J UNE 2012

$5.95Canada $6.95
M E M B E R P O R T R A I T
Alar Kivilo, ASC, CSC
W W W . T H E A S C . C O M
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’ve always been captivated
by the power of images and
how they create a visceral,
emotional response in the
viewer. Even though cinema is
more than 100 years old, there
still isn’t a quantifiable
cinematic language that
consistently elicits a desired
response in the audience.
Instead, each movie is a
creative journey of discovery
wherein one finds the light,
compositions, colors,
movements and juxtapositions
of images that best tell the
story at hand. This journey is
always pure magic.
“I started reading
American Cinematographer
as a young cinematographer in
Canada. It not only provided
a window into the world I
aspired to enter, but was also
my unofficial film school.
“I continue to devour AC
in search of clues as to how
my fellow cinematographers
find the right languages for
their films.”
— Alar Kivilo, ASC, CSC
“I
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s a l G e h t h t i w s t r a t S t I
m t
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s o D r o ffo s t o p s n a M g nng i t s e r e t n I
e h T e v i t c n i t s i d e h t g n i d u l c n i
5 r e v o t o h s d n a s r e t h g i F o o F
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. s i u q E
t s o M s ’ d l r o WWo
s l a i c r e m m o c 0 0
o t n e e t s g n i r p S e c u
r e d i e n
The International Journal of Motion Imaging
34 All Together Now
Seamus McGarvey, ASC, BSC spotlights Marvel’s top
superheroes for The Avengers
52 Beauty in Battle
Greig Fraser brings new vision to classic tale with
Snow White and the Huntsman
62 Blood Relatives
Bruno Delbonnel, ASC, AFC exhumes a vampire in
the swingin’ Seventies for Dark Shadows
74 Blast from the Past
Bill Pope, ASC takes on time-traveling aliens for
Men in Black III
DEPARTMENTS
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grab courtesy of Marvel Entertainment and Disney Enterprises.)
8 Editor’s Note
10 Short Takes: The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom
18 Production Slate: Moonrise Kingdom • Hemingway & Gellhorn
84 New Products & Services
100 International Marketplace
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102 Ad Index
104 ASC Membership Roster
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6
The Avengers is the superhero summit Marvel fans have
been waiting for their entire lives. I know this because our
associate editor, Jon Witmer, has been vibrating with
excitement since 2008, when Nick Fury (played by Samuel
L. Jackson) first popped up in a post-credits coda to Iron
Man. Shortly after Jon was revived by paramedics, he
began pleading to cover the production, and he achieved
his dream last August, when he was dispatched to his
hometown of Cleveland, Ohio, to visit the set.
Clearly, Jon was the right man for the assignment,
as he proves with an exuberant account of the shoot (“All
Together Now,” page 34). While we pruned his ambitious
first draft just a tad from its original, Leo Tolstoy length,
what remains is a definitive piece offering plenty of insights from the filmmakers, including
cinematographer Seamus McGarvey, ASC, BSC; director Joss Whedon; visual-effects super-
visor Janek Sirrs; production designer James Chinlund; gaffer Chris Napolitano; key grip John
Janusek; dimmer-board operator Bryan Booth; digital-imaging technician Daniel Hernandez;
and 2nd-unit director of photography Brad Shield.
Fans of the Dark Shadows television series are equally keen to see Tim Burton’s big-
screen blood feast, which adds a wry twist by exhuming 18th-century vampire Barnabas
Collins (Johnny Depp) in the swinging ’70s. Bruno Delbonnel, ASC, AFC ably achieved
Burton’s desire to create a film that “felt like the Seventies movies that I recall from my
youth,” while taking care to create a lighting style that made sense with a vampire lurking
about. “Sunlight was one of my principal constraints,” Delbonnel tells Benjamin B (“Blood
Relatives,” page 62). “There could be no direct sunlight on the main character, so for the
majority of the film he is in a kind of a penumbra.”
A retro vibe also lends mirth to Men in Black III , shot by Bill Pope, ASC. This time
around, Agent J (Will Smith) must travel back to 1969 to warn his partner, Agent K (played
by Josh Brolin in Sixties scenes and Tommy Lee Jones in the present) about an alien who has
also turned back the clock to elude capture. “When people ask me what this movie is like,
I tell them it’s a Hope and Crosby road picture, a comedy in the classic Hawksian sense,”
Pope tells Iain Stasukevich (“Blast from the Past,” page 74).
Greig Fraser is another cinematographer who applied a fresh spin to his project’s
source material. With Snow White and the Huntsman , he and director Rupert Sanders
breathe new life into the titular heroine (Kristen Stewart), who trains for combat before
taking on the evil Queen Ravenna (Charlize Theron). Fraser says the filmmakers were careful
not to let the movie’s spectacle overpower its characters. “We wanted to submerge the
viewer in this lush world of big locations and epic scale,” he explains to Jay Holben (“Beauty
in Battle,” page 52), “but at the same time, we also wanted to be able to respond to small,
intimate moments with our actors.”
Stephen Pizzello
Executive Editor
Editor’s Note
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10 June 2012 American Cinematographer
A Poetic Portrait of Survival
By Iain Stasukevich
The first four minutes of the Oscar-nominated documentary
short The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom were taken by an
amateur videographer in the small seaside town of Minamisanriku,
Japan, just moments after a 9.0 earthquake triggered a tsunami that
proceeds to rush at the camera. Voices cry out as the dark wall of
seawater crashes through buildings and cars, sweeping them cleanly
from the land. In the clip’s final moments, a few elderly stragglers
climb the hill toward the camera as people rush down to help them,
but the water rises too quickly, and the rescuers are sucked in with
the people they were trying to save.
At the time these events were occurring, documentarian Lucy
Walker was in New York, preparing for a trip to Tokyo to promote
her features Wasteland and Countdown to Zero. She was also plan-
ning to shoot a short film about the cherry blossom while she was in
Japan, and she’d asked cinematographer Aaron Phillips to join her in
crafting a “visual poem about the ephemeral nature of life.”
When Walker first heard news of the quake, she recalls, “I
said, ‘We can’t go there now.’ But my second thought was that
maybe it’s an important time to not run away, and to express our
appreciation of Japanese culture.” Phillips agreed. He notes, “The
Japanese people have an incredible respect for the duality of nature.
That’s what the film ended up being about.”
When their plane touched down at Narita, rolling blackouts
were still in effect in many of the island’s major cities, the rail system
was tangled by delays and detours, and portions of major roads had
been destroyed. Joining Walker and Phillips on the shoot was a local
translator, Seattle transplant James MacWhyte, whose contributions
proved vital. “James is very sensitive to the country’s cultural sensi-
bilities,” says Phillips. “It wasn’t just about being able to speak
Japanese; we needed someone who sensed the subtleties behind
the language.”
The team made stops in Kyoto, Hiroshima and Tokyo. It was
a cold spring, and the cherry blossoms were blooming while the
country was still reeling. In fact, many of the traditional hanami cele-
brations — cherry-blossom parties that sweep Japan every spring —
had been cancelled.
As they traveled, the filmmakers were careful to respect the
survivors’ privacy, and they adopted a bare-bones approach to the
filming process. Everything they needed could be transported in two
Short Takes
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.
Directed by
Lucy Walker
and shot by
Aaron Phillips,
the Oscar-
nominated
documentary
short The
Tsunami and
the Cherry
Blossom
presents a
“visual poem
about the
ephemeral
nature of life,”
says Walker.
I
backpacks: a Canon EOS 7D camera;
Canon EF 16-35mm, 24-70mm and 70-
200mm zoom lenses; a Canon 2x extender;
a Canon 24mm tilt-focus lens; Series 9 ND
and polarizer filters; and a Manfrotto fluid-
head tripod.
“The last thing we wanted to do
was walk in, put a big camera in people’s
faces and ask for all the gory details,” says
Phillips. “The 7D was great because it’s very
small. It looked like we were just taking
photographs. Even when we were doing
sound, we just had a pistol grip and a mic
going to a small MP3 recorder.”
The only artificial light Phillips used
was a last-minute addition, an AA-battery-
powered LED lamp. He notes, “We were
granted an interview with a 16th-genera-
tion cherry-blossom master, but he was only
available at night. It’s not the way I wanted
to light it, but a bigger light would have
slowed us down and been more intrusive.”
Much of the filming took place in
the heavily damaged northern T ¯ ohoku
prefecture. Phillips and Walker drove
through the affected areas, stopping along
the way to visit refugee centers with dona-
tions in hand. More often than not, the aid
workers and displaced townspeople were
forthcoming with their harrowing stories of
loss, as well as their hopes for the future.
“You can spend hundreds of hours
researching for a documentary, but some-
times it’s better to just show up and talk to
12 June 2012 American Cinematographer
Phillips (middle)
shot the short
with a Canon
EOS 7D fitted
with Canon
lenses. He
typically kept
the camera
mounted to a
Manfrotto
fluid-head
tripod,
eschewing
handheld work
in favor of
stable frames
inspired by
classical
Japanese
composition.
people,” says Walker. “We couldn’t have
done that with a huge crew and a lot of
equipment. What we had going for us was
intimacy and spontaneity. Being there was
the best research imaginable.”
One way in which The Tsunami and
the Cherry Blossom stands out from many
other documentaries is its poetic visual style.
Phillips kept the camera on a tripod, only
occasionally going handheld. Between the
documentary interviews, wide, lingering
shots of the rubble where homes, hospitals
and schools once stood are juxtaposed with
slow, smooth pans through tranquil parks
draped in a snowy coat of cherry-blossom
petals. “Many of our compositions were
inspired by classical Japanese composition
and framing, where the landscape helps
frame the shot,” Phillips says. “In many of
these locations, the damage was so exten-
sive that a well-framed static shot served
the film the best. It’s a sort of moving
photograph that really allows the viewer to
see the details.
“I was quite concerned about some
of the anomalies inherent in digital-capture
formats, particularly when shooting some
of the wider landscape shots and highly
detailed patterns,” he continues. “By
shooting predominantly on sticks, with slow
pans and tilts, we avoided the ‘Jello-cam’
breakup inherent in rolling-shutter cameras,
Phillips and
Walker (bottom)
employed a bare-
bones approach in
order to respect
their subjects’
privacy. “The last
thing we wanted
to do was walk in,
put a big camera
in people’s faces
and ask for all the
gory details,” says
Phillips.
14 June 2012 American Cinematographer
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cameras and now the Alexa. I love Clairmont’s custom gear and incredible service; it keeps me coming back! In visual effect shooting we always are
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H o l l y w o o d
8 1 8 - 7 6 1 - 4 4 4 0
V a n c o u v e r
6 0 4 - 9 8 4 - 4 5 6 3
T o r o n t o
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A l b u q u e r q u e
5 0 5 - 2 2 7 - 2 5 2 5
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16 June 2012 American Cinematographer
but we still encountered moiré and other
compression issues on some of the more
demanding, detailed shots. We placed very
high demands upon the camera and the
HDSLR format, but all things considered, it
delivered in spades. Filmmaking is fraught
with compromise, but also incredible oppor-
tunities.”
Given the subject matter, it was
impossible to avoid getting caught up in the
survivors’ plight. “It was emotionally
exhausting, but inspiring at the same time,”
Phillips relates. “Their livelihood was
completely swept away, but they were work-
ing together to rebuild. It was moving to see
how civilized and humane everyone was
with one another. We saw people at their
best under the worst of circumstances.”
He also experienced nature’s dark side
firsthand. He recalls, “I was in Iwaki, lying on
my stomach and trying to frame this shot
with flowers in the foreground and this
beautiful green hill with a path of blooming
cherry blossoms in the background. There
were these wonderful scents in the air, and I
was thinking how beautiful it all was, when
suddenly a 7.0 aftershock hit. I’d never felt a
tremor before. I pushed my hands into the
ground and felt like I was on a rocking boat.
The buildings around me were swaying. It
was quite extraordinary, and the aftershocks
continued like that for the next two weeks.”
The filmmakers captured roughly 45
hours of footage over the course of three
weeks. Walker and editor Aki Mizutani (who
was in Japan when the earthquake struck)
spent a month shaping that footage into the
40-minute final product, which premiered at
the 2011 Toronto International Film Festival.
The final color correction was
performed by colorist Phil Azenzer at Picture
Head in Hollywood. “I got the tones I
wanted in the camera, so [the final color
correction] was mainly about contrast adjust-
ment,” notes Phillips. “We used power
windows to lift people’s faces a bit here and
there. I’d just try to find a good angle where
the sun was at their backs, and that usually
worked quite well.”
“Aaron was able to accomplish so
much with the 7D,” says Walker. “He never
let us feel the limitations of the camera.” ●
Top: The
juxtaposition of
blooming cherry
blossoms and the
destruction caused
by the tsunami
underscores “the
duality of nature,”
which, Phillips says,
is “what the film
ended up being
about.” Middle:
Phillips frames two
displaced boats.
Bottom: The
cinematographer
lines up a shot along
a path in Iwaki.

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18 June 2012 American Cinematographer
Scout’s Honor
By Stephen Pizzello
Moonrise Kingdom teams Robert Yeoman, ASC with director
Wes Anderson for the sixth time. Incorporating the arch humor of
previous collaborations like Rushmore and The Royal Tenenbaums (AC
Jan. ’02), their latest outing concerns Sam (Jared Gilman), a precocious
orphan who schemes to elope with his pre-teen crush, Suzy (Kara
Hayward). Letting true love dictate their course, the two run away
from Suzy’s family and Sam’s Khaki Scout troop, sparking a riotous
pursuit by an overmatched posse of adults that includes a local cop
(Bruce Willis), a scoutmaster (Ed Norton) and Suzy’s parents (Bill Murray
and Frances McDormand).
While the movie includes many of the visual tropes that define
Anderson’s style — symmetrical compositions, swish pans, snap
zooms, and speed changes to emphasize key moments — the film-
makers’ use of the Super 16mm format is a departure from their previ-
ous outings, most of which were shot in anamorphic 35mm. Yeoman
recently spoke to AC about his work on the picture.
American Cinematographer:Why do you enjoy working
with Wes?
Robert Yeoman, ASC: Our first film together was Bottle
Rocket. We started referencing different movies in our prep period and
we found we were on the same plane visually. I often can anticipate
how Wes will want to shoot a scene.
One thing I really appreciate about Wes is that he has a very
clear vision of every element that will end up onscreen. If you ask him
any question, his response is never, ‘I don’t know.’ He always has an
answer, and it’s always very specific. It’s very refreshing to work with
a director like that and I feel that this is one reason his films have such
a cohesive, singular vision.
He appears to have an affinity for films from the 1960s
and ’70s.
Yeoman: He has many different influences and he’s particu-
larly fond of the French New Wave. On Moonrise Kingdom, he set up
a screening for the cast and crew of an English movie called Black Jack
[1979], directed by Ken Loach. We screened it during preproduction
in Newport [R.I.]. Wes really liked the visual tone of that movie, which
was beautifully shot in a natural style by Chris Menges, ASC, BSC.
What kind of prep did you do?
Yeoman: We spend a lot of our prep time going to the actual
locations. We take a viewfinder and a digital still camera with us and
we block out scenes just to get ideas. Because we were planning to
shoot on Super 16, I also had a 16mm camera with us most of the
time so we could see how the blocking and locations would appear
on film. Our A.D., producers, production designer and everyone else
accompanying us would stand in for the actors; in a sense, it was a
pre-shoot. We were able to make the necessary adjustments during
the actual filming of the movie.
Why did you opt for Super 16?
Yeoman: Wes actually brought up the idea of shooting
16mm, so I started shooting tests at Panavision Hollywood, compar-
Production Slate
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.
Scoutmaster
Ward (Edward
Norton) assesses
a tree house
while making
his morning
rounds at Khaki
Scout base
camp in
Moonrise
Kingdom.
I
soft egg crates evolved
more light, tighter control
“Luscious, enveloping light exactly where you want it and not where you don’t.
I will want to use CUfocus on every show I do from now on.”
DP Steven Fierberg, ASC
“ The CUfocus played a crucial role on Body of Proof, by allowing us to use large difusion frames while
minimizing problematic refections in our windows. The design is simple, but brilliant.”
Derrick Kolus, Chief Lighting Technician
“With CUfocus, I can place a key light close to my subject providing the soft wrap that I expect and still have signifcant
fall-of in the background - especially when challenged with limited space.”
DP Matt Mindlin
With the CU Focus, I can place my key lig W
lighttools.com/photometric
20 June 2012 American Cinematographer
ing different stocks in both 35mm and
16mm. Later I went to New York, where Wes
was living, and shot extensive tests on
16mm, using both an Arri 416 and Aaton
cameras. Wes was very pleased with the
results of the Super 16, so we went with it.
In our tests we found that the faster
stocks from both Kodak and Fuji — the 500
tungsten stocks — were grainier than we
wanted. We really liked the look of Kodak
[Vision3 200T] 7213 and decided to shoot
every frame of the movie on that stock. Its
ASA of 200 presented a bit of a challenge
when we were doing our night scenes, but I
wanted to keep the look as consistent as I
could, and Wes supported that decision.
We also knew we’d be shooting in
the fairly rugged terrain of Rhode Island and
that we’d often be climbing to some very
remote places. If we’d opted for 35mm,
we’d have been carrying a great deal more
equipment. We wanted everything to be
more mobile so we could more easily pick up
the cameras and run with them.
Wes favored the 1.85:1 aspect ratio
because he felt that the story’s locations —
like the house the Bishop family lives in —
would be better served by that format.
Our main camera was the Aaton
XTerà. It suited us perfectly and was great for
handheld. It also can film at speeds up to 75
fps and we used this on several occasions
throughout the film to accentuate a
moment. We also used the Aaton A-Mini-
mas, which are very small cameras that
allowed us to get camera moves we couldn’t
have achieved any other way. We had a few
issues with the A-Minimas; they occasionally
jammed, and we got some edge fog after
loading our daylight spools in the woods.
The cameras aren’t perfect, but they’re effec-
tive, and they allowed us to be very flexible.
They were so small I could easily run through
the woods holding one, and we used them
for the scene where Sam and Suzy are danc-
ing on the beach so we could move around
them very quickly. We were shooting at dusk
and our window of light was small. I added
a small onboard video monitor on the A-
Minima because the camera has a fixed
eyepiece that doesn’t really allow you to see
through the lens if you hold it low or high.
Were you using any special rigs
for other kinds of shots?
Yeoman: Wes wanted to stay low-
tech, and I remembered that on Chinatown,
the crew had mounted the camera on two
pipes to create a kind of poor man’s
Steadicam. We made one of those rigs, posi-
tioned a person on each end of it, and had
them walk backwards down various paths in
the woods. Fortunately, we had an excellent
Top to bottom:
Suzy (Kara
Hayward) and
Sam (Jared
Gilman)
rendezvous at
the appointed
time; Sam
details his plan
for their
journey; Robert
Yeoman, ASC
(bending down
at camera) and
his crew
prepare a dolly
shot for the
scene.
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22 June 2012 American Cinematographer
first focus puller, Stanley Hernandez, and
second AC, Braden Belmonte, who both did
a great job under very difficult conditions.
For shots of Sam traveling down the
river in a canoe, we traveled alongside him in
another canoe handholding the A-Minima,
or we sat in the canoe with him to do close-
ups. To get a very low shot of a dog running
through a field, I employed a homemade rig
that was like a little Pogocam with the A-
Minima mounted on the bottom of it. Wes
and I took turns running with it or hand-
holding the camera to get the shot.
We did use a Technocrane for the
scene in which Suzy runs up the steps inside
her house. This interior was a set, and the
camera starts on the first floor and cranes all
the way up to the third floor. There were
other ideas about how to accomplish this,
but I feel that the Technocrane was the most
effective choice. We also used a Steadicam
for one exterior shot of Bob Balaban as he
walks through a field, but that was it for
conventional camera rigs. Our key grip,
Sanjay Sami, was very adept in the design of
our low-tech approach. To achieve the shots
that establish the house interior at the begin-
ning of the film, we laid a dolly track and I
would swish-pan the camera at the preset
marks.
Why did you choose Rhode Island
as the primary location?
Yeoman: Wes did a lot of scouting
up and down the East Coast, and in most of
his movies he doesn’t specifically identify the
locations — he prefers them to seem like
these magical places in the world that he has
created. Rhode Island has a very rugged
Top to bottom: After cornering the young couple in the forest, Sam’s fellow Khaki Scouts
prepare to make their move; the grisly aftermath of the boys’ charge; director Wes Anderson
grabs a shot on the run.
landscape that worked beautifully for the
story. The exterior of the Bishop house
existed there as a real location, and Wes was
very much in love with that place as a setting
for the central characters. There were also
many beautiful wooded areas. I believe that
Rhode Island’s proximity to New York City
was also a big factor for equipment, crew,
film labs, etc., along with the tax incentives
we received for shooting there.
How did you build up your stop
for the occasional night exteriors and
the climactic storm sequence?
Yeoman: For the scenes where Suzy
is reading by the campfire, we started shoot-
ing maybe a half-hour before dark and just
kept shooting all the way into night. Some-
times I would add one small fill light. I was
always amazed when we got our dailies; I
thought some of the night scenes would be
too dark, but it was surprising how much the
film saw.
For the portions of the storm that
took place at the exteriors of the scout camp,
we used a couple of Lightning Strikes units,
giant Ritter fans, rain bars and rain towers.
We placed two 18Ks on towers to backlight
the rain and often incorporated them into
the shot. We lit the subsequent scene inside
the church with traditional movie lighting —
tungsten lights, Kino Flos, and two balloon
lights floated overhead to provide a very soft
base ambience. Our gaffer, Frans Wetter-
ings, was a wonderful collaborator on all of
these ambitious lighting setups. To create the
storm effects outside the church, we used
our Lightning Strikes units gelled with ½
CTO to make them less blue. The shots of
the kids climbing the church steeple were
done on a stage with a black background,
with tungsten units backlighting the water
and the rain. We used real rain for those
shots, but for the church windows, Wes
wanted us to create the rain effect with
lighting rather than traditional rain bars. We
experimented with some theatrical-lighting
units and found a system called Gam SX4
that could project different rotating patterns
placed in front of Lekos; we just defocused
them a bit to create the feeling of rain on the
windowpanes. Sometimes we even
projected those patterns onto the interior so
it looked as if rain was coming from the
windows.
The compositions in your
widescreen films with Wes are always
very striking, and this movie also has a
lot of centered framing and very
symmetrical blocking. How did the
format affect those aesthetics?
Yeoman: I love anamorphic — it’s
my favorite format — and there was
certainly some tradeoff involved in losing
that 2.40:1 frame. Nevertheless, the ease of
Super 16 was a good call. In terms of the
compositions, that’s just the way Wes sees
his world, and it’s the visual style he’s drawn
to. When we set up shots, they frequently
end up with that framing. He has always
had a love of theater, and he likes very
formal compositions. He’s also a big Kubrick
fan, so maybe those films have influenced
some of his style.
A lot of Sixties- and Seventies-
style snap zooms are sprinkled through-
24 June 2012 American Cinematographer
Clockwise from
top: Prepping a
scene on location
at the Bishop
house; the crew
creates heavy
rain for a shot of
Norton for the
climactic storm
sequence;
Yeoman checks
the light on his
young leading
lady.
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26 June 2012 American Cinematographer
out the film. Which lenses were you
using?
Yeoman: We carried a set of Zeiss
Super Speeds: 8mm, 9.5mm, 12mm,
16mm, 25mm and 50mm. We favored the
12mm quite a bit, but we bounced around
more in terms of our focal lengths than we
have on our other films. The zoom was a
Canon 11-165mm. It wasn’t as sharp or as
contrasty as the Zeiss lenses, but everyone
seemed to love it when we watched our
dailies. I tried to stop it down as much as I
could while shooting the exteriors in the
woods. It was dark and rainy when we were
doingthe shot of Sam and Suzy crossing the
river; I remember shooting that wide open,
but the sequence wound up having a very
nice quality.
How much of the movie’s color
palette was created in the DI? There’s a
distinctive yellow hue that really
enhances the period feel.
Yeoman: Wes is very specific about
every color we photograph. Every hue in the
wardrobe, sets, props, etc. is very carefully
chosen. In the DI, he tends to take the look
a bit warmer than what we shot, and he
generally likes to push the color saturation.
We didn’t use any filtration on this shoot,
not even an 85 filter, but we definitely
pushed the look with our colorist, Tim Stipan
at Technicolor New York, who did an amaz-
ing job.
How did you view your dailies?
We watched our dailies in the editing
room, on a giant flat screen off an Avid. I
haven’t watched film dailies in about five
years, but because we were eventually going
to a DI this representation of our work
seemed acceptable. I will say that I miss the
ritual of dailies, where department heads get
together to watch the film and discuss what
they have seen. I find that it tends to ener-
gize the crew and brings excitement to
seeing their hard work realized onscreen.
The times, they are a changin’.
TECHNICAL SPECS
1.85:1
Super 16mm
Aaton A-Minima, XTerá
Zeiss Super Speed, Canon
Kodak Vision3 200T 7213
Digital Intermediate
Love and War
By Jean Oppenheimer
While making his latest project, the
HBO telefilm Hemingway & Gellhorn, direc-
tor of photography Rogier Stoffers, ASC,
NSC became fascinated with American
writer and war correspondent Martha Gell-
horn, who covered major world conflicts
throughout her remarkable 60-year career.
“She was an incredible woman and wrote
beautifully,” declares Stoffers, who sat
down with AC shortly after wrapping the
movie. “She went traveling in Africa in
1962 all by herself. She was amazingly intel-
ligent.”
But, as Hemingway & Gellhorn
relates, Gellhorn (Nicole Kidman) was to
become famous less for her singular
achievements than for her marriage to
Ernest Hemingway (Clive Owen). The two
met in Key West, Fla., in late 1936, and
began an affair a few months later in
Madrid, where they were both covering the
Spanish Civil War. They married in 1940 and
divorced five years later. Hemingway & Gell-
horn chronicles their stormy relationship.
The project reunited Stoffers with
director Philip Kaufman, his collaborator on
Quills (AC Jan. ’01). They had access to
extensive reference material, including
thousands of photographs, many taken by
Robert Capa. Thanks to the bounty of refer-
ence material, the locations, clothes and
even some of the action could be replicated
in exact detail. To take the quest for authen-
ticity even further, Kaufman and editor
Walter Murch planned to integrate the lead
actors with stock footage to depict the main
characters traveling through the world in
the past.
With all of the planned visual-effects
work, it made sense to shoot digitally. HBO
suggested the Arri Alexa, and Stoffers was
excited to try it out. “This was in January
2011,” he recalls. “The camera was brand
new, and we went through two major soft-
ware updates during prep. At the time,
there was no ArriRaw, so we recorded 4:4:4
Dual-Link HD with 3-to-1 compression to a
Codex. We rated the camera at 800 ASA.
To minimize the compression and the noise
for greenscreen scenes, we shot those at
400.”
Though Stoffers normally favors
prime lenses, he knew Kaufman would
want to do “long takes that go from wide
to close, and having the ability to change
the focal length during the shot would be a
big help.” He selected the Fujinon Premier
18-85mm T2 zoom lens, which he describes
as “a real T2 with no distortion that
perfectly matches the [Arri/Zeiss] Ultra
Primes and Master Primes we also used.”
Videofax in San Francisco provided the
camera package, which included two
Alexas. “We always had some variation of
Hollywood Black Magic [filtration] on the
lens,” adds Stoffers.
The visual-effects work, which was
supervised by Chris Morley, involved not
only greenscreen composites, but also tran-
American journalists Martha Gellhorn (Nicole Kidman) and Ernest Hemingway (Clive Owen)
rendezvous in the Hotel Florida bar while covering the Spanish Civil War.
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sitions from documentary material to produc-
tion footage. “You can’t go straight from the
Alexa to old film because the Alexa has no
grain and no camera jitter,” notes Stoffers.
“They had to create transitions in which grain,
scratches, color and jitter were faded in and
out.”
A team at Tippett Studios handled the
insertion of the actors into the newsreel
footage. To determine where to place the
players, Morley used Maya software “to
create a digital camera and line up a digital
grid on the ground plane of the archival
footage,” he explains. “From the digital
camera, we then exported data regarding
camera height and angle, focal length and so
on, and I’d relay that information to camera
operator Kim Marks on the greenscreen set so
he could match those details exactly.
“We used orange duct tape to build a
20-by-20-foot grid on the floor [of the green-
screen stage], and once we’d lined up the
grids on video assist, Kim would lock down
the camera, I’d remove the practical grid, and
we’d be left with nothing but green,” contin-
ues Morley. “I could walk around the stage
with a small monitor and see myself in the
archival footage, and I’d set the actors’
marks.”
Dissolves between the production
footage and the historical material were
handled at EFilm, which developed software
to make this possible during the DI. To re-
create camera jitter, Morley first had Tippett
“create a node in our software package that
[allowed us to] set two key frames, one that
was full jitter and one that was no jitter. We
provided both to EFilm, and they did the
dissolves.”
Left, top to bottom: Hemingway strides through the
hotel lobby; lighting balloons assist in the lobby
interior; the “Condor ballet” required outside the
set, which was built in an old train station. Above:
Rogier Stoffers, ASC, NSC lines up a shot.
28 June 2012 American Cinematographer

Hemingway & Gellhorn takes place
in several countries, including Spain,
Finland, Cuba and China, but all the exteri-
ors and interiors were shot in and around
San Francisco. The main practical location
was an old, defunct train station in Oakland
that production designer Geoffrey Kirkland
transformed into the opulent lobby of
Madrid’s Hotel Florida, where Spanish Civil
War correspondents congregated when
they weren’t in the field. The 117'x60'
space offered 40'-high ceilings.
The audience’s first glimpse of the
hotel lobby is a one-minute Steadicam shot
executed by Tim Bellen (who shared
Steadicam duties with Will Arnot)that starts
tight on a piece of paper being ripped out
of a typewriter. As the camera pulls back,
the man clutching the paper hands it off to
another character. The camera continues
following the paper, introducing different
characters as it moves through the enor-
mous lobby, and eventually reveals some 40
people standing quietly around the bar. The
front door opens and Hemingway strides in,
and the atmosphere immediately becomes
boisterous and jovial.
The building had three 28'-tall
windowpanes looking east, and a row of
windowpanes high up looking west. “To
create a Mediterranean feel, [production
designer] Geoffrey Kirkland proposed putting
warm stained glass in the high windows and
filling the side and bottom panes of the east
windows with the same material to make it
all come together,” says Stoffers.
“We put ND.9 and 250 diffusion on
the colored glass in the tall windows, and we
had to put a thin layer of semi-translucent
plastic on the clear portions to help obscure
the array of lighting equipment that was just
outside,” recalls gaffer Steve Condiotti.
This array included seven 80' Condors
and two scissor lifts. Four Condors had
20'x30' flyswatters filled with UltraBounce
that could either block the sun or be used to
bounce light, and the other three held 18K
ArriMax HMIs. An 18K Fresnel was kept on
one of the scissor lifts at all times.
“Two other 18K Fresnels were on
Stoffers preps
an exterior in
San Francisco.
The filmmakers
found all the
locations they
needed for the
globetrotting
story in the
Bay Area.
30
stands outside, and in some cases they were
used to light the backdrop that was seen out
the door in reverses,” adds Condiotti, whose
DTC Lighting & Grip supplied the production’s
lighting. “There were also several 6K and 4K
Pars on the ground outside for other, smaller
windows.”
“To maintain lighting continuity during
some of the long scenes in the lobby required
a ballet of Condors, and choreographing it
required real skill,” says Stoffers. “Rigging
gaffer Jeff Gilliam and key rigging grip Duane
Robinson did a fantastic job of pre-rigging the
set, and best boy Chris Shellenberger and key
grip Gary Gill were instrumental in making it
all work perfectly.”
Fortunately, the elevated train plat-
forms were still in place on the west side of
the building, so Stoffers could easily light
through the glass with nine Nine-Light Maxi-
Brutes on stands to give that side of the room
a warm glow and block the afternoon sun.
For ambient light inside, his crew
floated two 8'x20' 12K Aerolight tungsten
balloons, but because Kaufman wanted to be
able to shoot 360 degrees at any time, they
could not be tethered to the ground. Robin-
son, who had worked in the same location
for Rent (AC Nov. ’05), built a truss that could
be attached to the ceiling, and this held the
balloons, as well as a black skirt that kept
their light off the walls. The entire apparatus
could be raised and lowered as necessary.
Additionally, the electricians moved two 4K
tungsten balloons around on the floor as
needed. Practicals in the space included
dozens of wall sconces and floor lamps, all
on individual dimmers.
“Rogier really likes to see color
contrast in the skin tones, and we achieved
that with the cool ‘daylight’ coming through
the front windows and the tungsten lighting
inside,” remarks Condiotti. Stoffers concurs,
noting, “The Alexa is really good at mixing
color temperatures, certainly in a daylight
setting with the color temperature set at
around 4,300°K. It’s a lot harder in a tung-
sten environment because the chip is more
balanced to daylight. In tungsten situations,
you have to exaggerate the colors to be able
to separate them.”
When possible, Stoffers used 30" Jem
Balls to light Kidman. “I love those lights,” he
says. “In general, I like to light women with
round [housings]. The front of the ball is close
to the subject and the sides are farther away,
which softens the shadows. I like to keep
them on my own Manfrotto boom arms,
which allow me to adjust the light during the
shot — starting up high at the wide begin-
ning of a shot and getting as close as possi-
ble when we end in a close-up — and stay
flexible to changes in the staging.”
Stoffers has high praise for the
production’s San Francisco-based crew,
including digital-imaging technician Jordan
Livingston, and 1st AC Patrick McArdle and
his camera team. “I also have to mention
Leigh Blicher at Videofax, who located and
purchased several pieces of equipment we
wanted to use,” he adds.
TECHNICAL SPECS
1.78:1
Digital Capture
Arri Alexa
Fujinon; Arri/Zeiss Ultra Prime, Master Prime

31
make t he dr e am r e al
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34 June 2012 American Cinematographer
D
irt and soot blanket six lanes of smoldering rubble that
run the length of a city block, and burned husks of cars
and trucks lie atop slabs of concrete jutting skyward in
front of shattered storefronts. The street signs indicate
this is what’s left of Manhattan’s 42nd Street and Vanderbilt
Avenue intersection, but in actuality it’s East 9th Street in
Cleveland, Ohio, on the 79th day of principal photography on
The Avengers.
In a nearby alleyway, Captain America (Chris Evans)
stands near a row of cameras amid the bustling crew, and not
far away, director Joss Whedon is consulting with cinematog-
rapher Seamus McGarvey, ASC, BSC in video village. When
both filmmakers come over to greet AC, Whedon says of his
director of photography, “Seamus is very fast, which I love, and
his style is very particular. It’s not over-thought, but it’s just
hyperbolic enough for this kind of movie, which is insanity
grounded in reality.”
The Avengers builds on the foundation laid by the
Marvel Studios features Iron Man (AC May ’08), Iron Man 2
(AC May ’10), The Incredible Hulk, Thor (AC June ’11) and
All
Together
Now
Seamus McGarvey, ASC, BSC
brings the Earth’s mightiest heroes
to the big screen for Joss Whedon’s
The Avengers.
By Jon D. Witmer
•|•
w ww.theasc.com June 2012 35
Captain America: The First Avenger (AC
Aug. ’11), and takes its cues from the
long-running Avengers comic-book
series, which first hit newsstands
in 1963. In the film, Strategic
Homeland Intervention, Enforcement
and Logistics Division leader Nick Fury
(Samuel L. Jackson) assembles Captain
America, Thor (Chris Hemsworth),
Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.), Hulk
(Mark Ruffalo), Hawkeye (Jeremy
Renner) and Black Widow (Scarlett
Johansson) to face the global menace
posed by Thor’s nefarious brother, Loki
(Tom Hiddleston), who unleashes an
extraterrestrial army in a bid to rule the
world.
Principal photography began in
April 2011 in New Mexico, and
McGarvey says his three months of
preproduction were “vital in terms of
getting to grips with the scale of the
project, and planning how we’d achieve
certain sequences.” Shooting digitally
was a given because of the extensive
digital effects and the producers’ original
plan to capture in 3-D. But when the
crew tested a 3-D workflow by shooting
the “tag” that followed the end titles of
Thor with Red Epic cameras and
Panavision Primo lenses in an Element
Technica rig, “it was not a successful day
of shooting,” says McGarvey.
“Although the native 3-D looked
great, each setup took too long,” he
explains. “I love when a crew picks up
speed and creates its own inner
dynamic. Joss, too, likes to keep the
momentum up on the set. Shooting
3-D is like throwing treacle bombs into
that beautiful élan. It wasn’t going to
afford us the impetus and dynamism we
needed.”
Marvel subsequently decided to
capture in 2-D and convert to 3-D in
post, and McGarvey abandoned the
Epic for the Arri Alexa. “I preferred the
look of the Alexa in terms of its range
and its ‘roundness,’” he says. “I recog-
nize [its image] as more akin to a film
look.”
In fact, McGarvey was so
impressed with the Alexa’s performance
in his tests that he bought his own;
christened “Schatzi de Bayer,” it served
as the production’s A camera. The main
unit also carried three Alexas (rented
from Panavision Woodland Hills), one
of which “was always rigged in
Steadicam mode, and the other two
were in studio mode and could easily be
switched for handheld,” says the cine-
matographer.
“We shot with Primos, predomi-
nantly primes, but we also used 19-
90mm and 24-270mm zooms, and
occasionally we got a 3:1 long zoom,” he
continues. “[With the zooms,] we
tended to stay around 21mm and
27mm, or at the longer end, like
100mm.”
McGarvey typically maintained a
T4 or T5.6 for day exteriors, and T2.8½
in other situations. “I shot everything at
[the Alexa’s base ISO of] 800. When I
tried to rate it lower, like at 400, it
seemed to build up in the shadows, and
I didn’t feel it had the same range. So I
simply used IR neutral-density filters to
bring down the stop for exteriors.”
The production also carried 10
Canon DSLR cameras, eight EOS 5D
Mark IIs and two EOS 7Ds, all fitted
with Canon EF lenses. Their footage
was recorded to SanDisk Extreme Pro
memory cards. “I prefer the 5D to the
7D,” McGarvey notes. “I like its larger
sensor and the way the depth of field
falls off quicker. But we used the 7Ds for
any slow-motion work [that involved
DSLRs].”
Typically, when the filmmakers
wanted to heighten an action moment
with high-speed footage, they rolled a
Panavised Arri 435 loaded with Kodak
Vision3 500T 5219. “We mostly used
slow motion for explosions at night, and
film really holds the detail in both the
flames and the low-key night exteriors,”
U
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From left: Thor (Chris Hemsworth), Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.),
Captain America (Chris Evans), Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner) and Hulk (Mark
Ruffalo) are among the heroes who stand united against a common
threat in The Avengers. Below: Cinematographer Seamus McGarvey, ASC,
BSC (left) and director Joss Whedon keep the characters in their sights.
36 June 2012 American Cinematographer
says McGarvey. “I pushed [the 5219]
one stop on a number of occasions, and
though it looks grainy next to Alexa
footage, generally speaking, the 35mm
material intercuts really well. Shooting
some film also meant we could carry
that camera the whole time, and it was
nice to have that flexibility.”
The filmmakers chose to frame
for 1.85:1. McGarvey recalls, “I was
keen to shoot 2.40:1 because I felt it
would have offered more scope, but Joss
was worried about the height of the
cityscape, and he wanted to be able to
create both vertical and horizontal
movement in the frame. Also, we had to
leave space for the Hulk. He’s scraping
the ceiling of our frame, and in 2.40:1
the poor guy would have been
beheaded!”
On the set, as McGarvey leads
AC through the rubble, he pauses to
introduce production designer James
Chinlund, who says his biggest chal-
lenge was “to create a world that would
allow these [disparate characters] to
coexist without seeming dissonant. Of
course, the comics were the foundation
for my work, because they’ve been prob-
lem-solving that for decades; the
[Marvel] series The Ultimates was an
especially key source.”
Equally integral to building a
believable world was visual-effects
supervisor and Iron Man 2 veteran Janek
Sirrs, who worked with 12 vendors to
complete about 2,200 visual-effects
shots for The Avengers. “As a cinematog-
rapher on this sort of movie, you have to
collaborate unequivocally with visual
effects — they’re part of the cinematog-
raphy, and vice-versa,” says McGarvey.
“Janek has been incredible; he under-
stands light, and he has great taste and
vision.”
The Third Floor provided previs
and postvis services, which were super-
vised by Nick Markel and Gerardo
Ramirez, respectively. Like previs,
postvis generates preliminary versions of
CG shots or elements, but combines
those pieces with production photogra-

All Together Now
Right: The
production turned
the aluminum
vacuum chamber
at NASA’s Space
Power Facility in
Sandusky, Ohio
into a SHIELD
center where an
experiment goes
horribly awry.
MR16s ringed the
chamber’s
perimeter, and a
12'x12' rig with
Kino Flos and
VL3000s offered
additional
illumination.
Below: SHIELD
director Nick Fury
(Samuel L.
Jackson) senses
trouble brewing.
w ww.theasc.com June 2012 37
phy in order to validate footage, provide
placeholders for editorial and generally
refine the effects. “Previs is invaluable to
get everybody on the same page,” says
Whedon. “But, at the same time, you
need to be able to change on the day.
There’s a very strong element of making
this up as I go, and shooting what was in
my head when I wrote [the screenplay]
but then forgot to tell anybody —
which, I’m happy to say, Seamus rolls
with.”
Down the alley in Cleveland, the
crew prepares a stunt in which Captain
America will jump over a speeding
Acura that’s on fire, retrieve his shield,
and throw it at an alien that’s climbed
onto the car. McGarvey muses, “This is
an action movie, so you have to make it
dynamic, and it has to have an impact.
As the action ramps up, you want to feel
the change, and moving the camera
allows for that.” As if on cue, key grip
John Janusek appears for a confab with
McGarvey. “We always have Chapman
dollies and 50-foot and 30-foot
Technocranes [on hand],” he says. “We
often put the 30-foot Techno on a
Chapman Titan to reach some of
the elevated sets.” McGarvey adds,
“Steve Welch is our Technocrane oper-
ator, Mitch Dubin is the A-camera
operator, and George Billinger is the
Steadicam/B-camera operator, and
they’re all unsurpassed masters at [creat-
ing] momentum and dynamic move-
ment. I also have the great support of
A-camera 1st AC Bill Coe and B-
camera 1st AC Harry Zimmerman.”
The production’s work in Ohio
also included filming in NASA’s Space
Power Facility in Sandusky. The heart of
the facility is a 100'-wide, 122'-high
aluminum vacuum chamber that
Chinlund dressed to appear as an active
SHIELD laboratory. Prof. Erik Selvig
(Stellan Skarsgard) has been using the
lab in an effort to tap the energy of the
tesseract, a cosmic cube that promises
near-unlimited power to those who can
harness it. Unfortunately for SHIELD,
the tesseract opens a portal through
which Loki appears, and the cube’s
growing energy output causes the entire I
m
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.
From top: A frame of
the previsualization
created by The Third
Floor for a scene
involving Black Widow
(Scarlett Johansson)
and Hulk; a frame from
the live-action plate
photography shot on
set; a postvis frame,
which composited
elements of the previs
with the live-action
footage to inform the
progression of the
visual effects; the final
composite frame.
38 June 2012 American Cinematographer
facility to collapse.
The Space Power Facility “was
one of our most spectacular locations,”
says McGarvey, “but it was tricky to
light because we wanted to look all
around.” The solution was to utilize a
shallow trough that circled the base of
the chamber. After gaffer Chris
Napolitano and his crew rigged the
trough with about 1,500 MR16 globes,
“the light bounced everywhere and lit
the entire dome,” says McGarvey.
“Over the center of the area, we
built a 12-by-12 rig with daylight Kino
Flos and a few [Philips Vari-Lite]
VL3000 moving lights that we could
focus down to highlight pieces of the
set,” adds Napolitano. The rig was
suspended on chain motors so it could
be adjusted for the frame line.
“CG swirls of energy were to be
added to the chamber, but Janek wanted
us to provide an interactive, blue glow at
the top of the space as the facility is
about to collapse,” says McGarvey. “We
used 6K Pars and an 18K ArriMax to
light the top of the dome, and the grips
used flags to create a pulsating effect.”
“I’m a big proponent of shooting
some real-world reference as a guide for
digital work,” Sirrs notes in an e-mail
interview with AC. “And Seamus was

All Together Now
Top: SHIELD’s
Helicarrier takes
to the skies,
offering the
Avengers a
mobile
headquarters.
Middle: The
Helicarrier’s
bridge
incorporated a
massive viewing
window; visual
effects replaced
the bluescreen
used on set with
sky and moving
clouds. Bottom:
An Arri Alexa on
a Libra head
mounted to a
Technocrane
captures the
action around the
Avengers’
meeting table on
the bridge.
soffet line
Carrier Bridge
N
S
E
W
DP: Seamus McGarvey BSC,ASC
Gaffer: Chris Napolitano
Rigging Gaffer: Kevin Lang
Plots: Bryan Booth
1/4 Grid
1/4 Grid
935
930
5K
2 K 2 K
701 702
2 K
8” 2K
black skirt w/ silk target
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
all inner spacelights
1/4 CTB
14
15
spacelight
101
102 103
104
105
106
107
108
112 111 110 109
116
115
114
113
opto 455
opto 461
opto 467
opto 473
opto 703
VL3000
Bay lights
1/8 CTB
425/426 428/429
431/432
433/434
451/452
449/450
437/438
443/444
445/446
686/687
Bay Light
DMX 4x4 ballast on
overhang to doubles
mixed tubes superblue
and 3200K
4021 4022
4025
4029
4031
4027
4033
4035
4024
4023
4019
4020
4036
4037
4026
4039
4x4 mixed tubes
4x2 mixed tubes
w ww.theasc.com June 2012 39
The Helicarrier’s
bridge was
constructed
onstage at
Albuquerque
Studios. In
addition to the
fixtures shown
in this plot, the
set was rigged
with MR16s and
LiteGear LED
LiteRibbon for
accent lighting.
At the bottom of
the page is the
viewing
window, beyond
which the crew
positioned space
lights, soft boxes
and cyc strips to
provide
“daylight”
ambience in the
set.
L
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B
r
y
a
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B
o
o
t
h
.
40 June 2012 American Cinematographer
always keen to light shots for [virtual]
characters; he’d use props such as a
partial Iron Man suit or silicone Hulk
bust. We always rolled on the stand-in
props so we could see how they truly
read in-camera.”
On set in Cleveland, crewmem-
bers demonstrate this point by stepping
into the alley holding gray and silver
reference balls, a color chart, and what
they refer to as “sushi,” a jiggling mass
that’s meant to represent the color and
texture of the aliens’ skin. They take their
places in front of the cameras that have
just rolled on Captain America throwing
his famous shield at one such alien.
After the cameras roll a few seconds of
reference, it’s on to the next setup.
As the main unit works in the
alley, the second unit, led by director
John Mahaffie and cinematographer
Brad Shield, polishes off a few shots
toward the north end of the 42nd Street
set. Shield says his unit’s biggest chal-
lenge on the show was a chase sequence
shot on location along a 1,600' stretch of
subterranean road near Pittsburgh, Pa.
In the sequence, Loki has possessed
Hawkeye and Selvig, and they race
through a tunnel with SHIELD agent
Maria Hill (Cobie Smulders) in hot
pursuit.
After scouting the location,
McGarvey and Napolitano worked with
Shield to devise a lighting plan, and the
second unit then had two weeks to rig
the location and six days to shoot the
action. The team relied mainly on B&M
Lighting Mac Tech LED tubes, which
were placed along the ceiling and on
vertical posts that divided parts of the
road into two lanes. The strategy “really
enhanced the feeling of speed as the
lights flashed through the frame,” says
Shield. “The LED tubes give you more
punch [than a fluorescent], and we could
turn [the ceiling units] on or off to adjust
the distance between sections of light
and dark.
“To give the last few hundred feet
of the tunnel a different look, we put
nook lights on the ceiling that were
wrapped in black,” he continues. “We
also placed nook lights shooting up the

All Together Now
Top: Cleveland, Ohio’s
Public Square was
re-dressed as Stuttgart,
Germany, where Loki
(Tom Hiddleston)
attempts to control the
populace. Middle: The
Avengers arrive on the
scene in their Quinjet,
which was built onstage
in Albuquerque, where
space lights provided
ambient light for the
cockpit. Bottom: The
Avengers take Loki into
custody aboard the
Quinjet; McGarvey
notes that the vehicle
interior was “rigged
with LEDs and small
tungsten sources, and
we keyed with a 2-by-4
Kino Flo.”
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42 June 2012 American Cinematographer
tunnel walls to give some detail where
the overhead lights weren’t playing.”
To capture the action, Shield and
Mahaffie mounted Arri Alexas and
Canon DSLRs to the picture cars, and
they also worked extensively with
Performance Filmworks’ Edge System.
“We had two cameras on the Edge
vehicle, which was driven by Dean
Bailey,” says Shield. “The A camera on
the main arm was operated by Greg
Baldi, with Tony Rivetti pulling focus,
and [operator] Peter Gulla and [1st
AC] Chip Byrd handled the B camera
on a secondary remote head with a long
lens.”
Following Loki’s arrival, Fury
assembles the Avengers aboard
SHIELD’s Helicarrier, a futuristic
aircraft carrier capable of operating both
on water and in air. The Helicarrier’s
bridge, a set built at Albuquerque
Studios, serves as a primary site where
the main characters gather. “We built
many opportunities for accent lighting
into the bridge,” says Chinlund. “I
think we probably broke records for
the amount of [LiteGear] LED
LiteRibbon we used!”
“We used hybrid LEDs that
[dimmer-board operator] Bryan Booth
could adjust to anywhere between
3,200°K and 5,500°K, and we also
installed a lot of red LEDs for ‘emer-
gency’ mode,” adds Napolitano.
The lighting inside the bridge
also included MR16s for accents in
various soffits and cavities, and nine
diffused 4'x4' bay lights gelled with
1
⁄8
CTB for general toplight ambience.
“We also used VL3000s, focusing them
into a bounce card on the floor if we
needed to accent different areas of the
set,” says Napolitano. “They had the
ability to go red for emergency mode.”
The bay lights and VL3000s were
rigged on truss motors so their height
could be adjusted as needed.
The bridge has a circular shape,
about 60 degrees of which is taken up
by a large viewing window. A total of 22
space lights were hung between the
window and a bluescreen for general
ambience, while nine soft boxes pushed
tungsten-generated “daylight” into the
set with more directionality. The center
five soft boxes contained three Arri
T12s gelled with ¼ CTB, while the
outer four boxes each contained three
5Ks gelled with ¼ CTB. Each box was
fronted with a 5'x8' frame of Light Grid
and fitted with two 2Ks gelled with ¼
CTB and ¼ Plus Green (for scenes that
required nighttime ambience). To give a
sense of daylight bouncing off clouds
and filtering into the bridge from below,
22 10-light cyc units gelled with ¼
CTB and 216 diffusion were positioned
beneath the window.
All of this lighting was run back
to Booth’s dimmer board. “I use the
High End Systems Hog 3PC as my
main board and server, and I used a
Lenovo 10-inch touch-screen tablet as
a remote so I could stand on set with
Seamus and Chris,” says Booth. “When
they said, ‘Turn that off,’ I knew exactly
what ‘that’ was, and I only needed to hit
a couple buttons on my tablet to do it.”
Rivaling the scope of the bridge
was the set for the penthouse apartment
of Tony Stark (a.k.a. Iron Man), situ-
ated atop Stark Tower in Manhattan.
Surrounded by bluescreen, the pent-
house set was constructed approxi-
mately 10' above the stage floor and

All Together Now
Fury confabs with Iron Man and Hulk’s alter egos, Tony Stark and Bruce Banner, respectively. These
before-and-after frames showcase the window-replacement work the visual-effects team performed in
the Helicarrier’s laboratory, and also illustrate the CG content that plays on the set’s monitors. The set
was lit practically, predominantly with built-in B&M Lighting Mac Tech LED tubes.
44 June 2012 American Cinematographer
comprised an “exterior” platform (where
Iron Man takes off and lands) that led
via walkway into the glassed-in apart-
ment. “It was a beautiful set with a lot of
modernist elements,” says McGarvey.
“It had very low ceilings, and I knew it
would have to be seen in wide angles to
get the most out of it. I worked quite
closely with James to incorporate prac-
ticals and make sure there was enough
ambience for both day and night
scenes.”
As a direct-sun source outside the
glass wall, McGarvey used a 100K
SoftSun on a blue-wrapped scissor lift.
For additional ambience, “[rigging
gaffer] Kevin Lang put in about 80
space lights gelled with ¼ CTB, and we
flew a silk underneath them,” adds
Napolitano.
“When we went to night mode,
we used about six space lights gelled
with ¼ CTB and ¼ Plus Green,” the
gaffer continues. “Inside the set was a
lot of practical lighting with LEDs.
James built some channels up in the
ceiling, and we [fitted] those with 300-
watt RFL globes on batten strips with
216 diffusion for a bit of accent. We also
put Source Four Pars inside 10-inch
recessed cans with some diffusion.”
A hallmark of the Iron Man films
that continues in The Avengers is the
inside-the-helmet view, which shows
Stark in close-up with superimposed
pop-ups that represent his armor’s
heads-up display. “We wanted to feel
like we were within the helmet, so the
lens had to be quite close to Robert,”
says McGarvey, who used Panavision’s
Frazier Lens System with a 50mm lens.
“At the same time, because there were
going to be CG graphics going around
the head, we didn’t want the focus to fall
off.”
To enable a deep shooting stop of
T8, McGarvey mounted a daylight-
balanced LED ring light around the
lens. Dubbed “the Big Softie,” the light
was approximately 2' wide. “It was
made by Nick Shapley, whose company,
LCA, is based in the U.K.,” says
McGarvey. “The Big Softie was inches
from Robert’s face, and it produced a

All Together Now
Top: Positioned
just behind Grand
Central Station,
Stark Tower
dominates
Manhattan’s
skyline in the
film. Bottom left:
Thor and Loki do
battle outside of
the tower’s
penthouse
apartment; white
curtains were
pulled in front of
the off-camera
bluescreen to
mitigate any blue
spill in the
footage. Bottom
right: Whedon
and Hiddleston
discuss the finer
points of world
domination.
46 June 2012 American Cinematographer
very flattering light. I didn’t want the
complete circle, so I masked off part of
it with black wrap, and you just see two
little triangles in his eyes.”
Back in Cleveland, Whedon and
McGarvey retreat to EFilm’s mobile-
dailies trailer during their lunch break.
Equipped with a grading suite and 12'
projection screen, the trailer was on
hand throughout principal photogra-
phy. EFilm also provided the produc-
tion with a profile look that matched the
monitors in the trailer with the HP
DreamColor monitors used on set and
at digital-imaging technician Daniel
Hernandez’s station.
“I used Technoprops’ four-chan-
nel color system, called Ccolor, which
was developed by Alex Arango,” notes
Hernandez, who sourced most of his
gear from Videohawks. “It allowed me
to color-correct four cameras in real
time using one laptop, instantly copy
looks from camera to camera, and adjust
the image on each camera.”
The filmmakers recorded in
ArriRaw to Codex digital recorders that
Hernandez linked with his station’s IP
address so that each time the cameras
rolled, the recorders would pull the
corresponding camera’s CDL metadata
from Ccolor. “I also created a CDL log
with the scene, take, roll number and
time-code stamp that could be ingested
into EFilm’s color system, and I
recorded reference video to a
CompactFlash card that I handed off to
EFilm at the end of every day,” adds
Hernandez.
After lunch, the crew continues
shooting the sequence involving the
burning Acura. The alien in the scene
is portrayed on set by a performer
wearing a gray bodysuit dotted with
motion-capture markers. “All of the
production-based motion capture was
done live in-camera primarily because it
involved digital characters interacting
with live-action characters,” notes Sirrs.
“Character performances for entirely
digital shots were captured with dedi-
cated motion-capture sessions during
post, and several sessions were done
with Mark Ruffalo so that the idiosyn-
crasies of his performance could be
incorporated into the [all-CG] Hulk.”
The footage shot in downtown
Cleveland is all part of the battle that
dominates The Avengers’ third act, when
the heroes must stand united against the
onslaught of Loki’s alien hordes. East
9th Street provided the backdrop for
one of the sequence’s most explosive
pieces, in which the aliens strafe the

All Together Now
Top and middle:
Cleveland, Ohio’s East
9th Street was dressed
as Manhattan’s 49th
Street for portion’s of
the film’s climactic
battle. Practical
explosions tore
through the location,
and visual effects then
added strafing alien
craft and laser blasts,
and replaced the
background. Bottom:
B-camera/Steadicam
operator George
Billinger captures the
action as Captain
America navigates the
chaos.
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48 June 2012 American Cinematographer
street, sending cars and trucks airborne
amid pillars of flame and billowing
smoke. “The hero angle looked straight
down the street as the explosions came
toward us,” McGarvey details. “It was a
spectacular image, and it really was in-
camera. Dan Sudick, the special-effects
supervisor, is a genius at choreographing
this kind of mayhem.”
All of the production’s cameras,
plus additional Alexas and 435s special-
ordered for the day, were used to capture
the effect. Most of the DSLRs were
placed in crash housings and positioned
in the midst of the action; one 5D was
given to a stunt performer who filmed
as he ran through the chaos, providing
what McGarvey calls “wonderful,
immersive footage.”
The crux of the battle occurs in
front of Grand Central Station, “sort of
the crossroads of New York City,” says
Chinlund. “Because of the viaduct that
reaches over 42nd Street and the
tunnels that surround Grand Central,
it’s a super-exciting setting for the final
battle.” Although principal photography
included a few days of location work in
Manhattan, most of the battle action
was shot in New Mexico, where the
production re-created the viaduct and
established a day-exterior look inside a
400'-long former railroad facility.
“When we found that space, I
urged the producers to shoot inside, and
I assured them we could make it look
like daylight,” says McGarvey. “Initially,
it seemed the cost would be prohibitive,
but shooting inside actually saved us
numerous days because we could keep
shooting in really bad weather. It was a
good investment.”
“Normally, I plead with anyone
who will listen to never shoot an
outdoor sequence on a composite
stage,” says Sirrs, “but the viaduct exte-
rior was a special case. The location is
supposed to be in shadow for 90 percent
of the day, and matching diffuse lighting
conditions is much more achievable
than simulating direct light.”
Rigging key grip John Beran and
his crew hung greenbeds for access to all
of the lamps in the space, and 1,300' of

All Together Now
Top and middle: The
production re-created
the viaduct that
extends over 42nd
Street in front of
Grand Central Station
inside a former
railway facility in New
Mexico, where 22 18K
ArriMax Pars were
bounced into
UltraBounces to
create a daylight
ambience. Bottom:
Hawkeye, Captain
America and Black
Widow steel
themselves for action.
Also visible are
“alien” performers
wearing motion-
capture tracking suits.
Creative confidence.
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greenscreen was positioned around the
perimeter of the set, stretching from the
floor to 50' high. Janusek adds, “We also
hung UltraBounce. If we were close to
the wall and didn’t want green spill, we
could pull back the greenscreen and use
the UltraBounce for fill.”
Working from the greenbeds, the
electricians bounced 22 18K ArriMax
Pars into 40'x40' UltraBounces that ran
the length of the ceiling to create the
overall ambient level. Additionally,
McGarvey says, “We wanted to create
accents that would suggest light bounc-
ing off glassy buildings, so we placed 8-
by-8-foot mirrors [on the greenbeds]
that we hit from the other side with
spots. That created splashes of hard
light that randomized the look and
really made it feel like daylight.”
To facilitate maximum freedom
in the greenscreen space, Sirrs eschewed
background plates in favor of building a
completely virtual environment by
“projecting photographic material onto
building shapes,” he explains. “A dedi-
cated stills unit from Industrial Light &
Magic spent close to six weeks shooting
panoramic spheres with Canon DSLRs
from a variety of vantage points in and
around our key locations. After the
basic building façades and streets were
created from the stills, the digital envi-
ronments still needed to be fleshed out
with everything required to add life to
static imagery. We ended up creating a
huge library of digital dressing that
could be used to populate shots as
needed.”
At press time, McGarvey was
nearing the end of a six-week digital

All Together Now
50
Evans, A-camera
operator Mitch
Dubin (seated
on dolly) and
McGarvey catch
their breaths
amidst the
action in
Cleveland.
grade at EFilm with colorist and ASC
associate member Steven J. Scott. The
first four weeks were devoted to the
2-D grade, and the last two weeks were
spent grading the 3-D conversion,
which was done by StereoD. McGarvey
describes his work in the DI as “quite
straightforward. We’re doing a lot of
windows and some very sophisticated
timing, but it’s not a strident look. The
Avengers is quite sharp and crisp. We
wanted to make it feel believable, like it’s
really happening.”
During the shoot, McGarvey and
Whedon found “key moments that we
knew would play well in 3-D, but we
weren’t trying to make things leap out of
the screen,” the cinematographer notes.
“The great thing about shooting 2-D
and converting in post is that there was
no sense of being corralled by 3-D while
we were shooting; it was just going to be
an enhancement at the end of the day.
“It’s with the greatest surprise and
pleasure that I’m watching the extraor-
dinary 3-D conversion that StereoD
made under the supervision of Graham
Clark,” McGarvey continues. “For the
action sequences in particular, it really
symphonizes the whole thing, and
enhances the sense of the city in jeop-
ardy and the power of these characters.
“I embarked on The Avengers out
of curiosity,” he notes. “I wanted to work
with Joss, I wanted to learn more about
visual effects, and I wanted to work on a
movie of this scale. What surprised me
is that once I got beyond all the trucks
and mayhem that accompany a film of
this nature, the inner sanctum of the set
was as recognizable as any low-budget
movie I’ve done. There are the same
constraints, concerns and energy, the
same instincts at play, and the same
heart and brain and eye.”
Back in Cleveland, as the sun
approaches the horizon and the martini
shot draws near, Whedon observes, “A
movie this big is a strange hybrid. It’s
utilitarian in the sense that it’s almost
run-and-gun. You’ve got 12 cameras
because it’s a big action scene, or you’ve
got one day to shoot five pages of
dialogue. Either way, Seamus makes it
all really sing.” ●
Cleveland.
A GREAT PLACE TO MAKE MOVIES.
216.623.3910
clevelandfilm.com
To find out more, contact the Greater Cleveland Film Commission.
MONDAY, AUGUST 8TH, 2011 4:05 PM
TECHNICAL SPECS
1.85:1
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Arri Alexa, 435;
Canon EOS 5D Mark II, 7D
Panavision Primo, Frazier Lens
System; Canon EF
Kodak Vision3 500T 5219
Digital Intermediate
Stereoscopic Conversion
51

52 June 2012 American Cinematographer
T
he dramatic adventure Snow White and the Huntsman
offers a new interpretation of the Brothers Grimm fairy
tale, which pits an evil, jealous queen against a beautiful
maiden. When a magical mirror informs Queen
Ravenna (Charlize Theron) that her stepdaughter, Snow
White (Kristen Stewart), is destined to surpass her in beauty
and become “the fairest of them all,” the evil queen orders
Snow White’s death, sending the young woman fleeing into
the forest. Ravenna sends The Huntsman (Chris
Hemsworth) in pursuit, but instead of killing Snow White,
he trains her in the art of combat. The young woman then
joins forces with a team of dwarves to form an army, and they
return to the castle to confront Ravenna.
At director Rupert Sanders’ side on Snow White was
cinematographer Greig Fraser, whose recent features include
Bright Star (AC Oct. ’09) and Let Me In (AC Oct. ’10). Fraser
and Sanders had previously collaborated on a number of
commercials, and Fraser credits the director with being “very
good at taking the bones of an idea and turning it into some-
thing interesting through his choice of actors, costumes, loca-
tions and script. He’s a practical guy who uses what’s in front
of him extraordinarily well.”
The duo wanted the camerawork to be “loose and free,
while still feeling true to a fairy tale,” Fraser continues. “We
wanted to submerge the viewer in this lush world of big loca-
tions and epic scale, but at the same time, we also wanted to
be able to respond to small, intimate moments with our
actors. On our past projects, we endeavored to shoot in real
locations, using natural light, with only the tiniest amount of
equipment, and we hoped to bring the spirit of that approach
on Snow White. We tried very hard to keep the [filmmaking]
process as simple and quick as possible.
“This sometimes meant having extra pieces of equip-
Snow White and the
Huntsman, shot by
Greig Fraser,
presents an action-
oriented version of
the classic fairy tale.
By Jay Holben
•|•
Beauty
in
Battle
w ww.theasc.com June 2012 53
ment at the ready,” he continues. “We
used two cranes, a 44-foot Moviebird
and a 50-foot SuperTechnocrane, for
almost the entire shoot, but we mostly
used them as a very quick way to put
the camera where we wanted it. We
wanted to avoid the sweeping crane
moves audiences have come to expect
from a story like this, and instead keep
the camera much more centered in the
moment.”
After testing several camera
systems in prep, the filmmakers
decided to shoot most of the picture in
anamorphic 35mm, and use Super
35mm for some visual-effects work and
65mm for select shots. “Shooting
65mm goes against the idea of keeping
it simple,” Fraser acknowledges, “but
the grandeur of the format really lent
itself to this story. The 65mm material
looks absolutely beautiful, and I wish
we’d been able to shoot more of
it. Panavision’s System 65 was a bit
bulkier and noisier than our light-
weight XL package, so we mostly used
it for wide shots and establishing shots,
because I would often find that
[35mm] wide lenses didn’t resolve the
fine detail in those shots as much as I
liked.” He composed the 65mm mate-
rial in 2.40:1 common center, with a
top and bottom crop.
Fraser shot Snow White on three
Kodak negatives, Vision2 50D 5201,
Vision3 250D 5207 and the recently
introduced Vision3 500T 5230. He
typically rates his stocks at
2
⁄3 of a stop
overexposed, “but for some scenes set in
snow, I would pull that back to just
1
⁄3
of a stop over.”
The camera package, provided
by Panavision London, included
anamorphic lenses in the G-series, E-
series and Primo lines, in addition to
spherical Primos and System 65 lenses.
“The G-series lenses are great on skin,”
notes Fraser. “They’re sharp, but not
pin sharp. They have a nice falloff that
really works for a kind of glamorous
feel. With Charlize and Kristen, they
looked fantastic, and I didn’t need any
filtration at all.
“When I was framing up with
the System 65 lenses, I was regularly
reminded of the image quality of
some of my own Hasselblad and
Mamiya lenses on my medium-format
cameras,” he adds.
In addition to lending Snow
White’s adventure “a great sense of
scale,” Fraser found that anamorphic
was “really useful for pulling our actors
out of the background, especially in the
forest,” thanks to its shallow depth-of-
field. “Natural forests are visually busy,
and they can look pretty to the eye but
less so on camera. A limited depth-of-
field can help a lot.”
The film’s story spans more than
20 years, and two different forest looks
were required: an Enchanted Forest
and a Dark Forest. After watching a
number of movies that involved forest
U
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.
Opposite: The
Huntsman (Chris
Hemsworth)
apprehends Snow
White (Kristen
Stewart) in the
Dark Forest. This
page, top to
bottom: Firelight
keys Queen
Ravenna (Charlize
Theron) as she
schemes to outwit
her enemies; the
Huntsman is called
before the queen
for a grim
assignment;
director of
photography Greig
Fraser preps a
scene in Ravenna’s
throne room.
54 June 2012 American Cinematographer
sets built onstage, Sanders and Fraser
lobbied production to shoot forest
scenes on location. (The shoot was
based at Pinewood Studios.) “Rupert
and I pushed quite strongly to shoot
our exteriors outside,” recalls Fraser.
“There’s no question that you have
more control inside, but we wanted
something that would look more natu-
ralistic, and, in fact, we wanted to
remove some of that control so we
could be free to respond to happy acci-
dents. We also wanted to be able to
move the camera freely, and building
our forest sets outside enabled us to do
that.”
The thickly wooded Dark
Forest, a grim place where only unusual
life forms survive, was built in a clear-
ing at Black Park, and it was
surrounded by an access track. “We
could move 360 degrees and not be
concerned about running out of back-
ground,” says Fraser. “Shooting with a
real forest as our backing rather than a
Translite, bluescreen or painted back-
ing gave our wide shots incredible
depth.
“I have to say, we got very lucky
with the weather,” he continues. “It was
the one thing we were most worried
about in terms of working outdoors,
but we ended up with many days of
bright sun and great weather. Rupert is
British, and he was shocked that we
actually had to be concerned about

Beauty in Battle
Top to bottom: Snow
White finds a brief
respite in the
Enchanted Forest;
Ravenna considers her
options; B-camera
operator Simon Baker
(left) and B-camera
1st AC Shaun Cobley
prep a shot depicting
one of Ravenna’s
consultations with her
magic mirror. On the
tripod in the
foreground is Fraser’s
Canon DSLR, which he
used on most setups
to shoot stills that he
could grade and send
to Deluxe London as a
reference for color
and contrast.
in night interiors, and they often keyed
Theron in the cavernous rooms in the
queen’s castle. “We used a mix of candles
and very large flames — a lot of flam-
beaus — throughout that set,” says
Fraser. “Initially, we thought we’d hook
the covered wagons to flicker generators
and just use them as additional firelight,
but they put a great light into Charlize’s
eyes, so we wound up using them
around her quite a bit.
“We had to be careful to avoid
any sources that felt too electronic,” the
cinematographer continues. “I’m a big
fan of LEDs for their low power
consumption, low heat and high output,
shadows. He’d say, ‘There aren’t any
shadows in England!’ Ironically, that
made our Dark Forest scenes difficult,
because we’d planned on a lot of over-
cast days with constant drizzle! My
gaffer, Perry Evans, wound up flying a
couple of 40-by-40-foot solids on
construction cranes to block out the
sun. Anything larger would have been
too hard to control in the wind.”
When the sun did retreat behind
the clouds, Fraser and Evans incorpo-
rated the same solids to help shape the
shadowless natural light. “We’d bring
them down to about 20 feet above the
set to create our negative fill,” Evans
explains. “The 40-by-40 size worked
well because if the wind caught them,
the guys could get a handle on them
instead of running for cover, and we
could [use them together] to get a 40-
by-80 sail if we needed that size.” As
an additional safety measure, the crew
cut 10' slits in the solids so the wind
could pass through the material.
When a little extra light was
needed for daytime forest scenes, two
Leelium 8K HMI lighting balloons
were tethered to the construction
cranes.
To help with contrast, and to
deepen the feel of the forest, Fraser also
employed a lot of fog. “It does a great
job at softening the background.
Continuity with smoke is always hard,
especially when the afternoon wind
gusts up, but the right amount helped
shape the forest in a way that nothing
else could.”
For night work in the forest,
Leelium 16K and 24K tungsten
balloons “were used in the deep back-
ground to give us some depth, and then
we used real firelight/flambeaus and
covered wagons [batten strips with
single bulbs covered in diffusion] to do
close-ups,” says Evans. “The wagons
had high-wattage bulbs in them, and
we dimmed them down to get the color
temp we wanted.”
The covered wagons were also
used in tandem with practical firelight
Top: Snow White detects a fearsome creature in the Dark Forest. Bottom: Stewart stands by in
the atmospheric fog as the filmmakers prep a crane shot in the set.
w ww.theasc.com June 2012 55
56 June 2012 American Cinematographer
but their light felt too artificial. The
effect of a traditional [tungsten] bulb is
very natural and very warm, both in
color and in overall feel. I liked the
covered wagons because they matched
the color and feel of the firelight easily.
If we needed more [output] from
them, we’d simply use higher-intensity
bulbs, and if we needed less, we’d
switch those out for 40-watt bulbs. We
did use a dimmer, but very little; we
didn’t want the color temperature to
drop too much.
“Also, I’ve found that in the DI,
I will often make the image a bit darker
than what we originally intended. If
you can put a bit more light in an
actor’s eyes on the set, you have more
room to darken the image [in post] and
still keep his or her eyes alive. The
covered wagons were great for that.”
Fraser and Evans tried to design
the lighting to facilitate 360-degree
shooting at all times. “It makes things
go a lot faster if you can take that
approach,” notes Fraser, “and it frees
the director and actors to make choices
they wouldn’t otherwise be able to
make.” However, incorporating a 360-
degree lighting plan was no small feat
in Ravenna’s mirror room, a set that had
one main entrance, tiny windows and a
domed ceiling. “There was a large fire
pit in the center of the room, and there
was a vent in the top of the set to let out
the heat and smoke,” Fraser explains.
“Perry and I used that vent for most of
our lighting.”
Evans elaborates, “We used five
half-Dinos around the edge of the hole.
We warmed them a bit with ½ CTS
and used some Hampshire Frost to
bring the individual bulbs together as
one source.” The crew turned the unit
on or off as needed. “We always had
one of them going as a strong backlight
to camera,” notes Evans, “and we had
one pointing straight down into the
room that was on most of the time.”
The queen’s throne room is an
equally imposing space. To represent
the darkness and decay that spreads
with the duration of her rule, produc-
tion designer Dominic Watkins applied
increasingly dark coats of paint to the

Beauty in Battle
Right: In the
heat of battle,
Prince William
(Sam Claflin),
Snow White’s
childhood
sweetheart,
prepares to
confront an
opponent.
Below: Fraser
eyes a setup.
Behind him is
the production’s
gaffer, Perry
Evans.
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58 June 2012 American Cinematographer
walls as the story progressed. “Of course,
as the walls got darker, we needed more
light!” says Fraser. “Additionally, we
wanted to be able to shoot some high-
speed in the throne room, and with each
doubling of speed, you need to double
the light. It adds up very quickly.”
The solution, he continues, was
overhead soft boxes “that were essen-
tially on steroids.” Evans explains, “We
built 10 40-by-40-foot soft boxes that
each held 24 5K space lights, and we
usually used two on each set. We were
able to run just a few [of the space
lights] for the 24-fps scenes, add a few
more when it got dark, and then really
crank them all when we shot high-
speed [of varying frame rates].” 20Ks
and ¾ Wendy Lights were positioned
outside the throne-room windows for
additional illumination.
The complications of shooting in
many of the production’s sets were miti-
gated by the use of previsualization,
which Halon Entertainment provided
under the guidance of previs supervisor
Brad Alexander. “Halon created 3-D
models of quite a number of our sets,
and before any actual sets were built, I
could go in with a virtual camera, select
any lens I wanted and start [planning
shots],” says Fraser. The virtual camera-
work was realized with an OptiTrack
motion-capture system.
“The mirror room was an espe-
cially complicated set, and we wanted to

Beauty in Battle
Top to bottom:
Snow White is
affected by the
dreaded poison
apple; the
freshly trained
warrior prepares
to attack the
queen’s soldiers;
Fraser fine-tunes
a shot for the
battle scene.
make sure the construction didn’t have
to be over-engineered,” Fraser contin-
ues. “With the previs, we were able to
see exactly what we needed and figure
out which walls needed to be wild, and
the art department could plan
construction accordingly.”
The previs also helped the film-
makers plan the two epic battle scenes
that bookend the film. The first battle
depicts how Ravenna infiltrates the
kingdom, and the final battle, which
incorporates hundreds of soldiers on
horseback along a beach, shows Snow
White’s attempt to defeat the queen.
“It’s always a challenge to coordi-
nate that many people and animals,”
Fraser says of the climactic battle. “But
we were also dealing with the ocean
and its changing tides, so each day we
had a very narrow window to execute
this huge battle.”
Using 3-D previs models of the
beach, Fraser and Sanders could exper-
iment with any number of camera
placements and moves, thereby deter-
mining the best way to cover the action
before they hit the sand. “On the
computer, resetting hundreds of horses
and soldiers to try another lens only
takes the click of a button, whereas on
set that would take you at least half an
hour,” says Fraser. “We could also plan
our helicopter moves, which had to
take into account a huge CG castle that
would be added in post, and then give
that previs to [aerial cinematographer]
John Marzano. We solved a lot of prob-
lems and answered a lot of questions
ahead of time using those previs
renderings.”
Of course, no Snow White tale
would be complete without dwarves. In
this case, there are eight, all of whom
were portrayed by actors of normal
height: Ian McShane, Ray Winstone,
Nick Frost, Brian Gleeson, Eddie
Marsan, Johnny Harris, Toby Jones and
Bob Hoskins. “On a day-to-day basis,
we had the challenge of making the

Beauty in Battle
60
Fraser checks the light and hairstylist Bonnie
Clevering tweaks her work as the B-camera team
(background, from left: Cobley, Baker and loader
Tom Wade) preps a high-angle shot of Snow White
in repose.
dwarves look smaller without using
forced perspective or CGI unless we
had to,” says Fraser. “We did play with
some basic forced perspective in certain
shots by putting the dwarves farther
away and the other actors closer to the
camera, but because of our loose
camera style, we weren’t very precise
with that, and we had to figure out
faster solutions.
“Through testing and discussion
with [visual-effects supervisors] Cedric
Nicolas-Troyan and Phil Brennan, we
created a toolbox of techniques that we
determined would work very well,”
continues the cinematographer. “The
simplest involved digging a trench for
the dwarves to walk in, or putting the
other actors on a platform that was
about 14 inches high. We also used
slightly wider lenses to shoot the
dwarves and positioned the camera a bit
above their eyelines to keep them more
toward the bottom of the frame, creat-
ing a lot of headroom. These simple
techniques were surprisingly effective,
and when we combined them with a
wide CG shot, where you see the
dwarves in relationship to the other
characters, you buy it without question.”
Deluxe Laboratories in London
processed the production’s 35mm
footage and generated digital dailies
(timed by Darren Rae), while FotoKem
in Burbank processed the 65mm nega-
tive, scanned it and e-maileddetailed
lab reports and reference JPEGs to the
set throughout the shoot. For the DI,
FotoKem scanned the 65mm negative
again at 8K, and EFilm in Hollywood
created 2K scans of the 35mm nega-
tive. The filmmakers carried out the
final color correction with Yvan Lucas
at EFilm.
“All in all, although this is an epic
medieval adventure, Rupert and I tried
to follow the philosophy that simpler is
better,” concludes Fraser. “Even our
high-tech previs really just allowed us
the freedom to experiment before
things got too expensive, and to
communicate our ideas more effectively
to our crew. Throughout the shoot, we
strove to keep the storytelling process at
the forefront of our work.” ●
61
TECHNICAL SPECS
2.40:1
Anamorphic 35mm,
4-perf Super 35mm and 65mm
Panaflex XL2, Millennium;
Panavision System 65;
PanArri 235
Panavision G-series, E-series,
Primo and System 65
Kodak Vision2 50D 5201;
Vision3 250D 5207, 500T 5230
Digital Intermediate
62 June 2012 American Cinematographer
Bruno Delbonnel, ASC, AFC
helps Tim Burton give
Dark Shadows a satirical ’70s twist.
By Benjamin B
•|•
T
im Burton’s Dark Shadows is loosely adapted from a
daytime soap opera featuring vampires, witches and
werewolves that aired on U.S. television from 1966-
1971. Asked whether he would describe his film as a
comedy, Burton replies, “It’s a real mixture of feelings and
emotions, which makes it difficult to place in a genre. It’s not
like we were remaking the TV show; the movie has more to
do with my memory of it. Setting the story in 1972 brought
back that time for me. You go through weird ages in life, and
14 is one of them. You forget about it until you explore it a
little [as an adult] and realize how disturbing the whole thing
was!”
Dark Shadows cinematographer Bruno Delbonnel,
ASC, AFC recalls that by following Burton’s lead, he imag-
ined a mélange of genres in the approach to the picture,
“something between a soap opera, which is overlit and where
you see everything, and a dramatic film, with a little taste of a
horror film. I wanted to create an image that corresponded to
Tim’s world, a world that is elegant, subtle and poetic.”
“Bruno really thinks as an artist,” notes Burton. “This
movie has an odd tone, and we were going for an odd acting
style that tended toward soap opera, and it was important that
the look [would] help support that. The feel, the look and the
set all helped to inform the acting style.”
The story starts in the 18th century, when Barnabas
Blood
Relatives
w ww.theasc.com June 2012 63
P
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.
Collins (Johnny Depp) is a wealthy
playboy in Collinsport, Maine, a town
dominated by his family and their fish-
ery business. Barnabas is romantically
involved with Angelique (Eva Green),
who turns out to be a witch, but aban-
dons her for a woman of his more
refined class, Josette (Bella Heathcote).
Hell hath no fury like a witch scorned,
and Angelique kills her rival, transforms
Barnabas into a vampire and buries him
“undead.”
Two hundred years later, a
construction crew accidentally unearths
his coffin. Barnabas goes on a killing
spree and returns to his family home,
which is now inhabited by some of his
descendants, including Elizabeth
(Michelle Pfeiffer), as well as live-in
psychiatrist Dr. Hoffman (Helena
Bonham Carter) and a nanny (also
played by Heathcote) who is the spit-
ting image of Josette.
Much of the fun of the film
comes from Barnabas’ discovery of the
modern world, including cars, TV and
rock ’n’ roll. He attempts to help his
family regain prosperity, but is foiled by
Angelique, who is now running the
town. The witch has not aged a day, and
she comes to seduce Barnabas and try to
destroy him for good.
To make the story’s 1972 setting
convincing, the filmmakers decided to
shoot on 35mm and avoid 3-D. “I
wanted this to look like a Seventies
movie,” says Burton. Delbonnel shot
the entire picture on Kodak Vision3
500T 5219 negative stock, pushing it to
ISO 800 “because all of the sets were
very dark mahogany, and we needed to
see them properly. I pushed in order to
keep my lighting list down. I usually
shot at T2.8. We needed a rich negative
for the DI work I had planned.”
Tapping Panavision London for
his camera package, Delbonnel shot
mostly with an Arricam Studio and
Opposite page:
After spending
200 years
imprisoned in a
grave, vampire
Barnabas Collins
(Johnny Depp,
center) returns to
his family estate
in 1972, only to
find it occupied by
his dysfunctional
descendants. This
page, top: Victoria
Winters (Bella
Heathcote) arrives
at Collinwood
Mansion after
landing a job as
the family’s
nanny. Bottom:
Barnabas admires
the craftsmanship
of his former
home while being
led through its
stately halls by
caretaker Willie
Loomis (Jackie
Earle Haley).
64 June 2012 American Cinematographer

Blood Relatives
Cooke S4 prime lenses, which he calls
“absolutely magnificent.” Both Burton
and Delbonnel favor fairly short focal
lengths; the lens of choice was the
27mm, followed by the 21mm, and the
32mm was used for close-ups.
After scouting a number of fish-
ing villages, the production decided it
would be more cost effective to build a
period set onstage at Pinewood Studios
than try to dress an existing town to
resemble coastal Maine in 1972. The
huge set included a small harbor in the
Pinewood water tank, with flat-hull
boats that could be navigated in the
shallow waters, and a large cannery
building that is burned down over the
course of the story.
Both Delbonnel and camera
operator Des Whelan stress the
elegance and simplicity of Burton’s mise
en scène, suggesting that the director’s
unusual visions are delivered in a classi-
cal form. Whelan surmises that Burton’s
beginnings as an animator might under-
lie his economy: “Animators are very
aware of what’s needed to tell a story,
and they don’t shoot more than that.
Tim doesn’t like loads of coverage; he
wants to make the story as lean as possi-
ble, with no fat. You can almost take the
clapperboards off and make the movie.
“He also has an uncanny ability to
hold the entire picture in his head, with
all the beats and rhythms that go into
making a film,” continues Whelan. “He
has a very strong visual style. He
concentrates on one image at a time.
Most of the time, it’s a single-camera
show, and he likes the camera to feel like
a secret observer tiptoeing around what
the actors are doing.”
“Tim’s master shot is not an
establishing shot,” Delbonnel notes.
“He will go wide not to show [the
setting], but to show the actors’ body
language. When Michelle Pfeiffer walks
in a scene, it’s not Michelle Pfeiffer
walking, it’s her character. The same is
true with Johnny Depp. Tim trusts his
actors completely, and he uses every-
thing they have to offer, not just their
voices or faces.”
According to Whelan, Burton
avoided over-the-shoulder shots, prefer-
ring clean singles that were often placed
in the middle of the frame, with the
actor looking almost straight into the
camera. “We’d have eyelines inside the
matte box,” he recalls. “The actors
couldn’t see beyond the camera, which
was literally a foot away from their face.
It’s almost like we were X-raying them!
Tim likes to bring the audience right up
close.” Burton notes, “This movie is
based on a soap opera, so it was impor-
tant that it have an intimacy to it. It’s
Top: Barnabas
represents the
height of 18th-
century fashion as
he strikes a
familiar pose.
Bottom: A wide-
eyed Victoria
examines the
Gothic trappings
of her new gig.
not a special-effects movie. We wanted
to emphasize the actors.”
One of the film’s conceits is that
Barnabas the vampire bursts into flames
whenever sunlight touches his body.
“Sunlight,” says Delbonnel, “was one of
my principal constraints. There could
be no direct sunlight on the main char-
acter, so for the majority of the film he
is in a kind of a penumbra. Even at the
breakfast table, for example, I put
sunlight at one end and not at the other,
where Barnabas was sitting.”
The Collinses’ long dining table
provides a good example of Delbonnel’s
lighting approach in interiors. For the
wide shot, he beamed two 20K Fresnels
through the set’s two windows to
provide sunlight on one end of the table
and the background wall, softening the
hard lights with ¼ Grid. When moving
in for a closer shot of an actor, he “added
more diffusion and some fill light.” He
softened the window source with two
additional diffusion frames, for a total
of three. The closest diffusion was posi-
tioned just outside the frame near the
actor, and its glow wrapped around the
person’s face. “I start with 20Ks, and
there is almost nothing at the other
end,” laughs Delbonnel.
The cinematographer then
added a 1K Lowel Rifa light on the
same side as the window, but closer to
camera. He diffused the Rifa twice, first
with Grid Cloth, and then with a thick-
ness of Depron, a polystyrene sheet
used for heating insulation. This double
diffusion created a wonderfully soft fill
“that allowed me to lift the blacks
which aren’t filled in the wide shot,” he
explains. The last option was to add
another Rifa on the shadow side.
Delbonnel notes that this light-
ing approach saves time because it does-
n’t involve relighting the entire set, and
it can be fine-tuned by changing diffu-
sion materials. “For example, if I don’t
have enough light, I can swap 216 for
251 diffusion and get one more stop, but
that means the contrast will be higher,
so I might add a little light on the
shadow side. I’m only playing on the
contrast and the diffusion with fill
light.” He adds that the diffusion frame
and fill lights are so close to the actor
that they do not have any effect on the
background.
w ww.theasc.com June 2012 65
Top: Barnabas has a
word with the
mistress of the
house, matriarch
Elizabeth Collins
Stoddard (Michelle
Pfeiffer). Bottom:
The undead guest
attempts to
reassume his place
at the head of
the table.
66 June 2012 American Cinematographer
“I always diffuse the source unless
I want a ray of light,” he says. “I don’t
like hard light except for the
Molebeam, which is interesting because
it offers a very beautiful parallel ray.
Otherwise, I diffuse everything, even
more so now with Depron. It’s beautiful
and much heavier than 216, which is
one of Lee’s strongest diffusions. Of
course, you need much stronger lights
because it’s so thick.”
Delbonnel used 10K and 20K
Molebeams to create the shafts of
sunlight that threaten Barnabas. In one
such scene, Angelique magically opens
the living-room curtains to send him
fleeing into the shadows. Delbonnel
added a bit of smoke to delineate the
sunbeam and give a little more expo-
sure. “Smoke is like flashing film — it
lights the scene,” he observes. He over-
exposed the painted backings outside
the windows by 2½-3 stops, noting,
“When you’re in a dark setting, the
outside looks overexposed to your eye.
“I like soft shadows,” he empha-
sizes. “My work is based on a very direc-
tional light that is also very soft. I vary
the contrast of the image with the
quantity of fill I add. If I start with a
very soft image, I can make it very
contrasty by not putting in any fill, for
example. My lighting is usually from
the side, with more or less fill.” He
laughs and adds, “I’m incapable of doing
frontlight! I admire those who can.”
The cinematographer explains
how he established an eerie, low-

Blood Relatives
Director Tim
Burton (at right
in top photos)
and
cinematographer
Bruno Delbonnel,
ASC, AFC create
an appropriately
“fab” vibe for a
scene in which
Barnabas enjoys
a slow dance
with Victoria.
Three Mac 2000
programmable
lights were aimed
at the disco ball
to throw big
squares of light
on the walls,
which were also
enhanced by
Seventies-style
lighting units
that combined
rotating discs
with colored oils.
68 June 2012 American Cinematographer
contrast mood for night exteriors,
including an important scene in which
Angelique magically sets the Collins
cannery on fire. “It’s a soft, moonless
night, but you can see everything. I like
to build an image up; it’s very rare for
me to film a black image, although I
might darken it later, in the DI. I want
the negative to be exposed; the silver in
the blacks has to be touched by light.
That gives you activated silver and beau-
tiful blacks. If you have unexposed silver,
it’s no good.”
Illumination for the fire scene
came from five large soft boxes
suspended from 98' cranes. Each box
was covered with ½ Grid and contained
12 space lights (with six 800-watt bulbs
each), for a hefty total of 58K.
Delbonnel’s crew also placed two 31K
Quarter Wendy Lights (with 48 650-
watt bulbs) to define the edges of the
buildings from the side. He lit the giant
bluescreen with two other cranes with
Quarter Wendy Lights, supplemented
by 10Ks for the bottom. He asked the
special-effects supervisor if he could
make the fire red “to make it seem more
magical than orange or yellow.”
A party in the ballroom at Collins
manor is marked by the appearance of
rock star Alice Cooper, who, at a vigor-
ous 70, plays himself at age 30, disguis-
ing his wrinkles with his trademark
makeup. Dominating the ballroom set
is a giant disco ball whose mirrors were
hit by three Mac 2000 programmable
lights. “We needed extremely direc-
tional sources to get big squares of light
on the walls,” says Delbonnel. “A 2K
Fresnel, for example, will give you noth-
ing.” The walls were also speckled by
“lighting units from the Seventies that
had rotating discs with colored oils.”
Small, programmable LED lights were
scattered throughout the space, notably
underneath the go-go dancers, and

Blood Relatives
Top: Making the
best of less-than-
luxurious
accommodations,
Barnabas seeks
some shuteye in
a cupboard.
Bottom: The
dapper vampire
must adapt as he
experiences the
culture shock of
his Seventies
surroundings.
70 June 2012 American Cinematographer
more Mac 2000s and some rock ’n’ roll
Par cans were built into the set. Twenty
very diffused space lights were placed on
the ceiling “to give us a base level” from
above.
A key to the movie’s painterly
look is the fashioning of what could be
called “DI dailies” in the production’s
on-set theater, which was manned by
colorist Peter Doyle. Burton stresses the
importance of defining the look during
production. “You know, you can do
anything in the DI, but you can do so
much that it feels kind of pushed,” he
observes. “We were trying to achieve the
look early on, in the original photogra-
phy. Of course, there was a little room to
[refine things in post], but Bruno and I
both feel that you should get it while
you’re shooting it. When we did find
the right tone with the color timing, it
just felt right. It felt like the Seventies
movies that I recall from my youth.”
Delbonnel calls Doyle, with
whom he first collaborated on 2009’s
Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince ,
“an essential partner” in creating the
look of Dark Shadows. “Peter is my
right-hand man. I have absolute confi-
dence in him. He has a great taste, and
he knows what I like. We developed
software for our work that goes very far.”
Doyle notes that getting the look
right in the dailies enables filmmakers
to avoid the pitfalls of DI work that goes
against the grain of the shoot. “If you
bend the image around too much in
post, I think the audience can feel it.
They may not be able to define it, but it
puts a little veil between them and the
performances.”
He chuckles as he asserts that the
DI-dailies process offers “the nirvana of
the rushes looking the way the cine-
matographer wants them to! But there’s
a philosophy that goes with that. What
I tried to offer Bruno was the idea of not
constantly bending the negative by
hand, but instead building something
like a custom print stock.” Making the
dailies timing interactive with the
shooting “is a holistic approach, and it
restores control [of the look] to the
cinematographer on set.
“We were building a color
process that was dependent on the
negative and how it was lit, and the two
became quite interactive,” continues
Doyle. “Bruno knew how things would
react to color temperature and exposure,
and he could decide to go for a certain
exposure and more or less color. By the
end of the shoot, we had a pretty good
idea of the picture in terms of the grade,
and when we sat down for the final
timing, we knew what to do. There
were no surprises.”
Doyle’s approach was to create
automatic processes, rather than grade
everything by hand. He called upon
color scientist/ASC associate member
Joshua Pines and pipeline engineer
Niklas Aldergreen at Technicolor to
create a toolbox of custom scripts, trans-
form functions and matrices to imple-
ment look elements. “If Bruno asked for
a specific adjustment more than three
times, we could automate it, and it
could be easily applied to the entire
film’s look,” says Doyle.
Delbonnel recalls that his search
for Dark Shadows’ look included a vari-
ety of references, starting with Alfred
Hitchcock’s Vertigo, shot in Technicolor
by Robert Burks, ASC. “That vibrant
Hollywood film, whose actors glow, was
my starting point. It also had the fairy-
tale aspect of Kim Novak’s character
coming back as a ‘ghost.’” With a laugh,
he acknowledges that he’s “not sure
people will see the relationship”
between the two films. “Sometimes
Top: Crane-
mounted
softboxes
provide general
illumination for
the seaside town
of Collinsport,
Maine, a set
built on the
backlot at
Pinewood
Studios in
England.
Bottom:
Delbonnel takes
a hands-on
approach to his
lighting.

Blood Relatives
references are very personal, just a basis
for reflection.
“Vertigo led me to wonder what
twisted Technicolor would look like,”
continues the cinematographer. “Maybe
it [would look like] a 3-strip failure, or
like something’s missing. So I thought
of the early attempts at color, like 2-strip
color. That looks twisted because it’s
only red and green, and something is
missing, which interests me. It’s a
distortion that is pretty interesting on
skin tones, and it seems to correspond to
Tim Burton’s world. It has softness.
Lips are a little magenta, and back-
grounds are a little blue-green.”
Doyle elaborates, “We threw
away the blue channel from the negative
— we didn’t use it at all — and instead
created a synthetic blue based on the red
and the green, and then we just twisted
that. The image looks kind of normal,
not like the wacky 2-strip Technicolor
that gave you purple grass and the like.
It’s just enough of a twist to make it feel
not contemporary and not real.”
Another vivid element of the DI
look was the narrowing of the color
palette. “That’s Peter’s genius,” says
Delbonnel. “He conceived of matrices
that allowed us to make selected colors
with incredible purity.” To achieve this,
Doyle asked Pines to build a 3-D look-
up table that would “slice the color spec-
trum into six sectors: RGB and CYM,”
says the colorist. “So all bright-yellow
items were only the one shade of yellow,
and all bright-red items were only the
one shade of red. Because we did that
across the six vectors, it kind of mixed
back again, so the result was like a six-
color print. If you see a bright, intense
red in the image, there is no other bright

Blood Relatives
72
Delbonnel lines
up a shot amid
some carefully
positioned
bounce light.
red in the film, and that is exactly the
same color as the blood that appears
throughout the film. The process sepa-
rates out the colors just enough to make
it a little interpretive; it’s somewhat
subtle. You could say that all of this was
driven by the desire to give a little sense
of interpretation to the scene rather than
[create] a realistic depiction. It really
worked. It gives the film a real snap.”
The DI work also included a
selective application of sharpening.
Doyle explains, “As the title implies, the
film is a lot about blacks and shadows, so
we pulled the image apart based on
density and applied selective sharpening,
so that as the picture goes from shadow
to brightness, it goes from over-sharp-
ened darks to blurred whites. However,
the areas sharpened in the blacks were
only sharpened in the broader shapes,
like the silhouette of a person or the
outline of a building. It gives the image
quite a 3-D quality; it separates the
actors from the set.”
This was coupled with removal of
the grain in the bright skin-tone
regions. This looks particularly striking
on Depp’s close-ups, yielding a soft,
painterly blooming on his white face
while keeping his dark eyes sharp.
Delbonnel wraps up the inter-
view by complimenting his Dark
Shadows crew, including 1st AC Julian
Bucknell, key grip Steve Ellingworth
and gaffer Chuck Finch. The cine-
matographer notes that Burton’s highly
collaborative working method is “great.
He asks everyone for our ideas during
prep, and if you give him an idea, he
might come back a week later with your
idea reworked — there’s maybe 10
percent of your idea, which he has trans-
formed into a Tim Burton idea. It’s
wonderful to work that way. The film is
really his world, but he truly collabo-
rates.”
Burton strikes a similar note at
the end of his interview, singling out
Delbonnel’s contributions to the film.
“This is the first time I’ve worked with
Bruno, and I loved it. He was really
thinking about the style of this film, not
his style, and he got into the soul and
character of the film.
“Bruno brings a different thing to
each of his films, and I love that,” the
director adds. “Working with him, you
don’t feel like you’re making a
‘Hollywood movie’; you feel like you’re
making a film that’s an artistic endeavor.
That feeling is important. That’s what
it’s all about.” ●
TECHNICAL SPECS
1.85:1
35mm
Arricam Studio, Lite
Cooke S4, Angenieux Optimo
Kodak Vision3 500T 5219
Digital Intermediate
73
“W
hen people ask me what this movie is like, I tell
them it’s a Hope and Crosby road picture, a
comedy in the classic Hawksian sense,” says Men
in Black III cinematographer Bill Pope, ASC.
Directed by Barry Sonnenfeld, the new installment of the
popular franchise finds Men in Black agents J (Will Smith)
and K (Tommy Lee Jones) contending with an evil alien,
Boris the Animal (Jemaine Clement), who has escaped his
lunar prison cell and traveled back to 1969 to prevent his
capture by young Agent K (Josh Brolin).
MiB III has been released in 3-D as well as 2-D, but the
production was a 2-D affair. “When Sony hired me, in
January 2010, I was told this movie would be released in 3-D,
so Barry and I set about determining whether we should orig-
inate in 3-D, or shoot 2-D and convert in post,” says Pope.
Using stand-ins for Smith and Jones, he tested Red One MX,
74 June 2012 American Cinematographer
Blast
fromthePast
Blast
Bill Pope, ASC and director
Barry Sonnenfeld take agents
J and K back in time — to 1969 —
for Men in Black III.
By Iain Stasukevich
•|•
w ww.theasc.com June 2012 75
Arri Alexa and Sony F35 cameras, and
stereoscopic rigs from 3ality, Pace and
Element-Technica. He also shot the
scene on 35mm, and that material was
sent to Sony Pictures Imageworks for
conversion.
“There was no contest: it was film
all the way,” says Pope. He goes on to
explain that for him and Sonnenfeld,
this had as much to do with production
logistics as it did with aesthetics. For
starters, the footprint of the 3-D camera
rigs cramped Sonnenfeld’s directorial
style, wherein an actor in a single often
delivers lines almost directly to the lens,
to the character standing just next to the
camera. Sonnenfeld prefers a 21mm
prime for close-ups, placing the film
plane around 2' from the actor’s nose. To
make room for the off-screen actor
when shooting in 2-D, Pope either
removed the mattebox “or, if it was a
really close eyeline, I’d put a dot inside
the mattebox and put the offscreen actor
behind me.”
The matteboxes of the 3-D rigs
were, in Pope’s opinion, too wide and
cumbersome for the task at hand, and
the additional glass surfaces that split the
image for the two cameras made light-
ing a slow process. “I couldn’t backlight
my actors because any light coming from
behind them would hit that mirror and
bounce onto their faces,” he recalls. “By
the time we’d flagged everything off and
tweaked all the lighting, it had been
hours. Barry and I were completely frus-
trated by the whole process.”
“When you shoot native 3-D,
you have to pick the interocular
[distance] for each shot ahead of time,”
adds Sonnenfeld. “The only way to
change it is to take one eye and convert
it, in which case you shouldn’t have
wasted your time with 3-D rigs in the
first place.”
Pope notes that capturing in 3-D
also promised to require more time-
consuming post work. “When you shoot
3-D, one image is bounced off a mirror
and one image is captured through a
mirror, so the two images have different
visual characteristics that have to be
resolved in post,” he says. “When you’re
bouncing off the mirror, you’re polariz-
ing the image, so all the reflective
surfaces [in each image], even the reflec-
tions off an actor’s skin, are entirely
different. The colors are different. The
densities are different. The contrast is
different. And no matter how good your
rig is, the alignment is never perfect. All
of these things have to be addressed
later on.
“As for film vs. digital, we tested
both through to release print,” Pope
continues. “The differences were subtle,
but noticeable, and we simply preferred
the qualities of film. We liked how grain
actually draws you into a picture by not
reproducing reality exactly. Barry espe- U
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Opposite: Agents J
(Will Smith) and K
(Tommy Lee Jones)
are back on the
case in Men in
Black III. This page,
left: J engages in
hot pursuit on the
streets of
Manhattan.
Below: Director of
photography Bill
Pope, ASC preps a
villainous
extraterrestrial for
its close-up.
76 June 2012 American Cinematographer
cially was put off by what he referred to
as digital’s feeling of ‘reportage.’ Also,
the first two films in this series were shot
on film, and we wanted the three to feel
like they belonged together.”
The team decided to shoot Super
35mm for a final aspect ratio of 1.85:1
and post-convert the picture at
Imageworks and Prime Focus under
the supervision of Corey Turner,
Imageworks’ 3-D visual-effects supervi-
sor. Arri CSC provided the camera
package for the New York-based
production, supplying Arricam Studios
and Lites and Arri/Zeiss Master Prime
lenses.
Under the guidance of visual-
effects supervisors Ken Ralston and Jay
Redd, Imageworks also handled most of
the movie’s visual effects, tackling such
sequences as a ray-gun battle in a
Chinese restaurant, Agent J’s time-trav-
eling jump off the Chrysler Building, a
monocycle chase through Brooklyn, and
the launch of the Apollo 11 spacecraft.
Excluding the stereoscopic-conversion
work, Imageworks was responsible for
roughly 700 effects shots. An additional
500 shots, ranging from background
display graphics to all-CG characters,
were handled by other facilities.
Ralston and Redd spent nearly
every day of production on set. For
key visual-effects setups, additional
Imageworks artists were on hand to
record camera positions and lens data, as
well as capture lighting information with
an HDR Spheron, a wide-angle turret
camera that measures real-world lumi-
nosity values from the darkest shadow
areas to the brightest sunlight with a
single 360-degree scan.
The production was large enough
to require two full-time gaffers — Bob
Finley was joined by Bill O’Leary for the
first half of production, and by Eric
Boncher for the second — and an army
of grips, led by key grips Mitch Lillian
and Tony Mazzucchi. “Bobby, Bill and
Eric were each assigned certain sets so
they could really dig in,” says Pope. “We
had three standing sets at Steiner
Studios in Brooklyn, and we had as
many as seven or eight sets up at the

Blast from the Past
Top: Agents K and
J prepare for
battle in Wu’s
Chinese
restaurant. Middle
and bottom: To
give themselves
maximum
flexibility for
filming the
nighttime action
sequence, the
filmmakers built
Wu’s interior and
exterior and a
portion of the
street onstage at
Kaufman-Astoria
Studios.
w ww.theasc.com June 2012 77
same time on two stages at Kaufman-
Astoria in Queens.”
The second unit, directed by
Simon Crane, was so busy it required
three cinematographers: Igor Meglic,
Kevin McKnight and Scott Maguire. To
help keep the first and second units on
the same page, Pope asked Finley to
create diagrams and notes for each setup
that detailed camera moves as well as
lighting instruments and their place-
ment, color temperature and diffusion.
Every setup was diagrammed, and the
second unit could refer to the notes and
diagrams when members of the main
unit were not readily available.
Pope explains that the second unit
handled the larger action and CGI-
intensive sequences, and in some cases
worked with the main unit on such
material. “If Will and Tommy were in a
gun battle with a bunch of aliens, we’d
light and shoot Will and Tommy’s side,
and then the second unit would come in
after us, relight the set and kill off 20
aliens,” he says. “Sometimes the second
unit had to go first, in which case I
would visit the sets with Simon, and
Barry and Simon would have a depart-
ment-head meeting on the weekend, or
at the end of a shoot day, to go through
the notes, storyboards and previs.”
As the film begins, J and K head
into Chinatown to investigate Wu’s, a
restaurant with some fishy items on the
menu. The restaurant, the street it sits on
and an adjacent alley were all built
onstage at Kaufman-Astoria Studios.
Production designer Bo Welch, a
veteran of the first two MiB films,
explains that the decision to build this
set “came down to how many pages were
in the script, how many nights we would
have to shoot, how many stores we
would need to buy out, and how much
parking we would require. We quickly
realized that for the same amount of
money, we could maintain complete
control and, with a little construction
and some CG extensions, have our own
street and restaurant.”
Building the set also increased
Pope’s lighting options inside Wu’s. The
restaurant was laid out with a dining
Top: Agent J drops into Men in Black headquarters in the present day. Middle: After traveling
back in time to 1969, J pays young Agent K (Josh Brolin) a visit at headquarters. Bottom: The
filmmakers prepare to shoot Brolin and Smith’s conversation.
78 June 2012 American Cinematographer
room and two small wings off to the side.
Welch incorporated a variety of practicals
into the set, and Pope augmented these
with Kino Flos gelled with
1
⁄4 CTS,
spotlighting tables and raking the dark
walls in the background. “The majority
of the backlight in the main dining room
was created with Arri T12 Fresnels and
2K Blondes with Chimeras and
1
⁄4 CTS
rigged in openings in the ceiling,” says
Finley. Half- or
3
⁄4-front keylight was
provided by an Arri T12 or 5K (depend-
ing on the frame rate and scope of the
shot) through a 6'x6' frame of bleached
muslin with a control grid on the front to
direct light onto the actor. Eyelight,
which was most often provided by an
Arri 1K or 650-watt light, was bounced
off a loose muslin behind the camera.
“I like the T12s for their punch
and nice, even spread,” continues Finley.
“The muslin cuts about 1
2
⁄3 stops, and we
also used a frame of Opal and 250
between [the fixture and the muslin
frame], and usually at least a double wire
scrim. This allowed for quick light
changes when Barry and Bill decided a
shot should be overcranked.”
Finley recalls that the street
outside Wu’s was approached like a real
location, “except we didn’t have to light
all the way down the street because there
was bluescreen on both ends. There was
a 20K on a Condor at each end of the
street for backlight, and we bounced the
key and fill light with 12-light HPLs into
12-by frames of muslin.” Practical street
lamps were fitted with 500-watt tungsten
bulbs, and 2Ks and 5Ks fitted with
Chimeras were hung from trusses rigged
over the buildings on both sides of the
street. Backlight was at or just over expo-
sure, between T2.8 and T2.8
1
⁄2, and the
key light was a half stop under.
The filmmakers also did some
location work for the Wu’s sequence,
filming on Canal Street in Chinatown.
“As we did onstage, we leaned more
toward neutral tungsten lighting on the
actual street,” says Finley, “so we turned
off most of the sodium-vapor streetlights
in our vicinity. Then we used the lights
on Condors and on top of buildings to
make up for what we were missing.”

Blast from the Past
Top: Part of the
Chrysler
Building’s rooftop
was built onstage
for the practical
portion of Agent
J’s time-traveling
leap. Middle:
Agent K takes to
a monocycle for a
chase through
the city in 1969.
Bottom: Pope
preps the
sequence.
Men in Black headquarters, which
is shown in both 2012 and 1969, lies
beneath Manhattan’s Battery Park
Tunnel. The headquarters and its entrance
were built inside Brooklyn’s massive
Marcy Armory. The 2012 iteration looks
austere and modern, with white and
chrome surfaces and recessed practicals.
Ten mirrored spires break up the set’s 75'
length, starting from the floor in flat,
circular, 6'-wide LED panels (courtesy of
LiteGear) and reaching into 9'-wide holes
in the ceiling. Each ceiling orifice held
four 6K Mole Richardson Maxi Coops.
Keylight was provided by 12-light HPLs
shooting through 12'x12' Light Grid or
muslin, and a bounced light off another
12'x12' muslin created a wraparound fill.
Balconies running the length of both sides
of the room provided platforms for 20K
and T12 backlights, all fitted with
Chimeras.
After discovering Boris the
Animal’s plot to change history, Agent J
travels back to 1969 to warn the young
Agent K. The filmmakers designed J’s
jump through time to make the most of
3-D’s potential: the agent leaps from the
beak of one of the eagles atop the Chrysler
Building and plummets through the
decades. “There’s no reason he’d have to
jump off a building to go back in time, but
Barry and I thought that in 3-D, it would
make everyone in the first row scream,”
Pope notes with glee. “We had to do it.”
The filmmakers shot the dialogue
portion of the scene at Steiner Studios
Stage 3, using a partial build of the
rooftop, and then the visual-effects team
handled the set extensions, the digital
build of New York City, and the jump.
Early in the production schedule, Redd
took Finley and an Imageworks team to
the top of the Chrysler Building to shoot
background tiles and reference material
with Canon EOS 5D Mark II DSLRs.
For the stage work, Pope’s crew
established even skylight with 120 6K
space lights going through
1
⁄4 CTB and
Light Grid. A 360-degree double-curtain
track was rigged from the perms to
surround the set. The bluescreen was hung
on the outside track, and four 20'x40'
UltraBounce panels were hung on the
80 June 2012 American Cinematographer
inside track so they could travel around
the set, providing skylight fill and helping
to reduce bluescreen spill.
Late-afternoon sunlight was
provided by three scissor lifts holding nine
Maxi Coops each. All the lights were
gelled with
1
⁄2 CTS, and one set of Maxi
Coops was softened with Light Grid. A
20K on a 60' Condor provided a hard-
sunlight rim.
Once J takes the plunge, his fall
lasts about 2
1
⁄2 minutes, during which the
3-D convergence and interaxial distances
change dynamically from cut to cut,
bringing the pavement on 42nd Street
ever closer to the audience. “The film-
makers wanted the fall to be as extreme as
humanly possible,” Ralston remarks, “but
we had to carefully orchestrate the depth
so it wouldn’t tear your brain out when we
cut from a deep falling shot to a big close-
up of Will’s face.”
Once he lands in 1969, J finds
young Agent K in the bureau’s home
office, where Welch established a period
look with dark carpets, wood paneling,
colorful furniture and even a fire pit. The
10 reflective spires from 2012 have
become 10 wood golf-tee sculptures.
As far as the camera and lighting
were concerned, “I didn’t want to
approach 1969 much differently than
2012 because it would have seemed a little
arch,” says Pope. “What people do and say
can be funny, but the look of the film
shouldn’t make you laugh.” One of the
few changes he made was to lend the ’69
headquarters a bit more contrast. To
achieve this, he had the crew remove the
ceiling and hang 78 6K space lights going
through a layer of Light Grid; the toplight
is broken up by the golf-tee sculptures.
Creating credible New York City
exteriors for 1969 proved a steep chal-
lenge. To bring the swinging heydays of
Brooklyn’s Coney Island amusement park
and Manhattan’s SoHo neighborhood to
life, for example, the filmmakers relied on
a blend of strategically chosen angles,
careful art direction, and CGI. “What’s
left of period New York is becoming
smaller and smaller as the city turns into
this kind of Disneyland for adults,” notes
Welch. “Shooting period on location is

Blast from the Past
Top: A final comp
from the climactic
scene at Cape
Canaveral shows
Agent K in action.
Middle: The
filmmakers prep a
shot of Brolin for
the scene. Bottom:
The Cape
Canaveral set
included the
Apollo 11 space
capsule.
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768
Tempers fray
as temperatures
rise, and the trail
is lost.
82
typically easier than starting from
scratch because you have evidence of its
existence, but it requires a more artful
arrangement of space, texture, volume
and all the things that make up movie
design.”
A nighttime chase through 1969
Brooklyn required extensive second-unit
work, which Meglic shot with Arri
Alexas for maximum dynamic range.
Imageworks artists subsequently
augmented the shots and created all-CG
city blocks with period cars, signage and
digital doubles of Smith, Brolin and
Clement. The chase ultimately leads the
characters to Cape Canaveral and the
Apollo 11 launch, which in MiB mythol-
ogy is a cover for the deployment of a
web around the Earth designed to
deflect alien invasions.
To prep the launch scene, the
department heads visited the Canaveral
Air Force Base in Florida to view the
original Saturn V gantry and rockets at
the Kennedy Space Center. Welch then
designed digital and physical models at
2
⁄3
scale, which he presented to the rest of the
crew in order to determine which parts of
the gantry should be built onstage and
which should be created digitally.
Ultimately, two floors of the structure were
constructed onstage at Kaufman-Astoria,
along with the Apollo 11 capsule and two
gantry arms that could be raised and
lowered to the capsule. (The two floors
were cleverly repeated in editing and
augmented with CGI to create the illusion
of a 20-story structure.)
The set was surrounded by blue-
screen and six 20'x40' UltraBounce panels.
“Because of the set’s proximity to the
perms, the sun and skylight had to be
rigged up above the steel perms,” notes
Finley. “The rigging grips, led by Jim
Boniece, had to first remove the steel-grid
floor panels from between the steel trusses
of the grid, and then add additional pipe
and truss above that for hang points. Then
Louis Petraglia’s electric-rigging crew
could go in and rig cable light.”

Blast from the Past
Pope and his collaborators prep a
dolly shot onstage.
83
Ninety-six 6K space lights with silk
skirts and
1
⁄2 CTB were rigged above the
gantry. 6-light Maxi coops gelled with
1
⁄2
CTB and Light Grid were hung over the
main tower area to augment the skylight,
and five 36-light Moleenos were rigged at
the capsule end of the lighting grid to
provide three-quarter backlight. Fourteen
12-light Maxis provided sunlight along
the gantry arm and tower. The 12-light
Maxis and 36-light Moleenos used for
sunlight were rigged so they could be
raised or lowered to accommodate the
height of a given shot. All of the keylights
and backlights were dimmed down to 75
percent to warm them up a bit.
“Even on a set that big, there’s still a
key light and a fill light,” Pope reflects.
“The main difference between lighting
two people in a room and lighting two
people on a gantry at Cape Canaveral is
what you do with the light.”
Visual effects aided some of the
sequence’s more complex shots, such as a
wide establishing shot of the launch pad
that quickly pushes into the actors on
the practical. Ralston and Redd assem-
bled each shot like a collage, replacing
parts of the gantry, and adding light to
the actors and surrounding them with
smoke. Some shots required almost a
complete reworking. “Everyone was in a
time crunch, so we couldn’t always take
the time to set up the lights and camera
the way we needed to,” says Ralston. “A
lot of the gantry ended up being elimi-
nated because the plates weren’t ideal.
We rotoscoped the actors and filled in
the rest of the shot with a digital gantry
[made from] the background plates we
shot in Florida.”
Pope supervised the digital timing
at EFilm in Hollywood, where he
worked with colorist and ASC associate
Steven J. Scott. “It’s just picking nits,
really,” says Pope, who took advantage of
EFilm’s proprietary Eworks grading
tools to balance minute discrepancies in
image density and hue. Immediately
after the 2-D grade was completed,
Pope and Sonnenfeld tackled the 3-D
version, which had to be graded for
Xpand and RealD projection systems.
Pope prefers Xpand for its bright, even
projection and active-glasses system.
“When you’re a cinematographer grad-
ing in 3-D, you realize the quality of
your work is affected more by the simple
choice of 3-D systems than by any other
decisions you make,” he notes. ●
TECHNICAL SPECS
Super 1.85:1
4-perf Super 35mm and Digital
Capture
Arricam Studio, Lite; Arri Alexa
Arri/Zeiss Master Primes
Kodak Vision3 500T 5219
Digital Intermediate
Stereoscopic Conversion
Rotolight Shines with Anova
Rotolight has introduced the eco-friendly Anova LED
EcoFlood, a computer-controlled, bi-color LED floodlight that deliv-
ers a 110-degree super-wide beam angle and the equivalent output
of a 1K tungsten fixture while drawing only 38 watts of power.
Anova can accurately reproduce any color of white light from
candlelight to full daylight (3,150°K to 6,300°K). Weighing 5.7
pounds, it is highly portable and well suited for both studio and
location work. The Anova is also equipped with a V-lock plate for
battery operation, providing three hours of operation at 100-
percent output.
Users can control Anova locally on the fixture, via wired
DMX, or through the built-in Wi-Fi with Rotolight’s Magic Eye app
on an iPhone or iPad. Magic Eye provides wireless remote control of
brightness and color temperature across multiple lights, and the app
can store, recall and transmit settings and transitions, enabling the
replication of lighting conditions from location to studio.
The Anova also offers remote control of third-party fixtures
via DMX Master Mode. Additionally, using the camera in an iPhone
or iPad, the Anova can see and measure both color and brightness,
allowing the fixture to accurately track changing light conditions on
location.
Building on the quality of light, color accuracy, portability,
ease of use and affordability of the company’s RL48 LED Ringlight,
Rotolight LED systems deliver full-spectrum “continuous light” with
studio-accurate color and a soft, wide, shadowless quality that is
perfect for portraiture or interview lighting.
For additional information, visit www.rotolight.com.
New Products & Services
• SUBMISSION INFORMATION •
Please e-mail New Products/Services releases to:
newproducts@ascmag.com and include full contact
information and product images. Photos must be
TIFF or JPEG files of at least 300dpi.
Litepanels
Highlights
Inca Series
Litepanels has intro-
duced the Inca Series tung-
sten-balanced LED Fresnel
fixtures, which incorporate
LEDs that are color-matched
to the incandescent tung-
sten-halogen lighting fixtures
used in many television
stations and other facilities.
The Inca Series makes it possi-
ble for a studio to change
over from incandescent to
LED fixtures in a staged,
multi-year plan, rather than
having to do so all at once.
The Inca 4 (4" lens) and Inca 6 (6" lens) Fresnel fixtures are
the first members of the series. The Inca 4 focuses from 13-72
degrees, and the Inca 6 focuses from 15-67 degrees. Both units
provide dimming from 100 to 0 percent with no noticeable shift in
color temperature. Focus and dimming can be controlled via DMX
512 protocol, or by on-fixture knobs.
The Inca 4 and Inca 6 use significantly less power than
conventional tungsten-halogen fixtures. The Inca 4 draws about 39
watts and provides comparable illumination to a 300-watt tradi-
tional tungsten Fresnel; the Inca 6 draws approximately 104 watts
and provides comparable illumination to a 650-watt traditional
tungsten Fresnel. Because Litepanels LED fixtures run cool to the
touch, there is an additional savings in the power it takes to cool a
studio.
For additional information, visit www.litepanels.com.
Canon Offers 4K Imaging Solutions
Canon U.S.A., Inc. is expanding its Cinema EOS System of
professional cinematography products with the introduction of the
Cinema EOS C500 and Cinema EOS C500 PL cameras. The C500
features an EF mount for Canon EF lenses, and the C500 PL features
a PL mount for PL lenses. Both cameras are capable of originating
4K-resolution (4096x2160) imagery with uncompressed raw output
for external recording.
The C500 and C500 PL cameras output their 4K-resolution
video as a 10-bit uncompressed raw data stream with no deBayer-
ing. The cameras can also output quad Full HD (3840x2160), 2K
(2048x1080), Full HD (1920x1080) and other resolutions. All of
these digital-image-source formats fully conform to established
84 June 2012 American Cinematographer
SMPTE production standards.
All 4K formats can be selected to
operate from 1 to 60 fps. The cameras
employ a 12-bit RGB 4:4:4 signal format
during 2K output, which can be selected to
operate from 1 to 60 fps as well. If switched
to a 10-bit YCrCb 4:2:2 mode, the camera
can operate at up to 120 fps.
The C500 and C500 PL simultane-
ously record 50 Mbps HD proxy video
to an in-camera CF card that is imme-
diately available to support offline
editing. Equipped with a new 8.85-
megapixel CMOS sensor, the cameras
are compatible with Canon’s wide
range of interchangeable EF Cinema
and PL-mount lenses and EF lenses for
Canon SLR cameras.
Canon has also unveiled the EOS-
1D C digital SLR, the newest addition
to its line of EOS DSLR cameras, and
the first to be designed as a member of the
Cinema EOS system. The EOS-1D C records
video at 4K (4096x2160) or Full HD
(1920x1080) resolution to support high-
end motion-picture and advanced-imaging
applications. The camera incorporates
Canon Log Gamma to enable the recording
of high-quality video while also providing a
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Blackmagic Design Unveils
Cinema Camera
Blackmagic Design has introduced
the Blackmagic Cinema Camera, a digital-
cinema camera that offers 13 stops of
dynamic range, a 2.5K sensor, a built-in SSD
recorder, a built-in capacitive touch-screen
LCD, standard jack audio connections, built-
in high-speed Thunderbolt connection, 3
Gb/s SDI output, a refrigerated sensor for
low noise, and full compatibility with Canon
EF- and Zeiss ZF-mount lenses.
The camera also includes a full copy
of DaVinci Resolve 9.0 for color correction,
and Blackmagic Ultrascope software for
waveform monitoring. Ultrascope can be
run on a laptop connected to the camera via
a Thunderbolt connection.
The Blackmagic Cinema Camera
includes a fast SSD recorder that can record
the full sensor detail in 12-bit Log raw files
onto fast solid-state disks. The CinemaDNG-
format files can be read by all high-end
video software. Additionally, the camera can
record ProRes and DNxHD for HD-resolution
files compatible with Final Cut Pro X and
Avid Media Composer. When recording in
either 2.5K or 1080 HD resolution, the
camera can capture 24, 25, 29.97 or 30 fps.
The built-in LCD display makes focus-
ing easy, and allows playback of captured
files. A speaker is built-in for clip playback,
and there is also a headphone socket and
embedded audio on the SDI output and
Thunderbolt connection. The SDI output
includes all camera data such as time code,
transport control, shutter angle, color
temperature setting and ASA information
overlaid in anti-aliased fonts.
For easy metadata entry, the LCD
features fast and responsive touch-screen
technology. When the user taps the display
with a finger, a data-entry window called
the “slate” appears; this lets the user enter
shot information just like typing on a smart
phone. This data is then stored in the files
and can be accessed by NLE software during
editing. Metadata is compatible with soft-
ware such as Final Cut Pro X and DaVinci
Resolve. All camera settings — such as
frame rate, shutter angle, color tempera-
ture, dynamic range and focus assist — can
be changed on the touch LCD.
The Blackmagic Cinema Camera will
be available in July for $2,995. For additional
information, visit www.blackmagic-
design.com.
85
high level of color-grading freedom.
The camera includes an 18.1
megapixel full-frame 24mm x 36mm Canon
CMOS sensor with the ability to record 8-bit
4:2:2 Motion JPEG 4K video or Full HD
video to the camera’s CF memory card.
Additional features include an extended
sensitivity range of up to ISO 25,600 for
exceptional motion-imaging results with
reduced noise even in low-light settings.
Additionally, Canon has announced
the development of four new EF Cinema
zoom lenses designed to deliver exceptional
optical performance on 4K-resolution
cameras. Each of the four lenses features a
compact, lightweight design to facilitate
handheld and Steadicam shooting while
also covering a wide range of focal lengths.
The lineup comprises two wide-angle cine
zooms — the CN-E15.5-47mm T2.8 L S (for
EF mounts) and the CN-E15.5-47mm T2.8 L
SP (for PL mounts) — and two telephoto
cine zooms — the CN-E30-105mm T2.8 L S
(for EF mounts) and CN-E30-105mm T2.8 L
SP (for PL mounts).
For additional information, visit
www.usa.canon.com.
Sony FS700U Captures
High Speed
Sony has introduced the NEX-
FS700U Full HD super-slow-motion
camcorder, the latest in its line of NXCam
interchangeable-lens E-mount camcorders.
The camcorder delivers Full-HD
images at 120 and 240 fps in an 8- or 16-
seconds burst mode, respectively. 480 fps
and 960 fps rates at reduced resolution are
also available. The NXCam system’s E-
Mount flexibility is designed to accept virtu-
86
ally all SLR and DSLR 35mm lenses, with the
use of simple, inexpensive adapters without
optical degradation.
The FS700U uses a new 4K Exmor
Super 35 CMOS sensor that comprises 11.6
million pixels. This high-speed readout chip
is optimized for motion-picture shooting,
providing high sensitivity, low noise and
minimal aliasing. Users can also capture
high-quality still images with the FS700U.
The FS700U’s 3G HD-SDI and HDMI
connectors can output Full HD 50p and
60p, in addition to standard HD 60i, 24p,
25p or 30p frame rates with embedded
time code and audio. 3G HD-SDI can
output native 23.98, 25 or 29.97 progres-
sive signals; users can also choose to output
PsF over the 3G HD-SDI. Thanks to the flex-
ibility of the digital ports, virtually any exter-
nal recorder can be connected.
NEX-FS700U operators can take
advantage of the camcorder’s built-in ND
filters, with a newly designed wheel that
rotates across the sensor like a turret. The
wheel includes positions for Clear,
1
⁄4 (2
stops),
1
⁄16 (4 stops) and
1
⁄64 (6 stops). The
camcorder also includes face detection and
auto focus to help ensure the subject is
always kept in focus.
Users can save up to 99 camcorder
profile settings on a memory card and can
copy the same setting to multiple units.
Compatible media includes MS and SD
memory cards and Sony’s HXR-FMU128
flash memory unit that attaches to the
camcorder.
Additional features include a detach-
able top handle secured by a pair of screws
(a cold shoe, plus two sets of ¼" and
3
⁄8"
holes) that allow heavy accessories to be
mounted; the handle is attached with a
rosette mount. The handle incorporates an
“active grip” that features four buttons for
commonly used functions: expanded focus,
auto iris, still capture and recording
8 1 8 . 4 5 8 . 9 7 9 0
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start/stop. Function buttons are also
enlarged to make operating easy, even
while wearing gloves. The camcorder’s
enhanced, durable design also includes
anchor points for compatibility with third
party accessories. The camcorder is
60/50 Hz switchable.
Sony is planning a firmware upgrade
that will enable the NEX-FS700U to output
4K bit-stream data over 3G HD-SDI when
used with a Sony 4K recorder.
The NEX-FS700U (body only) and
NEX FS700UK (with 18-200mm zoom lens)
are planned to be available this month at a
suggested list price starting at less than
$10,000.
For additional information, visit
http://pro.sony.com.
Arri Advances Anamorphic
Arri has unveiled the Alexa Plus 4:3,
a new Alexa model with similar functional-
ity to the Alexa Plus but featuring a 4:3
Super 35 sensor, the ability to switch from
16:9 sensor mode to 4:3 sensor mode, and
built-in licensing for high-speed shooting,
anamorphic de-squeeze and DNxHD.
Anamorphic lenses squeeze the
image by approximately a factor of two.
When using sensors that are natively 16:9
or wider, it becomes necessary to crop the
sides of the image to achieve the desired
widescreen aspect ratio, resulting in a
smaller used sensor area and a different
angle of view for the lens. With the Alexa
Plus 4:3 camera, the full area of the sensor
is used, which means more light per photo-
site, translating into greater sensitivity, less
noise, more exposure latitude and sharper
images. Alternatively, the larger sensor area
can be used for greater freedom in vertical
repositioning when using spherical lenses.
The Alexa Plus 4:3 joins the Alexa
Studio and Alexa M, which already have 4:3
sensors. The Studio might typically function
as an A camera, the Plus 4:3 as a B camera,
and the M as a compact, versatile C camera.
For additional information, visit
www.arri.com.
Panasonic Presents
Upgradeable HPX600
Panasonic has unveiled the AG-
HPX600 P2 HD shoulder-mount camcorder,
which boasts 10-bit, 4:2:2 AVC-Intra record-
ing.
Weighing less than 7 pounds, the
HPX600 incorporates a new
2
⁄3-type MOS
sensor to produce HD and SD images. The
HPX600 achieves a high sensitivity of F12 (at
59.94 Hz) and a signal-to-noise ratio of
59dB. The camcorder supports AVC-Intra
100/50, DVCPro HD, DVCPro 50, DVCPro
and DV as standard. It is 50 Hz and 59.94 Hz
switchable for worldwide use.
The HPX600 will be upgradeable as
new functionality becomes available.
Upgradeable options will include wireless
metadata input, proxy recording, variable
frame rates and AVC-Ultra recording. When
available in 2013, AVC-Ultra will offer
master-quality and/or low-bit-rate 10-bit,
4:2:2 recording in Full HD to meet a variety
of user needs from mastering to transmis-
sion. (However, the HPX600 will not support
all AVC-Ultra formats.) The HPX600 also
features wireless and wired connection abil-
ity with Wi-Fi, USB and Gigabit Ethernet. In
addition, a future option will support LiveU
for video uplink with real-time indication of
LiveU’s transmission status and video trans-
mission quality to the camera operator.
The interchangeable lens camcorder
will be equipped with Chromatic Aberration
Compensation to maximize lens perfor-
mance, Dynamic Range Stretch function to
help compensate for wide variations in light-
88
ing, and a highly accurate flash band detec-
tion and compensation software. Original
features will include a smart user interface
that permits accessibility to the camera’s
extensive functions from an LCD display on
the side of the camera. The HPX600 will
offer two P2 card slots and an SD card slot.
The AG-HPX600 will be available in
the fall at $16,000-$18,000.
For additional information, visit
www.panasonic.com.
JVC Expands ProHD
Camcorder Line
JVC Professional Products Co., a divi-
sion of JVC Americas Corp., has introduced
the GY-HM650 and GY-HM600 ProHD
handheld cameras.
Both cameras feature a built-in wide-
angle 23x autofocus zoom lens and boast
superior low-light performance and excel-
lent sensitivity (F11 at 2,000 lux) in a
comfortable, versatile form factor. The light-
weight cameras record HD or SD footage in
multiple file formats, including native .MP4,
.MOV and AVCHD, to non-proprietary
SDHC or SDXC media cards. In addition to
relay mode for uninterrupted recording, the
cameras allow simultaneous recording to
both memory cards for instant backup or
client copy.
The cameras feature a 1.22-
megapixel color viewfinder and color 3.5"
LCD. A second trigger and servo zoom
control on the built-in handle make it easy
to record while holding the camera at low
or high angles. Additionally, the Pre Rec
(retro cache) feature continuously records
and stores up to 5 seconds of footage in
cache memory to help prevent missed
shots.
The cameras are equipped with
three
1
⁄3" 12-bit CMOS sensors,
each with 1920x1080
pixels. The built-
in Fujinon HD
lens features
a wide focal range of 29-667mm (35mm
equivalent) and has manual focus, zoom
and iris rings, along with three ND filters.
Other features include auto focus with face
detection and an optical image stabilizer.
The cameras also include a built-in
stereo microphone and two XLR inputs with
phantom power and a shotgun mic holder,
as well as a headphone jack and separate
input for a wireless mic receiver. The
cameras are also equipped with a LANC
remote connector and are compatible with
JVC’s Compact Studio ProHD 7" monitor
for an affordable studio system. Addition-
ally, the cameras include a time-code
synchronization input and HD-SDI and
HDMI outputs.
Equipped with dual codecs, the GY-
HM650 is capable of producing Full HD files
on one memory card while simultaneously
creating smaller, Web-friendly files (
1
⁄4 HD)
on a second card; with built-in FTP and
Wi-Fi connectivity, the camcorder can
deliver the footage without a microwave or
satellite connection. It also records .MXF
files with rich descriptive metadata that is
optimized for asset management.
The GY-HM600 will be available in
the fall for a recommended price of $4,695;
the GY-HM650 will be available in the
winter for a recommended price of $5,695.
For additional information, visit
http://pro.jvc.com.
Angenieux Focuses on
Optimo Zooms
Thales Angenieux has introduced
two additions to its line of Optimo lenses:
the Optimo 19.5-94mm and Optimo 28-
340mm.
The Optimo 19.5-94mm is a 4.7x
zoom lens with a fast aperture of T2.6 (wide
open). The lens features a 329-degree focus
rotation with more than 50 calibrated
witness marks for precise focusing in feet or
meters. It weighs 12.3 pounds and features
a front diameter of 136mm and a close
focus of 2'5".
The 12x Optimo 28-340mm long
zoom lens features a fast aperture of T3.2
(wide open) and is ideal for capturing criti-
cal close-ups from longer distances. It is
designed with a 327-degree focus rotation
and more than 70 precise witness marks,
available in feet or meters. The Optimo 28-
340mm weighs approximately 24.4 pounds
and features a front diameter of 162mm
and a close focus of 4'5".
The Optimo 19.5-94mm and 28-
340mm boast minimal breathing. Both
lenses are available with PL mounts (PV
mounts by request) and are compatible
with Angenieux’s 1.4x and 2x extenders.
For additional information, visit
www.angenieux.com.
Fujifilm Adds PL-Mount Zoom
Fujifilm Optical Devices has intro-
duced the PL 19-90mm Cabrio ZK4.7x19,
the newest member of the company’s
Premier PL-Mount Zoom family. The lens
features an exclusive detachable servo drive
unit, making it suitable for use as a standard
PL lens or as an ENG-style lens. The PL 19-
90mm also features flange focal-distance
adjustment and macro function and is Lens
Data System and /i metadata compatible.
The PL 19-90mm covers a 31.5mm
sensor size on a digital-cinema-style
camera. Weighing 5.95 pounds (including
servo motors), the lens also incorporates a
nine-blade iris.
The digital servo boasts 16-bit
encoding. The PL 19-90mm can be
controlled using industry-standard wireless
controllers, as well as existing Fujinon wired
and wireless units. Other features include
luminous barrel markings for visibility in
dark shooting situations; distances are listed
in feet or meters and can be changed in the
field.
For additional information, visit
www.fujifilm.com.
Sachtler Supports Ace
Sachtler, part of Vitec Videocom, a
Vitec Group company, has introduced the
Ace tripod system. With a payload of up to
8.8 pounds, Ace is ideal for smaller HDV
camcorders and video-enabled DSLR
cameras. Ace is also compact, durable and
extremely lightweight. As with all Sachtler
products, Ace is ergonomically designed
and offers an intuitive feel.
For Ace, Sachtler developed the
patented Synchronized Actuated drag,
which guarantees accuracy and repeatabil-
ity. With three vertical and three horizontal
grades of drag (plus 0), SA-drag enables
fine adjustment for precise panning and tilt-
ing. Additionally, Ace’s five-step counterbal-
ance makes counterbalancing fast and
simple. The Ace fluid head has a tilt range
of +90 degrees to -75 degrees.
Ace incorporates a glass fiber rein-
forced composite material that makes the
75mm fluid head especially
light and offers a comfortable
and non-slip surface. The
head enables camera opera-
tors to work intuitively and
professionally. In addition,
Sachtler’s 50 years of
experience in develop-
ing camera support
promises depend-
ability, easy opera-
tion and such
features as the
practical park-
ing position for
spare camera
screws and
the long
104mm sliding
range of the
camera plate.
For additional information, visit
www.sachtler.com.
EasyRig Goes Mini
EasyRig and 16x9 Inc. have intro-
duced the EasyRig Mini body-worn
camera-support system. The EasyRig Mini
replaces the Turtle X and features a stabi-
lizing vest rather than a backpack to evenly
distribute weight across the chest and
back. The EasyRig Mini also allows for the
adjustment of the support bar in relation
90

to the vest in height, so camera height can
be tailored to each user.
The EasyRig Mini is available in two
models: the Mini, suitable for cameras
weighing up to 9 pounds, and the Mini
Strong, for cameras between 9-13.2
pounds. A new protective transport bag
can store both the camera and rig together
safely, and it can also be quickly trans-
formed into a backpack by simply unfolding
the shoulder straps that are securely stored
in the bag’s side pockets.
The EasyRig Mini is available now for
a recommended price of $1,410. For more
information, visit www.16x9inc.com.
P+S Technik Launches
PS-Micro Rig
P+S Technik has introduced the
compact and versatile PS-Micro Rig for
native 3-D productions.
Building on the success and func-
tionality of the PS-Freestyle Rig, the PS-
Micro Rig is compatible with any kind of
micro camera (such as the SI-2K or the
SinaCam) and boasts a flyweight of only
8.8 pounds. The rig can be used with
remote control or in a completely manual
mode. The PS-Micro Rig is suited for shoul-
der, crane or tripod operation, and is also
balanced for use on a Steadicam. The rig is
also compatible with a wide range of acces-
sories from P+S Technik and other third-
party manufacturers.
For additional information, visit
www.pstechnik.de.
Codex Gets Aboard Cinema EOS
Codex has begun shipping the
Onboard S Recorder, a recording solution
for compact HD digital-cinema cameras
such as the Canon Cinema EOS C300. Data
is recorded onto Codex’s new Capture
Drives from the HD-SDI output of the
camera. Codex has partnered with both
Vocas and Arri’s Professional Camera Acces-
sories group to design new mounts and
handheld solutions for the C300 to accom-
modate the Onboard S recorder.
Codex worked with Canon during
the development of the C500, which is
capable of originating 4K (4096x2160)
motion imagery, to ensure that the entire
workflow from recording to production is a
seamless experience. The Codex Onboard
M can record 4K raw files from the Cinema
EOS C500 onto Codex datapacks at up to
120 fps. The datapacks can then be loaded
on a Codex Transfer Station for Mac OS X,
a Codex Digital Lab or a Codex Vault S for
QC, dailies generation and archiving.
“Codex is committed to supporting
a wide range of cameras and we are excited
to work with Canon as they introduce a
variety of cameras for the feature film, tele-
vision and commercials markets,” says
Marc Dando, Codex’s managing director.
“Given our experience in recording raw
data, it was a natural progression for us to
develop an entire workflow, from recording
through post.”
The Codex Onboard M Recorder
was used with the C500 camera to capture
the Canon promo film 4 Cities, which
features material shot by cinematographers
Tony Pierce-Roberts, BSC; Ben Seresin, ASC,
BSC; and Martin Ruhe.
For additional information, visit
www.codexdigital.com.
AJA Goes 4K with Ki Pro Quad
AJA Video Systems has introduced
the Ki Pro Quad solid-state portable video
recorder, which is capable of capturing high-
quality edit-ready files in formats including
4K (4096x2160), Quad HD (3840x2160), 2K
(2048x1080) and HD (1920x1080), provid-
ing a fast path from camera-to-editorial with
10-bit 4:4:4 and
10-bit 4:2:2 color
support.
Ki Pro Quad
helps facilitate a
powerful workflow
for 4K, making it
suited to such
camera systems as
the new Canon
Cinema EOS C500.
Ki Pro Quad accepts
raw camera output
via SDI and simulta-
neously outputs
that data via
Thunderbolt. The
recorder also per-
forms deBayer processing of the raw data
that can be used to produce on-board Apple
ProRes recordings to SSD media. HD, 2K and
4K ProRes files recorded to removable SSD
media can then be used in a variety of popu-
lar nonlinear editors. The deBayered image
produced by the Ki Pro Quad can also be
used for real-time 4K monitoring; a scaled or
cropped output is also simultaneously avail-
able for 2K or HD monitoring via dedicated
SDI and HDMI connections.
Ki Pro Quad will be available later this
year through AJA’s worldwide network of
resellers for $3,995. For more information,
visit www.aja.com.
92
Convergent Design Records Raw
Convergent Design has unveiled the
Gemini Raw, which supports 4K raw record-
ing with live preview and playback to a 4K
monitor. Gemini Raw also boasts such
features as four-camera recording/quad-
split playback (in HD) and support for Avid
DNxHD (RGB and YCC), uncompressed
RGB 444, stereoscopic 3-D, simultaneous
recording of raw/dailies, and 120 fps (in
2K/HD).
Gemini Raw offers all the features of
the Gemini 4:4:4 with significantly greater
processing power, while retaining the same
size, power and weight. Six programmable
3G-SDI ports can be configured as four-
in/two-out or two-in/four-out; this innova-
tive capability enables such configurations
as quad-input record/quad-split display or
single-stream 4K raw recording/4K monitor-
ing. Stereo 3-D output options include luma
differencing, side-by-side and anaglyph.
Gemini Raw allows recording in
high-quality HD (in DNxHD-220) and simul-
taneously in raw/uncompressed. Users can
use the DNxHD footage for fast-turnaround
projects while archiving raw for future,
higher-resolution applications. Alternatively,
users can record raw and DNxHD-36 proxy
for dailies and offline work.
Gemini Raw includes a built-in 5.0"
800x480 LCD touch screen for live preview
and playback. Gemini Raw also employs
dual 1.8" SSD drives, which greatly reduce
size, weight and cost. Currently, these drives
support quad-stream recording of up to
1080p30/2K raw, single-stream 4K raw up
to 30p, single-stream 1080p/2K raw up to
120 fps (over dual 3G-SDI) or, in some
formats, the creation of two identical
masters (auto backup). The Gemini Raw
production kit includes (at no extra cost) a
simple SSD transfer station compatible with
widely available, low-cost USB 3.0, FW-800
and Thunderbolt adapters.
Pending certification by Arri, Gemini
Raw will support both ArriRaw 16:9 up to
Backstage Equipment, Inc.
8052 Lankershim Bl. · North Hollywood, CA 91605
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info@backstageweb.com · www.backstageweb.com

































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60 fps and ArriRaw 4:3 up to 48 fps. Full
support for Weisscam/P+S Technik HD/2K
raw is also planned. Convergent Design
also anticipates future support for addi-
tional 2K and 4K raw cameras and higher
frame rates.
For additional information, visit
www.convergent-design.com.
MTI Film Conveys
Cortex Platform
MTI Film has unveiled the Cortex
platform, a family of products that brings
coherence and portability to the process of
managing digital assets from the set to the
screen.
The first offering in the Cortex family
is Cortex Convey, which builds on the foun-
dation of the automated, data-centric deliv-
erables application used in MTI Film’s
Control Dailies system. Cortex Convey is a
standalone application that features a
powerful, multi-threaded transcoding
engine that supports all popular video
codecs with an interface that is easy to use.
The result is a simple, streamlined solution
that can be used at any phase in the post-
production workflow.
Cortex Convey includes MTI Film’s
best-of-breed algorithms for down-conver-
sion and color processing in a 32-bit float-
ing-point pipeline, as well as the latest real-
time GPU-accelerated demosaicing algo-
rithms for raw camera codecs. Cortex
Convey’s advanced project-management
features include multiple deliverable
templates per project, automated work-
flows and a one-to-many render engine. It
is a simpler and more flexible way to reliably
and simultaneously generate multiple, high-
quality file-based deliverables for all steps in
the post process.
MTI Film has also unveiled Cortex
Capture, a simple and powerful application
that includes all the functionality needed by
DITs and data wranglers with a price tag of
only $95. Cortex Capture provides onset
playback of a dozen common camera
formats, including Sony SRMaster and F65,
Red, ArriRaw, DNxHD and ProRes. It
includes tools for maintaining color deci-
sions by importing and setting looks that
can be exported as stills, ASC CDLs and
LUTs. Its project-management features
include commenting on frames or clips and
creating templates with color, audio and
burn-in options for use in dailies and
throughout the post process. All metadata,
including color, generated in Cortex
Capture can be exported and shared with
other Cortex products at the post facility,
saving time and ensuring consistency.
MTI Film also plans to roll out Cortex
Control Dailies to address other points in
the production and post process. Ultimately,
the Cortex family will form a seamless solu-
tion for managing media assets from prep
through post and beyond.
“A lot of time and money is wasted
because creative decisions and other meta-
data cannot be passed seamlessly from one
step in the process to the next,” says David
McClure, vice president of product develop-
ment for MTI Film. “It either has to be re-
entered or is lost completely. The Cortex
platform is designed to allow all the actors,
from DITs to dailies colorists to assistant
editors and more, to easily share this infor-
94
mation while remaining focused on their
central task, undistracted by a large,
complex application.”
For additional information, visit
www.mtifilm.com.
FotoKem Offers NextLab
Version 3.0
FotoKem has unveiled the newest
version of its NextLab software and on-set
system. Designed and developed in-
house, NextLab v3.0 can manage digital
camera files and metadata, supporting
Arri Alexa and Sony F65 in their native
raw formats, Red Epic and Scarlet, Silicon
Imaging and the Canon DSLR and
Cinema EOS lines. NextLab v3.0 also
incorporates the Academy Color Encod-
ing Specifications (ACES) architecture.
Additionally, FotoKem’s NextLab
Live is an application that supports on-set
color correction directly from digital
camera feeds in real time. It enables cine-
matographers to load a look-up table,
generate a color-decision list, and make
color choices while recording images.
With a digital-imaging technician, Next-
Lab Live is simple to set up on a laptop
and provides a color-control surface with
an SDI interface.
The NextLab software securely
stores media, archives to LTO, provides
quality control tools, audio syncing, color
management and transcoding. It is incor-
porated into an array of services and
offerings at FotoKem and its affiliates,
including Keep Me Posted, Spy and
Margarita Mix/LA Studios.
FotoKem’s NextLab Mobile is a
unified, rugged cart loaded with hard-
ware running the software on set or near
location. The NextLab Mobile unit has
been redesigned with a smaller footprint
and a sturdier enclosure.
“Our focus is solving on-set needs
and helping to integrate production and
post,” says Tom Vice, vice president and
general manager of NextLab. “Our Next-
Lab software solutions bring creative flex-
ibility to filmmakers in new ways that
adapt to how productions want to
work.”
For additional information, visit
www.fotokem.com.
95


Autodesk Redesigns Smoke
Autodesk, Inc. has unveiled Smoke
2013 video-editing software, a redesigned
version of the all-in-one video editing and
visual-effects tool for the Mac. Smoke 2013
features a unified creative workflow that
brings powerful node-based compositing
right in the timeline. Smoke can help editors
simplify their workflow, centrally manage
their media, work interactively with high-
resolution media throughout their projects
and deliver high-end content.
Smoke 2013’s intuitive, all-in-one
user interface combines track-based editor-
ial, industry-standard editing conventions
and proven Autodesk creative tools.
Smoke’s robust toolset includes proven
high-end finishing tools such as Action for
true 3-D compositing, Color Warper for
professional grading and color matching,
and Master Keyer for one-click chroma
keying and stereoscopic 3-D editing and
effects. Powerful ConnectFX node-based
compositing inside the timeline enables
high-end effects and advanced compositing
without having to leave the editorial envi-
ronment. MediaHub offers a modern
approach to working natively with the most
common formats, facilitating the manage-
ment of all project media from ingest to
edit, effects and archiving. Additionally,
Smoke 2013 runs on the most recent
generation of Apple iMac and MacBook Pro
systems using high-bandwidth Thunderbolt
storage and IO, bringing true high-end
video effects to flexible desktop and mobile
workflows.
Smoke 2013 will be available this fall
for $3,495 per license. For more informa-
tion, visit www.autodesk.com.
GenArts Packs Monsters GT v7
GenArts Inc., a leader in specialized
visual-effects software, has released
Monsters GT v7, the latest addition to the
company’s Sapphire Accents line. Designed
to meet the demand for both realistic and
original looks, Monsters GT features a wide
range of more than 50 exceptional effects
that enrich every artist’s visual-effects port-
folio so they can create extraordinary
imagery. For the first time, Monsters GT is
available in 11 mini-packs for $99 apiece
and a Natural Phenomena theme pack for
$299.
The Natural Phenomena theme pack
and the 11 mini-packs are available for
Autodesk systems, Adobe After Effects, The
Foundry Nuke, Eyeon Fusion, Assimilate
Scratch and Sony Vegas and deliver specific
types of effects in a single, convenient pack-
age. The Natural Phenomena theme pack
features 19 creative problem-solving tools
that realistically simulate weather, atmos-
pheric, fire and water effects without spend-
ing hours building the effects from scratch.
The Monsters GT mini-packs each
feature 2-5 effects and are ideal for creating
project-specific effects like film burns, night
vision, fluids, security-camera monitoring,
time-based image trails and dozens of other
looks. The complete collection of all 59
Monsters GT effects is also available for a
starting price of $499.
Additional features of Monsters GT
v7 include enhanced sprite quality and
smoother particle motion, new effects and
enhancements to create a more streamlined
workflow, resolution independence, GPU
acceleration for improved render times and
floating point processing for improved
image quality.
For additional information, visit
www.genarts.com.
Avid Releases iPad Editing App
Avid has released its first video-edit-
ing application for the iPad, Avid Studio,
which is available in the Apple App Store.
Avid has made the Avid Studio app
for the iPad easy enough for first-time users
yet sophisticated enough for more
98
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NAB 2012 Winner:
advanced editors. Offering frame-by-frame
editing accuracy and access to all kinds of
media, Avid Studio for iPad allows users to
quickly and easily create and share highly
professional multimedia experiences, wher-
ever they want to.
Avid Studio for iPad allows users to
begin editing with ease by offering access to
any videos, photos and audio already in
their iPad library, or media that can be
imported from iTunes, cameras and more.
Users can then arrange clips in the Story-
board, make precision edits using the
Timeline and enhance their movie
creations with high-quality transi-
tions, effects and a soundtrack. They
can share movies directly to YouTube,
Facebook and more — or export
projects to Avid Studio software,
where they can continue editing with
even more advanced tools. Users can
get started fast with an included,
easy-to-understand how-to guide.
Avid Studio for iPad takes full
advantage of touch capabilities to
offer a fun, easy and professional-
level editing experience. Multiple audio
tracks also allow for easy layering of music,
audio and sound effects.
For additional information, visit
www.avid.com/avidstudioapp.
Telemetrics Drives Lenses
Telemetrics Inc., a leading provider of
camera robotics and control systems, has
introduced the Universal Lens Driver System,
which motorizes zoom, focus and iris func-
tions. It is fully adjustable and easily adapted
to any manufacturer’s lens and can also be
used on most cameras with integral non-
motorized lenses. Additionally, the Lens
Driver supports three methods of control —
Serial RS232/422, Ethernet IP and analog
(standard broadcast lens interface) — and is
specially designed to perform smooth
motion transitions.
“The added production efficiency
that the new Lens Driver System generates
will be appreciated by a wide range of end
users,” says Anthony Cuomo, vice president
and general manager, Telemetrics Inc.
“Because of its universality, it will give us the
opportunity to offer a larger variety of
cameras and lenses for integration into our
camera robotics systems.”
For additional information, visit
www.telemetricsinc.com. ●
99
100 June 2012 American Cinematographer

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Advertiser’s Index
16x9, Inc. 100
Aadyn Technology 4
Abel Cine Tech 41
AC 1
Adorama 9, 45
Aerocrane Sales & Leasing
87
Aja Video Systems, Inc. 27
Alan Gordon Enterprises 100
Arri 5
AZGrip 101
Backstage Equipment, Inc.
94
Barger-Lite 6, 101
Birns & Sawyer 101
Blackmagic Design, Inc. 21
Burrell Enterprises, Inc. 100
Cammate 6
Cavision Enterprises 43
Chapman/Leonard Studio
Equipment Inc. 57
Chimera 47
Cinematography
Electronics 88
Cinekinetic 100
Clairmont Film & Digital 15
Cleveland Film Commission
51
Codex Digital Ltd. 11
Convergent Design 67
Cooke Optics 17
Creative Handbook 81
CTT Exp & Rentals 79
Dadco LLC 91
Deluxe C2
Denecke 101
Dolby Laboratories, Inc. 49
Eastman Kodak 64a-l, C4
EFD USA, Inc 23
Film Gear 93
Filmotechnic Canada Ltd. 6
Filmtools 90
Fujifilm North America 25
Glidecam Industries C3
Grip Factory Munich/GFM 95
Hollywood Post Alliance 96
Hollywood Rentals 98
Hive 60
Innovision 100
J.L. Fisher 31
K5600 13
Kino Flo 73
Koerner Camera Systems 86
Lee Filters 82
Lighttools 19
Lights! Action! Co. 101
Los Angeles Film Festival 97
Maccam 92
Maine Media 93
Manios Optical 100
Matthews Studio Equip. 69
Metal Toys 89
Mole-Richardson Company
30
Movcam Tech. Co., Ltd. 59
Movie Tech AG 100, 101
NBC/Universal 29
New York Film Academy 71
Nila Inc. 72
Oppenheimer Camera Prod.
85, 100
P+S Technik 101
Panther Gmbh 87, 89
PC&E 86
Pille Film Gmbh 100
Polecam Ltd 79
Powermills 101
PRG 99
Pro8mm 100
Rag Place, The 88
Rosco Laboratories 83
Scheimpflug Digital 61
Schneider Optics 2
Servicevision USA 50
Siggraph 103
Super16 Inc. 100
Thales Angenieux 32-33
Tiffen 7
VF Gadgets, Inc. 100
Videouniversity 101
Visionary Forces 91
Visual Products 95
Welch Integrated 107
Willy’s Widgets 100
www.theasc.com 88, 96,
102
102
104 June 2012 American Cinematographer
American Society of Cinematographers Roster
OFFICERS – 2011-’12
Michael Goi,
President
Richard Crudo,
Vice President
Owen Roizman,
Vice President
John C. Flinn III,
Vice President
Victor J. Kemper,
Treasurer
Frederic Goodich,
Secretary
Stephen Lighthill,
Sergeant-at-Arms
MEMBERS
OF THE BOARD
John Bailey
Stephen H. Burum
Richard Crudo
George Spiro Dibie
Richard Edlund
Fred Elmes
Michael Goi
Victor J. Kemper
Francis Kenny
Isidore Mankofsky
Robert Primes
Owen Roizman
Kees Van Oostrum
Haskell Wexler
Vilmos Zsigmond
ALTERNATES
Michael D. O’Shea
Rodney Taylor
Ron Garcia
Sol Negrin
Kenneth Zunder
David Darby
Allen Daviau
Roger Deakins
Jan DeBont
Thomas Del Ruth
Bruno Delbonnel
Peter Deming
Jim Denault
Caleb Deschanel
Ron Dexter
Craig Di Bona
George Spiro Dibie
Ernest Dickerson
Billy Dickson
Bill Dill
Anthony Dod Mantle
Stuart Dryburgh
Bert Dunk
Lex DuPont
John Dykstra
Richard Edlund
Eagle Egilsson
Frederick Elmes
Robert Elswit
Geoffrey Erb
Scott Farrar
Jon Fauer
Don E. FauntLeRoy
Gerald Feil
Steven Fierberg
Mauro Fiore
John C. Flinn III
Larry Fong
Ron Fortunato
Jonathan Freeman
Tak Fujimoto
Alex Funke
Steve Gainer
Robert Gantz
Ron Garcia
David Geddes
Dejan Georgevich
Michael Goi
Stephen Goldblatt
Paul Goldsmith
Frederic Goodich
Victor Goss
Jack Green
Adam Greenberg
Robbie Greenberg
Xavier Grobet
Alexander Gruszynski
Changwei Gu
Rick Gunter
Rob Hahn
Gerald Hirschfeld
Henner Hofmann
Adam Holender
Ernie Holzman
John C. Hora
Tom Houghton
Steve Mason
Clark Mathis
Don McAlpine
Don McCuaig
Seamus McGarvey
Robert McLachlan
Geary McLeod
Greg McMurry
Steve McNutt
Terry K. Meade
Suki Medencevic
Chris Menges
Rexford Metz
Anastas Michos
Douglas Milsome
Dan Mindel
Charles Minsky
Claudio Miranda
George Mooradian
Donald A. Morgan
Donald M. Morgan
Kramer Morgenthau
Peter Moss
M. David Mullen
Dennis Muren
Fred Murphy
Hiro Narita
Guillermo Navarro
Michael B. Negrin
Sol Negrin
Bill Neil
Alex Nepomniaschy
John Newby
Yuri Neyman
Sam Nicholson
Crescenzo Notarile
David B. Nowell
Rene Ohashi
Daryn Okada
Thomas Olgeirsson
Woody Omens
Miroslav Ondricek
Michael D. O’Shea
Vince Pace
Anthony Palmieri
Phedon Papamichael
Daniel Pearl
Edward J. Pei
James Pergola
Dave Perkal
Lowell Peterson
Wally Pfister
Bill Pope
Steven Poster
Tom Priestley Jr.
Rodrigo Prieto
Robert Primes
Frank Prinzi
Richard Quinlan
Declan Quinn
Earl Rath
Gil Hubbs
Shane Hurlbut
Tom Hurwitz
Judy Irola
Mark Irwin
Levie Isaacks
Peter James
Johnny E. Jensen
Frank Johnson
Shelly Johnson
Jeffrey Jur
Adam Kane
Stephen M. Katz
Ken Kelsch
Victor J. Kemper
Wayne Kennan
Francis Kenny
Glenn Kershaw
Darius Khondji
Gary Kibbe
Jan Kiesser
Jeffrey L. Kimball
Adam Kimmel
Alar Kivilo
David Klein
Richard Kline
George Koblasa
Fred J. Koenekamp
Lajos Koltai
Pete Kozachik
Neil Krepela
Willy Kurant
Ellen M. Kuras
George La Fountaine
Edward Lachman
Ken Lamkin
Jacek Laskus
Denis Lenoir
John R. Leonetti
Matthew Leonetti
Andrew Lesnie
Peter Levy
Matthew Libatique
Charlie Lieberman
Stephen Lighthill
Karl Walter Lindenlaub
John Lindley
Robert F. Liu
Walt Lloyd
Bruce Logan
Gordon Lonsdale
Emmanuel Lubezki
Julio G. Macat
Glen MacPherson
Paul Maibaum
Constantine Makris
Denis Maloney
Isidore Mankofsky
Christopher Manley
Michael D. Margulies
Barry Markowitz
ACTIVE MEMBERS
Thomas Ackerman
Lance Acord
Marshall Adams
Lloyd Ahern II
Russ Alsobrook
Howard A. Anderson III
Howard A. Anderson Jr.
James Anderson
Peter Anderson
Tony Askins
Charles Austin
Christopher Baffa
James Bagdonas
King Baggot
John Bailey
Michael Ballhaus
Andrzej Bartkowiak
John Bartley
Bojan Bazelli
Frank Beascoechea
Affonso Beato
Mat Beck
Dion Beebe
Bill Bennett
Andres Berenguer
Carl Berger
Gabriel Beristain
Steven Bernstein
Ross Berryman
Oliver Bokelberg
Michael Bonvillain
Richard Bowen
David Boyd
Russell Boyd
Jonathan Brown
Don Burgess
Stephen H. Burum
Bill Butler
Frank B. Byers
Bobby Byrne
Patrick Cady
Antonio Calvache
Paul Cameron
Russell P. Carpenter
James L. Carter
Alan Caso
Michael Chapman
Rodney Charters
James A. Chressanthis
T.C. Christensen
Joan Churchill
Curtis Clark
Peter L. Collister
Jack Cooperman
Jack Couffer
Vincent G. Cox
Jeff Cronenweth
Richard Crudo
Dean R. Cundey
Stefan Czapsky
www.theasc.com June 2012 105
Richard Rawlings Jr.
Frank Raymond
Tami Reiker
Robert Richardson
Anthony B. Richmond
Bill Roe
Owen Roizman
Pete Romano
Charles Rosher Jr.
Giuseppe Rotunno
Philippe Rousselot
Juan Ruiz-Anchia
Marvin Rush
Paul Ryan
Eric Saarinen
Alik Sakharov
Mikael Salomon
Harris Savides
Roberto Schaefer
Tobias Schliessler
Aaron Schneider
Nancy Schreiber
Fred Schuler
John Schwartzman
John Seale
Christian Sebaldt
Dean Semler
Ben Seresin
Eduardo Serra
Steven Shaw
Richard Shore
Newton Thomas Sigel
Steven Silver
John Simmons
Sandi Sissel
Santosh Sivan
Bradley B. Six
Michael Slovis
Dennis L. Smith
Roland “Ozzie” Smith
Reed Smoot
Bing Sokolsky
Peter Sova
Dante Spinotti
Terry Stacey
Ueli Steiger
Peter Stein
Tom Stern
Robert M. Stevens
David Stockton
Rogier Stoffers
Vittorio Storaro
Harry Stradling Jr.
David Stump
Tim Suhrstedt
Peter Suschitzky
Alfred Taylor
Jonathan Taylor
Rodney Taylor
William Taylor
Don Thorin
John Toll
Mario Tosi
Salvatore Totino
Luciano Tovoli
Jost Vacano
Theo Van de Sande
Eric Van Haren Noman
Kees Van Oostrum
Checco Varese
Ron Vargas
Mark Vargo
Amelia Vincent
William Wages
Roy H. Wagner
Mandy Walker
Michael Watkins
Michael Weaver
Jonathan West
Haskell Wexler
Jack Whitman
Gordon Willis
Dariusz Wolski
Ralph Woolsey
Peter Wunstorf
Robert Yeoman
Richard Yuricich
Jerzy Zielinski
Vilmos Zsigmond
Kenneth Zunder
ASSOCIATE MEMBERS
Alan Albert
Richard Aschman
Kay Baker
Joseph J. Ball
Amnon Band
Carly M. Barber
Craig Barron
Thomas M. Barron
Larry Barton
Wolfgang Baumler
Bob Beitcher
Mark Bender
Bruce Berke
Bob Bianco
Steven A. Blakely
Mitchell Bogdanowicz
Michael Bravin
William Brodersen
Garrett Brown
Ronald D. Burdett
Reid Burns
Vincent Carabello
Jim Carter
Leonard Chapman
Mark Chiolis
Denny Clairmont
Adam Clark
Cary Clayton
Dave Cole
Michael Condon
Robert B. Creamer
Grover Crisp
Peter Crithary
Daniel Curry
Ross Danielson
Carlos D. DeMattos
Gary Demos
Mato Der Avanessian
Kevin Dillon
David Dodson
Judith Doherty
Cyril Drabinsky
Jesse Dylan
Jonathan Erland
Ray Feeney
William Feightner
Phil Feiner
Jimmy Fisher
Scott Fleischer
Thomas Fletcher
Gilles Galerne
Salvatore Giarratano
Richard B. Glickman
John A. Gresch
Jim Hannafin
William Hansard
Bill Hansard, Jr.
Richard Hart
Robert Harvey
Josh Haynie
Charles Herzfeld
Larry Hezzelwood
Frieder Hochheim
Bob Hoffman
Vinny Hogan
Cliff Hsui
Robert C. Hummel
Roy Isaia
George Joblove
Joel Johnson
John Johnston
Marker Karahadian
Frank Kay
Debbie Kennard
Milton Keslow
Robert Keslow
Douglas Kirkland
Mark Kirkland
Timothy J. Knapp
Karl Kresser
Chet Kucinski
Chuck Lee
Doug Leighton
Lou Levinson
Suzanne Lezotte
Grant Loucks
Howard Lukk
Andy Maltz
Steven E. Manios, Jr.
Steven E. Manios, Sr.
Peter Martin
Robert Mastronardi
Joe Matza
Albert Mayer, Jr.
Bill McDonald
Karen McHugh
Andy McIntyre
Stan Miller
Walter H. Mills
George Milton
Mike Mimaki
Michael Morelli
Dash Morrison
Nolan Murdock
Dan Muscarella
Iain A. Neil
Otto Nemenz
Ernst Nettmann
Tony Ngai
Mickel Niehenke
Jeff Okun
Marty Oppenheimer
Walt Ordway
Ahmad Ouri
Michael Parker
Warren Parker
Dhanendra Patel
Kristin Petrovich
Ed Phillips
Nick Phillips
Joshua Pines
Carl Porcello
Howard Preston
David Pringle
Phil Radin
Christopher Reyna
Colin Ritchie
Eric G. Rodli
Domenic Rom
Andy Romanoff
Frederic Rose
Daniel Rosen
Dana Ross
Bill Russell
Kish Sadhvani
David Samuelson
Steve Schklair
Peter K. Schnitzler
Walter Schonfeld
Wayne Schulman
Juergen Schwinzer
Steven Scott
Alec Shapiro
Don Shapiro
Milton R. Shefter
Leon Silverman
Garrett Smith
Timothy E. Smith
Kimberly Snyder
Stefan Sonnenfeld
John L. Sprung
Joseph N. Tawil
J U N E 2 0 1 2
Ira Tiffen
Steve Tiffen
Arthur Tostado
Jeffrey Treanor
Bill Turner
Stephan Ukas-Bradley
Mark Van Horne
Richard Vetter
Dedo Weigert
Evans Wetmore
Franz Wieser
Beverly Wood
Jan Yarbrough
Hoyt Yeatman
Irwin M. Young
Michael Zacharia
Bob Zahn
Nazir Zaidi
Michael Zakula
Les Zellan
HONORARY MEMBERS
Col. Edwin E. Al drin Jr.
Neil A. Armstrong
Col. Michael Collins
Bob Fisher
David MacDonald
Cpt. Bruce McCandless II
Larry Parker
D. Brian Spruill
Adams, Bokelberg, Sivan
Join Society
New active member Marshall
Adams, ASC was born in Minneapolis,
Minn., but grew up in California, where his
father worked as an architect and was
frequently hired by members of the enter-
tainment industry. One such client noticed
Adams’ interest in making 8mm films and
invited him to watch a TV-show shoot on
the Universal backlot, an experience that
cemented Adams’ desire to work in the
motion-picture business.
He entered the industry through the
electric department, where he climbed the
ranks and eventually worked as a gaffer on
features such as Block Party, Baby Geniuses
and Gods and Monsters, and on series that
included Babylon Five and Felicity. Adams
stepped up to cinematographer in 2000,
and since then has earned credits on the
series Alias, The Agency, Kojak, Monk and
CSI: NY, among others.
Oliver Bokelberg, ASC, BVK was
born in Hamburg, Germany, where his
father had a photography studio. As a
teenager, he began working for his father as
a film runner and editor’s assistant, and he
was later accepted into New York Univer-
sity’s undergraduate film program. Upon
graduating, he began shooting music
videos, shorts and documentaries.
Bokelberg’s first feature credit was
Charms Incidents, which he followed with a
string of independent features. In 2002, he
shot Thomas McCarthy’s The Station Agent,
and they have since also collaborated on
The Visitor and Win Win. Bokelberg won a
Kodak Vision Award in 2000 for the feature
The Citizen. He earned ASC Award nomina-
tions in 2007 and 2008 for the pilots Raines
and My Own Worst Enemy, respectively.
Santosh Sivan, ASC, ISC grew up
in Kerala, India. The son of a renowned film-
maker, his passion for motion pictures was
kindled at an early age, and he credits his
exposure to American Cinematographer
with focusing his sights on cinematography.
He graduated from the Film and Television
Institute of India in 1984, and went on to
earn numerous awards for his work as a
director of photography through the 1980s
and ’90s. His honors include Best Cine-
matography National Awards for the
features Perumthachan, Kaalapani,
Mohiniyattam, Iruvar and Dil Se.
In 1995, Sivan became a founding
member of the Indian Society of Cine-
matographers. While continuing to work as
a cinematographer, he has also notched
numerous credits as a director on features
such as Halo, The Terrorist, Before the Rains
and Tahaan. He teaches cinematography at
the Film and Television Institute and
Whistling Woods in India, and at the Maisha
Film Lab in Africa. ●
Clubhouse News
106 June 2012 American Cinematographer
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e

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g

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From top: Marshall Adams, ASC; Oliver
Bokelberg, ASC, BVK; Santosh Sivan, ASC, ISC.
In Memoriam: ASC Associate Fred Godfrey
Associate member Dennis Fred Godfrey died on March
22 at the age of 84.
Godfrey was born on May 28, 1927, in Morgantown, West
Va. After graduating from Washington State College, he moved to
Los Angeles, where he landed a job at the Eastman Kodak Co. He
served as a liaison between Kodak and the cinematography
community, and his place within the community was recognized
early on: Godfrey became an associate member of the ASC in
January 1956.
Godfrey was a key figure of the ASC Awards Committee
for many years. For his service to the Society and the industry as a whole, he became the first
recipient of the ASC Bud Stone Award of Distinction at this year’s ASC Awards ceremony.
Never Stop Learning. Never Stop Networking.
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108 June 2012 American Cinematographer
When you were a child, what film made the strongest impres-
sion on you?
Mysterious Island (1961). What could be better than giant crabs,
bees and Jules Verne living under the ocean in his private submarine?
Which cinematographers, past or
present, do you most admire?
Caleb Deschanel, ASC, for his body of
work. I think that The Patriot, The Black
Stallion and The Right Stuff contain
some of the most memorable images in
contemporary films.
What sparked your interest in
photography?
My father had me shooting 8mm home
movies from the age of 8, but my first
real passion was still photography.
Sitting in the supersaturated red light in my bathroom-turned-dark-
room and watching black-and-white images magically appear on
blank paper got me hooked on making and manipulating images.
Where did you train and/or study?
I earned undergraduate and graduate degrees at UCLA’s School of
Fine Arts.
Who were your early teachers or mentors?
My most influential teachers at UCLA were my graduate professors
John Whitney Sr., who later became known as the father of
computer animation, and John Neuhart, who was part of the Charles
Eames group. In different ways they both blended film, design and
computers into new artistic expressions.
What are some of your key artistic influences?
I spent about three years blowing glass at UCLA, and then began
manipulating and shooting the abstract light effects that eventually
became my thesis in abstract visual design and light sculpture.
How did you get your first break in the business?
I got an interview at Paramount to work on Star Trek: The Motion
Picture (1979) and was hired by Bob Weiss to create the Matter-Anti-
matter engine of the starship Enterprise. The effect was based on my
lighting designs, and I eventually took on the on-set visual-effects
lighting for the entire film.
What has been your most satisfying moment on a project?
I recently screened my short film for Canon’s new C300 camera,
XXIT, at Paramount. It’s a very ambitious virtual-reality project that
made me reflect on how far we’ve come in the past 30 years.
Have you made any memorable blunders?
I’ve made plenty, and I learned from them all. They were generally
related to pyro or practical effects when we were shooting lots of
miniatures. It was nothing that a few insurance claims and an on-set
medic couldn’t fix!
What is the best professional advice
you’ve ever received?
The film business is like a prizefight: It’s
not how many times you get knocked
down that counts, it’s how many times
you get up and go again.
What recent books, films or
artworks have inspired you?
I generally read science fiction and
fantasy: George R.R. Martin, Robin
Hobb and Michael Sullivan. I thought
Inception was the greatest high-concept film to be released in years;
it set a new standard that will last for a long time, somewhat like
Blade Runner did in the 1980s.
Do you have any favorite genres, or genres you would like to
try?
I’m hooked on futuristic, high-concept fantasy and historical period
pieces. Creating something that simply does not exist in today’s
world is tremendously challenging and satisfying. For me, it brings
the magic back into the process of making movies.
If you weren’t a cinematographer, what might you be doing
instead?
I enjoy directing and producing as well as shooting. Essentially, I
enjoy collaborating with other very talented cinematographers and
a creative team to tell stories. If I worked outside film and television,
I would most likely be a fine-art still photographer.
Which ASC cinematographers recommended you for
membership?
Richard Kline, Francis Kenny, Richard Crudo and Victor J. Kemper.
How has ASC membership impacted your life and career?
It’s a lifelong dream realized. It’s also very humbling and gratifying to
be included in this remarkably talented and amazingly dedicated
group of people. ●
Sam Nicholson, ASC Close-up
CHR I S T I AN S E B AL DT, AS C
ONFILM
To order Kodak motion picture film,
call (800) 621-film.
© Eastman Kodak Company, 2012.
Photography: © 2012 Douglas Kirkland
“My images are the result of a collaboration
of so many bright minds. CSI is approaching
its 300th episode, and we’re still pushing
creatively. One glance at a well-crafted
image, and the audience understands the
story it tells. It’s a visual medium, and we
must create with this in mind. Film is a
point-and-shoot instrument. It’s reliable
and easy to work with, and its silky, smooth
texture makes everyone look good. For me,
seeing the final results is still an astonishing
and humbling experience.”
Christian Sebaldt, ASC has photographed
45 episodes of CSI: Crime Scene Investigation
over the past four seasons. He is the longest-
serving director of photography on that
series, which also earned him a 2010 Emmy®
Award. His credits also include more than 40
other narrative credits, including Parasomnia,
FeardotCom, Resident Evil: Apocalypse, Bratz,
Race to Space, and The Dark.
All these films were shot on Kodak motion
picture film.
For an extended interview with Christian
Sebaldt, visit www.kodak.com/go/onfilm.

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Alar Kivilo, ASC, CSC

“I

©photo by Owen Roizman, ASC

’ve always been captivated by the power of images and how they create a visceral, emotional response in the viewer. Even though cinema is more than 100 years old, there still isn’t a quantifiable cinematic language that consistently elicits a desired response in the audience. Instead, each movie is a creative journey of discovery wherein one finds the light, compositions, colors, movements and juxtapositions of images that best tell the story at hand. This journey is always pure magic. “I started reading American Cinematographer as a young cinematographer in Canada. It not only provided a window into the world I aspired to enter, but was also my unofficial film school. “I continue to devour AC in search of clues as to how my fellow cinematographers find the right languages for their films.” — Alar Kivilo, ASC, CSC

TO SUBSCRIBE BY PHONE:

Call (800) 448-0145 (U.S. only) (323) 969-4333 or visit the ASC website

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The Grads helped blend the dynamic range in the sky. artsy images that we were going for. allowing our camera’s sensor to see what it needed.” Cinematographer Eric Schmidt was nominated for an ASC Award for his work on Cold Case and has shot several features. combined with the Circular True Pols worked particularly well.“I spend most of my working hours on location so I need to know that I’m carrying the most reliable equipment. I did a shoot at 9000’ in the Poudre River Valley of Colorado. They give me the highest qualitylook across all formats. contrasty.schneideroptics.schneideroptics. He has created striking imagery for music videos for everyone from Bruce Springsteen to Foo Fighters and shot over 500 commercials including the distinctive The World’s Most Interesting Man spots for Dos Equis. That’s why I always travel with Schneider 4x5 and 6x6 filters.com www. including The Mechanic and I Melt With You. Recently. The Schneider filters helped me create the crisp. B+W • Century Century  • Schneider Schneider www. I found that the ND Soft Grads.com ww .

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a. ASC. a cosmic cube of unlimited power.J U N E 2 0 1 2 V O L . 9 3 N O . examines a holographic representation of the tesseract. in The Avengers.a. AFC exhumes a vampire in the swingin’ Seventies for Dark Shadows Bill Pope. 6 The International Journal of Motion Imaging On Our Cover: Tony Stark.).COM TO ENJOY THESE WEB EXCLUSIVES — DVD Playback: Anatomy of a Murder • Chinatown • The Last Temptation of Christ . (Frame grab courtesy of Marvel Entertainment and Disney Enterprises. BSC spotlights Marvel’s top superheroes for The Avengers Greig Fraser brings new vision to classic tale with Snow White and the Huntsman Bruno Delbonnel.) FEATURES 34 52 62 74 Seamus McGarvey.k. ASC takes on time-traveling aliens for Men in Black III All Together Now 52 Beauty in Battle Blood Relatives Blast from the Past 62 DEPARTMENTS 8 10 18 84 100 101 102 104 106 108 74 Editor’s Note Short Takes: The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom Production Slate: Moonrise Kingdom • Hemingway & Gellhorn New Products & Services International Marketplace Classified Ads Ad Index ASC Membership Roster Clubhouse News ASC Close-Up: Sam Nicholson — VISIT WWW. ASC.THEASC. Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.

Birchard. P. David Heuring. Printed in the USA.. John Calhoun. Jim Hemphill. CA 90078. established 1920 and in its 92nd year of publication. U. Article Reprints: Requests for high-quality article reprints (or electronic reprints) should be made to Sheridan Reprints at (800) 635-7181 ext. direct line for subscription inquiries (323) 969-4344. Copyright 2012 ASC Holding Corp. Orange Dr.com ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR Scott Burnell 323-936-0672 FAX 323-936-9188 e-mail: sburnell@earthlink.O. Fax (323) 876-4973. (323) 969-4333.sheridan.) Periodicals postage paid at Los Angeles. BOOKS & PRODUCTS CIRCULATION DIRECTOR Saul Molina CIRCULATION MANAGER Alex Lopez SHIPPING MANAGER Miguel Madrigal ———————————————————————————————————— ASC GENERAL MANAGER Brett Grauman ASC EVENTS COORDINATOR Patricia Armacost ASC PRESIDENT’S ASSISTANT Delphine Figueras ASC ACCOUNTING MANAGER Mila Basely ASC ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE Corey Clark ———————————————————————————————————— American Cinematographer (ISSN 0002-7928). CA and at additional mailing offices. 6 The International Journal ofMotion Imaging www... 1782 N. CA 90028. Douglas Bankston. $). Box 2230. Hollywood. POSTMASTER: Send address change to American Cinematographer. Michael Goldman. Benjamin B. is published monthly in Hollywood by ASC Holding Corp. Jean Oppenheimer. Patricia Thomson ———————————————————————————————————— ART DEPARTMENT CREATIVE DIRECTOR Marion Gore ———————————————————————————————————— ADVERTISING ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR Angie Gollmann 323-936-3769 FAX 323-936-9188 e-mail: gollmann@pacbell.net CLASSIFIEDS/ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Diella Nepomuceno 323-952-2124 FAX 323-876-4973 e-mail: diella@ascmag.com. Subscriptions: U. all other foreign countries $95 a year (remit international Money Order or other exchange payable in U.net ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR Sanja Pearce 323-952-2114 FAX 323-876-4973 e-mail: sanja@ascmag.A. Canada/Mexico $70. $50. Kenneth Sweeney. 8065 or by e-mail hrobinson@tsp.S. Robert S. Jay Holben.theasc.S. 4 ———————————————————————————————————— . Witmer TECHNICAL EDITOR Christopher Probst CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Stephanie Argy.S. (All rights reserved. Bosley ASSOCIATE EDITOR Jon D. Advertising: Rate card upon request from Hollywood office.com ———————————————————————————————————— CIRCULATION. Noah Kadner. 9 3 . Jon Silberg.com ———————————————————————————————————— PUBLISHER Martha Winterhalter ———————————————————————————————————— Visit us online at EDITORIAL EXECUTIVE EDITOR Stephen Pizzello SENIOR EDITOR Rachael K. Mark Hope-Jones. (800) 448-0145. Hollywood. Iain Stasukevich.J u n e 2 0 1 2 V o l . N o . Simon Gray.

from television dramas.THE CAMERA OF CHOICE TRULY CINEMATIC. Leading cinematographers.arridigital. RELIABLE. EASY. To name only a few: 3D FEATURES 47 RONIN ASTERIX & OBELIX FINAL DESTINATION 5 GRAVITY HANSEL & GRETEL: WITCH HUNTERS HUGO LIFE OF PI SPY KIDS 4 THE THREE MUSKETEERS WICKIE & THE TREASURE OF THE GODS WILD BILL 2D FEATURES ABRAHAM LINCOLN: VAMPIRE HUNTER CHRONICLE AMOUR EXTREMELY LOUD & INCREDIBLY CLOSE ROCK OF AGES SKYFALL THE AVENGERS THE WETTEST COUNTY IN THE WORLD WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOU‘RE EXPECTING TV PRODUCTIONS CALIFORNICATION DESPERATE HOUSEWIVES DOWNTON ABBEY SERIES 2 FINDER FORTY GAME OF THRONES GLADES HOMELAND HOUSE MD HOW TO MAKE IT IN AMERICA IN PLAIN SIGHT LAW & ORDER: SVU TATORT COMMERCIALS ARMANI BACARDI BMW CITROËN D&G WATCHES DHL DIOR LACOSTE MERCEDES NINTENDO NIKE VISA VOLKSWAGEN www. FUTURE PROOF. COST EFFICIENT. producers and directors are selecting the ALEXA digital camera system for every type of production.com . commercials and music videos to major international 2D and 3D feature films.

O’Shea Rodney Taylor Ron Garcia Sol Negrin Kenneth Zunder MUSEUM CURATOR 6 Steve Gainer . but an educational. Flinn III Victor J. Burum Richard Crudo George Spiro Dibie Richard Edlund Fred Elmes Michael Goi Victor J. cultural and pro fes sion al orga ni za tion. Kemper Frederic Goodich Stephen Lighthill Sergeant At Arms MEMBERS OF THE BOARD John Bailey Stephen H. Membership is by invitation to those who are actively en gaged as di rec tors of photography and have demon strated out stand ing ability. Kemper Francis Kenny Isidore Mankofsky Robert Primes Owen Roizman Kees Van Oostrum Haskell Wexler Vilmos Zsigmond ALTERNATES Michael D.2011/2012 Michael Goi President Richard Crudo Vice President Vice President Vice President Treasurer Secretary Owen Roizman John C. OFFICERS . ASC membership has be come one of the highest honors that can be bestowed upon a profes sional cin e ma tog ra pher — a mark of prestige and excellence.American Society of Cinematographers The ASC is not a labor union or a guild.

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and he achieved his dream last August. what remains is a definitive piece offering plenty of insights from the filmmakers. Jackson) first popped up in a post-credits coda to Iron Man. ASC. he and director Rupert Sanders breathe new life into the titular heroine (Kristen Stewart). ASC. production designer James Chinlund.” page 62). Shortly after Jon was revived by paramedics. ASC. ASC. Jon was the right man for the assignment. Fans of the Dark Shadows television series are equally keen to see Tim Burton’s bigscreen blood feast. Greig Fraser is another cinematographer who applied a fresh spin to his project’s source material. visual-effects supervisor Janek Sirrs.” he explains to Jay Holben (“Beauty in Battle. “but at the same time.Editor’s Note The Avengers is the superhero summit Marvel fans have been waiting for their entire lives. “When people ask me what this movie is like. key grip John Janusek. he began pleading to cover the production.” Pope tells Iain Stasukevich (“Blast from the Past. “There could be no direct sunlight on the main character. gaffer Chris Napolitano. AFC ably achieved Burton’s desire to create a film that “felt like the Seventies movies that I recall from my youth.” Delbonnel tells Benjamin B (“Blood Relatives.” A retro vibe also lends mirth to Men in Black III . I know this because our associate editor. Jon Witmer. Agent K (played by Josh Brolin in Sixties scenes and Tommy Lee Jones in the present) about an alien who has also turned back the clock to elude capture.” Photo by Owen Roizman. While we pruned his ambitious first draft just a tad from its original. director Joss Whedon. “We wanted to submerge the viewer in this lush world of big locations and epic scale. Clearly. which adds a wry twist by exhuming 18th-century vampire Barnabas Collins (Johnny Depp) in the swinging ’70s. intimate moments with our actors. so for the majority of the film he is in a kind of a penumbra. Stephen Pizzello Executive Editor 8 . digital-imaging technician Daniel Hernandez. and 2nd-unit director of photography Brad Shield.” page 34). Fraser says the filmmakers were careful not to let the movie’s spectacle overpower its characters. dimmer-board operator Bryan Booth. With Snow White and the Huntsman . Bruno Delbonnel.” while taking care to create a lighting style that made sense with a vampire lurking about.” page 74). Ohio.” page 52). Leo Tolstoy length. we also wanted to be able to respond to small. to visit the set. who trains for combat before taking on the evil Queen Ravenna (Charlize Theron). I tell them it’s a Hope and Crosby road picture. has been vibrating with excitement since 2008. Agent J (Will Smith) must travel back to 1969 to warn his partner. BSC. as he proves with an exuberant account of the shoot (“All Together Now. “Sunlight was one of my principal constraints. shot by Bill Pope. when he was dispatched to his hometown of Cleveland. when Nick Fury (played by Samuel L. including cinematographer Seamus McGarvey. This time around. a comedy in the classic Hawksian sense.

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we needed someone who sensed the subtleties behind the language. and she’d asked cinematographer Aaron Phillips to join her in crafting a “visual poem about the ephemeral nature of life. rolling blackouts were still in effect in many of the island’s major cities. “James is very sensitive to the country’s cultural sensibilities. It was a cold spring. and portions of major roads had been destroyed. That’s what the film ended up being about. Everything they needed could be transported in two American Cinematographer Photos and frame grabs courtesy of Lucy Walker. many of the traditionalhanami celebrations — cherry-blossom parties that sweep Japan every spring — had been cancelled. sweeping them cleanly from the land. “The Japanese people have an incredible respect for the duality of nature. the rail system was tangled by delays and detours. and to express our appreciation of Japanese culture. In fact. the Oscarnominated documentary short The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom presents a “visual poem about the ephemeral nature of life. a few elderly stragglers climb the hill toward the camera as people rush down to help them. He notes. the filmmakers were careful to respect the survivors’ privacy. Hiroshima and Tokyo.” says Phillips. and the cherry blossoms were blooming while the country was still reeling. I A Poetic Portrait of Survival By Iain Stasukevich The first four minutes of the Oscar-nominated documentary short The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom were taken by an amateur videographer in the small seaside town of Minamisanriku.” When their plane touched down at Narita. Voices cry out as the dark wall of seawater crashes through buildings and cars. whose contributions proved vital. In the clip’s final moments. “I said. just moments after a 9.” Phillips agreed. but the water rises too quickly. ‘We can’t go there now. documentarian Lucy Walker was in New York. At the time these events were occurring. and they adopted a bare-bones approach to the filming process. Seattle transplant James MacWhyte.” says Walker. Joining Walker and Phillips on the shoot was a local translator. she recalls.” The team made stops in Kyoto. Japan. and the rescuers are sucked in with the people they were trying to save.Short Takes Directed by Lucy Walker and shot by Aaron Phillips. “It wasn’t just about being able to speak Japanese. preparing for a trip to Tokyo to promote her features Wasteland and Countdown to Zero. She was also planning to shoot a short film about the cherry blossom while she was in Japan. As they traveled.0 earthquake triggered a tsunami that proceeds to rush at the camera.’ But my second thought was that 10 June 2012 maybe it’s an important time to not run away.” When Walker first heard news of the quake. .

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a Canon 2x extender. backpacks: a Canon EOS 7D camera. put a big camera in people’s faces and ask for all the gory details. Series 9 ND and polarizer filters. but sometimes it’s better to just show up and talk to 12 June 2012 American Cinematographer . but a bigger light would have slowed us down and been more intrusive. an AA-batterypowered LED lamp.” The only artificial light Phillips used was a last-minute addition. He typically kept the camera mounted to a Manfrotto fluid-head tripod. 24-70mm and 70200mm zoom lenses. “We were granted an interview with a 16th-generation cherry-blossom master. Even when we were doing sound. More often than not. a Canon 24mm tilt-focus lens. “You can spend hundreds of hours researching for a documentary.” says Phillips. eschewing handheld work in favor of stable frames inspired by classical Japanese composition. and a Manfrotto fluidhead tripod. the aid workers and displaced townspeople were forthcoming with their harrowing stories of loss. Canon EF 16-35mm. “The last thing we wanted to do was walk in. It looked like we were just taking photographs. “The 7D was great because it’s very small. It’s not the way I wanted to light it.Phillips (middle) shot the short with a Canon EOS 7D fitted with Canon lenses. as well as their hopes for the future. stopping along the way to visit refugee centers with donations in hand. He notes. Phillips and Walker drove through the affected areas. we just had a pistol grip and a mic going to a small MP3 recorder. but he was only available at night.” Much of the filming took place in the heavily damaged northern T ohoku ¯ prefecture.

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“In many of these locations. wide. “Many of our compositions were inspired by classical Japanese composition and framing. put a big camera in people’s faces and ask for all the gory details.” says Walker.” he continues. Between the documentary interviews.Phillips and Walker (bottom) employed a barebones approach in order to respect their subjects’ privacy. only occasionally going handheld. lingering shots of the rubble where homes. hospitals and schools once stood are juxtaposed with slow. It’s a sort of moving photograph that really allows the viewer to see the details.” says Phillips. Being there was the best research imaginable. 14 June 2012 American Cinematographer .” One way in which The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom stands out from many other documentaries is its poetic visual style. the damage was so extensive that a well-framed static shot served the film the best. where the landscape helps frame the shot. “The last thing we wanted to do was walk in. “By shooting predominantly on sticks. “We couldn’t have done that with a huge crew and a lot of equipment. particularly when shooting some of the wider landscape shots and highly detailed patterns. What we had going for us was intimacy and spontaneity. “I was quite concerned about some of the anomalies inherent in digital-capture formats. smooth pans through tranquil parks draped in a snowy coat of cherry-blossom petals. we avoided the ‘Jello-cam’ breakup inherent in rolling-shutter cameras. with slow pans and tilts. people. Phillips kept the camera on a tripod.” Phillips says.

I love Clairmont’s custom gear and incredible service.6 5 5 6 .4 4 4 0 Va n c o u v e r 6 0 4 .Over the years I have used just about every piece of equipment Clairmont Camera has ever owned.1 7 0 0 A l bu q u e rq u e 5 0 5 . it keeps me coming back! In visual effect shooting we always are inventing on the fly.7 6 1 .9 8 4 .4 5 6 3 Toronto 4 1 6 . I would recommend Clairmont Camera to anyone in the industry. With difficult setups like hanging off a 70-story building.2 5 2 5 M o n t r e a l 5 1 4 .5 2 5 .4 6 7 . time-lapse film cameras to super high-speed digital cameras and now the Alexa. Sam Nicholson. ASC Chairman / CEO Stargate Studios H o l l y w o o d 8 1 8 . complex driving rigs or doing “in camera” visual effects having equipment and service you can depend on is essential.2 2 7 .

lying on my stomach and trying to frame this shot with flowers in the foreground and this beautiful green hill with a path of blooming cherry blossoms in the background. It was quite extraordinary.” ● 16 June 2012 American Cinematographer .” The filmmakers captured roughly 45 hours of footage over the course of three weeks. The final color correction was performed by colorist Phil Azenzer at Picture Head in Hollywood. but inspiring at the same time. and I was thinking how beautiful it all was. Filmmaking is fraught with compromise. “He never let us feel the limitations of the camera.” “Aaron was able to accomplish so much with the 7D. so [the final color correction] was mainly about contrast adjustment. The buildings around me were swaying. Walker and editor Aki Mizutani (who was in Japan when the earthquake struck) spent a month shaping that footage into the 40-minute final product. “It was emotionally exhausting. and the aftershocks continued like that for the next two weeks.” notes Phillips. It was moving to see how civilized and humane everyone was with one another.” says Walker.” Phillips relates. “We used power windows to lift people’s faces a bit here and there. it was impossible to avoid getting caught up in the survivors’ plight. but we still encountered moiré and other compression issues on some of the more demanding. but all things considered. There were these wonderful scents in the air. which premiered at the 2011 Toronto International Film Festival. but they were working together to rebuild.0 aftershock hit.” He also experienced nature’s dark side firsthand. We saw people at their best under the worst of circumstances. detailed shots.Top: The juxtaposition of blooming cherry blossoms and the destruction caused by the tsunami underscores “the duality of nature. I’d never felt a tremor before. He recalls.” which. I’d just try to find a good angle where the sun was at their backs. We placed very high demands upon the camera and the HDSLR format. but also incredible opportunities. it delivered in spades. Phillips says. I pushed my hands into the ground and felt like I was on a rocking boat. “I got the tones I wanted in the camera. “I was in Iwaki.” Given the subject matter.” Middle: Phillips frames two displaced boats. Bottom: The cinematographer lines up a shot along a path in Iwaki. is “what the film ended up being about. and that usually worked quite well. when suddenly a 7. “Their livelihood was completely swept away.

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What kind of prep did you do? Yeoman:We spend a lot of our prep time going to the actual locations. sparking a riotous pursuit by an overmatched posse of adults that includes a local cop (Bruce Willis). Suzy (Kara Hayward). If you ask him any question. I also had a 16mm camera with us most of the time so we could see how the blocking and locations would appear on film. and it’s always very specific. American Cinematographer:Why do you enjoy working with Wes? Robert Yeoman. snap zooms. Why did you opt for Super 16? Yeoman: Wes actually brought up the idea of shooting 16mm. ASC: Our first film together was Bottle Rocket. compar- . I often can anticipate how Wes will want to shoot a scene. He appears to have an affinity for films from the 1960s and ’70s. ASC. which was beautifully shot in a natural style by Chris Menges. We started referencing different movies in our prep period and we found we were on the same plane visually. While the movie includes many of the visual tropes that define Anderson’s style — symmetrical compositions.D. It’s very refreshing to work with a director like that and I feel that this is one reason his films have such a cohesive. Incorporating the arch humor of previous collaborations like Rushmore and The Royal Tenenbaums (AC Jan. directed by Ken Loach. We take a viewfinder and a digital still camera with us and we block out scenes just to get ideas. singular vision. producers. in a sense. a precocious orphan who schemes to elope with his pre-teen crush. I Scout’s Honor By Stephen Pizzello clear vision of every element that will end up onscreen. Because we were planning to shoot on Super 16. and speed changes to emphasize key moments — the filmmakers’ use of the Super 16mm format is a departure from their previous outings.’ He always has an answer. Yeoman: He has many different influences and he’s particularly fond of the French New Wave. their latest outing concerns Sam (Jared Gilman). Yeoman recently spoke to AC about his work on the picture.I. We screened it during preproduction in Newport [R. his response is never. Wes really liked the visual tone of that movie. swish pans. ‘I don’t know. Letting true love dictate their course. OnMoonrise Kingdom. ASC with director Wes Anderson for the sixth time. production designer and everyone else accompanying us would stand in for the actors.]. ’02).Production Slate Scoutmaster Ward (Edward Norton) assesses a tree house while making his morning rounds at Khaki Scout base camp in Moonrise Kingdom. most of which were shot in anamorphic 35mm. so I started shooting tests at Panavision Hollywood. We were able to make the necessary adjustments during the actual filming of the movie. a scoutmaster (Ed Norton) and Suzy’s parents (Bill Murray and Frances McDormand). he set up a screening for the cast and crew of an English movie called Black Jack [1979]. One thing I really appreciate about Wes is that he has a very 18 June 2012 American Cinematographer Moonrise Kingdom photos by Niko Tavernise. Our A. the two run away from Suzy’s family and Sam’s Khaki Scout troop.. Moonrise Kingdom teams Robert Yeoman. BSC. it was a pre-shoot. Photos and frame grabs courtesy of Focus Features.

but brilliant.” DP Matt Mindlin With the CU Focus. The design is simple. I can place my key lig W lighttools.” Derrick Kolus.com/photometric . by allowing us to use large diffusion frames while minimizing problematic reflections in our windows. enveloping light exactly where you want it and not where you don’t. I will want to use CUfocus on every show I do from now on. I can place a key light close to my subject providing the soft wrap that I expect and still have significant fall-off in the background . tighter control “Luscious. ASC “ The CUfocus played a crucial role on Body of Proof.soft egg crates evolved more light.” DP Steven Fierberg.especially when challenged with limited space. Chief Lighting Technician “With CUfocus.

In our tests we found that the faster stocks from both Kodak and Fuji — the 500 tungsten stocks — were grainier than we wanted.Top to bottom: Suzy (Kara Hayward) and Sam (Jared Gilman) rendezvous at the appointed time. Later I went to New York. we had an excellent .85:1 aspect ratio because he felt that the story’s locations — like the house the Bishop family lives in — would be better served by that format. and Wes supported that decision. so we went with it. It suited us perfectly and was great for handheld. they occasionally jammed. and they allowed us to be very flexible. We made one of those rigs. and I remembered that on Chinatown. The cameras aren’t perfect. the crew had mounted the camera on two pipes to create a kind of poor man’s Steadicam. We also used the Aaton A-Minimas. Fortunately. It also can film at speeds up to 75 fps and we used this on several occasions throughout the film to accentuate a moment. we’d have been carrying a great deal more equipment. Robert Yeoman. and had them walk backwards down various paths in the woods. and shot extensive tests on 16mm. Wes was very pleased with the results of the Super 16. ing different stocks in both 35mm and 16mm. We really liked the look of Kodak [Vision3 200T] 7213 and decided to shoot 20 June 2012 every frame of the movie on that stock. Were you using any special rigs for other kinds of shots? Yeoman: Wes wanted to stay lowtech. using both an Arri 416 and Aaton cameras. and we got some edge fog after loading our daylight spools in the woods. We also knew we’d be shooting in the fairly rugged terrain of Rhode Island and that we’d often be climbing to some very remote places. Sam details his plan for their journey. They were so small I could easily run through the woods holding one. Our main camera was the Aaton XTerà. but I wanted to keep the look as consistent as I could. We wanted everything to be American Cinematographer more mobile so we could more easily pick up the cameras and run with them. and we used them for the scene where Sam and Suzy are dancing on the beach so we could move around them very quickly. Its ASA of 200 presented a bit of a challenge when we were doing our night scenes. We were shooting at dusk and our window of light was small. Wes favored the 1. which are very small cameras that allowed us to get camera moves we couldn’t have achieved any other way. where Wes was living. We had a few issues with the A-Minimas. but they’re effective. positioned a person on each end of it. If we’d opted for 35mm. ASC (bending down at camera) and his crew prepare a dolly shot for the scene. I added a small onboard video monitor on the AMinima because the camera has a fixed eyepiece that doesn’t really allow you to see through the lens if you hold it low or high.

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There were other ideas about how to accomplish this. Our key grip. director Wes Anderson grabs a shot on the run. we traveled alongside him in another canoe handholding the A-Minima. but that was it for conventional camera rigs. Wes and I took turns running with it or handholding the camera to get the shot. and the camera starts on the first floor and cranes all the way up to the third floor. or we sat in the canoe with him to do closeups. was very adept in the design of our low-tech approach. We also used a Steadicam for one exterior shot of Bob Balaban as he walks through a field. We did use a Technocrane for the scene in which Suzy runs up the steps inside her house. the grisly aftermath of the boys’ charge. Stanley Hernandez. but I feel that the Technocrane was the most effective choice. Sam’s fellow Khaki Scouts prepare to make their move.Top to bottom: After cornering the young couple in the forest. who both did a great job under very difficult conditions. Why did you choose Rhode Island as the primary location? Yeoman: Wes did a lot of scouting up and down the East Coast. we laid a dolly track and I would swish-pan the camera at the preset marks. To get a very low shot of a dog running through a field. I employed a homemade rig that was like a little Pogocam with the AMinima mounted on the bottom of it. Braden Belmonte. first focus puller. For shots of Sam traveling down the river in a canoe. This interior was a set. and in most of his movies he doesn’t specifically identify the locations — he prefers them to seem like these magical places in the world that he has created. and second AC. Rhode Island has a very rugged 22 June 2012 American Cinematographer . Sanjay Sami. To achieve the shots that establish the house interior at the beginning of the film.

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that’s just the way Wes sees his world. When we set up shots. Wes wanted us to create the rain effect with lighting rather than traditional rain bars. we used a couple of Lightning Strikes units. with tungsten units backlighting the water and the rain. rain bars and rain towers. along with the tax incentives we received for shooting there. we just defocused them a bit to create the feeling of rain on the American Cinematographer windowpanes. The exterior of the Bishop house existed there as a real location. I was always amazed when we got our dailies. they frequently end up with that framing. For the portions of the storm that took place at the exteriors of the scout camp. There were also many beautiful wooded areas. I believe that Rhode Island’s proximity to N ew York City was also a big factor for equipment. We placed two 18Ks on towers to backlight the rain and often incorporated them into the shot. He’s also a big Kubrick fan. He has always had a love of theater. we started shooting maybe a half-hour before dark and just kept shooting all the way into night. Frans Wetterings. 24 June 2012 giant Ritter fans. and it’s the visual style he’s drawn to. How did the format affect those aesthetics? Yeoman: I love anamorphic — it’s my favorite format — and there was certainly some tradeoff involved in losing that 2. the ease of Super 16 was a good call. Kino Flos. film labs.. Yeoman checks the light on his young leading lady.and Seventiesstyle snap zooms are sprinkled through- . etc. so maybe those films have influenced some of his style. Sometimes we even projected those patterns onto the interior so it looked as if rain was coming from the windows. we used our Lightning Strikes units gelled with ½ CTO to make them less blue. The shots of the kids climbing the church steeple were done on a stage with a black background. We used real rain for those shots. I thought some of the night scenes would be too dark. How did you build up your stop for the occasional night exteriors and the climactic storm sequence? Yeoman: For the scenes where Suzy is reading by the campfire. Nevertheless. was a wonderful collaborator on all of these ambitious lighting setups. and he likes very formal compositions.Clockwise from top: Prepping a scene on location at the Bishop house. and Wes was very much in love with that place as a setting for the central characters. Our gaffer. A lot of Sixties. Sometimes I would add one small fill light.40:1 frame. crew. We lit the subsequent scene inside the church with traditional movie lighting — tungsten lights. but for the church windows. We experimented with some theatrical-lighting units and found a system called Gam SX4 that could project different rotating patterns placed in front of Lekos. the crew creates heavy rain for a shot of Norton for the climactic storm sequence. and this movie also has a lot of centered framing and very symmetrical blocking. In terms of the compositions. but it was surprising how much the film saw. landscape that worked beautifully for the story. The compositions in your widescreen films with Wes are always very striking. and two balloon lights floated overhead to provide a very soft base ambience. To create the storm effects outside the church.

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HBO suggested the Arri Alexa. Kaufman and editor Walter Murch planned to integrate the lead actors with stock footage to depict the main characters traveling through the world in the past. They married in 1940 and divorced five years later.85:1 Super 16mm Aaton A-Minima. I remember shooting that wide open. involved not only greenscreen composites. It wasn’t as sharp or as contrasty as the Zeiss lenses.” But. At the time. they are a changin’. I will say that I miss the ritual of dailies. Thanks to the bounty of reference material. I tried to stop it down as much as I could while shooting the exteriors in the woods. “This was in January 2011. he knew Kaufman would want to do “long takes that go from wide to close. Every hue in the wardrobe. which he describes as “a real T2 with no distortion that perfectly matches the [Arri/Zeiss] Ultra Primes and Master Primes we also used. In the DI. sets. but we definitely pushed the look with our colorist. 12mm. who covered major world conflicts throughout her remarkable 60-year career. They had access to extensive reference material. “We always had some variation of Hollywood Black Magic [filtration] on the lens. How did you view your dailies? We watched our dailies in the editing room.5mm. It was dark and rainy when we were doingthe shot of Sam and Suzy crossing the river. clothes and even some of the action could be replicated in exact detail. and he generally likes to push the color saturation. The times. but everyone seemed to love it when we watched our dailies. but also tran- . which included two Alexas. which was supervised by Chris Morley. The project reunited Stoffers with director Philip Kaufman. so we recorded 4:4:4 Dual-Link HD with 3-to-1 compression to a Codex. We didn’t use any filtration on this shoot. How much of the movie’s color palette was created in the DI? There’s a distinctive yellow hue that really enhances the period feel. The visual-effects work.” he recalls.” He selected the Fujinon Premier 18-85mm T2 zoom lens. there was no ArriRaw. as Hemingway & Gellhorn relates. I haven’t watched film dailies in about five years. Which lenses were you using? Yeoman: We carried a set of Zeiss Super Speeds: 8mm. 25mm and 50mm. but because we were eventually going to a DI this representation of our work seemed acceptable. Hemingway & Gellhorn chronicles their stormy relationship. XTerá Zeiss Super Speed. 16mm. where department heads get together to watch the film and discuss what they have seen. many taken by Robert Capa.. and began an affair a few months later in Madrid. in late 1936. where they were both covering the Spanish Civil War. N SC became fascinated with American writer and war correspondent Martha Gellhorn. he tends to take the look a bit warmer than what we shot. To take the quest for authen- ticity even further. his collaborator on Quills (AC Jan.” Videofax in San Francisco provided the camera package. props. ASC. “She was an incredible woman and wrote beautifully. and Stoffers was excited to try it out.” declares Stoffers. The zoom was a Canon 11-165mm. we shot those at 400. out the film. We rated the camera at 800 ASA. but we bounced around more in terms of our focal lengths than we have on our other films. it made sense to shoot digitally.1. who sat down with AC shortly after wrapping the movie. With all of the planned visual-effects work. We favored the 12mm quite a bit. who did an amazing job. courtesy of HBO. the HBO telefilm Hemingway & Gellhorn. is very carefully chosen. not even an 85 filter. ’01). including thousands of photographs. Tim Stipan at Technicolor New York. on a giant flat screen off an Avid. “She went traveling in Africa in 1962 all by herself. 9. etc. Gellhorn (N icole Kidman) was to become famous less for her singular achievements than for her marriage to Ernest Hemingway (Clive Owen).” adds Stoffers. I Love and War By Jean Oppenheimer While making his latest project.” Though Stoffers normally favors prime lenses. and having the ability to change the focal length during the shot would be a big help. Additional photos courtesy of Steve Condiotti. and we went through two major software updates during prep. To minimize the compression and the noise for greenscreen scenes. “The camera was brand new. American journalists Martha Gellhorn (Nicole Kidman) and Ernest Hemingway (Clive Owen) rendezvous in the Hotel Florida bar while covering the Spanish Civil War. The two met in Key West. I find that it tends to energize the crew and brings excitement to seeing their hard work realized onscreen. director of photography Rogier Stoffers. the locations. Yeoman: Wes is very specific about every color we photograph. Fla. Canon Kodak Vision3 200T 7213 Digital Intermediate TECHNICAL SPECS 26 June 2012 American Cinematographer Hemingway and Gellhorn unit photos by Karen Ballard. but the sequence wound up having a very nice quality. She was amazingly intelligent.

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we then exported data regarding camera height and angle. Above: Rogier Stoffers. which developed software to make this possible during the DI. I’d remove the practical grid. and they did the dissolves. “They had to create transitions in which grain. which was built in an old train station.” Dissolves between the production footage and the historical material were handled at EFilm. We provided both to EFilm. color and jitter were faded in and out.Left. To recreate camera jitter. one that was full jitter and one that was no jitter. “From the digital camera. sitions from documentary material to production footage. scratches.” notes Stoffers. and I’d set the actors’ marks. Morley used Maya software “to create a digital camera and line up a digital grid on the ground plane of the archival footage. the “Condor ballet” required outside the set. “You can’t go straight from the Alexa to old film because the Alexa has no grain and no camera jitter.” A team at Tippett Studios handled the insertion of the actors into the newsreel footage. lighting balloons assist in the lobby interior.” continues Morley. Morley first had Tippett “create a node in our software package that [allowed us to] set two key frames. NSC lines up a shot. top to bottom: Hemingway strides through the hotel lobby. focal length and so on. and once we’d lined up the grids on video assist. ASC. and I’d relay that information to camera operator Kim Marks on the greenscreen set so he could match those details exactly. To determine where to place the players.” he explains. and we’d be left with nothing but green.” ➣ 28 June 2012 American Cinematographer . “I could walk around the stage with a small monitor and see myself in the archival footage. Kim would lock down the camera. “We used orange duct tape to build a 20-by-20-foot grid on the floor [of the greenscreen stage].

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The 117'x60' space offered 40'-high ceilings. “To create a Mediterranean feel. Cuba and China. This array included seven 80' Condors and two scissor lifts. Hemingway & Gellhorn takes place in several countries. The main practical location was an old. As the camera pulls back. The building had three 28'-tall windowpanes looking east. defunct train station in Oakland that production designer Geoffrey Kirkland transformed into the opulent lobby of Madrid’s Hotel Florida.” recalls gaffer Steve Condiotti. introducing different characters as it moves through the enormous lobby. and eventually reveals some 40 people standing quietly around the bar. where Spanish Civil War correspondents congregated when they weren’t in the field.9 and 250 diffusion on the colored glass in the tall windows. and the atmosphere immediately becomes boisterous and jovial. and the other three held 18K ArriMax HMIs. The camera continues following the paper. An 18K Fresnel was kept on one of the scissor lifts at all times. the man clutching the paper hands it off to another character. The front door opens and Hemingway strides in. “We put ND. including Spain. and we had to put a thin layer of semi-translucent plastic on the clear portions to help obscure the array of lighting equipment that was just outside. Four Condors had 20'x30' flyswatters filled with UltraBounce that could either block the sun or be used to bounce light. The filmmakers found all the locations they needed for the globetrotting story in the Bay Area.Stoffers preps an exterior in San Francisco. and a row of windowpanes high up looking west. “Two other 18K Fresnels were on 30 . The audience’s first glimpse of the hotel lobby is a one-minute Steadicam shot executed by Tim Bellen (who shared Steadicam duties with Will Arnot)that starts tight on a piece of paper being ripped out of a typewriter. [production designer] Geoffrey Kirkland proposed putting warm stained glass in the high windows and filling the side and bottom panes of the east windows with the same material to make it all come together. Finland. but all the exteriors and interiors were shot in and around San Francisco.” says Stoffers.

so Stoffers could easily light through the glass with nine Nine-Light MaxiBrutes on stands to give that side of the room a warm glow and block the afternoon sun. which softens the shadows. and this held the balloons.” Stoffers has high praise for the production’s San Francisco-based crew.” remarks Condiotti. they could not be tethered to the ground. built a truss that could be attached to the ceiling.stands outside. “Rogier really likes to see color contrast in the skin tones. Practicals in the space included dozens of wall sconces and floor lamps. the electricians moved two 4K tungsten balloons around on the floor as needed.78:1 Digital Capture Arri Alexa Fujinon. his crew floated two 8'x20' 12K Aerolight tungsten balloons.300°K. 1. certainly in a daylight setting with the color temperature set at around 4. I like to keep them on my own Manfrotto boom arms. The front of the ball is close to the subject and the sides are farther away. you have to exaggerate the colors to be able to separate them.” When possible. and in some cases they were used to light the backdrop that was seen out the door in reverses.” “To maintain lighting continuity during some of the long scenes in the lobby required a ballet of Condors. I like to light women with round [housings]. “I love those lights. “Rigging gaffer Jeff Gilliam and key rigging grip Duane Robinson did a fantastic job of pre-rigging the set. “There were also several 6K and 4K Pars on the ground outside for other. the elevated train platforms were still in place on the west side of the building. who had worked in the same location for Rent (AC Nov.” adds Condiotti. “In general. noting. Stoffers concurs. It’s a lot harder in a tungsten environment because the chip is more balanced to daylight. Arri/Zeiss Ultra Prime.” says Stoffers. Stoffers used 30" Jem Balls to light Kidman. as well as a black skirt that kept their light off the walls. smaller windows. Additionally. For ambient light inside. all on individual dimmers. In tungsten situations. but because Kaufman wanted to be able to shoot 360 degrees at any time.” he adds. The entire apparatus could be raised and lowered as necessary. including digital-imaging technician Jordan Livingston. whose DTC Lighting & Grip supplied the production’s lighting.” he says. “The Alexa is really good at mixing color temperatures. “I also have to mention Leigh Blicher at Videofax. and best boy Chris Shellenberger and key grip Gary Gill were instrumental in making it all work perfectly. which allow me to adjust the light during the shot — starting up high at the wide beginning of a shot and getting as close as possible when we end in a close-up — and stay flexible to changes in the staging. and choreographing it required real skill. ’05). Robinson. who located and purchased several pieces of equipment we wanted to use.” Fortunately. Master Prime ● TECHNICAL SPECS 31 . and we achieved that with the cool ‘daylight’ coming through the front windows and the tungsten lighting inside. and 1st AC Patrick McArdle and his camera team.

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By Jon D. but it’s just hyperbolic enough for this kind of movie. When both filmmakers come over to greet AC. and his style is very particular. The Incredible Hulk. and not far away.” The Avengers builds on the foundation laid by the Marvel Studios features Iron Man (AC May ’08). on the 79th day of principal photography on The Avengers.All Together Now D Seamus McGarvey. ASC. The street signs indicate this is what’s left of Manhattan’s 42nd Street and Vanderbilt Avenue intersection. director Joss Whedon is consulting with cinematographer Seamus McGarvey. In a nearby alleyway. but in actuality it’s East 9th Street in Cleveland. and burned husks of cars and trucks lie atop slabs of concrete jutting skyward in front of shattered storefronts. Ohio. Witmer •|• 34 June 2012 American Cinematographer irt and soot blanket six lanes of smoldering rubble that run the length of a city block. ASC. Captain America (Chris Evans) stands near a row of cameras amid the bustling crew. which I love. BSC in video village. It’s not over-thought. Iron Man 2 (AC May ’10). Whedon says of his director of photography. BSC brings the Earth’s mightiest heroes to the big screen for Joss Whedon’s The Avengers. “Seamus is very fast. Thor (AC June ’11) and . which is insanity grounded in reality.

when the filmmakers wanted to heighten an action moment with high-speed footage. and I didn’t feel it had the same range. each setup took too long. ™ & ©2011 Marvel.).” says the cinematographer. . predominantly primes.theasc.” Shooting digitally was a given because of the extensive digital effects and the producers’ original plan to capture in 3-D.] we tended to stay around 21mm and 27mm. one of which “was always rigged in Steadicam mode.” The production also carried 10 Canon DSLR cameras. but we also used 1990mm and 24-270mm zooms. christened “Schatzi de Bayer. Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr. “I prefer the 5D to the 7D. “I like its larger sensor and the way the depth of field falls off quicker. eight EOS 5D Mark IIs and two EOS 7Ds. “it was not a successful day of shooting. they rolled a Panavised Arri 435 loaded with Kodak Vision3 500T 5219. and planning how we’d achieve certain sequences. like at 400. Enforcement and Logistics Division leader Nick Fury (Samuel L.” he explains. who unleashes an extraterrestrial army in a bid to rule the world.com w occasionally we got a 3:1 long zoom. “We mostly used slow motion for explosions at night. Captain America: The First Avenger (AC Aug.” it served as the production’s A camera. all fitted with Canon EF lenses. Principal photography began in April 2011 in New Mexico.” McGarvey notes. Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner) and Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson) to face the global menace posed by Thor’s nefarious brother. and the other two were in studio mode and could easily be switched for handheld.” In fact. Below: Cinematographer Seamus McGarvey. and film really holds the detail in both the flames and the low-key night exteriors. which first hit newsstands in 1963. too. Shooting 3-D is like throwing treacle bombs into that beautiful élan. But when the crew tested a 3-D workflow by shooting the “tag” that followed the end titles of Thor with Red Epic cameras and Panavision Primo lenses in an Element Technica rig. McGarvey was so impressed with the Alexa’s performance in his tests that he bought his own.” he continues. “We shot with Primos. ASC. The main unit also carried three Alexas (rented from Panavision Woodland Hills). SMPSP. “I preferred the look of the Alexa in terms of its range and its ‘roundness. ’11). All rights reserved.” McGarvey typically maintained a T4 or T5. Loki (Tom Hiddleston). “[With the zooms. “I love when a crew picks up speed and creates its own inner dynamic. When I tried to rate it lower. like 100mm. and McGarvey says his three months of preproduction were “vital in terms of getting to grips with the scale of the project. So I simply used IR neutral-density filters to bring down the stop for exteriors. Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner) and Hulk (Mark Ruffalo) are among the heroes who stand united against a common threat in The Avengers. Photos and frame grabs ©2011 MVLFFLLC. It wasn’t going to afford us the impetus and dynamism we needed. “I recognize [its image] as more akin to a film look. it seemed to build up in the shadows.’” he says.From left: Thor (Chris Hemsworth). Joss.” Typically.). Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr. Hulk (Mark Ruffalo). BSC (left) and director Joss Whedon keep the characters in their sights. “Although the native 3-D looked great. or at the longer end. Thor (Chris Hemsworth). and ww. In the film.” Marvel subsequently decided to capture in 2-D and convert to 3-D in post.8½ in other situations. “I shot everything at [the Alexa’s base ISO of] 800. But we used the 7Ds for any slow-motion work [that involved DSLRs]. Jackson) assembles Captain America. Captain America (Chris Evans). Their footage was recorded to SanDisk Extreme Pro memory cards. and McGarvey abandoned the Epic for the Arri Alexa. likes to keep the momentum up on the set.” says McGarvey.” June 2012 35 Unit photography by Zade Rosenthal. and T2.6 for day exteriors. Strategic Homeland Intervention. and takes its cues from the long-running Avengers comic-book series.

Jackson) senses trouble brewing.40:1 the poor guy would have been beheaded!” On the set. McGarvey recalls. generally speaking. and in 2. Like previs. who says his biggest challenge was “to create a world that would allow these [disparate characters] to coexist without seeming dissonant. but combines those pieces with production photogra- . postvis generates preliminary versions of CG shots or elements. he understands light. “Janek has been incredible. because they’ve been problem-solving that for decades. and vice-versa.” says McGarvey. the [Marvel] series The Ultimates was an especially key source. you have to collaborate unequivocally with visual effects — they’re part of the cinematography. Below: SHIELD director Nick Fury (Samuel L. as McGarvey leads AC through the rubble. and it was nice to have that flexibility. the 35mm material intercuts really well. and though it looks grainy next to Alexa footage. He’s scraping the ceiling of our frame. Ohio into a SHIELD center where an experiment goes horribly awry. Shooting some film also meant we could carry that camera the whole time. the comics were the foundation for my work. and a 12'x12' rig with Kino Flos and VL3000s offered additional illumination.” Equally integral to building a believable world was visual-effects supervisor and Iron Man 2 veteran Janek Sirrs. “As a cinematographer on this sort of movie. we had to leave space for the Hulk. Of course.” The Third Floor provided previs and postvis services. and he has great taste and vision. “I pushed [the 5219] one stop on a number of occasions.” The filmmakers chose to frame for 1. which were supervised by Nick Markel and Gerardo Ramirez.200 visual-effects shots for The Avengers. respectively. Also. says McGarvey. MR16s ringed the chamber’s perimeter. but Joss was worried about the height of the cityscape.40:1 because I felt it 36 June 2012 would have offered more scope. and he wanted to be able to create both vertical and horizontal movement in the frame.◗ All Together Now Right: The production turned the aluminum vacuum chamber at NASA’s Space Power Facility in Sandusky. who worked with 12 vendors to complete about 2.85:1. “I was keen to shoot 2. he pauses to American Cinematographer introduce production designer James Chinlund.

June 2012 37 . Images courtesy of The Third Floor.” McGarvey adds. “We always have Chapman dollies and 50-foot and 30-foot Technocranes [on hand].” says Whedon. “But. Erik Selvig (Stellan Skarsgard) has been using the lab in an effort to tap the energy of the tesseract.” he says. a postvis frame. “Steve Welch is our Technocrane operator. There’s a very strong element of making this up as I go. 122'-high aluminum vacuum chamber that Chinlund dressed to appear as an active SHIELD laboratory. and the cube’s growing energy output causes the entire ww. provide placeholders for editorial and generally refine the effects. and George Billinger is the Steadicam/B-camera operator. so you have to make it dynamic. and moving the camera allows for that. Unfortunately for SHIELD. Inc. key grip John Janusek appears for a confab with McGarvey. McGarvey muses. you want to feel the change. The heart of the facility is a 100'-wide. I’m happy to say. and it has to have an impact. the final composite frame. and shooting what was in my head when I wrote [the screenplay] but then forgot to tell anybody — which. and Marvel. and throw it at an alien that’s climbed onto the car.phy in order to validate footage. you need to be able to change on the day. Mitch Dubin is the A-camera operator. the crew prepares a stunt in which Captain America will jump over a speeding Acura that’s on fire. “Previs is invaluable to get everybody on the same page. As the action ramps up. and they’re all unsurpassed masters at [creating] momentum and dynamic movement. I also have the great support of A-camera 1st AC Bill Coe and Bcamera 1st AC Harry Zimmerman. at the same time. Prof. Seamus rolls with.com w From top: A frame of the previsualization created by The Third Floor for a scene involving Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson) and Hulk. “This is an action movie. the tesseract opens a portal through which Loki appears.” The production’s work in Ohio also included filming in NASA’s Space Power Facility in Sandusky. retrieve his shield. a frame from the live-action plate photography shot on set. “We often put the 30-foot Techno on a Chapman Titan to reach some of the elevated sets.theasc.” As if on cue. which composited elements of the previs with the live-action footage to inform the progression of the visual effects. a cosmic cube that promises near-unlimited power to those who can harness it.” Down the alley in Cleveland.

After gaffer Chris Napolitano and his crew rigged the trough with about 1. “We used 6K Pars and an 18K ArriMax to light the top of the dome. “but it was tricky to light because we wanted to look all around. offering the Avengers a mobile headquarters. The Space Power Facility “was one of our most spectacular locations. The rig was suspended on chain motors so it could be adjusted for the frame line.” says McGarvey. Middle: The Helicarrier’s bridge incorporated a massive viewing window.” says McGarvey.500 MR16 globes. and the grips used flags to create a pulsating effect.” adds Napolitano.” The solution was to utilize a shallow trough that circled the base of the chamber. facility to collapse.◗ All Together Now Top: SHIELD’s Helicarrier takes to the skies.” says McGarvey.” “I’m a big proponent of shooting some real-world reference as a guide for digital work. Bottom: An Arri Alexa on a Libra head mounted to a Technocrane captures the action around the Avengers’ meeting table on the bridge. blue glow at the top of the space as the facility is about to collapse. “And Seamus was 38 June 2012 American Cinematographer .” Sirrs notes in an e-mail interview with AC. but Janek wanted us to provide an interactive. “CG swirls of energy were to be added to the chamber. “Over the center of the area. we built a 12-by-12 rig with daylight Kino Flos and a few [Philips Vari-Lite] VL3000 moving lights that we could focus down to highlight pieces of the set. “the light bounced everywhere and lit the entire dome. visual effects replaced the bluescreen used on set with sky and moving clouds.

4025 13 12 425/426 428/429 1 2 4037 black skirt w/ silk target 4027 451/452 431/432 116 Bay lights 1/8 CTB 105 3 106 opto 461 4036 11 115 opto 473 449/450 433/434 4026 114 437/438 107 4 108 4035 10 113 1/4 Grid opto 467 4031 112 111 935 110 109 445/446 4033 Lighting diagram courtesy of Bryan Booth. 9 443/444 5 4029 15 8 7 all inner spacelights 1/4 CTB 6 14 DP: Seamus McGarvey BSC. At the bottom of the page is the viewing window. the set was rigged with MR16s and LiteGear LED LiteRibbon for accent lighting. soft boxes and cyc strips to provide “daylight” ambience in the set. In addition to the fixtures shown in this plot.Bay Light VL3000 spacelight 8” 2K 5K W S N E 2K 4x4 mixed tubes 4x2 mixed tubes 701102 103702 opto 703 4021 4022 4020 4019 4023 686/687 2K 2K Carrier Bridge 4024 soffet line 4039 101 930 opto 455 1/4 Grid DMX 4x4 ballast on overhang to doubles mixed tubes superblue and 3200K 104 The Helicarrier’s bridge was constructed onstage at Albuquerque Studios.ASC Gaffer: Chris Napolitano Rigging Gaffer: Kevin Lang Plots: Bryan Booth ww. beyond which the crew positioned space lights.theasc.com w June 2012 39 .

As the main unit works in the alley. polishes off a few shots toward the north end of the 42nd Street set. and we keyed with a 2-by-4 Kino Flo. After the cameras roll a few seconds of reference. “To give the last few hundred feet of the tunnel a different look. and we could turn [the ceiling units] on or off to adjust the distance between sections of light and dark. After scouting the location. The team relied mainly on B&M Lighting Mac Tech LED tubes. where Loki (Tom Hiddleston) attempts to control the populace. In the sequence. Bottom: The Avengers take Loki into custody aboard the Quinjet.” 40 June 2012 . “We also placed nook lights shooting up the American Cinematographer Top: Cleveland. They take their places in front of the cameras that have just rolled on Captain America throwing his famous shield at one such alien. and the second unit then had two weeks to rig the location and six days to shoot the action. and they race through a tunnel with SHIELD agent Maria Hill (Cobie Smulders) in hot pursuit. which were placed along the ceiling and on vertical posts that divided parts of the road into two lanes. the second unit.” a jiggling mass that’s meant to represent the color and texture of the aliens’ skin. where space lights provided ambient light for the cockpit. and what they refer to as “sushi. The strategy “really enhanced the feeling of speed as the lights flashed through the frame.600' stretch of subterranean road near Pittsburgh. which was built onstage in Albuquerque. McGarvey notes that the vehicle interior was “rigged with LEDs and small tungsten sources. Pa. Shield says his unit’s biggest challenge on the show was a chase sequence shot on location along a 1. a color chart. Germany. McGarvey and Napolitano worked with Shield to devise a lighting plan. led by director John Mahaffie and cinematographer Brad Shield.” he continues.◗ All Together Now always keen to light shots for [virtual] characters. he’d use props such as a partial Iron Man suit or silicone Hulk bust. “The LED tubes give you more punch [than a fluorescent]. crewmembers demonstrate this point by stepping into the alley holding gray and silver reference balls. Loki has possessed Hawkeye and Selvig. it’s on to the next setup.” says Shield. Middle: The Avengers arrive on the scene in their Quinjet. Ohio’s Public Square was re-dressed as Stuttgart.” On set in Cleveland. We always rolled on the stand-in props so we could see how they truly read in-camera. we put nook lights on the ceiling that were wrapped in black.

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” says Booth. and nine diffused 4'x4' bay lights gelled with 1⁄8 CTB for general toplight ambience. a futuristic aircraft carrier capable of operating both on water and in air. and I only needed to hit a couple buttons on my tablet to do it. tunnel walls to give some detail where the overhead lights weren’t playing.” says Shield. “We built many opportunities for accent lighting into the bridge. “We had two cameras on the Edge vehicle. serves as a primary site where the main characters gather. The lighting inside the bridge also included MR16s for accents in various soffits and cavities. respectively. ‘Turn that off.” The bay lights and VL3000s were rigged on truss motors so their height could be adjusted as needed.” says Napolitano. and [operator] Peter Gulla and [1st AC] Chip Byrd handled the B camera on a secondary remote head with a long lens. predominantly with built-in B&M Lighting Mac Tech LED tubes.” Rivaling the scope of the bridge was the set for the penthouse apartment of Tony Stark (a. Shield and Mahaffie mounted Arri Alexas and Canon DSLRs to the picture cars. which was driven by Dean Bailey. focusing them into a bounce card on the floor if we needed to accent different areas of the set. and I used a Lenovo 10-inch touch-screen tablet as a remote so I could stand on set with Seamus and Chris. while the outer four boxes each contained three 5Ks gelled with ¼ CTB.500°K. The set was lit practically. “When they said. “They had the ability to go red for emergency mode.” adds Napolitano. Fury assembles the Avengers aboard SHIELD’s Helicarrier. and we also installed a lot of red LEDs for ‘emergency’ mode. while nine soft boxes pushed tungsten-generated “daylight” into the set with more directionality.200°K and 5. about 60 degrees of which is taken up by a large viewing window. Tony Stark and Bruce Banner. and also illustrate the CG content that plays on the set’s monitors. with Tony Rivetti pulling focus. “I use the High End Systems Hog 3PC as my main board and server.” 42 June 2012 Following Loki’s arrival.a. To give a sense of daylight bouncing off clouds and filtering into the bridge from below. “I think we probably broke records for the amount of [LiteGear] LED LiteRibbon we used!” “We used hybrid LEDs that [dimmer-board operator] Bryan Booth could adjust to anywhere between American Cinematographer .k. situated atop Stark Tower in Manhattan.◗ All Together Now 3. Each box was fronted with a 5'x8' frame of Light Grid and fitted with two 2Ks gelled with ¼ CTB and ¼ Plus Green (for scenes that required nighttime ambience).” says Chinlund. A total of 22 space lights were hung between the window and a bluescreen for general ambience.” To capture the action. The Helicarrier’s bridge. and they also worked extensively with Performance Filmworks’ Edge System. “The A camera on the main arm was operated by Greg Baldi. Iron Man). These before-and-after frames showcase the window-replacement work the visual-effects team performed in the Helicarrier’s laboratory. a set built at Albuquerque Studios. Surrounded by bluescreen. All of this lighting was run back to Booth’s dimmer board. The center five soft boxes contained three Arri T12s gelled with ¼ CTB. The bridge has a circular shape. the penthouse set was constructed approximately 10' above the stage floor and Fury confabs with Iron Man and Hulk’s alter egos. “We also used VL3000s. 22 10-light cyc units gelled with ¼ CTB and 216 diffusion were positioned beneath the window.’ I knew exactly what ‘that’ was.

.

All Together Now

Top: Positioned just behind Grand Central Station, Stark Tower dominates Manhattan’s skyline in the film. Bottom left: Thor and Loki do battle outside of the tower’s penthouse apartment; white curtains were pulled in front of the off-camera bluescreen to mitigate any blue spill in the footage. Bottom right: Whedon and Hiddleston discuss the finer points of world domination.

comprised an “exterior” platform (where Iron Man takes off and lands) that led via walkway into the glassed-in apartment. “It was a beautiful set with a lot of modernist elements,” says McGarvey. “It had very low ceilings, and I knew it would have to be seen in wide angles to get the most out of it. I worked quite closely with James to incorporate practicals and make sure there was enough ambience for both day and night scenes.” As a direct-sun source outside the glass wall, McGarvey used a 100K SoftSun on a blue-wrapped scissor lift. For additional ambience, “[rigging gaffer] Kevin Lang put in about 80 space lights gelled with ¼ CTB, and we
44 June 2012

flew a silk underneath them,” adds Napolitano. “When we went to night mode, we used about six space lights gelled with ¼ CTB and ¼ Plus Green,” the gaffer continues. “Inside the set was a lot of practical lighting with LEDs. James built some channels up in the ceiling, and we [fitted] those with 300watt RFL globes on batten strips with 216 diffusion for a bit of accent. We also put Source Four Pars inside 10-inch recessed cans with some diffusion.” A hallmark of the Iron Man films that continues in The Avengers is the inside-the-helmet view, which shows Stark in close-up with superimposed pop-ups that represent his armor’s
American Cinematographer

heads-up display. “We wanted to feel like we were within the helmet, so the lens had to be quite close to Robert,” says McGarvey, who used Panavision’s Frazier Lens System with a 50mm lens. “At the same time, because there were going to be CG graphics going around the head, we didn’t want the focus to fall off.” To enable a deep shooting stop of T8, McGarvey mounted a daylightbalanced LED ring light around the lens. Dubbed “the Big Softie,” the light was approximately 2' wide. “It was made by Nick Shapley, whose company, LCA, is based in the U.K.,” says McGarvey. “The Big Softie was inches from Robert’s face, and it produced a

All Together Now
phy. EFilm also provided the production with a profile look that matched the monitors in the trailer with the HP DreamColor monitors used on set and at digital-imaging technician Daniel Hernandez’s station. “I used Technoprops’ four-channel color system, called Ccolor, which was developed by Alex Arango,” notes Hernandez, who sourced most of his gear from Videohawks. “It allowed me to color-correct four cameras in real time using one laptop, instantly copy looks from camera to camera, and adjust the image on each camera.” The filmmakers recorded in ArriRaw to Codex digital recorders that Hernandez linked with his station’s IP address so that each time the cameras rolled, the recorders would pull the corresponding camera’s CDL metadata from Ccolor. “I also created a CDL log with the scene, take, roll number and time-code stamp that could be ingested into EFilm’s color system, and I recorded reference video to a CompactFlash card that I handed off to EFilm at the end of every day,” adds Hernandez. After lunch, the crew continues shooting the sequence involving the burning Acura. The alien in the scene is portrayed on set by a performer wearing a gray bodysuit dotted with motion-capture markers. “All of the production-based motion capture was done live in-camera primarily because it involved digital characters interacting with live-action characters,” notes Sirrs. “Character performances for entirely digital shots were captured with dedicated motion-capture sessions during post, and several sessions were done with Mark Ruffalo so that the idiosyncrasies of his performance could be incorporated into the [all-CG] Hulk.” The footage shot in downtown Cleveland is all part of the battle that dominates The Avengers’ third act, when the heroes must stand united against the onslaught of Loki’s alien hordes. East 9th Street provided the backdrop for one of the sequence’s most explosive pieces, in which the aliens strafe the

Top and middle: Cleveland, Ohio’s East 9th Street was dressed as Manhattan’s 49th Street for portion’s of the film’s climactic battle. Practical explosions tore through the location, and visual effects then added strafing alien craft and laser blasts, and replaced the background. Bottom: B-camera/Steadicam operator George Billinger captures the action as Captain America navigates the chaos.

very flattering light. I didn’t want the complete circle, so I masked off part of it with black wrap, and you just see two little triangles in his eyes.” Back in Cleveland, Whedon and
46 June 2012

McGarvey retreat to EFilm’s mobiledailies trailer during their lunch break. Equipped with a grading suite and 12' projection screen, the trailer was on hand throughout principal photograAmerican Cinematographer

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it’s a super-exciting setting for the final battle.” says Chinlund. I plead with anyone who will listen to never shoot an outdoor sequence on a composite stage. and 1.” McGarvey details. “It was a spectacular image. where the production re-created the viaduct and established a day-exterior look inside a 400'-long former railroad facility. It was a good investment.300' of American Cinematographer Top and middle: The production re-created the viaduct that extends over 42nd Street in front of Grand Central Station inside a former railway facility in New Mexico. Bottom: Hawkeye. “Initially. Dan Sudick. “When we found that space.” says McGarvey. and it really was incamera.” “Normally.” says Sirrs. the special-effects supervisor. The location is supposed to be in shadow for 90 percent of the day. is a genius at choreographing this kind of mayhem. providing what McGarvey calls “wonderful. I urged the producers to shoot inside. “but the viaduct exterior was a special case. sending cars and trucks airborne amid pillars of flame and billowing smoke. most of the battle action was shot in New Mexico. “The hero angle looked straight down the street as the explosions came toward us.” The crux of the battle occurs in front of Grand Central Station.◗ All Together Now street. Most of the DSLRs were placed in crash housings and positioned in the midst of the action. “Because of the viaduct that reaches over 42nd Street and the tunnels that surround Grand Central. 48 June 2012 . “sort of the crossroads of New York City. it seemed the cost would be prohibitive.” Although principal photography included a few days of location work in Manhattan.” Rigging key grip John Beran and his crew hung greenbeds for access to all of the lamps in the space. where 22 18K ArriMax Pars were bounced into UltraBounces to create a daylight ambience. and matching diffuse lighting conditions is much more achievable than simulating direct light. plus additional Alexas and 435s specialordered for the day. but shooting inside actually saved us numerous days because we could keep shooting in really bad weather. and I assured them we could make it look like daylight. immersive footage.” All of the production’s cameras. Also visible are “alien” performers wearing motioncapture tracking suits. were used to capture the effect. one 5D was given to a stunt performer who filmed as he ran through the chaos. Captain America and Black Widow steel themselves for action.

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” he explains. Janusek adds. the digital environments still needed to be fleshed out with everything required to add life to static imagery. the electricians bounced 22 18K ArriMax Pars into 40'x40' UltraBounces that ran the length of the ceiling to create the overall ambient level. stretching from the floor to 50' high. “We wanted to create accents that would suggest light bouncing off glassy buildings. A-camera operator Mitch Dubin (seated on dolly) and McGarvey catch their breaths amidst the action in Cleveland. so we placed 8by-8-foot mirrors [on the greenbeds] 50 . That created splashes of hard light that randomized the look and really made it feel like daylight.◗ All Together Now that we hit from the other side with spots.” Working from the greenbeds. “A dedicated stills unit from Industrial Light & Magic spent close to six weeks shooting panoramic spheres with Canon DSLRs from a variety of vantage points in and around our key locations. “We also hung UltraBounce. McGarvey says. Sirrs eschewed background plates in favor of building a completely virtual environment by “projecting photographic material onto building shapes. Additionally. greenscreen was positioned around the perimeter of the set.” At press time.” To facilitate maximum freedom in the greenscreen space. If we were close to the wall and didn’t want green spill. After the basic building façades and streets were created from the stills. We ended up creating a huge library of digital dressing that could be used to populate shots as needed. McGarvey was nearing the end of a six-week digital Evans. we could pull back the greenscreen and use the UltraBounce for fill.

“It’s with the greatest surprise and pleasure that I’m watching the extraor- dinary 3-D conversion that StereoD made under the supervision of Graham Clark. and the last two weeks were spent grading the 3-D conversion. 216. To find out more. McGarvey and Whedon found “key moments that we knew would play well in 3-D. There are the same constraints. McGarvey describes his work in the DI as “quite straightforward. and the same heart and brain and eye.” ● TECHNICAL SPECS 1.” he notes. Canon EOS 5D Mark II. and I wanted to work on a movie of this scale. “For the action sequences in particular. which was done by StereoD. “A movie this big is a strange hybrid. Canon EF Kodak Vision3 500T 5219 Digital Intermediate Stereoscopic Conversion MONDAY. The first four weeks were devoted to the 2-D grade. it really symphonizes the whole thing. “I wanted to work with Joss. concerns and energy. contact the Greater Cleveland Film Commission. Whedon observes. like it’s really happening. and enhances the sense of the city in jeopardy and the power of these characters. Seamus makes it all really sing. it was just going to be an enhancement at the end of the day. 7D Panavision Primo. but it’s not a strident look. Either way.com 51 . “I embarked on The Avengers out of curiosity. Frazier Lens System. We’re doing a lot of windows and some very sophisticated timing. I wanted to learn more about visual effects.grade at EFilm with colorist and ASC associate member Steven J. You’ve got 12 cameras because it’s a big action scene. The Avengers is quite sharp and crisp. the inner sanctum of the set was as recognizable as any low-budget movie I’ve done.3910 clevelandfilm. or you’ve got one day to shoot five pages of dialogue.85:1 Digital Capture.” McGarvey continues. Scott. 2011 4:05 PM Cleveland.” During the shoot. as the sun approaches the horizon and the martini shot draws near. “The great thing about shooting 2-D and converting in post is that there was no sense of being corralled by 3-D while we were shooting. It’s utilitarian in the sense that it’s almost run-and-gun. the same instincts at play. but we weren’t trying to make things leap out of the screen.” Back in Cleveland. 4-perf 35mm Arri Alexa. What surprised me is that once I got beyond all the trucks and mayhem that accompany a film of this nature.” the cinematographer notes. A GREAT PLACE TO MAKE MOVIES. We wanted to make it feel believable. 435.623. AUGUST 8TH.

and they return to the castle to confront Ravenna. By Jay Holben •|• Battle T 52 June 2012 Beauty in he dramatic adventure Snow White and the Huntsman offers a new interpretation of the Brothers Grimm fairy tale. we also wanted to be able to respond to small.” the evil queen orders Snow White’s death. using natural light. we endeavored to shoot in real locations. He’s a practical guy who uses what’s in front of him extraordinarily well. jealous queen against a beautiful maiden. At director Rupert Sanders’ side on Snow White was cinematographer Greig Fraser. while still feeling true to a fairy tale. “This sometimes meant having extra pieces of equip- American Cinematographer . locations and script. is destined to surpass her in beauty and become “the fairest of them all. costumes. Fraser and Sanders had previously collaborated on a number of commercials.” The duo wanted the camerawork to be “loose and free. and we hoped to bring the spirit of that approach on Snow White. with only the tiniest amount of equipment. he trains her in the art of combat. presents an actionoriented version of the classic fairy tale.Snow White and the Huntsman. sending the young woman fleeing into the forest.” Fraser continues. We tried very hard to keep the [filmmaking] process as simple and quick as possible. “We wanted to submerge the viewer in this lush world of big locations and epic scale. Ravenna sends The Huntsman (Chris Hemsworth) in pursuit. and Fraser credits the director with being “very good at taking the bones of an idea and turning it into something interesting through his choice of actors. shot by Greig Fraser. When a magical mirror informs Queen Ravenna (Charlize Theron) that her stepdaughter. but at the same time. ’09) and Let Me In (AC Oct. but instead of killing Snow White. which pits an evil. whose recent features include Bright Star (AC Oct. intimate moments with our actors. Snow White (Kristen Stewart). The young woman then joins forces with a team of dwarves to form an army. ’10). On our past projects.

with a top and bottom crop. After watching a number of movies that involved forest ww. they looked fantastic. and they can look pretty to the eye but less so on camera. provided by Panavision London.com w June 2012 53 . The 65mm material looks absolutely beautiful. Photos and frame grabs courtesy of Universal Pictures.” he adds. “When I was framing up with Unit photography by Alex Bailey. top to bottom: Firelight keys Queen Ravenna (Charlize Theron) as she schemes to outwit her enemies. a 44-foot Moviebird and a 50-foot SuperTechnocrane. in addition to spherical Primos and System 65 lenses.theasc. “but the grandeur of the format really lent itself to this story. and use Super 35mm for some visual-effects work and 65mm for select shots. especially in the forest. They have a nice falloff that really works for a kind of glamorous feel. This page. I would pull that back to just 1⁄3 of a stop over. but we mostly used them as a very quick way to put the camera where we wanted it. “but for some scenes set in snow.” notes Fraser. A limited depth-offield can help a lot. because I would often find that [35mm] wide lenses didn’t resolve the fine detail in those shots as much as I liked.” Fraser acknowledges. Panavision’s System 65 was a bit bulkier and noisier than our lightweight XL package. and instead keep the camera much more centered in the moment.” Fraser found that anamorphic was “really useful for pulling our actors out of the background. “Shooting 65mm goes against the idea of keeping it simple. Vision3 250D 5207 and the recently introduced Vision3 500T 5230. included anamorphic lenses in the G-series. the System 65 lenses. director of photography Greig Fraser preps a scene in Ravenna’s throne room. Fraser shot Snow White on three Kodak negatives. the filmmakers decided to shoot most of the picture in anamorphic 35mm. and I didn’t need any filtration at all.” The film’s story spans more than 20 years. I was regularly reminded of the image quality of some of my own Hasselblad and Mamiya lenses on my medium-format cameras. and I wish we’d been able to shoot more of it.” He composed the 65mm material in 2. “Natural forests are visually busy. We wanted to avoid the sweeping crane moves audiences have come to expect from a story like this. Opposite: The Huntsman (Chris Hemsworth) apprehends Snow White (Kristen Stewart) in the Dark Forest. but not pin sharp. In addition to lending Snow White’s adventure “a great sense of scale. for almost the entire shoot.ment at the ready.” The camera package. the Huntsman is called before the queen for a grim assignment.” he continues. so we mostly used it for wide shots and establishing shots. With Charlize and Kristen. Vision2 50D 5201. “The G-series lenses are great on skin. He typically rates his stocks at 2⁄3 of a stop overexposed. Eseries and Primo lines. and two different forest looks were required: an Enchanted Forest and a Dark Forest.” thanks to its shallow depth-offield. “They’re sharp.” After testing several camera systems in prep.40:1 common center. “We used two cranes.

” says Fraser. but we wanted something that would look more naturalistic.◗ Beauty in Battle Top to bottom: Snow White finds a brief respite in the Enchanted Forest. sets built onstage. B-camera operator Simon Baker (left) and B-camera 1st AC Shaun Cobley prep a shot depicting one of Ravenna’s consultations with her magic mirror. we wanted to remove some of that control so we could be free to respond to happy accidents. and he was shocked that we actually had to be concerned about American Cinematographer 54 June 2012 . “We could move 360 degrees and not be concerned about running out of background. “I have to say. we got very lucky with the weather. Sanders and Fraser lobbied production to shoot forest scenes on location. and it was surrounded by an access track. We also wanted to be able to move the camera freely.” he continues. (The shoot was based at Pinewood Studios. “It was the one thing we were most worried about in terms of working outdoors. bluescreen or painted backing gave our wide shots incredible depth. but we ended up with many days of bright sun and great weather. “Shooting with a real forest as our backing rather than a Translite. On the tripod in the foreground is Fraser’s Canon DSLR.” recalls Fraser. a grim place where only unusual life forms survive. in fact. which he used on most setups to shoot stills that he could grade and send to Deluxe London as a reference for color and contrast. and building our forest sets outside enabled us to do that. was built in a clearing at Black Park. Rupert is British. Ravenna considers her options. and.) “Rupert and I pushed quite strongly to shoot our exteriors outside. “There’s no question that you have more control inside.” The thickly wooded Dark Forest.

” Evans explains. and to deepen the feel of the forest. two Leelium 8K HMI lighting balloons were tethered to the construction cranes. gusts up. “The 40-by-40 size worked well because if the wind caught them. Leelium 16K and 24K tungsten balloons “were used in the deep background to give us some depth. “The wagons had high-wattage bulbs in them. the guys could get a handle on them instead of running for cover. Bottom: Stewart stands by in the atmospheric fog as the filmmakers prep a crane shot in the set. especially when the afternoon wind Top: Snow White detects a fearsome creature in the Dark Forest. and then we used real firelight/flambeaus and covered wagons [batten strips with single bulbs covered in diffusion] to do close-ups. Fraser also employed a lot of fog. we thought we’d hook the covered wagons to flicker generators and just use them as additional firelight. low heat and high output. ‘There aren’t any shadows in England!’ Ironically. He’d say. When a little extra light was needed for daytime forest scenes.com w in night interiors. and they often keyed Theron in the cavernous rooms in the queen’s castle. “I’m a big fan of LEDs for their low power consumption. Perry Evans. To help with contrast.” As an additional safety measure.” The covered wagons were also used in tandem with practical firelight ww. that made our Dark Forest scenes difficult.” says Fraser. Continuity with smoke is always hard.” When the sun did retreat behind the clouds. and we dimmed them down to get the color temp we wanted. but the right amount helped shape the forest in a way that nothing else could. but they put a great light into Charlize’s eyes. and we could [use them together] to get a 40by-80 sail if we needed that size. “We’d bring them down to about 20 feet above the set to create our negative fill. “It does a great job at softening the background. “We used a mix of candles and very large flames — a lot of flambeaus — throughout that set.” the cinematographer continues. “We had to be careful to avoid any sources that felt too electronic.” For night work in the forest. Anything larger would have been too hard to control in the wind.shadows. because we’d planned on a lot of overcast days with constant drizzle! My gaffer. wound up flying a couple of 40-by-40-foot solids on construction cranes to block out the sun. so we wound up using them around her quite a bit.theasc. the crew cut 10' slits in the solids so the wind could pass through the material. “Initially.” says Evans. June 2012 55 . Fraser and Evans incorporated the same solids to help shape the shadowless natural light.

” notes Evans. I will often make the image a bit darker than what we originally intended. If you can put a bit more light in an actor’s eyes on the set. Snow White’s childhood sweetheart. I’ve found that in the DI.◗ Beauty in Battle Right: In the heat of battle. We did use a dimmer.” Evans elaborates. We warmed them a bit with ½ CTS and used some Hampshire Frost to bring the individual bulbs together as one source. we didn’t want the color temperature to drop too much. both in color and in overall feel. “and it frees American Cinematographer the director and actors to make choices they wouldn’t otherwise be able to make. “Perry and I used that vent for most of our lighting. production designer Dominic Watkins applied increasingly dark coats of paint to the . 56 June 2012 “Also.” notes Fraser. The covered wagons were great for that. “It makes things go a lot faster if you can take that approach. and there was a vent in the top of the set to let out the heat and smoke.” Fraser and Evans tried to design the lighting to facilitate 360-degree shooting at all times.” However. If we needed more [output] from them. “We used five half-Dinos around the edge of the hole. Prince William (Sam Claflin). Below: Fraser eyes a setup. we’d simply use higher-intensity bulbs. a set that had one main entrance. tiny windows and a domed ceiling. but their light felt too artificial. Perry Evans.” Fraser explains. Behind him is the production’s gaffer. “There was a large fire pit in the center of the room. “We always had one of them going as a strong backlight to camera. we’d switch those out for 40-watt bulbs. “and we had one pointing straight down into the room that was on most of the time. prepares to confront an opponent. but very little.” The crew turned the unit on or off as needed. and if we needed less.” The queen’s throne room is an equally imposing space. you have more room to darken the image [in post] and still keep his or her eyes alive. I liked the covered wagons because they matched the color and feel of the firelight easily. incorporating a 360degree lighting plan was no small feat in Ravenna’s mirror room. To represent the darkness and decay that spreads with the duration of her rule. The effect of a traditional [tungsten] bulb is very natural and very warm.

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walls as the story progressed. select any lens I wanted and start [planning shots]. and we wanted to American Cinematographer 58 June 2012 .” The solution. “Additionally.” says Fraser. he continues. “Halon created 3-D models of quite a number of our sets. “We built 10 40-by-40-foot soft boxes that each held 24 5K space lights. and before any actual sets were built. you need to double the light. we needed more light!” says Fraser. add a few more when it got dark. and with each doubling of speed. “Of course.” Evans explains.” 20Ks and ¾ Wendy Lights were positioned outside the throne-room windows for additional illumination. the freshly trained warrior prepares to attack the queen’s soldiers. We were able to run just a few [of the space lights] for the 24-fps scenes. we wanted to be able to shoot some highspeed in the throne room. “The mirror room was an especially complicated set. It adds up very quickly. and we usually used two on each set. The complications of shooting in many of the production’s sets were mitigated by the use of previsualization. The virtual camerawork was realized with an OptiTrack motion-capture system. was overhead soft boxes “that were essentially on steroids. I could go in with a virtual camera. Fraser fine-tunes a shot for the battle scene. and then really crank them all when we shot highspeed [of varying frame rates]. which Halon Entertainment provided under the guidance of previs supervisor Brad Alexander.◗ Beauty in Battle Top to bottom: Snow White is affected by the dreaded poison apple. as the walls got darker.

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Eddie Marsan. Toby Jones and Bob Hoskins. from left: Cobley. we had the challenge of making the Fraser checks the light and hairstylist Bonnie Clevering tweaks her work as the B-camera team (background. 60 . The first battle depicts how Ravenna infiltrates the kingdom. whereas on set that would take you at least half an hour. we were able to see exactly what we needed and figure out which walls needed to be wild. which had to take into account a huge CG castle that would be added in post. so each day we had a very narrow window to execute this huge battle.” says Fraser.” Fraser says of the climactic battle. Baker and loader Tom Wade) preps a high-angle shot of Snow White in repose. Fraser and Sanders could experiment with any number of camera placements and moves. “With the previs. all of whom were portrayed by actors of normal height: Ian McShane. “On a day-to-day basis.◗ Beauty in Battle make sure the construction didn’t have to be over-engineered. thereby determining the best way to cover the action before they hit the sand. and the final battle. “We could also plan our helicopter moves.” Using 3-D previs models of the beach. resetting hundreds of horses and soldiers to try another lens only takes the click of a button. Johnny Harris. which incorporates hundreds of soldiers on horseback along a beach. Brian Gleeson. Ray Winstone.” Fraser continues. Nick Frost. shows Snow White’s attempt to defeat the queen. We solved a lot of problems and answered a lot of questions ahead of time using those previs renderings. “But we were also dealing with the ocean and its changing tides. there are eight. no Snow White tale would be complete without dwarves. “It’s always a challenge to coordinate that many people and animals. and the art department could plan construction accordingly.” Of course.” The previs also helped the filmmakers plan the two epic battle scenes that bookend the film. and then give that previs to [aerial cinematographer] John Marzano. In this case. “On the computer.

” concludes Fraser. E-series. creating a lot of headroom. PanArri 235 Panavision G-series. and to communicate our ideas more effectively to our crew. Rupert and I tried to follow the philosophy that simpler is better. although this is an epic medieval adventure. we strove to keep the storytelling process at the forefront of our work.” continues the cinematographer. where you see the dwarves in relationship to the other characters.” Deluxe Laboratories in London processed the production’s 35mm footage and generated digital dailies (timed by Darren Rae). we created a toolbox of techniques that we determined would work very well. we weren’t very precise with that. Throughout the shoot. 4-perf Super 35mm and 65mm Panaflex XL2. or putting the other actors on a platform that was about 14 inches high. Primo and System 65 Kodak Vision2 50D 5201. “Even our high-tech previs really just allowed us the freedom to experiment before things got too expensive. “The simplest involved digging a trench for the dwarves to walk in. The filmmakers carried out the final color correction with Yvan Lucas at EFilm. and we had to figure out faster solutions. Panavision System 65. but because of our loose camera style.” says Fraser. you buy it without question. while FotoKem in Burbank processed the 65mm negative. These simple techniques were surprisingly effective.” ● TECHNICAL SPECS 2. scanned it and e-maileddetailed lab reports and reference JPEGs to the set throughout the shoot. “We did play with some basic forced perspective in certain shots by putting the dwarves farther away and the other actors closer to the camera. and when we combined them with a wide CG shot.dwarves look smaller without using forced perspective or CGI unless we had to. and EFilm in Hollywood created 2K scans of the 35mm negative. 500T 5230 Digital Intermediate 61 .40:1 Anamorphic 35mm. “Through testing and discussion with [visual-effects supervisors] Cedric Nicolas-Troyan and Phil Brennan. We also used slightly wider lenses to shoot the dwarves and positioned the camera a bit above their eyelines to keep them more toward the bottom of the frame. Vision3 250D 5207. “All in all. FotoKem scanned the 65mm negative again at 8K. Millennium. For the DI.

ASC. and we were going for an odd acting style that tended toward soap opera. It’s not like we were remaking the TV show. subtle and poetic. You forget about it until you explore it a little [as an adult] and realize how disturbing the whole thing was!” Dark Shadows cinematographer Bruno Delbonnel. Burton replies. The feel. ASC. AFC recalls that by following Burton’s lead. the movie has more to do with my memory of it. when Barnabas American Cinematographer . with a little taste of a horror film. witches and werewolves that aired on U. “something between a soap opera. which is overlit and where you see everything. “This movie has an odd tone. and it was important that the look [would] help support that. Setting the story in 1972 brought back that time for me. You go through weird ages in life.” The story starts in the 18th century.Blood Relatives Bruno Delbonnel.” “Bruno really thinks as an artist.” notes Burton. and 14 is one of them. which makes it difficult to place in a genre. and a dramatic film.S. By Benjamin B •|• 62 June 2012 T im Burton’s Dark Shadows is loosely adapted from a daytime soap opera featuring vampires. I wanted to create an image that corresponded to Tim’s world. a world that is elegant. “It’s a real mixture of feelings and emotions. AFC helps Tim Burton give Dark Shadows a satirical ’70s twist. television from 19661971. Asked whether he would describe his film as a comedy. the look and the set all helped to inform the acting style. he imagined a mélange of genres in the approach to the picture.

a town dominated by his family and their fishery business. This page. To make the story’s 1972 setting convincing. Much of the fun of the film comes from Barnabas’ discovery of the modern world. Hell hath no fury like a witch scorned. Maine.theasc. Bottom: Barnabas admires the craftsmanship of his former home while being led through its stately halls by caretaker Willie Loomis (Jackie Earle Haley). vampire Barnabas Collins (Johnny Depp.” Tapping Panavision London for his camera package. Collins (Johnny Depp) is a wealthy playboy in Collinsport. Delbonnel shot mostly with an Arricam Studio and June 2012 63 . who turns out to be a witch. transforms Barnabas into a vampire and buries him “undead. courtesy of Warner Bros. the filmmakers decided to shoot on 35mm and avoid 3-D. but abandons her for a woman of his more refined class. including cars. Angelique. We needed a rich negative for the DI work I had planned. which is now inhabited by some of his descendants. I usually shot at T2. Josette (Bella Heathcote). Barnabas goes on a killing spree and returns to his family home. center) returns to his family estate in 1972. and we needed to see them properly. The witch has not aged a day. a construction crew accidentally unearths his coffin. top: Victoria Winters (Bella Heathcote) arrives at Collinwood Mansion after landing a job as the family’s nanny. including Elizabeth (Michelle Pfeiffer). Delbonnel shot the entire picture on Kodak Vision3 ww.8.com w 500T 5219 negative stock. as well as live-in psychiatrist Dr. Hoffman (Helena Bonham Carter) and a nanny (also played by Heathcote) who is the spitting image of Josette. Barnabas is romantically involved with Angelique (Eva Green). I pushed in order to keep my lighting list down.” Two hundred years later. He attempts to help his family regain prosperity. who is now running the town. and Angelique kills her rival. but is foiled by Photos by Peter Mountain and Leah Gallo.” says Burton. TV and rock ’n’ roll. and she comes to seduce Barnabas and try to destroy him for good. only to find it occupied by his dysfunctional descendants. “I wanted this to look like a Seventies movie.Opposite page: After spending 200 years imprisoned in a grave. pushing it to ISO 800 “because all of the sets were very dark mahogany.

it’s not Michelle Pfeiffer walking. The same is true with Johnny Depp. and they don’t shoot more than that. and he uses everything they have to offer. Burton avoided over-the-shoulder shots. “We’d have eyelines inside the matte box.” Burton notes. Tim trusts his actors completely.” “Tim’s master shot is not an establishing shot. it’s a single-camera show.◗ Blood Relatives Cooke S4 prime lenses. not just their voices or faces. so it was important that it have an intimacy to it. it’s her character. After scouting a number of fishing villages. It’s almost like we were X-raying them! Tim likes to bring the audience right up close. Tim doesn’t like loads of coverage.” According to Whelan. which was literally a foot away from their face. the production decided it would be more cost effective to build a period set onstage at Pinewood Studios than try to dress an existing town to resemble coastal Maine in 1972. which he calls “absolutely magnificent. with flat-hull boats that could be navigated in the shallow waters. and he likes the camera to feel like a secret observer tiptoeing around what the actors are doing. Most of the time. Whelan surmises that Burton’s beginnings as an animator might underlie his economy: “Animators are very aware of what’s needed to tell a story. preferring clean singles that were often placed in the middle of the frame. It’s Top: Barnabas represents the height of 18thcentury fashion as he strikes a familiar pose. “He will go wide not to show [the setting].” Delbonnel notes. with the actor looking almost straight into the camera. and a large cannery building that is burned down over the course of the story. 64 June 2012 American Cinematographer .” he recalls. “The actors couldn’t see beyond the camera. Bottom: A wideeyed Victoria examines the Gothic trappings of her new gig. but to show the actors’ body language. The huge set included a small harbor in the Pinewood water tank. and the 32mm was used for close-ups. the lens of choice was the 27mm. You can almost take the clapperboards off and make the movie. “He also has an uncanny ability to hold the entire picture in his head. He concentrates on one image at a time. he wants to make the story as lean as possible.” Both Burton and Delbonnel favor fairly short focal lengths. When Michelle Pfeiffer walks in a scene. suggesting that the director’s unusual visions are delivered in a classical form. “He has a very strong visual style. with all the beats and rhythms that go into making a film.” continues Whelan. with no fat. “This movie is based on a soap opera. Both Delbonnel and camera operator Des Whelan stress the elegance and simplicity of Burton’s mise en scène. followed by the 21mm.

” he explains. “was one of my principal constraints. We wanted to emphasize the actors. I’m only playing on the contrast and the diffusion with fill light. so for the majority of the film he is in a kind of a penumbra. The cinematographer then added a 1K Lowel Rifa light on the same side as the window. matriarch Elizabeth Collins Stoddard (Michelle Pfeiffer).Top: Barnabas has a word with the mistress of the house. he beamed two 20K Fresnels through the set’s two windows to provide sunlight on one end of the table and the background wall. where Barnabas was sitting. not a special-effects movie. The closest diffusion was positioned just outside the frame near the actor. and it can be fine-tuned by changing diffusion materials. Delbonnel notes that this lightww. a polystyrene sheet used for heating insulation. and there is almost nothing at the other end. for example. for a total of three.” One of the film’s conceits is that Barnabas the vampire bursts into flames whenever sunlight touches his body. June 2012 65 .” The Collinses’ long dining table provides a good example of Delbonnel’s lighting approach in interiors. first with Grid Cloth.” He adds that the diffusion frame and fill lights are so close to the actor that they do not have any effect on the background. There could be no direct sunlight on the main character.” He softened the window source with two additional diffusion frames. I can swap 216 for 251 diffusion and get one more stop. For the wide shot.” laughs Delbonnel. but that means the contrast will be higher. if I don’t have enough light.” says Delbonnel. Bottom: The undead guest attempts to reassume his place at the head of the table.com w ing approach saves time because it doesn’t involve relighting the entire set. “I start with 20Ks. and its glow wrapped around the person’s face. Even at the breakfast table. When moving in for a closer shot of an actor. This double diffusion created a wonderfully soft fill “that allowed me to lift the blacks which aren’t filled in the wide shot. The last option was to add another Rifa on the shadow side. but closer to camera. so I might add a little light on the shadow side. I put sunlight at one end and not at the other. “For example. “Sunlight. and then with a thickness of Depron. softening the hard lights with ¼ Grid. he “added more diffusion and some fill light. He diffused the Rifa twice.theasc.

” he emphasizes. “I always diffuse the source unless I want a ray of light. the outside looks overexposed to your eye. He overexposed the painted backings outside the windows by 2½-3 stops. Of course. with more or less fill. “I’m incapable of doing frontlight! I admire those who can. In one such scene. If I start with a very soft image.” The cinematographer explains how he established an eerie. which is one of Lee’s strongest diffusions. It’s beautiful and much heavier than 216. Angelique magically opens the living-room curtains to send him fleeing into the shadows.” he observes. My lighting is usually from the side. for example. Delbonnel added a bit of smoke to delineate the sunbeam and give a little more exposure. ASC. “I don’t like hard light except for the Molebeam.◗ Blood Relatives Director Tim Burton (at right in top photos) and cinematographer Bruno Delbonnel. which is interesting because it offers a very beautiful parallel ray. “I like soft shadows. lowAmerican Cinematographer 66 June 2012 . even more so now with Depron. Three Mac 2000 programmable lights were aimed at the disco ball to throw big squares of light on the walls.” Delbonnel used 10K and 20K Molebeams to create the shafts of sunlight that threaten Barnabas.” He laughs and adds. “Smoke is like flashing film — it lights the scene. AFC create an appropriately “fab” vibe for a scene in which Barnabas enjoys a slow dance with Victoria. noting. I can make it very contrasty by not putting in any fill.” he says. “My work is based on a very directional light that is also very soft. I vary the contrast of the image with the quantity of fill I add. which were also enhanced by Seventies-style lighting units that combined rotating discs with colored oils. “When you’re in a dark setting. I diffuse everything. Otherwise. you need much stronger lights because it’s so thick.

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” A party in the ballroom at Collins manor is marked by the appearance of rock star Alice Cooper. “We needed extremely directional sources to get big squares of light on the walls. “It’s a soft. moonless night. in the DI. for a hefty total of 58K. supplemented by 10Ks for the bottom. “A 2K Fresnel. Delbonnel’s crew also placed two 31K Quarter Wendy Lights (with 48 650watt bulbs) to define the edges of the buildings from the side. it’s no good.” The walls were also speckled by “lighting units from the Seventies that had rotating discs with colored oils. including an important scene in which Angelique magically sets the Collins cannery on fire.” Illumination for the fire scene came from five large soft boxes suspended from 98' cranes. disguising his wrinkles with his trademark makeup. at a vigorous 70.” Small. Barnabas seeks some shuteye in a cupboard. programmable LED lights were scattered throughout the space. for example. the silver in 68 June 2012 the blacks has to be touched by light. will give you nothing. notably underneath the go-go dancers. but you can see everything. contrast mood for night exteriors. He asked the special-effects supervisor if he could make the fire red “to make it seem more magical than orange or yellow. it’s very rare for me to film a black image. He lit the giant bluescreen with two other cranes with Quarter Wendy Lights.” says Delbonnel. I like to build an image up. If you have unexposed silver.◗ Blood Relatives Top: Making the best of less-thanluxurious accommodations. Dominating the ballroom set is a giant disco ball whose mirrors were hit by three Mac 2000 programmable lights. although I might darken it later. That gives you activated silver and beautiful blacks. I want the negative to be exposed. who. Each box was covered with ½ Grid and contained 12 space lights (with six 800-watt bulbs American Cinematographer each). Bottom: The dapper vampire must adapt as he experiences the culture shock of his Seventies surroundings. plays himself at age 30. and .

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you can do anything in the DI. we could automate it. “We were trying to achieve the look early on. I think the audience can feel it. It felt like the Seventies movies that I recall from my youth. He has a great taste. and he could decide to go for a certain exposure and more or less color. there was a little room to [refine things in post]. in the original photography. There were no surprises.” he observes. Of course. “Peter is my right-hand man. It also had the fairytale aspect of Kim Novak’s character coming back as a ‘ghost. transform functions and matrices to implement look elements. “You know. and the two became quite interactive. with whom he first collaborated on 2009’s Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince . and he knows what I like.’” With a laugh. American Cinematographer . we knew what to do. rather than grade everything by hand. whose actors glow. Maine. and when we sat down for the final timing. By the end of the shoot.” Making the dailies timing interactive with the shooting “is a holistic approach. “Bruno knew how things would react to color temperature and exposure. starting with Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo. When we did find the right tone with the color timing. shot in Technicolor by Robert Burks. Twenty very diffused space lights were placed on the ceiling “to give us a base level” from above. “If you bend the image around too much in post. A key to the movie’s painterly look is the fashioning of what could be called “DI dailies” in the production’s on-set theater.” continues Doyle. it just felt right.” Doyle notes that getting the look right in the dailies enables filmmakers to avoid the pitfalls of DI work that goes against the grain of the shoot. Bottom: Delbonnel takes a hands-on approach to his lighting. ASC.” says Doyle.◗ Blood Relatives They may not be able to define it. was my starting point. “If Bruno asked for a specific adjustment more than three times.” Delbonnel calls Doyle. but it puts a little veil between them and the performances.” Doyle’s approach was to create automatic processes. “We were building a color process that was dependent on the negative and how it was lit. more Mac 2000s and some rock ’n’ roll Par cans were built into the set. What I tried to offer Bruno was the idea of not constantly bending the negative by hand. Burton stresses the importance of defining the look during production. We developed software for our work that goes very far. “That vibrant Hollywood film. but instead building something like a custom print stock. He called upon color scientist/ASC associate member Joshua Pines and pipeline engineer Niklas Aldergreen at Technicolor to create a toolbox of custom scripts.” He chuckles as he asserts that the DI-dailies process offers “the nirvana of the rushes looking the way the cinematographer wants them to! But there’s a philosophy that goes with that. Delbonnel recalls that his search for Dark Shadows’ look included a variety of references. a set built on the backlot at Pinewood Studios in England. which was manned by colorist Peter Doyle. and it could be easily applied to the entire film’s look. we had a pretty good idea of the picture in terms of the grade. he acknowledges that he’s “not sure people will see the relationship” between the two films. but you can do so much that it feels kind of pushed. I have absolute confidence in him. and it restores control [of the look] to the cinematographer on set. “Sometimes Top: Cranemounted softboxes provide general illumination for the seaside town of Collinsport. but Bruno and I both feel that you should get it while 70 June 2012 you’re shooting it. “an essential partner” in creating the look of Dark Shadows.

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or like something’s missing. “Maybe it [would look like] a 3-strip failure. “He conceived of matrices that allowed us to make selected colors with incredible purity. just a basis for reflection. “Vertigo led me to wonder what twisted Technicolor would look like. and something is trum into six sectors: RGB and CYM. intense away the blue channel from the negative red in the image. skin tones.” missing. not like the wacky 2-strip Technicolor that gave you purple grass and the like.” continues the cinematographer.” Another vivid element of the DI look was the narrowing of the color palette. and backacross the six vectors. there is no other bright Delbonnel lines up a shot amid some carefully positioned bounce light. It’s a says the colorist. If you see a bright.” To achieve this. It has softness. “We threw color print.” says Delbonnel. and it seems to correspond to and all bright-red items were only the Tim Burton’s world. So I thought of the early attempts at color. “So all bright-yellow distortion that is pretty interesting on items were only the one shade of yellow. Because we did that Lips are a little magenta. one shade of red. which interests me. The image looks kind of normal. Doyle asked Pines to build a 3-D lookup table that would “slice the color speconly red and green. “That’s Peter’s genius. That looks twisted because it’s 72 . so the result was like a sixDoyle elaborates.” back again. It’s just enough of a twist to make it feel not contemporary and not real. references are very personal. and then we just twisted that. like 2-strip color. it kind of mixed grounds are a little blue-green.◗ Blood Relatives — we didn’t use it at all — and instead created a synthetic blue based on the red and the green.

so we pulled the image apart based on density and applied selective sharpening. This looks particularly striking on Depp’s close-ups. Delbonnel wraps up the interview by complimenting his Dark Shadows crew. painterly blooming on his white face while keeping his dark eyes sharp. It’s wonderful to work that way. “As the title implies. like the silhouette of a person or the outline of a building. However. the film is a lot about blacks and shadows. The process separates out the colors just enough to make it a little interpretive. It gives the film a real snap. You could say that all of this was driven by the desire to give a little sense of interpretation to the scene rather than [create] a realistic depiction. including 1st AC Julian Bucknell. you don’t feel like you’re making a ‘Hollywood movie’.” ● TECHNICAL SPECS 1. “Bruno brings a different thing to each of his films. The film is really his world.” The DI work also included a selective application of sharpening. That’s what it’s all about. and I love that.” Burton strikes a similar note at the end of his interview.” the director adds. It really worked.” This was coupled with removal of the grain in the bright skin-tone regions. Lite Cooke S4. That feeling is important. not his style.85:1 35mm Arricam Studio.red in the film. key grip Steve Ellingworth and gaffer Chuck Finch. you feel like you’re making a film that’s an artistic endeavor. but he truly collaborates. Doyle explains. “This is the first time I’ve worked with Bruno. and I loved it. he might come back a week later with your idea reworked — there’s maybe 10 percent of your idea. and that is exactly the same color as the blood that appears throughout the film. Angenieux Optimo Kodak Vision3 500T 5219 Digital Intermediate 73 . which he has transformed into a Tim Burton idea. the areas sharpened in the blacks were only sharpened in the broader shapes. it goes from over-sharpened darks to blurred whites. it’s somewhat subtle. singling out Delbonnel’s contributions to the film. so that as the picture goes from shadow to brightness. it separates the actors from the set. He was really thinking about the style of this film. He asks everyone for our ideas during prep. It gives the image quite a 3-D quality. “Working with him. The cinematographer notes that Burton’s highly collaborative working method is “great. and if you give him an idea. yielding a soft. and he got into the soul and character of the film.

Using stand-ins for Smith and Jones. or shoot 2-D and convert in post. Directed by Barry Sonnenfeld. a comedy in the classic Hawksian sense. he tested Red One MX. in January 2010. ASC and director Barry Sonnenfeld take agents J and K back in time — to 1969 — for Men in Black III. By Iain Stasukevich •|• hen people ask me what this movie is like. the new installment of the popular franchise finds Men in Black agents J (Will Smith) and K (Tommy Lee Jones) contending with an evil alien. I was told this movie would be released in 3-D. “When Sony hired me. MiB III has been released in 3-D as well as 2-D. who has escaped his lunar prison cell and traveled back to 1969 to prevent his capture by young Agent K (Josh Brolin). so Barry and I set about determining whether we should originate in 3-D. Boris the Animal (Jemaine Clement).” says Men in Black III cinematographer Bill Pope. but the production was a 2-D affair.Blast fromthePast Bill Pope. ASC.” says Pope. “W 74 June 2012 American Cinematographer . I tell them it’s a Hope and Crosby road picture.

Barry and I were completely frustrated by the whole process. the alignment is never perfect. we tested both through to release print. are entirely different. you’re polarizing the image. He goes on to explain that for him and Sonnenfeld.” says Pope. the footprint of the 3-D camera rigs cramped Sonnenfeld’s directorial style. “There was no contest: it was film all the way.” he says. and the additional glass surfaces that split the image for the two cameras made lighting a slow process. tweaked all the lighting. too wide and cumbersome for the task at hand. Arri Alexa and Sony F35 cameras.” adds Sonnenfeld.theasc.” he recalls. left: J engages in hot pursuit on the streets of Manhattan. so all the reflective surfaces [in each image]. in which case you shouldn’t have wasted your time with 3-D rigs in the first place. so the two images have different visual characteristics that have to be ww. “I couldn’t backlight my actors because any light coming from behind them would hit that mirror and bounce onto their faces. He also shot the scene on 35mm. We liked how grain actually draws you into a picture by not reproducing reality exactly. in Pope’s opinion. “As for film vs. to the character standing just next to the camera.com w resolved in post.” The matteboxes of the 3-D rigs were. “By the time we’d flagged everything off and Unit photography by Wilson Webb. “When you’re bouncing off the mirror. “The differences were subtle. and we simply preferred the qualities of film. but noticeable. you have to pick the interocular [distance] for each shot ahead of time.Opposite: Agents J (Will Smith) and K (Tommy Lee Jones) are back on the case in Men in Black III. Sonnenfeld prefers a 21mm prime for close-ups. it had been hours. if it was a really close eyeline. this had as much to do with production logistics as it did with aesthetics.” Pope notes that capturing in 3-D also promised to require more timeconsuming post work. one image is bounced off a mirror and one image is captured through a mirror. To make room for the off-screen actor when shooting in 2-D. placing the film plane around 2' from the actor’s nose. even the reflections off an actor’s skin.” “When you shoot native 3-D. And no matter how good your rig is. The contrast is different. “When you shoot 3-D. I’d put a dot inside the mattebox and put the offscreen actor behind me. The colors are different. and stereoscopic rigs from 3ality. wherein an actor in a single often delivers lines almost directly to the lens. Pace and Element-Technica. For starters. Barry espeJune 2012 75 . “The only way to change it is to take one eye and convert it. Photos and frame grabs courtesy of Columbia Pictures and Sony Pictures Imageworks. All of these things have to be addressed later on.” Pope continues. Pope either removed the mattebox “or. Below: Director of photography Bill Pope. ASC preps a villainous extraterrestrial for its close-up. and that material was sent to Sony Pictures Imageworks for conversion. The densities are different. digital. This page.

“Bobby. a monocycle chase through Brooklyn. Arri CSC provided the camera package for the New York-based production. Imageworks’ 3-D visual-effects supervisor.” says Pope. Bill and Eric were each assigned certain sets so they could really dig in. the first two films in this series were shot on film. tackling such sequences as a ray-gun battle in a Chinese restaurant. 76 June 2012 . The production was large enough to require two full-time gaffers — Bob Finley was joined by Bill O’Leary for the first half of production. Imageworks also handled most of the movie’s visual effects. the filmmakers built Wu’s interior and exterior and a portion of the street onstage at Kaufman-Astoria Studios. and the launch of the Apollo 11 spacecraft.” The team decided to shoot Super 35mm for a final aspect ratio of 1. Excluding the stereoscopic-conversion work. Imageworks was responsible for roughly 700 effects shots. and we wanted the three to feel like they belonged together.’ Also. additional Imageworks artists were on hand to record camera positions and lens data. supplying Arricam Studios and Lites and Arri/Zeiss Master Prime lenses. were handled by other facilities. Middle and bottom: To give themselves maximum flexibility for filming the nighttime action sequence.◗ Blast from the Past cially was put off by what he referred to as digital’s feeling of ‘reportage. Agent J’s time-traveling jump off the Chrysler Building. “We had three standing sets at Steiner Studios in Brooklyn. Under the guidance of visualeffects supervisors Ken Ralston and Jay Redd. An additional 500 shots. For key visual-effects setups. led by key grips Mitch Lillian and Tony Mazzucchi. and by Eric Boncher for the second — and an army of grips.85:1 and post-convert the picture at Imageworks and Prime Focus under the supervision of Corey Turner. and we had as many as seven or eight sets up at the American Cinematographer Top: Agents K and J prepare for battle in Wu’s Chinese restaurant. as well as capture lighting information with an HDR Spheron. ranging from background display graphics to all-CG characters. a wide-angle turret camera that measures real-world luminosity values from the darkest shadow areas to the brightest sunlight with a single 360-degree scan. Ralston and Redd spent nearly every day of production on set.

” he says. The restaurant. how many stores we would need to buy out. a veteran of the first two MiB films.” The second unit. and how much parking we would require. have our own street and restaurant. was so busy it required three cinematographers: Igor Meglic. directed by Simon Crane. we could maintain complete control and.com w June 2012 77 . Middle: After traveling back in time to 1969. in which case I would visit the sets with Simon. “Sometimes the second unit had to go first. To help keep the first and second units on the same page. ww. storyboards and previs. and the second unit could refer to the notes and diagrams when members of the main unit were not readily available. and in some cases worked with the main unit on such material. Bottom: The filmmakers prepare to shoot Brolin and Smith’s conversation. or at the end of a shoot day. Kevin McKnight and Scott Maguire. and Barry and Simon would have a department-head meeting on the weekend. the street it sits on and an adjacent alley were all built onstage at Kaufman-Astoria Studios.same time on two stages at KaufmanAstoria in Queens. how many nights we would have to shoot. “If Will and Tommy were in a gun battle with a bunch of aliens. J pays young Agent K (Josh Brolin) a visit at headquarters. Production designer Bo Welch. relight the set and kill off 20 aliens.” As the film begins.” Building the set also increased Pope’s lighting options inside Wu’s.theasc. Pope explains that the second unit handled the larger action and CGIintensive sequences. J and K head into Chinatown to investigate Wu’s. Pope asked Finley to create diagrams and notes for each setup that detailed camera moves as well as lighting instruments and their placement. we’d light and shoot Will and Tommy’s side. color temperature and diffusion. and then the second unit would come in after us. Every setup was diagrammed. We quickly realized that for the same amount of money. a restaurant with some fishy items on the menu. explains that the decision to build this set “came down to how many pages were in the script. to go through the notes. The restaurant was laid out with a dining Top: Agent J drops into Men in Black headquarters in the present day. with a little construction and some CG extensions.

8 1⁄2. and we also used a frame of Opal and 250 between [the fixture and the muslin frame]. “so we turned off most of the sodium-vapor streetlights in our vicinity. Half. filming on Canal Street in Chinatown. There was a 20K on a Condor at each end of the street for backlight.◗ Blast from the Past room and two small wings off to the side. and 2Ks and 5Ks fitted with Chimeras were hung from trusses rigged over the buildings on both sides of the street. was bounced off a loose muslin behind the camera.” says Finley. even spread. between T2. Eyelight. Middle: Agent K takes to a monocycle for a chase through the city in 1969.” continues Finley. and usually at least a double wire scrim. Backlight was at or just over exposure. Bottom: Pope preps the sequence. This allowed for quick light changes when Barry and Bill decided a shot should be overcranked. “As we did onstage. Welch incorporated a variety of practicals into the set.” says Finley.” American Cinematographer Top: Part of the Chrysler Building’s rooftop was built onstage for the practical portion of Agent J’s time-traveling leap. “The majority of the backlight in the main dining room was created with Arri T12 Fresnels and 2K Blondes with Chimeras and 1⁄4 CTS rigged in openings in the ceiling. we leaned more toward neutral tungsten lighting on the actual street.or 3⁄4-front keylight was provided by an Arri T12 or 5K (depending on the frame rate and scope of the shot) through a 6'x6' frame of bleached muslin with a control grid on the front to direct light onto the actor. “The muslin cuts about 12⁄3 stops. 78 June 2012 . which was most often provided by an Arri 1K or 650-watt light.” Finley recalls that the street outside Wu’s was approached like a real location. “except we didn’t have to light all the way down the street because there was bluescreen on both ends. and the key light was a half stop under. and we bounced the key and fill light with 12-light HPLs into 12-by frames of muslin. “I like the T12s for their punch and nice. and Pope augmented these with Kino Flos gelled with 1⁄4 CTS. Then we used the lights on Condors and on top of buildings to make up for what we were missing.” Practical street lamps were fitted with 500-watt tungsten bulbs. The filmmakers also did some location work for the Wu’s sequence.8 and T2. spotlighting tables and raking the dark walls in the background.

Ten mirrored spires break up the set’s 75' length. Pope’s crew established even skylight with 120 6K space lights going through 1⁄4 CTB and Light Grid. Each ceiling orifice held four 6K Mole Richardson Maxi Coops. starting from the floor in flat. The filmmakers designed J’s jump through time to make the most of 3-D’s potential: the agent leaps from the beak of one of the eagles atop the Chrysler Building and plummets through the decades. using a partial build of the rooftop. The bluescreen was hung on the outside track. which is shown in both 2012 and 1969. 6'-wide LED panels (courtesy of LiteGear) and reaching into 9'-wide holes in the ceiling. The headquarters and its entrance were built inside Brooklyn’s massive Marcy Armory. lies beneath Manhattan’s Battery Park Tunnel. For the stage work. circular. Keylight was provided by 12-light HPLs shooting through 12'x12' Light Grid or muslin. and then the visual-effects team handled the set extensions. Balconies running the length of both sides of the room provided platforms for 20K and T12 backlights. the digital build of New York City. Early in the production schedule. “We had to do it. “There’s no reason he’d have to jump off a building to go back in time. it would make everyone in the first row scream. and four 20'x40' UltraBounce panels were hung on the . Agent J travels back to 1969 to warn the young Agent K. with white and chrome surfaces and recessed practicals. After discovering Boris the Animal’s plot to change history. The 2012 iteration looks austere and modern. and a bounced light off another 12'x12' muslin created a wraparound fill. and the jump. Redd took Finley and an Imageworks team to the top of the Chrysler Building to shoot background tiles and reference material with Canon EOS 5D Mark II DSLRs.” The filmmakers shot the dialogue portion of the scene at Steiner Studios Stage 3.Men in Black headquarters. A 360-degree double-curtain track was rigged from the perms to surround the set. but Barry and I thought that in 3-D.” Pope notes with glee. all fitted with Chimeras.

for example.” Once he lands in 1969. but the look of the film shouldn’t make you laugh. “I didn’t want to approach 1969 much differently than 2012 because it would have seemed a little arch. where Welch established a period look with dark carpets. “What’s left of period New York is becoming smaller and smaller as the city turns into this kind of Disneyland for adults. To bring the swinging heydays of Brooklyn’s Coney Island amusement park and Manhattan’s SoHo neighborhood to life.” notes Welch. “What people do and say can be funny. “The filmmakers wanted the fall to be as extreme as humanly possible. Once J takes the plunge. As far as the camera and lighting were concerned. “Shooting period on location is American Cinematographer Top: A final comp from the climactic scene at Cape Canaveral shows Agent K in action. and one set of Maxi Coops was softened with Light Grid. A 20K on a 60' Condor provided a hardsunlight rim. Middle: The filmmakers prep a shot of Brolin for the scene. he had the crew remove the ceiling and hang 78 6K space lights going through a layer of Light Grid.” Ralston remarks. colorful furniture and even a fire pit. Late-afternoon sunlight was provided by three scissor lifts holding nine Maxi Coops each. careful art direction. and CGI. providing skylight fill and helping to reduce bluescreen spill. Creating credible New York City exteriors for 1969 proved a steep challenge. 80 June 2012 . his fall lasts about 21⁄2 minutes.” One of the few changes he made was to lend the ’69 headquarters a bit more contrast. Bottom: The Cape Canaveral set included the Apollo 11 space capsule. To achieve this. All the lights were gelled with 1⁄2 CTS. wood paneling.” says Pope. the filmmakers relied on a blend of strategically chosen angles. bringing the pavement on 42nd Street ever closer to the audience. J finds young Agent K in the bureau’s home office. the toplight is broken up by the golf-tee sculptures.◗ Blast from the Past inside track so they could travel around the set. “but we had to carefully orchestrate the depth so it wouldn’t tear your brain out when we cut from a deep falling shot to a big closeup of Will’s face. during which the 3-D convergence and interaxial distances change dynamically from cut to cut. The 10 reflective spires from 2012 have become 10 wood golf-tee sculptures.

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and then add additional pipe and truss above that for hang points. Then Louis Petraglia’s electric-rigging crew could go in and rig cable light.leefilters. the department heads visited the Canaveral Air Force Base in Florida to view the original Saturn V gantry and rockets at the Kennedy Space Center. Welch then designed digital and physical models at 2⁄3 scale. “Because of the set’s proximity to the perms. and the trail is lost. The chase ultimately leads the characters to Cape Canaveral and the Apollo 11 launch. Ultimately. Brolin and Clement. Tempers fray as temperatures rise. texture.) The set was surrounded by bluescreen and six 20'x40' UltraBounce panels. 3018 Think LEE www. along with the Apollo 11 capsule and two gantry arms that could be raised and lowered to the capsule. Imageworks artists subsequently augmented the shots and created all-CG city blocks with period cars.◗ Blast from the Past typically easier than starting from scratch because you have evidence of its existence. two floors of the structure were constructed onstage at Kaufman-Astoria. (The two floors were cleverly repeated in editing and augmented with CGI to create the illusion of a 20-story structure.” notes Finley. which in MiB mythology is a cover for the deployment of a web around the Earth designed to deflect alien invasions. To prep the launch scene. led by Jim Boniece. 768 Please visit us at: Lightfair Booth No. which he presented to the rest of the crew in order to determine which parts of the gantry should be built onstage and which should be created digitally. “The rigging grips. which Meglic shot with Arri Alexas for maximum dynamic range. had to first remove the steel-grid floor panels from between the steel trusses of the grid. volume and all the things that make up movie design.com 82 .” A nighttime chase through 1969 Brooklyn required extensive second-unit work. the sun and skylight had to be rigged up above the steel perms.” Pope and his collaborators prep a dolly shot onstage. but it requires a more artful arrangement of space. signage and digital doubles of Smith.

you realize the quality of your work is affected more by the simple choice of 3-D systems than by any other decisions you make. really. “A lot of the gantry ended up being eliminated because the plates weren’t ideal. “When you’re a cinematographer grading in 3-D. where he worked with colorist and ASC associate Steven J. The 12-light Maxis and 36-light Moleenos used for sunlight were rigged so they could be raised or lowered to accommodate the height of a given shot. Fourteen 12-light Maxis provided sunlight along the gantry arm and tower. Ralston and Redd assembled each shot like a collage. Pope prefers Xpand for its bright. We rotoscoped the actors and filled in the rest of the shot with a digital gantry [made from] the background plates we shot in Florida. Lite. such as a wide establishing shot of the launch pad that quickly pushes into the actors on the practical. 6-light Maxi coops gelled with 1⁄2 CTB and Light Grid were hung over the main tower area to augment the skylight.Ninety-six 6K space lights with silk skirts and 1⁄2 CTB were rigged above the gantry. “Even on a set that big. ● TECHNICAL SPECS Super 1. replacing parts of the gantry.” Pope reflects.” he notes. “It’s just picking nits. Pope and Sonnenfeld tackled the 3-D version. there’s still a key light and a fill light.” says Ralston. “Everyone was in a time crunch. who took advantage of EFilm’s proprietary Eworks grading tools to balance minute discrepancies in image density and hue. Scott. “The main difference between lighting two people in a room and lighting two people on a gantry at Cape Canaveral is what you do with the light.85:1 4-perf Super 35mm and Digital Capture Arricam Studio. so we couldn’t always take the time to set up the lights and camera the way we needed to. even projection and active-glasses system. Some shots required almost a complete reworking. and five 36-light Moleenos were rigged at the capsule end of the lighting grid to provide three-quarter backlight. Arri Alexa Arri/Zeiss Master Primes Kodak Vision3 500T 5219 Digital Intermediate Stereoscopic Conversion 83 .” Pope supervised the digital timing at EFilm in Hollywood. Immediately after the 2-D grade was completed.” says Pope. and adding light to the actors and surrounding them with smoke. which had to be graded for Xpand and RealD projection systems. All of the keylights and backlights were dimmed down to 75 percent to warm them up a bit.” Visual effects aided some of the sequence’s more complex shots.

For additional information.7 pounds. The C500 features an EF mount for Canon EF lenses.150°K to 6. ease of use and affordability of the company’s RL48 LED Ringlight. and the app can store. and the Inca 6 focuses from 15-67 degrees..A. The Anova also offers remote control of third-party fixtures via DMX Master Mode. Building on the quality of light.New Products & Services • SUBMISSION INFORMATION • Please e-mail New Products/Services releases to: newproducts@ascmag. Both units provide dimming from 100 to 0 percent with no noticeable shift in color temperature. via wired DMX. The Anova is also equipped with a V-lock plate for battery operation. Rotolight LED systems deliver full-spectrum “continuous light” with studio-accurate color and a soft. Inc. Additionally. visit www.com. Photos must be TIFF or JPEG files of at least 300dpi. rather than having to do so all at once. Users can control Anova locally on the fixture. Because Litepanels LED fixtures run cool to the touch. All of these digital-image-source formats fully conform to established American Cinematographer . Both cameras are capable of originating 4K-resolution (4096x2160) imagery with uncompressed raw output for external recording. The Inca 4 focuses from 13-72 degrees.com. The C500 and C500 PL cameras output their 4K-resolution video as a 10-bit uncompressed raw data stream with no deBayering. color accuracy. allowing the fixture to accurately track changing light conditions on location. Rotolight Shines with Anova Rotolight has introduced the eco-friendly Anova LED EcoFlood. a computer-controlled. it is highly portable and well suited for both studio and location work. the Anova can see and measure both color and brightness. providing three hours of operation at 100percent output. The Inca 4 (4" lens) and Inca 6 (6" lens) Fresnel fixtures are the first members of the series. which incorporate LEDs that are color-matched to the incandescent tungsten-halogen lighting fixtures used in many television stations and other facilities. Full HD (1920x1080) and other resolutions. The Inca 4 and Inca 6 use significantly less power than conventional tungsten-halogen fixtures. portability. enabling the replication of lighting conditions from location to studio.300°K). multi-year plan. The Inca 4 draws about 39 watts and provides comparable illumination to a 300-watt traditional tungsten Fresnel.litepanels.rotolight. Anova can accurately reproduce any color of white light from candlelight to full daylight (3. 2K (2048x1080). there is an additional savings in the power it takes to cool a studio. wide. visit www. using the camera in an iPhone or iPad. the Inca 6 draws approximately 104 watts and provides comparable illumination to a 650-watt traditional tungsten Fresnel. or through the built-in Wi-Fi with Rotolight’s Magic Eye app on an iPhone or iPad. or by on-fixture knobs. Magic Eye provides wireless remote control of brightness and color temperature across multiple lights. and the C500 PL features a PL mount for PL lenses. Canon Offers 4K Imaging Solutions Canon U.com and include full contact information and product images. bi-color LED floodlight that delivers a 110-degree super-wide beam angle and the equivalent output of a 1K tungsten fixture while drawing only 38 watts of power. For additional information. is expanding its Cinema EOS System of professional cinematography products with the introduction of the Cinema EOS C500 and Cinema EOS C500 PL cameras. The Inca Series makes it possible for a studio to change over from incandescent to LED fixtures in a staged. 84 June 2012 Litepanels Highlights Inca Series Litepanels has introduced the Inca Series tungsten-balanced LED Fresnel fixtures. The cameras can also output quad Full HD (3840x2160). recall and transmit settings and transitions.S. Focus and dimming can be controlled via DMX 512 protocol. Weighing 5. shadowless quality that is perfect for portraiture or interview lighting.

the camera can operate at up to 120 fps. a refrigerated sensor for low noise.blackmagicdesign. color temperature setting and ASA information overlaid in anti-aliased fonts. The Blackmagic Cinema Camera will be available in July for $2.5K sensor. and full compatibility with Canon EF. which can be selected to operate from 1 to 60 fps as well. 25. 29. the newest addition to its line of EOS DSLR cameras. shutter angle. this lets the user enter shot information just like typing on a smart phone.com www. and Blackmagic Ultrascope software for waveform monitoring. Alura.com marty@oppcam.com www. a built-in capacitive touch-screen LCD. transport control. a 2. dynamic range and focus assist — can be changed on the touch LCD. the cameras are compatible with Canon’s wide range of interchangeable EF Cinema and PL-mount lenses and EF lenses for Canon SLR cameras. The CinemaDNGformat files can be read by all high-end video software. o 60mm & 100mm Macro Lenses. Canon and Fujinon zoom lenses. Arriflex 235 OB Battery System. production companies and cameramen around the globe. a data-entry window called the “slate” appears. Arri Alexa & Sony F65 OB Power Supplies.oppenheimercameraproducts.Blackmagic Design Unveils Cinema Camera Blackmagic Design has introduced the Blackmagic Cinema Camera. 3 Gb/s SDI output.97 or 30 fps. the camera can capture 24. A speaker is built-in for clip playback. reliable camera accessor ies since 1992. The C500 and C500 PL simultaneously record 50 Mbps HD proxy video to an in-camera CF card that is immediately available to support offline editing. The cameras employ a 12-bit RGB 4:4:4 signal format during 2K output. All camera settings — such as frame rate.5K or 1080 HD resolution.oppenheimercameraproducts. The camera also includes a full copy of DaVinci Resolve 9. color temperature. standard jack audio connections. many LDC Monitor Yoke Mounts. the camera can record ProRes and DNxHD for HD-resolution files compatible with Final Cut Pro X and Avid Media Composer.com. a built-in SSD recorder. Metadata is compatible with software such as Final Cut Pro X and DaVinci Resolve. The Blackmagic Cinema Camera includes a fast SSD recorder that can record the full sensor detail in 12-bit Log raw files onto fast solid-state disks. and there is also a headphone socket and embedded audio on the SDI output and Thunderbolt connection. a digitalcinema camera that offers 13 stops of dynamic range.com 85 .0 for color correction.85megapixel CMOS sensor.995. seattle 206-467-8666 seattle toll free 877-467-8666 toll free marty@oppcam. The built-in LCD display makes focusing easy. visit www. The camera incorporates Canon Log Gamma to enable the recording of high-quality video while also providing a Film & Digital SPECIALTY PRODUCTS Oppenheimer Camera Products’ current offerings include the OppCam Panhandle System. Equipped with a new 8. Canon has also unveiled the EOS1D C digital SLR. and the first to be designed as a member of the Cinema EOS system. For additional information. This data is then stored in the files and can be accessed by NLE software during editing. The SDI output includes all camera data such as time code. builtin high-speed Thunderbolt connection. Our produc ts are used by rental houses. SMPTE production standards. If switched to a 10-bit YCrCb 4:2:2 mode. the LCD features fast and responsive touch-screen technology. For easy metadata entry. All 4K formats can be selected to operate from 1 to 60 fps. When the user taps the display with a finger. prac tical.and Zeiss ZF-mount lenses. Ultrascope can be run on a laptop connected to the camera via a Thunderbolt connection. We have been an innovator of elegant. and allows playback of captured files. Additionally. shutter angle. and Lens Carry Handles for Angenieux. The EOS-1D C records video at 4K (4096x2160) or Full HD (1920x1080) resolution to support highend motion-picture and advanced-imaging applications. When recording in either 2.

8 L S (for EF mounts) and the CN-E15.8 L SP (for PL mounts).8 L SP (for PL mounts) — and two telephoto cine zooms — the CN-E30-105mm T2.canon. Additional features include an extended sensitivity range of up to ISO 25. The camera includes an 18.600 for exceptional motion-imaging results with reduced noise even in low-light settings. The N XCam system’s EMount flexibility is designed to accept virtu86 . respectively. lightweight design to facilitate handheld and Steadicam shooting while also covering a wide range of focal lengths. Sony FS700U Captures High Speed Sony has introduced the N EXFS700U Full HD super-slow-motion camcorder. the latest in its line of NXCam interchangeable-lens E-mount camcorders.5-47mm T2. For additional information.high level of color-grading freedom. Canon has announced the development of four new EF Cinema zoom lenses designed to deliver exceptional optical performance on 4K-resolution cameras. visit www.or 16seconds burst mode. Each of the four lenses features a compact. The camcorder delivers Full-HD images at 120 and 240 fps in an 8.1 megapixel full-frame 24mm x 36mm Canon CMOS sensor with the ability to record 8-bit 4:2:2 Motion JPEG 4K video or Full HD video to the camera’s CF memory card. The lineup comprises two wide-angle cine zooms — the CN-E15. 480 fps and 960 fps rates at reduced resolution are also available.8 L S (for EF mounts) and CN-E30-105mm T2. Additionally.com.5-47mm T2.usa.

N EX-FS700U operators can take advantage of the camcorder’s built-in N D filters. which means more light per photosite. durable design also includes anchor points for compatibility with third party accessories. When using sensors that are natively 16:9 or wider. visit http://pro. resulting in a smaller used sensor area and a different angle of view for the lens. with the use of simple.nl 818. auto iris. Function buttons are also enlarged to make operating easy. Arri Advances Anamorphic Arri has unveiled the Alexa Plus 4:3. the handle is attached with a rosette mount. 25p or 30p frame rates with embedded time code and audio. providing high sensitivity.9790 SEE US AT CINE GEAR EXPO widescreen aspect ratio. even while wearing gloves. the larger sensor area can be used for greater freedom in vertical . Thanks to the flexibility of the digital ports.98. low noise and minimal aliasing. The FS700U’s 3G HD-SDI and HDMI connectors can output Full HD 50p and 60p. more exposure latitude and sharper images. 1⁄4 (2 stops). translating into greater sensitivity. This high-speed readout chip is optimized for motion-picture shooting. plus two sets of ¼" and 3⁄8" holes) that allow heavy accessories to be mounted. users can also choose to output PsF over the 3G HD-SDI. less noise.6 million pixels. The handle incorporates an “active grip” that features four buttons for commonly used functions: expanded focus. virtually any external recorder can be connected.000. Alternatively. and built-in licensing for high-speed shooting. a new Alexa model with similar functionality to the Alexa Plus but featuring a 4:3 Super 35 sensor. 3G HD-SDI can output native 23. Additional features include a detachable top handle secured by a pair of screws (a cold shoe. inexpensive adapters without optical degradation.aerocrane.458.ally all SLR and DSLR 35mm lenses. in addition to standard HD 60i. Anamorphic lenses squeeze the image by approximately a factor of two. the full area of the sensor is used. Sony is planning a firmware upgrade that will enable the NEX-FS700U to output 4K bit-stream data over 3G HD-SDI when used with a Sony 4K recorder. For additional information. The camcorder is 60/50 Hz switchable. 24p. Compatible media includes MS and SD memory cards and Sony’s HXR-FMU128 flash memory unit that attaches to the camcorder.com. With the Alexa Plus 4:3 camera. with a newly designed wheel that rotates across the sensor like a turret. The wheel includes positions for Clear. anamorphic de-squeeze and DNxHD.97 progressive signals. the ability to switch from 16:9 sensor mode to 4:3 sensor mode. 25 or 29.sony. Users can also capture high-quality still images with the FS700U. The FS700U uses a new 4K Exmor Super 35 CMOS sensor that comprises 11. still capture and recording start/stop. Users can save up to 99 camcorder profile settings on a memory card and can copy the same setting to multiple units. 1⁄16 (4 stops) and 1⁄64 (6 stops). it becomes necessary to crop the sides of the image to achieve the desired www. The camcorder also includes face detection and auto focus to help ensure the subject is always kept in focus. The N EX-FS700U (body only) and NEX FS700UK (with 18-200mm zoom lens) are planned to be available this month at a suggested list price starting at less than $10. The camcorder’s enhanced.

Upgradeable options will include wireless metadata input. Weighing less than 7 pounds.) The HPX600 also features wireless and wired connection ability with Wi-Fi. Dynamic Range Stretch function to help compensate for wide variations in light88 . The Alexa Plus 4:3 joins the Alexa Studio and Alexa M.arri. The interchangeable lens camcorder will be equipped with Chromatic Aberration Compensation to maximize lens performance. which already have 4:3 sensors. It is 50 Hz and 59. The HPX600 will be upgradeable as new functionality becomes available.94 Hz) and a signal-to-noise ratio of 59dB. DVCPro 50. The camcorder supports AVC-Intra 100/50. and the M as a compact. visit www. the HPX600 incorporates a new 2⁄3-type MOS sensor to produce HD and SD images.94 Hz switchable for worldwide use. variable frame rates and AVC-Ultra recording.repositioning when using spherical lenses.com. versatile C camera. USB and Gigabit Ethernet. When available in 2013. 4:2:2 recording in Full HD to meet a variety of user needs from mastering to transmission. a future option will support LiveU for video uplink with real-time indication of LiveU’s transmission status and video transmission quality to the camera operator. which boasts 10-bit. DVCPro and DV as standard. The HPX600 achieves a high sensitivity of F12 (at 59. For additional information. proxy recording. 4:2:2 AVC-Intra recording. the Plus 4:3 as a B camera. The Studio might typically function as an A camera. Panasonic Presents Upgradeable HPX600 Panasonic has unveiled the AGHPX600 P2 HD shoulder-mount camcorder. (However. DVCPro HD. the HPX600 will not support all AVC-Ultra formats. In addition. AVC-Ultra will offer master-quality and/or low-bit-rate 10-bit.

Additionally. For additional information. including native .MXF files with rich descriptive metadata that is optimized for asset management.2 (wide open) and is ideal for capturing critical close-ups from longer distances.com. The cameras are also equipped with a LAN C remote connector and are compatible with JVC’s Compact Studio ProHD 7" monitor for an affordable studio system. the GYHM650 is capable of producing Full HD files on one memory card while simultaneously creating smaller. Additionally. has introduced the GY-HM650 and GY-HM600 ProHD handheld cameras.5-94mm and Optimo 28340mm. In addition to relay mode for uninterrupted recording. The builtin Fujinon HD lens features a wide focal range of 29-667mm (35mm equivalent) and has manual focus. with built-in FTP and Wi-Fi connectivity. Other features include auto focus with face detection and an optical image stabilizer. The HPX600 will offer two P2 card slots and an SD card slot. available in feet or meters.695.22megapixel color viewfinder and color 3. It also records . JVC Expands ProHD Camcorder Line JVC Professional Products Co. the GY-HM650 will be available in the winter for a recommended price of $5. the Pre Rec (retro cache) feature continuously records and stores up to 5 seconds of footage in cache memory to help prevent missed shots. The Optimo 28- . Original features will include a smart user interface that permits accessibility to the camera’s extensive functions from an LCD display on the side of the camera. visit www. Angenieux Focuses on Optimo Zooms Thales Angenieux has introduced two additions to its line of Optimo lenses: the Optimo 19. the camcorder can deliver the footage without a microwave or satellite connection. The cameras feature a 1. a division of JVC Americas Corp. The AG-HPX600 will be available in the fall at $16. along with three N D filters.5" LCD..6 (wide open). Equipped with dual codecs. The Optimo 19. The GY-HM600 will be available in the fall for a recommended price of $4. The 12x Optimo 28-340mm long zoom lens features a fast aperture of T3. Web-friendly files ( 1⁄4 HD) on a second card.5-94mm is a 4. The cameras are equipped with three 1⁄3" 12-bit CMOS sensors.ing. The lens features a 329-degree focus rotation with more than 50 calibrated witness marks for precise focusing in feet or meters. For additional information.695.panasonic. The cameras also include a built-in stereo microphone and two XLR inputs with phantom power and a shotgun mic holder. each with 1920x1080 pixels. the cameras allow simultaneous recording to both memory cards for instant backup or client copy. versatile form factor. and a highly accurate flash band detection and compensation software. the cameras include a time-code synchronization input and HD-SDI and HDMI outputs.3 pounds and features a front diameter of 136mm and a close focus of 2'5". . It is designed with a 327-degree focus rotation and more than 70 precise witness marks.000-$18.7x zoom lens with a fast aperture of T2.jvc. Both cameras feature a built-in wideangle 23x autofocus zoom lens and boast superior low-light performance and excellent sensitivity (F11 at 2. as well as a headphone jack and separate input for a wireless mic receiver..com. to non-proprietary SDHC or SDXC media cards. It weighs 12. zoom and iris rings. A second trigger and servo zoom control on the built-in handle make it easy to record while holding the camera at low or high angles.000.MP4.MOV and AVCHD. The lightweight cameras record HD or SD footage in multiple file formats. visit http://pro.000 lux) in a comfortable.

For Ace. The PL 19-90mm can be controlled using industry-standard wireless controllers. making it suitable for use as a standard PL lens or as an ENG-style lens. As with all Sachtler products. The PL 1990mm also features flange focal-distance adjustment and macro function and is Lens Data System and /i metadata compatible.5-94mm and 28340mm boast minimal breathing.com. EasyRig Goes Mini EasyRig and 16x9 Inc.4x and 2x extenders. durable and extremely lightweight. Sachtler Supports Ace Sachtler. Fujifilm Adds PL-Mount Zoom Fujifilm Optical Devices has introduced the PL 19-90mm Cabrio ZK4. The lens features an exclusive detachable servo drive unit. Weighing 5. the newest member of the company’s Premier PL-Mount Zoom family. Ace incorporates a glass fiber reinforced composite material that makes the 75mm fluid head especially light and offers a comfortable and non-slip surface. SA-drag enables fine adjustment for precise panning and tilting.angenieux. a Vitec Group company. With three vertical and three horizontal grades of drag (plus 0). With a payload of up to 8.sachtler. Sachtler’s 50 years of experience in developing camera support promises dependability. For additional information.com. has introduced the Ace tripod system. the lens also incorporates a nine-blade iris.fujifilm.5mm sensor size on a digital-cinema-style camera. Both lenses are available with PL mounts (PV mounts by request) and are compatible with Angenieux’s 1. Other features include luminous barrel markings for visibility in dark shooting situations. Ace is ergonomically designed and offers an intuitive feel. Ace’s five-step counterbalance makes counterbalancing fast and simple.com. The EasyRig Mini replaces the Turtle X and features a stabilizing vest rather than a backpack to evenly distribute weight across the chest and back. visit www.7x19. as well as existing Fujinon wired and wireless units.95 pounds (including servo motors). In addition. have introduced the EasyRig Mini body-worn camera-support system. Ace is also compact. visit www. easy operation and such features as the practical parking position for spare camera screws and the long 104mm sliding range of the camera plate. The Ace fluid head has a tilt range of +90 degrees to -75 degrees. which guarantees accuracy and repeatability. Ace is ideal for smaller HDV camcorders and video-enabled DSLR cameras. For additional information. Sachtler developed the patented Synchronized Actuated drag. For additional information. The head enables camera operators to work intuitively and professionally.340mm weighs approximately 24. distances are listed in feet or meters and can be changed in the field. visit www. Additionally. The digital servo boasts 16-bit encoding. The EasyRig Mini also allows for the adjustment of the support bar in relation 90 . The PL 19-90mm covers a 31.4 pounds and features a front diameter of 162mm and a close focus of 4'5". part of Vitec Videocom.8 pounds. The Optimo 19.

The rig is also compatible with a wide range of accessories from P+S Technik and other thirdparty manufacturers. and it can also be quickly transformed into a backpack by simply unfolding the shoulder straps that are securely stored in the bag’s side pockets. visit www. Building on the success and functionality of the PS-Freestyle Rig.to the vest in height.de.410.8 pounds. for cameras between 9-13.pstechnik. For more information. The PS-Micro Rig is suited for shoulder.2 pounds. Data . visit www. a recording solution for compact HD digital-cinema cameras such as the Canon Cinema EOS C300. A new protective transport bag can store both the camera and rig together safely. For additional information. and the Mini Strong. The EasyRig Mini is available now for a recommended price of $1. crane or tripod operation.com. The EasyRig Mini is available in two models: the Mini. the PSMicro Rig is compatible with any kind of micro camera (such as the SI-2K or the SinaCam) and boasts a flyweight of only 8.16x9inc. and is also balanced for use on a Steadicam. suitable for cameras weighing up to 9 pounds. P+S Technik Launches PS-Micro Rig P+S Technik has introduced the compact and versatile PS-Micro Rig for native 3-D productions. The rig can be used with remote control or in a completely manual mode. so camera height can be tailored to each user. Codex Gets Aboard Cinema EOS Codex has begun shipping the Onboard S Recorder.

Codex’s managing director.995. which is capable of capturing highquality edit-ready files in formats including 4K (4096x2160). visit www. AJA Goes 4K with Ki Pro Quad AJA Video Systems has introduced 92 the Ki Pro Quad solid-state portable video recorder. Ben Seresin. Ki Pro Quad helps facilitate a powerful workflow for 4K.codexdigital. a scaled or cropped output is also simultaneously available for 2K or HD monitoring via dedicated SDI and HDMI connections. “Codex is committed to supporting a wide range of cameras and we are excited to work with Canon as they introduce a variety of cameras for the feature film. visit www. For more information. television and commercials markets. making it suited to such camera systems as the new Canon Cinema EOS C500. . from recording through post.is recorded onto Codex’s new Capture Drives from the HD-SDI output of the camera. The Codex Onboard M can record 4K raw files from the Cinema EOS C500 onto Codex datapacks at up to 120 fps. which is capable of originating 4K (4096x2160) motion imagery. a Codex Digital Lab or a Codex Vault S for QC.com. Codex worked with Canon during the development of the C500. to ensure that the entire workflow from recording to production is a seamless experience. “Given our experience in recording raw data.aja. Ki Pro Quad accepts raw camera output via SDI and simultaneously outputs that data via Thunderbolt. it was a natural progression for us to develop an entire workflow.com. and Martin Ruhe. The deBayered image produced by the Ki Pro Quad can also be used for real-time 4K monitoring. ASC. dailies generation and archiving.” says Marc Dando.” The Codex Onboard M Recorder was used with the C500 camera to capture the Canon promo film 4 Cities. which features material shot by cinematographers Tony Pierce-Roberts. Codex has partnered with both Vocas and Arri’s Professional Camera Accessories group to design new mounts and handheld solutions for the C300 to accommodate the Onboard S recorder. Quad HD (3840x2160). The recorder also performs deBayer processing of the raw data that can be used to produce on-board Apple ProRes recordings to SSD media. providing a fast path from camera-to-editorial with 10-bit 4:4:4 and 10-bit 4:2:2 color support. For additional information. HD. Ki Pro Quad will be available later this year through AJA’s worldwide network of resellers for $3. BSC. BSC. 2K and 4K ProRes files recorded to removable SSD media can then be used in a variety of popular nonlinear editors. The datapacks can then be loaded on a Codex Transfer Station for Mac OS X. 2K (2048x1080) and HD (1920x1080).

Six programmable 3G-SDI ports can be configured as fourin/two-out or two-in/four-out. which greatly reduce size. power and weight. Stereo 3-D output options include luma differencing. Gemini Raw also employs dual 1. while retaining the same size. Currently. uncompressed RGB 444. single-stream 1080p/2K raw up to 120 fps (over dual 3G-SDI) or. users can record raw and DNxHD-36 proxy for dailies and offline work. Users can use the DNxHD footage for fast-turnaround projects while archiving raw for future.0" 800x480 LCD touch screen for live preview and playback. Pending certification by Arri. weight and cost. and 120 fps (in 2K/HD). in some formats. Gemini Raw allows recording in high-quality HD (in DNxHD-220) and simultaneously in raw/uncompressed. stereoscopic 3-D. Gemini Raw includes a built-in 5. Gemini Raw will support both ArriRaw 16:9 up to . this innovative capability enables such configurations as quad-input record/quad-split display or single-stream 4K raw recording/4K monitoring. which supports 4K raw recording with live preview and playback to a 4K monitor. low-cost USB 3.0. Alternatively. side-by-side and anaglyph. FW-800 and Thunderbolt adapters. the creation of two identical masters (auto backup).8" SSD drives.Convergent Design Records Raw Convergent Design has unveiled the Gemini Raw. these drives support quad-stream recording of up to 1080p30/2K raw. single-stream 4K raw up to 30p. Gemini Raw offers all the features of the Gemini 4:4:4 with significantly greater processing power. Gemini Raw also boasts such features as four-camera recording/quadsplit playback (in HD) and support for Avid DN xHD (RGB and YCC). simultaneous recording of raw/dailies. higher-resolution applications. The Gemini Raw production kit includes (at no extra cost) a simple SSD transfer station compatible with widely available.

streamlined solution that can be used at any phase in the postproduction workflow. Inc. MTI Film Conveys Cortex Platform MTI Film has unveiled the Cortex platform. Convergent Design also anticipates future support for additional 2K and 4K raw cameras and higher frame rates. June 1-2. ASC CDLs and LUTs.” says David McClure.60 fps and ArriRaw 4:3 up to 48 fps. New York Street Backlot. visit www. Ultimately. which builds on the foundation of the automated. Red.backst a gew eb . 94 . Cortex Convey’s advanced project-management features include multiple deliverable templates per project. Hollywood. Its project-management features include commenting on frames or clips and creating templates with color. For additional information. a family of products that brings coherence and portability to the process of managing digital assets from the set to the screen. multi-threaded transcoding engine that supports all popular video codecs with an interface that is easy to use. Cortex Convey is a standalone application that features a powerful. The result is a simple. It includes tools for maintaining color decisions by importing and setting looks that can be exported as stills. data-centric deliverables application used in MTI Film’s Control Dailies system. the Cortex family will form a seamless solution for managing media assets from prep through post and beyond. “It either has to be reentered or is lost completely. It is a simpler and more flexible way to reliably 87 and simultaneously generate multiple. highquality file-based deliverables for all steps in the post process. generated in Cortex Capture can be exported and shared with other Cortex products at the post facility. The Cortex platform is designed to allow all the actors. including color. Full support for Weisscam/P+S Technik HD/2K raw is also planned. Cortex Capture provides onset playback of a dozen common camera formats. as well as the latest realtime GPU-accelerated demosaicing algorithms for raw camera codecs. MTI Film also plans to roll out Cortex Control Dailies to address other points in the production and post process. The first offering in the Cortex family is Cortex Convey. a simple and powerful application that includes all the functionality needed by DITs and data wranglers with a price tag of only $95. automated workflows and a one-to-many render engine. audio and burn-in options for use in dailies and throughout the post process.com. saving time and ensuring consistency. from DITs to dailies colorists to assistant editors and more. 2012 Paramount Studios. Cortex Convey includes MTI Film’s best-of-breed algorithms for down-conversion and color processing in a 32-bit floating-point pipeline. CA Booth #92 Backstage Equipment. ArriRaw. to easily share this infor- www. All metadata. including Sony SRMaster and F65. vice president of product development for MTI Film.convergent-design.co m (800 )6 92 -2 7 See us at the Cinegear Expo. DN xHD and ProRes. MTI Film has also unveiled Cortex Capture. “A lot of time and money is wasted because creative decisions and other metadata cannot be passed seamlessly from one step in the process to the next.

provides quality control tools. and make color choices while recording images. It is incorporated into an array of services and offerings at FotoKem and its affiliates. Spy and Margarita Mix/LA Studios.com. N extLab Live is simple to set up on a laptop and provides a color-control surface with an SDI interface. vice president and general manager of NextLab. With a digital-imaging technician. ➣ 95 . Additionally.com.0 can manage digital camera files and metadata. It enables cinematographers to load a look-up table.mation while remaining focused on their central task.fotokem. visit www. rugged cart loaded with hardware running the software on set or near location. visit www. NextLab v3. FotoKem’s N extLab Mobile is a unified. supporting Arri Alexa and Sony F65 in their native raw formats. FotoKem’s N extLab Live is an application that supports on-set color correction directly from digital camera feeds in real time. FotoKem Offers NextLab Version 3. The N extLab software securely stores media. N extLab v3. The N extLab Mobile unit has been redesigned with a smaller footprint and a sturdier enclosure. color management and transcoding. complex application. “Our NextLab software solutions bring creative flexibility to filmmakers in new ways that adapt to how productions want to work.” For additional information. generate a color-decision list. Designed and developed inhouse.mtifilm.” For additional information. Silicon Imaging and the Canon DSLR and Cinema EOS lines.0 also incorporates the Academy Color Encoding Specifications (ACES) architecture. including Keep Me Posted. audio syncing.” says Tom Vice. archives to LTO.0 FotoKem has unveiled the newest version of its NextLab software and on-set system. undistracted by a large. Red Epic and Scarlet. “Our focus is solving on-set needs and helping to integrate production and post.

Autodesk Redesigns Smoke Autodesk. a leader in specialized visual-effects software. a redesigned version of the all-in-one video editing and visual-effects tool for the Mac. work interactively with highresolution media throughout their projects and deliver high-end content. effects and archiving. visit www. Smoke can help editors simplify their workflow. Smoke 2013’s intuitive. Smoke 2013 features a unified creative workflow that brings powerful node-based compositing right in the timeline. Additionally. industry-standard editing conventions and proven Autodesk creative tools. Powerful ConnectFX node-based compositing inside the timeline enables high-end effects and advanced compositing without having to leave the editorial environment. Smoke’s robust toolset includes proven high-end finishing tools such as Action for true 3-D compositing. Smoke 2013 will be available this fall for $3. For more information. Color Warper for professional grading and color matching. has released . GenArts Packs Monsters GT v7 GenArts Inc. bringing true high-end video effects to flexible desktop and mobile workflows. and Master Keyer for one-click chroma keying and stereoscopic 3-D editing and effects..com. Inc.495 per license. all-in-one user interface combines track-based editorial.autodesk. MediaHub offers a modern approach to working natively with the most common formats. has unveiled Smoke 2013 video-editing software. Smoke 2013 runs on the most recent generation of Apple iMac and MacBook Pro systems using high-bandwidth Thunderbolt storage and IO. centrally manage their media. facilitating the management of all project media from ingest to edit.

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fire and water effects without spending hours building the effects from scratch. new effects and enhancements to create a more streamlined workflow. Eyeon Fusion. Avid Studio. The Natural Phenomena theme pack and the 11 mini-packs are available for Autodesk systems. visit www. security-camera monitoring. Monsters GT is available in 11 mini-packs for $99 apiece and a Natural Phenomena theme pack for $299. resolution independence.genarts. The N atural Phenomena theme pack features 19 creative problem-solving tools that realistically simulate weather. Avid Releases iPad Editing App Avid has released its first video-editing application for the iPad. GPU acceleration for improved render times and floating point processing for improved image quality. time-based image trails and dozens of other looks. the latest addition to the company’s Sapphire Accents line. Avid has made the Avid Studio app for the iPad easy enough for first-time users yet sophisticated enough for more 98 . The complete collection of all 59 Monsters GT effects is also available for a starting price of $499. The Monsters GT mini-packs each feature 2-5 effects and are ideal for creating project-specific effects like film burns. atmospheric. Assimilate Scratch and Sony Vegas and deliver specific types of effects in a single.Monsters GT v7. which is available in the Apple App Store. Adobe After Effects.com. Designed to meet the demand for both realistic and original looks. Additional features of Monsters GT v7 include enhanced sprite quality and smoother particle motion. For the first time. For additional information. convenient package. night vision. fluids. Monsters GT features a wide range of more than 50 exceptional effects that enrich every artist’s visual-effects portfolio so they can create extraordinary imagery. The Foundry N uke.

Remote Phosphor Technology eliminates coloraccuracy issues with an extended CRI of over 95.” says Anthony Cuomo. easy-to-understand how-to guide.” For additional information. Users can get started fast with an included. “The added production efficiency that the new Lens Driver System generates will be appreciated by a wide range of end users. the brightest digital soft source designed specifically for image capture. cameras and more. Offering frame-by-frame editing accuracy and access to all kinds of media. Avid Studio for iPad allows users to quickly and easily create and share highly professional multimedia experiences. photos and audio already in their iPad library. effects and a soundtrack. Avid Studio for iPad allows users to begin editing with ease by offering access to any videos. it will give us the opportunity to offer a larger variety of cameras and lenses for integration into our camera robotics systems. Multiple audio tracks also allow for easy layering of music. “Because of its universality. or media that can be imported from iTunes.com. Facebook and more — or export projects to Avid Studio software..trucolorlighting. Avid Studio for iPad takes full advantage of touch capabilities to offer a fun. NAB 2012 Winner: Introducing TruColor HS. ● HS Bright idea. which motorizes zoom. See TruColor HS at Cine Gear Expo Visit www. has introduced the Universal Lens Driver System. a leading provider of camera robotics and control systems.com 99 . audio and sound effects. It is fully adjustable and easily adapted to any manufacturer’s lens and can also be used on most cameras with integral nonmotorized lenses.avid. where they can continue editing with even more advanced tools. the Lens Driver supports three methods of control — Serial RS232/422. visit www. make precision edits using the Timeline and enhance their movie creations with high-quality transitions.advanced editors.com/avidstudioapp. Users can then arrange clips in the Story- board. Telemetrics Inc. Ethernet IP and analog (standard broadcast lens interface) — and is specially designed to perform smooth motion transitions. focus and iris functions. They can share movies directly to YouTube. wherever they want to.telemetricsinc. easy and professionallevel editing experience. visit www. vice president and general manager. For additional information. Additionally. Telemetrics Drives Lenses Telemetrics Inc.

International Marketplace OppCam Grip Systems for ex-demo and used equipment! SUPER16INC.COM Top-notch camera and lens servicing Ask about Ultra 16! www.com Toll-free: 877-376-6582FREE ESTIMATES American Cinematographer .de 100 June 2012 T: 607-642-3352bernie@super16inc.movietech.

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Advertiser’s Index
16x9, Inc. 100 Aadyn Technology 4 Abel Cine Tech 41 AC 1 Adorama 9, 45 Aerocrane Sales & Leasing 87 Aja Video Systems, Inc. 27 Alan Gordon Enterprises 100 Arri 5 AZGrip 101 Backstage Equipment, Inc. 94 Barger-Lite 6, 101 Birns & Sawyer 101 Blackmagic Design, Inc. 21 Burrell Enterprises, Inc. 100 Cammate 6 Cavision Enterprises 43 Chapman/Leonard Studio Equipment Inc. 57 Chimera 47 Cinematography Electronics 88 Cinekinetic 100 Clairmont Film & Digital 15 Cleveland Film Commission 51 Codex Digital Ltd. 11 Convergent Design 67 Cooke Optics 17 Creative Handbook 81 CTT Exp & Rentals 79 Dadco LLC 91 Deluxe C2 Denecke 101 Dolby Laboratories, Inc. 49 Eastman Kodak 64a-l, C4 EFD USA, Inc 23 Film Gear 93 Filmotechnic Canada Ltd. 6 Filmtools 90 Fujifilm North America 25 Glidecam Industries C3 Grip Factory Munich/GFM 95 Hollywood Post Alliance 96 Hollywood Rentals 98 Hive 60 Innovision 100 J.L. Fisher 31 K5600 13 Kino Flo 73 Koerner Camera Systems 86 Lee Filters 82 Lighttools 19 Lights! Action! Co. 101 Los Angeles Film Festival 97 Maccam 92 Maine Media 93 Manios Optical 100 Matthews Studio Equip. 69 Metal Toys 89 Mole-Richardson Company 30 Movcam Tech. Co., Ltd. 59 Movie Tech AG 100, 101 NBC/Universal 29 New York Film Academy 71 Nila Inc. 72 Oppenheimer Camera Prod. 85, 100 P+S Technik 101 Panther Gmbh 87, 89 PC&E 86 Pille Film Gmbh 100 Polecam Ltd 79 Powermills 101 PRG 99 Pro8mm 100 Rag Place, The 88 Rosco Laboratories 83 Scheimpflug Digital 61 Schneider Optics 2 Servicevision USA 50 Siggraph 103 Super16 Inc. 100 Thales Angenieux 32-33 Tiffen 7 VF Gadgets, Inc. 100 Videouniversity 101 Visionary Forces 91 Visual Products 95 Welch Integrated 107 Willy’s Widgets 100 www.theasc.com 88, 96, 102

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Cundey Stefan Czapsky David Darby Allen Daviau Roger Deakins Jan DeBont Thomas Del Ruth Bruno Delbonnel Peter Deming Jim Denault Caleb Deschanel Ron Dexter Craig Di Bona George Spiro Dibie Ernest Dickerson Billy Dickson Bill Dill Anthony Dod Mantle Stuart Dryburgh Bert Dunk Lex DuPont John Dykstra Richard Edlund Eagle Egilsson Frederick Elmes Robert Elswit Geoffrey Erb Scott Farrar Jon Fauer Don E. Liu Walt Lloyd Bruce Logan Gordon Lonsdale Emmanuel Lubezki Julio G. Vice President John C. Vice President Victor J. Kemper. Carpenter James L. Vice President Owen Roizman. Jensen Frank Johnson Shelly Johnson Jeffrey Jur Adam Kane Stephen M. Macat Glen MacPherson Paul Maibaum Constantine Makris Denis Maloney Isidore Mankofsky Christopher Manley Michael D. Kimball Adam Kimmel Alar Kivilo David Klein Richard Kline George Koblasa Fred J. David Mullen Dennis Muren Fred Murphy Hiro Narita Guillermo Navarro Michael B. O’Shea Rodney Taylor Ron Garcia Sol Negrin Kenneth Zunder ACTIVE MEMBERS Thomas Ackerman Lance Acord Marshall Adams Lloyd Ahern II Russ Alsobrook Howard A. Hora Tom Houghton Gil Hubbs Shane Hurlbut Tom Hurwitz Judy Irola Mark Irwin Levie Isaacks Peter James Johnny E. Katz Ken Kelsch Victor J. Cox Jeff Cronenweth Richard Crudo Dean R. Kuras George La Fountaine Edward Lachman Ken Lamkin Jacek Laskus Denis Lenoir John R. Christensen Joan Churchill Curtis Clark Peter L. Meade Suki Medencevic Chris Menges Rexford Metz Anastas Michos Douglas Milsome Dan Mindel Charles Minsky Claudio Miranda George Mooradian Donald A. O’Shea Vince Pace Anthony Palmieri Phedon Papamichael Daniel Pearl Edward J. Burum Bill Butler Frank B. Sergeant-at-Arms MEMBERS OF THE BOARD John Bailey Stephen H. Margulies Barry Markowitz Steve Mason Clark Mathis Don McAlpine Don McCuaig Seamus McGarvey Robert McLachlan Geary McLeod Greg McMurry Steve McNutt Terry K. Chressanthis T. Pei James Pergola Dave Perkal Lowell Peterson Wally Pfister Bill Pope Steven Poster Tom Priestley Jr. Secretary Stephen Lighthill. Negrin Sol Negrin Bill Neil Alex Nepomniaschy John Newby Yuri Neyman Sam Nicholson Crescenzo Notarile David B.C. Rodrigo Prieto Robert Primes Frank Prinzi Richard Quinlan Declan Quinn Earl Rath 104 June 2012 American Cinematographer . Flinn III. Koenekamp Lajos Koltai Pete Kozachik Neil Krepela Willy Kurant Ellen M. Morgan Kramer Morgenthau Peter Moss M. Treasurer Frederic Goodich. Leonetti Matthew Leonetti Andrew Lesnie Peter Levy Matthew Libatique Charlie Lieberman Stephen Lighthill Karl Walter Lindenlaub John Lindley Robert F. Byers Bobby Byrne Patrick Cady Antonio Calvache Paul Cameron Russell P.American Society of Cinematographers Roster OFFICERS – 2011-’12 Michael Goi. James Anderson Peter Anderson Tony Askins Charles Austin Christopher Baffa James Bagdonas King Baggot John Bailey Michael Ballhaus Andrzej Bartkowiak John Bartley Bojan Bazelli Frank Beascoechea Affonso Beato Mat Beck Dion Beebe Bill Bennett Andres Berenguer Carl Berger Gabriel Beristain Steven Bernstein Ross Berryman Oliver Bokelberg Michael Bonvillain Richard Bowen David Boyd Russell Boyd Jonathan Brown Don Burgess Stephen H. Kemper Francis Kenny Isidore Mankofsky Robert Primes Owen Roizman Kees Van Oostrum Haskell Wexler Vilmos Zsigmond ALTERNATES Michael D. Anderson Jr. Flinn III Larry Fong Ron Fortunato Jonathan Freeman Tak Fujimoto Alex Funke Steve Gainer Robert Gantz Ron Garcia David Geddes Dejan Georgevich Michael Goi Stephen Goldblatt Paul Goldsmith Frederic Goodich Victor Goss Jack Green Adam Greenberg Robbie Greenberg Xavier Grobet Alexander Gruszynski Changwei Gu Rick Gunter Rob Hahn Gerald Hirschfeld Henner Hofmann Adam Holender Ernie Holzman John C. Kemper Wayne Kennan Francis Kenny Glenn Kershaw Darius Khondji Gary Kibbe Jan Kiesser Jeffrey L. Carter Alan Caso Michael Chapman Rodney Charters James A. Nowell Rene Ohashi Daryn Okada Thomas Olgeirsson Woody Omens Miroslav Ondricek Michael D. Anderson III Howard A. FauntLeRoy Gerald Feil Steven Fierberg Mauro Fiore John C. Collister Jack Cooperman Jack Couffer Vincent G. Burum Richard Crudo George Spiro Dibie Richard Edlund Fred Elmes Michael Goi Victor J. President Richard Crudo. Morgan Donald M.

Sr. Rodli Domenic Rom Andy Romanoff Frederic Rose Daniel Rosen Dana Ross Bill Russell Kish Sadhvani David Samuelson Steve Schklair Peter K. Frank Raymond Tami Reiker Robert Richardson Anthony B. Stevens David Stockton Rogier Stoffers Vittorio Storaro Harry Stradling Jr. Al drin Jr. Knapp Karl Kresser Chet Kucinski Chuck Lee Doug Leighton Lou Levinson Suzanne Lezotte Grant Loucks Howard Lukk Andy Maltz Steven E. Mills George Milton Mike Mimaki Michael Morelli Dash Morrison Nolan Murdock Dan Muscarella Iain A. Peter Martin www. Wagner Mandy Walker Michael Watkins Michael Weaver Jonathan West Haskell Wexler Jack Whitman Gordon Willis Dariusz Wolski Ralph Woolsey Peter Wunstorf Robert Yeoman Richard Yuricich Jerzy Zielinski Vilmos Zsigmond Kenneth Zunder ASSOCIATE MEMBERS Alan Albert Richard Aschman Kay Baker Joseph J. Bill McDonald Karen McHugh Andy McIntyre Stan Miller Walter H. Steven E. Bruce McCandless II Larry Parker D. Shefter Leon Silverman Garrett Smith Timothy E. Richard Hart Robert Harvey Josh Haynie Charles Herzfeld Larry Hezzelwood Frieder Hochheim Bob Hoffman Vinny Hogan Cliff Hsui Robert C. Richmond Bill Roe Owen Roizman Pete Romano Charles Rosher Jr. Barber Craig Barron Thomas M. Tawil Ira Tiffen Steve Tiffen Arthur Tostado Jeffrey Treanor Bill Turner Stephan Ukas-Bradley Mark Van Horne Richard Vetter Dedo Weigert Evans Wetmore Franz Wieser Beverly Wood Jan Yarbrough Hoyt Yeatman Irwin M. Jr. Edwin E. Michael Collins Bob Fisher David MacDonald Cpt. Jr. Schnitzler Walter Schonfeld Wayne Schulman Juergen Schwinzer Steven Scott Alec Shapiro Don Shapiro Milton R. Six Michael Slovis Dennis L. Manios. Gresch Jim Hannafin William Hansard Bill Hansard. Neil Otto Nemenz Ernst Nettmann Tony Ngai Mickel Niehenke Jeff Okun Marty Oppenheimer Walt Ordway Ahmad Ouri Michael Parker Warren Parker Dhanendra Patel Kristin Petrovich Ed Phillips Nick Phillips Joshua Pines Carl Porcello Howard Preston David Pringle Phil Radin Christopher Reyna Colin Ritchie Eric G. Armstrong Col. Hummel Roy Isaia George Joblove Joel Johnson John Johnston Marker Karahadian Frank Kay Debbie Kennard Milton Keslow Robert Keslow Douglas Kirkland Mark Kirkland Timothy J. Young Michael Zacharia Bob Zahn Nazir Zaidi Michael Zakula Les Zellan HONORARY MEMBERS Col. DeMattos Gary Demos Mato Der Avanessian Kevin Dillon David Dodson Judith Doherty Cyril Drabinsky Jesse Dylan Jonathan Erland Ray Feeney William Feightner Phil Feiner Jimmy Fisher Scott Fleischer Thomas Fletcher Gilles Galerne Salvatore Giarratano Richard B. Manios. Blakely Mitchell Bogdanowicz Michael Bravin William Brodersen Garrett Brown Ronald D.J U N E 2 0 1 2 Richard Rawlings Jr. Smith Kimberly Snyder Stefan Sonnenfeld John L. Ball Amnon Band Carly M. Glickman John A. David Stump Tim Suhrstedt Peter Suschitzky Alfred Taylor Jonathan Taylor Rodney Taylor William Taylor Don Thorin John Toll Mario Tosi Salvatore Totino Luciano Tovoli Jost Vacano Theo Van de Sande Eric Van Haren Noman Kees Van Oostrum Checco Varese Ron Vargas Mark Vargo Amelia Vincent William Wages Roy H.theasc. Sprung Joseph N. Barron Larry Barton Wolfgang Baumler Bob Beitcher Mark Bender Bruce Berke Bob Bianco Steven A. Burdett Reid Burns Vincent Carabello Jim Carter Leonard Chapman Mark Chiolis Denny Clairmont Adam Clark Cary Clayton Dave Cole Michael Condon Robert B. Giuseppe Rotunno Philippe Rousselot Juan Ruiz-Anchia Marvin Rush Paul Ryan Eric Saarinen Alik Sakharov Mikael Salomon Harris Savides Roberto Schaefer Tobias Schliessler Aaron Schneider Nancy Schreiber Fred Schuler John Schwartzman John Seale Christian Sebaldt Dean Semler Ben Seresin Eduardo Serra Steven Shaw Richard Shore Newton Thomas Sigel Steven Silver John Simmons Sandi Sissel Santosh Sivan Bradley B. Creamer Grover Crisp Peter Crithary Daniel Curry Ross Danielson Carlos D. Brian Spruill June 2012 105 . Smith Roland “Ozzie” Smith Reed Smoot Bing Sokolsky Peter Sova Dante Spinotti Terry Stacey Ueli Steiger Peter Stein Tom Stern Robert M. Neil A. Jr.com Robert Mastronardi Joe Matza Albert Mayer.

One such client noticed Adams’ interest in making 8mm films and invited him to watch a TV-show shoot on the Universal backlot. he began shooting music videos. among others. West Va. Godfrey photo by Douglas Kirkland. Kaalapani. Before the Rains and Tahaan. Iruvar and Dil Se. ● 106 June 2012 Photo of Clubhouse by Isidore Mankofsky. His honors include Best Cinematography N ational Awards for the features Perumthachan. Adams. his passion for motion pictures was kindled at an early age. where he landed a job at the Eastman Kodak Co. he became the first recipient of the ASC Bud Stone Award of Distinction at this year’s ASC Awards ceremony. Bokelberg won a Kodak Vision Award in 2000 for the feature The Citizen. Sivan Join Society N ew active member Marshall Adams. and he credits his exposure to American Cinematographer with focusing his sights on cinematography. in Morgantown. an experience that cemented Adams’ desire to work in the motion-picture business. and on series that included Babylon Five and Felicity. and went on to earn numerous awards for his work as a director of photography through the 1980s and ’90s. ISC grew up in Kerala. he has also notched numerous credits as a director on features such as Halo. He served as a liaison between Kodak and the cinematography community. Oliver Bokelberg. The Terrorist. Charms Incidents. BVK was born in Hamburg. and his place within the community was recognized early on: Godfrey became an associate member of the ASC in January 1956. ASC. In 1995. and he was later accepted into N ew York University’s undergraduate film program. BVK. he shot Thomas McCarthy’s The Station Agent. Morgan. respectively. Bokelberg. which he followed with a string of independent features. The son of a renowned filmmaker. ISC. ASC. Upon graduating. ASC. Sivan became a founding member of the Indian Society of Cinematographers. he moved to Los Angeles.Clubhouse News In Memoriam: ASC Associate Fred Godfrey Associate member Dennis Fred Godfrey died on March 22 at the age of 84. The Agency. where he climbed the ranks and eventually worked as a gaffer on features such as Block Party. 1927.. . Santosh Sivan. Godfrey was a key figure of the ASC Awards Committee for many years. For his service to the Society and the industry as a whole. Godfrey was born on May 28. and they have since also collaborated on The Visitor and Win Win. He entered the industry through the electric department. shorts and documentaries. lighting by Donald M. where his father worked as an architect and was frequently hired by members of the entertainment industry. He earned ASC Award nominations in 2007 and 2008 for the pilots Raines and My Own Worst Enemy. he began working for his father as a film runner and editor’s assistant. Mohiniyattam. ASC. Bokelberg’s first feature credit was American Cinematographer From top: Marshall Adams. and at the Maisha Film Lab in Africa. Adams stepped up to cinematographer in 2000. Baby Geniuses and Gods and Monsters. ASC. ASC. Kojak. Monk and CSI: NY. Oliver Bokelberg. As a teenager. and since then has earned credits on the series Alias. Germany. In 2002. India. He graduated from the Film and Television Institute of India in 1984. where his father had a photography studio. While continuing to work as a cinematographer. ASC. Santosh Sivan. After graduating from Washington State College. but grew up in California. He teaches cinematography at the Film and Television Institute and Whistling Woods in India. Minn. ASC was born in Minneapolis.

com/workshops . Never Stop Networking. Sponsored by ® Guarantee your seat by Registering at Online Now www.Never Stop Learning.studentfilmmakers.

Essentially. for his body of work. What recent books. In different ways they both blended film. and I learned from them all. It was nothing that a few insurance claims and an on-set medic couldn’t fix! What is the best professional advice you’ve ever received? The film business is like a prizefight: It’s not how many times you get knocked down that counts. I enjoy directing and producing as well as shooting.How has ASC membership impacted your life and career? matter engine of the starship Enterprise. what film made the strongest impression on you? Mysterious Island (1961). Francis Kenny. ASC Have you made any memorable blunders? I’ve made plenty. at Paramount. who was part of the Charles If you weren’t a cinematographer. do you most admire? Caleb Deschanel. past or present. Which ASC cinematographers recommended you for membership? How did you get your first break in the business? Richard Kline. What could be better than giant crabs. It’s a very ambitious virtual-reality project that made me reflect on how far we’ve come in the past 30 years. bees and Jules Verne living under the ocean in his private submarine? What sparked your interest in photography? My father had me shooting 8mm home movies from the age of 8. Creating something that simply does not exist in today’s world is tremendously challenging and satisfying. it’s how many times you get up and go again. Kemper. Martin. Sitting in the supersaturated red light in my bathroom-turned-darkroom and watching black-and-white images magically appear on blank paper got me hooked on making and manipulating images. Richard Crudo and Victor J. The effect was based on my It’s a lifelong dream realized. Where did you train and/or study? I earned undergraduate and graduate degrees at UCLA’s School of Fine Arts. I spent about three years blowing glass at UCLA. I got an interview at Paramount to work on Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979) and was hired by Bob Weiss to create the Matter-Anti.. it brings the magic back into the process of making movies. design and instead? computers into new artistic expressions. group of people. or genres you would like to try? I’m hooked on futuristic. but my first real passion was still photography. Do you have any favorite genres. and I eventually took on the on-set visual-effects be included in this remarkably talented and amazingly dedicated lighting for the entire film. For me. Sam Nicholson. and then began I would most likely be a fine-art still photographer.Close-up Which cinematographers. XXIT. Who were your early teachers or mentors? My most influential teachers at UCLA were my graduate professors John Whitney Sr. When you were a child.R. who later became known as the father of computer animation. Robin Hobb and Michael Sullivan. I enjoy collaborating with other very talented cinematographers and What are some of your key artistic influences? a creative team to tell stories. it set a new standard that will last for a long time. films or artworks have inspired you? I generally read science fiction and fantasy: George R. It’s also very humbling and gratifying to lighting designs. high-concept fantasy and historical period pieces. If I worked outside film and television. The Black Stallion and The Right Stuff contain some of the most memorable images in contemporary films. They were generally related to pyro or practical effects when we were shooting lots of miniatures. and John Neuhart. manipulating and shooting the abstract light effects that eventually became my thesis in abstract visual design and light sculpture. ASC. somewhat like Blade Runner did in the 1980s. I thought Inception was the greatest high-concept film to be released in years. ● What has been your most satisfying moment on a project? I recently screened my short film for Canon’s new C300 camera. I think that The Patriot. 108 June 2012 American Cinematographer . what might you be doing Eames group.

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com/go/onfilm. For an extended interview with Christian Sebaldt. including Parasomnia. FeardotCom. seeing the final results is still an astonishing and humbling experience. It’s reliable and easy to work with. CSI is approaching its 300th episode. and we’re still pushing creatively. His credits also include more than 40 other narrative credits. call (800) 621-film. which also earned him a 2010 Emmy® Award. and the audience understands the story it tells. smooth texture makes everyone look good. 2012. and its silky. Film is a point-and-shoot instrument. He is the longestserving director of photography on that series. All these films were shot on Kodak motion picture film. Race to Space.ONFILM C H R I S T I A N S E B A L D T. For me. Photography: © 2012 Douglas Kirkland . visit www. © Eastman Kodak Company. Resident Evil: Apocalypse.kodak.” Christian Sebaldt. To order Kodak motion picture film. It’s a visual medium. A S C “My images are the result of a collaboration of so many bright minds. and The Dark. ASC has photographed 45 episodes of CSI: Crime Scene Investigation over the past four seasons. One glance at a well-crafted image. Bratz. and we must create with this in mind.

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