrocyanide Sodium Fluoride Sodium Fluorosilicate Sodium Glutamate Sodium Hydride Sodium Hydrogen Sulfate Sodium Hydrosulfide Sodium Hydrosulfite Sodium Hydroxide.Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 .Unsatisfactory x . Fluids. With some media however.com Silicone MQ.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 . VMQ.Satisfactory 2 . PVMQ 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 X 2 2 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 X 2 2 2 4 2 2 2 2 2 2 4 2 2 2 4 4 1 2 2 2 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU. 3 Molar Sodium Hypochlorite Sodium Hypophosphate Sodium Hypophosphite Sodium Hyposulfite Sodium Iodide Sodium Lactate Sodium Metaphosphate Sodium Metasilicate Sodium Methylate Sodium Monophosphate Sodium Nitrate Sodium Oleate Sodium Orthosilicate Sodium Oxalate Sodium Perborate Sodium Percarbonate Sodium Perchlorate Sodium Peroxide Sodium Persulfate Sodium Phenolate Sodium Phenoxide Sodium Phosphate (Dibasic) Sodium Phosphate (Mono) Sodium Phosphate (Tribasic) Sodium Plumbite Sodium Pyrophosphate Sodium Resinate E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V3819-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 X 3 3 3 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 2 3 3 2 3 3 3 1 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 X 3 3 3 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 2 3 3 2 3 3 3 1 1 1 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 X 3 3 3 2 1 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 3 X 3 3 3 1 3 3 1 3 3 3 1 1 1 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Hypalon CSM 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 . Lexington.parkerorings.Insufficient Data 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X X 1 1 1 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. 7-48 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Compatibility Tables for Gases. the service temperature range may be significantly different.

1.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Compatibility Tables for Gases. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. 73 and 74 Soybean Oil Spry SR-10 Fuel SR-6 Fuel Standard Oil Mobilube GX90-EP Lube Stannic Ammonium Chloride Stannic Chloride Stannic Chloride. Lexington.Insufficient Data 1 1 X X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 4 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended. VMQ.Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 .Unsatisfactory x . With some media however.Satisfactory 2 .parkerorings. PVMQ 2 1 X X X 2 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 2 2 X 2 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 4 4 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 4 3 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Sodium Salicylate Sodium Salts Sodium Sesquisilicate Sodium Silicate Sodium Silicofluoride Sodium Stannate Sodium Sulfate Sodium Sulfide and Sulfite Sodium Sulfocyanide Sodium Tartrate Sodium Tetraborate Sodium Tetraphosphate Sodium Tetrasulfide Sodium Thioarsenate Sodium Thiocyanate Sodium Thiosulfate Sodium Trichloroacetate Sodium Triphosphate Solvesso 100. 50% Stannic Tetrachloride Stannous Bisulfate Stannous Bromide Stannous Chloride (15%) Stannous Fluoride Stannous Sulfate Stauffer 7700 Steam Below 400°F E0540-80 N0674-70 V3819-75 N0674-70 V3819-75 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V3819-75 E0540-80 V1238-95 V1238-95 N0674-70 V1164-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 V1164-75 N0674-70 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0692-75 3 1 X 1 X 3 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 X 3 3 3 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 3 1 1 3 3 3 1 3 3 2 4 3 1 X 1 X 3 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 X 3 3 3 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 3 1 1 3 3 3 1 3 3 2 4 1 1 X 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 4 4 4 4 3 2 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 3 1 X 1 X 3 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 X 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 3 3 3 1 3 3 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 1 2 X 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 4 4 2 2 3 2 4 4 2 1 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 1 1 X 1 X 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 X 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 1 X X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 2 2 1 1 2 2 1 4 X X 4 4 4 X 4 4 2 4 4 1 X X X 4 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 X 4 4 4 2 2 X 1 2 2 1 4 X X 4 4 4 X 4 4 X 4 1 1 X 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 4 4 4 4 3 2 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 2 1 1 X 1 X 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 X 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 1 1 X 1 X 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 X 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 1 1 X 1 X 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 X 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 Hypalon CSM 1 1 X 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 X X 2 2 3 4 4 4 2 1 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 . 150 Sorbitol Sour Crude Oil Sour Natural Gas Sovasol No. EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM 7-49 .Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 . the service temperature range may be significantly different. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS. and 3 Sovasol No. 2.com Silicone MQ. Fluids.

parkerorings.Insufficient Data 4 X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 X 2 1 1 1 3 1 2 2 2 X 2 1 X 2 1 1 X 4 1 X 1 1 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Steam.500°F Steam. Fluids. With some media however. PVMQ 4 X 2 4 2 2 2 2 2 4 2 1 2 2 X X 2 X X 2 2 X 3 3 2 2 2 X 4 2 X 2 2 1 X 4 2 4 4 4 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Compatibility Tables for Gases.com Silicone MQ. EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM . 3 Molar to 158°F Sulfuric Acid. the service temperature range may be significantly different.Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 . Dry Sulfur Dioxide.Satisfactory 2 . Concentrated to 158°F Sulfuric Chlorohydrin (Chlorosulfonic Acid) Sulfurous Acid Sunoco #3661 Sunoco All purpose grease E0962-90 FF200-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V0834-70 N0674-70 V3819-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 4 X 2 1 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 1 3 3 2 2 3 2 2 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 2 1 X 4 3 2 X 4 3 2 1 1 4 X 2 1 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 1 3 3 2 2 3 2 2 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 2 1 X 4 3 2 X X 3 2 1 1 3 X 2 4 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 4 4 1 1 4 1 1 1 3 4 1 1 1 1 2 4 X 2 1 1 3 4 1 2 4 4 4 X X 1 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 1 3 3 1 1 3 2 1 3 3 1 1 1 4 4 4 3 1 1 X 1 3 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 1 X X X X X X X X X 3 X X X X X X X X X X X X 4 X 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 2 1 1 4 4 1 2 4 1 1 1 3 4 4 4 2 1 2 2 X 4 1 2 X 4 1 2 2 2 4 X 2 4 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 4 4 1 X 4 1 1 4 4 4 2 4 4 X 2 4 X 3 1 3 X 4 1 2 4 4 4 X X 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 1 X 4 4 2 X 4 4 4 1 1 4 X X 1 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 3 3 4 X 3 4 4 X 4 X X X X X X 1 X X 4 4 3 4 4 3 1 1 4 X 2 4 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 4 4 1 X 4 1 1 1 3 4 2 2 1 X 2 4 X 2 1 1 X 4 1 2 4 4 4 X 2 4 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 4 4 1 X 4 1 1 4 4 4 2 4 4 X 2 4 X 2 1 X X X 1 2 4 4 4 X 2 4 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 4 4 1 X 4 1 1 4 4 4 2 4 4 X 2 4 X 2 1 X X X 1 2 4 4 4 X 2 4 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 4 4 1 X 4 1 1 4 4 4 2 4 4 X 2 4 X 2 1 X X X 1 2 4 4 Hypalon CSM 4 X 2 4 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 2 1 1 4 4 1 X 4 1 1 X 4 4 4 4 3 X 2 2 X 4 1 1 X X 1 1 2 2 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 .Unsatisfactory x . 400° . 7-50 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. Wet Sulfur Hexafluoride Sulfur Liquors Sulfur Monochloride Sulfur Tetrafluoride Sulfur Trioxide Dry Sulfuric Acid (20% Oleum) Sulfuric Acid. Lexington. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. VMQ. Concentrated Room Temp Sulfuric Acid.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended. Above 500°F Stearic Acid Stoddard Solvent Strontium Acetate Strontium Carbonate Strontium Chloride Strontium Hydroxide Strontium Nitrate Styrene (Monomer) Succinic Acid Sucrose Solutions Sulfamic Acid Sulfanilic Acid Sulfanilic Chloride Sulfanilimide Sulfite Liquors Sulfolane Sulfonated Oils Sulfonic Acid Sulfonyl Choride Sulfur Sulfur (Molten) Sulfur Chloride Sulfur Dioxide. Liquidified under pressure Sulfur Dioxide.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 . ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS.

With some media however. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Sunoco SAE 10 Sunsafe (Fire resist. hydr.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 . VMQ. PVMQ 4 X 4 2 4 4 2 2 2 1 X 2 X X X X X 4 X 4 4 X X X X 4 X 4 2 X X 2 X X 4 4 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU. bituminous Tartaric Acid Tellone II Terephthalic Acid Terpineol Terpinyl Acetate Tertiary Amyl Methyl Ether (TAME) Tertiary Butyl Catechol or p-tert-butylcatechol Tertiary Butyl Mercaptan Tetrabromoethane Tetrabromomethane Tetrabutyl Titanate Tetrachloroethylene Tetrachoroethane Tetraethyl Lead Tetraethyl Lead “Blend” Tetraethyl Orthosilicate (TEOS) Tetrahydrofuran Tetrahydrothiophen Tetralin Tetramethyl Ammonium Hydroxide Tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane (TMCTS) Tetramethyldihydropyridine Tetraphosphoglucosate Tetraphosphoric Acid Tetrasodium Pyrophosphate Texaco 3450 Gear Oil Texaco Capella A and AA N0674-70 N0674-70 N1500-75 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 V1164-75 N0674-70 V3819-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 V3819-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V3819-75 FF500-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 V3819-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 V3819-75 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 2 1 X 3 2 2 X 4 4 4 2 2 4 4 2 2 X 4 X 4 3 X 2 3 X X 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 2 1 X 3 2 2 X 4 4 4 2 2 4 4 2 2 X 4 X 4 3 X 2 3 X X 1 1 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 1 4 2 X 1 3 4 X 2 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 X 2 X 4 1 X 4 1 X X 4 4 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 3 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 X 1 3 X 1 3 X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 2 2 2 1 4 2 2 1 3 2 X 1 4 4 X 2 X 4 4 2 4 4 2 4 X 4 X 4 1 X 4 1 X X 4 2 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 2 4 4 X 1 4 4 X 2 X 4 4 2 4 4 4 4 X 4 X 4 1 X 4 1 X X 4 4 1 4 2 4 1 1 1 4 4 X X 4 X 4 X 4 X 4 4 X 4 4 X X X 4 X X 4 X 4 4 X X 1 1 1 4 2 4 1 1 1 X X 1 X 4 2 3 X 4 X X 3 X 4 4 X X X 3 X X 4 X 3 4 X X 1 2 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 1 4 2 X 1 3 4 X 2 X 4 4 2 4 4 4 4 X 2 X 4 1 X 4 1 X X 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 1 4 2 X 1 4 4 X 2 X 4 4 2 4 4 4 4 X 4 X 4 1 X 4 1 X X 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 1 2 1 X 1 4 4 X 4 X 4 4 2 4 4 4 4 X 4 X 4 1 X 4 1 X X 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 1 3 3 X 1 4 4 X 4 X 4 4 2 4 4 4 4 X 4 X 4 1 X 4 1 X X 4 4 Hypalon CSM 2 2 4 1 4 4 2 1 4 1 X 1 4 4 X 2 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 X 4 1 X 4 1 X X 4 4 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 . the service temperature range may be significantly different. Lexington.Insufficient Data 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 2 X 1 X 2 2 4 2 2 2 2 X 4 X 1 X X 2 1 X X 1 1 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (.Satisfactory 2 .< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Compatibility Tables for Gases. Fluids.Unsatisfactory x . fluid) Super Shell Gas Surfuryl Chloride Swan Finch EP Lube Swan Finch Hypoid-90 —T — Tallow Tannic Acid (10%) Tar. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 .parkerorings.com Silicone MQ. Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS. EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM 7-51 .5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended.

Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 . Fluids. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.com Silicone MQ.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Compatibility Tables for Gases. the service temperature range may be significantly different. 65 Thio Acid Chloride Thioamyl Alcohol Thiodiacetic Acid Thioethanol Thioglycolic Acid Thiokol TP-90B Thiokol TP-95 Thionyl Chloride Thiophene (Thiofuran) Thiophosphoryl Chloride Thiourea Thorium Nitrate Tidewater Multigear. 7-52 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. PVMQ 4 4 2 4 4 4 4 4 2 4 4 X X 2 X 2 2 2 2 X X X X 2 2 2 4 2 2 2 2 2 X 2 2 4 4 X 4 X Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU. 140 EP Lube Tidewater Oil-Beedol Tin Ammonium Chloride Tin Chloride Tin Tetrachloride Titanic Acid Titanium Chloride Titanium Dioxide Titanium Sulfate Titanium Tetrachloride Toluene Toluene Bisodium Sulfite Toluene Diisocyanate (TDI) Toluene Sulfonyl Chloride N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 V1164-75 V3819-75 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 V3819-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 2 X X 4 X 1 3 3 3 4 4 2 2 3 3 3 1 1 3 1 1 3 X 3 3 2 4 X 4 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 2 X X 4 X 1 3 3 3 4 4 2 2 3 3 3 1 1 3 1 1 3 X 3 3 2 4 X 4 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X X 4 X 4 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 1 1 1 4 4 1 4 4 1 X 1 1 4 4 X 2 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X 1 X 1 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 3 3 3 1 1 3 1 1 3 X 3 3 1 1 X 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 2 4 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 4 4 X X 4 X 2 1 1 1 2 2 4 4 1 1 1 2 2 1 2 2 1 X 1 1 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X X X X X X 4 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 4 4 1 4 4 1 X 1 1 4 4 X 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 2 X X 4 X 1 4 4 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 1 1 4 X 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 2 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 1 X X X X X X 1 4 4 4 X X 3 3 4 4 4 1 1 4 1 1 4 X 4 4 4 4 X X 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X X 4 X 4 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 1 1 1 4 4 1 4 4 1 X 1 1 4 4 X 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X X X X X X 4 1 1 1 X X 4 4 1 1 1 4 4 1 4 4 1 X 1 1 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X X X X X X 4 1 1 1 X X 4 4 1 1 1 4 4 1 4 4 1 X 1 1 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X X X X X X 4 1 1 1 X X 4 4 1 1 1 4 4 1 4 4 1 X 1 1 4 4 X 4 4 Hypalon CSM 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X X X X X X 2 1 1 1 2 2 4 4 1 1 1 2 4 1 2 2 1 X 1 1 4 4 X 4 4 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 . ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS.Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 . 60. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Texaco Meropa 220 (No Lead) Texaco Regal B Texaco Uni-Temp Grease Texamatic “A” 1581 Fluid Texamatic “A” 3401 Fluid Texamatic “A” 3525 Fluid Texamatic “A” 3528 Fluid Texamatic “A” Transmission Oil Texas 1500 Oil Therminol 44 Therminol 55 Therminol 66 Therminol FR Therminol VP-1.Satisfactory 2 .parkerorings.Insufficient Data 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 1 X X X X X X 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 2 2 X 4 2 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended. VMQ.Unsatisfactory x . Lexington. With some media however. EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM .

Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 . Lexington.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 .< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Compatibility Tables for Gases. the service temperature range may be significantly different. Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. PVMQ 2 X 2 X 2 1 2 2 X 3 X X 2 4 4 X X X X 4 2 4 4 2 X 4 4 3 X X X X 2 2 2 4 4 X X 2 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU.parkerorings.com Silicone MQ. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Toluenesulfonic Acid Toluidine Toluol Toluquinone Tolylaldehyde Toothpaste Transformer Oil Transmission Fluid Type A Triacetin Triaryl Phosphate Tribromomethylbenzene Tributoxyethyl Phosphate Tributyl Citrate Tributyl Mercaptan Tributyl Phosphate Tributylamine Trichloroacetic Acid Trichloroacetyl Chloride Trichlorobenzene Trichloroethane Trichloroethanolamine Trichloroethylene Trichloromethane Trichloronitromethane (Chloropicrin) Trichlorophenylsilane Trichloropropane Trichlorosilane Tricresyl Phosphate Triethanol Amine Triethyl Phosphate Triethylaluminum Triethylborane Triethylene Glycol Triethylenetetramine Trifluoroacetic Acid Trifluoroethane (R-23) Trifluoromethane Trifluorovinylchloride Triisopropylbenzylchloride Trimethylamine (TMA) E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 E3609-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 E0540-80 FF500-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 V3819-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 V3819-75 V3819-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 3 2 3 2 3 1 1 1 2 4 2 4 3 4 4 X 2 2 2 4 3 3 4 3 X 4 4 4 3 2 X X 3 3 3 4 4 2 2 3 3 2 3 2 3 1 1 1 2 4 2 4 3 4 4 X 2 2 2 4 3 3 4 3 X 4 4 4 3 2 X X 3 3 3 4 4 2 2 3 1 4 1 4 1 1 4 4 1 1 4 1 1 4 1 X 2 4 4 4 1 4 4 1 X 4 4 1 2 4 X X 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 3 1 4 X 3 1 1 1 3 1 1 3 X 1 1 2 4 1 X X 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 X X X X X 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 1 4 1 4 1 1 2 2 2 4 4 4 1 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 1 X 4 4 3 2 4 X X 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 1 4 1 1 4 4 3 4 4 2 1 4 4 X 2 4 4 4 1 4 4 1 X 4 4 2 2 4 X X 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 2 2 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 3 4 3 1 1 4 4 3 4 4 X 4 X 4 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 3 X X 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 4 1 4 1 4 1 1 4 4 1 1 4 1 1 4 2 X 2 4 4 4 1 4 4 1 X 4 4 1 2 4 X X 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 1 4 1 1 4 4 2 4 4 2 1 4 4 X 2 4 4 4 1 4 4 1 X 4 4 4 2 4 X X 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 1 4 1 1 4 4 2 4 4 4 1 4 2 X 2 4 4 4 1 4 4 1 X 4 4 4 2 4 X X 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 1 4 1 1 4 4 2 4 4 2 1 4 2 X 2 4 4 4 1 4 4 1 X 4 4 4 2 4 X X 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 1 Hypalon CSM 1 4 1 4 1 1 4 2 2 4 4 4 1 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 1 X 4 4 4 2 4 X X 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 1 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 . VMQ. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.Unsatisfactory x .5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended. With some media however. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS. Fluids.Satisfactory 2 . EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM 7-53 .Insufficient Data 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 4 2 2 2 1 3 4 X 4 2 2 2 1 2 2 1 X 2 2 2 4 2 X X 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 1 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (.

KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.com Silicone MQ.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended.parkerorings. the service temperature range may be significantly different. Fuel B) —U— Ucon Hydrolube J-4 Ucon Lubricant 50-HB-100 Ucon Lubricant 50-HB-260 Ucon Lubricant 50-HB-5100 Ucon Lubricant 50-HB55 Ucon Lubricant 50-HB-660 Ucon Lubricant LB-1145 Ucon Lubricant LB-135 Ucon Lubricant LB-285 Ucon Lubricant LB-300X Ucon Lubricant LB-625 Ucon Lubricant LB-65 Ucon Oil 50-HB-280x Ucon Oil Heat Transfer Fluid 500 (Polyalkalene Glycol) Ucon Oil LB-385 V1164-75 V1164-75 N0674-70 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 Factory N0674-70 V3819-75 V3819-75 N0674-70 V1164-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0602-70 N0602-70 N0602-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 2 2 1 4 4 3 4 3 3 X 1 X X 1 2 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 2 1 4 4 3 4 3 3 X 1 X X 1 2 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 X 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 3 2 3 3 X 1 X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 1 X X 4 4 2 2 4 1 3 1 1 X 2 X X 4 4 2 4 2 4 4 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 1 1 X 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 X 1 1 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 X X X X 1 2 1 2 1 3 3 4 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 3 3 1 X 4 4 4 4 4 X 3 X X 1 4 1 4 1 2 2 4 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 X 3 X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 1 1 X 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 X 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 1 1 X 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 X 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 1 1 X 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 X 1 1 Hypalon CSM 4 4 2 2 4 1 4 1 1 X 3 X X 4 4 4 4 2 4 4 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 X 1 1 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 . Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Trimethylbenzene Trimethylborate (TMB) Trimethylpentane Trinitrololuene (TNT) Trioctyl Phosphate Triphenylphosphite Tripoly Phosphate Tripotassium Phosphate Trisodium Phosphate Tritium Tung Oil (China Wood Oil) Tungsten Hexafluoride Tungstic Acid Turbine Oil Turbine Oil #15 (MIL-L-7808A) Turbo Oil #35 Turpentine Type I Fuel (MIL-S-3136)(ASTM Ref.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Compatibility Tables for Gases. PVMQ X X 2 X 3 2 3 2 2 X 4 X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU. VMQ. EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM .Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 . ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS. Lexington. Fuel A) Type II Fuel MIL-S-3136 Type III Fuel MIL-S-3136(ASTM Ref. 7-54 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.Satisfactory 2 .Unsatisfactory x . With some media however.Insufficient Data 2 2 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 X 2 X X 1 2 1 2 1 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 . Fluids.

Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 .< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Compatibility Tables for Gases. With some media however. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 . Fluid) Univolt #35 (Mineral Oil) Unsymmetrical Dimethyl Hydrazine (UDMH) UPDI(Ultrapure Deionized Water) Uranium Hexachloride Uranium Hexafluoride Uranium Sulfate Uric Acid —V — Valeraldehyde Valeric Acid Vanadium Oxide Vanadium Pentoxide Varnish Vegetable Oil Versilube F44. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. Lexington.Insufficient Data 1 2 2 1 1 4 1 X X X 3 1 1 1 1 2 1 X 1 3 X 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 2 1 4 1 1 1 X Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (. F55 Versilube F-50 Vinegar Vinyl Acetate Vinyl Benzene Vinyl Benzoate Vinyl Chloride Vinyl Fluoride Vinylidene Chloride Vinylpyridine Vitriol (White) VV-H-910 V V-L-825 —W — Wagner 21B Brake Fluid Water Wemco C Whiskey and Wines White Liquor N0674-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 Factory Factory E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 V1164-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 E0540-80 E0540-80 C0873-70 E0667-70 E0540-80 N0674-70 E3609-70 N0674-70 1 2 2 1 1 2 3 X X X 3 3 3 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 2 3 X X X 3 3 3 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 X 3 2 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 1 1 X X X 1 1 1 4 4 4 3 1 1 2 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 3 1 X X 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 X 4 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 1 X X 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X 1 1 4 4 2 2 2 1 X X X 1 1 1 2 2 4 3 1 1 2 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 2 1 2 2 2 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 2 1 X X X 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 X 1 2 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 X 1 1 4 1 X X 4 4 1 1 X 4 X X X 4 4 4 1 1 4 1 X 1 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 1 X 4 1 4 X X 3 3 1 1 X 4 X X X 4 4 4 1 1 3 X X 1 4 X 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 2 X 4 1 4 X 1 4 4 4 4 1 1 X X X 1 1 1 4 4 4 3 X 1 2 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 2 4 2 1 4 1 X 1 4 4 4 4 1 1 X X X 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 X 1 2 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 2 X X 1 4 1 X 1 4 4 4 4 1 1 X X X 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 X 1 2 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 2 X X 1 4 1 X 1 4 4 4 4 1 1 X X X 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 X 1 2 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 2 X 2 1 4 1 X Hypalon CSM 1 4 4 2 4 1 1 X X X 1 1 1 2 2 4 X X 1 X X 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 2 X 2 1 4 1 X Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 .Unsatisfactory x .Satisfactory 2 . Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.parkerorings. VMQ. PVMQ 1 X X 4 4 4 2 X X X 2 2 2 2 2 4 1 X 3 3 X X X X X X X 2 2 3 3 1 4 1 X Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU.com Silicone MQ. EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM 7-55 . Fluids. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended Ucon Oil LB-400X Undecylenic Acid Undecylic Acid Univis 40 (Hydr. the service temperature range may be significantly different.

the service temperature range may be significantly different.Unsatisfactory x . EU Natural Rubber NR Fluorocarbon FKM . With some media however. PVMQ 4 4 1 1 4 1 4 4 4 X 4 2 X X 2 2 2 2 X 2 X X X 2 1 1 X 2 1 2 1 Styrene-Butadiene SBR Fluorosilicone FVMQ Polyurethane AU. VMQ. Lexington. 7-56 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.Doubtful (sometimes OK for static seal) 4 .parkerorings.Satisfactory 2 . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.Insufficient Data 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 4 1 1 4 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 Approximate Service Temperature Ranges for Commonly Used Basic Polymer Types* Nitrile (General Service) Nitrile (Low Temperature) Hydrogenated Nitrile Ethylene Propylene Fluorocarbon Hifluor Perfluoroelastomer (Parofluor) -34°C to 121°C (-30°F to 250°F)* -55°C to 107°C (-65°F to 225°F)* -32°C to 149°C (-23°F to 300°F)* -57°C to 121°C (-70°F to 250°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 205°C (-15°F to 400°F)* -26°C to 320°C (-15°F to 608°F)* AFLAS Neoprene Polyacrylate Polyurethane Butyl Fluorosilicone Silicone -9°C to 232°C (15°F to 450°F)* -51°C to 107°C (-60°F to 225°F)* -21°C to 177°C (.Fair (usually OK for static seal) 3 .com Silicone MQ. ALWAYS TEST UNDER ACTUAL SERVICE CONDITIONS.5°F to 350°F)* -40°C to 82°C (-40°F to 180°F)* -59°C to 120°C (-75°F to 250°F)* -73°C to 177°C (-100°F to 350°F)* -115°C to 232°C (-175°F to 450°F)* NOTE: *These temperature ranges will apply to the majority of media for which the material is potentially recommended. Solids Aflas (TFE/Propylene) FEPM Hydrogenated Nitrile HNBR Neoprene/Chloroprene CR Ethylene Propylene EPDM Perfluoroelastomer FFKM Polyacrylate ACM Butadiene BR Recommended White Oil White Pine Oil Wolmar Salt Wood Alcohol Wood Oil —X— Xenon Xylene Xylidenes-Mixed-Aromatic Amines Xylol —Z— Zeolites Zinc Acetate Zinc Ammonium Chloride Zinc Bromide Completion Fluid Zinc Chloride Zinc Chromate Zinc Cyanide Zinc Diethyldithiocarbamate Zinc Dihydrogen Phosphate Zinc Fluorosilicate Zinc Hydrosulfite Zinc Naphthenate Zinc Nitrate Zinc Oxide Zinc Phenolsulfonate Zinc Phosphate Zinc Salts Zinc Silicofluoride Zinc Stearate Zinc Sulfate Zinc Sulfide Zirconium Nitrate N0674-70 V1164-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0674-70 V1164-75 E0540-80 V1164-75 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 V1164-75 N0674-70 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 E0540-80 V3819-75 E0540-80 V3819-75 N0674-70 N0674-70 E0540-80 N0674-70 N0674-70 V3819-75 E0540-80 N0674-70 E0540-80 N0674-70 1 2 1 1 1 1 4 3 4 1 2 3 X 1 3 3 3 3 X 3 X 1 1 3 1 1 X 3 1 3 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 4 3 4 1 2 3 X 1 3 3 3 3 X 3 X 1 1 3 1 1 X 3 1 3 1 4 4 1 1 4 1 4 1 4 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 4 1 1 4 3 X 1 3 3 3 3 X 3 X 1 1 3 1 1 X 3 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 2 4 2 1 2 1 4 4 4 1 2 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 X X X 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 4 4 1 1 4 1 4 4 4 1 4 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 2 1 2 1 X 2 4 1 1 4 4 4 X 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 1 X 1 4 3 1 4 4 4 X 4 4 X X 4 4 4 4 X 4 X X X 4 1 1 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 3 1 4 4 4 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 4 4 1 1 4 1 4 4 4 1 4 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 2 1 2 4 4 1 1 4 1 4 4 4 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 2 1 2 4 4 1 1 4 1 4 4 4 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 2 1 2 Hypalon CSM 4 4 1 1 3 1 4 4 4 1 4 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 Hifluor FKM Isoprene IR Nitrile NBR Butyl IIR COMPOUND COMPATIBILITY RATING 1 .< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Compatibility Tables for Gases. Fluids.

. . . Italy . . . . . . . . . Table 8-5 Compound Specifications for Commonly Used SAE and ASTM Specifications . . . . . . .1 How To Order O-Rings and Other Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . Table 8-3 Military Rubber Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . United Kingdom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . International . . . . . . . . . . 8-8 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lexington. . . . Table 8-2 Military Fluid Specification Description. . . . . . . . 8-8 8-8 8-8 8-8 8-8 8-8 8-8 Specifications 8-6 8. . .parkerorings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .com 8-1 . . . . . . . 8-2 8-2 8-3 8-4 8-5 8.1 Parker Compound Numbering System. . . . . . . . . . .2 International O-Ring Standards and Test Methods Germany . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .< Back Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Section VIII – Specifications 8. . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Ordering Addresses . . . . . . . France . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sweden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Table 8-4 AMS and NAS Rubber Specifications . . . United States . . . . . . . . . . .

with one notable exceptions. and in specifying the necessary size number for the desired dimensions. See the following examples: Example 1: N0674-70 indicates a 70 durometer nitrile compound durometer hardness base polymer Example 2: NA151-70 indicates a 70 durometer nitrile compound durometer hardness special property description Base Polymer Specifications Prefix letters on compound designations used by Parker Seal. telephone number (859) 269-2351. Propylene Fluorosilicone Nitrile. but Parker has updated to the four digit format to allow utilization of a computer format for listing new compounds beyond 999.e. Lexington. For further assistance. The three digit format was previously used. P. indicate the base polymer by a prefix letter. Box 11751. The basic number is merely a sequential number and has no particular significance. You may also contact the Inside Sales Department at the Parker Seal O-ring Division. Note that there is only one base polymer and one hardness associated with each basic number (i. Kentucky 40512.parkerorings. The information in these tables may be used as a guide in selecting the most suitable Parker O-ring compound to seal any common fluid. there is not both N0674-70 and N0674-90). AFLAS Table 8-1a: Compound Designation Codes Specialty Property Letter A B E F G J L M P W X Description General purpose Low compression set Ethylene acrylate Fuel resistant or fully fluorinated Higher fluorine content NSF / FDA / WRAS approvals Internally lubed Mil / AMS specifications Low temperature flexible or tetrafluoroethylene . compound N0674-70 may be shown as N674-70. Hydrogenated. Carboxylated Polyurethane Silicone Fluorocarbon. Ethylene Acrylic Butyl Neoprene Ethylene. Lexington.1 How to Order O-Rings and Other Parts 8.O.com .< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook How to Order 8. the prefix letter is followed by a secondary letter. and the base polymers and specialty property description they indicate are identified in Table 8-1a and 8-1b. Perfluorinated elastomer. you will see Parker compound numbers shown in a three digit format without a zero (0) preceding the numerical designation. In some instances. 2360 Palumbo Drive. Active Compound Designation Codes Letter A B C E L N P S V Polymer Polyacrylate. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. and the type A durometer hardness by a two digit suffix number.propylene Non-black compound Carboxylated Table 8-1b: Compound Specialty Property 8-2 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.1 Parker Compound Numbering System From time to time.1. please feel free to call your Parker Seal Territory Sales Manager or Parker O-ring Distributor. This indicates a specialty property. Parker compound numbers. There is no difference in compounds shown with or without the zero (0) preceding the older three digit compound designations. For example.

Petroleum Base. N0756-75 (2) -26°C to +204°C (-15°F to +400°F). Range Propellent. Fire Resistant. Synthetic Base Grease.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Military Fluid Specification Description Fluid Specification MIL-L-2104 MlL-S-3136 MlL-L-3150 MlL-G-3278 MlL-O-3503 MlL-G-3545 MIL-G-4339 MIL-G-4343 MIL-J-5161 MIL-F-5566 MIL-G-5572 Parker O-Ring Compound N0304-75 N0602-70 N0304-75 LM159-70 N0304-75 N0304-75 N0304-75 N0304-75 N0602-70 E1267-80 N0602-70 Description Oil. Technical.115/145 Aviation Gas Hydraulic Fluid. Fire Resistant. Preservative Synthetic Di-ester Base Fluid Denatured Ethyl Alcohol Synthetic Di-ester Base Lubricating Oil Aircraft Calibrating Fluid Hydraulic Fluid. Hydraulic Grease. Syn. Petroleum Base. Non-petroleum Automotive Brake Oil. Kerosene Type. cpd. Instrument Fuel Oil. JP-5 Jet Engine Oil Lubricating Oil. cpd. 22% Lubricating Oil. Petroleum Base. cpd. Table 8-2: Military Fluid Specification Description Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. Arctic Hydraulic Fluid.com 8-3 . Hydrocarbon Oil. Aircraft Turbine Engine. N0756-75 Recommended compounds are military quality. Rust Inhibited. Synthetic Hydrocarbon Base. Aerozine-50 Hydraulic Fluid. Low Temperature Specifications MlL-H-5606 MlL-T-5624 MlL-L-6081 MlL-L-6082 MlL-H-6083 MlL-L-6085 MlL-A-6091 MlL-L-6387 MlL-C-7024 MlL-H-7083 MlL-G-7118 MlL-G-7187 MLO-7277 MlL-G-7421 MLO-7557 MlL-G-7711 MlL-L-7808 MlL-L-7870 MlL-C-8188 MLO-8200 MlL-H-8446 MLO-8515 MlL-L-9000 MlL-L-9236 (1) N0602-70 N0304-75 N0304-75 N0304-75 V1164-75 E1267-80 V1164-74 N0602-70 E1267-70 N0304-75 N0304-75 V1164-75 LM159-70 V1164-75 N0304-75 V1164-75 N0304-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 N0304-75 V1164-75 V1164-75 N0304-75 (2) V1164-75 N0602-75 47-071 (2) MIL-H-87257 (2) (1) -48°C to +113°C (-55°F to +235°F). Diesel. Aircraft Reciprocating Engine. Graphite Hydraulic Fluid. Preservative Silicone Fluid. Silicate-ester Base Hydraulic Fluid. Diesel Synthetic Lubricating Oil. Marine Power Transmission Fluid Lubricating Oil. Wide Temp. cpd. Turbine Fluid Specification MlL-E-8500 MIL-G-10924 MIL-H-13910 MIL-L-15017 MIL-G-15793 MIL-F-16884 MlL-F-17111 MlL-L-17331 MlL-H-19457 MlL-L-21260 MlL-S-21568 MlL-H-22251 MlL-L-23699 MlL-G-23827 MlL-G-25013 MlL-G-25537 MIL-F-25558 MlL-C-25576 MlL-F-25656 MlL-L-25681 MlL-G-25760 MlL-P-27402 MlL-H-27601 MlL-L-46167 MIl-H-46170 MIL-F-81912 MlL-F-82522 MIL-T-83133 MIL-H-83282 Parker O-Ring Compound E1267-80 N0304-75 E1267-80 N0304-75 N0304-75 N0304-75 N0304-75 V1164-75 E1267-80 N0304-75 E1267-80 E1267-80 V1164-75 N0602-70 V1164-75 N0304-75 N0602-70 N0602-70 N0602-70 V1164-75 V1164-75 Description Ethylene Glycol. Hi-Temp. Grade JP6 Oil. Aircraft Hydraulic Fluid. Engine. Internal Combustion Engine. Aviation. Synthetic Fuel. Silicone Base. N0951-75 -54°C to +135°C (-65°F to +275°F). Non-corrosive. Dimethyl Polysiloxane Hydrazine Solution. High Temperature. Hi-Temp. Uninhibited Automotive Grease Hydraulic Fluid. Aircraft and Ordnance Jet Fuel JP-4. Steam Turbine Fire Resistant Hydraulic Fluid (phosphate-ester base) Lubricating Oil. General Purpose Corrosion Preventive Oil. Aircraft and Missile. N0304-75 -54°C to +135°C (-65°F to +275°F). Helicopter Oscillating Bearing Grease Fuel. Base Hydraulic Fluid. Synthetic Di-ester Base Lubricating Oil. Hydrolube Actuator Grease Grease. Preservative Aircraft Grease Oil. Extreme Low Temp. Flight Vehicle Lubricating Oil. Petroleum Base. General Purpose Lubricating Oil. Ram Jet (RJ1) Rocket and Ram Jet Fuel (RP1) Jet Fuel. Hydraulic Fluid. Aircraft. Grade JP-8 Hydraulic Fluid. Expendable. Synthetic Hydrocarbon Base. Moly Disulphide. Extreme High Temperature Aircraft. Lexington. Silicate-ester Base (MLO-8515) Hydraulic Fluid. Preservative Hi-Temperature Grease Soluble Oil Pneumatic System Grease Jet Fuel. Ramjet Engine. High Temperature Bearing Grease. cpd. Grades 80/87 91/96.parkerorings. Fire Resistant. Appropriate industrial compounds may be selected from the Fluid Compatibility Table in Section VII. Low Temperature. Grease. meeting military material specifications. T-H Dimer Grade RJ-4 Turbine Fuel. Aircraft and Instrument Bearing Grease. Aircraft Reciprocating Piston Engine Hydraulic Fluid. Turbine Engine Fuel. Engine Standard Test Fluids. Silicate-ester Base (MlL-H-8446) Lubricating Oil. Referee Isopropyl Alcohol Fuel. V1164-75 -29°C to +135°C (-20°F to +275°F). Aircraft Turbine Engine. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. Grease. 100/130.

Gaskets. V1164-75. 1a.80 to 437°F (-62 to 225°C) . II 47-071 Synthetic. see the section on ordering. Grade 70/1 LM160-80 Type 1. Class 1. O-ring. For the most current information.com .Packing. but they do not necessarily represent operating temperature limits. Sheet. Synthetic Class I N0674-70(1) Class II S0604-70 N0304-75 (Room temperature to 194°F) (RT to 90°C) MIL-DTL-25732C . 1b. Synthetic. 2b. Hydrocarbon Fuel Resistant (Jet Fuels) N0602-70 ( -65 to 160°F) (-54 to 71°C) Note: AMS-P-5315 supercedes MIL-P-53158 (Military O-ring series MS29512 and MS29513) MIL-P-5510C . 2a. Improved Performance N0756-75 (-65 to 275°F) (-54 to 135°C)(2) Note: AMS-P-5315 supercedes MIL-P-53158 Notes: When ordering parts made with a military. Class 1. Strip and Molded Type I N0602-70 (-20 to 158°F) (-29 to 70°C)(2) Grade B MIL-P-5315B . Low Compression Set Low Temperature Resistant. Petroleum Hydraulic Fluid Resistant (MIL-H-5606) Petroleum Base Hydraulic Fluid (-65 to 275°F) (-54 to 135°C)(2) (Military O-ring series MS28775) MIL-R-25988 . Air (-90 to 350°F)(-68 to 176°C)(2) Type 1.Rubber Fluorosilicone Elastomer. See discussion on “Temperature” in the Basic O-Ring Elastomers Section (II). Preformed. 2b. Low Compression Set Specifications ZZ-R-765E 1a. 50 and 65 Durometer Hardness Type I C0267-50 (-20 to 212°F) (-29 to 100°C)(2) Class 1 MIL-R-3533B .Packing. Table 8-3: Military Rubber Specifications 8-4 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. Fluorocarbon Elastomer. 40 50 70 80 70 60 Note: A-A-59588 supercedes ZZR-R-765E MIL-G-1149C. Low Compression Set High Temperature Resistant.Gasket. (2) These temperatures are limits for particular tests required by the specifications. (3) Inactive for new design.Rubber. Molded and Extruded Shapes. Low Compression Set High Temperature Resistant. Oil and Fuel Resistant (MIL-H-5606 Petroleum Base) LM158-60 Hydraulic Fluid. Low Compression Set Low and High Temperature Resistant.80 to 437°F (-62 to 225°C) .Gasket Materials. 1b. 2a. Grade 75/2 Note: AMS-R-25988 supercedes MIL-R-35988 MIL-P-82744 . Synthetic Rubber. Low Compression Set High Temperature Resistant. Fuel.80 to 437°F (-62 to 225°C) Description Rubber. Grade 80/4 L1077-75(1) Type 1. Set Resistant (-15 to 400°F) (-5 to 105°C) V1226-75 Class 2 V0709-90 Note: AMS-R-83248 supercedes MIL-R-83248C MIL-R-83485 Grade 80 VM835-75 Rubber. most of these specifications are in the process of being revised to AMS specifications. 1b. 2a.103 to 437°F (-75 to 225°C) . Synthetic Oil Resistant (AMS3021) Types I. Type I . Otto Fuel Compatible E0515-80 (-65 to 250°F) (-54 to 121°C) MIL-R-83248C. Sheet. Di-Ester Base Lubricant (-65 to 275°F) (-54 to 135°C)(2) (Military O-ring series MS29561 and WAS617) Note: AMS-R-7362 supercedes MIL-R-7362D MIL-G-21569B . refer to MIL-P-25732.103 to 437°F (-75 to 225°C) . N0507-90 (-45 to 160°F) (-43 to 71°C)(2) (Military O-ring series MS28778) Note: AMS-P-5510 supercedes MIL-P-5510 MIL-DTL-7362D . contact the O-Ring Division. 2b. Straight Thread Tube Fitting Boss (MIL-H-5606 Petroleum Based Hydraulic Fluid. High Temperature Fluid and Compression Class I V0747-75. Grade 60/3 LM159-70 Type 1. AMS or NAS specification material.parkerorings.Rubber. 2a.103 to 437°F (-75 to 225°C) . 2b.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Military Rubber Specifications Note: In keeping with the Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act (FASA). Preformed. Rubber Specification Class Grade Parker Compound S1198-40 S0899-50 S0383-70 S0614-80 S1224-70 S0613-60 Temperature Range(2) . (1) Extra charges may apply for testing and documentation. Lexington. 2b.Rubber. fluorocarbon Elastomer. Improved performance @ low Temp (-40 to 400°C) Note: AMS-R-83485 supercedes MIL-R-83485 MIL-P-83461B .Packings. Silicone Low and High Temperature Resistant. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. 1a. Petroleum Hydraulic Fluid Resistant. Preformed. Class 3.Packing. Cylinder Liner Seal. Class 1.

Extreme Low Temperature Resistant Silicone Rubber Silicone Rubber. Sheet. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. Hydrocarbon Fuel Resistant Gasket. Lexington. Low Compression Set Fuel and Low Temperature Resistant Synthetic Lubricant Resistant High Temp. General Purpose Silicone. Fluorosilicone Elastomer. General Purpose Silicone. Synthetic Oil Resistant Packing. LM159-70. Lubricating Oil. Improved Performance at Low Temperatures Specifications When ordering parts made with military. Fluid Resistant. High Temperature Resistant High Temp. Fluid Resistant. V0709-90 N0756-75 VM835-75 Durometer 35-45 45-55 45-55 65-75 55-65 65-75 35-45 45-55 55-65 65-75 75-85 55-65 65-75 45-55 65-75 70-80 85-95 70-80 60-70 65-75 70-80 80-75 75-85 65-75 85-95 65-75 70-80 55-85 70-95 70-80 70-80 Title Dry Heat Resistance Low Temperature Resistance Weather Resistant. LM160-80. Fluorocarbon Elastomer. Inc. Very Low Compression Set FKM Packing. General Purpose Fluorosilicone Rubber. AMS. Phosphate Ester Resistant Packing. Chloroprene Type Aromatic Fuel Resistant Phosphate-Ester Resistant. Preformed. Table 8-4: AMS(1) and NAS(2) Rubber Specification Descriptions Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.parkerorings. Inc. Chloroprene Type Weather Resistant. Butyl Type Silicone. Heat Resistant. Fluorocarbon Elastomer. Perfluorocarbon. V1226-75. Compression Set Resistant Sealing Rings. Limited Performance Rubber. Improved Performance Rubber. L1077-75 V1164-75.com 8-5 . Petroleum Hydraulic Fluid Resistant. Straight Thread Tube Fitting Boss Rubber. (1) Aerospace Material Specification issued by the Society of Automotive Engineers. or NAS specification material. Preformed. (2) National Aerospace Standard issued by Aerospace Industries Association of America. Molded and Extruded Shapes. O-ring. General Purpose Silicone. Phosphate Ester Resistant Packing O-ring. Oil and Fuel Resistant Rubber. Fuel and Oil Resistant Silicone.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > AMS(1) and NAS(2) Rubber Specification Descriptions Description Rubber Specification AMS3201 AMS3205 AMS3208 AMS3209 AMS3212 AMS 3238 AMS3301 AMS3302 AMS3303 AMS3304 AMS3305 AMS3325 AMS3337 AMS3345 AMS3357 AMS7257 AMS7259 AMS7267 AMS7271 AMS7272 AMS7276 NAS1613 Rev 2 NAS1613 Rev 5 AMS-P-5315 AMS-P-5510 AMS-R-7362 AMS-P-25732 AMS-R-25988 AMS-R-83248 AMS-P-83461 AMS-R-83485 Note: Parker Compound N0545-40 N0299-50 C0267-50 C1124-70 N0525-60 B0318-70 S0469-40 S0595-50 S0613-60 S1224-70 S0614-80 LM158-60 S0383-70 S0899-50 S1224-70 FF200-75 V0709-90 S0355-75 N0506-65 N0287-70 V1164-75 E0515 E1267-80 N0602-70 N0507-90 47-071 N0304-75 LM158-60. High Temperature Fluid and Compression Set Resistant Packings. O-ring. Petroleum Hydraulic Fluid Resistant. see section on ordering. Very Low Compression Set FKM Silicone. General Purpose Silicone.

Specifications Compound Selections For Commonly Used SAE and ASTM Specifications MIL-R-3065 ASTM D735-58/ SAE J14 Specification Parker Compound Number E0603-70 E0893-80 E0515-80 E0540-80 E0652-90 B0612-70 C0267-50 C0518-60 C0873-70 C1124-70 C0267-50 C0518-60 C0873-70 C0147-70 N0674-70 N0545-40 N0545-40 N0299-50 N0299-50 N0506-65 N0525-60 N0602-70 47-071 N0497-70 N0497-70 N0674-70 N0103-70 N0103-70 P0642-70 N0951-75 N0304-75 N0507-90 N0552-90 E0529-60 E1244-70 E0803-70 E0810-80 ASTM D200-97 Specification M2AA708 A13 EA14 F17 M2AA810 A13 EA14 F17 Z1 (Purple) M2AA810 A13 EA14 F17 M2AA810 A13 EA14 F17 M2AA907 A13 EA14 F17 M3BA707 A14 M2BC510 A14 B14 EO14 EO34 F17 M3BC614 A14 B14 EO14 EO34 F17 M3BC710 A14 B14 EO14 EO34 M3BC710 A14 B14 EO14 EO34 F17 M2BE510 A14 B14 EO14 EO34 F17 M2BE614 A14 B14 EO14 EO34 F17 M3BE710 A14 B14 EO14 EO34 M2BE710 A14 B14 EO14 EO34 F17 M2BF714 B34 EO14 EO34 M2BG410 B34 EA14 EF11 EF21 EO14 EO34 M5BG410 A14 B34 EO14 EO34 M2BG510 B14 EA14 EF11 EF21 EO14 EO34 F17 M2BG510 A14 B14 M2BG608 B34 EA14 EO14 F17 Z1 (65 ± 5 Type A Durometer) M2BG614 B34 EA14 EF11 EF21 EO14 EO34 F17 M2BG708 EA14 EF11 EF21 EO14 EO34 F17 M2BG708 EF11 EF21 EO34 F17 M5BG710 A14 B14 M2BG710 B14 B34 EA14 EF11 EF21 M2BG714 B14 B34 EA14 EF11 EF21 EO14 EO34 M(5)BG714 A14 B14 B34 EO14 EO34 M2BG714 B14 B34 EA14 EF11 EF21 EO14 E034 F17 M4BG721 B14 EO14 EO34 M7BG810 EA14 EF11 EF21 EO14 EO34 Z1 (75 ± 5 Type A Durometer) Z2 (1) M7BG810 EA14 EF11 EO14 EO34 F16 Z1 (75 ± 5 Type A Durometer) M7BG910 B14 EA14 EF11 EF21 EO14 EO34 F16 M2BG910 B14 EA14 EF21 EO14 EO34 M(2)CA614 A25 B44 M3CA710 A25 B44 EA14 M4CA714 A25 B35 EA14 F17 G21 M8CA814 A25 B35 EA14 F17 R810BF2 R810BF2 SC515BE1E3F2 SC615BE1E3F1 SC715BE3F1 SC715BE3F2 SB415BE1E3F1 SB515A1BE1E3F2 SB712BE1F2 SB620BE1F1 SB715A1BE1E3 SB715BE1E3F2 SB708E1E3F2 SB915BE1E3 SB915BE1E3 Prefix (grade) numbers and suffix letters in parenthesis are technically “not permitted”. Lexington. Explanations in parenthesis apply to the Z suffix letters. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. In this example. which requires that minimum tensile strength indications shall be expressed in SI units (Megapascals). they describe a property of the material. the “14” indicates that the tensile strength of the material shall not fall below 14 MPa. The “M” prefix in these callouts signifies this fact. Table 8-5: Compound Selectons for Commonly Used SAE and ASTM Specifications 8-6 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. To convert this value to psi (pounds per square inch).< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Compound Selections for Commonly Used SAE and ASTM Specifications This table is in accordance with the 1997 revision of ASTM D2000. and the requirement is shown in the 6th and 7th characters of each specification (excluding the “ASTM D2000”). the equivalent is 104.1 Bar (2030 psi) . after 70 hours at 125°C when tested on plied discs per ASTM D395.com . but nevertheless.parkerorings. For example. multiply by 145. in the specification number M2BC614. (1) Compression Set = 20% max.

Explanations in parenthesis apply to the Z suffix letters. Lexington. they describe a property of the material.parkerorings.” but nevertheless. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Compound Selections for Commonly Used SAE and ASTM Specifications (Continued) MIL-R-3065 ASTM D735-58/ SAE J14 Specification Parker Compound Number N0506-65 N0497-70 47-071 N0674-70 N0674-70 N0951-75 N0304-75 N0552-90 N1210-90 EO692-75 E0540-80 N1173-70 N1231-80 AA150-70 KB163-90 LM158-60 LM159-70 S0469-40 S0595-50 S0613-60 S0317-60 S0455-70 S1224-70 S0383-70 S0614-80 V1164-75 V1226-75 V1164-75 V1226-75 V0747-75 VM835-75 V0709-90 V0894-90 V0709-90 V0894-90 V1238-95 NA151-70 N0497-70 N0552-90 E0652-90 ASTM D200-97 Specification M2CH608 A25 B34 F17 Z1 (65 ± 5 Type A Durometer) M3CH708 A25 B14 B34 EO16 EO36 EF31 M2CH708 A25 EO35 F17 M3CH714 A25 B14 EO16 E036 M3CH714 A25 B34 EO16 EO36 M3CH810 A25 EO16 Z1 (75 ± 5 Type A Durometer) Z2 (1) M3CH810 A25 EO16 Z1 (75 ± 5 Type A Durometer) M3CH910 B34 EO16 EO36 M2CH910 EO15 EO35 Z1 (80% Min Elongation) M3DA710 A26 B36 EA14 Z1 (75+/-5 type A Durometer) Z2 (130% Min Elongation) M3DA810 A26 B36 EA14 M2DH710 A26 B16 EO16 EO36Z1 (175% Min Elongation) M2DH810 A26 B16 EO16 M3DH710 A26 B16 EO16 EO36 F13 M2DH910 A26 B36 EO16 EO36 M2FK606 A19 EA36 M2FK606 A19 EF31 Z1 (70+/-5 type A Durometer) M2GE405 A19 B37 EA14 EO16 EO36 F19 G11 M3GE503 A19 B37 EA14 EO16 EO36 F19 G11 M3GE603 A19 B37 EA14 EO16 EO36 F19 G11 M3GE603 A19 EO16 F19 M7GE705 A19 B37 EA14 EO16 EO36 F19 G11 M7GE705 A19 B37 EA14 EO16 EO36 F19 G11 M7GE705 F19 M6GE803 A19 B37 EA14 EO16 EO36 F19 G11 M2HK710 A1 .11 B38 EF31 EO78 Z1 (75 ± 5 Type A Durometer) Z2 (Brown) Z3 (150% Min Elongation) M6HK810 A1-10 B38 EF31 EO78 EO88 Z1 (75 ± 5 Type A Durometer) M7HK810 A1-11 B38 Z1 (75 ± 5 Type A Durometer) Z2 (130% Min Elongation) M3HK910 A1 .com 8-7 .11 B38 EF31 EO78 Z1 (75 ± 5 Type A Durometer) M4HK710 A1 .10 B37 B38 EF31 EO78 Z1 (75 ± 5 Type A Durometer) Z2 (Brown) M4HK710 A1 . (1) Compression Set = 20% max.10 B37 EF31 EO78 M3HK910 A1 .11 B38 EF31 EO78 M5HK910 A1 .11 B38 EF31 EO78 Z1 (Brown) M2HK910 B37 C12 EF31 Z1 (95 ± 5 Type A Durometer) Z2 (80% Min Elongation) SAE 120RI Class 1 SAE 120R1 Class 2 SAE J515 Type 1 SAE J515 Type 2 Specifications TB715E1E3 TA507BE1E3F2 TA605BE1E3F2 TA705BE1E3F2 TA705BE1E3F2 TA805BE1E3F2 Prefix (grade) numbers and suffix letters in parenthesis are technically “not permitted. Table 8-5: Compound Selectons for Commonly Used SAE and ASTM Specifications Revisions from Older Versions of ASTM Old E14 E34 L14 E51 E61 E71 = = = = = = New E014 E034 EA14 EF11 EF21 EF31 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. after 70 hours at 125°C when tested on plied discs per ASTM D395.10 B37 B38 EF31 EO78 Z1 (Brown) M5HK910 A1 .10 B37 B38 EF31 EO78 Z1 (75 ± 5 Type A Durometer) M2HK710 A1 .

Testing of plastics and elastomers. Rubber and latex.6 / 2. French purchase codes R 1 to R 27 are identical with Parker sizes 5-578 to 5-606. fire-resistant hydraulic fluids. Testing of rubbers. Design criteria for O-ring grooves.4 / 3. Aerospace. materials. This standard applies to DIN 3771 Part 1. minimum requirements. Fire resistant hydraulic fluids. Lexington. cleaning and servicing. Diesel oil. O-rings . determination of the resistance to liquids. leaded petroleum oils. West Conshohocken. minimum requirements. properties and requirements. Inner diameters.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook 8. cf European O-ring codes. Testing of elastomers. O-rings. Products from rubber. This standard covers acceptance criteria for surface finish and form. Table 11. equipment and procedures. sizes to ISO 3601-1.Part 5. 8. O-rings . Testing of elastomers . determination of resistance to flex-cracking and crack growth. testing methods. determination of rebound resilience. Standard reference elastomer. Testing of elastomers. Certification of material testing. see Table 11. determination of the behavior at low temperature (behaviour to cold). measurement of specific gravity. heating oils L.1. Fluid systems. difference and abbreviations. Fluid systems.7 and 8. group HFA-1. flareless. Fluid systems.6 / 2. Testing of elastomers. Procedures and tables for inspection by attributes — statistical sampling. Testing of rubber. Cross-section diameters are: 1. minimum requirements. Testing of elastomers.4 mm are recommended. The cross-section tolerances correspond to ISO 3601/1 and DIN 3771 Part 1 (within a few hundredths of a millimeter). PA 15096-0001 ASTM standard specifications can be obtained from: ASTM 100 Barr Harbor Drive. Fluid systems. tolerances. heating oils. Fluid systems. O-rings. heating oils. hydraulic oils H and H-L. minimum requirements.2 International O-Ring Standards and Test Methods Germany DIN 3770 Sealing rings (O-rings) with special accuracy made of elastomeric materials. M and S. Cross sections 1. guidelines. Testing of rubber or elastomers. Liquid fuels. O-rings.1. shelf-life of parts from elastomers (under preparation). quality acceptance criteria. BS 4518 Specifies dimensions and tolerances together with groove dimensions. In certain areas the French R 1 to R 88 are used. determination of tear growth. Liquid fuels. testing of rubber in standard text mixtures. testing and marking of O-rings. Italy A committee for seal and hose standardization exists in the UNI which recommends the use of the American AS 568 A standard specification.. cross-linked by peroxide to characterize working fluids with respect to their reaction on NBR. Warrendale.3 Ordering Addresses DIN and DIN ISO standard specifications and VDMA recommendations can be obtained from: Beuth Verlag GmbH Burggrafenstrasse 4-10.Part 3.com DIN 53 545 DIN 53 670 DIN ISO 1629 VDMA 24 317 LN 9214 8-8 . vapors and gases. elongation at break and stress values at tensile test. heating oil EL. measurement of tensile strength. O-rings . molded shapes from soft rubber (elastomers). Fluid systems. marking. Fluid systems. determination of indentation hardness of soft rubber (IRHD). determination of abrasion resistance. surface finish and form. Sweden O-rings are standardized under SMS 1586. Liquid fuels. hydraulic oils H-LP. Hydraulic fluids.4 / 3. principles. determination of indentation hardness of soft rubber (IRHD). Rubber parts. testing. O-rings for connectors to ISO 6149. minimum requirements.parkerorings.0 / 5.1 gives a cross-reference among the various European standard specifications.0 / 5. Hydraulic fluids.Part 2. Fluid systems. Quality acceptance levels. PA 19428 Military specifications can be obtained from: Defense Automated Printing Service 700 Robbins Ave. O-ring dimensions are identical with the Parker 2-xxx series. field of application. O-rings . NF-T-47-502 is comparable with ISO 3601 Part 2. microhardness on samples of minor dimensions.4 mm France The following French standards base upon ISO 3601 Parts 1 to 3: NF-T-47-501 is comparable with ISO 3601 Part 1.Part 4. Shore A and D hardness tests. requirements for storage. Testing of rubber and elastomers.7 and 8. International ISO 3601/1 ISO 3601/2 (under preparation) DIN 3771 Part 1 ISO 3601/3 (under preparation) Specifications DIN 3771 Part 2 DIN 3771 Part 3 DIN 3771 Part 4 DIN 7715 DIN 7716 DIN 9088 DIN 24 320 DIN 40 080 DIN 50 049 DIN 51 524 DIN 51 525 DIN 51 600 DIN 51 601 DIN 51 603 Part 1 DIN 51 603 Part 2 DIN 53 479 DIN 53 504 ISO 3601/4 (under preparation) ISO 3601/5 (under preparation) Fluid systems. tolerances and size coding. Testing of rubbers and elastomers. O-rings.Part 1.determination of compression set. strip specimen. R 28 to R 88 are identical with Parker sizes 2-325 to 2-349 and 2-425 to 2-460. hydraulic. their hardness range and fields of application of O-rings to DIN 3771 Part 1. NF-T-47-503 is comparable with ISO 3601 Part 3. Aerospace. Testing of elastomers. nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR). Cross Reference List. Swedish military standard. PA 19111-5094 ATTN: DODSSP Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. hardness test on samples. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. This standard should not be used for new designs. Testing of elastomers. O-ring grooves with back-up rings. For more details. minimum requirements. Building 4/D Philadelphia. Liquid fuels. United States AS 568 B (Aerospace Standard) DIN 53 505 DIN 53 507 DIN 53 512 DIN 53 516 DIN 53 517 DIN 53 519 Part 1 DIN 53 519 Part 2 DIN 53 521 DIN 53 522 DIN 53 538 Published by the SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers) specifies sizes and tolerances. maximum stress. D-10787 Berlin AMS and SAE specifications can be obtained from: SAE 400 Commonwealth Dr. United Kingdom BS 1806 Specifies dimensions (inches) for inner diameters and cross-sections and their tolerances including grooves. This standard covers materials. This standard contains sizes and tolerances of O-rings with special accuracy for general applications in fluid systems. crosssections. O-rings . Fluid systems. toroidal sealing rings (O-rings) for solderless tube fittings with coupling sleeves. Table 11.

. . . . . . . . . . .9-12 Series 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-25 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. . . . . 9-20 JIS B2401 Sizes . . . . . . . . . . . . Series G Sizes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Series A Sizes .9-11 Parker Series 5-XXX O-Ring Sizes . . . . . . . . . . . . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. . . . . . . . . . Lexington. . . . 9-2 Parker Series 3-XXX O-Ring Sizes . . . . . . . . . . .< Back Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Section IX Sizes Parker Series 2-XXX O-Ring Sizes . . . .parkerorings. . . . . . . . . 9-17 Sizes ISO 3601-1. . . . . . . . 9-19 ISO 3601-1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-23 ISO 6149 O-rings for Metric Tube Fittings . . . 9-21 Unusual Size Cross Reference to European O-Ring Codes and Sizes . . . . . . . . . . . . . .com 9-1 . . . . . . . . . . . . .XXX Locator Table. . . . . . .

003 .08 0.05 34.114 1.003 .005 .0234 .82 12.27 1.78 1.070 .070 .08 0.10 0.739 2.003 .87 60.050 .011 .176 .08 0.489 1.0324 .0113 .003 .301 1.003 .78 1.003 . see the Appendix.78 1.33 0. see Section VIII.com .78 1.08 0.003 .13 0.08 0.002827 .114 .22 66.08 0.70 28.0128 .0188 .005 .68 4.57 72. In.13 0.009 .009 .35 21.0098 .78 1.0105 .78 1.78 1.020 .003 .23 0.239 1.003 .08 0.28 0. Only) Basic Volume Cu.) Table 9-1: Parker Series 2-XXX O-Ring Sizes 9-2 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.28 0.003 .003 .08 0.364 .0045 . Tolerance ± W ± 5 (Ref.070 .070 .0204 .070 .D.070 . (Size Only) (a) 2-001 2-002 2-003 2-004 2-005 2-006 2-007 2-008 2-009 2-010 2-011 2-012 2-013 2-014 2-015 2-016 2-017 2-018 2-019 2-020 2-021 2-022 2-023 2-024 2-025 2-026 2-027 2-028 2-029 2-030 2-031 2-032 2-033 2-034 2-035 2-036 2-037 2-038 2-039 2-040 -001 -002 -003 -004 -005 -006 -007 -008 -009 -010 -011 -012 -013 -014 -015 -016 -017 -018 -019 -020 -021 -022 -023 -024 -025 -026 -027 -028 -029 -030 -031 -032 -033 -034 -035 -036 -037 -038 -039 -040 1/32 3/64 1/16 5/64 3/32 1/8 5/32 3/16 7/32 1/4 5/16 3/8 7/16 1/2 9/16 5/8 11/16 3/4 13/16 7/8 15/16 1 1-1/16 1-1/8 1-3/16 1-1/4 1-5/16 1-3/8 1-1/2 1-5/8 1-3/4 1-7/8 2 2-1/8 2-1/4 2-3/8 2-1/2 2-5/8 2-3/4 2-7/8 3/32 9/64 3/16 13/64 7/32 1/4 9/32 5/16 11/32 3/8 7/16 1/2 9/16 5/8 11/16 3/4 13/16 7/8 15/16 1 1-1/16 1/8 1-3/16 1-1/4 1-5/16 1-3/8 1-7/16 1-1/2 1-5/8 1-3/4 1-7/8 2 2-1/8 2-1/4 2-3/8 2-1/2 2-5/8 2-3/4 2-7/8 3 1/32 3/64 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 .60 17.003 .78 1.070 .08 0.001964 .0068 .005 .070 .010 . 4 Standard O-Ring Size (Units are in Inches) Actual (b) Per AS 568A I.78 1.003 .018 .52 25.0355 0.070 .070 .003 .12 26.38 0.070 .003 . O-rings manufactured out of compounds with different shrinkage rates (other than AN) will produce slightly different dimensions and tolerances.30 29.00 15.47 33.364 2.08 0.0151 .015 .23 0. For more information on shrinkage rates.08 0.23 0.009 .801 .D.114 2.070 .78 0.018 . (a) 3 Nominal Size (Inches) (Ref.07 1.78 1.101 .0309 .003 . Tolerance ± W ± 7 Sizes Parker Size No.003 .78 1.46 0.0017 .78 1.65 37.009 .0030 .070 . AMS or NAS material Specification.040 .040 Area = .0090 . These correspond to AS568A dimensions.51 1.070 .70 56.57 2.78 1. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. O.D.78 1.003 .001256 .070 .003 .52 1.78 1.08 0.003 .009 .13 0.13 0.004 .08 0.009 .070 .060 .614 2.08 0.070 .08 0.95 23.0136 .018 .D.070 .010 .0003 .78 1.005 .65 9.08 0.004 .551 .78 1.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Sizes Parker Series 2-XXX O-Ring Sizes 1 2 Size Only Parker Size No.10 0.08 0.070 .05 63.070 .78 1.08 0.0294 . AS 568A (Size Only) Uniform Dash No.070 .18 0.13 0.003 .0340 .208 .08 0.070 .145 .08 0. Only) I.426 .46 0.070 .0037 .87 31. Specifications.52 53.38 0.0052 .78 2.08 0.51 0.0026 .40 69.23 0.25 10.42 1.08 2-001 2-002 2-003 2-004 2-005 2-006 2-007 2-008 2-009 2-010 2-011 2-012 2-013 2-014 2-015 2-016 2-017 2-018 2-019 2-020 2-021 2-022 2-023 2-024 2-025 2-026 2-027 2-028 2-029 2-030 2-031 2-032 2-033 2-034 2-035 2-036 2-037 2-038 2-039 2-040 (a) The rubber compound must be added when ordering by the 2-size number (i.010 .08 0.08 0..46 0.78 1.070 Area = .011 .13 0.23 0.005 .011 .08 0.003 .13 0.864 1.02 1.003 .489 2.51 0.864 .78 1.989 1.364 1.78 1. W.003 .78 1.82 41.005 .003 .015 .25 0.13 0.78 1.33 0.005 .020 .070 .005 .78 1.0034 .28 0.676 .00 44.parkerorings.0143 .0158 .003 .0166 .003 .08 0.07 7.005 .070 .17 18.070 .239 2.864 .003 .78 1.46 0.018 .08 0.042 .0173 .003 .0021 .239 .989 2.08 0.070 .739 .614 .0075 .08 0.78 1.007 .25 0.070 .08 0.0279 . Lexington.35 50.070 .08 0.78 1.070 .070 .08 0.013 .46 0.28 6.33 0.23 0.42 14.003 . for more information.003 .029 .08 0.78 1.08 0.739 1.08 0.47 5.926 .060 Area = .070 .78 1.e.13 0.0060 . in.78 1.003 .25 0.13 0. (b) This chart provides dimensions for standard (AN) shrinkage materials ONLY.005 .77 20. 6 Metric O-Ring Size (Units are in Millimeteres) Actual (b) Per AS 568A I.0219 .08 0.003 .13 0.003 .013 .003 .003848 (sq.74 1.08 0.78 1.78 1.0083 .489 . N0674-70 2-007).070 .070 .78 1.018 .90 3.003 .070 .003 .003 .08 0.08 0.070 .0010 . .020 .17 47.003 . (c) When ordering O-rings to a Military.75 0.070 .78 1.0264 .08 0.013 .051 1.10 0.0022 .0006 .176 1.050 Area = .003 .301 .78 1.0120 .0249 .78 1.005 .004 .070 .614 1.056 .

030 .024 .003 .003 .103 .010 .61 0. N0674-70 2-007).62 2.003 .005 .08 0.08 0.174 .62 2.0642 . (b) This chart provides dimensions for standard (AN) shrinkage materials ONLY.103 .239 4.070 .62 2.003 .parkerorings.0581 .62 2.489 4.003 .103 .0491 .0612 .62 2.549 .62 2.0122 .62 2.103 .237 1.94 0.42 5.78 1.08 0.30 0.13 0.674 .0105 .005 .92 82.003 .34 40.103 .012 .0551 .081 .0236 .08 0.94 42.97 101.003 .009 .362 .08 0.487 1.12 18.0171 .D.0089 .549 1.003 .08 0.003 .003 .82 31.003 .54 17.003 .103 .005 .070 .0465 75.62 2. 3 Nominal Size (Inches) (Ref.37 13. O-ringsmanufactured out of compounds with different shrinkage rates (other than AN) will produce slightly different dimensions andtolerances.009 .012 .005 .103 .003 .112 .25 0.62 2.0383 .003 . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.62 94.070 .003 .72 133.62 2.003 .003 .070 Area = .78 2.08 0.62 2.23 0.239 .62 2. Only) I.003 .0367 .015 .08 0.D.674 .103 . see the Appendix. For more information on shrinkage rates.08 0.012 .0285 .23 6.62 2.08 0.206 .30 0.61 0.0432 .< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Parker Series 2-XXX O-Ring Sizes (Continued) 1 2 Size Only Parker Size No.e.08 0.003 .37 126.012 .103 . in.103 .18 0.015 . for more information.84 3.17 37.005 .61 0.037 .010 .47 25.024 .42 32.010 .003 . 4 Standard O-Ring Size (Units are in Inches) Actual (b) Per AS 568A I.003 .003 . W.0154 .0220 .72 20.78 1.103 .38 0.003 .30 0.612 1..62 2.739 4.003 .070 .070 .009 .799 .007 .38 1.62 2.103 .08 0.13 0.0064 .62 2.103 .08 0.103 .924 .862 .003 .08 0.012 .30 0.103 .D.08 0.62 2.13 0.19 10.739 3.76 0.070 .0430 .003 .103 .69 0.64 28. Only) Basic Volume Cu.0203 .78 1.94 15.070 .103 .103 . Tolerance ± W ± 7 Parker Size No.103 .25 0.13 0.D.78 1.62 2.07 26.103 .08 0.003 .003 . see Section VIII.103 .103 .003 .070 .299 1.112 1.77 39.62 2.59 36.62 2.08 0.) Table 9-1: Parker Series 2-XXX O-Ring Sizes Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.76 0.08 0.003 . In.0253 .23 0.08 0.62 2.237 .02 7.299 .78 1.003 .25 0. AS 568A (Size Only) Uniform (a) Dash No.0187 .0460 . Tolerance ± W ± 5 (Ref.08 0.003 .08 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.62 2.76 0.89 23.174 1.987 1.0370 .003 .78 1.62 2.62 2.08 0.737 .52 0.08 0.25 0. Lexington.103 .103 Area = .005 .com 9-3 .29 21. Specifications.08 0.0449 .0081 .103 .487 .003 .25 0.143 .94 0.62 0.0351 .99 34. O.08 0.003 .08 0.13 0.103 .62 2.362 1.989 5.63 4.103 .027 .989 3.070 .59 9.13 0.24 2.005 .08 0.0048 .78 1.030 .0318 .0302 . 6 Metric O-Ring Size (Units are in Millimeteres) Actual (b) Per AS 568A I.38 0.003 .012 .08 0.06 2.003 .08 0.003848 .08 0.30 0.0269 .037 .78 1.010 . These correspond to AS568A dimensions.08 0.010 .0400 .0334 .049 .0072 .070 . AMS or NAS material Specification.0056 .103 .0138 .005 .239 3.024 .08 0.0040 .32 107.25 0.103 .005 .24 29.989 4.08 0.77 12.103 .08 0.010 .78 1.62 2.30 0.003 .489 3.13 0.003 .07 1. (Size Only) (a) Sizes 2-041 2-042 2-043 2-044 2-045 2-046 2-047 2-048 2-049 2-050 2-102 2-103 2-104 2-105 2-106 2-107 2-108 2-109 2-110 2-111 2-112 2-113 2-114 2-115 2-116 2-117 2-118 2-119 2-120 2-121 2-122 2-123 2-124 2-125 2-126 2-127 2-128 2-129 2-130 2-131 -041 -042 -043 -044 -045 -046 -047 -048 -049 -050 -102 -103 -104 -105 -106 -107 -108 -109 -110 -111 -112 -113 -114 -115 -116 -117 -118 -119 -120 -121 -122 -123 -124 -125 -126 -127 -128 -129 -130 -131 3 3-1/8 3-1/4 3-3/8 3-1/2 3-5/8 3-3/4 3-7/8 4 4-1/8 4-1/4 4-3/8 4-1/2 4-5/8 4-3/4 4-7/8 5 5-1/8 5-1/4 5-3/8 1/16 1/4 3/32 9/32 1/8 5/16 5/32 11/32 3/16 3/8 7/32 13/32 1/4 7/16 5/16 1/2 3/8 9/16 7/16 5/8 1/2 11/16 9/16 3/4 5/8 13/16 11/16 7/8 3/4 15/16 13/16 1 7/8 1-1/16 15/16 1-1/8 1 1-3/16 1-1/16 1-1/4 1-1/8 1-5/16 1-3/16 1-3/8 1-1/4 1-7/16 1-5/16 1-1/2 1-3/8 1-9/16 1-7/16 1-5/8 1-1/2 1-11/16 1-9/16 1-3/4 1-5/8 1-13/16 1-11/16 1-7/8 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 1/16 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 2.030 . (c) When ordering O-rings to a Military.612 .0521 .08 0.005 .62 2.049 1.08 2-041 2-042 2-043 2-044 2-045 2-046 2-047 2-048 2-049 2-050 2-102 2-103 2-104 2-105 2-106 2-107 2-108 2-109 2-110 2-111 2-112 2-113 2-114 2-115 2-116 2-117 2-118 2-119 2-120 2-121 2-122 2-123 2-124 2-125 2-126 2-127 2-128 2-129 2-130 2-131 (a) The rubber compound must be added when ordering by the 2-size number (i.13 0.027 .103 . .0400 .23 0.424 .02 120.27 88.08 0.003 .69 0.08 0.424 1.008332 (sq.08 0.08 0.015 .005 .67 114.0416 .62 2.62 2.

0809 .08 0.1071 .e.parkerorings.82 58.08 0.103 .0564 .045 .56 0.38 0.12 177.103 .020 .550 2.62 2.08 2-132 2-133 2-134 2-135 2-136 2-137 2-138 2-139 2-140 2-141 2-142 2-143 2-144 2-145 2-146 2-147 2-148 2-149 2-150 2-151 2-152 2-153 2-154 2-155 2-156 2-157 2-158 2-159 2-160 2-161 2-162 2-163 2-164 2-165 2-166 2-167 2-168 2-169 2-170 2-171 Sizes (a) The rubber compound must be added when ordering by the 2-size number (i.987 .77 66.103 .08 0.56 0.015 .022 . O.08 0.425 2.003 .103 . see the Appendix. .62 2.0743 .737 2.D.08 0.97 120.56 0.0596 .017 .0580 .43 0.237 2. AMS or NAS material Specification.89 0.62 2.62 2.103 .1398 .015 .103 .82 190.08 0.1921 .024 . Lexington.103 Area = .08 0.69 75.035 .62 2.017 .61 0.67 133.89 0.103 .38 0.103 .08 0.020 .737 4.103 .103 .62 2.003 .62 2.003 .43 0.62 2.14 2.024 .56 0.08 0.2118 44.103 .103 .040 .103 .D.800 2.89 0.003 .987 7.08 0.0678 .1136 .99 61.003 .040 .103 .62 2.487 4.675 2.1790 .024 .71 0.487 5.52 202.25 56.0711 .12 72.08 0.020 .003 .030 .0482 .028 .035 .487 3.08 0.87 82.43 0.02 1.0531 .62 2.0727 .62 2.62 2.003 .62 2.103 .103 .51 0.08 0.022 .003 .103 .003 .737 7.030 . 4 Standard O-Ring Size (Units are in Inches) Actual (b) Per AS 568A I.08 0.64 55.237 4.003 .035 .0776 .57 94.51 0. Only) Basic Volume Cu.95 69.0498 .08 0.103 .017 .003 .62 2.003 .51 0.112 2.017 .02 1.103 .62 2.103 .34 67.103 .103 .1332 .08 0.12 45.1202 .175 2.72 152.08 0.003 .08 0.60 63. (Size Only) (a) 2-132 2-133 2-134 2-135 2-136 2-137 2-138 2-139 2-140 2-141 2-142 2-143 2-144 2-145 2-146 2-147 2-148 2-149 2-150 2-151 2-152 2-153 2-154 2-155 2-156 2-157 2-158 2-159 2-160 2-161 2-162 2-163 2-164 2-165 2-166 2-167 2-168 2-169 2-170 2-171 -132 -133 -134 -135 -136 -137 -138 -139 -140 -141 -142 -143 -144 -145 -146 -147 -148 -149 -150 -151 -152 -153 -154 -155 -156 -157 -158 -159 -160 -161 -162 -163 -164 -165 -166 -167 -168 -169 -170 -171 1-3/4 1-13/16 1-7/8 1-15/16 2 2-1/16 2-1/8 2-3/16 2-1/4 2-5/16 2-3/8 2-7/16 2-1/2 2-9/16 2-5/8 2-11/16 2-3/4 2-13/16 2-7/8 3 3-1/4 3-1/2 3-3/4 4 4-1/4 4-1/2 4-3/4 5 5-1/4 5-1/2 5-3/4 6 6-1/4 6-1/2 6-3/4 7 7-1/4 7-1/2 7-3/4 8 1-15/16 2 2-1/16 2-1/8 2-3/16 2-1/4 2-5/16 2-3/8 2-7/16 2-1/2 2-9/16 2-5/8 2-11/16 2-3/4 2-13/16 2-7/8 2-15/16 3 3-1/16 3-3/16 3-7/16 3-11/16 3-15/16 4-3/16 4-7/16 4-11/16 4-15/16 5-3/16 5-7/16 5-11/16 5-15/16 6-3/16 6-7/16 6-11/16 6-15/16 7-3/16 7-7/16 7-11/16 7-15/16 8-3/16 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 1. 3 Nominal Size (Inches) (Ref.862 1.003 .62 2.045 .08 0.612 2.89 0.103 .43 0.08 0. (c) When ordering O-rings to a Military.76 0.62 2.29 48.07 158.71 0. In.003 .08 0.02 1.300 2.017 .003 .487 2.62 2.37 145.0760 .43 0.76 0.61 0.32 126.62 0.862 2.0694 .08 0.737 1. AS 568A (Size Only) Uniform (a) Dash No.62 2.62 2.62 2.17 196.003 .62 2.08 0.103 .022 .com .003 .08 0.103 .362 2.987 2.003 .0629 .08 0.62 2.1725 .62 2.015 .103 .08 0.237 5.237 6.08 0.43 0.008332 (sq.1594 .62 113.1856 .103 .08 0. These correspond to AS568A dimensions.0514 .1005 .003 .103 .737 5.003 .76 0.08 0. W.62 2.003 .003 . O-rings manufactured out of compounds with different shrinkage rates (other than AN) will produce slightly different dimensions and tolerances.103 .003 . Tolerance ± W ± 7 Parker Size No.08 0.47 183.003 . For more information on shrinkage rates.27 107.030 .987 6.103 .D.103 .237 3.1267 .0645 .987 4.08 0.045 .103 .237 7.89 1. Specifications.017 .08 0.51 0.020 .045 .62 2.22 88.1987 .38 0.42 164.08 0.925 1. for more information.040 .103 .62 2.0940 .90 50.987 5.62 2.003 . Tolerance ± W ± 5 (Ref.D.737 3.) Table 9-1: Parker Series 2-XXX O-Ring Sizes 9-4 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.003 .0547 .003 .028 .0662 .07 53.14 1.737 6.87 0.1660 .003 .103 .020 ..02 1.487 6.08 0.1529 . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.14 1.003 .42 59.62 2.003 .003 .< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Parker Series 2-XXX O-Ring Sizes (Continued) 1 2 Size Only Parker Size No.51 0.987 3. Only) I.08 0.003 .2052 .022 .003 .103 .51 0.0612 . in.62 2.08 0.020 .62 2.003 .62 2.103 .487 7.0874 . see Section VIII.14 1.799 1.1463 .003 .69 47.003 .08 0.47 52. 6 Metric O-Ring Size (Units are in Millimeteres) Actual (b) Per AS 568A I.02 139.035 .003 .62 2.103 .103 . (b) This chart provides dimensions for standard (AN) shrinkage materials ONLY.92 101.050 2.103 .003 .61 0.08 0.62 2.62 2.08 0.103 . N0674-70 2-007).035 .003 .62 2.77 171.17 64.040 .52 71.62 2.62 2.62 2.

10 0.237 9.020 .004 .004 .0446 .050 .D.010 .53 3. (c) When ordering O-rings to a Military.04 47.08 0.050 .10 0.0386 .2314 .004 .139 . O.27 1.53 3. Specifications.46 0.13 0.62 3. 6 Metric O-Ring Size (Units are in Millimeteres) Actual (b) Per AS 568A I.139 . O-ringsmanufactured out of compounds with different shrinkage rates (other than AN) will produce slightly different dimensions and tolerances.22 215.024 .015 .004 .050 .012 .007 .51 0.008332 .010 .010 .25 0.004 .005 .27 1.004 .39 24.53 3.30 0.139 .44 1.359 1.53 3.46 0.004 . For more information on shrinkage rates.10 0.08 0.parkerorings.004 .139 .171 .0267 .018 .61 3.015 .139 .46 0.139 .004 .139 .296 .139 .671 .22 21.359 2.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Parker Series 2-XXX O-Ring Sizes (Continued) 1 2 Size Only Parker Size No. 4 Standard O-Ring Size (Units are in Inches) Actual (b) Per AS 568A I.734 1.62 2.34 5.010 .e.139 .003 .004 .005 .64 20.08 0.10 0.92 228.10 0.10 0.050 .69 12.10 0.984 2.103 .61 2.32 4.1072 .139 .004 .25 0.69 40.103 .0744 .92 63.38 0.237 8.359 .53 3.10 0.57 28.62 2.53 3.859 .08 0.94 7.57 56. in.D. Lexington. Only) I.08 0.139 .0684 .53 3.87 15.D.020 .) Table 9-1: Parker Series 2-XXX O-Ring Sizes Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.734 .004 .020 .055 .003 . In.1191 .609 1.1310 .30 0.09 66.139 .139 .171 1.139 .010 .004 .004 .139 .0357 .29 13.004 .609 .004 .484 2. These correspond to AS568A dimensions.0654 .005 .62 0.139 . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.0774 .0565 .796 .62 2.53 3.005 .53 3.484 1.004 . (b) This chart provides dimensions for standard (AN) shrinkage materials ONLY.53 3.10 2-233 (a) The rubber compound must be added when ordering by the 2-size number (i.0624 .139 .103 .53 3. W. AS 568A (Size Only) Uniform (a) Dash No.004 .38 0.139 .10 2-172 2-173 2-174 2-175 2-176 2-177 2-178 2-201 2-202 2-203 2-204 2-205 2-206 2-207 2-208 2-209 2-210 2-211 2-212 2-213 2-214 2-215 2-216 2-217 2-218 2-219 2-220 2-221 2-222 2-223 2-224 2-225 2-226 2-227 2-228 2-229 2-230 2-231 2-232 Sizes 3-1/8 1/8 2.25 0.13 0.10 0.018 .27 69. see the Appendix.139 .055 .003 .921 .25 0.003 .08 0.984 1.004 .com 9-5 .103 .30 0.139 .57 221.62 2.421 1.0207 .055 .27 1.10 0.10 0.109 1.139 .004 .015 .34 32.003 .020 .139 .139 .004 .0416 .17 29.D.010 .737 .139 .51 0.139 .53 0.53 3.23 0.10 0.234 2.10 0.52 9.10 0.987 9.92 34.1370 209.139 .1250 .103 .004 .10 0.53 3.005 .09 37.484 .1429 72.10 0.0952 .0297 .22 50.53 3.737 8. (Size Only) (a) 2-172 2-173 2-174 2-175 2-176 2-177 2-178 2-201 2-202 2-203 2-204 2-205 2-206 2-207 2-208 2-209 2-210 2-211 2-212 2-213 2-214 2-215 2-216 2-217 2-218 2-219 2-220 2-221 2-222 2-223 2-224 2-225 2-226 2-227 2-228 2-229 2-230 2-231 2-232 2-233 -172 -173 -174 -175 -176 -177 -178 -201 -202 -203 -204 -205 -206 -207 -208 -209 -210 -211 -212 -213 -214 -215 -216 -217 -218 -219 -220 -221 -222 -223 -224 -225 -226 -227 -228 -229 -230 -231 -232 -233 8-1/4 8-1/2 8-3/4 9 9-1/4 9-1/2 9-3/4 3/16 1/4 5/16 3/8 7/16 1/2 9/16 5/8 11/16 3/4 13/16 7/8 15/16 1 1-1/16 1-1/8 1-3/16 1-1/4 1-5/16 1-3/8 1-7/16 1-1/2 1-5/8 1-3/4 1-7/8 2 2-1/16 2-1/4 2-3/8 2-1/2 2-5/8 2-3/4 2-7/8 8-7/16 8-11/16 8-15/16 9-3/16 9-7/16 9-11/16 9-15/16 7/16 1/2 9/16 5/8 11/16 3/4 13/16 7/8 15/16 1 1-1/16 1-1/8 1-3/16 1-1/4 1-5/16 1-3/8 1-7/16 1-1/2 1-9/16 1-5/8 1-11/16 1-3/4 1-7/8 2 2-1/8 2-1/4 2-3/8 2-1/2 2-5/8 2-3/4 2-7/8 3 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 3/32 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 8. Tolerance ± W ± 5 (Ref.53 3.046 1.18 0.39 53.004 . AMS or NAS material Specification.103 Area = .003 .234 .10 0.30 0.1131 .53 3.30 0.1012 .139 Area = .53 3.2576 .018 .25 0.23 0.13 0.53 3.004 .010 .2510 .10 0.53 3.103 .546 .74 59.004 .51 0.13 0.609 2.0178 .139 .421 .53 3.10 0.53 3.38 0.53 3.10 0.012 .015175 (sq.0476 .30 0.012 .10 0.0327 .53 3.53 3. see Section VIII.0505 .012 .0893 .0148 .139 .003 .10 0.0535 .12 10.055 .10 0.27 234.10 0.53 3.139 .109 2.53 3.734 .47 17.62 2.25 0.53 3. Tolerance ± W ± 7 Parker Size No.004 .139 .004 .10 0.40 0.139 .62 2.024 .296 1.0714 .51 0.139 .10 0.012 .487 8.53 3.0237 .99 26.10 0.53 3.97 247.40 1.08 0.012 .10 0.234 1.004 .004 .2249 .10 0.2183 .53 3. Only) Basic Volume Cu.13 0.13 0.0833 .40 1.82 23.859 .62 240.859 1.74 31.004 .10 0.87 44.2379 .487 9.53 0.52 36.2445 .27 1.103 .0595 .004 ..10 0.004 . N0674-70 2-007).04 18. for more information.139 .009 .004 .53 3. 3 Nominal Size (Inches) (Ref. .

004 .1489 .004 .59 129.61 0.53 3.54 240.045 .2204 .030 . In.234 8.89 0.2025 .984 6.055 .e.734 6.71 0.359 5. Lexington.76 0.055 .71 0.53 3.040 .53 3.139 .035 .004 .3157 .14 1.40 3.139 .76 0.004 .27 1.139 .D.10 0.984 3.27 1.10 0.004 .76 0.139 .050 .234 6.234 4. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.004 .14 1.004 .109 5.734 5.050 .84 98. Tolerance ± W ± 5 (Ref.139 .3277 .139 .004 .2800 .139 .53 3.67 94.004 .484 4.) Table 9-1: Parker Series 2-XXX O-Ring Sizes 9-6 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.234 9. for more information.10 0.53 3.10 0.53 3.004 .53 3.139 .12 139. 6 Metric O-Ring Size (Units are in Millimeteres) Actual (b) Per AS 568A I.D.53 3.09 196.734 8.10 0. (Size Only) (a) 2-234 2-235 2-236 2-237 2-238 2-239 2-240 2-241 2-242 2-243 2-244 2-245 2-246 2-247 2-248 2-249 2-250 2-251 2-252 2-253 2-254 2-255 2-256 2-257 2-258 2-259 2-260 2-261 2-262 2-263 2-264 2-265 2-266 2-267 2-268 2-269 2-270 2-271 2-272 2-273 -234 -235 -236 -237 -238 -239 -240 -241 -242 -243 -244 -245 -246 -247 -248 -249 -250 -251 -252 -253 -254 -255 -256 -257 -258 -259 -260 -261 -262 -263 -264 -265 -266 -267 -268 -269 -270 -271 -272 -273 3 3-1/8 3-1/4 3-3/8 3-1/2 3-5/8 3-3/4 3-7/8 4 4-1/8 4-1/4 4-3/8 4-1/2 4-5/8 4-3/4 4-7/8 5 5-1/8 5-1/4 5-3/8 5-1/2 5-5/8 5-3/4 5-7/8 6 6-1/4 6-1/2 6-3/4 7 7-1/4 7-1/2 7-3/4 8 8-1/4 8-1/2 8-3/4 9 9-1/4 9-1/2 9-3/4 3-1/4 3-3/8 3-1/2 3-5/8 3-3/4 3-7/8 4 4-1/8 4-1/4 4-3/8 4-1/2 4-5/8 4-3/4 4-7/8 5 5-1/8 5-1/4 5-3/8 5-1/2 5-5/8 5-3/4 5-7/8 6 6-1/8 6-1/4 6-1/2 6-3/4 7 7-1/4 7-1/2 7-3/4 8 8-1/4 8-1/2 8-3/4 9 9-1/4 9-1/2 9-3/4 10 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 2.3872 .64 148.609 3.139 .004 .3634 .004 .139 .035 .53 3.859 4. Only) I.29 142.484 5.139 .94 136.2561 .76 0.139 .139 .1608 .77 132.1727 . These correspond to AS568A dimensions.024 .4707 75.2681 .024 .2740 .024 .39 183.53 0.79 78.139 .14 215. see the Appendix.53 3.1668 .1787 .10 0.40 1.4588 .53 3.2859 .53 3.359 4.040 .030 .61 0.04 177.2144 .050 .54 110. Specifications.1548 .139 .004 .53 3.004 .734 .984 7.2621 .53 3. O-rings manufactured out of compounds with different shrinkage rates (other than AN) will produce slightly different dimensions and tolerances.139 .035 .024 .004 .D.2442 .82 151.004 .004 .89 0.139 .10 0.53 3.004 .734 4.10 0.1966 .139 .53 3.139 .10 0.10 0.004 .139 . .734 3. Only) Basic Volume Cu.484 7.44 202.71 0.10 0.53 3.10 0.. AS 568A (Size Only) Uniform (a) Dash No.004 .53 3.89 0.49 91.028 .53 3.734 7.53 3.89 0. (b) This chart provides dimensions for standard (AN) shrinkage materials ONLY.004 .004 .004 .109 3.89 247.004 .10 0.10 0.035 .004 .139 .2085 .139 .004 .40 1.139 .028 .53 3.004 .035 .61 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.859 5.53 3.79 209. see Section VIII.1846 .004 .004 .53 3.10 0. W.53 3.72 113.10 0.484 8.004 . N0674-70 2-007).139 .2502 .89 117.015175 (sq.89 0.3038 .10 0.84 228.984 9.028 .4468 .028 .139 Area = .050 .10 0.984 5.2383 .89 0.10 0.045 .139 .10 0.484 6.53 3.02 1.69 171.139 .89 0.139 .89 0.035 .10 0.53 3.139 .2323 .10 0.10 0.035 .484 9.53 3.139 .028 .10 0.984 8.139 .71 0.14 85. (c) When ordering O-rings to a Military.71 0.10 0.045 .359 3.4230 .53 3. AMS or NAS material Specification.040 .14 1.234 3.10 0.040 .53 3. For more information on shrinkage rates.984 4.030 .035 .609 5.10 0.139 .< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Parker Series 2-XXX O-Ring Sizes (Continued) 1 2 Size Only Parker Size No.53 3.139 .10 0.10 0.24 123.89 1.27 1.004 .02 1. in.53 3.004 .53 3.035 .484 3.53 3.004 .035 .53 3.D.99 158.10 2-234 2-235 2-236 2-237 2-238 2-239 2-240 2-241 2-242 2-243 2-244 2-245 2-246 2-247 2-248 2-249 2-250 2-251 2-252 2-253 2-254 2-255 2-256 2-257 2-258 2-259 2-260 2-261 2-262 2-263 2-264 2-265 2-266 2-267 2-268 2-269 2-270 2-271 2-272 2-273 Sizes (a) The rubber compound must be added when ordering by the 2-size number (i.859 3.10 0.02 1.53 3.76 0.2264 .004 .74 190.1906 .4111 .10 0.10 0.139 .53 3.004 .89 0.004 . 3 Nominal Size (Inches) (Ref. 4 Standard O-Ring Size (Units are in Inches) Actual (b) Per AS 568A I.53 3.24 0.10 0.19 104.030 .004 .53 3.14 1.61 0.139 .004 .32 88.139 .3396 .030 .49 221.004 .139 . O.024 .234 7.37 107.07 120.3515 .10 0.47 145.27 1.com .97 82.34 164.42 126.234 5. Tolerance ± W ± 7 Parker Size No.139 .61 0.139 .19 234.004 .609 4.parkerorings.055 .2919 .045 .109 4.10 0.02 1.3753 .139 .139 .3992 .4349 .53 3.02 101.10 0.

005 .018 .40 1.65 1.79 355.53 3.210 .0745 .D. (Size Only) (a) 2-274 2-275 2-276 2-277 2-278 2-279 2-280 2-281 2-282 2-283 2-284 2-309 2-310 2-311 2-312 2-313 2-314 2-315 2-316 2-317 2-318 2-319 2-320 2-321 2-322 2-323 2-324 2-325 2-326 2-327 2-328 2-329 2-330 2-331 2-332 2-333 2-334 2-335 2-336 2-337 -274 -275 -276 -277 -278 -279 -280 -281 -282 -283 -284 -309 -310 -311 -312 -313 -314 -315 -316 -317 -318 -319 -320 -321 -322 -323 -324 -325 -326 -327 -328 -329 -330 -331 -332 -333 -334 -335 -336 -337 10 10-1/2 11 11-1/2 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 7/16 1/2 9/16 5/8 11/16 3/4 13/16 7/8 15/16 1 1-1/16 1-1/8 1-3/16 1-1/4 1-5/16 1-3/8 1-1/2 1-5/8 1-3/4 1-7/8 2 2-1/8 2-1/4 2-3/8 2-1/2 2-5/8 2-3/4 2-7/8 3 10-1/4 10-3/4 11-1/4 11-3/4 12-1/4 13-1/4 14-1/4 15-1/4 16-1/4 17-1/4 18-1/4 13/16 7/8 15/16 1 1-1/16 1-1/8 1-3/16 1-1/4 1-5/16 1-3/8 1-7/16 1-1/2 1-9/16 1-5/8 1-11/16 1-3/4 1-7/8 2 2-1/8 2-1/4 2-3/8 2-1/2 2-5/8 2-3/4 2-7/8 3 3-1/8 3-1/4 3-3/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 1/8 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 9.0813 .33 5. AS 568A (Size Only) Uniform (a) Dash No. (c) When ordering O-rings to a Military.100 2.412 .139 .69 34.600 .39 75.1697 .53 3.210 .33 5.210 .81 18.53 3.24 16.005 .51 0.005 .1153 .005 .012 .005 .005 .210 .30 0.39 329.38 0.64 15.065 .5303 .53 3.30 0.0949 .005 .34 27.009 .94 29.015 .53 3.004 . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.020 .020 .139 .350 2.162 1.13 0.8149 .40 1.3330 .009 . Tolerance ± W ± 5 (Ref.25 0.012 .139 .210 .1493 .13 0.955 16.018 .10 0.975 . Only) Basic Volume Cu.725 1.010 .51 0.210 . For more information on shrinkage rates.210 .6256 .787 .61 3.004 .210 .13 0.10 0.210 .7210 .29 278.65 1.66 456. N0674-70 2-007).33 5. 6 Metric O-Ring Size (Units are in Millimeteres) Actual (b) Per AS 568A I.005 .055 .005 .065 .210 .4826 .13 0.69 62. in.53 3.38 0.004 .210 .475 2.30 0.46 12.1629 .975 1. O-ringsmanufactured out of compounds with different shrinkage rates (other than AN) will produce slightly different dimensions and tolerances.10 0.33 5.33 5.D.005 .33 5.004 .005 .075 . see the Appendix.005 .33 5.18 0.33 5.015 .13 0.475 1.13 0.015175 .139 .23 0.005 .984 12.984 15.015 .2106 .10 0.005 .210 .210 .30 0.139 .005 .65 1.33 5.010 .33 5.210 .004 .225 2.004 .99 50.33 5.46 0.25 0. for more information.53 3.13 0.5541 .25 0.018 .10 0.005 . 4 Standard O-Ring Size (Units are in Inches) Actual (b) Per AS 568A I.06 10.350 1.D.210 .139 .10 0.005 .33 5.13 0..005 .33 5.3194 .25 0.210 . Specifications.004 .33 5.010 .8626 .82 46.475 .018 . These correspond to AS568A dimensions.69 304.19 380.005 .13 0.13 2-274 2-275 2-276 2-277 2-278 2-279 2-280 2-281 2-282 2-283 2-284 2-309 2-310 2-311 2-312 2-313 2-314 2-315 2-316 2-317 2-318 2-319 2-320 2-321 2-322 2-323 2-324 2-325 2-326 2-327 2-328 2-329 2-330 2-331 2-332 2-333 2-334 2-335 2-336 2-337 Sizes (a) The rubber compound must be added when ordering by the 2-size number (i.210 .17 53.2922 .139 . Tolerance ± W ± 7 Parker Size No.13 0.30 0.005 .020 .13 0.955 .2242 .47 40.287 1.984 14.850 2.13 0.13 0.33 5. W.210 .537 .04 69.2514 . (b) This chart provides dimensions for standard (AN) shrinkage materials ONLY.53 3.parkerorings.004 .005 .005 .07 13.59 405.210 .16 24.1017 .13 0.13 0. In.210 .912 .38 0.1221 .13 0.065 .13 0.139 .1289 .2650 .005 .725 2.139 Area = .210 .005 .850 .03 2.13 0.3466 253.010 . Lexington.984 13.007 .210 .015 .6733 .005 .33 5.100 1.2786 .005 .91 2.12 32.46 0.33 5.10 0.53 5.600 1.33 5.33 5.010 .139 .33 5.22 72.065 .87 66.57 1.210 Area = .037 1.484 11.012 .024 .77 26.065 .13 0. see Section VIII.210 .64 43.005 .99 291.139 .33 5. Only) I.662 .5064 .725 .13 0.600 2.33 5.e.13 0.25 0.33 5.13 0.16 0.065 .975 2.10 0.13 0.com 9-7 .33 5.225 1.34 56.984 10.D.46 0.53 3.13 0.65 1.005 .210 .33 5. .13 0.210 .004 .210 . O.984 11.42 19.65 1.59 266.59 23.010 .38 0.33 5.080 .484 10.0881 .004 .51 0.10 0.955 17.25 0.13 0.13 0. AMS or NAS material Specification.26 430.012 .055 .5779 .51 31.3058 .005 .33 5.020 .034636 (sq.) Table 9-1: Parker Series 2-XXX O-Ring Sizes Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.210 .004 .139 .53 3.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Parker Series 2-XXX O-Ring Sizes (Continued) 1 2 Size Only Parker Size No.23 0.012 .52 59.65 1.33 5.13 0.13 0.29 37.10 0.210 .005 .850 1.0677 .7672 .1833 .10 0.1357 . 3 Nominal Size (Inches) (Ref.005 .13 0.51 0.46 0.210 .1970 .99 21.1561 .33 0.1425 .085 .1085 .2378 .

3738 .0538 1.09 88.9450 .94 0.005 .055 .024 .210 .13 0.62 227.33 5.475 8.13 0.97 234.210 .5370 .4826 .005 .4146 .37 129.100 3.13 0. see the Appendix.13 0. N0674-70 2-007).33 5.210 .037 .350 3.40 1.13 0.210 .225 3.13 0.725 6.005 .32 240.17 183.D.4690 .005 .33 5.005 . for more information.475 9.33 5.210 .6050 .13 0.76 0.94 0.850 5.037 .037 .13 0. 6 Metric O-Ring Size (Units are in Millimeteres) Actual (b) Per AS 568A I.055 .005 .13 0.210 .13 0.33 5. see Section VIII.024 .13 0.045 .13 0.005 .975 7.33 5.005 .33 5.13 0.210 .14 1.77 158.030 .8090 .33 5.4282 .33 5.7002 .005 .005 .975 8.005 . (Size Only) (a) 2-338 2-339 2-340 2-341 2-342 2-343 2-344 2-345 2-346 2-347 2-348 2-349 2-350 2-351 2-352 2-353 2-354 2-355 2-356 2-357 2-358 2-359 2-360 2-361 2-362 2-363 2-364 2-365 2-366 2-367 2-368 2-369 2-370 2-371 2-372 2-373 2-374 2-375 2-376 2-377 -338 -339 -340 -341 -342 -343 -344 -345 -346 -347 -348 -349 -350 -351 -352 -353 -354 -355 -356 -357 -358 -359 -360 -361 -362 -363 -364 -365 -366 -367 -368 -369 -370 -371 -372 -373 -374 -375 -376 -377 3-1/8 3-1/4 3-3/8 3-1/2 3-5/8 3-3/4 3-7/8 4 4-1/8 4-1/4 4-3/8 4-1/2 4-5/8 4-3/4 4-7/8 5 5-1/8 5-1/4 5-3/8 5-1/2 5-5/8 5-3/4 5-7/8 6 6-1/4 6-1/2 6-3/4 7 7-1/4 7-1/2 7-3/4 8 8-1/4 8-1/2 8-3/4 9 9-1/4 9-1/2 9-3/4 10 3-1/2 3-5/8 3-3/4 3-7/8 4 4-1/8 4-1/4 4-3/8 4-1/2 4-5/8 4-3/4 4-7/8 5 5-1/8 5-1/4 5-3/8 5-1/2 5-5/8 5-3/4 5-7/8 6 6-1/8 6-1/4 6-3/8 6-5/8 6-7/8 7-1/8 7-3/8 7-5/8 7-7/8 8-1/8 8-3/8 8-5/8 8-7/8 9-1/8 9-3/8 9-5/8 9-7/8 10-1/8 10-3/8 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3.94 0.13 0.034636 (sq.59 151.14 1.005 .225 7.13 0.33 5.13 0.225 6.6186 . Only) I.92 215.40 5.42 148.82 177. W.600 5.475 7.61 0. 4 Standard O-Ring Size (Units are in Inches) Actual (b) Per AS 568A I.005 .33 5.725 5.94 0.725 9.9722 .7274 .005 .028 .8362 .33 5.71 0.005 .27 221.005 .33 5. For more information on shrinkage rates.050 .33 5.6730 .210 .005 .4554 .210 .33 5.005 .33 5.27 1.13 0.037 .) Table 9-1: Parker Series 2-XXX O-Ring Sizes 9-8 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.47 170.005 .D.050 .100 4. (c) When ordering O-rings to a Military.33 5.61 0.13 0.225 5.13 0.210 .13 0.975 6.33 5.5778 .54 132.024 .210 .005 .037 .005 .030 .225 4.5642 .210 .94 0.040 .005 .005 .040 .725 3.3602 .44 94.5506 .57 208.210 .210 .02 1.028 .67 247.D.005 .210 .74 81.5098 .5234 . O-rings manufactured out of compounds with different shrinkage rates (other than AN) will produce slightly different dimensions and tolerances.com .045 .07 142.210 .210 .37 0.13 0. in.210 .210 .33 5.13 2-338 2-339 2-340 2-341 2-342 2-343 2-344 2-345 2-346 2-347 2-348 2-349 2-350 2-351 2-352 2-353 2-354 2-355 2-356 2-357 2-358 2-359 2-360 2-361 2-362 2-363 2-364 2-365 2-366 2-367 2-368 2-369 2-370 2-371 2-372 2-373 2-374 2-375 2-376 2-377 Sizes (a) The rubber compound must be added when ordering by the 2-size number (i.parkerorings.33 5.6322 .210 .84 120.89 139.0810 1. In.33 5.4418 .14 1.33 5.33 5.975 5.33 5.028 .210 .030 .475 6.210 .87 196.475 3.4962 .49 113. Only) Basic Volume Cu.037 .97 104.33 0.005 . Tolerance ± W ± 7 Parker Size No.6458 .7546 .9994 1.14 1.210 .005 .13 0.725 8.13 0.62 97.005 .975 4.94 0. These correspond to AS568A dimensions.33 5.028 .005 .61 0.050 . Lexington.210 .050 .225 8.3874 .13 0.13 0.0266 1.13 0.024 .8634 .030 .94 0.13 0. Specifications.27 1.045 .030 .210 .210 .13 0.725 7.33 5.040 .33 5.005 . AS 568A (Size Only) Uniform (a) Dash No.350 4.850 3.210 .005 .13 0.225 9.210 .19 126.71 0.13 0.32 110.33 5.045 .67 116.210 .210 .33 5.76 0.725 4..210 Area = .76 0.02 1.33 5.02 253.13 0.13 0.475 4.27 91.040 .79 100.13 0.600 4.40 1.33 5.71 0.475 5.005 .1083 78.4010 . .22 202.005 .005 . (b) This chart provides dimensions for standard (AN) shrinkage materials ONLY.02 123.02 1.33 5.600 3.92 85.27 1.13 0.71 0.24 145.210 .030 .005 .76 0.33 5.6594 .13 0.210 .055 .350 5.14 107.005 . O.94 0.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Parker Series 2-XXX O-Ring Sizes (Continued) 1 2 Size Only Parker Size No.028 .76 0.33 5.33 5.037 .975 .037 .52 189.13 0.210 .037 . Tolerance ± W ± 5 (Ref.D.33 5.33 5. 3 Nominal Size (Inches) (Ref.005 .055 . AMS or NAS material Specification.27 1.005 .33 5.005 .7818 .100 5.12 164.71 0. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.76 0.210 .94 1.210 .02 1.005 .210 .33 5.40 1.210 .61 0.850 4.210 .8906 .13 0.9178 .210 .72 135.975 9.5914 .13 0.005 .13 0.210 .e.

94 0.19 126. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.D.14 1.02 123.33 5.99 6.210 . 3 Nominal Size (Inches) (Ref.13 0.17 183.955 17.045 .275 .210 .33 5.040 .0729 1.15 0.225 5. AS 568A (Size Only) Uniform (a) Dash No.15 0.33 5.66 582.12 164.97 380.275 .005 .955 18.006 .15 0.006 .) Table 9-1: Parker Series 2-XXX O-Ring Sizes Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.13 0.88 113.350 5.8454 . in.850 4.68 608.parkerorings.940 24. (c) When ordering O-rings to a Military.94 0.210 .006 .15 0. for more information.6327 266.9796 1.850 5. see Section VIII.78 1.070 .037 .006 .006 .940 23.99 6. Tolerance ± W ± 5 (Ref.1429 1.15 0.99 6.975 15.275 .65 1.475 11.975 8.6278 2.005 .84 0.006 .99 6.15 0.005 .040 .105 .475 7.13 0.91 2.15 0.8678 1.475 6.33 5.99 6.37 405.4118 2.005 .65 1. In.045 .275 .07 142.52 1.41 2.975 14. Tolerance ± W ± 7 Parker Size No.080 .040 .210 .33 5.13 0.33 5.46 506.99 0.2129 1.065 .975 6. W.033 .275 . 6 Metric O-Ring Size (Units are in Millimeteres) Actual (b) Per AS 568A I.99 6.4347 1.065 .99 6.79 2.037 .13 0.15 0.02 1.99 6.67 2.065 .< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Parker Series 2-XXX O-Ring Sizes (Continued) 1 2 Size Only Parker Size No.40 5.33 6.24 145.005 .26 430.2171 1.13 0.955 16. 4 Standard O-Ring Size (Units are in Inches) Actual (b) Per AS 568A I.3528 1.15 0.84 0.006 .94 0.99 6.275 .13 0.005 . Lexington.48 658.14 1.15 0.99 6.037 .6523 1.275 Area = .33 5.29 2.D.06 481.110 .99 6.275 .3259 1.15 0.725 4.13 0.67 116. Only) Basic Volume Cu.210 .085 .006 .275 . O.006 .D.94 0.006 .99 6.99 6.15 0.005 .57 215.100 .0030 1.72 135. O-rings manufactured out of compounds with different shrinkage rates (other than AN) will produce slightly different dimensions and tolerances.08 633.210 .9097 .095 .725 5.210 .94 0.955 19.0963 1.99 6.54 2.975 13.57 354.99 6.84 120.15 0.005 .94 1.13 0.275 .275 .86 532.006 .03 2.41 2.26 557.99 6.02 1.006 .033 .006 .2715 1.045 .100 5.070 .005 .e.075 .94 0.005 .7590 1.33 5.005 .15 0.210 .0496 1.005 .52 189.005 .33 5.37 129.955 22. N0674-70 2-007).33 5. .77 158.725 7.9766 2.600 4.1627 1.955 21.475 4.037 .5190 2.02 1.115 .006 .725 6.006 . (Size Only) (a) 2-378 2-379 2-380 2-381 2-382 2-383 2-384 2-385 2-386 2-387 2-388 2-389 2-390 2-391 2-392 2-393 2-394 2-395 2-425 2-426 2-427 2-428 2-429 2-430 2-431 2-432 2-433 2-434 2-435 2-436 2-437 2-438 2-439 2-440 2-441 2-442 2-443 2-444 2-445 2-446 -378 -379 -380 -381 -382 -383 -384 -385 -386 -387 -388 -389 -390 -391 -392 -393 -394 -395 -425 -426 -427 -428 -429 -430 -431 -432 -433 -434 -435 -436 -437 -438 -439 -440 -441 -442 -443 -444 -445 -446 10-1/2 11 11-1/2 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 4-1/2 4-5/8 4-3/4 4-7/8 5 5-1/8 5-1/4 5-3/8 5-1/2 5-5/8 5-3/4 5-7/8 6 6-1/4 6-1/2 6-3/4 7 7-1/4 7-1/2 7-3/4 8 8-1/2 10-7/8 11-3/8 11-7/8 12-3/8 13-3/8 14-3/8 15-3/8 16-3/8 17-3/8 18-3/8 19-3/8 20-3/8 21-3/8 22-3/8 23-3/8 24-3/8 25-3/8 26-3/8 5 5-1/8 5-1/4 5-3/8 5-1/2 5-5/8 5-3/4 5-7/8 6 6-1/8 6-1/4 6-3/8 6-1/2 6-3/4 7 7-1/4 7-1/2 7-3/4 8 8-1/4 8-1/2 9 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 3/16 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 10.15 0.13 0.275 . Only) I.210 .475 10.210 .275 .210 .600 5.037 .225 6.1662 1.22 202.060 .33 5.com 9-9 .33 5.13 0.15 0.4928 1.055 .54 132.033 .59 151.9330 . For more information on shrinkage rates.8863 .5435 1.5394 1.045 .475 .475 5.275 .0854 2. AMS or NAS material Specification.005 .006 .006 .15 0.275 .275 .33 5.27 1.006 .33 5.0263 1. Specifications.955 20.99 6.33 5.84 0.52 1.87 196.975 7.89 139.D.037 .77 291.040 .94 0.14 1.3062 1.225 7.07 278.275 .120 .034636 .9563 .13 0.84 0.65 1.275 .17 329.275 .975 12.090 .210 .005 . see the Appendix.99 6.940 4.47 170.14 1.006 1.16 2.006 .15 0.275 .33 5.13 0.037 .275 .15 0.3030 2.940 25.05 0.02 1.1196 1.13 0.99 6.92 3.275 .210 .037 .3995 1.006 .975 5.13 0.99 6.060 .47 304.78 1.210 .42 148.1942 2.095 .13 0.210 .4461 1.210 .210 .99 6.94 0.005 .037 ..975 11.059396 (sq.15 0.7366 2.210 Area = .275 .2595 1.210 .006 .15 0.66 456.33 5.005 .15 2-378 2-379 2-380 2-381 2-382 2-383 2-384 2-385 2-386 2-387 2-388 2-389 2-390 2-391 2-392 2-393 2-394 2-395 2-425 2-426 2-427 2-428 2-429 2-430 2-431 2-432 2-433 2-434 2-435 2-436 2-437 2-438 2-439 2-440 2-441 2-442 2-443 2-444 2-445 2-446 Sizes (a) The rubber compound must be added when ordering by the 2-size number (i.13 0.82 177. These correspond to AS568A dimensions.005 .13 0.033 . (b) This chart provides dimensions for standard (AN) shrinkage materials ONLY.

15 0.275 .37 2.99 6.17 2.8456 380.92 3.67 1.54 2.9615 532.99 6.99 6.99 6.060 . W.15 0.3084 443.52 1.78 1.075 .40 1.475 9.99 6. for more information.006 .9389 393.006 .e.090 .15 0.7749 506. O-rings manufactured out of compounds with different shrinkage rates (other than AN) will produce slightly different dimensions and tolerances.006 .006 1.006 .275 .955 19.27 2.78 1.29 2.455 18.975 13.475 13.15 0.1481 557.075 .16 2.15 0.99 6.1925 291..006 .275 .975 9.006 .055 .15 0.52 1.955 21.006 .99 6. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.15 0. 4 Standard O-Ring Size (Units are in Inches) Actual (b) Per AS 568A I.006 .975 14.275 .275 .955 17.16 2.4017 456. Only) Basic Volume Cu.006 . see the Appendix.15 0.006 .66 3.15 0.100 .15 0.67 2.275 .975 15.52 1.76 3.275 .5185 608. Lexington.006 .0285 405.475 12.6590 354.275 .275 .99 6.15 0.99 6.475 14.41 2.475 11.006 .99 6.940 24.57 2.99 6.99 6.955 18.15 0.975 12. Tolerance ± W ± 7 Parker Size No.40 1.115 .080 .15 0.055 .77 2.275 .87 2.070 .15 0.7051 633.15 0.275 . AMS or NAS material Specification.2151 430.08 4.8193 240.0992 278.parkerorings. 3 Nominal Size (Inches) (Ref.975 10.48 4.955 20.275 .275 Area = .52 1.15 0.15 0.006 .15 0.070 .47 2. AS 568A (Size Only) Uniform (a) Dash No. 6 Metric O-Ring Size (Units are in Millimeteres) Actual (b) Per AS 568A I.006 .16 2.055 . see Section VIII. (b) This chart provides dimensions for standard (AN) shrinkage materials ONLY.060 .475 15.99 6.006 .37 2.4950 468.99 0.99 6.26 3.006 .15 0.275 .91 1.006 . .D.275 .006 .9126 253.99 6.91 2.070 .78 1.275 .275 .15 0.105 .05 6.955 16.955 22.96 3.99 6.095 .52 1.006 .40 1.7260 227.070 .07 3.99 6.1218 417.3319 582.) Table 9-1: Parker Series 2-XXX O-Ring Sizes 9-10 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.99 6.99 6. in.99 6.455 19.16 3.006 .15 0.275 .059396 (sq.15 0.99 6.06 3.940 .07 2.275 .0059 266.095 .060 .006 . Tolerance ± W ± 5 (Ref.455 16.D.99 6. N0674-70 2-007).006 .29 2.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Parker Series 2-XXX O-Ring Sizes (Continued) 1 2 Size Only Parker Size No.006 .68 4.66 4.D.15 0. Only) I.060 .275 .15 0.78 1.940 25.15 0.060 .455 17.79 2.36 3. Specifications.97 1.97 2.475 10.52 1.15 0.5657 342.006 .085 . These correspond to AS568A dimensions.275 .275 . For more information on shrinkage rates. (c) When ordering O-rings to a Military.275 .275 .99 6.7523 367. O.110 .15 0.006 .78 1.67 2.99 6.275 .8917 658.86 3.006 .275 .D.41 2.006 .275 .085 .com . (Size Only) (a) 2-447 2-448 -447 -448 -449 -450 -451 -452 -453 -454 -455 -456 -457 -458 -459 -460 -461 -462 -463 -464 -465 -466 -467 -468 -469 -470 -471 -472 -473 -474 -475 9 9-1/2 10 10-1/2 11 11 1/2 12 12-1/2 13 13-1/2 14 14-1/2 15 15-1/2 16 16-1/2 17 17-1/2 18 18-1/2 19 19-1/2 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 9-1/2 10 10-1/2 11 11-1/2 12 12-1/2 13 13-1/2 14 14-1/2 15 15-1/2 16 16-1/2 17 17-1/2 18 18-1/2 19 19-1/2 20 20-1/2 21-1/2 22-1/2 23-1/2 24-1/2 25-1/2 26-1/2 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 8.15 0.99 6.15 2-447 2-448 2-449 2-450 2-451 2-452 2-453 2-454 2-455 2-456 2-457 2-458 2-459 2-460 2-461 2-462 2-463 2-464 2-465 2-466 2-467 2-468 2-469 2-470 2-471 2-472 2-473 2-474 2-475 Sizes 2-449 2-450 2-451 2-452 2-453 2-454 2-455 2-456 2-457 2-458 2-459 2-460 2-461 2-462 2-463 2-464 2-465 2-466 2-467 2-468 2-469 2-470 2-471 2-472 2-473 2-474 2-475 (a) The rubber compound must be added when ordering by the 2-size number (i.2858 304.006 . In.88 1.3791 316.975 11.99 6.46 3.26 4.275 .070 .99 6.090 .940 23.120 .275 .4724 329.6816 494.99 6.060 .275 .03 2.085 .5883 481.

118 Area = .0137 .95 3.10 0.69 53.468 . Lexington.10 0.18 21.00478 .10 0. (b) This chart provides dimensions for standard (AN) shrinkage materials ONLY.056 Area = .064 Area = .706 .003 .83 1.116 .012 .95 2.10 0.46 1.95 2.10 0.95 2.46 2.10 3-901 3-902 3-903 3-904 3-905 3-906 3-907 3-908 3-909 3-910 3-911 3-912 3-913 3-914 3-916 3-918 3-920 3-924 3-928 3-932 Sizes (a) The rubber compound must be added when ordering by the 3-size number (i.18 0.118 .0187 .0326 .08 0.009 .005 .090 2.171 1.08 0.005 .21 2.23 0.004 .097 Area = .010 .D.414 .005 ..01057 .301 .014 .63 1.004 .95 2.0055 .92 23.10 0.63 1. For more information on shrinkage rates.004 .0346 . N552-90 3-910). 3-901 3 -902 3-903 3-904 3-905 3-906 3-907 3-908 3-909 3-910 3-911 3-912 3-913 3-914 3-916 3-918 3-920 3-924 3-928 3-932 -901 -902 -903 -904 -905 -906 -907 -908 -909 -910 -911 -912 -913 -914 -916 -918 -920 -924 -928 -932 3/32 1/8 3/16 1/4 5/16 3/8 7/16 1/2 9/16 5/8 11/16 3/4 13/16 7/8 1 1-1/8 1-1/4 1-1/2 1-3/4 2 .116 .0387 .004 .078 Area = .056 .47 43.00 3.004 .01094 (sq.13 0.0366 .351 .003 .010 .475 1.0632 .0428 .118 .003 .26 0.097 .) I.072 .00594 .07 7.59 29. Tolerance ± W ± Metric O-Ring Size per AS568A (b) (Units are in Millimeters) Tolerance I. These correspond to AS568A dimensions.116 .004 .0063 .93 19. Ref.047 1.097 .52 11. in.08 0.26 0.009 .0548 .D.005 .00 0.009 .23 0.08 0.0489 .0037 .355 1.13 0.23 0. Tube O.014 .) Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.003 .04 26.26 0.08 0.009 .0019 .185 .003 .30 0. MS33656.118 .0102 .530 .13 0.072 .0198 .42 37. MS33657.13 0.46 16.018 .83 1.004 .087 Area = .116 Area = .004 .46 2. Table 9-2: Parker Series 3-XXX O-Rings Sizes .13 0.118 .74 34.239 .98 2.00246 .863 . 8 9 10 11 O-Ring Size – Actual (b) per AS568A (Units are in Inches) 3-XXX (a) Size No.00 3.10 0.36 17.46 0.D.0082 .0031 . 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Basic Volume Cu.116 .644 .337 .10 0.010 .720 2.004 .08 0.064 .003 .082 Area = .116 .92 10.003 .0759 .00739 . SAE straight thread O-ring boss and mating swivel and adjustment style fittings. ± W ± 3-XXX (a) Size No.parkerorings.e.003 .10 0.08 0.47 25. O-rings manufactured out of compounds with different shrinkage rates (other than AN) will produce slightly different dimensions andtolerances.08 0.007 .087 .08 0.95 2.09 59.00407 .755 .36 0.018 .004 .003 .00 3.00528 . In.08 0.com 9-11 .23 0. see the Appendix.116 .42 1.064 . AS568A Dash No.36 0.23 0.005 .924 .072 Area = .986 1.65 8.003 .08 2. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.082 .89 13.009 .< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Parker Series 3-XXX O-Ring Sizes These O-rings are intended for use with internal straight thread fluid connection bosses and tube fittings.36 0.13 0.078 .005 . (Ref.70 6.0844 4.00322 .

13 0.074 .02 0.070 .350 .18 8.02 1.13 0. Please consult the factory or your local Parker Distributor for the availability of special sizes not included in this list as of this writing.02 1.473 .320 .08 .003 .113 .005 .13 0.18 0.13 0.13 0.38 8.88 2.074 .301 .326 .133 .13 0.005 .13 0.071 .88 1.71 3.312 .13 0.07 6.35 2.13 0. Inches Tol ± W.19 9.08 .070 .08 .005 .146 .13 0.35 11.003 .003 .074 .08 .88 1.050 .362 .08 .005 .103 .57 4.038 .005 .003 .13 0.13 0.91 3.57 1.59 2.13 0.02 1.13 0.78 2.13 0.070 .313 .290 .99 9.132 .003 .10 .154 .08 . Millimeters Tol ± W Tol ± Std 5-Size I.62 1.06 7.39 1.92 6.003 .003 .08 .80 0.040 .08 .059 .330 .08 .88 1.003 .005 .10 .031 .13 0.13 0.125 .08 .18 1.13 0.24 2.004 .437 .08 .005 .30 1.006 .08 .352 .08 .066 .07 6.02 0.005 .003 .69 1.003 .08 .031 .13 0.57 10.13 0.08 .003 5-118 5-187 5-051 5-101 5-578 5-632 5-102 5-178 5-683 5-646 5-103 5-190 5-579 5-669 5-148 5-105 5-106 5-580 5-193 5-108 5-124 5-107 5-125 5-581 5-685 5-582 5-194 5-638 5-179 5-151 5-127 5-1002 5-197 5-180 5-686 5-583 5-052 5-202 5-698 5-584 5-687 5-1004 5-056 5-710 5-673 1.005 .05 3.08 .14 1.42 1.005 .97 8.003 .100 .13 0.08 .88 4.192 .15 0.25 3.003 .08 .516 .97 1.005 .278 .13 0.005 . see the Appendix.42 12.103 .224 .08 .005 .02 1.005 .08 .074 .312 .287 .68 1.50 1.13 0. Lexington.13 0.239 .094 .39 2.070 .62 1.39 1.68 1.426 .118 . Sizes Parker Series 5-XXX O-Ring Sizes Std 5-Size I.350 .34 13.13 0.08 .031 .005 .094 .78 1.15 0.08 .13 0.30 6.20 3.13 0.045 .08 .91 12.08 .005 .003 .070 .174 .D.040 .88 5.070 .005 .005 .15 0.239 .003 .469 .78 2.15 0.040 .13 0.003 .88 2.13 0.500 .122 .10 . These correspond to AS568A dimensions.003 .003 .003 .005 .47 4.126 .22 2.003 5-204 5-205 5-160 5-712 5-585 5-664 5-1006 5-206 5-1007 5-133 5-612 5-586 5-587 5-018 5-699 5-700 5-716 5-057 5-209 5-211 5-212 5-614 5-718 5-134 5-588 5-002 5-215 5-218 5-682 5-058 5-613 5-1011 5-222 5-223 5-225 5-615 5-652 5-726 5-566 5-230 5-231 5-675 5-616 5-1014 5-135 7.003 .040 .094 .08 .003 .005 .13 0.08 .103 .040 .95 3.003 .88 1.242 .003 .005 .13 0.353 .045 .08 .005 .38 6.25 1.005 .050 .90 13.82 10.003 .08 .006 .08 . Note: These molds are cut to allow for standard “AN” shrinkage.410 .13 0.005 .005 .283 .17 1.13 0.08 .08 .08 .08 .13 0.91 4.62 1.228 . O-rings manufactured out of compounds with different shrinkage rates (other than AN) will produce slightly different dimensions and tolerances. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.003 .89 8.103 .08 .003 .07 6.08 .005 .65 7.040 .08 .005 .050 .176 .005 .80 1.005 .056 .005 .005 .13 0.02 4.003 .003 .08 .004 . This tooling will be maintained while volume demand continues.13 0.036 .97 1.003 .005 .88 .003 .508 .14 0.040 .050 ..39 0.87 2.074 .003 .08 .08 .13 0.062 .076 .13 0.15 .038 .10 11.165 .08 .13 .08 .13 0.88 2.92 7.074 .053 .15 0. Inches Tol ± W.425 .07 6.005 .003 .005 .89 8.19 4.39 3.13 0. Table 9-3: Parker Series 5-XXX O-Rings Size Cross Reference Table 9-12 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.384 .094 .070 .91 11.39 1.418 .005 .30 6. A mold scrapped as defective will not be replaced unless demand justifies the expense.13 0.08 .118 .13 1.005 .03 10.003 .003 .08 .e.28 8.13 0.074 .64 1.003 .005 .97 1.006 .13 0.parkerorings.08 .176 .27 1.154 .08 .08 .18 0.08 .239 .005 .62 10.13 0.78 2.314 .005 .305 .036 .95 7.02 1.40 3.283 .003 .003 . N0674-70 5-007).003 .003 .040 .47 4.239 .13 0.074 .08 .08 .074 .13 0.43 8.176 .005 .08 .13 8.02 1.08 .005 .005 .354 .69 5.13 0.370 .458 .040 .391 .69 2.00 1.003 .27 1.489 .13 0.005 .055 .006 .248 .003 .154 .003 .91 2.040 .051 .003 . and in materials having standard shrinkage they will normally produce rings to the dimensions listed.003 .08 .038 .63 11.120 .13 0.13 0.78 1.02 0.005 .447 .27 1.092 .248 .003 .003 .003 .54 2.50 2.003 .003 .08 .47 4.53 9.005 .102 .11 13.08 .30 1.com .13 0.003 .003 .003 .005 .08 5-204 5-205 5-160 5-712 5-585 5-664 5-1006 5-206 5-1007 5-133 5-612 5-586 5-587 5-018 5-699 5-700 5-716 5-057 5-209 5-211 5-212 5-614 5-718 5-134 5-588 5-002 5-215 5-218 5-682 5-058 5-613 5-1011 5-222 5-223 5-225 5-615 5-652 5-726 5-566 5-230 5-231 5-675 5-616 5-1014 5-135 .19 7.08 .97 1. Tol ± Metric 5-Size I.312 .08 .059 .116 .005 .501 .007 .08 .08 .10 .004 .08 (a) The rubber compound must be added when ordering by the 5-size number (i.103 .005 .187 .79 5.003 .004 .92 7.15 0.41 10.08 .13 0.005 . (b) This chart provides dimensions for standard (AN) shrinkage materials ONLY.176 .39 3.005 .13 0.003 .08 .251 .08 .91 1.070 .47 4.13 0.056 .005 .106 .066 .128 .426 .02 1.13 0.005 .094 .37 1.62 1.054 .005 .106 .25 9.051 .270 .003 .344 .005 .005 .005 .D.62 3.13 .13 0.074 .005 .08 .78 2. 2007.005 .65 7.13 0.82 11.006 .003 .413 .70 12.416 .08 .003 .003 .128 .91 3.10 .29 7.040 .75 0.93 1.78 1.469 .13 0.42 1.040 .005 .025 .005 .005 .08 .005 .094 .08 .003 .005 .00 3.005 .049 .332 .28 5.86 7.003 .15 6.038 . Tol ± Metric 5-Size I.13 0.103 .79 2.005 .004 .08 .13 0.003 .003 .074 .79 1.13 0.006 .73 12. Materials with other than standard shrinkage will give different dimensions and tolerances.301 .08 .070 .19 7.003 .005 .364 .13 0.13 0.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Parker Series 5-XXX O-Ring Sizes The following 5-XXX sizes are O-rings of nonstandard dimensions for which Parker tooling was available as of January 1. Millimeters Tol ± W Tol ± 5-118 5-187 5-051 5-101 5-578 5-632 5-102 5-178 5-683 5-646 5-103 5-190 5-579 5-669 5-148 5-105 5-106 5-580 5-193 5-108 5-124 5-107 5-125 5-581 5-685 5-582 5-194 5-638 5-179 5-151 5-127 5-1002 5-197 5-180 5-686 5-583 5-052 5-202 5-698 5-584 5-687 5-1004 5-056 5-710 5-673 .60 1.003 .75 1.88 1.10 .49 10.13 0.003 .005 .13 0. For more information on shrinkage rates.08 .004 .005 .08 .08 .13 0.322 .003 .006 .208 .15 0.08 .526 .13 0.27 0.02 0.003 .10 3.02 1.003 .003 .39 7.80 10.08 .005 .050 .003 .005 .005 .525 .08 .003 .D.75 9.13 0.13 0.79 2.74 8.13 0.02 1.040 .13 0.040 .003 .13 0.10 0.005 .455 .29 12.005 .005 .110 .180 .36 0.35 3.13 0.071 .004 .395 .40 9.15 0.040 .62 1.233 .13 0.003 .003 .92 7.88 1.007 .003 .94 8.005 .005 .005 .08 .56 11.93 10.27 1.78 1.13 0.004 .13 0.003 .003 .005 .003 .006 .375 .42 1.98 8.10 .15 0.005 .13 0.003 .01 12.046 .78 1.79 .005 .003 .08 .484 .063 .048 .006 .08 .34 2.D.08 .02 0.08 .

670 1.014 .62 1.45 39.103 . Inches Tol ± W.53 5.003 .412 1.010 1.24 15.007 .623 .58 2.09 35.744 .36 0.008 .139 .20 0.18 0.226 1.003 .61 22.79 20.010 .23 0.007 .070 .23 0.18 1.78 2.08 .18 0.015 .015 .554 .012 .109 .007 .15 46.000 1.53 3.045 .625 .071 .003 .10 .139 .010 .670 1.583 .65 25.30 0.004 .010 .93 37.83 36.48 14.017 .53 1.031 .24 15.007 .003 .33 2.03 0.015 .275 .765 1.81 1.008 .003 .230 1. Millimeters Tol ± W Tol ± 5-162 5-239 5-156 5-563 5-735 5-736 5-591 5-609 5-242 5-021 5-243 5-676 5-247 5-248 5-617 5-250 5-251 5-005 5-136 5-643 5-252 5-254 5-743 5-592 5-256 5-594 5-257 5-593 5-181 5-964 5-263 5-264 5-266 5-137 5-595 5-006 5-751 5-003 5-596 5-708 5-753 5-049 5-273 5-022 5-138 5-597 5-598 5-278 5-139 5-709 5-677 5-279 5-761 5-618 5-599 .004 .003 .10 .14 31.58 2.061 .20 0.59 24.750 .47 38.937 1.25 0.047 .69 1. Tol ± Metric 5-Size I.010 .78 6.43 0.08 .007 .63 3.18 0.34 18.23 0.007 .125 .007 .009 .10 .590 .007 .707 .594 .34 3.08 .08 .015 .008 .38 0.017 .07 25.03 3.78 3.10 .08 .003 .004 .com 9-13 .003 .18 0.012 .004 .08 .465 1. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.89 17.58 6.003 .08 .250 .00 1.186 1.08 .36 0.802 1.575 .13 .78 1.88 15.010 .080 .008 .004 .003 .008 .38 0.78 5.54 1.27 3.401 1.22 31.25 0. For more information on shrinkage rates.10 .53 1.003 .016 .671 1.30 0.775 .10 .094 1.631 .016 .00 2.57 3.275 .D.10 .980 2.08 .050 .14 3.113 .e.08 .550 1.062 .003 .012 .080 .004 .78 6.031 .40 25.016 .20 0.57 2.25 1.25 0.040 .553 1.009 .09 36.D.09 15.004 .30 0.08 .10 .08 .016 .69 2.652 .18 0.08 .81 31.003 .15 .004 .05 19.78 1.003 .004 .08 .003 .58 0.93 16.20 0.42 18.80 48.724 . see the Appendix.10 19.18 0.38 0.41 0.25 0. Lexington.004 .14 1.225 1.012 .42 42.625 .18 0.092 .003 .13 .003 .23 0.979 .30 0.22 20.003 .009 .91 .20 0.03 48.10 .141 .59 35.08 .007 .004 .08 .007 .080 .78 2.08 .96 18.014 .007 .29 50.08 .891 1.004 .257 .08 .18 0.722 .421 1.58 1.016 .092 .015 .24 47.003 .23 0.006 .139 . Tol ± Metric 5-Size I.53 1.031 .57 1.004 .34 2.15 .010 .600 .78 2.103 .070 .08 .218 .073 .38 0.56 16.41 0.43 27.10 .003 .139 .67 3.08 .08 .52 1.18 0.857 .003 .62 3.786 1.583 .674 1.515 1.016 .004 .08 .10 .60 40.003 .18 0.017 .08 .58 1.017 .010 .18 0.29 37.78 30.003 .070 .83 45.004 1.010 .890 .064 .30 0.012 .040 .20 0.41 0.41 0.10 .08 .08 .61 14.79 1.08 .015 .39 18.004 .88 15. N0674-70 5-007).003 .08 .10 .08 .012 .15 .59 21.18 3.009 .338 1.103 .29 18.009 .82 15.25 0.12 39.838 .140 .03 3.212 1.015 .58 2.070 .070 .19 1.36 0.19 1.40 2.003 .047 .69 1.004 .53 0.41 0.080 1.141 .36 0.342 1.62 1.925 1.031 .014 .005 .12 31.18 0.42 45.015 .08 .010 . Table 9-3: Parker Series 5-XXX O-Rings Size Cross Reference Table Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.57 47.10 .004 .87 25.600 .27 2.81 26.106 .004 .016 .08 .009 .23 30.20 0.23 0.08 .012 .004 .259 1.10 .10 .850 1.070 .062 .48 39.050 .003 .141 .103 .08 .003 .23 0.08 .006 .000 .41 0.437 1.106 .766 .004 5-162 5-239 5-156 5-563 5-735 5-736 5-591 5-609 5-242 5-021 5-243 5-676 5-247 5-248 5-617 5-250 5-251 5-005 5-136 5-643 5-252 5-254 5-743 5-592 5-256 5-594 5-257 5-593 5-181 5-964 5-263 5-264 5-266 5-137 5-595 5-006 5-751 5-003 5-596 5-708 5-753 5-049 5-273 5-022 5-138 5-597 5-598 5-278 5-139 5-709 5-677 5-279 5-761 5-618 5-599 14.070 .210 .062 .450 1.08 .41 41.03 3.665 .007 .003 .008 .003 .003 .004 .123 .20 0.610 .10 .58 3.30 0.30 0.070 .38 0.017 .118 .012 .30 0.004 .047 .38 0.57 1.10 .10 .007 .070 .69 2.20 0.070 1.779 .279 1.40 36.603 .10 .812 1.640 1.51 16.25 0.49 15.141 .10 .454 1.99 3.34 15.65 1.003 .007 .23 0.25 0.10 .02 2.12 22.003 .040 .77 22.004 .003 .62 1.79 28.90 49.559 1.08 .26 16.062 .007 .46 19.18 1.012 .15 .003 .850 1.070 .08 .50 25.58 .012 .77 46.13 .78 1.30 0.43 0.07 14.229 1.003 .153 1.125 .18 0.004 .81 14.003 .25 0.003 .005 .004 .103 .003 .105 ..882 1.58 3.008 .59 48.016 .012 .003 .08 .10 .58 2.007 .08 .003 .08 .79 3.36 0.012 .004 .83 21.20 0.08 .879 .725 .08 .003 .19 2.010 .D.003 .30 0.275 .36 0.125 .197 .015 .007 .58 2.58 3.007 .016 1.139 .18 0.913 1.008 .18 0.008 .08 .003 .56 1.08 .78 2.85 2.18 0.080 .009 .10 .014 .99 46.112 1.39 2.680 1.660 .58 1.18 0.092 .32 15.062 .031 .003 .38 0.35 3.13 .627 .36 0.10 .873 1.67 2.78 6.009 .25 0.21 37.139 .23 21.150 .009 .99 47.69 19.006 .79 1.007 .18 0.141 .017 .08 .08 .003 .parkerorings.55 1.34 3.38 0.660 .004 .796 .08 .10 .41 0.468 1.62 0.99 0.18 2.08 .10 .003 .005 .010 .788 1.540 1.070 .005 .106 .014 .014 .80 0.10 .77 1.141 .003 .23 0.03 0.36 45.18 0.18 0.33 16.24 31.36 0.094 .18 27.20 50.18 0.90 19.23 0.075 .50 3.009 .012 .78 6.12 30.25 0.12 3.003 .141 .13 .004 .141 .10 .62 3.817 1.836 .52 42.10 .065 .08 .003 .006 .08 .103 .08 .059 . These correspond to AS568A dimensions.007 .99 34.080 .720 .003 .004 . (b) This chart provides dimensions for standard (AN) shrinkage materials ONLY.003 .003 .41 0.29 21.10 .031 .81 14.08 .19 0.860 1.03 1.141 .003 .591 1.004 .007 .08 .03 1.18 0.125 .20 0.08 Sizes (a) The rubber compound must be added when ordering by the 5-size number (i.640 .003 .08 .18 0.24 29.99 15.004 1.141 .30 0.67 44.004 .46 1.10 .003 .80 3.36 0.76 16.003 .820 .010 .038 .060 .015 .78 5.10 .99 2.08 .604 .007 .87 2.02 2.141 .10 .50 25.41 0. Millimeters Tol ± W Tol ± Std 5-Size I.29 30.08 .08 .20 0.004 .D. O-rings manufactured out of compounds with different shrinkage rates (other than AN) will produce slightly different dimensions and tolerances.79 3.15 .41 0.003 .008 .79 1.016 .905 .014 .42 42.008 .57 3.018 .031 .007 .03 16.30 0.105 .30 0.38 0.003 .08 .38 0.010 .43 0.141 .66 42.10 .987 1.003 .968 .141 .080 .141 .49 33.643 .08 .08 .38 0.25 0.149 .< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Parker Series 5-XXX O-Ring Sizes (Continued) Std 5-Size I.003 .02 3.898 .003 .53 1.014 .99 24.045 .070 .18 0.76 16.98 32.055 .10 5-004 5-763 5-600 5-140 5-601 5-291 5-1028 5-602 5-294 5-295 5-141 5-296 5-297 5-301 5-603 5-157 5-604 5-605 5-780 5-008 5-670 5-142 5-312 5-657 5-606 5-980 5-024 5-320 5-158 5-009 5-321 5-788 5-327 5-143 5-329 5-1018 5-330 5-671 5-025 5-035 5-1023 5-335 5-794 5-1042 5-795 5-9 81 5-011 5-337 5-1043 5-144 5-796 5-338 5-701 5-342 5-343 1.004 .86 36.47 3.752 .850 .33 3.38 0.070 .004 .015 .871 .570 .475 1.004 .003 .37 39.190 1.44 42.081 .007 .125 .003 5-004 5-763 5-600 5-140 5-601 5-291 5-1028 5-602 5-294 5-295 5-141 5-296 5-297 5-301 5-603 5-157 5-604 5-605 5-780 5-008 5-670 5-142 5-312 5-657 5-606 5-980 5-024 5-320 5-158 5-009 5-321 5-788 5-327 5-143 5-329 5-1018 5-330 5-671 5-025 5-035 5-1023 5-335 5-794 5-1042 5-795 5-981 5-011 5-337 5-1043 5-144 5-796 5-338 5-701 5-342 5-343 27.08 .210 .213 1.18 0.79 3.004 .650 .06 5.008 .080 .015 .014 .43 0.106 .006 .016 .25 0. Inches Tol ± W.81 22.10 .43 0.005 .43 0.02 46.058 .08 .33 22.004 .97 1.

812 2.024 .236 5.89 0.975 4.78 2.005 .61 0.147 .682 4.15 .19 85.004 .020 .33 5.275 .99 6.08 .725 3.08 .15 69.08 .035 .035 .79 1.004 .035 .02 1.112 .76 64.08 .070 .24 77.300 3.13 . O-rings manufactured out of compounds with different shrinkage rates (other than AN) will produce slightly different dimensions and tolerances.07 139.15 .020 .576 2.11 77. Tol ± Metric 5-Size I.46 0.89 0.99 2.003 .71 77.46 0.08 .210 3. (b) This chart provides dimensions for standard (AN) shrinkage materials ONLY.53 3.02 1.006 .78 6.56 2.43 67. N0674-70 5-007).004 .139 .363 3.093 .51 0.53 1.46 92.080 3.024 .340 5.035 .275 .92 6.112 3.56 0.53 2.60 2.115 .22 126.10 .78 3.36 54.66 1.006 .15 5-031 5-828 5-986 5-390 5-987 5-831 5-1054 5-833 5-394 5-988 5-395 5-396 5-989 5-060 5-836 5-401 5-1060 5-840 5-842 5-844 5-402 5-848 5-850 5-403 5-851 5-852 5-853 5-559 5-407 5-408 5-410 5-412 5-855 5-856 5-413 5-414 5-858 5-416 5-062 5-417 5-063 5-862 5-863 5-421 5-573 5-567 5-1041 5-064 5-428 5-430 3.103 .040 .78 1.19 1.604 5.003 .61 0.361 6.46 0.475 5.100 .10 .D.006 .45 133.08 .022 .233 . Inches Tol ± W.78 3.02 1.31 2.78 6.122 .56 4.035 .390 4.140 .004 .78 6.08 .51 0.78 2.61 0.411 2.60 118.74 4.640 3.76 0.08 .214 .52 6.72 61.103 .003 .024 .003 .56 0.73 5.003 .89 0.13 Sizes (a) The rubber compound must be added when ordering by the 5-size number (i.040 .99 2.83 125.018 .51 0.026 .10 .004 .968 5.020 3.275 .32 111.02 1.003 .89 0.89 0.035 .085 4.13 .10 .61 0.003 .875 4.004 .414 5.024 . For more information on shrinkage rates.71 0.10 52.57 1.003 .127 .10 .78 2.600 .51 112.81 139.003 .062 .443 3.44 3.070 .004 .683 2.040 .10 .53 2.070 .15 .108 .65 146.616 5.71 51.10 .29 73.10 .035 .444 5.13 .005 .08 .76 0.78 1.096 4.170 .003 .040 .78 2.103 .028 .99 1.005 .003 .003 .08 .71 0.140 .124 .080 4.73 5.005 .05 147.139 .020 .10 .024 .035 .024 .003 .10 .78 6.156 3.004 . Lexington.53 2.02 1.10 .15 .004 .16 80.61 0.004 .92 5.08 .018 .76 0.08 .035 .051 2.022 .003 .018 .08 .53 1.53 3.10 .51 0.020 2.D.003 .13 .140 2.070 .78 3.004 .62 100.103 .84 0.024 .56 0.006 .024 .024 .040 .312 2.057 5.com .53 3.003 .84 68.60 76.73 6.111 .62 1.878 2.10 .004 .08 .172 2.028 .004 .080 .02 1.139 ..32 133.08 .004 .89 0.060 3.661 3.103 .005 .42 87.350 6.030 .61 0.080 .45 115.018 .71 0.38 79.10 .162 3.315 .925 4.62 3.15 .249 5.004 .52 57. Table 9-3: Parker Series 5-XXX O-Rings Size Cross Reference Table 9-14 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.210 .020 .003 .97 102.64 0.14 77.04 147.070 .99 94.04 104.08 .281 2.141 2.46 0.004 .62 6.035 .15 .985 6.76 128.030 .32 54.070 .004 .035 .006 .060 2.275 .022 .003 .003 .61 0.10 .004 .59 152.08 .209 .006 5-655 5-037 5-346 5-642 5-1044 5-027 5-1046 5-145 5-347 5-348 5-800 5-1047 5-015 5-702 5-039 5-354 5-355 5-805 5-703 5-358 5-361 5-159 5-982 5-807 5-704 5-042 5-697 5-367 5-705 5-368 5-044 5-369 5-810 5-811 5-1052 5-374 5-557 5-813 5-815 5-045 5-816 5-819 5-984 5-821 5-825 5-1053 5-380 5-979 5-381 5-985 51.99 1.22 70.020 .671 2.02 1.030 .66 0.004 .750 5.08 .56 0.040 .003 .070 .139 .34 142.02 152.10 .139 .275 .003 .535 2.125 3.53 3.03 3.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Parker Series 5-XXX O-Ring Sizes (Continued) Std 5-Size I.225 2.92 83.03 2.15 .789 5.89 0.27 74.026 .427 4.030 .046 2.275 .89 0.040 .99 3.070 .024 .040 .62 2.92 120.003 .81 3.225 4.07 117.94 58.27 3.006 . Millimeters Tol ± W Tol ± Std 5-Size I.08 .070 .024 .70 149.02 1.62 3.66 0.53 81.062 .00 133.71 0.003 .15 .46 0.66 0.035 .13 .15 .53 1.350 3.57 164.036 3.78 2.003 .139 .57 4.070 .070 .78 3.040 .76 0.003 .44 0.08 .047 .11 103.275 .070 .487 5.97 52.08 .725 2.66 0.99 2.09 117.006 .31 81.004 .52 138.004 .46 0.004 .018 .044 .10 .10 .110 . These correspond to AS568A dimensions.188 .037 3.553 5.139 .66 71.846 2.035 .171 4.78 6.52 3.10 125.18 2.003 .08 .070 .125 .035 .040 .10 65. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.78 3.070 .003 .060 .59 127.782 2.27 91.15 1.024 .022 .89 0.40 151.139 .030 .36 54.89 0.15 .08 . Millimeters Tol ± W Tol ± 5-655 5-037 5-346 5-642 5-1044 5-027 5-1046 5-145 5-347 5-348 5-800 5-1047 5-015 5-702 5-039 5-354 5-355 5-805 5-703 5-358 5-361 5-159 5-982 5-807 5-704 5-042 5-697 5-367 5-705 5-368 5-044 5-369 5-810 5-811 5-1052 5-374 5-557 5-813 5-815 5-045 5-816 5-819 5-984 5-821 5-825 5-1053 5-380 5-979 5-381 5-985 2.139 .10 .46 0.10 .39 65.003 .51 100.13 .08 .018 .354 3.003 .10 .78 3.225 3.10 .040 .020 .05 1.024 .99 6.020 .006 .500 5.984 5.40 3.275 .72 78.62 1.005 .930 4.08 .020 4.12 3.296 2.957 3.53 3.36 2.022 .003 .10 .035 .030 .94 107.062 .61 0.99 1.041 3.62 3.14 104.275 .99 .13 .10 .040 .99 1.D.08 .10 .035 .46 0.003 .D.57 2.70 141.471 2.89 0.030 .006 .08 .937 3.61 0.62 6.010 .76 0.56 1.10 .006 .08 .004 .23 79.103 .10 3.12 3.103 .08 .62 3.51 0.02 1.89 0.609 4.003 .147 .29 6.10 . Inches Tol ± W.89 0.53 2.46 0.155 .57 105.003 . see the Appendix.030 .08 .61 0.003 .51 0.004 .004 .02 1.29 80.76 0.94 55.09 85.070 .260 .018 .006 .026 .020 .026 .028 .08 .56 0.71 0.45 88.028 .070 .08 .76 0.08 .38 54.89 0.25 .003 .51 0.465 5.82 1.02 3.161 3.08 .082 .003 .08 .08 .37 139.10 .275 .61 0.78 1.139 .005 .08 .139 .46 0.42 72.815 5.98 161.103 .117 4.63 103.022 .123 .030 5.10 74.103 .003 .265 5.32 58.168 .66 0.64 137.parkerorings.018 .08 .103 .003 .76 0.036 2.61 0.630 4.100 4.139 .94 6.150 .56 0.89 0.004 .018 .139 .46 0.10 .004 .033 .11 64.275 .563 2.56 0.004 .62 1.08 .23 1.e.125 .66 0.28 138.82 85.17 1.531 4.006 .664 4.070 .026 .004 .060 .139 .023 6.08 .08 .15 .53 1.47 118.99 3.61 0.05 142.026 . Tol ± Metric 5-Size I.84 2.78 4.252 .130 3.035 .035 .140 .24 62.18 8.147 .31 51.030 .020 .482 .61 0.003 .76 0.10 .02 1.003 .030 .004 .56 0.882 5.005 5-031 5-828 5-986 5-390 5-987 5-831 5-1054 5-833 5-394 5-988 5-395 5-396 5-989 5-060 5-836 5-401 5-1060 5-840 5-842 5-844 5-402 5-848 5-850 5-403 5-851 5-852 5-853 5-559 5-407 5-408 5-410 5-412 5-855 5-856 5-413 5-414 5-858 5-416 5-062 5-417 5-063 5-862 5-863 5-421 5-573 5-567 5-1041 5-064 5-428 5-430 92.070 .026 .89 0.022 .090 .022 .035 .51 0.750 4.006 .04 79.76 0.08 .004 .070 .103 .17 56.022 .89 1.15 .120 .10 .08 3.89 0.275 .29 161.033 .62 3.54 1.140 2.15 .006 .10 .00 1.024 .003 .84 0.164 .018 .524 2.56 0.035 .32 .08 .15 .73 135.004 .924 2.76 104.004 .475 3.030 .028 .10 .89 0.89 0.53 2.018 .50 80.76 0.003 .163 2.65 123.003 .51 0.

08 .080 .78 1.14 1.234 16.24 212.50 337.260 12.080 .52 1.10 .52 1.088 14.004 .78 1.53 5.003 .004 .640 7.52 1.78 3.53 2.004 .003 .03 2.10 .10 .005 .570 14.050 .10 .055 .070 .600 14.006 .141 .03 2.112 .08 .53 1.10 .004 .57 308.52 1.260 15. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. For more information on shrinkage rates.10 .070 .210 .13 .40 1.75 5.005 .78 1.003 5-666 5-869 5-434 5-696 5-691 5-873 5-975 5-875 5-438 5-439 5-876 5-877 5-445 5-880 5-575 5-450 5-882 5-635 5-883 5-884 5-885 5-886 5-457 5-458 5-887 5-165 5-889 5-976 5-890 5-623 5-464 5-891 5-466 5-469 5-471 5-894 5-474 5-898 5-476 5-069 5-900 5-480 5-482 5-164 5-901 5-485 5-486 5-902 5-487 5-488 165.78 1.006 .275 .10 .109 12.78 1.19 412.141 .40 1.004 .210 .017 12.080 .92 399.06 339.28 421.64 262.616 13.03 2.004 .070 .070 .78 1.10 .275 .072 .44 348.006 .40 232.81 287.78 1.005 .507 16.080 .53 3.54 370.84 372.000 12.004 .41 392.070 .10 .004 .15 .139 .27 1.060 .78 3.10 .13 .03 357.004 .050 .005 .03 2.03 2.210 .52 1.139 .13 .139 .10 .13 .99 3.080 .08 .006 .73 340.060 .23 307.606 10.139 .080 .139 .52 367.53 2.139 .61 341.45 1.88 342.139 .58 3.53 2.40 312.52 1.10 .53 5.29 2.84 3.52 1.475 12.875 9.13 .003 .139 .410 15.256 .003 .045 . (b) This chart provides dimensions for standard (AN) shrinkage materials ONLY.725 12.465 15.78 1. These correspond to AS568A dimensions.53 6.004 .53 5.08 5-569 5-905 5-906 5-907 5-908 5-611 5-619 5-492 5-070 5-910 5-071 5-072 5-493 5-494 5-496 5-498 5-500 5-912 5-1097 5-073 5-502 5-624 5-074 5-504 5-626 5-505 5-506 5-507 5-508 5-166 5-920 5-921 5-512 5-076 5-077 5-924 5-925 5-079 5-515 5-516 5-517 5-518 5-571 5-930 5-520 5-522 5-080 5-524 5-622 5-525 12.031 16.45 419.13 .18 .52 1.78 1.299 12.070 .15 .52 1.10 .33 3.14 327.234 14.060 .003 .78 6.006 . Tol ± Metric 5-Size I.99 3. Table 9-3: Parker Series 5-XXX O-Rings Size Cross Reference Table Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.139 .57 5.004 .50 3.139 .070 .003 .27 1.050 .705 12.070 .277 8.66 328.004 .24 3.87 320.64 6.070 .996 11.78 1.64 6.004 .004 .10 .090 .103 .08 .45 304.33 3.43 253.050 .749 10.003 .08 .004 .139 .08 .33 3.80 305.10 .10 .03 2.64 417.29 2.003 .52 1.006 .34 413.003 .87 180.72 238.070 .070 .718 13.040 .188 .< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Parker Series 5-XXX O-Ring Sizes (Continued) Std 5-Size I.53 3.33 2.575 16.343 10.78 1.108 7.139 . O-rings manufactured out of compounds with different shrinkage rates (other than AN) will produce slightly different dimensions and tolerances.52 259.71 348.006 .490 13.178 10.055 .78 1.27 279.210 .03 2.10 Sizes (a) The rubber compound must be added when ordering by the 5-size number (i.81 394.005 .103 .003 .78 1.060 .055 .00 270.883 10.78 1.425 7.139 .003 .004 .66 425.080 .53 5.004 .29 2.060 .33 6.15 .08 .78 1.03 2.750 12.03 2.005 .070 .78 1.74 311.43 279.60 388.139 .070 .78 1.78 1.250 .61 167.460 13.050 .004 .103 .08 .10 .541 13.080 .110 7.78 1.802 8.750 13.17 210.15 .78 3.41 375.103 .15 .03 2.15 .10 .13 .275 .62 3.210 .13 .005 .94 345.53 3.78 1.210 .34 387.10 .548 15.410 13.14 1.62 6.78 1.070 .05 407.60 192.125 .54 366.275 .53 5.300 15.005 .15 .52 1.60 2.285 16.62 1.71 263.03 2.090 .10 .08 .52 1.187 .248 13.425 10.03 2.03 2.08 .13 .53 5.com 9-15 .080 .15 .360 12.270 13.070 .53 4.65 343.D.060 .840 12.30 287.03 2. N0674-70 5-007).72 394.62 322.80 3.171 10.08 .54 180.89 262.78 1.53 5.004 .004 .070 .62 391.53 3.004 .84 349.734 13.005 .62 3.055 .99 3.139 .10 .470 14.370 9.005 .37 194. Millimeters Tol ± W Tol ± Std 5-Size I.27 1.139 .12 263.78 1.080 .08 .29 2.070 .D.139 .33 2.765 .004 .260 .004 .29 2.260 .08 .78 6.10 .62 2.08 .92 198.03 2.004 .53 3.15 .160 12.13 .03 2.140 .15 .004 .060 .006 .48 3.210 .003 .070 .53 6.080 .210 .005 .67 298.14 1.80 269.210 .137 .10 .006 .139 .331 11.09 225.045 .D.004 .08 .08 .060 .78 1.10 .435 16.33 3.27 1.03 276.13 .210 .139 7.004 .85 346.005 .83 1.91 293.80 400.463 .99 3.003 .380 12.45 264.003 .006 .14 1.10 .070 .13 .03 2.139 .75 7.84 358.006 .984 10.070 .99 2.15 .10 .33 2.071 .03 2.070 .10 .33 183.340 10.72 373.225 .03 2.090 .53 5.006 .10 .003 .29 3.070 .62 1.83 1.375 13.04 3.35 3. Millimeters Tol ± W Tol ± 5-666 5-869 5-434 5-696 5-691 5-873 5-975 5-875 5-438 5-439 5-876 5-877 5-445 5-880 5-575 5-450 5-882 5-635 5-883 5-884 5-885 5-886 5-457 5-458 5-887 5-165 5-889 5-976 5-890 5-623 5-464 5-891 5-466 5-469 5-471 5-894 5-474 5-898 5-476 5-069 5-900 5-480 5-482 5-164 5-901 5-485 5-486 5-902 5-487 5-488 6.060 .090 .78 1.004 .53 4.15 .820 14.53 6.080 .104 .01 422.171 15.66 272.139 .003 . Inches Tol ± W.e.10 .060 .53 5.104 .27 1.005 .13 .139 .33 3.139 .210 .22 326.53 4.003 .070 .070 .613 7.10 .006 .139 .623 12.139 .27 1.59 258.006 .139 .210 .39 313.580 7.090 .004 .060 .103 .004 .350 8.10 .78 1.29 2.64 188.33 3.640 16.29 2.080 .230 7.62 3.210 .080 .78 1.08 .139 .285 .53 3.004 .15 .71 323.03 2.33 1.62 .60 5.820 9.070 .139 .45 425.060 .520 6.111 14.13 .004 .99 2.005 .52 1.004 .33 3.210 .080 .070 .060 .53 3.650 13. Inches Tol ± W.004 .40 1.33 3..359 10.78 2.10 .162 9.060 .54 367.080 .42 361.070 .99 6.10 .430 14.125 .34 258.00 249.78 3.02 1.060 .915 13.090 .52 1.275 .275 .070 .070 .99 6.062 .004 .275 .005 .275 .722 14.13 .656 10.070 .080 .53 3.050 .139 .08 .050 . see the Appendix.10 .004 .10 .060 .08 .10 .08 370.149 .56 1.060 .562 11.750 16.080 .175 .045 .900 12.004 .045 .08 .004 .15 .15 .006 .27 1.10 .45 316.750 16.232 10.56 1.79 385.080 .139 .139 .210 .003 .090 .53 3.005 .53 2.003 . Tol ± Metric 5-Size I.006 .04 336.21 3.03 2.06 194.10 .99 1.18 5.995 10.139 .parkerorings.14 1.139 .070 .62 6.78 1.13 .045 .080 .674 14.D.080 .080 .004 .004 .674 7.372 10.335 11.33 3.795 15.045 .78 3.139 .10 .060 .78 1.540 15.13 .630 10.53 5.060 .10 .78 1.103 .070 .52 1.087 .060 .42 230.070 .52 1.275 .52 1.86 310.070 .103 .070 .53 3.003 .780 14.25 351.071 9.734 10.004 5-569 5-905 5-906 5-907 5-908 5-611 5-619 5-492 5-070 5-910 5-071 5-072 5-493 5-494 5-496 5-498 5-500 5-912 5-1097 5-073 5-502 5-624 5-074 5-504 5-626 5-505 5-506 5-507 5-508 5-166 5-920 5-921 5-512 5-076 5-077 5-924 5-925 5-079 5-515 5-516 5-517 5-518 5-571 5-930 5-520 5-522 5-080 5-524 5-622 5-525 316.070 .94 375.33 4.470 14. Lexington.103 .10 .234 12.53 2.48 5.740 15.080 .64 273.004 .070 .005 .187 .52 1.003 .609 7.005 .94 314.159 .59 181.03 2.103 .090 .139 .58 5.72 4.005 .39 270.40 1.53 193.53 6.070 .52 1.10 .275 .53 6.15 .52 1.10 .78 1.13 .14 1.005 .13 .78 2.03 2.

120 .004 .99 6.82 638.53 3.10 .214 .005 .500 19.004 .210 .139 .007 .13 .34 438.e.29 2.090 .05 3.71 443.100 .006 .408 27.210 .99 4.10 . Tol ± Metric 5-Size I.29 2.53 3.53 3.275 .004 .33 3.78 3.54 6.405 18.53 6.74 604.76 698.36 444.33 4.13 .10 .99 6.100 .70 663.53 6.870 17.10 6.139 .29 2.281 .15 .10 .275 .090 .210 .612 23.153 25.169 18.250 .870 18.29 2.242 .275 .004 .188 .54 2.05 3.210 . Inches Tol ± W.33 5.265 18.090 .139 .090 .10 .120 .D.90 454.54 2.005 .13 .99 3. Table 9-3: Parker Series 5-XXX O-Rings Size Cross Reference Table 9-16 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.090 .004 .10 .77 461.120 .180 21.003 .006 .33 501.29 2.004 .13 .53 6.576 23.15 . These correspond to AS568A dimensions.474 25.10 .139 .006 .564 22.29 2.58 665. N0674-70 5-007).15 .33 3.33 5.16 2.540 23.380 19.100 . see the Appendix.29 2.100 . Millimeters Tol ± W Tol ± Std 5-Size I.187 .54 2.004 .05 3.54 2.parkerorings.05 3.10 .29 2.090 .54 2.268 17.52 6.05 3.004 .54 3.250 .120 .375 .25 495.13 .188 26.006 .960 20.44 3.13 .090 .100 .210 .004 .100 .004 5-935 5-526 5-082 5-528 5-937 5-529 5-1100 5-939 5-083 5-084 5-533 5-1102 5-085 5-534 5-1104 5-1105 5-943 5-944 5-947 5-541 5-086 5-948 5-950 5-1010 434.com .05 3.875 25.090 .005 .97 547.004 .30 479.275 .29 2.13 .05 3.15 438.147 .139 .50 453.10 .100 .780 24..240 .D.08 .139 .004 .350 18.29 2.D.139 .100 .139 .04 647.120 .53 6.281 .15 .54 2.55 2.53 3.05 3.500 17.92 598.275 .005 . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.004 .090 .139 .90 473.05 3.500 18.15 Sizes (a) The rubber compound must be added when ordering by the 5-size number (i.390 17.15 .090 .090 .D.120 .29 2.210 .120 .006 .15 .53 5.10 .35 5.090 .53 6.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Parker Series 5-XXX O-Ring Sizes (Continued) Std 5-Size I.29 2.120 .120 .99 9.006 .49 469.13 .006 .10 .29 2.13 .005 .54 2.005 .090 .33 3.006 . Tol ± Metric 5-Size I.15 .360 23.006 .15 .139 .004 .006 5-088 5-547 5-953 5-089 5-551 5-090 5-552 5-167 5-168 5-169 5-091 5-170 5-171 5-173 5-631 5-172 5-092 5-955 537.99 .89 647.54 2.120 .625 28.910 18.580 19.91 458.100 17.100 .005 .210 .15 438.99 6.02 506.53 .10 .55 492.18 .35 7.05 3.006 .05 3. O-rings manufactured out of compounds with different shrinkage rates (other than AN) will produce slightly different dimensions and tolerances. (b) This chart provides dimensions for standard (AN) shrinkage materials ONLY.05 3.54 2.10 5-088 5-547 5-953 5-089 5-551 5-090 5-552 5-167 5-168 5-169 5-091 5-170 5-171 5-173 5-631 5-172 5-092 5-955 21.455 17.10 .15 3.73 567.006 .250 17.53 3. Millimeters Tol ± W Tol ± 5-935 5-526 5-082 5-528 5-937 5-529 5-1100 5-939 5-083 5-084 5-533 5-1102 5-085 5-534 5-1104 5-1105 5-943 5-944 5-947 5-541 5-086 5-948 5-950 5-1010 17.51 597.096 .005 .725 19.09 467.005 .090 .01 631.250 17.120 . Inches Tol ± W.15 . For more information on shrinkage rates.004 .10 .14 3.120 .93 466.33 5.120 .880 19.56 3.485 27.275 .140 .406 23.062 18.13 .139 .801 .73 3.275 .500 26.15 .61 441.005 .125 26.132 .090 .275 .68 731.98 523.05 3.15 .139 .30 497.15 .29 2.44 5.75 6.10 .29 2.99 5.139 .609 .100 .94 594.12 701.635 18.47 2.53 3.090 .83 599.100 .49 463.004 . Lexington.35 5.139 .006 .006 .29 2.33 479.53 7.120 .05 3.18 670.15 .

112 1.000 2.D.279 1.390 5.640 1.350 .248 .017 12.548 15.554 12.772 .437 .469 .370 .559 1.046 2.299 12.882 6.331 12. .640 .036 3.979 1.364 .225 1.450 1.482 7.342 1.D.820 14.230 1.780 24.070 .176 .473 2.625 .631 .163 2.985 12.125 27.485 26.224 .154 .180 23.671 2.501 .180 .172 2.995 11.D.683 .270 .475 3.233 2.670 1.750 4.430 14.725 . .169 18.508 .891 2.650 .570 .604 .359 14.425 .550 2.410 .575 17.465 .352 .116 .604 5.553 5.722 23.413 .406 23.133 .171 15.192 .384 .883 10.836 1.786 2.278 .421 1.350 19.160 10.037 3.580 21.070 .583 .968 8.401 1.176 .718 14.125 5.036 2.248 13.188 .154 .301 .875 25.186 1.707 .575 1.625 1.228 .165 .418 .507 16.102 .627 .405 19.526 .265 5.350 11.905 .260 15.500 .153 25.724 .623 .226 1.775 .312 .489 5.860 2.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Series 5-XXX Locator Table Size 5-001 5-002 5-003 5-004 5-005 5-006 5-008 5-009 5-011 5-015 5-018 5-021 5-022 5-024 5-025 5-027 5-031 5-035 5-037 5-039 5-042 5-044 5-045 5-049 5-051 5-052 5-056 5-057 5-058 5-060 5-062 5-063 5-064 5-069 5-070 5-071 5-072 5-073 5-074 5-076 5-077 5-079 5-080 5-082 5-083 5-084 5-085 5-086 5-088 5-089 5-090 5-091 5-092 5-101 5-102 5-103 5-105 5-106 5-107 5-108 I.752 .460 13.576 2.930 5.470 14.475 16.540 1.740 15.500 21.915 16.380 12.020 1.898 .140 3.312 .100 .873 1.603 .171 4.117 4.750 .239 .411 2.871 .parkerorings.426 4.670 1.375 .987 1.268 17.640 1.600 12.020 3.610 Sizes Table 9-4: Series 5-XXX Locator Table Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.361 6.239 .802 1.242 .414 5.312 .332 .132 .213 1.437 1.616 13.236 .838 .314 .750 10.796 1.128 .541 13.277 9.475 5.016 12.613 7.980 2.110 9.071 10.750 6. .250 17.765 2.468 .910 18.765 17.296 .750 13.535 .176 .126 .094 1.154 .454 1. Lexington.D.096 4.524 2.344 .500 26.890 1.516 .340 5.305 .640 8.487 5.350 .680 .924 3.612 3.320 6.625 .259 1.416 .471 2.540 16.749 10.458 .564 23.239 .474 27.455 18.088 14.766 .656 10.249 5.469 . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.779 .455 .643 .300 15.900 .004 1.490 13.270 13.338 1.600 14.616 Size 5-421 5-428 5-430 5-434 5-438 5-439 5-445 5-450 5-457 5-458 5-464 5-466 5-469 5-471 5-474 5-480 5-482 5-485 5-486 5-487 5-488 5-492 5-493 5-494 5-496 5-498 5-500 5-502 5-504 5-505 5-506 5-507 5-508 5-512 5-515 5-516 5-517 5-518 5-520 5-522 5-524 5-525 5-526 5-528 5-529 5-533 5-534 5-541 5-547 5-551 5-552 5-557 5-559 5-563 5-566 5-567 5-569 5-571 5-573 5-575 I.031 16.250 17.153 1.470 26.051 .540 23.234 15.531 4. .141 .062 18.146 1.520 .640 16.968 1.070 .283 .260 12.553 1.234 5.875 Size 5-578 5-579 5-580 5-581 5-582 5-583 5-584 5-585 5-586 5-587 5-588 5-590 5-591 5-592 5-593 5-594 5-595 5-596 5-597 5-598 5-599 5-600 5-601 5-602 5-603 5-604 5-605 5-606 5-609 5-611 5-612 5-613 5-614 5-615 5-616 5-617 5-618 5-619 5-622 5-623 5-624 5-626 5-631 5-632 5-635 5-638 5-642 5-643 5-646 5-652 5-655 5-657 5-664 5-666 5-669 5-670 5-671 5-673 5-675 5-676 I.326 .660 .232 10.251 .750 16.674 15.212 1.630 14.463 13.108 7.652 .665 .650 13.410 13.720 .176 Size 5-118 5-124 5-125 5-127 5-133 5-134 5-135 5-136 5-137 5-138 5-139 5-140 5-141 5-142 5-143 5-144 5-145 5-148 5-151 5-156 5-157 5-158 5-159 5-160 5-162 5-164 5-165 5-166 5-167 5-168 5-169 5-170 5-171 5-172 5-173 5-178 5-179 5-180 5-181 5-187 5-190 5-193 5-194 5-197 5-202 5-204 5-205 5-206 5-209 5-211 5-212 5-215 5-218 5-222 5-223 5-225 5-230 5-231 5-239 5-242 I.D.879 .109 12.111 14.570 14.391 .925 1.161 .031 1.059 .120 .408 .com 9-17 .363 3.846 3.515 1.370 .229 1.112 3.957 4.340 10. 5.547 .600 Size 5-243 5-247 5-248 5-250 5-251 5-252 5-254 5-256 5-257 5-263 5-264 5-266 5-273 5-278 5-279 5-291 5-294 5-295 5-296 5-297 5-301 5-312 5-320 5-321 5-327 5-329 5-330 5-335 5-337 5-338 5-342 5-343 5-346 5-347 5-348 5-354 5-355 5-358 5-361 5-367 5-368 5-369 5-374 5-380 5-381 5-390 5-394 5-395 5-396 5-401 5-402 5-403 5-407 5-408 5-410 5-412 5-413 5-414 5-416 5-417 I.435 16.674 1.576 25.594 .

583 .225 .820 9.600 3.425 3.725 3.080 3.178 10.171 10.937 .D.812 1.412 1.030 5.484 .990 15.354 1.465 16.162 3.000 12.725 12.660 .975 3.880 19.375 Size 5-912 5-920 5-921 5-922 5-924 5-925 5-930 5-935 5-937 5-939 5-943 5-944 5-947 5-948 5-950 5-953 5-955 5-964 5-975 5-976 5-979 5-980 5-981 5-982 5-983 5-984 5-985 5-986 5-987 5-988 I.353 .535 2.475 1.290 .057 Size 5-855 5-856 5-858 5-862 5-863 5-869 5-873 5-875 5-876 5-877 5-880 5-882 5-883 5-884 5-885 5-886 5-887 5-889 5-890 5-891 5-894 5-898 5-900 5-901 5-902 5-905 5-906 5-907 5-908 5-910 I.734 10.525 1.313 .410 15.913 2.801 .130 3.D.343 10.780 14.443 1.322 .139 7.609 7.815 6.360 28.996 11.060 2.782 3.725 2.984 5.427 4.156 3.630 4. Lexington.085 4.580 7.000 .840 13.372 10.100 Size 5-989 5-1002 5-1004 5-1006 5-1007 5-1010 5-1011 5-1014 5-1018 5-1023 5-1028 5-1041 5-1042 5-1043 5-1044 5-1046 5-1047 5-1052 5-1053 5-1054 5-1060 5-1097 5-1100 5-1102 5-1104 5-1105 I.330 20.984 10.D.870 18.041 3.287 7.335 12.937 2.744 7.734 14.301 .674 7.925 4. 13.350 9.682 4.817 1.234 12.350 3. 4.705 12.060 3.789 5.591 1.com .960 22.606 10.190 6.354 4.850 1.285 17.395 .623 12.248 .563 2.110 2.878 .500 5.802 8.080 1. 1.850 2.360 12.208 .465 5.750 17.609 13.390 17.225 2.590 .882 2.812 2.664 4.426 . 5.100 17.312 2.010 Size 5-763 5-769 5-780 5-788 5-794 5-795 5-796 5-800 5-805 5-807 5-810 5-811 5-813 5-815 5-816 5-819 5-821 5-825 5-828 5-831 5-833 5-836 5-840 5-842 5-844 5-848 5-850 5-851 5-852 5-853 I.162 9. 1.447 .788 1.425 10.850 1.875 4.444 5.795 14.609 .281 3.parkerorings.870 18.122 .023 1.500 18.210 3.820 .140 2.283 .265 18.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Series 5-XXX Locator Table (Continued) Size 5-677 5-682 5-683 5-685 5-686 5-687 5-691 5-696 5-697 5-698 5-699 5-700 5-701 5-702 5-703 5-704 5-705 5-708 5-709 5-710 5-712 5-716 5-718 5-726 5-735 5-736 5-743 5-751 5-753 5-761 I.661 4.380 19.362 .300 3.004 .671 1.857 1.635 Sizes Table 9-4: Series 5-XXX Locator Table 9-18 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.D.176 1.225 3.080 4.500 18.020 4.975 4.D.239 .725 19.230 7. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.

15 1.09 3.0 160.0 58. ± 1.5 33.0 54.7 6.0 243.28 0.8 3.0 71.13 0.13 0.21 0.7 45.42 0.40 0.com 9-19 .49 0.95 2.56 0. ± 30.0 150.0 5.15 0.23 2.17 0.22 1.0 258.42 1.09 3.67 0.55±0.0 165.15 0.5 36.0 65.0 175.08 2.38 0.31 0.11 1.15 0.80±0.13 0.44 0.16 2.13 0.57 0.20 0.0 128. d1 (mm) Cross-Section d2 (mm) Inside Dia.0 20.4 23.35 0.8 2.00 1.30±0.0 125.65±0.0 212.61 1.25 0.3 6.33 0.24 0.5 56.00±0.14 0.19 0.29 1.0 25.15 3.0 19.45 0.87 0.0 190.42 0.10 5.00±0.60 0.5 28.0 103.53 0.64 0.13 0.15 0.5 8.16 0.65±0.0 155.9 7.23 0.00±0.35 0.92 0.39 0.0 10.14 0.0 18.0 75.0 355.0 67.18 0.55 3.0 4.90 1.11 2.0 9.49 1.0 41.13 0.80±0.0 300.30±0.0 82.5 85.55±0.0 109.3 0.29 0.71 1.30±0.0 0.80 1.17 1.14 1.75 4.32 1.6 6.0 0.0 250.17 0.84 1.13 0.0 180.0 61.13 0.0 185.0 97.0 69.0 290.72 Tol.0 400.2 47.0 0.39 1.0 118. d1 (mm) Cross-Section d2 (mm) Sizes x Table 9-5: Inside Diameters.0 236.0 8.15 1.55±0.37 0.5 95.63 0.71 0.0 77.03 1.0 60.6 11.76 1.24 0.5 35.41 0.0 345.34 0.8 12.5 32.14 0.32 0.0 307. d1 (mm) Tol.45 0.00 2.5 100.0 375.0 115.08 2.51 0.83 0.13 0.0 272.27 0.57 1.5 90.2 14.5 8.54 1. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.5 13.6 25.0 31.2 42.13 0.2 11.5 10.0 387.13 0.8 26.0 136.69 0.0 92.0 315.95 0.13 7.20 1.0 325.5 43.59 0.0 2.5 4.5 80.62 0.0 46.80 0.20 0.7 50.50 0.0 15.76 0.48 0.26 Cross-Section d2 (mm) 1.46 0.55 0.5 38.65 1.26 1.06 1.09 3.06 2.13 0.13 0.7 40.0 16.3 5.13 x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x Tol.77 0.0 122.0 365.0 170.0 21.38 0.17 0.15 5.08 2.0 106.15 0.24 2.65±0.5 48.13 0.5 53.89 0.0 224.16 0.0 200. Cross Sections and Tolerances for Aerospace Applications — Series A (ISO 3601-1) Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.1 7.13 0.0 335.13 0.85 0.10 5.0 218.32 0.25 0.29 x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 7.09 1.0 73.5 2.5 63.46 1.75 9.66 0.0 265. ± 112.0 145.0 230.0 87.0 51. Cross Sections and Tolerances for Aerospace Applications — Series A (ISO 3601-1) Inside Dia.0 132.13 0.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Inside Diameters.74 0.2 22.13 0.5 37.31 0.0 17.14 0.0 6.36 0.0 280.87 5.52 0.5 34.0 140.29 0.81 0.15 x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x Inside Dia.98 1. Lexington.80±0.18 0.21 0.10 5.35 1.13 7.0 195.0 206.22 0.parkerorings.

13 0.75 4.09 3.72 3.13 7.0 112.93 1.25 2.5 35.0 412.0 75.0 71.5 56.0 236.79 0.63 3.49 2.15 3.0 290.14 0.0 97.56 2.47 0.3 5.14 0.0 250.0 224.0 136.0 0.9 7.08 2.75 1.0 315.54 0.46 x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x Sizes x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x Table 9-6: Inside Diameters.0 630.0 1.10 1.5 8.15 0.0 425.58 0.44 0.0 515.10 5.7 6.5 100.5 90.16 0.75 9.16 0.36 0.93 4.0 272.2 11.0 243.0 258.45 3.45 0.0 2.21 0.0 300.0 73.48 0. Cross Sections and Tolerances for Aerospace Applications — Series G (ISO 3601-1) 9-20 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.0 31.6 6.0 20.10 5.0 145.0 92.87 0.0 125.00±0.0 54.17 0.5 32.81 3.84 0.08 2.8 26.5 0.0 437.0 475.34 4.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Inside Diameters. ± 165.31 0.20 0.00 1.24 0.19 0.0 200.27 Tol. ± 36.91 0.5 33.13 1.0 115.24 2.0 600.71 1.65±0.0 17.4 23.0 140.15 x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x Inside Dia.33 0.0 77.14 0.80±0.5 8.22 0.32 0.28 0.16 0.0 206.00±0.5 95.0 103.42 0.13 0.48 1.23 0.59 1.20 0.13 4.43 0.46 0.32 0.98 2.15 5.5 43.0 132.29 0. d1 (mm) Tol.13 0.17 0.34 1.75 0.0 46.5 10.0 4.0 170.0 15.0 122.1 7.03 1.08 1.09 3.95 0.7 50.0 18.15 0.0 82.62 2.50 0.0 218.0 155.07 3.5 48.3 6.17 0.5 34.67 1.24 1.31 1.0 650.84 2.parkerorings.54 3.0 6.34 Cross-Section d2 (mm) 1.63 1.08 2.0 60.55±0. d1 (mm) Cross-Section d2 (mm) Inside Dia.55±0.63 0.6 11.55 1.13 0.15 0.5 4.55 3.16 0.8 2.83 1.0 160.10 5.21 2.0 387.5 28.0 265.38 0.15 1.0 87.0 150.18 0.16 0.0 30.5 13.39 0.8 12.55 0.14 0.14 2.0 67.2 42.81 0.0 58.0 400.0 21.5 85.19 0.99 3.44 1.13 7.37 2.25 0.0 128.88 1.8 3.5 63.0 51.0 118.83 0.19 0.7 45.7 40.20 1.52 0.30 3.0 335.87 5.15 0.16 0.0 9.30±0.02 2.08 2.56 0.65±0. Cross Sections and Tolerances for Aerospace Applications — Series G (ISO3601-1) Inside Dia.0 280.0 500.0 345.51 1.30±0.0 615.5 53.43 2.0 5.0 69.80±0. d1 (mm) Cross-Section d2 (mm) .65±0.com 7.09 3.0 8.0 180.0 545.61 0. ± 1.6 25.30 2.22 4.37 3.76 2.0 530. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.68 2.40 0.21 0.97 1.80±0.0 355.0 670.55±0.41 0.0 230.0 487.15 3.15 0.18 0.35 0.15 0.00±0.64 0.51 0.17 0.91 2.0 190.0 19.0 10.5 2.0 212.59 0.13 x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x Tol.26 0.66 0.41 1.79 1.0 41.0 61.0 560.77 0.67 0.2 47. Lexington.19 0.0 185.0 365.73 0.2 14.05 1.22 3.5 37.0 16.0 307.0 195.71 0.2 22.0 65.5 38.05 4.14 0.89 0.0 375.0 580.37 0.14 0.69 0.0 462.30±0.93 0.22 0.24 0.0 109.15 1.15 0.0 25.0 106.0 175.0 450.26 0.5 80.38 1.0 325.17 1.

42 P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P 48 49 50 48A 50A 52 53 55 56 58 60 62 63 65 67 70 71 75 3.5 24.71 ±1.7 39.68 ±1.45 ±0.5 179.8 15.5 339.7 48.98 ±1.55 ±1.6 70.29 ±0.6 61.5 269.22 ±0.42 ±2.53 ±0.5 ±0.26 ±1.7 45.37 ±0.67 ±2.21 ±0.5 214.57 ±2.7 47.44 ±1.5 184.61 ±0.24 ±0.8 5.com 9-21 .4 ±1.97 ±2.5 154.6 149.4 79.7 28.39 ±0.5 30 1.6 64.55 ±0.2 12 12.5 314.6 111.48 ±0.33 ±0.49 ±0.8 9.47 ±0.5 284.91 ±1.09 5.25 ±0.91 ±0.73 ±0.7 22.12 ±1.73 ±2.4 175 180 185 190 195 ±0.8 14.20 ±0.29 ±0.5 359.01 ±1.7 29.30 ±1.5 26 28 29 29.31 ±0.8 6. Lexington.53 ±0.5 249.5 31 31.5 374.5 224.5 274.6 109.29 ±0.25 ±0.73 ±0.8 9.69 ±0.7 44.7 35.5 169.5 204.5 36 38 39 40 41 42 44 45 46 ±0.6 104.8 17.4 64.19 ±0.6 55.7 49.52 ±0.59 ±0.14 ±0.30 ±2.48 ±1.16 ±0.5 259.7 24.6 144.4 ±0.77 ±0.61 ±0.08 2.13 79.10 47.6 57.6 131.14 ±2.20 ±2.5 279.9 ±0.4 89.84 ±1.4 39.7 34.28 ±0.6 52.4 29.33 ±0.8 8.6 84.6 114.8 20.16 ±0.5 334.4 49.6 ±0.6 62.4 94.84 ±0.4 54.2 29.6 54.2 31.6 149.61 ±1.5 189.45 ±0.5 399.6 66.7 ±0.17 ±0.5 264.20 ±0.87 ±0.5 ±0.5 209.5 194.16 ±1.1 ±0.6 94.18 ±0.45 ±2.24 ±0.30 ±0.8 3.5 384.62 ±1.88 ±1.19 ±1.41 ±0.25 ±0.51 P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P G G G G G G G G G G G G G G 200 205 209 210 215 220 225 230 235 240 245 250 255 260 265 270 275 280 285 290 295 300 315 320 335 340 355 360 375 385 400 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 80 85 90 95 8.7 43.8 4.09 ±1.15 ±0.31 ±0.parkerorings.15 199.5 289.0 11.15 ±0.37 ±0.5 14 15 16 18 20 21 22 22A 22.81 2.38 ±0.19 ±0.81 ±0.5 234.23 ±1.01 ±2.5 254.7 38.65 ±0.33 ±2.04 ±2.45 ±0.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > JIS B2401 Sizes JIS B2401 Thickness W (mm) Inner Diameter d (mm) JIS B2401 Thickness W (mm) Inner Diameter d (mm) JIS B2401 Thickness W (mm) Inner Diameter d (mm) P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 10A 11 11.6 129.19 ±0.5 164.57 ±0.65 Sizes ±1.75 ±1.17 ±2.5 3.82 ±0.15 174.5 294.4 69.05 ±1.8 10.26 ±0.3 13.4 50.57 ±0.6 69.56 ±0.5 219.37 ±0.2 35.34 ±0.7 40.24 ±0.8 12.23 ±0.5 229.7 41.8 7.34 ±0.58 ±1.45 ±0.4 34.14 ±0.85 ±0.81 ±1.78 ±1.44 ±0.5 32 34 35 35.7 27.8 21.17 ±0.6 51.7 25.6 119.34 ±0.41 ±0.5 159.92 ±0.8 21.6 89.4 24 25 25.69 ±0.8 11.8 19.49 ±0.5 239.10 ±2. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.5 354.7 31.6 99.5 299.77 ±0.24 ±0.5 208.94 ±1.7 80 85 90 95 100 102 105 110 112 115 120 125 130 132 135 140 145 150 150A 155 160 165 170 8.17 ±0.4 ±0.6 134.2 25.6 59.41 ±0.33 ±1.62 ±0.19 ±1.45 ±0.29 ±0.54 ±2.6 49.6 124.4 44.06 ±1.6 74.1 23.10 30.37 ±1.07 ±2.37 ±0.18 ±0.7 37.10 Table 9-7: JIS B2401 Sizes Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.4 84.5 244.7 33.40 ±1.5 319.94 ±0.6 139.6 101.50 ±0.7 3.

55 ±1.51 G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G 200 205 210 215 220 225 230 235 240 245 250 255 260 265 270 275 280 285 290 295 199.4 139.3 284.19 ±1.3 339.84 ±1.14 ±2.3 264.63 ±2.3 329.3 354.3 164.4 144.3 169.05 ±1.13 5.3 214.3 254.60 ±2.70 Sizes G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G 5.07 ±2.3 269.51 ±2.58 ±1.33 ±1.3 ±2.3 334.77 ±1.57 ±2.24 ±2.42 ±2.3 ±2. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.3 154.48 ±2.3 324.3 319.12 ±1.20 ±2.4 129.parkerorings.79 399.76 394.3 349.81 ±1.17 G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G 300 305 310 315 320 325 330 335 340 345 350 355 360 365 370 375 380 385 299.3 294.3 359.64 ±1.40 ±1.94 ±1.04 ±2.33 ±2.3 274.3 304.3 184.85 ±0.7 ±0.37 ±1.4 109.13 G 390 G 395 G 400 384.3 289.36 ±2.73 389.13 5.3 309.4 114.1 ±0.3 249.08 ±1.3 159.4 104.3 ±2.3 314.3 364.16 ±1.94 ±0.54 ±2.4 124.7 ±0.91 ±1.3 369.73 ±1.88 ±1.3 219.3 209.4 149.3 244.3 ±2.3 174.3 ±2.30 ±1.3 379.98 ±1.27 ±2.com .3 ±1.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook JIS B2401 Sizes (Continued) JIS B2401 Thickness W (mm) Inner Diameter d (mm) JIS B2401 Thickness W (mm) Inner Diameter d (mm) JIS B2401 Thickness W (mm) Inner Diameter d (mm) G G G G G 100 105 110 115 120 3.4 119.26 ±1.10 125 130 135 140 145 150 155 160 165 170 175 180 185 190 195 99.3 234.91 ±0.3 344.4 134.3 ±0.3 204.3 374.44 ±1.45 ±2.67 ±2.3 259.3 279.3 194.23 ±1.82 Table 9-7: JIS B2401 Sizes 9-22 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.71 ±1.7 ±0.30 ±2.3 179.10 ±2.97 ±2.3 239.47 ±1.61 ±1.3 224.87 ±0.39 ±2.3 229.68 ±1.3 189. Lexington.01 ±1.01 ±2.

173* R.parkerorings.113 R.139 R.116 R.127 R.135 R.137 R.129 R.S. -135 -136 -137 -138 -139 -140 -141 -142 -143 -144 -145 -146 -147 -148 -149 -210 -211 -212 -213 -214 -215 -216 -217 -218 -219 -220 -221 -222 -223 -224 -225 -226 -227 -228 -229 -230 -231 -232 -233 -234 -235 -236 -237 -238 -239 -240 -241 -242 -243 -244 UK Code No.167* R. 2-004 2-005 2-006 2-007 2-008 2-009 2-010 2-011 2-012 2-013 2-014 2-015 2-016 2-017 2-018 2-019 2-020 2-021 2-022 2-023 2-024 2-025 2-026 2-027 2-028 2-110 2-111 2-112 2-113 2-114 2-115 2-116 2-117 2-118 2-119 2-120 2-121 2-122 2-123 2-124 2-125 2-126 2-127 2-128 2-129 2-130 2-131 2-132 2-133 2-134 MIL-P 5516 Class B Size No.130* R. R.122 R.S.164* R.136 R.120 R. AN-15 AN-16 AN-17 AN-18 AN-19 AN-20 AN-21 AN-22 AN-23 AN-24 AN-25 AN-26 AN-27 - Sizes Table 9-8: Unusual Size Cross Reference to European O-Ring Codes and Sizes Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. -4 -5 -6 -7 -8 -9 -10 -11 -12 -13 -14 -15 -16 -17 -18 -19 -20 -21 -22 -23 -24 -25 -26 -27 -28 -110 -111 -112 -113 -114 -115 -116 -117 -118 -119 -120 -121 -122 -123 -124 -125 -126 -127 -128 -129 -130 -131 -132 -133 -134 UK Code No. 1806 No.103 R. R.131 R.107 R.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Unusual Size Cross Reference to European O-Ring Codes and Sizes Parker Size No.161* R.125 R.110 R.140 R.126 R.com 9-23 .101 R.152* R. 2-135 2-136 2-137 2-138 2-139 2-140 2-141 2-142 2-143 2-144 2-145 2-146 2-147 2-148 2-149 2-210 2-211 2-212 2-213 2-214 2-215 2-216 2-217 2-218 2-219 2-220 2-221 2-222 2-223 2-224 2-225 2-226 2-227 2-228 2-229 2-230 2-231 2-232 2-233 2-234 2-235 2-236 2-237 2-238 2-239 2-240 2-241 2-242 2-243 2-244 MIL-P 5516 Class B Size No.142 R.133 R.176* - French Code No.118 R.111 R. AN-1 AN-2 AN-3 AN-4 AN-5 AN-6 AN-7 AN-8 AN-9 AN-10 AN-11 AN-12 AN-13 AN-14 - Parker Size No. 1806 No. AN6227B-1 AN6227B-2 AN6227B-3 AN6227B-4 AN6227B-5 AN6227B-6 AN6227B-7 AN6227B-8 AN6227B-9 AN6227B-10 AN6227B-11 AN6227B-12 AN6227B-13 AN6227B-14 - B.146* R.149* R.155* R.138 R.105 R. AN6227B-15 AN6227B-16 AN6227B-17 AN6227B-18 AN6227B-19 AN6227B-20 AN6227B-21 AN6227B-22 AN6227B-23 AN6227B-24 AN6227B-25 AN6227B-26 AN6227B-27 AN6230B-1 AN6230B-2 AN6230B-3 AN6230B-4 AN6230B-5 AN6230B-6 AN6230B-7 AN6230B-8 AN6230B-9 AN6230B-10 AN6230B-11 AN6230B-12 AN6230B-13 AN6230B-14 AN6230B-15 AN6230B-16 AN6230B-17 AN6230B-18 AN6230B-19 AN6230B-20 AN6230B-21 AN6230B-22 B.124 R.141 R.132* - French Code No.170* R. Lexington. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.102 R.158* R.104 R.

186 R.254 R.234 R.179 R.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Unusual Size Cross Reference to European O-Ring Codes and Sizes (Continued) Parker Size No.250 R.180 R.205 R.227 R.163 R.S.198 R.148 R. 1806 No. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.S.154 R.184 R.262 French Code No.172 R.196 R.209 R.com . 2-245 2-246 2-247 2-248 2-249 2-250 2-251 2-252 2-253 2-254 2-255 2-256 2-257 2-258 2-259 2-260 2-261 2-262 2-263 2-264 2-265 2-266 2-267 2-268 2-269 2-270 2-271 2-272 2-273 2-274 2-325 2-326 2-327 2-328 2-329 2-330 2-331 2-332 2-333 2-334 2-335 2-336 2-337 2-338 2-339 MIL-P 5516 Class B Size No. AN6227B-43 AN6227B-44 AN6227B-45 AN6227B-46 AN6227B-47 AN6227B-48 AN6227B-49 AN6227B-50 AN6227B-51 AN6227B-52 AN6227B-88 AN6227B-53 AN6227B-54 AN6227B-55 AN6227B-56 AN6227B-57 AN6227B-58 AN6227B-59 AN6227B-60 AN6227B-61 AN6227B-62 AN6227B-63 AN6227B-64 AN6227B-65 AN6227B-66 AN6227B-67 AN6227B-68 AN6227B-69 AN6227B-70 AN6227B-71 AN6227B-72 AN6227B-73 AN6227B-74 AN6227B-75 AN6227B-76 AN6227B-77 AN6227B-78 AN6227B-79 AN6227B-80 AN6227B-81 AN6227B-82 AN6227B-83 AN6227B-84 AN6227B-85 AN6227B-86 B.232 R.195 R.244 R. AN6230B-23 AN6230B-24 AN6230B-25 AN6230B-26 AN6230B-27 AN6230B-28 AN6230B-29 AN6230B-30 AN6230B-31 AN6230B-32 AN6230B-33 AN6230B-34 AN6230B-35 AN6230B-36 AN6230B-37 AN6230B-38 AN6230B-39 AN6230B-40 AN6230B-41 AN6230B-42 AN6230B-43 AN6230B-44 AN6230B-45 AN6230B-46 AN6230B-47 AN6230B-48 AN6230B-49 AN6230B-50 AN6230B-51 AN6230B-52 AN6227B-28 AN6227B-29 AN6227B-30 AN6227B-31 AN6227B-32 AN6227B-33 AN6227B-34 AN6227B-35 AN6227B-36 AN6227B-37 AN6227B-38 AN6227B-39 AN6227B-40 AN6227B-41 AN6227B-42 B.222 R.261 R.169 R.191 R.214 R.240 R.200 R. R.202 R.157 R.182 French Code No.160 R.236 R.175 R.143 R. 1806 No.218 R.248 R. Lexington.246 R. -245 -246 -247 -248 -249 -250 -251 -252 -253 -254 -255 -256 -257 -258 -259 -260 -261 -262 -263 -264 -265 -266 -267 -268 -269 -270 -271 -272 -273 -274 -325 -326 -327 -328 -329 -330 -331 -332 -333 -334 -335 -336 -337 -338 -339 UK Code No.260 R.151 R.224 R.188 R. -340 -341 -342 -343 -344 -345 -346 -347 -348 -349 -425 -426 -427 -428 -429 -430 -431 -432 -433 -434 -435 -436 -437 -438 -439 -440 -441 -442 -443 -444 -445 -446 -447 -248 -249 -450 -451 -452 -453 -454 -455 -456 -457 -458 -459 UK Code No.192 R.238 R.216 R. 2-340 2-341 2-342 2-343 2-344 2-345 2-346 2-347 2-348 2-349 2-425 2-426 2-427 2-428 2-429 2-430 2-431 2-432 2-433 2-434 2-435 2-436 2-437 2-438 2-439 2-440 2-441 2-442 2-443 2-444 2-445 2-446 2-447 2-248 2-249 2-450 2-451 2-452 2-453 2-454 2-455 2-456 2-457 2-458 2-459 MIL-P 5516 Class B Size No.242 R.256 R. R-28 R-29 R-30 R-31 R-32 R-33 R-34 R-35 R-36 R-37 R-38 R-39 R-40 R-41 R-42 Parker Size No.252 R. R-43 R-44 R-45 R-46 R-47 R-48 R-49 R-50 R-51 R-52 R-53 R-54 R-55 R-56 R-57 R-58 R-59 R-60 R-61 R-62 R-63 R-64 R-65 R-66 R-67 R-68 R-69 R-70 R-71 R-72 R-73 R-74 R-75 R-76 R-77 R-78 R-79 R-80 R-81 R-82 R-83 R-84 R-85 R-86 R-87 Sizes Table 9-8: Unusual Size Cross Reference to European O-Ring Codes and Sizes 9-24 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.183 R.parkerorings.230 R.194 R.187 R.220 R.212 R.258 R.259 R.166 R. R.190 R.257 R.207 R.145 R.

60 38. ± mm 0. Lexington. ± mm 0.18 0.46 W mm 1.90 2.20 2.5 M16x1. Contact the division for availability.162 R.30 15.60 56.128 R.115 R. 5-064 5-434 5-445 5-474 5-578 5-579 5-580 5-581 5-582 5-583 5-584 5-585 5-586 5-587 5-588 5-589 5-590 5-591 5-592 5-593 5-594 5-595 5-596 5-597 5-598 5-599 5-600 5-601 5-602 5-603 5-604 5-605 5-606 UK Code No.108 R.60 29.30 11.08 0.13 0.90 2.165* R.10 9.233* R.10 8.90 Tol.90 2.5 M22x1.168 R.221* Parker Size No.90 2.10 0.60 Tol.153 R.36 0.174 R.199* R.08 0.30 13.219* R.15 0.20 2.112 R.60 1.08 0. Design Table 9-9: O-Rings for Metric Tube Fittings (ISO 6149) Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.5 M27x2 M33x2 M42x2 M48x2 M60x2 O-Ring Name M8 ISO O-Ring M10 ISO O-Ring M12 ISO O-Ring M14 ISO O-Ring M16 ISO O-Ring M18 ISO O-Ring M22 ISO O-Ring M27 ISO O-Ring M33 ISO O-Ring M42 ISO O-Ring M48 ISO O-Ring M60 ISO O-Ring Parker Part No 0024-0063 0031-9063 0036-6087 0044-5087 0052-4087 0060-2087 0076-0087 0092-9114 0116-5114 0152-0114 0175-6114 0222-8114 ID mm 6.30 0. R.23 0.106* R.109* R.117 R.10 0. 5-052 5-612 2-110 5-614 5-613 5-615 5-616 5-243 5-617 5-256 2-117 5-618 5-321 5-332 5-035 5-701 5-037 5-702 5-039 5-703 5-361 5-704 5-705 2-350 2-351 2-352 2-353 2-354 2-355 2-356 2-357 2-358 2-359 2-360 UK Code No.10 *Parker O-Ring Division is tooled in these sizes for Nitrile and Fluorocarbon rubber only.171* R.com 9-25 .123* R.121 R.5 M18x1.10 0. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.20 2.253* R-1 R-2 R-3 R-4 R-5 R-5A R-6 R-6A R-7 R-8 R-9 R-10 R-11 R-12 R-13 R-14 R-15 R-16 R-17 R-18 R-19 R-20 R-21 R-22 R-23 R-24 R-25 R-26 R-27 Sizes Table 9-8: Unusual Size Cross Reference to European O-Ring Codes and Sizes O-Rings for Metric Tube Fittings (ISO 6149) (Similar to SAE J2244) Port Thread M8x1 M10x1 M12x1.147 R.241* R.144 R.13 0.226* R.150* R.20 2.5 M14x1.08 0.20 0.08 0.177 R.203* R.13 0.208* R.156* R.13 0.08 0.114 R.20 2.10 0.210* R.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Unusual Size Cross Reference to European O-Ring Codes and Sizes (Continued) Parker Size No.119* R.60 2.213* R.134* R.201* R.30 23.30 19.217* R.215* R.206* R. R.08 0.41 0.parkerorings.60 44.

parkerorings.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Sizes 9-26 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. Lexington. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.com .

. . . . . . . . . . .1. .parkerorings. . .2 Extrusion and Nibbling . .1.6 Sharp Edges . . . . . . . . 10. .1. . . .2. . . . . . . . 10. . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-9 10. . . . . 10.2 Molded Elastomeric O-Ring Quality Pass/Fail Limits . . . . . . . . .1.4 Abbreviations . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . .1. 10-16 Appendix 10. . .1 Chamfers . 10-2 10-2 10-2 10-3 10-3 10-4 10-4 10-5 10-5 10-5 10-5 10-5 10-6 10-6 10-6 10-6 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lexington. .1. . . . 10-16 10. . .1. . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . .1.1. 10-7 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Explosive Decompression . . . . .1. 10. . . . . . . . 10-6 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. .2. . . . . . . . . . . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. . 10. . . . . . . . . . . 10. .1. . .5 Rolling . . .1 O-Ring Failure Modes . . . .1. 10. .1. . . . . . . . . .3 Failure Mode and Effects Analysis for Customers . .4 Stretching for Assembly .1. .1. . . .1. . . .1.2. . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Why an O-Ring Fails Prematurely . . . . .3 Cleanliness and Cleaning Materials . . . . 10.< Back Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Section X – Appendix 10. . 10. . . . .1.2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Other Causes of O-Ring Failure . . . . . .6 Installation Damage . . .2 Assembly Hints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .com 10-1 . .5 Standard Shrinkage . .1. . . . .2 Traversing of Cross Drilled Ports . .1. . .1 Procedure for O-Rings Molded of Compounds Having Non-Standard Shrinkage Rates .5 Abrasion . . . . 10. . . . . . . . .2. . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . .1.3 Glossary of Seal and Rubber Terms. 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . .2. . . . . . . .1 Compression Set. .3 Spiral Failure . . 10-15 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

10. 5. Table 10-1: Compression Set Failure Analysis 10-2 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. for an in-depth discussion of compression set and Section IV. The following brief summary of O-ring failure patterns is intended to give the designer/engineer a brief overview of the more common types of failure and a listing of recommended corrective actions. (See Section II.I.com . Excessive temperature developed causing the O-ring to harden and lose its elastic properties.parkerorings. and continued education and training of assembly personnel.) There are a number of factors that can contribute to compression set failure of an O-ring seal.sae.B. Parker suggests the engineer obtain a copy of Publication AIR1707. Prevention/Correction Suggested solutions to the causes of compression set are: 1. See Table 10-1 for a failure analysis and corrective action discussion.1. For a more complete listing of O-ring failure modes. 3. 7. 3. 5. Static O-Ring Sealing. we intend to cover only the types encountered most frequently. An effective O-ring seal requires a continuous “seal line” between the sealed surfaces. Patterns of O-Ring Failure. or frictional heat build-up.1 Compression Set Probably the most common cause of O-ring failure is compression set. Selection of O-ring material with inherently poor compression set properties. available from: SAE Inc.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Appendix 10. PA 15095 www. While there are a number of different types and causes of seal failure. Basic O-Ring Elastomers. 2. for information on correct gland design. Figure 10-1 provides an illustration of characteristic compression set.) 4. It is important to maximize sealing life and reliability by reducing the probability of seal failure at the onset by the use of good design practices. contains extensive material and some excellent photographs and will be most helpful for identifying the less common modes of O-ring failure not covered in this guide. Volume swell of the O-ring due to system fluid. Lexington.1 Why an O-Ring Fails Prematurely The premature failure of an O-ring in service can usually be attributed to a combination of causes and not merely a single failure mode.1.1. 10. the flat sides of which were the original seal interface under compression before failure. 6. Select O-ring material compatible with intended service conditions. Compression Set is caused by one or more of the following conditions: 1. Appendix Figure 10-1: Characteristic compression set — high deformation -seen as flattening on all contact surfaces. Compression Set Failure Analysis In general. external environmental factors. 2. For a complete discussion of this exclusive Parker service. Excessive squeeze due to over tightening of adjustable glands. number will be of great assistance in this area. (High temperatures may be caused by system fluids. The establishment of this “seal line” is a function of gland design and seal crosssection which determines the correct amount of squeeze (compression) on the O-ring to maintain seal integrity without excessive deformation of the seal element. Incomplete curing (vulcanization) of O-ring material during production.1. Introduction of fluid incompatible with O-ring material. O-ring seals are susceptible to failure. O-Ring Failure Modes Like any device subject to judgment in design or to human error during installation. pre-production testing. look later in this section. Patterns of O-Ring Failure. (Requesting the Parker C.org AIR1707. Check frictional heat build-up at seal interface and reduce if excessive. proper compound selection. Improper gland design. Inspect incoming O-ring shipments for correct physical properties. Use “Low-Set” O-ring material whenever possible. Reduce system operating temperature. 4. They are listed below. 400 Commonwealth Drive Warrendale. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.) Identification of Compression Set Failure A typical example of classic O-ring compression set in simplistic terms: the O-ring ceases to be “O” shaped and is permanently deformed into a flat sided oval.

KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. In an O-ring that has failed due to nibbling.005 inches.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > 10. trapping the O-ring between the mating surfaces. See Table 10-2 for a failure analysis and corrective action discussion. Inadequate or improper lubrication. Provide proper lubrication. Improper installation (O-ring pinched or rolled). the Parker T-Seal. This type of O-ring failure is caused when the seal becomes “hung-up’’ at one point on its diameter (against the cylinder wall) and slides and rolls at the same time. The resultant twisting of the O-ring as the sealed device is cycled finally causes the seal to develop a series of deep spiral cuts (usually at a 45° angle) on the surface of the seal. Table 10-3 provides a discussion of spiral failure analysis. 5. 3. Decrease clearance by reducing machining tolerances. in some long stroke piston or rod applications. O-ring material too soft. Increase in clearance gaps due to excessive system pressure. softening. spiral failure is generally caused by an O-ring both sliding and rolling at the same time. with its built-in back-up rings. (See Section VI.1. Stroke speed (usually too slow).1. or with spiral cuts in surface Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. 10. Excessive clearances. Replace current O-ring with a harder O-ring. Use alternative seal shape.1. (For more complete discussion on spiral failure. Appendix Figure 10-2: Extruded O-Ring Extrusion and Nibbling Failure Analysis In general. shrinking. Increase rigidity of metal components. Spiral Failure Failure Analysis As stated above. 7. Prevention/Correction Suggested solutions to the causes of spiral failure are as follows: 1. Table 10-2: Extrusion and Nibbling Failure Analysis Figure 10-3: Twisted O-ring with spiral marking. Lexington. extrusion and nibbling are caused by one or more of the following conditions: 1. Static O-Ring Sealing). 3. 5. 8. Piston Rod). Irregular clearance gaps caused by eccentricity. it may have the appearance that many small pieces have been removed from the low pressure side. Consider use of alternate seal shapes. Uneven surface finishes. 5. 2. the Parker T-seal is specifically designed to prevent spiral failure and its use will allow for increased tolerances because of built-in anti-extrusion back-up rings. Improper size (too large) O-ring installed causing excessive filling of groove. 7.) of O-ring material by system fluid. Improve surface finish of sealed assembly at dynamic interface (Cylinder Bore. Identification of Spiral Failure You will see the typical cuts that gave this type of O-ring failure its name. 6. 2. Eccentric components. 2. Figure 10-2 shows an example of an extruded and “nibbled” O-ring. for example. ParBack Back-Up Rings. 4. Use back-up devices. more than 50% of the O-ring may be destroyed before catastrophic leakage is observed.com 10-3 . Figure 10-3 illustrates spiral failures. O-ring too soft. This form of failure may also be found from time to time in static applications subject to high pressure pulsing which causes the clearance gap of the mating flanges to open and close. 8. High pressure (in excess of system design or high pressure excursions). cracking. Prevention/Correction Suggested solutions to the causes of Extrusion and Nibbling listed above are: 1. for information on Parker Parbak anti-extrusion devices. In some forms of extrusion. 7. may prevent extrusion and spiral failure. 4. Consider the use of internally lubed O-rings.3 Spiral Failure Spiral failure of an O-ring is often found on long stroke hydraulic piston seals and to a lesser degree on rod seals.) 3. Table 10-3: Spiral Analysis Identification of Extrusion Failure A typical example of O-ring extrusion is when edges of the ring on the low pressure or downstream side of the gland exhibit a “chewed” or “chipped” appearance. 2. see Section IV. 3.parkerorings. Check for out-of-round components (Cylinder Bores especially). 4.1. Degradation (swelling. 6. etc. Conditions which may cause this to occur are: 1. Wide clearance combined with side loads. Improper machining of O-ring gland (sharp edges). Check O-ring material compatibility with system fluid. Break sharp edges of gland to a minimum radius 0. Replace with a harder O-ring. for example. 4. 5. 6. Parker T-Seals are available to fit a number of standard AS568 O-ring grooves and may directly interchange with O-rings in most cases. Insure installation of proper size O-rings.2 Extrusion and Nibbling Extrusion and nibbling of the O-ring is a primary cause of seal failure in dynamic applications such as hydraulic rod and piston seals.

O-Ring Applications. 2. Increase decompression time to allow trapped gas to work out of seal material. It might be termed O-ring embolism. In severe cases. (Refer to Section III. 10. Improper finish of the surface in dynamic contact with the O-ring.4 Explosive Decompression As system pressures increase we are seeing this type of O-ring failure with more frequency. Rapid decrease in system pressure causes the trapped gas to expand to match the external pressure and this expansion causes blisters and ruptures on the seal surface. or rotary motion. Use proper surface finish (see surface finish in Dynamic Seals section). Table 10-4 Explosive Decompression Failure Analysis Figure 10-5: Wear is Seen as Flattening of O-ring on One Side 10-4 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive.1. Provide adequate lubrication by use of proper system fluid. 2. 4.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook 10. Consider use of internally lubricated O-rings to reduce friction and wear. Consider changing to an O-ring material with improved abrasion resistance. Table 10-5: Abrasion Failure Analysis Explosive Decompression Failure Analysis Explosive decompression or gas expansion rupture is caused by high pressure gas trapped within the internal structure of the elastomeric seal element. the blisters may recede as the pressure is equalized with little effect on seal integrity. Excessive temperatures. Lexington. If problem persists and pressures are very high. acting as an abrasive. Figure 10-5 shows wear on an O-ring.com . causing small ruptures or embolisms on the O-ring surface. Abrasion Failure Analysis In general. Install filters if necessary. in that after a period of service under high pressure gas. 3.1. oscillating. for more information on this problem. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. 4. This usually is found only in dynamic seals subject either to reciprocating. 3. 5. If the volume of trapped gas is small. Excessive trapped gas may cause total destruction of the seal. 2. 3.1. Choose a seal material with good resistance to explosive decompression. abrasion of O-ring seals is caused by one or more of the following: 1. Contamination of system fluid by abrasive particles.5 Abrasion Another rather common type of O-ring failure is abrasion. Check for contamination of fluid and eliminate source. Improper lubrication provided by system fluid. examination of the internal structure of the O-ring will reveal other splits and fissures. This surface finish may be too rough. Appendix Table 10-4 provides a failure analysis discussion. Identification of Explosive Decompression Failure The seal subjected to explosive decompression will often exhibit small pits or blisters on its surface. the gas trapped within the internal structure of the O-ring expands rapidly.) Prevention/Correction Suggested solutions to explosive decompression are: 1. when the pressure is reduced too rapidly. or too smooth. Figure 10-4: O-Ring Damaged by Explosive Decompression Prevention/Correction Suggested solutions to problems caused by abrasion are: 1. consider use of Parker Metal Seals.parkerorings. Possible causes of O-ring abrasion are listed in Table 10-5. causing inadequate lubrication due to inability of surface to hold lubricant.1. Figure 10-4 illustrates an O-ring damaged by explosive decompression.

Tape all threads over which the O-ring will pass. O-ring twisted/pinched during installation. 5. Weather and ozone degradation 2. Lexington. To avoid this.parkerorings.6 Installation Damage Many O-ring failures can be directly attributed to improper installation. O-Ring Can Be Sheared Internal Chamfer Optimal Solution Figure 10-7: Drilled Port Assembly Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. Check all components for cleanliness before installation. Table 10-6: Installation Damage Failure Analysis 10.2. the O-ring is a precision device requiring care during installation. In spite of its simple appearance. X 15° to 20° Y "Leading Edge Chamfer" X>Y Figure 10-6: Chamfers Prevention/Correction Probably the best way to prevent damage to O-rings during installation is the use of good old-fashioned “Common Sense. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. 10.1. O-ring not properly lubricated before installation. The deformed O-ring returns to its original round cross-section as it enters the port and is sheared as it leaves the drilled area. In practical terms all factors influencing the seal must be considered. Use an O-ring lubricant such as Parker O-Lube or Parker Super O-Lube if its use will not contaminate system.7 Other Causes of O-Ring Failure Damages to O-rings can be caused by compounding of the causes described in paragraphs 10. 5. 2.1.2.” There are some specific solutions which are listed below: 1. 10.1. Break all sharp edges on metal components. 9. connection holes should be repositioned.1. Loss of plasticizer(s) If you encounter an unusual type of O-ring failure or are unable to identify a particular failure mode.2 Traversing of Cross-Drilled Ports An O-ring can be sheared when a spool or rod moves in a bore broken by cross-drilled ports. Heat aging and oxidation 3. Provide a 20° lead-in chamfer. 6. 7.1.1. Inadequate or improper assembly will lead to high servicing costs and subsequent downtime. Insufficient lead-in chamfer. Upon failure of an O-ring check all causes mentioned above.2 Assembly Hints Leak-free seals are achieved only when a proper sealing material is selected in the right size and sufficiently deformed. Figure 10-6 shows the leading edge chamfer and an O-ring before deformation. there are several other possible causes of O-ring failure. Double check O-ring to ensure correct size and material.2. General Carelessness. O-ring dirty upon installation. Although not illustrated here.1 Chamfers To prevent damaging of seals during assembly. 6.1. Some of the more frequent causes of O-ring failure due to careless handling are listed in Table 10-6.1. All edges must be free from burrs and sharp edges bevelled.2. 10. There are sharp corners on mating metal components such as the O-ring gland or threads over which the O-ring must pass during assembly. 8. 3.6. chamfers are necessary on all leading edges. If repositioning is not possible. please feel free to contact the O-Ring Division Applications Engineering Department for assistance. The dimension X should be greater than dimension Y to ensure a trouble-free assembly operation. 7. 4. Optimal solution is the relief of the bore on complete circumference which allows the O-ring to return to a round crosssection before being compressed again. 4.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > 10. 10. See Figure 10-7. Correct deformation depends on observance of machine element tolerances and surface finishes. 3. In most cases these experienced engineers will be able to offer both an identification of the problem and a number of possible solutions.com 10-5 . Undersize O-ring on rod application. Blind grooves in multi-port valves. Oversize O-ring on piston seal application. Be CAREFUL. O-ring gland and/or other surfaces over which O-ring must pass during assembly contaminated with metal particles.1.1 through 10. 2. They are: 1. Installation Damage 15° to 20° Appendix Failure Analysis Damage to an O-ring during installation can occur when: 1. an internal chamfer is recommended.

paragraph 10. etc. Fluid Pressure Shaft Small Area Appendix Large Area Action of Fluid Pressure to Prevent Rolling of O-ring O-Ring Delta-Ring Square-Ring X-Ring All are subject to torsional or spiral failure.2. Cleaning material must also be a medium which is compatible with the elastomer. 10. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.3 Failure Mode and Effects Analysis for Customers Parker Seal has a wide network of people who are trained to analyze your requirements and assist in suggesting intelligent solutions to specific problems during all stages…design…prototype…testing…qualification…specification writing…and purchasing. Stamp Location Aid Stamp Fitting Sleeve Location Aid Fitting Back-Stop Use of a Stamp and a Location Aid Fitting Back-Stop Figure 10-10: Use of a Stamp and a Location Aid 10-6 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. and even during qualification of a component or entire assembly. With small inner diameters the percentage can be significantly greater eventually becoming critical.4 Stretching for Assembly O-rings or back-up rings can be stretched during assembly by 50% of their inner diameters. Lexington. threads.5 Rolling O-rings of large inner diameters and small cross-sections tend to roll during assembly. submission of working samples for test and evaluation. slits.1. Also grease used to ease assembly must be compatible. They can help you in many ways — preparation of preliminary sketches.2. glands.1. 10. 10. bores. See Figures 10-9 and 10-10.2.parkerorings.3 Cleanliness and Cleaning Materials Lack of cleanliness of O-ring glands leads to leakage. All these services can be supplied by a trained Parker Territory Sales Manager or Parker Distributor. It therefore is important to ensure that the stretch remains less than elongation at break given in compound data sheets.1.6 Sharp Edges O-rings should not be forced over sharp edges.1. Such sharp edges must be removed or covered. Fitting aids assist assembly and thus avoid sharp edges. To ensure protection from foreign particles of sealing faces during working life it is necessary to use filters or to plan maintenance cycles.com .1. You can count on your Parker Territory Sales Manager and your Parker Distributor to give you good counsel.2.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook 10. If an O-ring is stretched to near its elastic limit it will still return to its original size after a short delay. 10.3) or tend to leak. Ring Cross-Sections for Reciprocating Seals Figure 10-8: Rolling of O-ring Use of a Fitting Aid Figure 10-9: Use of a Fitting Aid Parker Territory Sales Managers serving customers in the field are trained to recognize undesirable or uneconomical proposed applications in favor of those that are logical and cost efficient.2. An O-ring rolled during fitting can be prone to spiral failure (cf.1. splines. See Figure 10-8.

At Parker Seal.210 . Appendix The pictures displayed do not necessarily represent an acceptable or defective product. Our internal and field personnel are ready to help you with all your sealing needs.103 . For depression formed by foreign material removal revert to Mold Deposit. Width is measured at widest direction. etc.002 . or depression formed by its removal.180 Foreign Material Any extraneous. and/or OD.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Parker Seal also has the capability to analyze seals and their behavior in proposed applications through Finite Element Analysis (FEA). undispersed pigment.005 .210 .070 .004 .139 . which are dependant upon the actual cross section size of the subject O-ring. The use of other defect tolerance documents may apply if requested by the customer.180 . This information is based upon the industry standard MIL-STD-413C. the requirements of MILSTD-413C are utilized during the processing and inspection of Parker Seals O-Rings.003 .com 10-7 . All this can be done in a matter of days without investment in tooling. contamination. 10. Several of the noted defects may vary in actual physical representation as it relates to size and shape.210 . or physical testing. imbedded matter. customer satisfaction is our goal. They are intended to display examples of how a given defect may appear.103 . of very slight depth with normal surface texture and radial edge.006 Width None . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.2 Molded Elastomeric O-Ring Quality Pass/Fail Limits This section is intended to provide visual references regarding the standard published visual defect tolerances.139 .005 . Cross section . Flash: A film-like material which extends from the parting line on the ID. which has subsequently been cancelled but is still in common use. FEA is a powerful tool which allows the designer and the engineer to design complex parts and then verify with FEA mathematical models whether the design will perform under actual conditions. Parker engineers are available to help you with your sealing questions and all are fully qualified to recommend solutions to your sealing problems and how these problems can be corrected to prevent future failure.003 .005 . If the proposed design shows shortcomings under this modeling analysis.275 Depth None .002 Length .139 . usually curved. Flow Marks: Cross Section .180 .parkerorings. and your Authorized Parker Seal Distributor is a sealing expert who can assure you fast service and the kind of reliable seals you need.007 . Incomplete flow and knit of the material. and agreed upon at the time of quote.015 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. O-Ring Defect Description: MIL-STD-413C Description Excess Flash or Parting Line Projection Definition Parting Line Projection: A continuous ridge of material on the parting line at the ID and/or OD.060 . prototype parts. Dirt.002 . Unless requested otherwise. and may be super-imposed on the parting line projection Cause Parting Line Projection: Enlarged corner radii due to mold wear (triangular formation).006 Flow Marks (Flow Lines) A thread-like recess. when you need them.002 .070 . Excessive Flash: Mold plate separation or inadequate trim and deflash Tolerances for: Flash and/or Projection: Cross Section .275 Depth .003 .103 .002 . Lexington.070 .275 Depth .010 .004 . changes can easily be made in the design until acceptable performance is predicted by the model.060 . Foreign Material: No “protruding” foreign material is acceptable on any cross section.

Non-Fills or Voids: Cross Section .210 .Fill or Void A randomly spaced.103 . Off-Register: Relative lateral shift of mold plates.139 .139 .010 .103 .005 Width None .010 . The edges are smoothly flared into the O-ring surface and have similar texture.103 .006 . and usually divided by the parting line.003 . located on the parting line at the ID or OD.004 .210 . irregular in shape. Thermal expansion over a sharp mold edge or by premature cure. Mismatch: Dimensional differences in the mold halves Off-Register and/or Mismatch: Cross Section . saucer-like recess.040 Off-Register and Mismatch Off-Register: Misaligned O-ring halves.003 Width None allowed .210 .275 Maximum Allowed . though smoothly faired into ring surface are irregular and can be present on full circumference on OD and/or ID within the following limits Cross Section . Nicks or Parting Line Indentations: Cross Section . irregularly shaped. Lexington.103 . Mismatch: Cross section of each half are different sizes.004 .070 . Backrind: Edges.070 .070 . Mold cavities not being completely filled with material.139 .015 .103 .006 .003 .006 Backrind A longitudinal recess of wide angle “U-like” or “W-like” cross sections orientated circumferentially and located only at parting lines.005 .139 .004 .005 .006 Width .003 .003 .005 .006 .015 .003 .015 .070 .< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook O-Ring Defect Description: MIL-STD-413C (Continued) Description Mold Deposit (Dirty Mold) Definition Surface indentations. surface indentation having a coarser texture than the normal O-ring surface.275 Depth None .004 .003 .003 . sometimes triangular in shape.parkerorings.275 Depth . KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www.003 .025 .275 Depth .210 .275 Depth None allowed .030 Non.025 .004 .210 .139 . Cause A build-up of hardened deposits adhering to the mold cavity.com .004 . Tolerances for: Mold Deposit (Dirty Mold): Cross section .070 .025 .010 10-8 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. with a rough surface texture.030 Appendix Nicks or Parting Line Indentation A shallow. A deformity in the \mold cavity edge at the parting line. It may have molded edges which may or may not join.020 .005 Width .020 .010 .002 .

waxes. Antiozonant: A substance that retards or prevents the appearance of cracks from the action of ozone when the elastomer is exposed under tension. Aging: To undergo changes in physical properties with age or lapse of time. Bonds may be classified by type as follows: (a) Mechanical Bond — purely physical attachment accomplished by such means as “through” holes interlocking fingers. scrap ing or erosion. Not to be confused with dust from external sources. Break: A separation or discontinuity in any part of an article. Back-Up Ring: (Anti-extrusion device) a ring of relatively hard and tough material placed in the gland between the O-ring and groove side walls. Banbury Mixer: A specific type of internal mixer used to blend fillers and other ingredients with an elastomer. valves. Absorption: The physical mechanism by which one substance attracts and takes up another substance (liquid. fresh aniline and an oil will completely dissolve in one another.3 Glossary of Seal and Rubber Terms —A— Abrasion: The wearing away of a surface in service by mechanical action such as rubbing. Aging. Alpha (α) Particles: Positively charged particles composed of two protons and neutrons (often referred to simply as helium atom nuclei) and characterized by limited penetration.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > 10. or continuity of operation. Oxygen Bomb: A means of accelerating the change in physical properties of rubber compounds by exposing them to the action of oxygen at an elevated temperature and pressure. Bloom: A dusty or milky looking deposit that sometimes appears on the surface of an O-ring after molding and storage. or vapor) to its SURFACE and through molecular forces causes the incident substance to adhere thereon. gauges. (c) “Vulcanized” Bond — adhesion of an elastomer to a previously primed surface using heat and pressure thus vulcanizing the elastomer at the same time. caused by migration of a liquid or solid to the surface. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. Air Checks: Surface markings or depressions due to trapping air between the material being cured and the mold or press surface. Accelerated Service Test: A service or bench test in which some service condition. or vapor) into its INTERIOR. Blemish: A mark. Adhesion: Tendency of rubber to bond or cling to a contact surface. Appendix 10-9 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. Aniline Point: The lowest temperature at which equal volumes of pure. Bake-Out: A process whereby a vacuum system is heated for a given time at some predetermined temperature to degas all the components.e. Note: Ambient temperature is not necessarily the same as atmospheric temperature. Accelerator: A substance which hastens the vulcanization of an elastomer causing it to take place in a shorter time or at a lower temperature. Used for accelerated aging test. i. either statically or dynamically. Bench Test: A modified service test in which the service conditions are approximated. seals. Blisters: A raised spot in the surface or a separation between layers usually forming a void or air-filled space in the vulcanized article. Acid Resistant: Withstands the action of acids. An excessive break-out value is taken as an indication of the development of adhesion. Lexington. to prevent extrusion of the O-ring. Beta (β) Particles: Negatively charged particles or electrons. Air Bomb: Similar to an oxygen bomb but used with air. Adsorption: The physical mechanism by which one substance attracts another substance (either solid. characterized by limited penetration. Abrasion Resistance: The ability of a rubber compound to resist mechanical wear. envelope design. gas. (b) “Cold” Bond — adhesion of previously vulcanized elastomer to another member through use of suitable contact cements. deformity. liquid. etc. Antioxidant: An organic substance which inhibits or retards oxidation. Expressed in same terms as friction. Air Curing: The vulcanization of a rubber product in air as distinguished from vulcanizing in a press or steam vulcanizer.com . Atmospheric Cracking: Cracks produced in surface of rubber articles by exposure to atmospheric conditions. or temperature. Accelerated Life Test: Any set of test conditions designed to reproduce in a short time the deteriorating effect obtained under normal service conditions. to air containing ozone. gas. but the equipment is conventional laboratory equipment and not necessarily identical with that in which the product will be employed. fittings. Antirad: A material which inhibits radiation damage. Bond: The term commonly used to denote the attachment of a given elastomer to some other member. Break-Out: Force to initiate sliding. Bleeding: Migration to the surface of plasticizers. or similar materials to form a film or beads. Adhere: To cling or stick together. Ambient Temperature: The surrounding temperature relative to a given point of application. is exaggerated in order to obtain a result in shorter time. riveting etc. or injury that impairs the appearance.parkerorings. such as speed. —B— Backrind: Distortion at the parting line usually in the form of a ragged indentation.

Coefficient of Thermal Expansion: Average expansion per degree over a stated temperature range expressed as a fraction of initial dimension. This relaxation eventually results in permanent deformation or “set. or shaft is driven by or against the system fluid.e. i. Cracking: A sharp break or fissure in the surface. Explosive Decompression: Rupturing of the substructure caused by the rapid removal of pressure from an elastomer containing dissolved gases. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. Corrosion (Packing): Corrosion of rigid member (usually metal) where it contacts packing. Elastomer: Any synthetic or natural material with resilience or memory sufficient to return to its original shape after major or minor distortion.com . finely divided material added to the elastomer to aid in processing and improve physical properties. Butt Joint: Joining two ends of a seal whereby the junction is perpendicular to the mold parting line. ERG: Unit of energy (C. liquids diffuse more readily than solids. gases. Cure Date: Date when O-ring was molded. Durometer: (a) An instrument for measuring the hardness of rubber. plunger.602 E -12 ergs. Dynamic Seal: A seal required to prevent leakage past parts which are in relative motion. Dynamic: An application in which the seal is subject to movement.S. or combinations thereof) due to the intermingling motion of their individual molecules. Also known as SBR and GRS. of portion of seal into clearance between mating metal parts. Commercially Smooth: Degree of smoothness of the surface of an article that is acceptable for use. Cold Resistant: Able to withstand the effects of cold or low temperatures without loss of serviceability. Copolymer: A polymer consisting of two different monomers chemically combined. to promote corrosion of the rigid member by the trapped fluid. 10-10 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. Measures the resistance to the penetration of an indentor point into the surface of rubber. Cure: See Vulcanization. Compression Modulus: The ratio of the compressive stress to the resulting compressive strain (the latter expressed as a fraction of the original height or thickness in the direction of the force). ram. The result is a blistering or swelling of the material. Appendix Butyl: A copolymer of isobutylene with small amounts of isoprene. The actual corroding agent is fluid medium trapped in the interface. Conductive Rubber: A rubber capable of conducting electricity. Buna-S: A general term for the copolymers of butadiene and styrene. —C— Calender: A machine used to form sheets of rubber between steel rollers..G. Compression modulus may be either static or dynamic. Diffusion: The mixing of two or more substances (solids.) equal to one dyne centimeter or approximately equal to the work done by a force of 1 gram causing a movement of 1 centimeter. similarly. under pressure. Elongation: Generally means “ultimate elongation” or percent increase in original length of a specimen when it breaks. Buna-N: Same as nitrile rubber. i. —E— Elasticity: The property of an article which tends to return it to its original shape after deformation. Gases diffuse more readily than liquids.” Cross-Section: A seal as viewed if cut at right angles to the mold parting line showing internal structure. —F— Face Seal: A seal between two flat surfaces. Cylinder: Chamber in which piston. Most generally applied to rubber products used to conduct static electricity. Creep: The progressive relaxation of a given rubber material while it is under stress. Extrusion: Distortion or flow.e. Cold Flexibility: Flexibility following exposure to a predetermined low temperature for a predetermined time. Lexington. 2Q94 means second quarter 1994. liquids. Generally due to excessive strain. Some elastomeric compounds are quite resistant to explosive decompression. Electron Volt: Unit of energy in atom calculations equal to 1. Dynamic Packing: A packing employed in a joint whose members are in relative motion. Compound: A term applied to a mixture of polymers and other ingredients.parkerorings. —D— Degassing: The intentional but controlled OUTGAS of a rubber substance or other material. May be linear or volumetric. Compression Set: The amount by which a rubber specimen fails to return to original shape after release of compressive load. (b) Numerical scale of rubber hardness. to produce a usable rubber material. Filler: Chemically inert.. Evaporation: The direct conversion from liquid state to vapor state of a given fluid.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Brittleness: Tendency to crack when deformed. Curing Temperature: The temperature at which the rubber product is vulcanized. Corrosive (Packing): A property of packing whereby it is assumed often incorrectly. abrasion resistance and strength — giving it varying degrees of hardness. or moving parts contact the seal. Cold Flow: Continued deformation under stress. rod.

polished surface. Hypalon: DuPont trade name for chlorosulphonated polyethylene. Causes little swell of rubber. such as a large lump of material dropping on a conveyor belt. Memory: Tendency of a material to return to original shape after deformation. It is very penetrating. Flex Resistance: The relative ability of a rubber article to withstand dynamic bending stresses. removed by trimming. bent or bowed at low temperatures without cracking. this is a measure of absolute pressure. Mold Cavity: Hollow space or cavity in the mold which is used to impart the desired form to the product being molded. low snap or recovery of a material. (Usually 100% elongation for elastomers). Logy: Sluggish. Friction: Resistance to motion due to the contact of surfaces.parkerorings. being the height of a column of mercury that the air or other gas will support. Hardness Shore A: The rubber durometer hardness as measured on a Shore “A” gauge. Mold Lubricant: A material usually sprayed onto the mold cavity surface prior to the introduction of the uncured rubber.a rubber seal without fabric or metal reinforcement. Low Temperature Flexibility: The ability of a rubber product to be flexed.a material of uniform composition throughout. (b) In seals . Modulus of Elasticity: One of the several measurements of stiffness or resistance to deformation. to facilitate the easy removal of the molded rubber parts.com . Flex Cracking: A surface cracking induced by repeated bending or flexing. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. Standard atmospheric pressure will support a mercury column 760 millimeters high (760 mm Hg. Modulus: Tensile stress at a specified elongation. Fluid: A liquid or a gas. either moving or at rest. Homogeneous: (a) General . —M— mm Hg: Millimeters of mercury. Measured by the relative resistance of the material to an indentor point of any one of a number of standard hardness testing instruments. Hermetic Seal: An airtight seal evidencing no detectable leakage.) Any value less than this represents some degree of vacuum. In vacuum work. —G— Gamma (γ) Radiation: Electromagnetic disturbance (photons) emanating from an atom nucleus. but often incorrectly used to indicate specifically static tension modulus. Normally refers to a static seal. Fuel (Nonaromatic): Fuel which is composed of straight chain hydrocarbons. generally so it is completely covered. Mirror Finish: A bright.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > Flash: Excess rubber left around rubber part after molding due to space between mating mold surfaces. Flow Cracks: Surface imperfections due to improper flow and failure of stock to knit or blend with itself during the molding operation. Flock: Fibrous filler sometimes used in rubber compounding. an elastomer. instantaneous stroke or contact of a moving body with another. Gland: Cavity into which O-ring is installed. Immediate Set: The deformation found by measurement immediately after removal of the load causing the deformation. —L— Leakage Rate: The rate at which a fluid (either gas or liquid) passes a barrier. Includes the groove and mating surface of second part which together confine the O-ring. Linear Expansion: Expansion in any one linear dimension or the average of all linear dimensions. Impact: The single. Friction (Running): Constant friction developed during operation of a dynamic O-ring. but has a shorter wave length (approx. Mold Marks: Indentations or ridges embossed into the skin of the molded product by irregularities in the mold cavity surface. 35 Shore “A” durometer reading is considered soft. Mold Finish: The uninterrupted surface produced by intimate contact of rubber with the surface of the mold at vulcanization. Lexington. Higher numbers indicate harder material. 90 is considered hard. Appendix 10-11 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. Gasket: A device used to retain fluids under pressure or seal out foreign matter. Friction (Breakout): Friction developed during initial or starting motion. —I— Identification: Colored dots or stripes on seals for identification purposes. Mismatch: Unsymmetrical seal caused by dissimilar cavities in mating mold sections. Life Test: A laboratory procedure used to determine the amount and duration of resistance of an article to a specific set of destructive forces or conditions. This type of radiation travels in wave form much like X-rays or light. —H— Hardness: Resistance to a distorting force. Fuel (Aromatic): Fuel which contains benzene or aromatic hydrocarbons. Total Leakage Rate includes the amounts that diffuse or permeate through the material of the barrier as well as the amount that escapes around it. Causes high swell of rubber. 1 A° or 10 E -07 mm). Immersion: Placing an article into a fluid.

Pock Mark: See “Pit or Pock Mark”. Radiation Damage: A measure of the loss in certain physical properties of organic substances such as elastomers. due principally to ionization of the long chain molecule. elastomeric seal material by means of the Mooney Shearing Disk Viscometer. Oxygen Bomb: A chamber capable of holding oxygen at an elevated pressure which can be heated to an elevated temperature. protons. Oxidation: The reaction of oxygen on a compound usual detected by a change in the appearance or feel of the surface. Pit or Pock Mark: A circular depression. improve low temperature properties. This value is usually expressed in ergs per gram. good physical properties and useful temperature range. O-Ring: A torus. Permeability: The rate at which a liquid or gas under pressure passes through a solid material by diffusion and solution. or solids are entrapped within the folds of a given substance during working or solidification. reciprocating.parkerorings. —P— Packing: A flexible device used to retain fluids under pressure or seal out foreign matter. —O— Occlusion: (a) The mechanical process by which vapors. Nominal Dimension: Nearest fractional equivalent to actual decimal dimension. or by a change in physical properties or both. Oil Resistant: Ability of a vulcanized rubber to resist the swelling and deteriorating effects of various type oils. and improve processing. Lexington. air.g. plasticizers. Non-Blooming: The absence of bloom. comprising wave-like emissions as gamma. —N— Nitrile: (Buna-N) The most commonly used elastomer for O-rings because of its resistance to petroleum fluids. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. e. synonymous with elastomer. etc. gases. Optimum Cure: State of vulcanization at which the most desirable combination of properties is attained. etc. Mooney Viscosity: The measurement of the plasticity or viscosity of an uncompounded or compounded. electrons. Post Cure: The second step in the vulcanization process for the more exotic elastomers. Appendix —R— Radiation: An emission of varying energy content from a disturbed atom undergoing internal change. Radiation Dosage: The total amount of radiation energy absorbed by a substance. Mooney Scorch: The measurement of the rate at which a rubber compound will cure or set up by means of the Mooney Viscometer test instrument. comprising streams of particles either neutral or charged. or rotary motion. Oil Swell: The change in volume of a rubber article due to absorption of oil or other or other fluid. (b) Electromagnetic. It is believed that this ionization process (i e. 10-12 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. Outgassing: A vacuum phenomenon wherein a substance spontaneously releases volatile constituents in the form of vapors or gases. Plastometer: An instrument for measuring the plasticity of raw or unvulcanized compounded rubber. Provides stabilization of parts and drives off decomposition products resulting from the vulcanization process. inhibitors.a quantity of gamma or X-ray radiation equal to approximately 83 ergs of absorbed energy per gram of air. it is the rate of gas flow expressed in atmospheric cubic centimeters per second through an elastomeric material one centimeter square and one centimeter thick (atm cc/cm²/cm sec). liquids. (b) The materials so trapped. these constituents may include water vapor. Plasticizer: A substance. electron loss) results in redundant cross-linking and possible scission of the molecule.) Moving (dynamic) — O-ring seal in which there is relative motion between some gland parts and the O-ring — oscillating. added to an elastomer to decrease stiffness. usually a viscous liquid. O-Ring Seal: The combination of a gland and an O-ring providing a fluid-tight closure. and is denoted by the following units: (a) Roentgen . (Some designs may permit momentary or minimum leakage. There are two broad classifications or types: (a) Corpuscular. Permanent Set: The deformation remaining after a specimen has been stressed in tension for a definite period and released for a definite period. unvulcanized.com . Ozone Resistance: Ability to withstand the deteriorating effect of ozone (which generally causes cracking). This effect is cumulative. Non-moving (static) — O-ring seal in which there is no relative motion between any part of the gland and the Oring (distortion from fluid pressure or swell from fluid immersion is excluded). Normally refers to a dynamic seal. usually small. Over Cure: A degree of cure greater than the optimum causing some desirable properties to be degraded. ultraviolet. In rubber terminology. neutrons. Off-Register: Misalignment of mold halves causing out-ofround O-ring cross section.< Back Section Contents Table of Contents Search Next > Parker O-Ring Handbook Mold Register: Accuracy of alignment or fit of mold sections. In rubber compounds. Used for an accelerated aging test. a circle of material with round cross section which effects a seal through squeeze and pressure. Polymer: A material formed by the joining together of many (poly) individual units (mer) of one or more monomers. Porosity: Quality or state of being porous.

—S— Scorching: Premature curing or setting up of raw compound during processing. Specific Gravity: The ratio of the weight of a given substance to the weight of an equal volume of water at a specified temperature. —T — Tear Resistance: Resistance to growth of a cut or nick when tension is applied to the cut specimen Commonly expressed as pounds per inch thickness. Sun Checking: Surface cracks. Size. Sublimation: The direct conversion of a substance from solid state to vapor state without passing through a transitory liquid state.a quantity of ionizing radiation that causes an energy absorption of approximately 83 to 93 ergs per gram of tissue. including tolerance limits. Rubber. Synthetic: Manufactured or man-made elastomers. This is generally an arbitrary value. See Gasket. Appendix 10-13 Parker Hannifin Corporation • O-Ring Division 2360 Palumbo Drive. Temperature Range: Maximum and minimum temperature limits within which a seal compound will function in a given application. Reinforcing Agent: Material dispersed in an elastomer to improve compression.I. KY 40509 Phone: (859) 269-2351 • Fax: (859) 335-5128 www. Lexington.2 Roentgens.com . Tensile Strength: Force in pounds per square inch required to cause the rupture of a specimen of a rubber material. Sizes established in SAE standard AS 568A have been adopted by the military and industry. Runout (Shaft): Same as gyration. Terpolymer: A polymer consisting of three different monomers chemically combined. Seal: Any device used to prevent the passage of a fluid (gas or liquid). Relative Humidity: The ratio of the quantity of water vapor actually present in the atmosphere to the greatest amount possible at the given temperature. Register. b) Difference between finished part dimensions and mold cavity used to make the part.the unit of dosage related to elastomers. Nominal: Approximate size of part in fractional dimensions. Usually the removal of a small portion of the flash or sprue which remains attached to the product. Sprue Marks: Marks left on the surface of a rubber part. It is independent of type of radiation or specimen. Actual: Actual dimensions of the O-ring or other seal. May also indicate the actual size of the groove into which a nominal size seal fits. The RAD is approximately equal to 1. Service: Operating conditions to be met. May be linear or volumetric. upon recondensing. after removal of the sprue or cured compound in the gate through which the compound is injected or transfer molded. Threshold: The maximum tolerance of an elastomer to radiation dosage expressed as a total number of ergs per gram (or rads) beyond which the physical properties are significantly degraded. reforms into the solid state with no intervening liquid phase. Strain: Deflection due to a force. shear or other stress properties. Shaft: Reciprocating or rotating member usually within cylinder. Rubber: Same as elastomer. Squeeze: Cross section diametral compression of O-ring between surface of the groove bottom and surface of other mating metal part in the gland assembly. Stress: Force per unit of original cross section area. Off or Uneven: See Off-register. Shore A Hardness: See Hardness and Durometer. Shrinkage: a) Decreased volume of seal. Sorption: The term used to denote the combination of absorption and adsorption processes in the same substance. usually caused by extraction of soluble constituents by fluids followed by air drying. Static Seal: Part designed to seal between parts having no relative motion. Rubber.< Back Section Contents Parker O-Ring Handbook Table of Contents Search Next > (b) REP (Roentgen equivalent-physical) . (d) RAD . Silicone Rubber: Elastomer that retains good properties through extra wide temperature range. (c) REM (Roentgen equiva