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The Asian Development Bank’s Support for the Transport Sector in Sri Lanka

The Asian Development Bank’s Support for the Transport Sector in Sri Lanka

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This sector assistance program evaluation (SAPE) was undertaken to (i) provide an independent assessment of ADB projects and technical assistance (TA) in the sector approved during the 12-year period 1999–2010, in total 10 projects and 14 advisory TA operations for a total cost of $986.0 million; (ii) identify areas for improving the effectiveness of ADB interventions; and (iii) provide evaluation lessons and recommendations.
This sector assistance program evaluation (SAPE) was undertaken to (i) provide an independent assessment of ADB projects and technical assistance (TA) in the sector approved during the 12-year period 1999–2010, in total 10 projects and 14 advisory TA operations for a total cost of $986.0 million; (ii) identify areas for improving the effectiveness of ADB interventions; and (iii) provide evaluation lessons and recommendations.

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05/27/2014

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7.

ADB’s Operations Evaluation Department, the predecessor of IED, assessed the
performance of transport sector assistance in Sri Lanka in 2007 as part of a country
assistance program evaluation (CAPE) for Sri Lanka.6

The CAPE rated the overall

performance of ADB’s transport sector assistance programs as successful. ADB’s
assistance was rated highly relevant. Loans and TA operations were found to have
responded to critical sector needs and to have addressed physical, institutional, and
policy constraints. The sector assistance program was rated effective and efficient.
Outcomes were rated likely to be sustainable.

8.

The 2007 CAPE nevertheless pointed out several challenges facing the transport
sector: (i) fragmented planning and policy formulation, with responsibilities divided
among several ministries and agencies; (ii) poor intercity and urban mobility; (iii) the
need for innovative financing schemes to enable the construction of intercity
expressways in strategic transport corridors; and (iv) institutional and governance
constraints that impeded efficient delivery of transport infrastructure and services. The
CAPE findings were addressed in the transport sector strategy included in the
2009−2011 country partnership strategy (CPS).7

9.

ADB focused its transport sector strategy for Sri Lanka on the need for greater
connectivity, including more efficient links between rural areas and national roads and
urban areas. Key improvements viewed as needed to strengthen Sri Lanka’s
international competitive position included (i) reducing transport costs; (ii) improving

6

IED. 2007. Country Assistance Program Evaluation: Sri Lanka, Inclusive Development and Conflict
Resolution: Major Challenges in the Future. Manila: ADB.

7

ADB. 2008. Country Partnership Strategy: Sri Lanka, 2009–2011. Manila.

ADB focused its
transport sector
strategy for Sri
Lanka on the
need for greater
connectivity,
including more
efficient links
between rural
areas and
national roads
and urban areas

4 The ADB’s Support for the Transport Sector in Sri Lanka

connectivity; (iii) increasing port capacity; (iv) increasing public–private partnerships
(PPPs); and (v) improving the policy, regulatory, and institutional frameworks. ADB
continues to support capacity development to establish a centralized procurement unit
and enhance institutional capacity for independently preparing feasibility studies and
detailed designs.

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