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Tahoe Magazine Summer 2012

Tahoe Magazine Summer 2012

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Tahoe Magazine is a product of the Tahoe Daily Tribune, North Lake Tahoe Bonanza, Sierra Sun and Lake Tahoe Action. All content is copyrighted, May 2012. Tahoe Magazine strives for accuracy and is not responsible if event details change after publication.
Tahoe Magazine is a product of the Tahoe Daily Tribune, North Lake Tahoe Bonanza, Sierra Sun and Lake Tahoe Action. All content is copyrighted, May 2012. Tahoe Magazine strives for accuracy and is not responsible if event details change after publication.

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Published by: Sierra Nevada Media Group on May 24, 2012
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11403 Brockway Road • Truckee • 530.587.

6681
10115 Donner Pass Road • Historic Downtown Truckee • 530.550.8800
PATIO FURNITURE Tropitone • O.W. Lee • Mallin • Telescope
Summer Classics • Lane Venture • Polywood • Kingsley Bate • Lloyd Flanders • Woodard
Huge Selection, In-Stock & Ready to Go!
All In-Stock Furniture Marked 15-40% Off MSRP
BARBECUES
Vermont Castings
Green Egg • Fire Magic
Calise • Napoleon • Primo
Summer
Savor Sweet
TRUCKEE/NORTH TAHOE’S LARGEST SELECTION
PATIO FURNITURE • SPAS • BARBECUES
FIREPITS • OUTDOOR KITCHENS • ACCESSORIES
FREE
LOCAL
DELIVERY
Village at Northstar
In the
Mountain
On the
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 2 5/11/2012 2:34:00 PM
Zephyr Cove 775 588 6130
190 Highway 50
South Lake Tahoe 530 544 2121
989 Tahoe Keys Boulevard
/ChaseInternational @ChaseRealEstate
Two
States
P A M
LUSBY
775
843 9688
One Great
Company
MONI CA
PORTER
530
400 4484
A D E L E
LUCAS
530
545 0888
J I M
WIRE
530
314 9008
B R E N T
JOHNSON
530
416 2625
MARGE
HAUGE
775
720 5153
SHEI L A
EDNER
530
545 0392
S C O T T
PEARCE
530
318 1030
RYON
GRAY
530
318 9274
J ENNI FER
FORTUNE
530
318 9286
A N J A
BUCHHOLZ
530
318 4179
BROOKE
HERNANDEZ
530
314 9766
S T A R
BROOKS
530
318 5818
D O U G
ROSNER
530
314 9221
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 166 5/12/2012 2:05:32 PM
11403 Brockway Road • Truckee • 530.587.6681
10115 Donner Pass Road • Historic Downtown Truckee • 530.550.8800
PATIO FURNITURE Tropitone • O.W. Lee • Mallin • Telescope
Summer Classics • Lane Venture • Polywood • Kingsley Bate • Lloyd Flanders • Woodard
Huge Selection, In-Stock & Ready to Go!
All In-Stock Furniture Marked 15-40% Off MSRP
BARBECUES
Vermont Castings
Green Egg • Fire Magic
Calise • Napoleon • Primo
Summer
Savor Sweet
TRUCKEE/NORTH TAHOE’S LARGEST SELECTION
PATIO FURNITURE • SPAS • BARBECUES
FIREPITS • OUTDOOR KITCHENS • ACCESSORIES
FREE
LOCAL
DELIVERY
Village at Northstar
In the
Mountain
On the
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 3 5/11/2012 3:45:24 PM
SAVE
30%
OFF
UP TO
YOUR RENTAL
WITH THIS COUPON
Certain restrictions apply. See store
for details. Offer valid for the 2012
summer season. Cannot be combined
with any other offer. Mention this ad
to receive discount offer.
TAHOESUMMAG
*TAHOESUMMAG*
A ride up 2.4 miles in the Heavenly Gondola will leave you
breathless as you take in the panoramic views of Lake
Tahoe. On your way up, stop at the Observation Deck
for a latte at Cafe Blue or to pick up unique Heavenly
souvenirs at Gondola Sports. Visit SkiHeavenly.com or call 1-800-HEAVENLY.
Gondola Sightseeing and Adventure Peak at Heavenly
SIGHTSEEING | TAMARACK LODGE AND BAR 9150’ | TUBING | HIKING TRAILS | CHILDREN’S ACTIVITIES
Available at the Marriott location,
across from the Heavenly Gondola
Junior Bikes
Adult Comfort Bikes
Full Suspension Mountain Bikes
Helmets included with all rentals
OR RESERVE ONLI NE
Bike Rentals
at Heavenly
530-542-2859 | WWW. RENTBIKES.ORG/TAHOEMAG
Partners in
Outdoor Recreation
Summer2012 TAHOE magazine 5
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 4 5/11/2012 3:45:25 PM
SAVE
30%
OFF
UP TO
YOUR RENTAL
WITH THIS COUPON
Certain restrictions apply. See store
for details. Offer valid for the 2012
summer season. Cannot be combined
with any other offer. Mention this ad
to receive discount offer.
TAHOESUMMAG
*TAHOESUMMAG*
A ride up 2.4 miles in the Heavenly Gondola will leave you
breathless as you take in the panoramic views of Lake
Tahoe. On your way up, stop at the Observation Deck
for a latte at Cafe Blue or to pick up unique Heavenly
souvenirs at Gondola Sports. Visit SkiHeavenly.com or call 1-800-HEAVENLY.
Gondola Sightseeing and Adventure Peak at Heavenly
SIGHTSEEING | TAMARACK LODGE AND BAR 9150’ | TUBING | HIKING TRAILS | CHILDREN’S ACTIVITIES
Available at the Marriott location,
across from the Heavenly Gondola
Junior Bikes
Adult Comfort Bikes
Full Suspension Mountain Bikes
Helmets included with all rentals
OR RESERVE ONLI NE
Bike Rentals
at Heavenly
530-542-2859 | WWW. RENTBIKES.ORG/TAHOEMAG
Partners in
Outdoor Recreation
Just minutes from Emerald Bay is a year-round oasis waiting to be explored.
Historic lodging, camping, boat rentals, marina, Rum Runner Emerald Bay
cruises, bike rentals, live music, outdoor dining at The Beacon Bar & Grill and
more! Visit camprichardson.com or call 800 544 1801.
Your moment. Your memories. Your playground.
FOREST SERVICE Camp Richardson is operated under Special Use
Permit with the U.S. Forest Service, Lake Tahoe Basin
Management Unit.

1900 Jameson Beach Rd., South Lake Tahoe
We’ve got over 100 ways to get you and
your family on the lake!
Rentals (Top Quality Equipment)
· JeI SkIs & Seu Doos · SkI BouIs
· SuII BouIs · PufIy BouIs · PufusuIIIng
Tahoe Thunder & Windsong
· PfIvuIe ChufIefs up Io 24 Pussengefs
· DuIIy Toufs · CousI Guufd CefIIhed
South Shore Water shuttle
WIIh sIops uI TImbef Cove MufInu, Cump
BIchufdson MufInu und LukesIde MufInu.
530-541-4FUN (4386)
www.ucIIon-wuIefspofIs.com
Timher Cove Marina - 530-541-4386
1-1/2 miles west of the casinos (across from Safeway).
Camp Richardson Marina - 530-542-6570
Highway 89 on the way to Emerald Bay.
Lakeside Marina - 530-541-9800
North of the casinos 1/2 mile.
Meeks Bay - 530-525-5588
West Shore Lake Tahoe.
Summer2012 TAHOE magazine 5
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 5 5/11/2012 3:45:25 PM
775.588.6276
392 Kingsbury Grade · Lake Tahoe, NV
Dinner:
Sunday thru Thursday • 4:30pm to 9:30pm
Friday and Saturday • 4:30pm to 10:00pm
Come Join Us For Happy Hour In The Lounge
Mon thru Fri • 4:30 to 6:30
Delicious appetizers & cocktails starting at $4
Nestled halfway up the mountain just minutes from the
bustling casinos of downtown, this cliffside restaurant
offers a spectacular view of Lake Tahoe and the Mountains.
Featuring fresh fish specialties, award-winning prime rib,
and the Original Hot Chocolate Lava Cake, our renowned
chefs have tailored a menu to compliment local cuisine while
introducing a hint of the exotic.
This Forest is still
Standing Tall.
Named One of America’s
Top 100 Critical Access Hospitals
One of America's Top 100
Critical Access Hospitals
Tahoe Forest Hospital was recently named one of the top
100 critical access hospitals in the United States.
Critical access hospitals are recognized as the safety net
to communities across America. And only four California
hospitals earned this prestigious acknowledgement from
iVantage Health, endorsed by the National Rural Health
Association.
Results were measured across 56 different performance
metrics, including quality, outcomes, patient perspective,
affordability and efficiency.
Over the last ten years, Tahoe Forest Hospital has reinvested
in its technology, services and people.These
changes have led to national recog-
nition as a leader in rural healthcare.
For details on our continuing
efforts, go to tfhd.com.
6 Summer2012 TAHOE magazine
TotalRewardsTahoe.com
LAKE TAHOE OUTDOOR
ARENA AT HARVEYS
2012 SUMMER CONCERT SERIES
Shows subject to change or cancellation. Must be 21 or older to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.
®
Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2012, Caesars License Company, LLC. T1600-12-94
Ticketmaster.com or ApeConcerts.com
ALL SHOwS ARE ON-SALE NOw!
brad
paisley
the band perry
easton corbin
saturday, July 28
chicago
doobie
brothers
Friday, July 13
50th anniVersary tour!
the
beach boys
sunday, July 15
maroon 5
JaVier colon
saturday, July 21
SOLD OUT!
Journey
pat benatar
Featuring
neil giraldo
loVerboy
sunday, July 22
toby keith
brantley gilbert
wednesday, august 8
norah
Jones
sunday, august 12
Joe
cocker
huey lewis
& the news
Friday, august 17
sammy
hagar
the red
rocker
saturday, september 1
sugarland
lauren alaina
canaan smith
saturday, august 18
Lauren
aLaina
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 6 5/11/2012 3:45:27 PM
6 Summer2012 TAHOE magazine
Whimsical
Weddings
TotalRewardsTahoe.com
LAKE TAHOE OUTDOOR
ARENA AT HARVEYS
2012 SUMMER CONCERT SERIES
Shows subject to change or cancellation. Must be 21 or older to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.
®
Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2012, Caesars License Company, LLC. T1600-12-94
Ticketmaster.com or ApeConcerts.com
ALL SHOwS ARE ON-SALE NOw!
brad
paisley
the band perry
easton corbin
saturday, July 28
chicago
doobie
brothers
Friday, July 13
50th anniVersary tour!
the
beach boys
sunday, July 15
maroon 5
JaVier colon
saturday, July 21
SOLD OUT!
Journey
pat benatar
Featuring
neil giraldo
loVerboy
sunday, July 22
toby keith
brantley gilbert
wednesday, august 8
norah
Jones
sunday, august 12
Joe
cocker
huey lewis
& the news
Friday, august 17
sammy
hagar
the red
rocker
saturday, september 1
sugarland
lauren alaina
canaan smith
saturday, august 18
Lauren
aLaina
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 7 5/11/2012 3:45:27 PM
inside
26 Life is good
38 Getting to know Tahoe
42 Boating
50 Life down under 52 Best beaches
53 Rafting & kayaking
58 Easy does it dining
66 Dining guides
72 Music is everywhere
84 Cal-Neva ghost stories
91 Museums for everyone
96 e unsolved mystery train wreck
100 Recreation map
108 Rock climbing
112 Tahoe trail running
116 Hiking from lake to sky
132 Celebrity golf tourney
134 South Shore special events
142 Donner Lake Triathlon
145 North Shore & Truckee special events
160 Advertising directory
Charming
Chapels
Whimsical
Weddings
32
Capturing
Tahoe
Te Rat Pack’s
cherished play spot
64
Good
Libations
124
Grant
Korgan
Summer2012 TAHOE magazine 9
magazine
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 8 5/11/2012 3:45:36 PM
Grant
Korgan
about the
cover photo
Photo by Kippy Spilker
Tahoe visitors Kathy Miyoshi and
Barbara Schaefer paddled their kay-
aks to Fannette Island in Emerald Bay
to have lunch on the rocks by the tea house. This was
Kathy’s rst time kayaking, and she and Barb had a fantastic
time trying to gure it all out. Thus, the triumphant raising of the paddles
as they yelled, “We nally got it!”
As the owner of Geminai Graphics & Photography, Kippy Spilker enjoys
bringing together her love of photography with her love of the outdoors.
In 2010, she and her husband published a small photo book, “Scenes
From A Kayak,” which is available at Amazon.com, and she is almost
never without her camera. Having been a designer for over 15 years and
photographer for 10, she has been published worldwide and won several
contests and awards. You can see her work at www.geminai.com.
Publishers:
Michael Gelbman
Kimberly Kuntz
Editors:
Trisha Leonard
Kevin MacMillan
Layout & Design:
Jessica Brooks
Keigh Cox
Jesse Mireles
Michelle Morton
Jina Padilla
Terri Thomas
Media Marketing Consultants:
Stacy Collins
Peggy Cocores
Michelle Geary
Ryan Johnson
Susan Kokenge
Carolyn O’Connor
Natasha Schue
Circulation:
Pat Greenlaw
Josh Sweigert
Tahoe Magazine is a product of the
Tahoe Daily Tribune, North Lake Tahoe
Bonanza, Sierra Sun and Lake Tahoe
Action. All content is copyrighted,
May 2012. Tahoe Magazine strives for
accuracy and is not responsible if event
details change after publication.

TI ME S HARE RE S AL E S : S AVE THOUS ANDS !
1-800-996-2001
Located in the Cecil’s Fountain Plaza
Between Marriott & Embassy Suites
4118 Lake Tahoe Blvd., Suite 5, Second Floor
O
PEN
7 D
AY
S A

W
EEK
IN
C
LU
D
IN
G

EV
EN
IN
G
S
Since 1989, Paradise has been the market leader for Lake Tahoe & Hawaii timeshare resales.
Marriott Timber Lodge - Best Deals
- 2BR Gold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 3,750
- 2BR Summer Platinum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 9,000
- 2BR Platinum Ski . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 12,000
- 2BR Platinum Plus Week 27 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 15,000
Tahoe Beach & Ski - a Lakefront Resort
- Studio High. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1,000
- 1BR Standard High . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1,500
Te Marriott Vacation Club -
- Newport Coast - CA 2BR/2BA Platinum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 9,500
- Desert Villas I - Red . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 8,500
- Ko Olina Beach Club 2BR/2A Platinum Even . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 4,995
Diamond Lake Tahoe Vacation Resort
- 2 BR Even . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,850
- 2 BR All ................................................................................................................................... $ 3,250
We also have . . . Hilton, Stardust, Americana, Worl dmark, Wyndham, Perennial, Tahoe Sands, Wall ey’s & many more.
Check out more INCREDIBLE DEALS at: www.timeshare-resale.com Prices & details subject to change as listings are sold.
Marriott Grand Residence - We are MGR specialists
- 2BR/3BA 3 Week Tahoe Interest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 12,500
- Studio Pool View QTR 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 25,000
- 1BR/1BA QTR 1 Courtyard View with Balcony . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 34,500
- 2BR/3BA QTR 3 Tahoe View Lock-out with Balcony . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 69,900
- 1BR/2BA ALL 4 QTR’s Gondola/Tahoe View Lock-Off w/balcony . . . . . .$ 225,000
Te Ridge Tahoe - Incredible Savings
- Terrace 2BR All . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 2,400
- Plaza 2BR Prime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 2,500
- Naegle 2BR Summer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 3.000
Hyatt High Sierra Lodge - North Shore Luxury
- 2BR/2BA Silver Week 38 1,400pts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 4,900
- 2BR/2BA Gold Week 6 1,880pts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 8,500
- 2BR/2BA Platinum Week 28 2,000 pts ..........................................................$ 22,500
- 2BR/2BA Diamond Week 52 2,200pts ...........................................................$ 19,900

Summer2012 TAHOE magazine 9
Contributing Photographers:
Derrick Ament
Grant Barta
Haether Allison
Keoki Flagg
Jeff Lamppert
Kaisa MacDonald
Michelle Morton
Jon Paul
Jen Schmidt
James Spiker
Sylas Wright
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 9 5/11/2012 3:45:40 PM
P
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S
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T
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L
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P
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TOURS
WINEMAKER’S
DINNERS
THUNDERBIRD
YACHT CRUISES
WEDDINGS &
EVENTS
I
r I7Jâ, wler ûeerje Wli||ell |til| li: "Ce:|le·
ir·|le·'l¡,' le irri|ei li: jririlejei jte:|: |e
etjerierte |le mejit el |ele Ielee |¡ erje¡irj
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trti:irj e|eeri li: Iltrier|iri Ietl|.
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10 Summer2012 TAHOE magazine
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 10 5/11/2012 3:45:42 PM
10 Summer2012 TAHOE magazine
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 11 5/11/2012 3:45:42 PM
Summer2012 TAHOE magazine 13
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 12 5/12/2012 2:54:17 PM
LICENSED IN CALIFORNIA & NEVADA
(530) 542-7684 • (800) 530-5322
(530) 577-2100 • (800) 227-3247
C e n t u r y 2 1 a t T a h o e
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Meyers Station Office ~ South Lake Tahoe on
Hwy. 50 at the “Gateway” to Lake Tahoe
In the new Village Center Office next to
Starbucks & Raleys at Stateline
Website: TahoeParadiseRealty.com
Long Term Rentals 1-800-391-4454
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We rent luxury.
Before your next visit to Lake
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you in the lap of luxury. And
if you’re thinking of investing
in a second home, use a
REALTOR.® Ten ask us
to make it available to our
discriminating renters.
Summer2012 TAHOE magazine 13
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 13 5/11/2012 2:43:38 PM
By Jenny Goldsmith
Tahoe Magazine
T
he sun slowly settles on the western horizon of Lake Tahoe, bringing
to life the legendary alpenglow that is synonymous with the
incandescent, alpine lake. A bride and groom stand together on the edge
of 72 miles of glimmering shoreline, surrounded by 360-degree views of
towering, snow-capped wilderness. Vows are exchanged, promises are
made, a lifetime of happiness awaits.
Lake Tahoe weddings are unparalleled when it comes to beauty, romance
and caliber. From a private wedding onboard a luxury yacht to a rustic
cabin setting with family and friends; from an extravagant helicopter
ceremony in the bluebird sky to an upscale exchange of vows at one
of Tahoe’s luxury resorts, the Tahoe region oers a myriad of wedding
opportunities for any style, budget or taste.
“With some of the most gorgeous scenery in the world, Tahoe provides
a romantic backdrop unlike any other,” said Danielle Loberg, event
coordinator with Lake Tahoe Cruises and Zephyr Cove Resort. “Whether
the beach, mountains, banquet halls; sunshine or snow, you can have the
wedding you have always dreamed about.”
Venues
W
hen it comes to nding the perfect venue for tying the knot in
Tahoe, the possibilities are endless. Private estates, world-class
restaurants, luxury hotels, quaint wedding chapels, mountaintop
ceremonies and chartered cruises all boast one-of-a-kind experiences
that can be customized for any couple, on any budget.
“Tahoe has it all when it comes to venues, and we are able to provide a
unique style for each wedding avenue,” Loberg said.
As the wedding specialist for Lake Tahoe Cruises, Loberg serves as
the mastermind for on-the-water ceremonies. e company’s eet of
paddlewheelers and cruises provides unmatched vessels for intimate,
private services, and a team of wedding planners is always on deck to
ensure no ower has wilted, no cake overturned, no detail overlooked.
“From the Tahoe Paradise Yacht to the Paddlewheelers, the Tahoe Queen
and MS Dixie II, we can accommodate the largest groups of any vessel in
Lake Tahoe,” Loberg said. “Our packages are also built a la carte, allowing
you to easily build the wedding of your dreams — from our public cruises
with an Emerald Bay backdrop during dinner, to an exclusive wedding
charter — you choose your scenery.”
For brides and grooms devoid of proper sea legs, a classic, mahogany-
style, lakefront restaurant may be the perfect spot for saying “I do.” Each
“With some of the most gorgeous
scenery in the world, Tahoe provides a
romantic backdrop unlike any other.”
— Danielle Loberg
Whimsical
Weddings
From the venues, to the recreation activities, to the music, to the
region’s camaraderie, there’s nothing like tying the knot in Tahoe.
Je
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TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 14 5/12/2012 3:05:43 PM
Weddings
cardinal point around the lake ofers an array of fne-dining outlets for
year-round wedding events of any size and budget.
“Gar Woods is situated on North Lake Tahoe and is, what I think,
one of the best banquet venues in the area because of the view and
location,” said Ilana Mador, group sales and marketing manager for
Gar Woods Grill & Pier in Carnelian Bay. “Te entire second level of
the restaurant has foor-to-ceiling windows overlooking Lake Tahoe
and we can accommodate any party size.”
Gar Wood’s sister restaurant, Riva Grill in South Lake Tahoe, also
ofers a customized experience with award-winning cuisine tailored to
specifc needs and on-site event planners to oversee the process from
start to fnish. Establishments like the West Shore Café (Homewood),
Captain Jon’s (Tahoe Vista) and Jake’s on the Lake (Tahoe City),
to name a few, are also known for their unsurpassed views, quality
menus and banquet facilities.
“We have a beautiful venue here and we do a lot of small weddings
and rehearsal dinners, but our establishment is always open for larger
scale weddings that ofer that lakefront experience,” said Danielle
McCord, banquet manager at Jake’s. “Everything is taken care of as far
as the food and drinks, and we can do the service right in house so you
don’t have to look outside for other vendors.”
As a bride-to-be, McCord personally recognizes the value in selecting
a venue that will provide the overall foundation for a wedding.
Planning your wedding at an already-set establishment, like Jake’s on
the Lake, is a cost-efective way to maximize your experience because
we already have the tables, chairs and linens, food and alcohol — and
of course the view,” said McCord, who will tie the knot in North Lake
Tahoe this July.
Upscale hotels
T
hen, of course, there is the multitude of upscale hotel locations
ofering all-encompassing services from exquisite catering and
discounted accommodations to concierge services, spa packages and
beach-to-ballroom wedding locations.
“Tat’s the great thing about a resort — it’s very inclusive, so not only
do you have everything set for your special ceremony and reception,
but guest rooms can be arranged on the property for out of town
friends and family so everyone can be together,” said Lauren Hall,
Catering Manager for the Hyatt Regency Lake Tahoe Resort, Spa and
Casino, located on the shores of Incline Village.
...continued on next page
May our Hearts
Become One
as We Unite
Tips for tying the knot in Tahoe
• Be realistic and honest about what you want. Before
looking for a venue or vendors, talk about what aspects
are going to make or break your dream wedding.
• Book your venue well in advance. Because Tahoe is
such a popular destination, places book up fast, and
fnding the right location is crucial for the wedding’s
overall success.
• Hire a planner. Tere are so many aspects involved in
planning a wedding, especially a destination wedding,
and an event coordinator can ensure things happen
smoothly, on time and in line with the bride’s wishes.
• Put together a reasonable budget. You don’t want to
begin planning your ideal wedding only to fnd that
you are far from being able to aford it; this is setting
yourself up to be disappointed.
• Plan ahead. Tahoe is a mountain town, so no matter
what time of year, do not expect it to be warm in the
evening hours. And have a backup plan in the unlikely
event that it rains.
• Hire a musical talent of some sort. Musicians really
keep things fowing so every aspect you want to see
happen actually occurs.
• Have a timeline for your wedding. Tere are many
people out there who don’t want to feel rushed, and
a timeline is a guideline. It should outline all of the
things that you want to happen and approximate times
that they should occur.
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 15 5/11/2012 2:44:51 PM
16 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
Weddings
... from previous page
e Resort at Squaw Creek, PlumpJack Squaw Valley
Inn and e Ritz Carlton, Lake Tahoe, all accommodate ski-in, ski-
out wedding goers in the winter months. By mid-June, when the
Sierra snowpack has nally melted and wildowers begin to paint the
landscape, nothing compares to a summer wedding at one of these
mountain-based resorts.
Finally, just as the Lake Tahoe region is recognized for its peaceful, serene
landscape and laid-back lifestyle, so are the private estates and chapels
that serve as the ideal destination for secluded, intimate wedding vows.
One often-overlooked gem of North Lake Tahoe is the Squaw Valley
Chapel — a historically signicant site oering traditional church
services and unrivaled views of the surrounding peaks.
“e architecture of the chapel is a classic example of what modern
architecture was in mid-to-late 50s, and is very representative of the
cutting-edge style that was so desired for the 1960 Olympics,” said Tuck
Wilson, a longtime church-goer and representative for the chapel.
Aside from traditional wedding services, the chapel also boasts a full
kitchen and reception area, both indoor and outdoor — two features that
Wilson believes sets the church apart from similar settings in the region.
e shores of Lake Tahoe are also speckled with hidden estates nestled
between Ponderosa Pines and Quaking Aspens, available for high-end
events and loaded with amenities, providing an all-encompassing,
exclusive wedding experience.
Born and bred Tahoan and bride-to-be Shelby Hartman, and her ancé
Scott Yorkey, chose a rustic, private cabin on the North Shore to celebrate
their vows with family and friends — a site that reects their personal
style, as well as gives guests the ultimate Tahoe experience.
“We found the perfect place in Tahoe that really illustrates who we are
as a couple — we’re more laid-back and outdoorsy — and we wanted
our wedding to reect that,” Hartman said. “I’m so excited for my
wedding day, and when I envision myself getting ready at the cabin, I
feel completely calm and happy — the lake calms me down more than
anything and this venue ts both mine and Scott’s personal style.”
Activities
F
or outdoor-enthusiast brides and grooms like Hartman and Yorkey,
Tahoe is the quintessential destination for their friends and family
who want to take advantage of the region’s myriad of activities.
“Everyone loves coming to Tahoe and there really is something to oer
everyone here,” Hartman said of her hometown. “When planning our
wedding, we chose Tahoe because we feel so connected to the area,
but we also wanted a destination wedding that all of our guests can
enjoy, whether they want to relax on the beach, go water skiing, hiking,
mountain biking or golng — Tahoe has it all, so it will be a nice vacation
for our guests.”
And that’s where a wedding planner can come in handy. With so many
diverse, year-round opportunities to explore the region, hiring an event
coordinator can help guests navigate the innite number of recreational
options.
“e real hallmark of the Tahoe bride and groom is that they tend to
be a very active couple and want to plan a wedding destination that
oers skiing, mountain biking, water skiing, boating, horseback riding,
hiking and yoga,” said Scott Corridan, a Tahoe-based event planner
who is featured as one of InStyle Magazine’s Top 10 Celebrity Event
Producers. “Couples are here to celebrate their wedding and have that
amazing experience, but outside of that, they’re building all these other
wonderful wedding memories for their guests as well.”
For guests not necessarily seeking an adrenaline rush, the casinos,
shopping boutiques, spas and museums throughout the basin can
keep their blood pressure down, while still highlighting what the
region has to oer.
“Tahoe has all the appeal,” said Melissa Panico, owner of MAP Events,
based in San Francisco and North Lake Tahoe. “A lot of my Bay Area
clients have memories of Lake Tahoe from their childhood, and that
connection makes it a very special place for them to get married.”
...continued on page 18
“We found the perfect place in Tahoe
that really illustrates who we are as a
couple — we’re more laid-back and
outdoorsy — and we wanted our
wedding to reflect that.”
— Shelby Hartman
Jeff Lam
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16 Summer2012 TAHOE magazine
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18 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
Music
N
o wedding celebration would be complete without musical
entertainment, and Tahoe arguably breeds some of the most
talented, innovative musicians out there. Whether you’re seeking a
destination wedding equipped with after-hours live music or simply want
a jam band, pop-radio disc jockey, or the tender sounds of an acoustic
guitar to serenade your wedding and reception, Tahoe’s array of musical
talent can supplement all desires.
“I think we’ve got an awful lot of very good musicians around Tahoe, and
that’s one thing that diferentiates us,” said Wilson, whose acoustic guitar
talents can be heard at Squaw Valley Chapel, among other Tahoe venues.
“It’s a really cool place to live, so people who can eke out a living will
move here, and there are more live music venues than would typically be
found in an area of this population.”
Te Nevada-based casinos fll their event calendars with year-round
entertainment, and many restaurants and bars feature local musicians
every weekend.
“Every bride is diferent and I want to know what her taste is — I’m not a
dance band and I’m not a string quartet, I’m an acoustic guitarist, so it’s
all about fnding out what the couple wants to hear,” Wilson said.
And if a bride isn’t necessarily looking for Wilson’s tenor vocal stylings
singing in harmony with his acoustic guitar, he doesn’t hesitate to point
them in the direction of their desired sounds.
Camaraderie
I
t’s that camaraderie that so many industry professionals echo that really
elevates Tahoe as a premier wedding center from other destination
locales.
“I was so surprised by that element of camaraderie and work-togetherness
between vendors in Tahoe,” said Panico. “Tere’s not a lot of rivalry and
vendors aren’t as competitive as they would be in a larger metropolitan
area, and that’s really refreshing, I didn’t expect that at all when I brought
my services to the region.”
Maybe it’s the dense air pressure or the overall positive attitude shared
by Lake Tahoe locals, but that fellowship and cooperation among the
region’s vendors alleviates any confict that may arise in the marriage
planning process.
“What I love about Tahoe and Truckee is that the vendor community is
really very small and we all work very hard to maintain strong friendships
and relationships with one another,” Corridan said. “When you’re trucks
aren’t getting through on highway 80 because of a snow storm, you have
to rely on other people in the neighborhood to get things done, and that’s
what makes us all successful.” s
A lot of my Bay Area clients have
memories of Lake Tahoe from their
childhood, and that connection
makes it a very special place for
them to get married.”
— Melissa Panico
Weddings ... from page 16
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TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 18 5/12/2012 3:22:45 PM
18 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 19 5/11/2012 2:49:34 PM
20 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
By Jenny Goldsmith
Tahoe Magazine
E
very year, thousands of tourists ock to the Lake Tahoe Basin in
search of epic powder lines, world-class mountain biking terrain,
internationally recognized golf courses and a pure glimpse of Lake
Tahoe’s organic, unparalleled landscape.
But there’s one industry here that isn’t always in the spotlight: the
wonderful world of wedding chapels.
e wedding industry in Tahoe is teeming with venues, photographers,
event coordinators, orists, bakeries and live entertainment, and it’s no
surprise the wedding chapel business serves up an instrumental slice of
the marriage pie.
Lake Tahoe chapels oer all-inclusive
wedding experience
F
lip open the Tahoe yellow pages and take your pick from dozens
of one-stop-shop chapels advertising reasonable prices, marriage
licensing services, a plethora of wedding packages, and aordable o-
site locations.
“When you’re a destination bride, you want a stress-free wedding and
that’s where we come in,” said Tonya Sayed, owner of e Wedding
Chapel at Harveys in Stateline, Nev.
Tonya and her husband Ronald have been o ciating weddings at
Harveys for 25 years, and in this economy, their business seems like the
best bet. For less than $300, a bride and groom can indulge in a venue,
owers, a minister and music, with a multitude of add-ons available for
more elaborate ceremonies.
“It’s what people think of when they picture a Nevada wedding chapel,
but we also have beachfront, private residences we can use and we can
accommodate parties from two to 200,” Sayed said.
It’s this unique advantage of owning a wedding business on the shores of
Lake Tahoe that separates the basin’s charming chapels from their Vegas
and Reno counterparts.
“We are a full-service chapel, and our ministers will travel around the
entire Lake Tahoe Basin in both California and Nevada,” said CeCe
Beatleston, owner of Tahoe Mountain Wedding Chapel in South Lake
Tahoe.
Beatleston’s 24-hour chapel welcomes walk-ins and specializes in
everything wedding from casual, spontaneous nuptials to more elaborate
ceremonies at lakefront beach properties, upscale wineries and chartered
boat excursions. With one consultation, a bride can have her customized,
dream wedding completely planned from linens to licensing without
lifting a nger or breaking the wallet.
“We make it really easy to get married here and we give people such a
wonderful experience,” Beatleston said. “When you come up here and you
see all the little chapels, it really gets people in the mood for marriage.”
e allure of a quickie wedding
D
riving along Lake Tahoe Boulevard on the South Shore, several
phosphorescent heart-shaped chapel signs icker on the left and
right of the roadway, so it’s no wonder the commercial row of businesses
will put visitors and locals in a wedding-state-of-mind.
“We’re a lot like Vegas in the sense that you see all these brides running
around, especially in the summertime, and you can really see what a
popular place this is for weddings,” Beatleston said.
Some clients do all the planning themselves and spend months preparing
for the perfect day, while others show up on a chapel doorstep without
much notice and for the sake of spontaneity, Beatleston said.
“Sometimes at larger weddings, couples can get lost in all the planning
and chaos, and it becomes more about the family and friends and less
about the commitment between a bride and groom, so we get a lot of
brides and grooms that will come in and say we just want to make this
special for us,” Beatleston said of her more impulsive patrons.
Charming Chapels
Lake Tahoe is steeped in history and
tradition when it comes to chapel weddings
When you come up here and
you see all the little chapels, it
really gets people in the mood for
marriage.” — CeCe Beatleston, owner,
Tahoe Mountain Wedding Chapel
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 20 5/11/2012 2:49:48 PM
20 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
Charming Chapels
is quickie-wedding scenario rings true for Patricia and Donald Esse,
who eloped more than 30 years ago during a snowy night in October at
the now-retired Fond-du-Lac Lodge and Wedding Chapel o Highway
50.
“We didn’t want all the pressure of a big wedding,” Patricia Esse said. “It
was very spur-of-the-moment, but it was so romantic, it really was.”
After the short and sweet ceremony, the San José-based newlyweds
got wind that legendary rock singer Neil Sedaka was performing, and
they were able to accomplish their dream wedding in one fell swoop
— entertainment and all.
irty-three years and two sons later, the Esses frequently travel from
their Bay Area home to the Sierra to reminisce about their wedding day.
“Every time we go, it brings back the memory for us, and we’re lucky to be
close enough that we can drive up anytime,” Patricia said.
Let “e King” declare you man and wife
W
hile the Tahoe oasis is hundreds of miles away from the orescent
desert of Las Vegas, that doesn’t mean Minister Elvis won’t be
spotted at a Lake Tahoe wedding chapel.
“People don’t realize that Elvis spent more time in Tahoe than he did
in Vegas, but Vegas really capitalized on the Elvis chapel theme,” said
Beatleston, who supplies a multitude of Elvis impersonators for good-
humored couples who ‘can’t help falling in love’ with the help of the rock
icon.
Elvis may have left the building decades ago, but his legacy lives on in
South Lake Tahoe. e Horizon Casino — once dubbed Sahara Tahoe in
the 70s — oers an Elvis-themed suite complete with a life-size cardboard
Elvis cutout and an old-school jukebox.
Elvis fan club websites proclaim the book “Elvis: Live at Del Webb’s
Sahara Tahoe” as one of history’s best kept secrets about e King’s life
and career in Tahoe. And every wedding chapel around the lake has an
Elvis on speed dial for couples looking to pay homage to the entertainer.
...continued on page 24
“Every time we go, it brings back
the memory for us, and we’re lucky
to be close enough that we can
drive up anytime.”
— Patricia Esse

Jen Schm
idt/jenschm
idtphotography.com
Jeff Lamppert Photography/www.lamppert.com
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 21 5/11/2012 2:50:09 PM
Lake Tahoe
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Visit www.TahoeWeddings.org today
and let the big day planning begin!
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22 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
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22 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 23 5/11/2012 2:50:14 PM
24 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
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t may not be the self-proclaimed wedding capital of the world, but
Lake Tahoe is steeped in history and tradition when it comes to chapel
weddings. Many of these lakefront sanctuaries have been around for
decades, but no one has stood the test of time longer than the famous
Chapel of the Bells in South Lake Tahoe.
“We’ve been here for 50 years and we are by far the oldest wedding
chapel in South Lake,” said the Rev. Robert McIntyre, owner and
o ciator at Chapel of the Bells for the past eight years.
e 24-hour full-service chapel has wed up to three generations of
brides and grooms, and since taking the reins in 2004, McIntyre is
happy to say he’s never raised his prices.
“To be able to say that in 50 years of business we’ve had three dierent
family members from three dierent generations come here to get
“This is a business
where everybody who
walks through the
door is happy.”
— the Rev. Robert McIntyre

Chapels
... from page 21
Je
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Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 25
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 24 5/12/2012 3:28:13 PM
24 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
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Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 25
married is pretty neat,” said McIntyre, fresh o marrying a Sacramento-
based couple and dressed in his o ciating nest. “ere isn’t a day
that goes by in the summer where there aren’t people taking pictures
in our front lawn who got married here years ago.”
For McIntyre and the fellowship of o ciators in South Lake Tahoe,
the job benets more than their bank accounts. It’s about connecting
with a bride and groom, elevating their wedding experience through
simplicity and accessibility and bearing witness to a memorable day
that can never be recreated.
“is is a business where everybody who walks through the door
is happy; it’s the most important day of their lives together and it’s
wonderful to be able to provide a service like this,” McIntyre said. “I
absolutely love what I do.” ▲
While ve dierent counties make up the
Lake Tahoe region, four play a key role –
Placer and El Dorado County in California,
and Washoe and Douglas County in Nevada.
Make sure you know the wedding license laws
and regulations for the county you will be
getting married in. Information provided by:
www.placer.ca.gov;
www.edcgov.us;
www.co.washoe.nv.us;
www.cltr.co.douglas.nv.us
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 25 5/12/2012 3:28:59 PM
W
hen Mark Twain wrote the quote above, he blamed the
inordinate number of sun-kissed, happy people tooling along
the beaches, boulders and bike paths of Lake Tahoe on the air;
but he just as easily could have blamed it on the water
In the essay entitled “Lost Legends of Tahoe #9”, writer Steven C. Brandt
suggests — with tongue in cheek — that Explorer John C. Fremont was
looking for the fabled spring in the mountains south of Lake Tahoe in
the winter of 1844. Fremont never found his prize, but Brandt playfully
suggests that maybe, somewhere in a nearby gully, a magical spring
might today be gurgling up and feeding a stream that fows into into a
drain in the forest, underneath the shops and cafes, and through culvert
into Lake Tahoe.
Don’t get over-excited. Brandt’s narration might be the only story of its
kind.
“I haven’t heard of anyone looking for a fountain of youth in the Sierra,”
says Daniel DeFoe, a Professor of History at Sierra College. “But do me a
favor, will you? If you hear of anyone who did, let me know.”
DeFoe continues — Fremont’s foray into the snow-covered high Sierra
in the dead of winter resulted in the usual hardships of hunger and cold.
Tey almost starved, he says — but before he hangs up, he adds “You
know, I think the best example of rejuvenation in the Tahoe landscape
was John Muir’s experience.”
In chapter nine of “Tahoe Beneath the Surface: Te Hidden Stories of
America’s Largest Mountain Lake,” author Scott Lankford tells a true
story of John Muir’s comeback.
John Muir had grown depressed, thin and heartsick, Lankford writes,
after 10 years of living life as a dedicated family man on his wife’s farm in
Martinez, Calif. Muir’s wife, Louie, knew what her husband needed and
sent him home to the mountains.
When Muir arrived in the Tahoe basin, the basin’s forests had been
ravaged by logging, and Muir wanted to retreat. But Louie urged him to
stay, to reignite and to become the “noble” man she knew him to be.
In Tahoe, life is good.
THE SHINY,
HAPPY PEOPLE
“Tree months of camp life on Lake Tahoe would restore an
Egyptian mummy to his pristine vigor, and give him an appetite
like an alligator. I do not mean the oldest and driest mummies, of
course, but the fresher ones. Te air up there in the clouds is very
pure and fine, bracing and delicious. And why shouldn’t it be?
— it is the same the angels breathe…”
- Mark Twain
By Jenell Schwab
Tahoe Magazine
EXPERIENCING TAHOE
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Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 27
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Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 27
Muir complied. After watching fowers bloom year after year, perhaps he
knew regeneration would come with time. To quote Lankford quoting
Muir: “Tis grand show is eternal. It is always sunrise somewhere; the
dew is never all dried at once; a shower is forever falling; vapor is ever
rising. Eternal sunrise, eternal dawn and gloaming, on sea and continents
and islands, each in its turn, as the round earth rolls.”
Muir stayed for a while at the home of a friend, whose property along the
South Shore of Lake Tahoe had not been logged. And then Muir took his
frst step and walked around Lake Tahoe. Tat frst step eventually turned
into a trek north to Washington state, and even farther to Alaska, and upon
his return, Muir was ready for the second leg of his advocacy career.
Muir was inspired up of the couch by a sense of vitality – a vitality that
has been sensed in the region for centuries in the streams, the air, the
peaks, the trees and the lake itself. Te Washoe people believed Lake
Tahoe inhabited powerful spirits, which could be both benevolent and
malevolent.
Te railways believed Lake Tahoe was a place that could entice tourists to
ride a bumpy train all the way from the New York City.
“No Health or Pleasure Seeker shall fail to visit!” shouted one
advertisement.
And still today, whether a woman exercises on the trails and generates
endorphins in her body; or a man seats himself on a mountain peak in
meditation; or a teenager soaks up sunshine and reads a good book near
the lakeshore — visitors and residents to use the landscape to access a
sense of well-being.
...continued on the next page
EATING HEALTHY
THE TAHOE WAY
After you have filled your mind, body and spirit with
all-good-things Tahoe and Truckee, stop by one of
these places to fill your belly.
• NEW MOON NATURAL FOODS
505 West Lake Blvd., Tahoe City
• TOMAATO’S PIZZA, PASTA & SALADS
120 Country Club Drive, Unit 61, Incline Village
• GRASS ROOTS NATURAL FOODS
2040 Dunlap Drive, South Lake Tahoe
• SPROUTS NATURAL FOODS CAFE
3123 Harrison Ave., South Lake Tahoe
• GRASS ROOTS NATURAL FOODS,
2040 Dunlap Dr., South Lake Tahoe
• NEW MOON NATURAL FOODS,
11357 Donner Pass Rd., Truckee
“I haven’t heard of anyone looking for a fountain of youth in the Sierra.
But do me a favor, will you? If you hear of anyone who did, let me know.”
— Daniel DeFoe,
History Professor, Sierra College
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 27 5/11/2012 3:38:16 PM
Monday-Thursday: 8:00 am-5:00 pm
Fridays by appointment
N. Lake Blvd
Kings Beach, CA
Above ACE Hardware
www.kingsbeachdentist.com
Cosmetic and
Comprehensive
Dentistry
General Dentistry
530.546.5678
(530) 546-7437 • 8499 North Lake Boulevard • Kings Beach
Between Taco Bell & China Express
Mountain and Road Bike Rentals
Bike Parts & Accessories
Rafts • Float Tubes • Swim Shorts • Ladies Swimsuits
Swim Masks • Goggles • Tahoe T-Shirts & Souvenirs
www.TahoeBikeSki.com
show ad for a bike rental discount, see website for coupon information
28 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
HEALTH .... from previous page
“Tis is not a dark place,” says Brad Barnett of Te Lighthouse Spa in
Tahoe City. “Tis is a place of good, quality white light.”
Brad and his wife, Sheila, own Te Lighthouse Spa; the center’s large
windows aford, on exceptionally sunny days, a view of the lake that looks
like a giant dome over a glistening bowl of diamonds.
“One person said she could feel all the negative energy draining out her
feet and emptying in the lake,” Brad says, while Sheila plays with the light
in the room by adjusting the curtains and shades.
“People have diferent needs when they come in. Some need a dark,
quiet room and others just need the space,” Sheila says before gesturing
toward the view.
Others value the sense of play the landscape afords. Take, for example,
Studio Lake Tahoe in Meyers, which will ofer yoga and pilates classes on
paddleboards this summer.
“You can’t go wrong,” says studio owner Crissy Jory. “Stretch and then go
for a paddle. It’s a great way to enjoy the day, and that’s what it’s about.”
And still others choose to simply bask in what the landscape provides. At
Sierra Hot Springs Resort and Retreat Center in Sierraville, just north of
Truckee, visitors soak for hours in a cocktail of minerals in natural warm
and hot springs.
Call the springs fountains of youth, if you choose. To each their own.
Whether a person calls it exercise or play or a vortex or sunlight or magic,
few will be impervious enough to call it nothing. s
“Tis grand show is eternal. It is always sunrise
somewhere; the dew is never all dried at once; a
shower is forever falling; vapor is ever rising.
Eternal sunrise, eternal dawn…”
— John Muir
Village Center
At Highway 50 & Heavenly Village Way t 4PVUI-BLF5BIPFt0OF#MPDLGSPN4UBUFMJOF
4 0 6 5 ) 5" ) 0 & 4 ." - - "5 4 5"5 & - * / &
We have it all!
Top Brands, Unique Shoppes
Apparel
Adore
Hot Cha Cha
Savvy
Sidestreet Boutique
Sidestreet Formal Wear
Sidestreet Kids
Sidestreet Leathers & Furs
Top Drawer
Art Galleries
Artifacts
Jon Paul Gallery
Marcus Ashley Gallery
Sun Art Gallery
Untamed Art
Wyland Galleries
Eateries
Baja Fresh
Blue Dog Pizza
Jamba Juice
Raley’s Deli
Starbucks
Subway
Services
Bike Rentals - Sports Ltd.
Buckingham Vacation Properties
Century 21
Elevated Fitness
Imagine Salon
Raley’s Pharmacy
Raley’s Superstore
Rio Nails & Spa
Wells Fargo Bank
Specialty Shoppes
Alpaca Exotic Imports
Beads ETC.
Dog.Dog.Cat.
Lake Tahoe Holidays
Made In Lake Tahoe, USA
Simpson’s Jewelers
Sports, Ltd.
Tahoe Trading Post
True Value Hardware
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 28 5/11/2012 3:38:20 PM
28 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
Village Center
At Highway 50 & Heavenly Village Way t 4PVUI-BLF5BIPFt0OF#MPDLGSPN4UBUFMJOF
4 0 6 5 ) 5" ) 0 & 4 ." - - "5 4 5"5 & - * / &
We have it all!
Top Brands, Unique Shoppes
Apparel
Adore
Hot Cha Cha
Savvy
Sidestreet Boutique
Sidestreet Formal Wear
Sidestreet Kids
Sidestreet Leathers & Furs
Top Drawer
Art Galleries
Artifacts
Jon Paul Gallery
Marcus Ashley Gallery
Sun Art Gallery
Untamed Art
Wyland Galleries
Eateries
Baja Fresh
Blue Dog Pizza
Jamba Juice
Raley’s Deli
Starbucks
Subway
Services
Bike Rentals - Sports Ltd.
Buckingham Vacation Properties
Century 21
Elevated Fitness
Imagine Salon
Raley’s Pharmacy
Raley’s Superstore
Rio Nails & Spa
Wells Fargo Bank
Specialty Shoppes
Alpaca Exotic Imports
Beads ETC.
Dog.Dog.Cat.
Lake Tahoe Holidays
Made In Lake Tahoe, USA
Simpson’s Jewelers
Sports, Ltd.
Tahoe Trading Post
True Value Hardware
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 29 5/11/2012 3:38:21 PM
See us at the Truckee
Home and Building Show
HANDCRAFTED
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FOR
OUTSIDE LIVING
PERFECT FOR
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Individually hand crafted
Call Mark at 1-250-567-1274
30 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
H
E
A
L
T
H
S
O
L
U
T
IONS
Integrating
Body, Mind & Spirit
Sierra Acupuncture &
Healing Arts
MAUREEN LAMERDIN
O.M.D., DIPL AC.
894 Southwood Blvd., Incline Village
775.841.3336
sierraacupuncture@sbcglobal.net
sierraacupuncturearts.com
Cranio-Sacral Therapy
KERSTIN S. TRACY
MS, LMT
Ready2Heal LLC
6135 Lakeside Drive, Suite 119, Reno •
775.400.0058
kerstin@ready2heal.net • ready2heal.net
ViaMassage & Rolf Bodywork
LESA SOL PENSAK
BCSI, HHP, CMT
770 Northwood Blvd., Incline Village
775.443.8500
lesapensak@gmail.com • lesapensak.wordpress.com
Do check out the sights
While there are some amazing views to be seen from highways around
the lake, those sights are only a sliver of what is out there. Gain some
elevation by taking a hike, hitching a ride on the Heavenly Gondola or
even considering a helicopter or glider tour. Seeing Lake Tahoe stretched
out in front of you can make you feel like a modern-day John C. Fremont
and will leave a lasting impression. For frst-time visitors, driving around
the lake should also be a consideration. While often cast as one location,
there are dozens of diferent enclaves around the lake, each with its own
feel and character. Take your time and experience each of the locales. Te
drive typically takes between two and three hours, depending on your
pace.
Don’t feeD the bears
Lake Tahoe’s bear population is out and about this time of year and is
ready to make lunch out of your leftovers if you’re not careful. Bears that
get accustomed to trash become nuisances and can meet untimely ends
because of their acquired taste for people food. No one wants to see this.
You can help prevent it. Using bear-proof garbage containers, waiting
until the morning of pickup to put trash out, cleaning barbecue grills after
use, feeding pets inside and never approaching or feeding a wild animal
are all good ways to keep Lake Tahoe’s bears wild.
Do get out on the lake
Lake Tahoe is surrounded by a spiderweb of hiking and biking trails that
provide some of the best experiences on two feet. But, there really isn’t
anything like the 360-degree view of Lake Tahoe’s blue that you get from
getting out on the water. Tere are a plethora of ways to get out there,
including renting a kayak or taking a boat tour. Do it. It is important to
keep in mind, though, that all but the surface of Lake Tahoe stays pretty
darn cold, even during the summer. So be sure to take the proper safety
precautions when out on the lake.
SUN DAYS FUN DAYS
some helpful hints on surviving laKe tahoe’s summer
aaaaahhh, summer. It’s an amazing season at Lake Tahoe.
Te roads are (usually) clear of snow. Blue skies match a blue lake, and the
Lake Tahoe Basin’s collective thermostat gets set to a balmy 72 degrees.
Tank tops and fip fops turn into uniforms. Skin hidden by months of
winter clothes reappears like spring fowers.
And, to the surprise of some, it is Lake Tahoe’s busiest season. Te massive
infux of people into the basin can make for some busy weekends and
some grumpy locals. But by taking heed of some friendly advice, your visit
to Tahoe will be enjoyed by both you and the citizens of the Sierra.
By Adam Jensen
Tahoe Magazine
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 31
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 30 5/11/2012 3:38:32 PM
30 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 31
Don’t trash the beach
Tis seems like a no brainer, but trash is an unsightly addition to Lake
Tahoe’s scenic playground. Volunteers remove thousands of pounds
of garbage from area beaches each year, but can never get it all. Bottles,
cans and any other refuse dropped between the area’s ubiquitous granite
boulders can be impossible to remove. So give volunteers some help and
pack it out before your empty beer bottle becomes a near-permanent
addition to Lake Tahoe’s many landmarks.
Do keep your butts to yourself
Similarly, Lake Tahoe is a very fre-prone area. Just one careless cigarette
ficked into the forest, or an improperly extinguished campfre, can start a
wildfre that threatens life and property. It really isn’t that hard to take care
of your smokeables, so take the time to extinguish them and pack them
out with the rest of your trash. Also, don’t be shy when dumping water on
your campfres. Tey should be completely out before you leave.
Don’t be afraiD to ask
Got a question? Track down a local and give him or her a shout. Lake
Tahoe residents always know the best spots for any particular moment or
setting. Generally, we are a friendly lot and are more than happy to point
you in the right direction as long as you are courteous and respectful.
Also, if someone on the clock hooks you up with some local knowledge
and there is a tip jar in sight, don’t be bashful. Your generosity will be
appreciated.
Do aDjust your altituDe
At more than 6,000 feet, Lake Tahoe is a high-altitude environment
and the sun can be oppressive up here. Don’t be afraid to glop on the
sunscreen to avoid getting burned and subsequently outed as a tourist/
lobster homonid. Also, the altitude and sun can dehydrate you in a matter
of hours. Drink lots of water even if you don’t feel thirsty. Any booze you
may consume will hit you harder than at sea level, so take it easy there,
tiger.
Don’t block the highway
Parking is always an issue at Lake Tahoe, especially near the most popular
attractions like Emerald Bay and the beaches along the East Shore. Tis
often leads to a cluster of cars nearly stacked on top of each other or
jutting out into the road. Emerald Bay and Sand Harbor can be especially
bad, with cars choking of the road and pedestrians crossing the highway
haphazardly, making it a dangerous situation for everyone involved. Lake
Tahoe can change your perspective on many things, but it doesn’t change
the trafc laws. So, make sure your parking job is appropriate and not
ruining someone’s day before getting out to soak up the sights.
Do take your time
Around the lake, there is something known as “Tahoe Time.” It’s a lot
like “Island Time” in that you can generally expect folks to be on the
fashionably late side. It’s just the atmosphere of the place. Hey, you’re on
vacation, right? Take some time to step back, relax and breathe. Tis is also
a good mindset on area roadways. With mostly two-lane roads encircling
the lake, the chances of you getting somewhere more than a few seconds
faster than the next guy are slim to none. Tat being said, if you fnd
yourself doing more gawking at the lake or wildlife than driving, it’s best
to pull over take in the sights on two feet. You won’t be disappointed. s
Don’ t be afraiD to glop on the sunscreen to avoiD getting
burneD anD subsequently outeD as a tourist/lobster homoniD.
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 31 5/11/2012 3:38:43 PM
Capturing Tahoe
when snapping away in lake Tahoe,
preparation is key
By Joe Proudman
Tahoe Magazine
Te beauty of the Lake Tahoe region often induces an
emulsion-exposing need for those experiencing all
that it has to ofer. From Emerald Bay to Sand Harbor,
and all that surrounds the lake, photographers make
a pilgrimage to the area in search of stunning images.
Experiencing Tahoe
All photos by Jon Paul
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 33
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 32 5/11/2012 3:38:47 PM
“I think Lake Tahoe ofers
just a vast amount of diversity.
Obviously we’ve got a huge lake
with beautiful shoreline and
rivers entering the lake, marshy
areas, wetlands, and very obviously,
we’re surrounded by mountains,” said
Jon Paul, South Lake Tahoe photographer
and gallery owner. “So we really have a huge
diversity to ofer relative to photography. We
can do grand landscapes, we can do fne, detailed
images, we can do images of moving water.”
Some of what makes Tahoe an ideal place to shoot also makes it
tricky at times. Tere aren’t many access to points to the lake, and skies
get a bit hazy in the summer, according to Paul, but for large-format
photographers, it’s all about preparation.
“Lake Tahoe, as beautiful as it is, is often dif cult to photograph. It’s
surrounded by mountains, which means the sun is usually rising
20 minutes after it actually gets above the horizon, and it sets 20-30
minutes before it drops below the horizon on the other side. I always
joke, that instead of having that magic hour of light, we have the magic
minute,” Paul said. “And things happen very quickly. It’s a place where
you really need to study and do your homework so you can be in a place
and prepared, and to a degree, expecting certain conditions with a
certain composition.
“So I do a lot of scouting and pre-visualizing how it will look in a certain
light in a certain location,” he added. “Given that, when the light is right,
it is stunningly beautiful and the fact that it isn’t quite so easy makes
it more rewarding when you get that amazing shot and mother nature
cooperates and everything
comes together.”
You do not need to be an
advanced photographer with
more actuations on your camera
than miles on your car to come
away with wall-worthy photos
of Lake Tahoe. While Tahoe
does ofer various challenges
to fnding unique and stunning
images, it’s more important to
simply get out there.
If visiting Tahoe with the
family, Paul, who ofers custom
photography seminars in which he ventures out with clients to various
locations, recommends scouting out locations, and then getting out
and shooting before anyone is even awake.
“Once you learn about the area and get yourself to the right place at the
right time, the light can really be spectacular, and the subject matter is
amazing,” he said.
If you are interested in a photography excursion, you can fnd more
information at www.jonpaulgallery.com. You don’t need a view camera
or an elaborate digital camera to head out, Paul said, just a need to
learn.
Tips for capturing great
Tahoe images
• To get the silky, smooth water shots, use a
longer exposure
• Bring your tripod and put it to use
• when shooting with longer exposures, use a
remote trigger or the camera’s timer
• Sunset happens quickly in Tahoe, so be
ready before the sun drops
• Sunrise is prime time to shoot emerald Bay
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 33
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 33 5/11/2012 3:38:51 PM
www.laketahoelockshop.com
775.831.6844
Christmas Tree Village Shopping Center
868 Tahoe Blvd.
#
15 Incline Village, NV 89451
laketahoelockshop@yahoo.com
Fast, Friendly Mobile Service
Commercial • Residential
Vehicle Lockouts • Re-Keying
THE ONLY FULL SERVICE
LOCKSHOP ON THE NORTH SHORE
34 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
Truckee
Truckee FacTory SToreS
As far as outlet malls go, Truckee’s is small but offers some
unique options, including Sears and a few clothing options.
It’s right on the main strip in West Truckee, just past the high
school. Free parking.
DownTown Truckee
Historic Downtown Truckee has its own interstate exit, and offers
everything from unique western clothing stores to candy shops to a
variety of restaurants and art galleries. Paid parking.
NorTh/WesT shore
Tahoe ciTy
Downtown Tahoe City comes alive each summer. Just off the
highway, the downtown area offers restaurants, clothing stores,
massage studios and places to get manicures and pedicures. Also,
take a break and enjoy Commons Beach nearby. Free parking.
kingS Beach
Kings Beach is more than just sand and volleyball. Enjoy the bou-
tique stores right along the highway and just across from the recre-
ation area. Shopping options vary from party gifts to restaurants to
adventure sporting goods. Free parking.
incline Village
Anywhere you go in Incline, you will find some shopping options.
From toy stores along the highway to restaurants and retailers, this
hamlet across the Nevada border is a great way to spend an after-
noon. Free parking.
Squaw Valley
Located on Highway 89 between Truckee and Tahoe City, Squaw
offers a variety of sporting goods stores, clothing shops, restaurants
and art galleries — all next to a world class ski resort. Free parking.
norThSTar caliFornia
Located on Highway 267 between Truckee and Kings Beach,
Northstar’s retailers offer kids clothing, African artwork, sporting
goods and trendy clothing options. Free parking.
Experiencing Tahoe shopping
Shoppers enjoy walking through
Heavenly Village in South Lake
Tahoe at sunset.
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 35
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 34 5/11/2012 3:38:52 PM
34 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
Cus tom
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Seasonal Necessities
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(530) 587-4883
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 35
souTh shore
FacTory SToreS aT The y
Factory Stores at the Y is located at the intersection of U.S.
Highway 50 and Highway 89 in South Lake Tahoe and is open 9
a.m. to 6 p.m. seven days a week. There is plenty of free parking.
Shoppers can save 20 percent to 60 percent on name brand mer-
chandise.
Village cenTer
Enjoy the Art Center of Lake Tahoe at the Village Center with
the highest concentration of Fine Art anywhere in Lake Tahoe.
Together there are six locations, featuring more than 100 Artists.
Also, enjoy a monthly event called the third Friday Art Walk. It is
the third Friday of every month from 4-7 p.m., where people can
stroll the galleries. Free parking.
heaVenly Village
Located near the base of the Heavenly Gondola, shopping
options include clothing, food, drink, and outdoor gear for the
whole family. Also, enjoy a gondola ride when you’re ready for a
break. Free and paid parking options.
STaTeline
A number of shops and stores surround the casino corridor,
including some music shops and other boutique shopping oppor-
tunities. Also, many of the casinos have gift shops so you don’t
leave Tahoe empty-handed. Free and paid parking options. s
Make a tahoe fashion statement at an affordable price!
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TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 35 5/11/2012 3:38:54 PM
475, 495 North Lake Tahoe Blvd., Tahoe City, CA (530) 583-1580 • www.cobblestonetahoe.com
475 North Lake Blvd., Suite 151
Tahoe City, CA 96145
530.581.1106
Uncorkedtahoecity.com
great wines and artsan cheeses
tastngs every day
meet the winemaker events
saturdays from 4 to 7pm
Custom Framing
Original Paintings
David Marsh Furniture
Gifts & Cards
Art Installation
New location — Upstairs
Avoe Tahoe Sports
530•583•3043
pablosgalleryandframeshop.com
Custom Framing & Gallery
530•583•JEAN
kaliforniajeanbar.com
Tahoe City • Truckee
Northstar
Open Daily 10am-6pm
530.583.9900
LATHER & FIZZ
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475 N. Lake Blvd. #154-155
Tahoe City, CA
530.580.4028
ana@royalforever.com
Women’s Clothing
Intimates
Outerwear
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Thursday, August 16
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Visit us online at
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for info on tickets, Summer
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A new generation bike shop
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Replacement Parts
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530.581.2558
tahoegravityshop.com
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Smokehouse X Wood Grill
Grand Opening May 25, 2012
475 N. Lake Blvd. Tahoe City, CA
tahoebrewing.com | (530) 581-HOPS
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see our ad
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Tahoe City • 530.581.4298
Truckee • 530.582.0429
www.BluestoneTahoe.com
Present this ad
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with a $75 purchase
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TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 36 5/11/2012 3:38:57 PM
475, 495 North Lake Tahoe Blvd., Tahoe City, CA (530) 583-1580 • www.cobblestonetahoe.com
475 North Lake Blvd., Suite 151
Tahoe City, CA 96145
530.581.1106
Uncorkedtahoecity.com
great wines and artsan cheeses
tastngs every day
meet the winemaker events
saturdays from 4 to 7pm
Custom Framing
Original Paintings
David Marsh Furniture
Gifts & Cards
Art Installation
New location — Upstairs
Avoe Tahoe Sports
530•583•3043
pablosgalleryandframeshop.com
Custom Framing & Gallery
530•583•JEAN
kaliforniajeanbar.com
Tahoe City • Truckee
Northstar
Open Daily 10am-6pm
530.583.9900
LATHER & FIZZ
B A T H B O U T I Q U E
Fresh Hand Made Soap • Bath Bombs
Bubble Cupcakes • Bedhead PJs
475 N. Lake Blvd. #154-155
Tahoe City, CA
530.580.4028
ana@royalforever.com
Women’s Clothing
Intimates
Outerwear
Accessories
Beachwear
T
A
H
O
E

Y
O
U
T
H

B
A
L
L
E
T
DANCE IN
THE PARK
Thursday, August 16
Sugar Pine Point State Park
Visit us online at
www.tahoeyouthballet.com
for info on tickets, Summer
classes, special workshops
and master classes
A new generation bike shop
for trailriders, freeriders,
urban dirt jumpers and
downhill racers.
Replacement Parts
& Bike Repairs
530.581.2558
tahoegravityshop.com
Cra Brewery
Smokehouse X Wood Grill
Grand Opening May 25, 2012
475 N. Lake Blvd. Tahoe City, CA
tahoebrewing.com | (530) 581-HOPS
N
E
W
B
R
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W
P
U
B
I
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C
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!
What’s in
Your Garage?
Bring us
Your Gear!
530.581.0662
nutsports@att.net
NEW &USED
TAHOE SPORTS
Consignment Store
see our ad
on page 37
Tahoe City • 530.581.4298
Truckee • 530.582.0429
www.BluestoneTahoe.com
Present this ad
and receive a
book of unique
Tahoe photography
with a $75 purchase
(a $20 value)
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 37 5/11/2012 3:39:01 PM
By Susanne Haala
Tahoe Magazine
Getting to know Tahoe
LAKE TAHOE provides locals and visitors a variety of
outdoor delights, from beautiful weather to abundant scenic vistas to
fantastic recreational activities. And there is a growing push to return
the lake’s favors by going green. One big way people can help is by
getting out of their cars.
Alternative transportation benefits users with affordable rates, and
gives a nod to the lake by helping preserve it for future generations.
BY BICYCLE
Riding in a car, the views of the lake can come up fast. Sometimes,
the moment you see one, you’ve already passed by. Or, even worse,
crowded parking areas can make you move on and miss out on
unique spots altogether.
One way to solve these problems? Change your pedals.
Stopping to take in the Jewel of the Sierra is a lot easier on a bike,
and you won’t face the possibility of getting towed away or finding a
parking ticket under your wiper blade.
Riding a bike at Lake Tahoe is a popular way to save some money,
get a little exercise, enjoy the scenery and help keep Lake Tahoe’s
environment healthy.
Numerous road construction projects around the lake each summer
also make bikes an especially smart option over a car.
BIKES, BOATS, TROLLEYS AND CARS:
GETTING AROUND LAKE TAHOE
“A GREAT WAY TO SEE
TAHOE IN THE SUMMER IS
TAKING A BIKE RIDE ALONG
THE TRUCKEE RIVER.”
- Adam Ramos
Take your helmet, water and a camera for a less than 30-minute
excursion from Incline Village to Sand Harbor and look forward to a
hassle-free spin. A nearly continuous nine-mile bike path along Lake
Tahoe’s West Shore also offers up stellar views of Lake Tahoe between
Homewood and Tahoe City. The path continues along the Truckee
River to Squaw Valley.
“A great way to see Tahoe in the summer is taking a bike ride along the
Truckee River,” said Lake Tahoe resident Adam Ramos. “The paved
four-mile stretch from Squaw Valley to Tahoe City is a lot of fun and
offers great scenery.”
At the South Shore, a family friendly bike path starts just north of the
“Y” and takes you past historic Camp Richardson while providing
easy access to area beaches.
More adventurous mountain bikers might enjoy the Tahoe Rim Trail,
which offers mountain biking on about 50 percent of its 165 miles.
“Hike or bike sections of the Rim Trail, it offers great views from any
angle,” said Truckee resident Erick Saine. “On or off road there is
miles of terrain to discover while cycling in the Lake Tahoe region.”
The Flume Trail, on Lake Tahoe’s East Shore, provides stunning views
of Lake Tahoe above Sand Harbor. While the trail starts with a long,
strenuous uphill climb, a shuttle service is available during the sum-
mer and helps eliminate some of the leg work.
Bike rentals are available at numerous locations around the lake.
Full-day rentals generally run about $30.
A map of Lake Tahoe bike paths and lanes is available at
www.tahoebike.org.
More information on the Flume Trail is available at
www.theflumetrail.com. More information on the Tahoe Rim Trail
is available at www.tahoerimtrail.org.
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 39
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 38 5/11/2012 3:50:55 PM
Operated by:
Airport Mini Bus
CPCN #2350
Daily scheduled VIP airport service
Resonable rates · 3:30am until midnight
Reservations: NorthLakeTahoeExpress.com · (866) 216-5222
Google Your Trip / Other Transportation: LakeTahoeTransit.com
Operated by:
Airport Mini Bus
CPCN #2350
What’s new on the lake this summer? What’s new on the lake this summer?
Nor thLakeTahoeWaterShuttle.com
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 39
BY BOAT
As you may suspect, boating is big
on a lake affectionately known as
“Big Blue.” And those looking to
get out on the water may have
a new way to go this summer.
A pilot water taxi is expected
to start at the North Shore by
June 30 and feature round-trip
service between Homewood,
Sunnyside and Tahoe City.
The service will be “a unique
way to experience the area for
the visitors” and will have room for
20 passengers at a time, according
to Carl Hasty, district manager for the
Tahoe Transportation District.
Boat rental shops can be found all around the lake and offer a wide
range of boats and jet skis. Rentals can cost upward of $700 a day, but
smaller-size boats for a romantic sunset ride can be found for about
$200 and are sure to end a day in a beautiful unforgettable atmo-
sphere.
Kayaks or paddle boards are a still cheaper alternative to motor-
ized boats and can be rented for about $80 per day from area shops.
There are also several companies that offer boat tours and allow you
to kick back and relax.
Emerald Bay, which invites with its scenery at the southwest corner
of Lake Tahoe, is the most popular — and one of the most rewarding
— day trips for Lake Tahoe boaters.
BY BUS AND TROLLEY
While taking the bus may not be the most glamorous option to get
around at Lake Tahoe, public transit eliminates one of the biggest
headaches at the lake in the summer: driving.
BlueGo is the public bus system at the South Shore and Tahoe Area
Regional Transit provides bus service at the North Shore.
More information on North Shore routes is available at
www.placer.ca.gov and information for the South Shore can be
found at www.bluego.org.
If you prefer an open-air experience, trolley services are also offered
by the bus services during the warmer months.
The year-round Truckee Trolley operates three routes between
Truckee, Northstar and Kings Beach from 9:15 a.m. to 5:15 p.m.
Monday through Saturday, depending on weather and traffic
conditions. For more information on TART routes call 530-550-1212
or 800-736-6365. For more information on BlueGo routes call
530-541-7149. ▲
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 39 5/11/2012 3:50:59 PM
U.S. INTERSTATE 80
U.S. 80 near Emigrant Gap
Lane replacement
MAY-OCT. 2012: UP TO 30-MINUTE DELAY
U.S. 80 Donner Summit to west of Donner Park
Lane replacement
MAY-OCT. 2012: UP TO 30-MINUTE DELAY
CALIFORNIA STATE ROUTE 89
SR 89 between Truckee and Tahoe City
Pavement rehabilitation
MAY-OCT. 2012: UP TO 20-MINUTE DELAY
SR 89 Tahoma to Tahoe City
Water quality improvements and some paving
MAY-OCT. 2012-2015: UP TO 10-MINUTE DELAY
CALIFORNIA STATE ROUTE 267
SR 267 near Northstar Drive to near Brockway Summit
Slope stabilization and shoulder paving
MAY-OCT. 2012: UP TO 30-MINUTE DELAY
U.S. HIGHWAY 50
U.S. 50 from Zephyr Cove to Glenbrook
Drop inlet modification
MAY-OCT. 2012: UP TO 10-MINUTE DELAY
U.S. 50 from Trout Creek Bridge to Ski Run Boulevard
Water quality improvements, roadway widening and paving
MAY-OCT. 2012-2013: UP TO 10-MINUTE DELAY
U.S. 50 Cave Rock to Spooner Summit
Slope stability and erosion control improvements
MAY-OCT. 2012: UP TO 30-MINUTE DELAY
NEVADA STATE ROUTE 431
SR 431 from SR 28 to Mount Rose Summit
Water quality improvements
MAY-OCT. 2012: UP TO 10-MINUTE DELAY
NEVADA STATE ROUTE 28
SR 28 from SR 431 to North Shore Stateline
Water quality and erosion-control improvements
MAY-JUN. AND SEPT.-OCT. 2012: UP TO 30-MINUTE DELAY
SR 28 at SR 431
Construct roundabout
MAY-OCT. 2012: UP TO 30-MINUTE DELAY
SR 28 from Incline Village to Sand Harbor
Drop inlet modifications
MAY-OCT. 2012: UP TO 10-MINUTE DELAY
SUMMER ROAD CONSTRUCTION
DELAYED
TRAFFIC
AHEAD
Source:
www.tahoeroads.com
40 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
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40 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
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TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 41 5/11/2012 3:51:16 PM
species established a stronghold in Lake Mead in Southern Nevada in
2008 and procreated at an alarming rate.
The mussels have become a large problem in the Great Lakes area,
attaching to intake and outtake pipes, costing lakeside industries
millions of dollars annually, while wreaking havoc on native species
in the ecosystem.
Ted Thayer, Wildlife Program Manager for TRPA, said while the
invasive mussels are a prominent reason for the agency’s inspection
policies, other species are causing concern.
“New Zealand mud snails and plants such as hydrilla are on our
radar screen,” Thayer said. “The threat is imminent.”
None of these species have had the catastrophic impact zebra and
quagga mussels have wrought on waterways in the Great Lakes regions,
but they could set the stage for dramatic environmental consequences
in the future.
In order to fund the ongoing inspections of boats, the TRPA
has established a fee for boaters based on the size of the vessel, the
horsepower of the engine and whether the boat is used exclusively in
Lake Tahoe.
For a full listing of fees visit trpa.org.
PUT AWAY THE ANCHOR,
unfurl the spinnaker and someone man the helm as boating season on
Lake Tahoe rapidly approaches.
Those with a penchant for nautical adventures of all varieties can
satiate their waterlust on Lake Tahoe. The famed water body, known
widely as the “Jewel of the Sierra,” can accommodate motorboaters
with a need for speed, leisurely sailors out for a relaxing jaunt on
the waters or those who prefer to man their own kayaks, canoes and
paddleboards.
However, Lake Tahoe officials are committed to protect the lake
from the threat of overuse, pollution, environmental degradation
and aquatic invasive species and have implemented a rigorous boat
inspection program. Boaters are asked to exercise a little patience
and cooperation with inspectors who are trying to keep potentially
destructive forces out of the lake’s unique but fragile ecosystem.
AQUATIC INVASIVE SPECIES
The Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, a bistate environmental
regulatory and planning agency created in 1969 by Congress, is one of
the main agencies responsible for protecting Tahoe’s environment.
Fears about the potential invasion of zebra and quagga mussels are
increasing in the American West, after the environmentally detrimental
Getting to know tahoe by water
By Matthew Renda
Tahoe Magazine
EVERYTHING
YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT
BOATING LAKE TAHOE
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 43
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 42 5/11/2012 3:51:51 PM
30'-40'-50' Boat Slips For Sale
Lake Tahoe’s Only Inland Marina
530-541-2155
Boat Ramp Launch
The Fresh Ketch
Fishing Guides Boating Charters
www.tahoekeysmarina.net
Vacation Rentals at the Marina
530-541-2155
• Over 200 Slips for Rent or Sale
• Launching Double Concrete Ramp
• Gas Dock
• Winter & Summer Storage
• Shrink Wrap
• Repair and Maintenance
• Luxury Accommodations
• Real Estate Sales
• Chandlery
• Boat Sales
• Boat Rentals
• Fishing Charters
• Sailing Lessons & Charters
• Restaurants / Bar
• Banquet Facilities
• Yacht Charters
• Cruises
• Scuba
• Water Ski
• Balloon Rides
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 43
EVASION ILLEGAL
Aquatic invasive species are usually transported from one body of
water to another via watercraft. So, it is important for boaters to provide
inspectors with factual information regarding which water bodies into
which their boat had previously launched.

Two summers ago, a 29-year-old Los Angeles resident was fined
$5,000 for evading an inspector-mandated decontamination by
providing false information regarding the last lake his boat had
navigated. And last summer, officials at one of the basin’s inspection
stations prevented a vessel with 37 quagga mussels on it from entering
the lake.
Boaters receive an inspection seal upon a successful completion of
a lakeside inspection, which take place at main entry points into the
basin. Those who tamper with such seals will also be subject to fines
and penalties.
BOATING SAFETY
Despite generally safe conditions afforded by Lake Tahoe, boaters
need to be prepared for dangerous situations. When out in the water,
individuals should ensure their vessel is equipped with the safety
equipment required by federal law.
Such items include lifejackets, fire extinguishers, a whistle, a bell
or horn, a visual distress signal or flare, a ventilation duct allowing for
proper ventilation of inboard gasoline engines and a backfire flame
arrestor for inboard engines.
Other safety items
recommended for prudent
boaters include:
Handheld flares
VHF marine radio
Cellular phone
Anchor and line
First aid kit
Flashlight
Fenders
Extra clothing
Tool kit
Sunscreen (SPF 35, minimum)
.... continued on next page
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 43 5/11/2012 3:52:06 PM
Lake Tahoe has many underwater hazards, such as boulders
or piles of rocks, which may emerge as lake levels drop. Most of
the obstructions are marked by the U.S. Coast Guard with white
buoys, which should be kept between the boat and the shore.
Wind can be a deceptive problem for sailors on the waters
of Lake Tahoe. Abrupt gusts of high intensity are sufficient to
capsize small watercraft. Mornings, in particular, can produce
deceptively calm conditions. In the event of sudden wind gusts,
head for protective harbors until conditions improve. Also, consult
detailed weather forecasts before heading out.
Alcohol is a significant cause of many boating related accidents,
injuries and fatalities.
“Drinking while operating a boat presents the same dangers
that drinking while driving a car does,” said Levi Read, spokesman
for the U.S. Coast Guard. “It’s important to identify a designated
driver to avoid breaking the law.”
Operating a boat under the influence of alcohol or drugs is a
federal offense punishable by a fine of up to $5,000 and one year
in prison.
Lake Tahoe is an alpine lake, which means its water temperature
is cool year-round, making it conducive to hypothermia for those
exposed to sudden immersion, rendering self-rescue in such
cases difficult if not impossible. Tahoe’s temperature necessitates
wearing a lifejacket when out on the water. ▲
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 45 44 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
BOATING SAFETY.... from previous page
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TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 44 5/11/2012 3:52:15 PM
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 45 44 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
YOU KNOW HOW SPECIAL LIVING IN TAHOE CAN BE.
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TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 45 5/11/2012 3:52:19 PM
46 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
Interested in
floating the river this
summer? Give these
companies a call for
more information.
FLOAT RAFTING
Truckee River Raft.
Company
530-581-0123
River Road/ Highway 89,
Tahoe City. Self guided,
five-mile float down the
Truckee River
Mountain Air Sports -
Truckee River Rafting
530-583-RAFT (7238)
River Road/ Highway 89,
Tahoe City. Self guided,
five-mile float down the
Truckee River
WHITEWATER
RIVER RAFTING
And if you’re looking for a
little more adventure, the
Truckee River does offer
more intense rafting adven-
tures and some whitewater
tours. Call the below options
for more information.
Tahoe Whitewater Tours
800-442-7238
or 530-581-2441
www.gowhitewater.com
Tributary Whitewater Tours
800-672-3846
or 530-346-6812
www.whitewatertours.com
S
ome people call it rafting, others call it a booze cruise.
Regardless of how it’s defined, the commercial and pri-
vate rafters who float down the stretch of the Truckee
River from Tahoe City to the Alpine Meadows bridge are out to
have a good time.
This section of the river offers locals and visitors a perfect
way to relax on a warm, sunny weekend day, via a lazy float on
an inner-tube or makeshift raft or take out a kayak or canoe for
a little more exercise. Whatever you choose, odds are the trip
could take four or more hours, so with that in mind, here are
some very important tips to remember before setting out:
• Bring sunscreen. It gets very sunny in Tahoe, and its high
elevation means you’re closer to the sun than you think. Be
sure to protect yourself.
• Be careful of rapids. While this stretch of the Truckee is
generally a very calm one, there will be a few spots of light rap-
ids along the way that could pose a danger to a rubber tube or
your feet or bottom if they’re in the water and happen to snag
a rock.
• Bring lifejackets for the kids and non-swimmers. Tahoe
gets lots of snow in the winter, and the water level in the river
fluctuates, so be careful.
• Have a parking plan. A lot of people forget that when
they begin their float on the Truckee, four hours later,
they’re going to end it miles away. And if you forgot to stra-
tegically park a car near the end of your float, it could be a
long afternoon for your group to make it back to where you
started.
• Always have a designated driver. If you do drink on the
river, have a designated driver for afterward so everyone can
get home safely.
Generally, the commercial raft companies have no policy
on drinking except to prohibit glass and kegs from being
taken on the river. However, in an effort to keep the river
and its surrounding roads safe, the Placer County Board of
Supervisors four years ago voted to ban alcohol consump-
tion on the Truckee River for the region’s busy holiday week-
ends, like Fourth of July weekend, which is traditionally one
of the busiest and rowdiest weekends of the summer. Local
law enforcement takes this holiday alcohol ban very seri-
ously, and will issue hefty citations for those who violate it.
According to previous interviews, the two commercial
rafting companies on the Truckee River are limited by Placer
County regulations to up to 100 boats each on the river at
any given time. However, it’s a rule rarely enforced due to
the high volume of private rafters who dot the river and
don’t use rafting companies.
Although some have reservations as to the environmental
impact of rafting on the river, all rafters are encouraged to
pick up after their party and to leave the river canyon in bet-
ter shape than they found it. The key to finishing up a fun
floating trip is to be responsible, safe and friendly to your
tour guide, the Truckee River. ▲
Guide to river rafting
GET YOUR FLOAT ON
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 47
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 46 5/11/2012 4:02:27 PM
46 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 47
Full Service Marina - Shopping - Dining
700 N. Lake Blvd. • Tahoe City, CA • tahoecitymarina.com
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530.583.1039
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TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 48 5/11/2012 4:02:31 PM
WEST SHORE ASSOCIATION
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Chambers Landing
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6300 Chambers Lodge Road, Homewood, CA
Bar open daily at 11:30 am
Enjoy Chambers Punch & POGka
beginning June 22nd
Grill opens daily at 11:30 am
Friday & Saturday, Grill open until 8:00 pm
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(530) 525-9253
www.TahoeMaritime.org
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 49 5/11/2012 4:02:32 PM
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50 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
In truth, the lake only has one native species of trout, the Lahontan
cutthroat trout, which no longer occurs naturally in the waters. The fish is now
stocked by the Nevada Department of Wildlife. A major food source for the
Lahontans, the lake’s native plankton species, Daphnia, has been impacted
heavily by introduced species. But the species is rebounding.
Recent legislation allowing the commercial harvest of crayfish from Lake
Tahoe has been passed. The crayfish, another invasive species, have been
linked to increased algae blooms, which, in turn, decrease the lake’s clarity.
On some of the lake’s sandy shores, millions of tiny Asian clam shells
decorate the bottom. But freshwater mussels, a native shellfish, can still be
found near and in the lake’s tributaries.
The effort to save Lake Tahoe from invasive species is one of the largest
preservation efforts in the world. To stop quagga and zebra mussels from
entering the lake, every boat that’s launched must undergo an inspection.
Even paddlers are encouraged to check their boards, kayaks and canoes for
signs of invasive hitchhikers. Hopefully, with the cooperation of all who love
Lake Tahoe, what’s left of an ecosystem can be preserved. ▲
Getting to know tahoe
By Dylan Silver
Tahoe Magazine
U
nder the blue sheen of Lake Tahoe’s surface is another world. Tiny
minnows flit and dart through cracks in the granite. Crayfish
crawl along the sandy bottom. Larger trout come and go from the
shallows, hunting for a quick snack.
This world is not what it used to be. Many of the species that play roles in
this theater were introduced from outside the original cast. And some of them
pose a threat to Lake Tahoe’s legendary clarity.
Fish species like the rainbow trout, lake trout or Mackinaw and Kokanee
salmon were all brought to Lake Tahoe in the last 200 years. Smaller critters
like the opossum shrimp were introduced to feed the game fish listed above.
In total, more than 10 prominent introduced and invasive species have found
their way into Lake Tahoe.
“How are we going to get rid of these species?” asked Nevada Department of
Wildife spokesman Chris Healy. “How far can you go to turn the plot back?”
To return to the original ecosystem would be nearly impossible, but threads
of it remain, and some work to preserve what’s left is being undertaken.
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 50 5/11/2012 4:02:41 PM
50 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
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52 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
Guide to the best beaches
L
i
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s

a

B
e
ac
h
!
Every local has their favorite beach.
Find yours from the list below
or for a full list and map, visit
www.aboutlaketahoe.com/beaches.
BALDWIN BEACH: South Lake Tahoe
beach off Highway 89 about 1 mile north
of Fallen Leaf Lake. North or South beach.
Tallac Creek meets Lake Tahoe at North
beach. No dogs.
BURNT CEDAR BEACH: Incline
Village saves its beach space for resi-
dents, but there are day passes for guests.
Sweeping paths meandering past restful
benches, barbecues, the snack bar and
heated pool. Outdoor tiki bar. Lakeshore
Drive, 1.4 miles east of the Hyatt and
Country Club Drive.
CAMP RICHARDSON: South Lake
Tahoe, off Jameson Beach Road, adja-
cent to historic Camp Richardson resort,
between Tahoe Keys and Emerald Bay.
Marina for boat launch. Barbecue area.
CARNELIAN BAY BEACH: Between
Gar Woods and Sierra Boat Co. on North
Shore. Dogs legal. Restrooms, benches
and footpaths. Mostly rocky beach, picnic
tables available.
CAVE ROCK BEACH: Find this beach
off Highway 50 on the southeast side of the
lake, near Zephyr Cove. Public.
CHIMNEY BEACH: Highway 28,
tucked away on Nevada’s East Shore, just
East of Sand Harbor. Very limited roadside
parking. Small parking lot as well for free
parking. Accessed via hike down from
highway. No public facilities.
COMMONS BEACH: Playgrounds,
soft green grass, mini-climbing wall, picnic
tables, barbecues. No dedicated parking,
no dogs allowed. Located directly east of
the “Wye” intersection (Highways 28 and
89) on Highway 28 in downtown Tahoe
City.
EL DORADO BEACH: South Lake
Tahoe beach, close to Lakeside Beach
in proximity and description, this area
is public.
HIDDEN BEACH: Highway 28,
tucked away on Nevada’s East Shore
between Incline Village and Sand Harbor.
Very limited roadside parking. Accessed via
small hike along highway. No public facilities.
HYATT REGENCY LAKE TAHOE:
Private beach for hotel guests in Incline
Village. Boat, jet ski and other rentals are
accessible from Ski Beach and the Hyatt’s
Beach.
INCLINE BEACH: Reserved for Incline
Village residents, temporary renters or
homeowner’s association. Day passes for
guests. Outdoor tiki bar. Lakeshore Drive,
just west of Ski Beach. 775-832-1100.
KINGS BEACH STATE RECREATION
AREA: On Highway 28 in Kings Beach on
North Shore. A large, free sand beach with
paid state parking ($10). Boat, jet ski and
other rentals are available. Barbecue areas,
kid’s park, and public restrooms.
KIVA BEACH: South Lake Tahoe
beach just north of Camp Richardson.
Dogs allows. Public beach. No barbecues.
LAKE FOREST BEACH: At the foot of
Bristlecone off Lake Forest Road 1.5 miles
east of Tahoe City with picnic tables and
fire pits.
LAKESIDE BEACH: South Lake
Tahoe. Members only, but that includes
Park Avenue area hotels, motels and the
casinos. No dogs. No fee. The water is not
as clear on this part of the lake, due to the
inflow of the upper Truckee River into the
lake nearby.
MOON DUNE BEACH: Across from
from Rustic Cottages Motel in Tahoe Vista
on the North Shore. Small sandy beach with
picnic tables and fire pits. Roadside parking.
NEVADA BEACH: Big and windy, it’s
0.7 mile long and in some cases 300 yards
wide, in Stateline on South Shore. Some
camping nearby, and a favorite among
kiteboarders. There is a parking fee.
NORTH TAHOE BEACH: Directly
across from Safeway in Kings Beach. Some
parking, grassy areas, volleyball court, pic-
nic tables.
PATTON BEACH: Small stony beach
adjacent to Sierra Boat Co. Marina and
the Kayak Cafe in Carnelian Bay. Limited
parking, picnic tables.
POPE BEACH: South Lake Tahoe, first
beach off Highway 89 as you head toward
the West Shore. Excellent for families.
There is a parking fee. No barbecues.
REGAN BEACH: South Lake Tahoe,
just west of El Dorado Beach. More of a
lakeside park than a traditional beach.
Good place for a group picnic without all
the sand.
ROUND HILL PINES: South Shore,
between Nevada Beach and Zephyr Cove.
More of a lakeside park than a traditional
beach. Good place for a group picnic with-
out all the sand.
SAND HARBOR: Highway 28, 2 miles
east of Incline Village. Tahoe’s most popu-
lar and perhaps most beautiful beach.
Limited parking. Pay to park. Walk-in
entrance fee. No roadside parking.
SECLINE BEACH: At the end of
Secline Street in Kings Beach, just south
of the junction of Highway 267. Very
limited parking, undeveloped
rocky beach with access to lawn
areas, picnic tables and fire
pits.
SKI BEACH: Reserved
for Incline Village residents.
Day passes for guests. Boat
ramp, barbecue areas,
kids climbing struc-
tures, slides and swings
and volleyball courts.
Lakeshore Drive, across
street from Hyatt.
SKYLANDIA
BEACH: Off of Lake
Forest Road 1/2 mile east
of Tahoe City with picnic
tables and fire pits. Stony
beach.
SPEEDBOAT BEACH:
Also known as Bucks
Beach. At the bottom of
Speedboat Avenue, off of
Highway 28 just past the
Cal-Neva on the California
side. Small sandy beach,
very limited parking.
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 53
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 52 5/11/2012 4:03:22 PM
52 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
• We’ve fown ages 2-92
• In operation since 1987
• Excellent safety record
• USCG licensed captains
• No prior experience needed
Our friendly, professional staff is available
to provide a safe outing ensuring a memorable experience
For reservations,please call
(530) 583-SAIL
Kayaks
Stand Up Paddle Boards
Pedal Boats
Aqua-Cycle Trikes
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 53
TAHOE KEYS: Located near the Upper
Truckee River and in the middle of the
South Shore, this area is popular for its
unique geography and landscape. Better
place to hike around and explore than
lounge.
TAHOE STATE RECREATION AREA:
Highway 28 on the eastern edge of Tahoe
City, adjacent to the Boatworks Mall, $5 to
park.
TAHOE VISTA RECREATION AREA:
Highway 28 at National Avenue, in Tahoe
Vista. Picnic tables and fire pits, boat
launch fee.
WEST END BEACH: On the west end
of Donner Lake in Truckee. Shaded picnic
and barbecue areas for families. Free park-
ing available along Old Highway 40.
WILLIAM KENT BEACH: On Highway
89, 2.5 miles south of Tahoe City. Camping,
picnic tables and fire pits, small sandy
beach.
ZEPHYR COVE: From Stateline, head
east on Highway 50 for about three miles.
Party beach with one mile of sand. No dogs
allowed. There is a fee. ▲
Beach goers enjoy Diver’s
Cove at Sand Harbor.
Photo: Michelle Morton
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 53 5/11/2012 4:03:30 PM
A
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Inspiring High Sierra Adventures
Experience the best of Lake Tahoe!
Ph: 530.913.9212
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Kayak and Paddleboard Rentals
on the beach in Tahoe Vista - 7010 N. Lake Blvd.
Kayak & SUP Tours • Mountain Biking • Hiking • Multisport
Family Adventures • Teambuilding • Group Events
Discover Kayaking & Paddleboarding - (coupon does not apply)
Thunderbird Lodge Kayak Tours - Tuesdays (coupon does not apply)
* Mention coupon at time of booking. Expires 9/30/12
54 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
Getting to know tahoe Yacht Clubs
T
o facilitate that love of
boating, the Tahoe Yacht
Club, Tahoe Windjam-
mers Yacht Club and South
Lake Tahoe Yacht Club strive to
continue a long-held tradition,
while growing membership,
fostering interest and a love of
boating and sailing to future
generations.
All the clubs oer racing, cruising and social events throughout the
year. Schedules and membership details can be found on their websites.
Founded in 1925, Tahoe Yacht Club is one of the oldest boating asso-
ciations in the West, and includes 500 family members from throughout
the country.
South Lake Tahoe Yacht Club was chartered in 1961 as the Boat Club,
changing its name in 1978. It has more than 200 members “banded to-
gether for the purpose of mutual interest in the eld of boating, educa-
tion, legislation, and general involvement in boating,” according to its
website.
Tahoe Wind-
jammers Yacht
Club has provided
an outlet for sail-
ing enthusiasts
since 1968. It’s
popular Women’s
Sailing Clinic is planned for July 21. is is open to any women looking to
gain basic sailing knowledge or sail trim techniques for more advanced
sailors. e annual 25-mile Southern Cross Race is scheduled for June 23.
More information can be found on their website.
Besides summer activities, all clubs oer diverse opportunities for so-
cializing throughout the year such as skiing, hiking, wine tastings, chari-
table events, potlucks dinners, clean-up days and more.
You needn’t be a boat owner to participate and opportunities to crew
on sailboats abound. All that’s required is a love of the water and enjoying
being on the lake (or ocean).
Membership benets include reciprocal privileges at many clubs
worldwide. It’s worth your time and eort to compare membership costs
as many clubs have initiation fees ranging from $100 to $5,000. ▲
SHARING THE LOVE
OF BOATING, SAILING & RACING
Tahoe Yacht Club
P.O. Box 7620, Tahoe City, CA 96145
700 North Lake Blvd. (Tahoe City Marina)
530-581-4700 or at tahoeyc.com
South Lake Tahoe Yacht Club
P.O. Box 17213, South Lake Tahoe, CA 96150
530-542-2962 or at southlaketahoeyachtclub.com
Tahoe Windjammers Yacht Club
P.O. Box 10466, South Lake Tahoe, CA 96158
2435 Venice Dr., Ste. 118, (Tahoe Keys Marina)
530-406-9525 or at tahoewindjammers.com
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 54 5/11/2012 4:03:38 PM
54 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 55 5/11/2012 4:03:40 PM
Barifot Mountain Photo
serving both professional photographers & beginners since 1984
flm processing / on-line prints / photo restoration
passport photos / holiday cards / greeting cards
announcements / photo books & keepsakes
create your own one-of-a-kind gifts
530.583.5050 barifotphoto.com
351 north lake blvd. tahoe city, ca
affordable & unique
t-shirts flags jewelry mugs
personalized stationery
calendars & much more!
are your photos organized?
confused about prints or digital? we can help!
personal photo organizer consultations... call for an appt.
TAHOE CITY
Your place for summer fun at the lake!
Tahoe City Farmers’ Market
Thursdays, May - October
Tahoe City Solstice Festival and Wine Walk
June 15 - 24
Concerts at Commons Beach
Sundays, June 24 - September 9
Movies at Commons Beach
Wednesday Nights, June 27 - August 29
4th of July Fireworks
Farm to Table Dinner
July 10
Pacific Fine Arts Festival
August 17 - 19
August 24 - 26
Labor Day Weekend
Town-wide Sidewalk Sale
September 1 - 3
Tahoe City Harvest Festival
October 6 - 20
530.583.3348
VISITTAHOECITY.COM
56 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
530.583.1762 ~ northtahoemuseums.org
Gatekeeper’s Museum
Steinbach Indian Basket Collection
130 West Lake Blvd. Tahoe City Next to Fanny Bridge
Watson Cabin Museum
560 North Lake Blvd., Downtown Tahoe City
Open Noon - 4 pm Free Admission
Closed Tuesdays
Open 10 am to 4 pm; Closed Tuesdays
Admission: $5 General, $4 Seniors
Children under 12 ~ Free
*Blue Star Museums: Free to Active Military Families
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 56 5/12/2012 4:03:30 PM
56 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
Boatworks Mall,
Downtown Tahoe City
530.581.GAME
Your favorite toy
and game store.
Fun for all ages.
Pool, Shuffleboard
& Foos Ball
11 am - 2 am • Open 7 Days A Week
530.583.2400 • 395 North Lake Blvd. Tahoe City
8 HD TVs
Watch Your
Favorite
Team Here
F
R
E
E
W
iF
i
Tahoe City’s Original Sports Bar
• Office Supplies
• Artist Supplies
• Copies, Copies, Copies ...
• Greeting Cards
• Gift Wrap & Bags
• Fed Ex Shipping
9

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p
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m
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M
o
n
d
a
y
-
F
r
i
d
a
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...Copies & more!
351 North Lake Blvd.
downtown Tahoe City, next to Barifot across from the firehouse
p/530 583.6511 f/530 583.0801
TheStoreTC@sbcglobal.net
Largest Selection
of Local Designers
& Tahoe Pendants
530.581.4298 • 495 North Lake Blvd.
Cobblestone Mall • Tahoe City
530.582.0429 • 10046 Donner Pass Rd. #3
Commercial Row • Truckee
www.BluestoneTahoe.com
Ͷ͹ͷ Noith Lake Blvu ȁ Tahoe Cityǡ CA
ͷ͵ͲǤͷͺ͵Ǥͳͳʹͺ ȁ iufϐlesanuiuơnecksǤcom
rufles & ruffnecks
chiluienǯs appaiel gifts toys
Catimini - A Bird Baby - Go Gently Baby
Plan Toys - Little Giraffe
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 57
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 57 5/11/2012 4:03:45 PM
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 59 58 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
By Simone Grandmain
Tahoe Magazine
Jax on the Tracks
10144 West River Street,
Truckee
530-550-7450
jaxtruckee.com
When Bud Haley took over this
Truckee diner, his goal was to
provide a first-rate dining expe-
rience without high-end prices.
Mission accomplished. The 1/2
lb. burgers, featured on the Food
Network, run about $9 and are
served with sides of coleslaw,
baked beans, fries or parmesan
chips. For breakfast, lunch or
dinner, go with the All Day Ad-
diction — two eggs, Canadian
bacon and avocado served on
hash browns and fresh greens,
then drizzled with a balsamic
vinaigrette and basil pesto for
$9.95. The atmosphere at Jax is
old-school diner (but shiny!) and
its fun railroad track location,
combined with the Kid Menu,
makes it a family affair. Hey, this
summer you can even bring the
dog! Back by popular demand,
the outdoor barbecue will be
firing up on the patio, complete
with oyster bar.
Spoon
1785 West Lake Blvd.
(Hwy. 89), Tahoe City
530-581-5400
spoontakeout.com
Such a cute place you want to
eat it up with, well, a spoon. But
the Pan Roasted Wild Salmon
served with fresh jalapeño
salsa, couscous and fresh mixed
greens ($14.95), Tri Tip and salad
($12.95), Chicken Penne Alfredo
with spinach, tomato and zuc-
chini ($12.95), and the Turkey
Dinner ($11.95) are hearty
enough to justify a fork. This is
comfort food with fresh thrown
in and no discomfort applied to
the wallet. Open Thurs.–Tues.
3-9 pm, closed Tues. & Wed.
Dockside 700
Wine Bar and Grill
700 North Lake Blvd.,
Tahoe City
530-581-0303
dockside700.com
Any place offering a 1,200-
square-foot covered lakeside
deck with a million-dollar view
of Lake Tahoe and happy hour
prices should automatically be
featured in “Easy Does It Din-
ing.” Be there from 4-6 p.m. to fill
up on meatball sliders, spinach
and artichoke dip for two, and
pulled pork nachos for starters.
The real fun begins, however,
when the barbecue comes out for
lunch and dinner, and the tri tip,
ribs and chicken start sizzling.
Order by the half or full pound to
share, get some extra sides and
forget about the clean-up — it’s
summer in Tahoe, baby!
Sato Japanese Restaurant
3436 Lake Tahoe Blvd,
South Lake Tahoe
530-544-0774
You know how, one hour after
eating sushi, you are hungry
again? This is probably because
you weren’t able to afford enough
to do the trick. Enter Sato’s “All
You Can Eat” sushi. Not all you
“care” to eat (meaning it is not
very good) or all you can eat from
“this” menu (meaning lots of
pre-made rolls). No, at this gem
you just sit down at the impec-
cable sushi bar, order as if you
just had a great day on the slots,
and hand over $21.95. They don’t
even have one of those rude
signs up that says (I have seen
them!) “Must eat all the rice.”
That’s like saying, “All you can
eat sushi but first you must drink
two gallons of water.” No tricks
at Sato’s — just amazing, fresh,
affordable sushi à la carte (two
pieces average about $3.75).
1 2
3
4
S
o you’re here for the
week, and you don’t
want to spend too much
on food. Here’s a local’s guide
on how to save as much money
as possible on eating, so you
can spend more of it on fun
and adventure at Lake Tahoe.
EASY
DOES
IT
D
I
N
I
N
G
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 58 5/11/2012 5:34:24 PM
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 59 58 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
Local’s Favorite for 27 Years!
BEACHSIDE GRILLE
Lake Tahoe • Cal i forni a
Slow Roasted Prime Rib • Baby Back Ribs • Steaks
Saefood & Pasta Specials • Gourmet Hamburgers
Kids Menu • 12 ft. long Salad Bar • Full Bar
8338 North Lake Blvd., Kings Beach, CA
530.546.3315 • Open Daily 11am-10pm
www.jasonsbeachsidegrille.com
Sam’s Place
611 Highway 50,
Zephyr Cove
775-588-2844
samsplacetahoe.com
Start with the Mini Taco ap-
petizers (ten for $7.99) and
Chuckie fries (spicy potato
wedges, cheese, and barbecue
sauce, $6.89)) and then split a
1/3 pound burger for about $8 or
“splurge” on the Philly Chees-
esteak sando for $9.89. Another
way to go: the one-filet serving
of fish and chips for $6.99. The
name of the game at Sam’s Place
in the warm-weather months
is: Sit on the patio, share menu
items (but get your own mojito!)
and stay awhile.
Char-Pit
8732 North Lake Blvd,,
Kings Beach
530-546-3171
charpit.com
This classic just got all 21st
Century on us by offering a $2
coupon on its website. Use it
and see why this Tahoe dining
icon has remained a burger and
barbecue staple for more than
four decades. The burgers (1/4
or 1/2 lb.) are arguably the very
best in Tahoe. In honor of my
heritage, I have to go with the
French, topped with bleu cheese
and barbecue sauce. There’s also
a selections of killer sandwiches;
of these, I am partial to the Aloha
Chicken, which reminds me of
a little place in Hawaii called
Kua’Aina, right down to the
perfectly grilled pineapple sauce
and brush of Kikkoman Teriyaki
sauce.
The Grid Bar and Grill
8545 North Lake Blvd.,
Kings Beach
530-546-0300
thegridbarandgrill.com
Stop in weekdays from 4-6 p.m.
for the 1/3 lb. burger with fries
and Miller Draft at $4.99, or
try some half-priced apps. Any
other day or time of the week,
this place is still “do-able” with
burgers and fries running $10 or
less or, my personal favorite, the
Pastrami Burger with fries for an
even $10. There are daily drink
specials and offers for discounts
on The Grid’s website and Face-
book, or, if you plan to make this
your regular watering hole, bring
your own shot glass to keep on
site for convenience and “locals”
discounts.
The Divided Sky Bar
and Restaurant
3200 US Highway 50,
South Lake Tahoe
530-577-0775
thedividedsky.com
Located about five miles from
South Lake Tahoe in Meyers,
this habit-forming hangout
started out as a place to go on the
one-mile strip known as “town.”
Now its upstairs living room
setting could be NBC’s answer
to a new episode of “Friends”
with Monica (the gourmet in the
show, for those of you not in the
know) still doing the cooking.
What an amazing menu! Hot
broiled sandwiches include “The
Amsterdam,” marinated goat
cheese, black olives, artichoke
hearts, sun-dried tomatoes,
parmesan and pistachios; “The
Freel Peak,” grilled Portobello
mushrooms, organic marinara,
grilled onions, black olives, moz-
zarella and parmesan; or cold,
“The Kiva,” smoked salmon,
raw onions, mixed greens and
ricotta cheese served on toasted
ciabatta. All sandwiches run less
than $9. There are also photo-
worthy salads and, to top it all
off, The Best Dang Carrot Cake.
So kick back, order a cocktail or a
coffee and then move to Meyers
so you can come back every day.
5
7
6
8
....continued on page 60
Jax on the Tracks.
JAM?
I Can Help
Get You Out!
Law Office of
Adam T. Spicer
DUI Defense Traffic Offenses
Cal i forni a Medi cal Mari j uana
530.539.4130
www. A d a mS p i c e r L a w. c o m
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 59 5/12/2012 4:05:43 PM
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 61 60 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
Best Pies New York
Style Pizzeria and
Restaurant
10068 Donner Pass Rd.,
Truckee
530-582-1111
bestpiesco.com
Lots of options here and no
crazy break-the-bank pizza price
surprises (what topping did my
kid order, foie gras?). All piz-
zas are size BIG, with thin New
York style crust, beginning at
$14.50 for a cheese and ending
with the most expensive, the
Garbage Pie (serious case of “the
works”) for $23.50. You can also
order half/half at no additional
charge, or by the slice (with up
to three toppings) which is a lot
of creative fun. The Specialty
Rolls — pizza dough rolled out
thin and stuffed with fillings like
sausage and pepper or spinach,
goat cheese and shallots, then
baked, cut in half and served
with hot tomato sauce — are the
meal deal of Truckee/Tahoe at
$5.50. Daily beer and $5 slice
special between 2-5 p.m. Salads
so good they have started to sell
their dressing bottles for take-
out. There are three generations
of New York pizza experience
coming into play at this restau-
rant — take advantage of it.
Wagon Train Coffee Shop
10080 Donner Pass Rd.,
Truckee, across from the
bus depot
530-587-7574
wagontriancoffeeshop.com
Strap on your feed bag and get
comfortable, you’re not moseying
anywhere. For 45 years this
Truckee
landmark has been serving classic
American food with American
portions reminiscent of the days
when we tilled the fields or chopped
the lumber. The burgers (in fact, all
lunch and dinner selections) come
with a generous salad bar, owner
Brian Smart’s home-made soup and
fries. Locals will come in for break-
fast, order “the regular” (sometimes
off the bargain kids’ menu) and
check the “Specials Board” outside
to decide on lunch. I love the
specials board. It is like winning the
lottery when they have the Ortega
Burger with all the accoutrements
for $10. The walls here are decorated
with photos from Truckee’s colorful
past and an electric train runs the
track overhead; yet, while the inte-
rior may be steeped in memorabilia,
owner Siobhan Smart’s political
commentary and opinions are up-
to-the-minute. Agree or disagree,
you’ll have fun with it. Hint: Arrive
before 7:30 a.m and get your break-
fast at half-price.
Pine Street Café @ Tahoe
Forest Hospital
10121 Pine Street, off
Donner Pass Rd., Truckee
530-587-6011
tfhd.com
You know, if I keep writing about
this place I will never get my favorite
seat by the little waterfall. Truly,
once you discover the gastronomi-
cal/economical wonders performed
here, it becomes a once-a-day ritual.
Sometimes two, if they are serving
the salmon with mango salsa for $5.
Why, I asked, is this hospital food so
darn good? I mean, that Rosemary
Chicken Breast and the trendy
Quinoa on the salad bar are stuff
fancy restaurants are made of. The
answer? The powers that be at Ta-
hoe Forest Hospital decided train-
ing hospital workers to be culinary
experts was not a good fit, so now
they bring in culinary experts to
become hospital workers. The
result: Great chefs in the house
who showcase their talents in
this sunny cafeteria. Some days
you will find great homemade
south-of-the-border fare, oth-
ers Pork Tenderloin with Port
Wine Berry Sauce, always an
amazing salad bar, always
around $4-5. Open breakfast
($2-3), lunch and dinner, from
7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Note: The
coffee bar selections are still
free, but only if you bring
your own cup.
Timber
House
Restaurant and Bar
Lakeside Inn and Casino
168 Hwy. 50, Stateline
1-800-624-7980
lakesideinn.com
Views of the Sierra and Mount
Tallac are a pretty solid indicator
you are in a good place, but you’re
afraid you may have to siphon gas
out of someone’s car to pay for it.
Not so! At least not for breakfast and
lunch. The $4.99 breakfast special,
available from 11 p.m. to 11 a.m.,
will keep you fueled up with two
eggs, bacon or sausage, and choice
of pancakes or French Toast. The
only way you are going to beat that
price is if you are a senior, then you
eat the same for free, once a month.
For lunch there is an entire menu
offering half servings of selections
(still plentiful) at lesser costs.
Freshies
3330 Lake Tahoe Blvd.,
South Lake Tahoe
530-542-3630
freshiestahoe.com
If your family wrestled with the
decision of The Islands vs. Tahoe
for the annual vacation, wrestle no
more. This cutie pie of a restaurant
has a Hawaiian feel but with the
crisp fresh air of the Sierra wafting
through its open interior. The menu
is creative and affordable with Wow!
selections, including the grilled
Portobello mushroom appetizer
topped with red curry, basil pesto,
carrots and coconut milk for $9.95
and a full pound of Good Old Red’s
country style pork ribs for $12.95.
The burger and meal-type sand-
wiches for lunch include macaroni
salad, sesame slaw or salad for $10-
$11, and for dinner, the vegetarian
entrees go easy on the pocketbook
and big on the flavor. I’m telling you,
the sweet potato and quinoa griddle
cakes topped with a sweet chili
garlic sauce at $13.95 would make a
vegetarian out of Colonel Sanders.
Hunan Garden
900 Emerald Bay Rd.,
South Lake Tahoe
530-544-5868
I will be a writer of little words
here, because I have my mouth
full and need to reach for my chop
sticks. Suffice to say: Chinese
Buffet. More than 40 hot and cold
items to choose from, desserts too,
lunch ($7.50) or dinner ($10.75).
Hunan Garden is open daily from
11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. and takes res-
ervations for large parties. Me? I
take the Hunan Chicken, over and
over, as much as I like.
The Red Hut Cafes
2723 Lake Tahoe Blvd.
(530-541-9024) or
3660 Lake Tahoe Blvd.
(530-544-1595),
South Lake Tahoe.
redhutcafe.com
First of all, I loved my waitress
Cheryl, who called me “honey.”
More than once. She must really like
me too. Secondly, I was transported
to waffle heaven, which isn’t really
surprising as that is how The Red
Hut got started back in 1959 when
it was the Red Hut Waffle Shop. For
$7.49 I treated myself to the Waffle
Sandwich which consists of one
big waffle, an egg and two pieces
of bacon or sausage. For an extra
buck I could have added bananas
or strawberries, but I’m a Waffle
Sandwich purist. Lunch proved
equally delightful and affordable
with great 1/3 lb. burgers for $6.99
with fries. For dinner, I went back to
the breakfast menu (you can do that
at Red Hut) and had Don’s Special,
two pancakes, two eggs and three
slices of bacon at $7.99. And where
were the kids for all this? Cancel
the babysitter! The Kids’ Menu has
children friendly options for $3.99
with drink, $2.99 without.
10
11
13
12
14
15
9
... from page 59
The Red Hut Cafe.Photo: Kelly Gardner
W
agon Train Coffee Shop.
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 60 5/11/2012 5:34:28 PM
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 61 60 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner
Happy Hour Daily 3-6 pm
Customized Catering
(775) 833-1030
www.crosbyspub.com
Where the Locals Eat & Play
11 HD Flat Screens
Multi-Play/Multi-Denomination Poker Machines
Come enjoy our outdoor patio seating!
IN CHRISTMAS TREE VILLAGE • 868 TAHOE BOULEVARD, INCLINE VILLAGE, NV
T’s Mesquite Rotisserie
901 Tahoe Blvd.
Incline Village, Nevada
775-831-2832
Local businesses in the vicinity of
this popular eatery will concur: It
is impossible to get any work done
once T’s fires up its monster rotis-
series. It’s the aroma that will draw
you in the first time, but it is the
burritos, says owner Chuck Swing,
that will keep you coming back.
“We didn’t intend to be known as
Mexican, but we have definitely
leaned south of the border — the
burritos pay our rent!” That’s
money well spent. All ingredients
are fresh, fresh and fresh again,
to keep up with the line out the
door. The rotisseries turn out
succulent tri tip, pork and chicken
at a steady clip. The salsa (many
like the green, I’m a Habanera girl)
keeps getting refilled. And you will
leave with cash in your pocket to
come back again. A family of four
can dine here for under $30. Lo-
cated just five minutes from Sand
Harbor, it’s a great place to stop
for take out on your way there, or
to fill up on your way back.
T’s trivia: The “T” stands for
Terri — Chuck’s bride of 32
years.
Mott Canyon
Tavern and Grill
259 Kingsbury
Grade, Stateline
775-588-8989
mottcanyon.com
OK, so you got your outdoor
patio and 1/3 lb. burgers for
$7 – what more do you need?
How ‘bout the Chicken Noodle
Casserole or “Day Old” Spa-
ghetti and Meatballs with soup,
salad or fries for $8.95. Maybe
you need a daily beer special.
OK, Mott can help you out
there. Need diversions between
rounds? Step right up to video
poker or golf. The locals have a
saying, “If you can’t find some-
thing to eat at Mott, you’re just
not hungry.” Maybe they should
change that to “If you can’t find
something to eat, drink or do at
Mott, you’re asleep.”
16
17
....continued on page 62
Freshies. Photo: Dan Keenan.
530-587-8852
10418 Donner Pass Rd.
www.burgermetruckee.com
CHECK OUT OUR SPECIAL DEALS
ON FACEBOOK AND TWITTER!
Call Ahead for Speedy Service!
Open Daily
11am-9pm
FREE
PARKING
775-737-9404
6280 Sharlands Ave.
Unit 101
www.burgermereno.com
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 61 5/11/2012 5:34:30 PM
• Open 24/7
• Full Bar
• 25 HDTVs
• Breakfast
• Lunch
• Dinner
930 Tahoe Blvd. • Raley’s Center • 775.831.9008 • www.rookieslaketahoe.com
UFC, NFL,
NBA, MLB,
SOCCER,
& MORE!
We’ve Got
Your Game…
Penny-Nickel Slots,
Video Poker, Blackjack,
Keno & More…
Hand Tossed Pizza…
Outdoor Dining, Catering,
Large Party Seating,
Daily Specials, Free Wi-Fi
8”- $5.99
14”- $10.99
Toppings – 79¢
Calzones – $6.99
$3.99
BREAKFAST
(7am-Noon Daily)
H
A
L
F
P
R
IC
E
BURGER
TUESDAYS
2
4
/
7
HAPPY
HOUR
SPORTS BAR & GRILL
W
H
E
R
E

E
V
E
R
Y
O
N
E

P
L
A
Y
S
!
$1.50
BEERS
Pabst, Miller
High Life and
Busch Light
FUN
FOR THE
W
HOLE
FAM
ILY
62 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
Fat Cat Café
599 North Lake Tahoe
Blvd., Tahoe City
530-583-3355
fatcatcafetahoe.com
This place would be my new guilty
pleasure except they are so good to
my body and my budget I can’t put
them in that nifty category. Painted
Hills grass-fed beef in my lasagna for
only $13? Organic greens and Tatsoi
spinach in my salads? Unbelievable.
The share plates and pastas entrees
are ample for two, especially if you
start with an appetizer like the Thai
Lettuce Wraps ($11) or the Ahi Tuna
Tower (amazing) for $13. The upscale
décor features art work by local talent
and the wine and cocktail selections
add to the “I’m a Fat Cat” feel. Impres-
sive music line-up in the evenings, so
put your dogs up and stay awhile.
Flight Deck Restaurant
and Bar
1901 Airport Road,
South Lake Tahoe
530-542-3325
I have always loved the food at
airports, and this place is no excep-
tion, except I can afford an appetizer
and a meal! Start with the calamari
app for $7.95 (better be traveling à
duex) and then move on to a grilled
burger with fries, salad or onions
rings for $6.95. Great homemade
south of the border creations as well.
Says owner Thomas Miller as he
fusses over a turkey and roast beef
in the oven, “You can pretty much
get anything you want here.” No
kidding. Live music Thurs-Sun;
Amateur Stand Up Comedy
Hour every Saturday; Open
Mic’ Nite on Tuesday; Happy
Hour every day all day with daily
food specials including Prime Rib
Saturday, Italian Sunday, Steak
Specials on Monday, Mexican Tues-
days, Cooks Choice Wednesday,
BBQ Baby Back Ribs on Thursday
and Fish Fridays. All this and a stun-
ning view of the Sierra Nevada.
Taco Jalisco’s
11400 Donner Pass Rd.,
Truckee
530-587-1131
I know. There are more Mexican


restaurants
in Tahoe/Truckee than
single men. But do they all, or
any, have the incredible Armadilla
for $13.95? I think not! This built-
for-two (three, if you ask for more
of the complimentary tortillas)
sizzling masterpiece is jam-
packed with pork, beef, shrimp,
chicken and cactus all simmering
in a brown, spicy sauce served in a
hot rock pedestal-like dish. It
comes with
side of refried
beans, tortillas, and
Spanish rice for roll-up fixings.
On the lighter side, there’s tacos
(beef, chicken or pork) for $1.50
and seafood specials throughout
the week. s
20
18
19
... from page 61
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TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 62 5/11/2012 5:34:36 PM
62 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
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TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 63 5/11/2012 5:34:39 PM
DINING cocktails
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 65 64 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
good
libations
Te Wet Woody
By Simone Grandmain
Tahoe Magazine
Gar Woods Grill and Pier
5000 North Lake Blvd.
Carnelian Bay, CA
530-546-3366
garwoods.com
Riva Grill on the Lake
900 Ski Run Blvd. #3
South Lake Tahoe, CA
530-542-2600
rivagrill.com
This summer, Gar Woods Bar and Grill will serve up its 2
millionth Wet Woody! Stop by its lakeside deck to find out what
all the fuss is about, or, in South Lake Tahoe, visit Woody’s second
home: Riva Grill on the Lake. The Wet Woody is a blended drink
using no ice. The trick is in the Taylor Distributors’ mega-machine
that freezes the ingredients in their entirely, the end product
being a smooth, creamy cocktail.
White rum I Peach schnapps I Fruit juices
Te Rum Runner
The Beacon Bar & Grill
1900 Jameson Beach Rd.
South Lake Tahoe, CA
530-541-0630
camprichardson.com
This cocktail is so popular it has its
own logo, own mixes sold onsite at
The Beacon, and its own day of the
week: Rum Runner Wednesday.
And with this signature drink
being served up at just $5, it’s an
affordable way to ensure you won’t
run up your tab.
White rum I Spiced rum
Dark rum I Fruit juices
Blend white and spiced rums with
juices and ice. Float dark rum on top
before serving.
GeT youR TAhoe SummeR oN WITh ThIS SIx-PACk oF SIP-SATIoNS
FRom A SexTeT oF TAhoe/TRuCkee ReSTAuRANTS
Chipotle Margarita
The Fresh Ketch Restaurant
2435 Venice Drive East
South Lake Tahoe, CA
530-541-5683
freshketch.com
Aye-yi-yi! Such a thing of beauty it is hard to
keep your eyes on the lakeside view offered
here. It gets easier with the second one,
though...
Corzo Silver Tequila I Peach liquor I Agave
Pineapple juice I homemade sweet and sour Chipotle
mix all to taste, serve over ice or blended.
Te Clay Pot
Casa Baeza
10010 Bridge St., Truckee
530-562-4144
This place serves 140 (count them!) different kinds of tequila. I think, after
about 127, they might all taste the same. So for starters, go with their famous
Clay Pot and savor the difference.
Tenoch Tequila I Squirt soda I Fresh squeezed lime juice
mix all and serve over ice.
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 64 5/11/2012 5:34:48 PM
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 65 64 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
The only thing more amazing than the views
of Tahoe is the menu of fresh seafood, great
steaks and music as fresh as the fare itself.
Tahoe’s only Fresh Bar with the latest in
infused cocktails using the freshest ingredients.
The Fresh Ketch
just got Fresher
tahoe keys marina ~ right on the water
TheFreshKetch.com ~ 530.541.5683
z+1! \ea|ce |r. · :e. |+|e I+|ee, t|. ºê¹!ò
A beacon of
Voted Tahoe’s Best
- Steak
- Pasta
- Seafood
- Appetlzers
- Lakevlew Dlnlng
FOREST SERVICE
l900 1ameson 8each Pd., South Lake Tahoe
Home of the Rum Runner
& Best Beer
Selection in Tahoe
The Beacon Bar & Grill
Open Year Round at
Historic Camp Richardson Resort
530-54l-0630 - 8eaconTahoe.com
Camp Richardson is operated under Special Use Permit with the U.S. Forest Service, Lake Tahoe
Basin Management Unit.
Fun
Jake’s On The Lake
780 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City
530-583-0188
jakestahoe.com
Best Bloody
Best Pies
10068 Donner Pass Rd., Truckee
530-582-1111
bestpies.com
Really more like a meal, or at least a side salad, this Bloody
is garnished with huge green olives, picked green beans,
pepperoncini and a full celery stick.
Celery salt I major Peters
Bloody mary mix (this has
smoke flavor, molasses,
onions, garlic and chili spices)
han Vodka I Tabasco
Cholula chili sauce
Wet rim of large glass and
dip in celery salt then fill with
ice. Pour in vodka, stopping
about three inches from the
top. Top off with Bloody mary
mix and season to taste with
hot sauces.
Kimo could be my new best friend. I like the way he
is put together, right down to the pineapple spear
and jaunty paper umbrella.
myers Platinum Rum I orange Curacao I Passion fruit juice
Guava juice I orange juice I Pineapple juice I Dark rum
mix myers rum, curacao and blend of juices. Pour over ice,
float dark rum on top.
Kimo’s Mai Tai
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 65 5/11/2012 5:34:51 PM
MEYERS, THE “Y” & EMERALD BAY
Alpina Coffee Café . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.541.7449
822 Emerald Bay Rd., So. Lake Tahoe alpinacafe.com
The Beacon Bar & Grill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.541.0630
1900 Jameson Beach Rd., So. Lake Tahoe - L D A beacontahoe.com
Bert’s Cafe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.544.3434
1146 Emerald Bay Rd., So. Lake Tahoe bertscafe.com
Brothers Bar & Grill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.541.7071
888 Emerald Bay Rd., So. Lake Tahoe - B L D A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Cantina Bar & Grill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.544.1233
765 Emerald Bay Rd., So. Lake Tahoe - L D A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . cantinatahoe.com
Evans American Gourmet Cafe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.542.1990
536 Emerald Bay Rd., So. Lake Tahoe - D A evanstahoe.com
Flight Deck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.542.3325
1901 Airport Rd., So. Lake Tahoe - B L D A
Getaway Café. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.577.5132
3140 Highway 50, So. Lake Tahoe - B L D A getawaycafetahoe.com
Taco Bell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.544.5114
1060 Emerald Bay Rd., So. Lake Tahoe - L D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . tacobell.com
Passaretti’s Italian Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.541.3433
1181 Emerald Bay Rd., So. Lake Tahoe - L D A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . passarettis.com
CENTRAL SOUTH SHORE
Artemis Mediterranean Grill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.542.2500
2229 Lake Tahoe Blvd., So. Lake Tahoe - L D A. . . . . . . artemismediterraneangrill.com
Baumann’s Swiss Chalet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.544.3304
2544 Lake Tahoe Blvd., So. Lake Tahoe - D A. . . . . . . . . . .baumannswisschalet.com
Big Daddy’s Burgers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.541.3465
3490 Lake Tahoe Blvd., So. Lake Tahoe - L D A
The Cork & More. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.544.5253 / 866.544.1033
1032 Al Tahoe Blvd., So. Lake Tahoe - B L D A thecorkandmore.com
Echo Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.544.5400
4130 Lake Tahoe Blvd., So. Lake Tahoe - L D A embassytahoe.com
Fat City Food Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.542.2780
2660 Lake Tahoe Blvd., So. Lake Tahoe - L D A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . fatcityfood.com
Fire + Ice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.544.3204
4100 Lake Tahoe Blvd., Marriott Timber Lodge, So. Lake Tahoe - L D A . . . . fire-ice.com
The Fresh Ketch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.541.5683
2435 Venice Dr., So. Lake Tahoe - L D A thefreshketch.com
Izzy’s Burger Spa. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.544.5030
2591 Highway 50, So. Lake Tahoe - L D A izzysburgerspa.com
Jazz Kat Café . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.541.2084
3434 Lake Tahoe Blvd., So. Lake Tahoe - B L . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MacDuff’s Public House . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.542.8777
1041 Fremont Ave., So. Lake Tahoe - B L D A macduffspub.com
Mandarin Garden Chinese Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.544.8885
2502 Lake Tahoe Blvd., So. Lake Tahoe - L D A tahoe.com/mandarin-garden
Margaritas Mexican Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.544.6907
2502 Lake Tahoe Blvd., So. Lake Tahoe - L D A
Nepheles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.544.8130
1169 Ski Run Blvd., So. Lake Tahoe nepheles.com
Off the Hook Sushi Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.544.5599
2660 Lake Tahoe Blvd., So. Lake Tahoe - D A offthehooksushi.com
Overland Meat & Seafood Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.544.3204
2227 Lake Tahoe Blvd., So. Lake Tahoe - B L D . . . . . . . . . . . . overlandmeatco.com
Samurai Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.542.0300
2588 Lake Tahoe Blvd., So. Lake Tahoe - D A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . sushitahoe.com
Scusa! Italian Ristorante . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.542.0100
2543 Lake Tahoe Blvd., So. Lake Tahoe - D A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . scusalaketahoe.com
Tahoe Eats
Key to optional restaurant
Information - please call or
visit the restaurant’s website
for verification:
B = serving breakfast
L = serving lunch
D = serving dinner
A = serving alcoholic
beverages
At the Lake Tahoe Airport
Open 7 Days a Week until 10pm
Outdoor Dining on the Sky Deck
Breakfast on Weekends 10am-1pm
Open at 11am on Weekdays
1901 Airport Rd | So. Lake Tahoe
530.542.3325
Italian Restaurant
Serving Sun - Thurs 11am - 9pm
Fri & Sat 11am - 9:30pm
Located 1/4 mile south of the “Y”
1181 Emerald Bay Road
530.541.3433
www.passarettis.com
Italian Restaurant
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 66 5/11/2012 5:34:54 PM
Spectacular scenery and
delectable dining.
Call 775.588.2787
or visit EdgewoodTahoe.com
Enjoy fne dining and spirits
at a higher elevation.
3140 Hwy 50 | Meyers
(On the left after coming down

Echo Summit from Sacramento)
530.577.5132
open daily for
breakfast, lunch & dinner
* dog-friendcly patio *
Gourmet Burgers, Pasta,
Steak, Seafood, Salads,
Fresh Sauces and the Best
Soup on the South Shore
Serving up Alpine
Comfort Cuisine
STATELINE & ZEPHYR COVE
19 Kitchen • Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775-586-6777
Harvey’s Lake Tahoe, 18 Highway 50, Stateline - D A totalrewardstahoe.com
Brooks’ Bar & Deck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775.588.2787
100 Lake Parkway, Stateline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . edgewoodtahoe.com
The Cabo Wabo Cantina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775.586.6611
Harveys Lake Tahoe, 18 Highway 50, Stateline . . . . . . . . . . .totalrewardstahoe.com
The Chart House Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775.588.6276
392 Kingsbury Grade, Lake Tahoe - D A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . chart-house.com
Ciera Steak + Chophouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800.648.3353
Montbleu Resort, Casino & Spa, 55 Highway 50, Stateline - D A. . . montbleuresort.com
Edgewood Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775.588.2787
100 Lake Parkway, Stateline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . edgewoodtahoe.com
Forest Buffet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775.586.6611
Harrah’s Casino, 15 Highway 50, Stateline . . . . . . . . . . . . . .totalrewardstahoe.com
Hard Rock Café . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775.588.6200
Harveys Lake Tahoe, 18 Highway 50, Stateline - L D A . . . . . . . . . . . . hardrock.com
Friday’s Station . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775.586.6611
Harrah’s Casino, 15 Highway 50, Stateline - D A . . . . . . . . . .totalrewardstahoe.com
聚福樓 (Gi Fu Loh) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775-586-6611
Harrah’s Casino, 15 Highway 50, Stateline . . . . . . . . . . . . . .totalrewardstahoe.com
Latin Soul Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775.588.7777
Lakeside Inn & Casino, 168 Highway 50, Stateline - B L D A . . . . . . . . lakesideinn.com
Luigi’s Tahoe Pizza . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775.588.0442
209 Kingsbury Grade, Stateline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pizzalaketahoe.com
Sage Room Steak House . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775-588-2411
Harveys Lake Tahoe, 18 Highway 50, Stateline, NV . . . . . . . . .totalrewardstahoe.com
Sam’s Place . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775.588.2844
611 Highway 50, Zephyr Cove - B L D A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . samsplacetahoe.com
Sul Lago Ristorante . . . . . . Rest: 775.588.4156 Deli & Pizzeria: 775.588.4157
177 Highway 50, Stateline - L D A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . sullagoristorante.com
Timber House Restaurant & Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775.588.7777
Lakeside Inn & Casino, 168 Highway 50, Stateline - B L D A . . . . . . . . lakesideinn.com
Sushi Pier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775.588.8588
195 Highway 50, Stateline - L D A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .sushipiertahoe.com
Zephyr Cove Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775-589-4906
760 Highway 50, Zephyr Cove - B L D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .zephyrcove.com
Tahoe Eats
F a l l / Wi n t e r 2 0 1 1
Your definitive guide to dining on the South Shore of Lake Tahoe.
Tahoe Tastes gives you detailed information on local restaurants along with a locator
map showing you where to find them, a listing of social media websites, diner reviews,
and scannable QR codes linking to even more online information and specials.
Pick up your copy today from one of the helpful Concierges at
Montbleu Resort & Casino, Harrah’s Lake Tahoe, Harvey’s Lake Tahoe the
Embassy Suites Lake Tahoe Hotel & Ski Resort, or at the Tahoe Daily Tribune office.
Sugar Pine Bakery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.542.7000
3564 Lake Tahoe Blvd., So. Lake Tahoe - B L . . . . . . . . . . . . . . sugarpinebakery.net
Taco Bell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.544.0409
2681 Lake Tahoe Blvd., So. Lake Tahoe - L D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . tacobell.com
Tep’s Villa Roma. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.541.8227 / 800.490.3066
3450 Lake Tahoe Blvd., So. Lake Tahoe -D A tepsvillaroma.com
Thai Nakorn II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.544.3232
2108 Lake Tahoe Blvd., So. Lake Tahoe - L D A . . . . . . . . . . . . thainakorntahoe.com
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 67 5/11/2012 5:35:04 PM
INCLINE VILLAGE, KINGS BEACH & CRYSTAL BAY
Austin’s Restaurant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775.832.7778
120 Country Club Blvd. #25, Incline Village - L D A . . . . . . . . . . . . austinstahoe.com
Bar Bar Bar U-Bake Pizza. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775.831.2877
760 Incline Village - L D A
Bite. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775.831.1000
907 Tahoe Blvd., Incline Village - D A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .bitetahoe.com
Char Pit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sand Harbor 530.414.8949 Kings Beach 530.546.3171
Sand Harbor State Park & 8732 North Lake Blvd., Kings Beach - L D A. . . . . charpit.com
China Wok . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775.833.3663
120 Country Club Dr. #62, Incline Village - L D
Crosby’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775.833.1030
868 Tahoe Blvd., Christmas Village, Incline Village - B L D A . . . . . . crosbyspub.com
Dimaggio’s at the Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775.298.2424
800 Tahoe Blvd., Incline Village - B L D A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .inclinepizza.com
Jason’s Landing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.546.3315
8338 No. Lake Blvd.., Kings Beach - L D A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . jasonslanding.com
Kings Cafe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.546.3663
8421 North Lake Blvd., Kings Beach - B L D A
La Mexicana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.546.0310
8515 Brook Ave.,Kings Beach - L D A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . rookieslaketahoe.com
Lupita’s Mexican Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775.833.4141
754 Mays Blvd., Incline Village - L D A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rookie’s Sports Bar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775.831.9008
930 Tahoe Blvd., Raley’s Center, Incline Village - B L D A . . . . . rookieslaketahoe.com
Soule Domain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.546.7529
9983 Cove St., Brockway - D A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . souledomain.com
T’s Mesquite Rotisserie. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775.831.2832
901 Tahoe Blvd. #3, Incline Village - L D A
Tomaato’s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775.833.2200
120 Country Club Dr. #61, Incline Village - D A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .tomaatos.com
Wild Alaskan Restaurant & Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775.832.6777
930 Tahoe Blvd. #901, Incline Village - L D A. . . . . . wildalaskanrestaurantandbar.com
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TRUCKEE, TAHOE CITY & WEST SHORE
Blue Coyote. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.587.7777
10015 Palisades Dr., Truckee - L D A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . bluecoyotetruckee.com
CB’s Pizza & Grill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.546.4738
5075 North Lake Blvd., Carnelian Bay - L D A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.cbspizza.com
Chambers Landing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530/525-9190
6300 Chambers Lodge Rd., Homewood - L D A
Cottonwood Restaurant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.587.5711
10142 Rue Hilltop Rd., Truckee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . cottonwoodrestaurantcom
Dockside 700 Wine Bar & Grill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.581.0303
700 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City - B L D A
Firesign Café . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.583.0871
1785 West Lake Blvd., Tahoe City - B L A
Lakeside Pizza & Sports Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.583.2000
850 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City - L D A. . . . . . . . . . . . .www.lakesidetahoecity.com
Obexer’s Internet Café & Deli . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.525.1300
5300 West Lake Blvd., Homewood - B L D A
Pete ‘N Peters Sports Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.583.2400
395 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City
Swiss Lakewood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.525.5211
5055 West Lake Blvd., Homewood - D A
Taco Bell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.550.9300
12277 Deerfield Dr., Truckee - L D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . tacobellcom
Tahoe Mountain Brewing Co . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.581.4677
475 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City - L D A
Uncorked Tahoe City . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530.581.1106
475 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City - A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . uncorkedtahoecity.com
Tahoe Eats A dining guide to the North Shore & Truckee
Key to optional restaurant
Information - please call or
visit the restaurant’s website
for verification:
B = serving breakfast
L = serving lunch
D = serving dinner
A = serving alcoholic
beverages
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 69
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 68 5/11/2012 5:35:09 PM
A dining guide to the North Shore & Truckee
Restaurant & Bar
W
I
L
D
ALA
S
K
A
N
Casual Dining
Open Daily from 11 am
Happy Hours
3-6 pm & 9 - 10 pm
775.832-6777
Raley’s Center, Incline Village • behind Radio Shack • 930 Tahoe #901
www.wildalaskanrestaurantandbar.com
Summer2012 TAHOE magazine69
Wine Tasting
I
n certain social circles, there arguably
is no more effective way to be labeled a
pretentious bombast than to take a slow sip
of wine and utter something like: “I detect a
rich flavor of blackberry with a succinct woody
finish and perhaps a fading hint of citrus.”
However, in other social circles, there is no
better way to ingratiate oneself.
Irrespective of the socio-economic connota-
tions associated with being a wine connoisseur
or whether the vernacular surrounding wine
tasting strikes one as helpfully descriptive or
snootily overblown, winemaking is dynamic
and complex, and those with a sophisticated
knowledge of the process say every decision
made by a viticulturist — a term for one who
cultivates grape vines — will be apparent in
the final product.
The geography of TasTe
Stephen Tebb, winemaker at Napa Valley-
based Robert Craig Winery, is an expert in how
agricultural and biochemical scientific prac-
tices are informing the winemaking industry.
Tebb’s degree in oenology (science of wine)
from University of California, Davis, informs
his daily operations at the vineyard; yet, when
he talks to Northern California and Tahoe
crowds, he avoids overly scientific information
regarding biochemical interactions, instead
providing a more accessible version of wine-
making.
Perhaps the most crucial decision a wine-
maker can make, Tebb said, is where to place
his or her vineyard — climate, precipitation,
slope or gradient of the land, soil type, acidity
of soil, amount of sunlight and wind vectors
are the prominent factors.
“Wine should reflect some aspect of its
origin,” Tebb said. “It denotes the special char-
acteristics that the geography, geology and
climate of a certain place bestows upon the
varieties.”
Most individuals with barely a passing
knowledge of wine can distinguish among dif-
ferent grape varieties, such as Merlot, Cabernet
Sauvignon or Chardonnay. But Tebb’s claim is
that wine varieties as distinct and different as
red zinfandel and Chardonnay share a com-
mon thread of taste if they are grown in the
same region.
Conversely, if one takes identical grapes
and plants them in two different regions — say
Loire Valley in France and Napa Valley — one
will end up with very different tasting prod-
ucts.
“Each grape exhibits a unique quality that is
specific to that region,” Tebb said.
CreaTive deCisions
However, it’s not a matter of simply choos-
ing an ideal plot of land in largely heralded
winemaking regions like Napa, Sonoma or the
emerging Paso Robles and letting the vines run
rampant until harvest time.
The winemaker or viticulturist is responsible
for making creative decisions in an effort to
reach “the best expression of the region,” Tebb
said.
For instance, Robert Craig’s Chardonnay is
grown in Durrell Vineyard, located in Sonoma
Valley close to the San Francisco Bay. Tebb
said the natural acidity of the soil and cool fog-
laden air make for ideal growing conditions for
the white wine.
However, Tebb believes aging a majority of
the wine in stainless steel barrels as opposed
to classic oak barrels highlights and draws out
the taste of this particular wine more effec-
tively — an example of how the winemaker’s
intuition helps craft the final product.
... continued on next page
wine
Making an art
form better
The science of
By Matthew Renda
Tahoe Magazine
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 69 5/12/2012 4:14:45 PM
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 71 70 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
Wine ...from previous page
The decision to employ stainless steel is specific to that type of
Chardonnay, Tebb said, as Robert Craig also produces a Cabernet
Sauvignon in the Spring Mountain District of Napa Valley that is aged
for 20 months in Chateau-style French oak barrels.
Tebb said he must make a litany of those types of decisions based on
the type of grape, the region where it’s growing and the best possible
expression of those combining factors in order to create a great wine.
Thus, winemaking, when viewed holistically, is less of a science and
more of an art, with an individual operating creatively within certain
generally accepted formal guidelines to realize an original expression
reminiscent of a specific time and place.
sCienCe providing Tools
Nevertheless, scientific data can help a viticulturist from the begin-
ning of the winemaking process, Tebb said, until the end.
Tebb employs the use of aerial infrared photography that paints a
picture of how much heat is in certain portions of the vineyard, which
indicates the presence of rocky soil and can help form planting deci-
sions.
Soil analysis, particularly regarding salinity, acidity and plant nutri-
ent status, help drive fertilization decisions, Tebb said.
Many scientific measurements are taken throughout the growing
season, as soil moisture content, the vines’ water potential for leaves,
sap flow in vines, sugar and acid in the grape help guide choices
regarding the ideal time to harvest. Such measurements are also critical
to the fermentation process, when yeast interacts with the sugars in the
grape (a grape consisting of 24 percent sugar will create a wine that is
14 percent alcohol) to create ethanol or ethyl alcohol.
Tebb must consistently monitor the amount of sugar, oxygen and
yeast in the process. Controlled and steady temperatures are also criti-
cal to a successful transformation of grape juice to wine.
At the biochemical level, the biomolecule tannin — the modification
of which plays a crucial role in the aging of wine and is responsible for
its astringent flavor — is thoroughly analyzed and tinkered with during
fermentation.
Technological developments have also helped refine the winemak-
ing process. In the past, Tebb said, once grapes are harvested, workers
meticulously choose the best ones and discard those that are damaged
or failed to ripen.
Manufacturers have developed an optical sorting machine, which,
once given a digital image of an ideal grape, can sift through a conveyor
belt full of fruit, dispensing rotten or damaged grapes with a brief but
strong gust of air.
One year, after harvest, meteorological forces meant Tebb’s crew had
to accelerate the sorting process in order to prevent fruit rot.
“Our entire harvest would’ve gone bad if it wasn’t for that machine,”
he said. “It saved us about five to 10 days.”
never The same
While making wine is essentially the same as it was 10,000 years ago
— archeological evidence suggests the earliest known winemaking
operation was located in the Eastern European country of Georgia circa
8000 B.C. — today’s viticulturists have a greater arsenal of tools and
sophisticated measurement techniques at their disposal.
Tebb said he believes this makes for more consistency in the
winemaking process, meaning a reduction of error year to year.
Nevertheless, the dynamic forces of climate, topography and geology
all interact differently from year to year, he said, meaning a vineyard
will never replicate the exact same wine.
“It’s all part of the fun,” he said. s
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 70 5/11/2012 5:35:10 PM
Summer2012 TAHOE magazine71 70 Summer2012 TAHOE magazine
Tahoe’s most useful real estate web-site: LampeRealEstate.com
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find the
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They’re the doctors and physical
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GOOD F OR L I F E
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 71 5/11/2012 5:44:44 PM
Entertainment music
By Tim Parsons
Tahoe Magazine
hArrAh’S LAKe tAhoe
South Shore Room
May 26: Elvin Bishop, $27.50
June 2: Big Bad Voodoo Daddy, $40

June 9: Eric Burdon & The Animals, $45
2012 LAKe tAhoe SuMMer CoNCert SerIeS

outDoorS At hArVeY’S
July 13: Chicago, the Doobie Brothers, 49 to $99.50, 7 p.m.
July 15: The Beach Boys 50th Anniversary Reunion Tour,
$49.50 to $125.50, 7:30 p.m.
July 21: Maroon 5, $59.50 to $150.50, 7 p.m.
July 22: Journey, Pat Benatar, Loverboy, $59.50 to 199.50, 7 p.m.
July 28: Brad Paisley, The Band Perry, Easton Corbin, $69.50
to $135.50, 6:30 p.m.
Aug. 8: Toby Keith, Brantley Gilbert, $59.50 to $135.50, 7 p.m.
Aug. 12: Norah Jones, $39.50 to $69.50, 8 p.m.
Aug. 17: Joe Cocker, Huey Lewis & The News, $49.50 to
$99.50, 7:30 p.m.
Aug. 18: Sugarland, Lauren Alaina, Canaan Smith, $59.50 to
$125.50, 7 p.m.
F
rom major concerts to mel-
low evenings on the beach,
myriad musical options are
available at Lake Tahoe.
As many as 20 big shows are slated at
South Shore for the Summer Outdoor
Concert Series at the MontBleu
Amphitheater and Lake Tahoe Outdoor
Arena at Tahoe.
On North Shore there will be free
shows each week. The Commons Beach
Concert Series begins June 24 at Tahoe
City’s Commons Beach, national touring blues
artists perform Tuesdays at the Village at
Squaw Valley’s Bluesdays!, Music in the Park
is presented Wednesday nights at the Truckee
Amphitheater, Truckee Thursdays has live
music and activities during its farmers market
and on Fridays Music at the Beach is presented
in Kings Beach.
Although the Lake Tahoe Music Festival has
ended, there will be plenty of classical music
shows at Incline Village and all around the
lake. The inaugural Lake Tahoe SummerFest
will be held the first three weekends of August
at Sierra Nevada College, and Toccata’s seventh
season features concerts from June 20 through
Sept. 20.
National touring bands stop year-round
at Crystal Bay Casino, Harrah’s Lake Tahoe,
and MontBleu Resort Casino & Spa. Music of
course also is offered at dozens of bars and
clubs all around the lake and Truckee.
Toby Keith performs at Harveys Outdoor Arena on Aug. 8, 2012.
Summer2012 TAHOE magazine73 72 Summer2012 TAHOE magazine
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 72 5/11/2012 5:44:47 PM
Tahoe’s Best
Now Does Even
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Award Winning Professionals
Open Daily
530.541.8477
Spa Services at Local Prices!
Appointments Recommended
Walk-Ins Welcome
2009 • 2006
2005 • 2004
2003
www.AltitudeSalonAndSpa.com
2229 Lake Tahoe Blvd, Ste C • South Lake Tahoe
Kings Trading Post Center
Nails
Waxing
Facials
Massage
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Food & Drink Specials
Thursday Ladies Night
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Pool Table, Ping Pong,
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Enjoy Sam’s Famous Pizza & Great Food
in the comfort of your own home!
Delivery Service Full Menu Available
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Open Every Day!
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great food | fun atmosphere!
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D
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Mojitos, Martinis,
Margaritas
Lighted Patio
for Evening Dining
Waterfall
Full Outdoor Bar
frie
n
d
ly
e
m
p
lo
y
e
e
s
&
p
a
tro
n
s
Summer2012 TAHOE magazine73
Sept. 1: Sammy Hagar and the Wabos, general admission $69.50
or $75 on the day of the show, 8 p.m.
2012 SuMMer CoNCert SerIeS
MontBleu Outdoor Amphitheater
Six to 10 concerts to be held, artists were not announced at
press time. Confirmed dates are June 30, July 7, July 14, July 26,
Aug. 4, Sept. 2
Sammy Hagar and the Wabos will play at Harveys on Sept. 1, 2012.
72 Summer2012 TAHOE magazine
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 73 5/11/2012 5:44:49 PM
74 Summer2012 TAHOE magazine
entertainment music
CoMMoNS BeACh
CoNCert SerIeS
Sundays at Tahoe City All Summer Long
Hit the beach in Tahoe City this summer for another fantastic season
of free, live music every Sunday afternoon. Concerts typically start at
4:30 p.m. and the music goes until 7 p.m. Arrive early to get a good
seat and enjoy the show. www.visittahoecity.org
People love the Commons Beach Concert Series because you can stand in the lake
and still see the show.
June 24: Jellybread,
Downbeat, Dad’s LPs,
the Blues Monsters
July 1: He’s My Brother,
She’s My Sister
July 8: Monphonics
July 15: Dead Winter
Carpenters
July 22: Mumbo Gumbo
July 29: New Monsoon
Aug. 5: Poor Man’s Whiskey
Aug. 12: The Trey Stone Band
Aug. 19: Hot Buttered Rum
Aug. 26: Samba Da’
Sept. 2: To be announced
888 Emerald Bay Road
Just North of the “Y”
530.541.7017
facebook.com/brothersgrill
Brothers Benedict
breakfast
lunch
Brothers
Black Diamond
dinner
cocktails
the best
bloody’s
brothers bar & grill
happy hour
seven days a week 3-6
awesome
patio area
relax!
Brothers Chocolate Lava Cake
great
service
live music
7 TVs and 100”
outside projector
Brothers South Shore Burger
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 74 5/11/2012 5:44:53 PM
74 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
888 Emerald Bay Road
Just North of the “Y”
530.541.7017
facebook.com/brothersgrill
Brothers Benedict
breakfast
lunch
Brothers
Black Diamond
dinner
cocktails
the best
bloody’s
brothers bar & grill
happy hour
seven days a week 3-6
awesome
patio area
relax!
Brothers Chocolate Lava Cake
great
service
live music
7 TVs and 100”
outside projector
Brothers South Shore Burger
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 75 5/12/2012 4:31:19 PM
Corner of Palisades Dr. and
Brockway Rd. (next to 7-11)
530-587-7777
OPEN EVERYDAY
Happy Hour Everyday 3pm-6pm
BURGERS • PIZZA • SPORTS
Full Menu til 10pm
19 TVs • 12 Beers on Tap
All the Packages
NFL • NBA • MLB • NHL • College Football
18 TVs • 12 Beers on Tap
OPEN DAILY AT 11:30am
Open For Lunch and Dinner
Everyday at 11:30 am
775.588.1677
laketahoecigar@aol.com
Lake Tahoe Cigar
next to Buffet inside MontBleu
Best Selection
of Premium
Cigars
&
NFL-NBA-MLB-NHL
Sports Memorabilia
FREE
Cigar with $50
Purchase of Any
Sports Items
M E N ’ S A C C E S S O R I E S
N
o
S
m
o
k
i
n
g
J
a
c
k
e
t
R
e
quired
Summer2012 TAHOE magazine77 76 Summer2012 TAHOE magazine
Entertainment music
BLueSDAYS!
Tuesdays at the Village at Squaw Valley
Unwind in the Village at Squaw Valley every Tuesday
from 6:30 -8:30 p.m. Catch a free blues concert on the
Events Plaza Stage with acclaimed blues musicians,
“Blue Plate Specials” from the Village restaurants, “Blue
Dot Deals” at unique shops. Check out Squaw.com
for the incredible Bluesdays lineup. Bluesdays lodging
packages are also available.
www.squaw.com/bluesdays-squaw
July 3: Chris Cain
July 10: John Németh
July 17: Ron Hacker & the Hacksaws
July 24: Hamilton Loomis
July 31: Guitar Shorty
Aug. 7 Jimmy Thackery & the Drivers
Aug. 14: Coco Montoya
Aug. 21: Kenny Neal
Aug. 28: Blues Monsters & Friends
Guitar Shorty will play at Squaw Valley on July 31, 2012.
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 76 5/11/2012 5:44:55 PM
Summer2012 TAHOE magazine77 76 Summer2012 TAHOE magazine
Discover the Difference!
+ +
CALL 866-397-0383 TODAY!
suddenlink.com
MuSIC
IN the PArK
Starting June 20 - Every
Wednesday through Aug. 29
Summer Music Series -
Free concerts at the Truckee
Regional Park Amphitheater
6:30-8 p.m. Take your beach
chairs and picnic on the grass
while the bands play.
www.tdrpd.com
530-582-7720
truCKee
thurSDAYS
Truckee Thursdays, 5 p.m.
June 14-Aug. 23 Activities
include a certified organic
Farmers’ Market, live
music, arts and crafts ven-
dors, beer garden, side-
walk sales, outdoor dining,
and children’s activities.
www.historictruckee.com
McKinney & Assoc. Inc., Realtors
Jacqueline Claudette Madeleine
We treat you like family
3 Sisters Working For You!
2196 Lake Tahoe Blvd.
South Lake Tahoe
(530) 542-5516 (866) 542-5516
www.sltahoeproperties.com
3sisters@cbmckinney.com
Fiddlin’ Jen of the Dead Winter Carpenters
plays at the Truckee Recreation & Park
District’s Summer Music Series.
InnerRhythms performed a variety of
dances to the music of The Beatles at the
Truckee amphitheater last summer.
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 77 5/11/2012 5:44:57 PM
rediscover the
value
CASINO RESORT • LAKE TAHOE
50 Highway 50
|
Stateline, NV
|
800.648.3322
|
www.horizoncasino.com
Our family-friendly resort offers:
• Horizon Stadium Cinemas
• Town Square Buffet
• Weekly Wine Tastings
We are just minutes from world-class
golf courses and ski resorts.
Come discover why we are
Tahoe’s Best Kept Secret.
Kids receive
a FREE
Arcade Card
at every
Sunday show
ILLUSION FUSION
Starring Alex Ramon
High-energy, theatrical magic show
in The Golden Cabaret
Kids under 12 FREE with each
Summer2012 TAHOE magazine79 78 Summer2012 TAHOE magazine
Entertainment music
MuSIC oN the BeACh
Fridays, Kings Beach State
Recreation Area, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
July 6: Blues Monsters
July 13: tba
July 20: tba
July 27: tba
Aug. 3: tba
Aug. 10: tba
Aug. 17: Zanzibar
Aug.24: tba
Aug. 31: tba
CrYStAL BAY CASINo
May 25: Dead Winter Carpenters
May 26: Robert Earl Keen, David Jacobs
Strain, Jeffrey Halford
May 27: Tab Benoit
June 8: Donavon Frankenreiter
June 16: David Allan Coe,
HellBound Glory
June 22: Albino
July 23: Pretty Things Peep Show
June 29: Dick Dale
June 30: Leftover Salmon
July 7: Super Diamond
July 18: Chris Robinson Brotherhood,
Fox Street Allstars
July 13: Old Man Markley, Sneaky Creatures
July 28: the Malone Brothers
Sept. 8: Marcia Ball
MoNtBLeu theAtre
MontBleu Resort Casino & Spa
June 23: Gary Valenciano, $55-$75, 9 p.m.
www.montbleuresort.com
The Crown Room in the Crystal Bay Casino is equipped with a state-
of-the-art sound system and dozens of 50-inch plasma video screens.
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 78 5/11/2012 5:45:03 PM
Summer2012 TAHOE magazine79 78 Summer2012 TAHOE magazine
Check our website for specials
www.inclineattahoe.com
888-686-5253
Long term
1 bedroom to 6 bedroom
$100 to $900 per night
Year round
For your real estate inquiries
please contact
775-336-7005 or 775-831-9000
rhonda_hutton@yahoo.com
LAKEFRONT/LAKEVIEW SALES
& PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
811 Tahoe Boulevard Incline Village, NV 89451
VACATION
RENTALS
Rhonda J.
HUTTON
Broker/Salesman
40th ANNuAL ShAKeSPeAre FeStIVAL
July 13-Aug. 26 — “The Two Gentlemen of Verona” — at Sand
Harbor State Park, Incline Village. Performances are at 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday through Sundays. Gates open at 5. For tickets call 1-800-
74-SHOWS or visit www.laketahoeshakespeare.com
LAKe tAhoe SuMMerFeSt
Aug. 3-5, Aug. 10-12 and Aug 17-19.
Performances directed by Maestro Joel Revzen held at 6:30 p.m.
Fridays and Saturdays and 3 p.m. Sundays at Sierra Nevada
College’s outdoor venue, Incline Village.
Visit www.tahoesummerfest.org or call 775-298-0245
HUNAN GARDEN
O F L A K E T A H O E
DELUXE LUNCHEON BUFFET
ALL YOU CAN EAT SOUP, SALAD, APPETIZERS, AND ENTREES
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
11AM - 9:30PM • 530-544-5868
900 EMERALD BAY RD • SO LAKE TAHOE, CA
Gourmet Pizza, Pasta & Salad
775-833-2200
Eat In • Take Out
Delivery to Incline
Open 5pm-9pm Daily
Closed Wednesday
In the Country Club Center (Across from the Hyatt)
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 79 5/11/2012 5:45:06 PM
80 Summer2012 TAHOE magazine
Entertainment music
James Rawie conducts the Toccata orchestra.
CLASSICAL MuSIC
Toccata: the Tahoe Symphony Orchestra and Chorus
Seventh Big Blue Summer Music Fest
June 20-24: Mountain Mozart
July 3-7: Baroque to Broadway
July 15-18: North Star Chamber Players
July 27-Aug. 1: Toccata 7th Anniversary
Aug. 20: John Lennon Memorial Concert
Sept. 15-20: 9/11 Memorial Concert
Performances held at Incline Village, South Lake Tahoe, Truckee,
Tahoe City and Reno. Contact: www.ToccataTahoe.com or 775-313-9697
A woman dances on the pier at the Valhalla Boathouse during a concert. Photo: Michelle Morton.
The Valhalla Boathouse has been converted into a
unique, historic entertainment venue.

VALhALLA
At LAKe tAhoe
June 2-3, 9-10: Valhalla Renaissance Fair
June 17: Music on the Lawn
July 3: Tahoe Improv Players
July 5-8, July 12-15: Play “God of Carnage”
July 8: Music on the Lawn
July 11: Solid Air
July 12: Clarke & Manning
July 18: Clarke & Manning
July 16-20: Missoula Children’s Theatre
July 16: Houston Jones
July 19-22, 26-29: Play: “Death by Golf”
July 25: Joni Morris
July 28: Wa She Shu It Deh Native American
Arts Festival
Aug. 1-5, 7-8: Play: “Guilty Pleasures”
Aug. 2: Carol Foldvary-Anderson
Aug. 4: Young Shakespeare
Aug. 7: Tahoe Improv Players
Aug. 8: Anna and Bartlomiej Helwig, Donna
Axton
Aug. 9-20: Kit Night
Aug. 11 Murder Mystery Radio Theatre
Aug. 12: Great Gatsby Festival and Tea
Aug. 19: Music on the Lawn
Aug. 23: Peter Steinhart
Aug. 29: Peter Steinhart
Sept. 2: Music on the Lawn
Sept. 4: Tahoe Improv Players
Sept. 9: Music on the Lawn
Sept. 14: “A Celebration of Writers around
the Lake”
Oct. 26-28: Valhalloween
Nov. 16: 17th annual Valhalla Holiday Faire
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 80 5/11/2012 5:45:12 PM
80 Summer2012 TAHOE magazine
A woman dances on the pier at the Valhalla Boathouse during a concert. Photo: Michelle Morton.
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 81 5/11/2012 5:45:12 PM
Twogreat choices for dinner.
(775) 588-7777 or (800) 624-7980 LakesideInn.com
Just .7 miles fromthe state line but a world away in attitude.
LakesideInn.com/social
The Timber House dinner menu features
CertifiedAngus Beef, fresh fish and
house specialties. Signature cocktails,
an impressive wine list and dessert creations
complete your dining experience.
Breakfast Lunch Dinner Late Night
Open daily. Closed 2:30 - 4 p.m. and 10 - 11 p.m.
Chef Alvaro lets his passions soar with
the fusion of flavors at Latin Soul.
Dishes representing Central and
SouthAmerica, Mexico and the Caribbean
take you on a delectable culinary journey.
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
Open daily from8 a.m. - 11p.m.
82 Summer2012 TAHOE magazine
Entertainment casinos
South Shore
Harrah’s Resort
Lake Tahoe
www.harrahslaketahoe.com
775-588-6611
15 Highway 50
Stateline, NV 89449
Open 24 hours
Harveys Lake Tahoe
www.harveystahoe.com
775-588-6611
18 Highway 50
Stateline, NV 89449
Open 24 hours
Horizon Resort
and Casino
www.horizoncasino.com
800-648-3322
50 Highway 50
Stateline, NV 89449
Open 24 hours
Lakeside Inn and Casino
www.lakesideinn.com
775-588-7777
168 Highway 50
Stateline, NV 89449
Open 24 hours
Montbleu Casino Resort
www.montbleuresort.com
888-829-7630
55 Highway 50
Stateline, NV 89449
Open 24 hours
North Shore
Cal Neva Resort,
Spa and Casino
www.calnevaresort.com
Reservations: 800-225-6382
General Info: 800-233-5551
2 Stateline Road
Crystal Bay, NV 89402
Open 24 hours
Crystal Bay Club Casino
www.crystalbaycasino.com
775-833-6333
14 Crystal Drive
Crystal Bay, NV 89402
Open 24 hours
Hyatt Regency
Lake Tahoe Resort,
Casino and Spa
www.hyatt.com
775-832-1234
111 Country Club Drive
Incline Village, NV 89451
Open 24 hours
Jim Kelley’s
Tahoe Nugget
775-831-0455
20 Highway 28
Crystal Bay, NV 89402
Open 24 hours
Tahoe Biltmore
www.tahoebiltmore.com
800-245-8667
5 Highway 28
Crystal Bay, NV 89402
Open 24 hours

Cruise Lake Tahoe
The best way to experience Lake Tahoe is on its famed waters.
Let our paddlewheelers entertain your whole crew for a classic Tahoe cruise.
Lule1uhoeCruises.com · 800 238 24ô3 · íucebool.com/luletuhoecruises
M.S. DIXIE II
TAHOE QUEEN
ZEPHYR COVE RESORT
SKI RUN MARINA
Zephyr Cove Pesort und Murinu operuted under u speciul U.S. lorest Service use permit. Munuged by APAMAPK Purls und Destinutions.
FOREST SERVICE
Tahoe Queen
Departs from Ski Run Marina
Take a ride on Tahoe’s only authentic Mississippi
paddlewheeler, a unique paddle-propelled boat that
harks back to the steamer’s heyday.
Scenic Emerald Bay Cruise
Photo ops abound on this daytime jaunt to Tahoe’s
must-see bay, home to the only island on the lake.
Emerald Bay Dinner Cruise
Emerald Bay’s alpenglow highlights the perfect setting
for dining, spending time together and sightseeing.
M.S. Dixie II
Departs from Zephyr Cove Resort
Tahoe’s largest cruising vessel, and the locals’ favorite,
brings Southern charm to a stunning Sierra backdrop.
Scenic Emerald Bay Cruise
This narrated day ride delivers iconic lake views
alongside Tahoe facts and historic yarns.
Dinner Dance Cruise
The captain’s fnest to sweep you off your feet:
on-board dining, live music and the sun setting
over Emerald Bay.
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 82 5/11/2012 5:45:15 PM
82 Summer2012 TAHOE magazine
Cruise Lake Tahoe
The best way to experience Lake Tahoe is on its famed waters.
Let our paddlewheelers entertain your whole crew for a classic Tahoe cruise.
Lule1uhoeCruises.com · 800 238 24ô3 · íucebool.com/luletuhoecruises
M.S. DIXIE II
TAHOE QUEEN
ZEPHYR COVE RESORT
SKI RUN MARINA
Zephyr Cove Pesort und Murinu operuted under u speciul U.S. lorest Service use permit. Munuged by APAMAPK Purls und Destinutions.
FOREST SERVICE
Tahoe Queen
Departs from Ski Run Marina
Take a ride on Tahoe’s only authentic Mississippi
paddlewheeler, a unique paddle-propelled boat that
harks back to the steamer’s heyday.
Scenic Emerald Bay Cruise
Photo ops abound on this daytime jaunt to Tahoe’s
must-see bay, home to the only island on the lake.
Emerald Bay Dinner Cruise
Emerald Bay’s alpenglow highlights the perfect setting
for dining, spending time together and sightseeing.
M.S. Dixie II
Departs from Zephyr Cove Resort
Tahoe’s largest cruising vessel, and the locals’ favorite,
brings Southern charm to a stunning Sierra backdrop.
Scenic Emerald Bay Cruise
This narrated day ride delivers iconic lake views
alongside Tahoe facts and historic yarns.
Dinner Dance Cruise
The captain’s fnest to sweep you off your feet:
on-board dining, live music and the sun setting
over Emerald Bay.
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 83 5/11/2012 5:45:15 PM
84 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
TAHOE HISTORY
Paying a
sPooky visit
to a
haunted
casino
unexPlainable video images
from cal neva
c
al n
eva tunnel t
our
2 p.m. W
ednesdays and Thursdays;
4, 5, 6 and 7 p.m.
Fridays and saTurdays;
2 and 3 p.m.
phone: 775-832-4000 or 800-225-6382
TickeTs: $10 includes 2-For-1 drink
coupon and 10 percenT discounT aT dining room or circle bar
K
L
“it was like something was in there with us,
and the girl that i was with was so scared she
had to leave.”
— “late-nite” billy drewitz
By Tim Parsons
Tahoe Magazine
he best bargain for a Lake Tahoe visitor might be the $10 tunnel
tour and a free drink at the Cal Neva Resort in Crystal Bay and
Brockway on the North Shore. It’s likely the area’s most historic
building and it has an incredible view.
And then, of course, there are the ghosts.
Hans Weig recently showed a tour group the cabin where Hollywood
starlet Marilyn Monroe frequently stayed and the Indian Room, which
straddles California and Nevada, making it convenient for proprietors to
rearrange gambling furniture when alerted to law enforcement inspec-
tions.
He also told the story of how a 1937 fre destroyed the original structure.
But coincidentally, there was enough recently purchased lumber at
the site for a 500-man crew to rebuild the casino in 30 days. However, a
pamphlet provided by the Cal Neva said it took 100 men 40 days. Tat’s
how much of the history is at Tahoe and the Cal Neva — a story based
on some kind of fact but, what with all the shenanigans and goings-on,
plenty of room is left for interpretation.
However, this tour ended with a walk through subterranean passageways
and an undeniable palpability: there is something to the ghost stories.
Several of the visitors captured shooting streaks of lights — orbs — on
cellphone cameras. Te videos and still images gave folks a prized Tahoe
souvenir and an excuse to cash in their drink tokens at the circle bar.
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 85
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 84 5/12/2012 4:43:24 PM
84 Summer2012 TAHOE magazine
c
al n
eva tunnel t
our
2 p.m. W
ednesdays and Thursdays;
4, 5, 6 and 7 p.m.
Fridays and saTurdays;
2 and 3 p.m.
phone: 775-832-4000 or 800-225-6382
TickeTs: $10 includes 2-For-1 drink
coupon and 10 percenT discounT aT dining room or circle bar
K
L
Summer2012 TAHOE magazine85
who can it be NOW?
Who might these sprits be? Tere are plenty of possibilities. Is one
Monroe, who was found dead days after visiting the lake? Or perhaps
Frank Sinatra, Cal Neva’s most notable — but hardly the most notorious
— owner? Maybe folks bumped of by the mob, or gamblers who paid
the ultimate price when they could not fulfll their debts? Or how about
native American Washoe Indians, who were exterminated from the area?
Certainly, there have been plenty of premature deaths around the place.
Consider:
• cal neva’s second owner norman biltz Put a shot-
gun in his mouth and committed suicide, as his Father
had done beFore him.
• the wiFe oF the third owner, James makay, died in
one oF the lodge’s cabins oF a drug overdose.
• the man who was the Fourth cal neva owner was
killed in a 1931 gunFight.
• walter hemPel, a longtime emPloyee, was murdered
in 1949 in his car Parked near the site.
• a 22-year-old casino change girl was murdered in
1971 by a 19-year-old bar back.
Former Cal Neva tour guide Carl Buehler wrote about strange experi-
ences in the 2010 book, “Mind Blowing True Ghost Stories.”
Te food and beverage manager took a cellphone image of what looks to
be the shape of a human with facial features. He snapped the shot after
he felt a chill, “not like a cold chill from freezing temperatures, but like
the feeling of ‘something cold’ passing right through his body.”
Te incident occurred at what is considered the epicenter of the ghost
sightings, the stage in the Frank Sinatra Room. A music promoter, “Late-
Nite” Billy Drewitz, considered a couple of years ago making the venue
back into a nightclub. He contemplated using Sinatra’s old offi ce beside
the stage but was told because of the ghosts no one had ever been able to
stay in it very long.
ok, it’s scary
“A few things happened,” said Drewitz, explaining the frst incident came
when he and a couple of his staf were in the offi ce after a show had
ended. A stench from a nearby room grew increasingly odoriferous as
the crew grew uncomfortable.
“It was like something was in there with us, and the girl that I was with
was so scared she had to leave,” Drewitz said. “Tere was a loud clank
and it came from the showroom. Like sheet metal. It was so loud it
startled you out of your seat.

“Coincidence, who knows? I do know the showroom was completely
locked up, and then 20 minutes later there was a sound exactly like that
again. It was like someone was telling us they were there.”
....continued on next page
“the Floating orbs, maybe it’s a
maniFestation oF some sort oF energy
that we don’t understand yet, or
maybe it’s the PeoPle that the mob
knocked oFF.”
— ulises bella,
saxoPhonist For the band ozomatli
Photo: Joe Proudman
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 85 5/11/2012 5:45:21 PM
86 Summer2012 TAHOE magazine
... from previous page
Weig said it is common for rattled visitors to check out in the middle of
the night, especially those staying in Monroe’s cabin.
Perhaps knowing the Cal Neva’s reputation makes it more likely to
experience a ghost. Sinatra and his pals are long gone, but the Cal Neva
continues to be a top musical venue. Ozomatli recently performed there,
and saxophonist Ulises Bella didn’t know about the ghosts, but when he
was told about them, he said he was disappointed.
“I’m always one of those guys who says I want to see a damn ghost
already,” he said. “Te foating orbs, maybe it’s a manifestation of some
sort of energy that we don’t understand yet, or maybe it’s the people that
the mob knocked of.”
Te tunnels were used during Prohibition to transport booze from a boat
on the lake up to the casino. Te tunnels, now flled in, are said to have
been connected to other nearby casinos and hotels which also would
sell the illegal hooch.
A tunnel underneath the circle bar, and next to a stairwell where Mon-
roe’s ghost was seen and a light mysteriously goes on and of, is a place
Weig speculated most of the murders at the casino took place.
Tat’s where several orbs were photographed on this tour. s
cal neva
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Kristen Fencl • 775.832.8012
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TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 86 5/11/2012 5:45:22 PM
86 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 87 5/11/2012 5:51:45 PM
“don’t beLieVe eVerytHinG
you read. i’LL be baCk.”
— Sammy Davıs Jr., before hıs fınal performance, a show ın the
Harrah’s Lake Tahoe South Shore Room
Rat Pack’s
CHeriSHed PLay SPot
THE
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 89
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 88 5/11/2012 5:51:59 PM
T
h
e

T
h
r
i
l
l

O
n

T
h
e

H
i
l
l
T
h
e

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h
r
i
l
l

O
n

T
h
e

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i
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VisitVirginiaCityNV.com 800-718-7587
Experience Virginia City’s
historic venues and attractions
at discounted prices with a
COMSTOCK ADVENTURE PASS
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 89
StorieS about
Frank, Sammy
and dean
By Tim Parsons
Tahoe Magazine
Along with its natural beauty and legal gambling, Lake Tahoe is famous
for entertainment, and its best-known entertainers continue to be the
Rat Pack.
Frank Sinatra, Sammy Davis Jr. and Dean Martin were the ringleaders
and their heyday was in the 1960s.
Rock ‘n’ roll star George Torogood even referred to Davis, who was
known as “the world’s greatest entertainer,” before a show this past win-
ter in Harrah’s Lake Tahoe South Shore Room.
“I always like working that room, you know why?” Torogood asked.
“Because if anything happens to me right after I play that gig, it’s going
to say, ‘George Torogood and Sammy Davis Jr. gave their last perfor-
mances on that stage.’”
Longtime stage manager Gary Zaskoda recalled the show when Davis
performed after being diagnosed with throat cancer.
“Don’t believe everything you read,” Davis told Zaskoda before he took
the stage. “I’ll be back.”
down the hatch, deano
One of Sinatra’s most iconic songs from the early ’60s was “My Kind of
Town (Chicago is).” Te city beside Lake Michigan could have easily
been changed in the song to Lake Tahoe by “Ol’ Blue Eyes,” who owned
the Cal Neva Resort from 1960-63.
Rat Pack members frequently played at the Cal Neva, which still presents
shows in the Frank Sinatra Room, decorated with items purchased by
the man known as “Te Voice.”
A trap door at the front on the stage allowed behind-the-curtain exits for
the entertainers, including an infamous escape by Martin, who was said
to be too inebriated to perform. Fortunately, Sinatra was there to fll in,
still laughing as the curtain rose. Martin had given him a mirthful salute
as he backed down the hatch.
Martin’s song “Party Dolls and Wine” was representative of the Rat Pack
credo. One of its members, Peter Lawford, married into the Kennedy
family, and Joseph Kennedy was a frequent visitor to the Cal Neva. Tere
was a special booth in the Frank Sinatra room where Kennedy and other
VIPs could watch the show without being seen by the rest of the audi-
ence.
Marilyn Monroe used to stay at Cal Neva cabin No. 4, and longtime ru-
mors are the Hollywood movie starlet had afairs with Joseph’s sons John
and Robert Kennedy. Monroe’s singing, “Happy Birthday, Mr. President,”
in front of a Madison Square Garden audience which included President
John F. Kennedy and the frst lady continues to feel awkward 50 years
later.
... continued on next page
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 89 5/11/2012 5:52:00 PM
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90 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
rat Pack ... from previous page
an ephemeral era
Monroe died in August 1962, a week after overdosing on drugs at the
Cal Neva, where she stayed after flming a movie with Clark Gable, “Te
Misfts.” A photo of Monroe, Sinatra and former Cal Neva owner “Wingy”
Grober is displayed in the hallway leading to the Frank Sinatra Room. It
probably was taken during Monroe’s last night at Tahoe.
Kennedy was assassinated in 1963 by Lee Harvey Oswald, who was sub-
sequently assassinated by Jack Ruby, a longtime Cal Neva employee.
Sinatra lost his gaming license and the Cal Neva because of his ties with
mob boss Sam Giancana.
A couple of weeks after the Kennedy assassination, Sintara’s 19-year-old
son, Frank Sinatra Jr., was kidnapped from Harrah’s Lake Tahoe. Te son
was released two days after Sinatra paid a quarter-million dollar ransom.
Tree bungling kidnappers were later apprehended.
Te last performance by a Rat Pack member was by Martin in May 1977
in the Celebrity Room.
Te sprit of the Rat Pack continues with tribute groups like the Dean-O-
Holics, who often perform at the Cal Neva.
“It’s defnitely haunted by the spirit of that era,” said Peter “Not Lawford”
Petty. “It just washes right over you. We stalked the stage already and it
just feels right. Te Rat Pack is indeed coming home.” s
In this photo taken in 1959,
Marilyn Monroe talks with Frank
Sinatra at the Cal Neva Lodge.
Photo: Associated Press
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 91
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 90 5/11/2012 5:52:05 PM
90 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
Discover Tahoe & Truckee’s hisTory
visiT ancienT peoples, eccenTric esTaTes, railroaD barons, eleganT wooDen boaTs
anD more aT These Tahoe/Truckee museums
F
rom The graniTe rock on Donner summiT peak To The ForesTeD slopes
oF The sierra nevaDa Tumbling To The azure waTers oF lake Tahoe,
people have liveD, workeD anD recreaTeD in This region. Discover ancienT
peTroglyphs, meeT railroaD anD lumber barons, re-creaTe eleganT roaring
20s summer Days anD more aT The Following hisToric lanDmarks anD museums.
exhibiTs, special evenTs anD Tours will immerse you in The culTure anD
environmenT oF everyThing Truckee Tahoe.
D
onner Memorial State Park in Truckee commemorates the ordeal
of a party of emigrants who spent the winter of 1846-47 huddled
in rough cabins near the mountain lake we now call Donner Lake.
Arriving at this spot late in October 1846, the emigrants were unable to com-
plete their journey across the Sierra to safety in California due to an early,
heavy snowfall. George Donner and his extended family camped about six
miles away at Alder Creek. Out of the original number of 81 men, women and
children who arrived at these camps, 42 perished of hunger, cold and illness.
In 1893, landowner Joseph Marzen deeded one acre of land to Charles
McGlashan of Truckee for the purpose of erecting a monument to the Don-
ner Party. Te monument was fnally completed and dedicated on June 6,
1918. It still stands today on the site of the Breen Cabin. On June 28, 1928, the
original acre of land, plus 15 acres donated by the Native Sons of the Golden
West, became a California State Park.
Today, the original park has grown to more than 3,000 acres of beautiful
recreational land encompassing Lodgepole Pine forests, lakeshore access,
wildfower meadows and hiking trails. Tere are 152 campsites open from
Memorial Day through September. Summer activities include camping,
hiking, fshing and boat rental. Winter activities are snowshoeing and cross-
country skiing. Interpretive programs ofered are Donner Party history walks,
Junior Rangers, nature hikes and campfre programs.
Te Emigrant Trail Museum is open all year and features exhibits in-
terpreting Donner Party history, as well as other local cultural and natural
history. Visit the bookstore and browse books for all ages, as well as souvenir
and gift items.
In the spring of 2011, construction began on a new visitor center that is
expected to open in the summer of 2013. It will include an expanded array
of exhibits, more interactive opportunities, a larger retail store and meeting
rooms.
Donner MeMorial State Park
eMigrant trail MuSeuM
12593 Donner Pass Road, Truckee
Open 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily, from Memorial Day through Labor Day weekend.
Closed Tuesday and Wednesday from Labor Day through Memorial Day.
Parking fee is $8. Call 530-582-7892, visit www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=503.
R
ailroads of the Truckee area played a signifcant role in founding and
developing the town of Truckee. From the blasting of black powder in
the granite over Donner Lake, to the hissing of the frst steam coming
in to town, to whistles of lumberjacks in the mountains, to the crack of ice be-
ing loaded in the reefers, and tourists focking to share the beauty of the area,
the Truckee Railroad Museum tells the story.
Housed in a real caboose, the museum provides an overview of the
Truckee Donner Railroad Society’s plans for a larger museum. Displays
include dioramas and annotated historic photographs telling the story of
building of the Transcontinental Railroad, the logging railroads and the
early tourist railroad connecting Truckee and Lake Tahoe. A restored sleeper
roomette from the 50s and a train table featuring Tomas, the Tank Engine,
make the visit enjoyable for the whole family.
truckee railroaD MuSeuM
10075 Donner Pass Road, Downtown Truckee
Next to the train depot. Open 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Saturday and Sunday
and major holidays. Visit www.truckeedonnerrailroadsociety.com
email info@truckeedonnerrailroadsociety.com
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 91
Don Davis points out historical facts to visitors in the Truckee Railroad Museum,
an actual caboose located in Downtown Truckee.
By Amy Edgett
Tahoe Magazine
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 91 5/11/2012 5:52:11 PM
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 93 92 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
olD Jail MuSeuM
10142 Jibboom St., Truckee
Summer weekends, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Contact Chelsea Walterscheid
at 530-305-4231 or www.truckeehistory.org.
T
ruckee’s Old Jail Museum is operated by the Truckee Donner Histori-
cal Society that discovers, procures and preserves whatever may relate
to the aboriginal, natural, civil, literary and ecclesiastical history of the
Town of Truckee and surrounding area.
It was built in 1875 and ran continuously as a jail until 1964. Now a
museum, visitors may see displays on Truckee’s early industries, including
ice harvesting, lumbering and railroad. Tere are specimens from Charles
McGlashan’s famous Butterfy Collection and many exhibits showing early
pioneer life in this historic town.
Te Old Jail Museum is a small museum in a real old jail. Te cells have
been turned into display space, but the interior hasn’t changed since it was a
jail, giving visitors a chance to see what it would have been like to be locked
up in one of the west’s oldest jails. Te museum is run 100 percent by volun-
teers. Be sure to check it out this summer, especially on these days:
May 28 - Memorial Day at the Museum. Opening of the City of San
Francisco 60th Anniversary Exhibit at noon.
June 16 - Old Jail Museum opens for the season.
June 23 - Part 1: Ice Industry Historian, Tom Macaulay, will talk through
a slide show (place TBD) 11 a.m. Part 2: On-site tour of a historic ice
harvesting location, Legacy Trail. Maps will be given out at the presentation.
Call Chaun to RSVP and for more information, 530-559-2378.
WeStern Pacific
railroaD MuSeuM
700 Western Pacifc Way, Portola, CA. • www.wplives.org
O
nce you arrive in Portola, follow the signs around town to the West-
ern Pacifc Railroad Museum, or frst visit the Portola Visitor’s Center,
424 East Sierra Ave., in the Williams House Museum, an old log
house that includes pictures and artifacts. Donated to the City of Portola, the
State of California has recognized it in the California Historical Landmark
Registry.
Back at the Western Pacifc Railroad Museum, don’t worry about the kids!
Seldom will you see a “no climbing” or “please do not touch” sign. Visitors
are encouraged to climb aboard and experience the collection in a truly
hands-on way. Sit in the engineer’s seat behind the controls of the mighty
UP 6946, the largest diesel locomotive ever built. Tour vintage passenger
cars and see what rail travel was like before the days of Amtrak. Sit in the
conductor’s seat in one of many restored cabooses. Better yet, take a train
ride or a locomotive cab ride on weekends.
tWenty-Mile interPretive
MuSeuM on Donner SuMMit
The Donner Summit Historical Society operates an interpretive museum
along Old Highway 40, from the Eagle Lakes road in Cisco Grove to
beyond Rainbow Bridge on Donner Summit.
D
onner Summit is a fascinating place, especially historically. It has
been visited by humans for thousands of years, it is the site of the
frst transcontinental highway (the Lincoln Highway) and the frst
transcontinental railroad. It has been a hive of activities including many dif-
ferent industries: agriculture, sawmills, forestry, mink farming, ice harvest-
ing, dairy cattle, railroading, highway maintenance, tourism and the ski
industry. Te rescued members of the Donner Party crossed Donner Summit
right at the Summit.
Signs point out bits of history that occurred at a specifc location, and give
suggestions of things to do nearby, such as hiking trails, and recreational op-
portunities. Each sign includes a map, and old photographs of the early days
on the summit. Look for the distinctive roadside signs starting just below
Rainbow Bridge on the Donner Lake side. Tere are three near the bridge
parking lot, and continue over the summit beyond Cisco Grove. Te Donner
Summit Historical Society Museum is located in Soda Springs at the corner
of Old 40 and Soda Springs Road. For more information contact www.don-
nersummithistoricalsociety.org.
Te “museum” is prominent on the National Geographic GeoTourism
Sierra map for the Donner Summit area. Te museums of Placer County,
under the leadership of the County museums, will hold a Heritage Trail tour.
Te public may visit participating museums for free during the weekend of
Aug. 11-12, 2012. Tere will be 18 museums participating this year, including
Donner Summit. Visit www.heritagetrail.blogspot.com.
MuSeuMS from previous page Open May through October, with full operating hours June through Sep-
tember. Portola Railroad Days to be held in August, date TBD. For informa-
tion, visit www.wplives.org or fnd them on Facebook.
Upon entering the museum grounds, purchase admission wrist bands
and train ride tickets in the newly remodeled gift shop, located at the en-
trance to the Diesel Shop. Snacks, cold drinks and gifts may also be pur-
chased. Adults: $8, children $4 and a family pass is $20 for two adults and
all children under 18 in your party. Children under 4-years-old admitted
free. Operated by the Feather River Rail Society, a California 501c3 nonproft
organization.
kiDZone MuSeuM
11711 Donner Pass Road, Truckee
Summer Hours: Tuesday through Sunday, 9 a.m. -1:30 p.m. Closed on
Monday. Visit www.kidzonemuwseum.org or call 530-587-KIDS (5437).
I
nspire learning through creative play and discovery. Te KidZone
Museum’s current exhibit, Starfsh Enterprise, features an Imagination
Playground “reef” building blocks to create underwater “forts” and sculp-
tures; a “research” submarine that children sit in and pretend that they’re
submarine operators; reading nook; sand play and various fsh costumes,
like a shark, crab and dolphin. Complementing imaginative hands-on indoor
explorative options at the KidZone Museum, the Outdoor Natural Science
Learning Center ofers water and plenty of sand play; a hand and wind-pow-
ered iron windmill; two slides accessed by stone steps in the dirt; a nature
escape under a willow tree arbor; a hanging scale to weigh various items;
watering buckets to water the edible garden and much more. And, the Center
is open in winter for various snow play activities, like building snow men and
caves. Te Museum is dedicated to and designed for families with children
up to age 7. Exhibits change periodically.
KidZone day camps are ofered June through August. Each camp has
a special theme and ofers hands-on learning through exploration. Topics
include the investigating of farming; exploring the ecosystem; working with
Te Old Jail Museum,
operated by the Truckee
Donner Historical Society,
houses artifacts and
exhibits in what was an
operating jail from 1875
through 1964.
Photo: Billie Cornell
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 92 5/11/2012 5:52:15 PM
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 93 92 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
fber art to make tie dyes and weave items and many more tons of fun activi-
ties. Te Family Camp at Sagehen Creek is the frst weekend of August. Tis
overnight adventure includes science explorations, arts, musical entertain-
ment and home-cooked meals under the stars.
2012 marks the KidZone Museum’s 20th Anniversary. KidZone is a non-
proft children’s museum nationally recognized for its exemplary children
museum eforts. Te Museum relies on the generous support of volunteers,
members, benefactors along with donations and participation in its annual
Tahoe Family Festival in August. Visit www.kidzonemuseum.org.
WatSon cabin MuSeuM
560 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City, 530-583-1762. Opens May 26, 2012.
T
he Watson family home, built by Robert M. for his son Robert H. as
a wedding present, laid out just as daughter Mildred remembered it
from childhood.
gatekeePer’S MuSeuM
130 West Lake Blvd., Tahoe City, open Wednesday through Monday,
10 a.m.-5 p.m. Memorial Day through Labor Day; Friday through
Saturday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., October through Memorial Day.
F
eaturing Tahoe history artifacts from steamers, resorts such as Tahoe
Tavern, snow measurement pioneer Dr. Church, movies, photographs.
Houses Marion Steinbach Indian Basket Collection, more than 900
baskets made by native people west of the Rockies, including a 1,500-plus
year-old basket hat found in a Nevada cave, baskets smaller than a dime.
Tahoe Steamer memorabilia, scale Tahoe steamer model (with lights and
sounds), name plate, metal plate, bell and more from the famous steamer
that once plied the waters of Lake Tahoe and serviced the Tahoe Tavern.
Photo archives, view catalogs of Tahoe photo archives, may be ordered and
purchased also.
Both museums are owned and operated by the North Lake Historical
Society. Te natural and cultural histories of Lake Tahoe inform who we are
and defne our sense of place and our heritage. Te mission of the NLTHS is
to hold these histories in trust by collecting, preserving and presenting them
for all people, keeping them safe and accessible now and for future genera-
tions. Check out these special events all summer long, put on by the North
Lake Historical Society. For more events and detailed information,
visit www.northtahoemuseums.org
June 12 - Skunk Harbor History Hike, Incline Village, Nev., 9 a.m. hike
and B.Y.O. picnic lunch, Skunk Harbor, with historian Paul Ackerman.
June 21 - Tird Tursday Speaker Series: Mark Twain Tahoe Mystery
Public Festivity, Gatekeeper’s Museum, 6:30 p.m. Authors Robert Stewart and
Dave Antonucci did super sleuthing to determine where on the lake Mark
Twain camped back when, only to arrive to difering conclusions. Tey will
discuss their fndings. Get the books, and a map, go check it out for yourself
and report back what you found!
July 1 - Ursus Among Us: Te American Black Bear in the Tahoe Basin,
Gatekeeper’s Museum. Exhibit about ursus americanus, black bears in the
area, including bear biology; history with local humans; featuring visual,
audio and tactile elements and a real taxidermy bear!
July 11 - Basketweaving Class: Audrey Frank, Gatekeeper’s Museum,
9:30 a.m., Native weaver Frank will teach people of any level to make pine
needle baskets. Bring a lunch, water, a towel and something to in which to
soak pine needles.
July 15 - Te Gathering, Gatekeeper’s Museum Evening, NLTHS an-
nual fundraising dinner and auction: support the museums with a tasty meal
and auction.
July 18 - Toni Fauver Memorial Hike, Gatekeeper’s Museum to start,
morning annual wildfower hike. Te destination remains a secret until the
morning of the hike, and they always fnd wonderful fowers!
July 19 - Tird Tursday Speaker Series: Take Me to the River: Fly Fish-
ing and Why It’s So Cool, Gatekeeper’s Museum, 6:30 p.m., Fly fshing guide
Matt Heron and renowned fy tyer Andy Burk explain fy fshing for all levels.
Heron will conduct a casting clinic the last half hour of the program.
aug. 11 anD 12 - Placer County Heritage Trails Days: Watson Cabin
Living History Day, Watson Cabin, 11 a.m.. It’s pioneer time at the Watson
Cabin. Wash clothes the old-school way and make real butter.
aug. 12 - Placer County Heritage Trails Days: Gatekeeper’s Truckee
Railroad Regulators, Gatekeeper’s Museum, 11 a.m. Gunslingers from the
Old West come back to visit the Museum. Skits and family fun.
SePt. 22 anD 23 - 9th Annual Basketweavers’ Gathering, Gatekeep-
er’s Museum, 11 a.m. Native weavers from all over California and Nevada will
gather to demonstrate weaving. Baskets for sale, and appraisers for Indian
baskets will be on hand. Also, “Nuts to Soup,” a demonstration of processing
acorns from nuts to the fnished edible product.
tahoe MaritiMe MuSeuM
5205 W. Lake Blvd. Homewood,
June 1 to Sept. 30, Thursday through Tuesday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Oct. 1
to May 30, Friday, Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Call 530-525-9253 or visit www.tahoemaritime.org.
T
he Tahoe Maritime Museum stimulates an interest in, increases
knowledge of and maintains watercraft and marine artifacts signifcant
in Lake Tahoe’s maritime history through the highest standards of
historic preservation, innovative interpretation and public education.
“Tahoe Twenties: A Story of Boats, Booze & Business” will focus on how the
1920s had a lasting impact on the Lake Tahoe basin. Boats that have never
been displayed in the museum before will be showcased along with a 1916
REO car. Te Tahoe Maritime Museum is a fun, family friendly museum that
explores diferent aspects of the unique maritime history of Lake Tahoe.
Below are some other fun events scheduled this summer:
May 27 - Public Opening of Tahoe Twenties: A Story Boats, Booze &
Business along with Family Fun Day full of activities for all ages, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
June 9 - Family Day! Te frst family day of the summer centers around
engines and what makes them go, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
June 14 - Lecture: State of the Lake with Heather Segale of Tahoe Envi-
ronmental Research Center, 5:30 p.m.
Jennifer Malone
of the California
Basketweaver’s
Association and
Wukchumni, a
Yokets of
California tribe
member,
demonstrates
her art at the
Gatekeeper’s
Museum.
Photo:
Amy Edgett
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 93 5/11/2012 5:52:18 PM
vikingSholM
Tours daily 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Call Sugar Pine Point SP at 530-525-3345 or
Vikingsholm at 530-525-9530. Tours are $8 for adults and $5
for children 8-17. Under 7 free.
L
ocated in Emerald Bay because it reminded her of the fjords of Scan-
dinavia, Lorna Knight built her summer residence of Vikingsholm
in 1929. View the bed where Charles Lindbergh slept. Tey will host
a variety of nature-inspired interpretive programs all summer to include
campfre programs, hikes and full moon kayak tours. Information for these
programs will be available at the park specifes website at www.parks.ca.gov.
May 26 to June 22 and Sept. 4-30, tours 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. once an hour on
the hour. June 23 to Sept. 3, tours 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m. on the hour and half-
hour.
Visitor Center Hours. Main season: Doors will open daily half-hour be-
fore the frst tour of the day and half-hour after the last tour begins. Shoulder
season: Te doors will remain open for visitors, on the weekends and at
Vikingsholm the same hours as above. Monday through Friday, the Sugar
Pine Visitor Center will be open 11 a.m.-4 p.m.
July 28, Living History Day, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free event. Parking $10, visit
www.laketahoelivinghistory.com.
tallac hiStoric Site
Composed of three historic estates, all listed on the National Registry of
Historic Houses. Located on Highway 89, Emerald Bay Road, 2.5 miles North
of South Lake Tahoe and 6.5 miles South of Emerald Bay.
eD Z’berg Sugar Pine Point State Park
Pine loDge hellMan-ehrMan ManSion
May 26 to June 22 and Sept. 4-30, tours weekends, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. on the
hour. Tours weekdays: noon, 1 p.m., 2 p.m. June 23 to Sept. 3, tours daily,
10 a.m.-3 p.m. on the hour.
E
d Z’berg Sugar Pine Point State Park, located on Tahoe’s West Shore,
between Homewood and Emerald Bay, 530-525-7982, call for park
hours. Daily tours 10 a.m.-3 p.m., mid-June through Labor Day. Re-
duced tour schedule in early June and in September. Tour tickets are $8 for
adults, $5 children 6-17 years. Children under 6 are free.
In 1897, San Francisco businessman I.W. Hellman began buying property
at Sugar Pine Point and by 1913 had acquired nearly 2,000 acres. His grand
but informal summer home, called Pine Lodge, was completed in 1903 and
was considered to be one of the fnest in the high Sierra. His daughter, Flor-
ence Hellman Ehrman inherited the estate and she and her husband Sydney
spent many summers there entertaining family and friends.
Guests of the Ehrmans participated in various activities on a regular
basis. Mrs. Ehrman usually scheduled hikes, swimming, riding, fshing,
boating, tennis, picnics and croquet. In 1965 the house and 1,975 acres of the
estate were acquired by the California State Park System. Today the house is
maintained as a house museum and as an example of the opulent tradition
in Tahoe summer homes.
MuSeuMS from previous page
June 28 - Lecture: Peter Goin and his new book, Lake Tahoe: A Maritime
History, 5:30 p.m.
June 30 - Tahoe Twenties! Te Tahoe Maritime Museum presents a new
public program that is fun, educational and family friendly. Free, 10 a.m.-4
p.m. A Swinging Summer Night following our day of fun; an evening of food,
fashion, and fun. Spend the evening immersed in everything ‘20s while help-
ing the museum raise funds for the next exhibit.
July 4 - Fourth of July Boat Parade. Watch from Commons Beach in
Tahoe City or along the West Shore as members of the Tahoe Maritime Mu-
seum form a parade of wooden boats from Tahoe City back down to Obexer’s
Marina in Homewood.
July 7 - Truckee Annex Open House, Woody 101: Wooden Boat Care.
July 26 - Lecture: David Antonucci, Mark Twain at Lake Tahoe. Speak-
ing about his latest book, “Te Fairest Picture,” Antonucci will share the real
story behind the author’s time at the lake, 5:30 p.m.
aug. 9 - Lecture: Tahoe Twenties: Behind the Scenes. Curatorial staf
and special guests will talk about the exhibit, boats of the 1920s, and present
additional photos and items, 5:30 p.m.
aug. 24 - Lecture: Fashion of the Twenties. Curator Jan Lovier from the
Marjorie Russell Clothing and Textile Research Center will talk about the
amazing revolutionary trends of the period and how fashion on and in the
lake changed over time, 5:30 p.m.
aug. 25 - Free Family Fun Day. Bring the family in and learn all about
water, what foats, how streams fow, and more. Plan on getting wet! Also the
museum’s 25th birthday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
labor Day WeekenD - Anniversary of Teaser’s Gold Cup Regatta
was for the International Trophy win. Celebrate the racing history of this
legendary boat and learn more about her short, but amazing racing story.
Teaser will be on display in the museum’s parking lot. Family activities will
be held throughout the museum.
Te museum reserves the right to cancel or alter any programs. Ad-
ditional listings online. Unless noted, general admission fees apply, some
activities have special admittance fees. Call 530-525-5253, ext. 100 for more
information.
balDWin MuSeuM
Free, call 530-541-5227. Located at Tallac Historic Site. Open weekends:
May 26-June 10, 11 a.m.- 4 p.m. Daily June 16-Sept. 3, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m.,
Sept. 4-9, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Visit www.fs.usda.gov/ltbmu.
T
he Baldwin has a gift shop that ofers a selection of books on the his-
tory of the Lake Tahoe Basin and souveniers that will delight children
of all ages. Tere is a 13-minute video on the history of South Lake
Tahoe and the Tallac Historic Site.
Pope House tours, daily, one day a week closed for cleaning, TBD. Call
530-541-5227. May 26 to June 10, 1 p.m. and 2:30 p.m.; June 16 to Sept. 3, 11
a.m., 1 p.m. and 2:30 p.m.; Sept. 4-9, 1 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. Suggested dona-
tions: $5 per person and $3 children ages 6-12.
aug. 11 anD 12 - “Gatsby” Weekend, to include the Gatsby Tea and
Fashion Show held on the Valhalla Grand Lawn
Te Pope House is decorated with 1920 vintage furniture including the
original dining room set owned by the Pope family.
94 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
Te Boat House on the Tallac Historic Site captures the magenta alpenglow of a
Lake Tahoe sunset.
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 94 5/11/2012 5:52:21 PM
94 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
the PoPe eState
Located at Tallac Historic Site.
AKA the “Vatican Lodge,” original section build in 1894, completed to
today’s structures in 1899. Te Dextra Baldwin House, Te Baldwin Museum,
built in 1921. Te Heller Estate, Valhalla, built in 1924, including the Valhalla
Boathouse Teater, built originally in early 1900s.
valhalla
Located at Tallac Historic Site. Visit www.valhallatahoe.com for special
events, no set open hours to the public. Valhalla offce open April 9 -
Dec. 12, 2012, call 530-541-4975, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.
S
pecial programs at the Baldwin Museum and the Pope House. Call 530-
541-5227 for more information and reservations. Not available every
day. Lucky’s Legacy Self Guided Cell Phone Tour, Tallac Site Stroll,
Kitchen Kids (reservations recommended), Afternoon with Anita, Tea with
Mrs. Tevis and Vintage Vatican.
the lake tahoe
hiStorical Society MuSeuM
3058 Lake Tahoe Boulevard, South Lake Tahoe. Please visit
www.laketahoemuseum.org or call 530-541-5458 for hours of operation.
Te Lake Tahoe Historical Society was founded in 1968 to identify, pre-
serve and present the artifacts and archives of the Lake Tahoe Basin. Its main
presence is through the Museum, 1930s style cabin and 153-year-old Osgood
Toll House.
Te Museum features Washoe culture, early industry, the importance
of steamers, the helm wheel to the SS Tahoe, pioneer and farm exhibits, a
Pony Express mochila, a Lincoln Highway Monument, archival flms of Lake
Tahoe, photos available for reprint, and a museum bookstore with cards, gift
items, and titles covering local and California history. Admission is free. Dur-
ing summer, the 1930s log cabin is furnished with artifacts from 1930-1950
and docent tours are available most Saturdays. Private tours are available for
a donation by prior arrangement at 530-541-5458.
Te 9th Annual Garden Tour Fundraiser, Tahoe in Bloom, will be Sunday,
July 29, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tour private gardens and learn about high altitude
gardening techniques. Refreshments and music included in $20 ticket price.
thunDerbirD loDge
5000 Highway 28, Incline Village. Visit www.ThunderbirdTahoe.org,
call 775-832-8750, public tours May-October, open Tuesday-Saturday,
tour times vary.
Explore historic Tunderbird Lake Tahoe. Lake Tahoe’s magical Castle-
in-the-Sky and the world-famous Tunderbird yacht. Docent-guided tours
take visitors on an hour and 15-minute walk through the stone mansion and
grounds to reveal the mystery and legacy of the enigmatic George Whittell,
Jr. Legend springs to life as you discover the Lighthouse Room, Old Lodge,
the servant’s quarters with original kitchen, as well as the 600’ underground
tunnel leading to the cavernous Boathouse.
In the Boathouse resides the legendary wooden speedboat, Tunderbird,
built for Whittell in 1939 and powered by twin Allison V12 1150hp engines
from vintage WWII fghter aircraft. Walk along the serpentine Dragon’s Tail
path to the enchanting Card House with its celebrated poker stories. Your
tour ofers breathtaking views of Lake Tahoe, the nearby mountain ranges,
elegant gardens, lagoons, waterfalls and fountains. Discover the magic of
Tunderbird Lake Tahoe, the history, the architecture, and the men and
women of Lake Tahoe’s gilded age. Tunderbird Lake Tahoe and the Tun-
derbird Yacht are available for private or corporate events and group tours.
Tunderbird’s Winemakers’ Dinners are the highlight of Lake Tahoe’s
summer social season. Always a sellout, these elegant afairs pair California’s
fnest wines with famous chefs from the Tahoe region. Make your reserva-
tions early for dinners held second Sundays July through October. Te price
of each dinner is $195 per person ($125 of which is a charitable contribu-
tion). A VIP reception and cruise with the Winemaker aboard the famous
Tunderbird Yacht is available for an additional donation at the July, August
and September dinners. Visit www.TunderbirdTahoe.org
or call 775-832-8752:
July 8 - Clif Lede Vineyards,
Kale Anderson, Winemaker,
Wolfdale’s Cuisine Unique, Chef
Douglas Dale
aug. 12 - Elyse Winery, Ray
Coursen, winemaker and owner, Te
Soule Domain at Lake Tahoe, Charlie
Soule, chef and owner
SePt. 9 - Martin Estate Winery,
Petra and Greg Martin, proprietors,
Hyatt Regency, Lake Tahoe, Lone
Eagle Grille, Chef Rick Koplau
oct. 14 - Miner Family Wines,
Dave Miner, founder and owner,
Ritz~Carlton, Lake Tahoe, Chef
Ruben Garcia s
incline village & cryStal bay
hiStorical Society
T
he society’s latest exhibit is entitled “Te Early Years” and tells the
story of Incline Village and Crystal Bay from 1870-1970. Open daily,
it is located across the hall from Starbucks in the center of the Incline
Village community, at the intersection of Tahoe and Village boulevards.
Learn more at www.tahoehistory.org.
Te Tunderbird Lodge ofers tours
of the magnifcent Lake Tahoe
estate, where the powerfully sleek
Tunderbird yacht is housed.
Photo: Heather Ellison
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 95 5/11/2012 5:52:23 PM
TAHOE HISTORY
N
E
V
A
D
A

T
R
A
I
N

W
R
E
C
K
:
A
N

U
N
S
O
L
V
E
D

M
Y
S
T
E
R
Y
froM Mark tWain to kit carSon to the
Donner Party anD More, the truckee/tahoe region anD itS
SurrounDingS have an abunDance of hiStorical figureS anD eventS — incluDing a
MySteriouS train Wreck in 1939 that killeD 24 PeoPle that no one can SeeM to Solve
D
espite an extensive investigation by law enforcement and
Southern Pacifc detectives, a deadly train wreck that tore
apart the luxury streamliner City of San Francisco in central
Nevada 73 years ago remains unsolved. Depending on whom
you want to believe, the tragedy was either the result of the engineer
speeding too fast for the tracks, or according to Southern Pacifc railroad
offi cials, a deliberate and murderous act of sabotage. Te mystery of
what really happened at Harney, Nevada, has never been solved, but
these facts are indisputable. In August 1939, the most tragic railroad
disaster in Nevada’s history killed 24 people and virtually destroyed
Southern Pacifc’s fnest passenger train.
At its inauguration on January 2, 1938, the City of San Francisco, was
deemed the “world’s most superlative train.” Te sleek streamliner
consisted of deluxe sleepers, coaches loaded with amenities, and motive
power supplied by six 900-horsepower engines. A technological marvel
in engineering, she was proclaimed the ‘largest, fastest, most beautiful,
powerful, and luxurious streamliner ever designed.” Te elegant train
pulled 17 coaches instead of the normal 11, and was capable of speeds
in excess of 100 mph. When placed into service, the hi-tech train cut 19
hours from the fastest previous time on its route between Chicago and
Oakland, California.
like the native aMericanS,
Mountain Men, anD Wagon trainS
before it, the nation’S firSt tranS-
continental railroaD folloWeD the
huMbolDt river aS it MeanDereD
WeSt acroSS nevaDa.
Like the native Americans, mountain men, and wagon trains before it,
the nation’s frst transcontinental railroad followed the Humboldt River
as it meandered west across Nevada. But instead of a dusty farm wagon
hitched behind plodding oxen, the City of San Francisco raced over the
high desert at speeds averaging between 75 and 110 mph. On Saturday,
August 12, 1939, the setting sun glinted of the City of San Francisco’s
silver metallic skin as it streaked across the landscape. Outside it was
blistering hot, but passengers aboard the air-conditioned streamliner
took no notice as they enjoyed dinner, cocktails, or cards. Chief Engineer
Ed Hecox confdently manned the throttle. Hecox, 65 years old and up
for retirement, had been hired by Southern Pacifc as a steam freman
when he was 29, and now had 36 years and more than a million miles
under his belt. SP often called upon the experienced veteran for special
speed tests and demonstration runs, and had assigned him to the City of
San Francisco as soon as it was built.
Te train stopped briefy at the little town of Carlin and once all was
ready Hecox throttled the powerful streamliner forward. Te track fol-
lowed the Humboldt River into the west end of Paradise Canyon where
it approached bridge No. 4. Always alert, Hecox noticed a clump of sage-
brush lodged against the outside rail but thought little of it. “We were
doing 60 at the time, hitting the milepost on the head, just 17 miles out
of Carlin and three hours to Sparks,” he later recalled. “Nevada is full of
tumbleweed, sagebrush and jackrabbits, but you don’t stop a stream-
liner for a clump of tumbleweed.” But as soon as the lead locomotives
reached that part of the track the train derailed. Miraculously, the front
engines crossed the bridge upright without striking the infrastructure.
Te lead locomotives plowed through the wooden track ties and rock
ballast before coming to a stop upright well past the river. the desert
darkness behind them much of the train was a tangled mess of crushed
and twisted metal. Hecox, his freman, and two diesel technicians
survived unscathed, but they were among the few lucky ones who did.
Out of control, the streamliner’s coaches had snapped their connections
with the engines and slammed into the old iron bridge. Te violent de-
struction lasted less than a minute, but the worst train wreck in Nevada
history killed 24 passengers and crewmembers and injured 121 others.
Only 31 escaped unharmed.
Once all of the injured passengers and crewmembers were rushed to
hospitals, Southern Pacifc offi cials began their investigation into the
cause of the wreck. Many passengers blamed Hecox for going too fast,
but the veteran engineer swore he was traveling at a safe speed. From
the outset, company offi cials contended that sabotage was the cause
of the derailment. Dan O’Connell, chief special agent for the SP out of
San Francisco, stated that at the site of the derailment the spikes had
been pulled out of a 30-foot section of rail, the rail then forced inward
about 5 inches, and then the track respiked. Rumors circulated that SP
was claiming sabotage to cover up reckless operation in order to avoid
legal liability, but O’Connell ignored the accusations of a cover-up and
launched a massive investigation, the most intensive in U.S. railroad his-
tory. To increase public interest and help in the investigation, SP posted
a $5,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of
the vandals; it was later increased to $10,000.
By M
ark M
cLaughlin
Tahoe Magazine
... continued on next page
Photo: nevaDa hiStorical Society
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 97 96 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 96 5/11/2012 5:53:49 PM
TAHOE HISTORY
N
E
V
A
D
A

T
R
A
I
N

W
R
E
C
K
:
A
N

U
N
S
O
L
V
E
D

M
Y
S
T
E
R
Y
froM Mark tWain to kit carSon to the
Donner Party anD More, the truckee/tahoe region anD itS
SurrounDingS have an abunDance of hiStorical figureS anD eventS — incluDing a
MySteriouS train Wreck in 1939 that killeD 24 PeoPle that no one can SeeM to Solve
D
espite an extensive investigation by law enforcement and
Southern Pacifc detectives, a deadly train wreck that tore
apart the luxury streamliner City of San Francisco in central
Nevada 73 years ago remains unsolved. Depending on whom
you want to believe, the tragedy was either the result of the engineer
speeding too fast for the tracks, or according to Southern Pacifc railroad
offi cials, a deliberate and murderous act of sabotage. Te mystery of
what really happened at Harney, Nevada, has never been solved, but
these facts are indisputable. In August 1939, the most tragic railroad
disaster in Nevada’s history killed 24 people and virtually destroyed
Southern Pacifc’s fnest passenger train.
At its inauguration on January 2, 1938, the City of San Francisco, was
deemed the “world’s most superlative train.” Te sleek streamliner
consisted of deluxe sleepers, coaches loaded with amenities, and motive
power supplied by six 900-horsepower engines. A technological marvel
in engineering, she was proclaimed the ‘largest, fastest, most beautiful,
powerful, and luxurious streamliner ever designed.” Te elegant train
pulled 17 coaches instead of the normal 11, and was capable of speeds
in excess of 100 mph. When placed into service, the hi-tech train cut 19
hours from the fastest previous time on its route between Chicago and
Oakland, California.
like the native aMericanS,
Mountain Men, anD Wagon trainS
before it, the nation’S firSt tranS-
continental railroaD folloWeD the
huMbolDt river aS it MeanDereD
WeSt acroSS nevaDa.
Like the native Americans, mountain men, and wagon trains before it,
the nation’s frst transcontinental railroad followed the Humboldt River
as it meandered west across Nevada. But instead of a dusty farm wagon
hitched behind plodding oxen, the City of San Francisco raced over the
high desert at speeds averaging between 75 and 110 mph. On Saturday,
August 12, 1939, the setting sun glinted of the City of San Francisco’s
silver metallic skin as it streaked across the landscape. Outside it was
blistering hot, but passengers aboard the air-conditioned streamliner
took no notice as they enjoyed dinner, cocktails, or cards. Chief Engineer
Ed Hecox confdently manned the throttle. Hecox, 65 years old and up
for retirement, had been hired by Southern Pacifc as a steam freman
when he was 29, and now had 36 years and more than a million miles
under his belt. SP often called upon the experienced veteran for special
speed tests and demonstration runs, and had assigned him to the City of
San Francisco as soon as it was built.
Te train stopped briefy at the little town of Carlin and once all was
ready Hecox throttled the powerful streamliner forward. Te track fol-
lowed the Humboldt River into the west end of Paradise Canyon where
it approached bridge No. 4. Always alert, Hecox noticed a clump of sage-
brush lodged against the outside rail but thought little of it. “We were
doing 60 at the time, hitting the milepost on the head, just 17 miles out
of Carlin and three hours to Sparks,” he later recalled. “Nevada is full of
tumbleweed, sagebrush and jackrabbits, but you don’t stop a stream-
liner for a clump of tumbleweed.” But as soon as the lead locomotives
reached that part of the track the train derailed. Miraculously, the front
engines crossed the bridge upright without striking the infrastructure.
Te lead locomotives plowed through the wooden track ties and rock
ballast before coming to a stop upright well past the river. the desert
darkness behind them much of the train was a tangled mess of crushed
and twisted metal. Hecox, his freman, and two diesel technicians
survived unscathed, but they were among the few lucky ones who did.
Out of control, the streamliner’s coaches had snapped their connections
with the engines and slammed into the old iron bridge. Te violent de-
struction lasted less than a minute, but the worst train wreck in Nevada
history killed 24 passengers and crewmembers and injured 121 others.
Only 31 escaped unharmed.
Once all of the injured passengers and crewmembers were rushed to
hospitals, Southern Pacifc offi cials began their investigation into the
cause of the wreck. Many passengers blamed Hecox for going too fast,
but the veteran engineer swore he was traveling at a safe speed. From
the outset, company offi cials contended that sabotage was the cause
of the derailment. Dan O’Connell, chief special agent for the SP out of
San Francisco, stated that at the site of the derailment the spikes had
been pulled out of a 30-foot section of rail, the rail then forced inward
about 5 inches, and then the track respiked. Rumors circulated that SP
was claiming sabotage to cover up reckless operation in order to avoid
legal liability, but O’Connell ignored the accusations of a cover-up and
launched a massive investigation, the most intensive in U.S. railroad his-
tory. To increase public interest and help in the investigation, SP posted
a $5,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of
the vandals; it was later increased to $10,000.
By M
ark M
cLaughlin
Tahoe Magazine
... continued on next page
Photo: nevaDa hiStorical Society
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 97 96 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 97 5/11/2012 5:55:01 PM
98 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
TxnIN Wxrtx ... from previous page
O’Connell’s investigation was massive. Witness tips poured in as citizens
hoped to cash in on the reward. One lead was about a suspicious man
with deformed ears seen in Fernley. Te so-called “earless” man, Bob
LaDucuer, was one of 93,110 men interrogated over the next six months.
All were cleared. Te outbreak of World War II took most SP agents of
active pursuit, but O’Connell never let up — by the time he retired in
1944, he and his men had interviewed or studied reports on 210,437
suspects! Despite this incredible efort, SP has never prosecuted anyone
for the crime and the $10,000 reward was never claimed.
Some survivors of the wreck fled legal proceedings against the railroad.
Despite litigation and bad press, Southern Pacifc played hard ball with
the victims. Passenger F.S. Foote typifed the railroad’s handling of the
situation. Foote sufered a broken jaw, broken sternum, four cracked
ribs, internal hemorrhaging, a brain concussion, and a punctured lung.
SP reimbursed Mr. Foote $7,500 which barely paid for his hospital and
medical expenses. In addition, SP also sent Foote $5, which represented
the amount he had paid for the extra fare to board the luxury streamliner
in Chicago. Te money came with a note: “While technically a refund of
only the value of the unused portion of the ticket would be in order, we
are refunding the full amount of the extra fare due to the interruption to
our service. Trust that we shall have the pleasure of serving you in the
future.”
In 1977, Southern Pacifc Railroad gave author Don DeNevi access to
review the evidence and archived reports. At that time all relevant physi-
cal evidence from the 1939 derailment and investigation was stored in
a locked room in the basement of Southern Pacifc’s headquarters in
San Francisco, and the $10,000 reward for the arrest and conviction of
the culprits was still in force, in memory of Agent O’Connell. After the
1996 merger between SP and Union Pacifc railroads, the new company
moved its San Francisco offi ces to Omaha and offi cials are now unaware
of what may have happened to the evidence. An inquiry by this writer
to determine if the monetary reward was still active went unanswered
by Union Pacifc offi cials. Apparently, railroad detectives are concerned
that any publicity related to this case may inspire a copycat crime. A
few weeks after an article about the Harney wreck was published in the
October 1995 issue of SP’s quarterly journal Trainline, Amtrak’s 12-car
Sunset Limited was intentionally derailed near Hyde, Arizona.
— Tahoe historian Mark McLaughlin is a nationally published au-
thor and professional speaker. His award-winning books are available
at stores or at www.thestormking.com. Tis story was adapted from
Western Train Adventures: Te Good, the Bad & the Ugly. Mark can be
reached at mark@thestormking.com. s
froM the outSet, coMPany officialS
contenDeD that Sabotage WaS
the cauSe of the DerailMent.
Photo: nevaDa hiStorical Society
Photo: M
ark M
claughlin
SUMMER THRILLS

MOUNTAIN ADVENTURE. When the snow melts, the wildfowers begin to bloom
and a whole new variety of high Alpine adventure kicks off at Kirkwood! On weekends and holidays,
take on lift accessed mountain biking, a ropes challenge course or the popular Zip Tahoe canopy
tour. Daily, also fnd a challenging Disc Golf Course, horseback riding, nearby lake activities, fy
fshing, rock climbing and a network of spectacular hiking trails winding through the surrounding
National Forest. Learn more about your high Sierra escape at kirkwood.com.
WEEKENDS: Lift Accessed Hiking & Mountain Biking.
Visit kirkwood.com for lodging, summer passes and a schedule of summer events and activities.
WINTER 2012/13 SEASON PASSES
are on sale all summer. Get your
pass early and save on a full season
of Tahoe’s best snow.
W W W . K I R K W O O D . C O M
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 98 5/11/2012 5:56:03 PM
98 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
TxnIN Wxrtx ... from previous page
O’Connell’s investigation was massive. Witness tips poured in as citizens
hoped to cash in on the reward. One lead was about a suspicious man
with deformed ears seen in Fernley. Te so-called “earless” man, Bob
LaDucuer, was one of 93,110 men interrogated over the next six months.
All were cleared. Te outbreak of World War II took most SP agents of
active pursuit, but O’Connell never let up — by the time he retired in
1944, he and his men had interviewed or studied reports on 210,437
suspects! Despite this incredible efort, SP has never prosecuted anyone
for the crime and the $10,000 reward was never claimed.
Some survivors of the wreck fled legal proceedings against the railroad.
Despite litigation and bad press, Southern Pacifc played hard ball with
the victims. Passenger F.S. Foote typifed the railroad’s handling of the
situation. Foote sufered a broken jaw, broken sternum, four cracked
ribs, internal hemorrhaging, a brain concussion, and a punctured lung.
SP reimbursed Mr. Foote $7,500 which barely paid for his hospital and
medical expenses. In addition, SP also sent Foote $5, which represented
the amount he had paid for the extra fare to board the luxury streamliner
in Chicago. Te money came with a note: “While technically a refund of
only the value of the unused portion of the ticket would be in order, we
are refunding the full amount of the extra fare due to the interruption to
our service. Trust that we shall have the pleasure of serving you in the
future.”
In 1977, Southern Pacifc Railroad gave author Don DeNevi access to
review the evidence and archived reports. At that time all relevant physi-
cal evidence from the 1939 derailment and investigation was stored in
a locked room in the basement of Southern Pacifc’s headquarters in
San Francisco, and the $10,000 reward for the arrest and conviction of
the culprits was still in force, in memory of Agent O’Connell. After the
1996 merger between SP and Union Pacifc railroads, the new company
moved its San Francisco offi ces to Omaha and offi cials are now unaware
of what may have happened to the evidence. An inquiry by this writer
to determine if the monetary reward was still active went unanswered
by Union Pacifc offi cials. Apparently, railroad detectives are concerned
that any publicity related to this case may inspire a copycat crime. A
few weeks after an article about the Harney wreck was published in the
October 1995 issue of SP’s quarterly journal Trainline, Amtrak’s 12-car
Sunset Limited was intentionally derailed near Hyde, Arizona.
— Tahoe historian Mark McLaughlin is a nationally published au-
thor and professional speaker. His award-winning books are available
at stores or at www.thestormking.com. Tis story was adapted from
Western Train Adventures: Te Good, the Bad & the Ugly. Mark can be
reached at mark@thestormking.com. s
froM the outSet, coMPany officialS
contenDeD that Sabotage WaS
the cauSe of the DerailMent.
Photo: nevaDa hiStorical Society
Photo: M
ark M
claughlin
SUMMER THRILLS
Ki r k wo o d Mo u n t a i n Re s o r t | Hi g h wa y 8 8 a t Ca r s o n Pa s s | L o d g i n g : 1 . 8 0 0 . 9 6 7 . 7 5 0 0 | www. k i r k wo o d . c o m

MOUNTAIN ADVENTURE. When the snow melts, the wildfowers begin to bloom
and a whole new variety of high Alpine adventure kicks off at Kirkwood! On weekends and holidays,
take on lift accessed mountain biking, a ropes challenge course or the popular Zip Tahoe canopy
tour. Daily, also fnd a challenging Disc Golf Course, horseback riding, nearby lake activities, fy
fshing, rock climbing and a network of spectacular hiking trails winding through the surrounding
National Forest. Learn more about your high Sierra escape at kirkwood.com.
WEEKENDS: Lift Accessed Hiking & Mountain Biking.
Visit kirkwood.com for lodging, summer passes and a schedule of summer events and activities.
WINTER 2012/13 SEASON PASSES
are on sale all summer. Get your
pass early and save on a full season
of Tahoe’s best snow.
W W W . K I R K W O O D . C O M
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 99 5/11/2012 5:56:23 PM
recreation general map
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 101 100 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 100 5/11/2012 5:56:28 PM
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 101 100 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 101 5/12/2012 1:17:06 PM
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 103 102 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
recreation golf
▲ nortH sHore
COYOTE MOON
10685 Northwoods Blvd., Truckee, CA
530-587-0886 • www.coyotemoongolf.com
In a tranquil mountain setting above 6,300 feet, Coyote Moon is a
majestic masterpiece designed by Brad Bell. The course is 250 secluded
acres of rolling hills framed by towering pines without a home site or
structure to spoil the view. The course cascades over a beautiful Sierra
ridgeline, meandering among granite bluffs and around crystal clear
Trout Creek.
GRAEAGLE MEADOWS GOLF COURSE
6934 Hwy 89, Graeagle, (Blairsden) CA
530-836-2323 • www.playgraeagle.com
Challenging 18-hole championship golf course along the scenic Feather
River surrounded by the spectacular beauty of the Sierra. Graeagle Meadows
Golf Course has a reputation for being one of the best in Northern California.
INCLINE VILLAGE MOUNTAIN COURSE
690 Wilson Way, Incline Village, NV 89451
775-832-1150 • www.golfincline.com
With spectacular green sites and contours, the Mountain Course
demands more accuracy than distance. Shot making skills are necessary
to navigate the terrain. A tribute to designer Robert Trent Jones Jr., the
mountainous 18-hole course features challenging par 3s averaging over
150 yards and par 4s that challenge even the most proficient golfer.
INCLINE VILLAGE CHAMPIONSHIP COURSE GOLF COURSE
955 Fairway Blvd. Incline Village, NV
775-832-1146 • www.golfincline.com
Located in a sprawling mountain setting, this par 72 golf course stretch-
es more than 6,900 yards from the blue tees, which carries a course rating
of 72.2 with a slope of 133.
NORTHSTAR CALIFORNIA
129 Basque Dr. Truckee, CA
530-562-3290 • www.northstarattahoe.com
Inspiring mountain and meadow views compliment this Robert Muir
Graves championship course. Wide-open, links style play characterizes the
front side while shot-making is a premium on the back with its narrow, tree-
lined fairways, creeks and small greens. The 6,897 yards play tough with
water on 15 holes and traps.
OLD BROCKWAY GOLF COURSE
7900 North Lake Blvd. Kings Beach, CA
530-546-9909 • www.oldbrockway.com
This North Lake Tahoe golf course was built in 1924 by Harry Com-
stock. Old Brockway meanders through towering Jeffrey pines with views
of majestic mountains and Lake Tahoe. The charm and character of the
old Brockway remains the same today, much as it did in the 1920s and
1930s. In 1934, Old Brockway was the home of the first Bing Crosby Golf
Tournament.
OLD GREENWOOD
12915 Fairway Drive, Off I-80 at Overland Trail, Truckee, CA
530-550-7010 • www.oldgreenwood.com
With Old Greenwood tranquil, natural setting, only one person was
considered when it came to designing the golf course at Old Green-
wood: Jack Nicklaus. Recently named one of the Best Upscale Courses in
America by Golf Digest, the golf experience at Old Greenwood is sure to
rival that of other Nicklaus masterpieces.
PONDEROSA GOLF COURSE
10040 Reynolds Way, Truckee, CA
530-587-3501 • www.ponderosagolfcoursetruckee.com
North Tahoe’s best value is the nine-hole course in Truckee. Located just one
mile south of downtown, this beautifully maintained course is managed. By the
Truckee Donner Recreation & Park District. Fantastic views of the Pacific Crest
and the Carson Range along with a snack bar, driving nets and chipping and
putting greens. Rental clubs and a full retail shop are on site.
PLUMAS PINES GOLF RESORT
402 Poplar Valley Rd., Graeagle, CA
530-836-1420 • www.plumaspinegolf.com
As you approach the Plumas Pines Golf Resort, glimpses of green peek
through the towering pine trees, hinting at what is to come. A 1980
Homer Flint designed golf course, Plumas Pines Golf Resort features
6,504 yards, par 72.
RESORT AT SQUAW CREEK
400 Squaw Creek Rd. Olympic Valley, CA
530-581-6637 • www.squawcreek.com
Nestled below the granite peaks of world famous Squaw Valley USA, this
Robert Trent Jones, Jr. design demands accurate play. The par 71 champion-
ship links layout winds along the valley floor through and around wetlands,
providing awesome vistas as well as a severe test of target golf. Resort at
Squaw Creek has received Audubon status as a certified cooperative sanctu-
ary and one of Golf Magazine’s top 10 courses.
Gorgeous
Golf
Greens Greens
Many of Lake Tahoe’s golf courses offer amazing views of the mountains or the lake.
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 102 5/12/2012 1:17:10 PM
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 103 102 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
COYOT E � MOON� GOL F � COUR S E
Experience true
mountain golf at its finest!
For additional information, please call
our Golf Shop at 530.587.0886
or visit www.coyotemoongolf.com
to book your tee times
T R UCK E E � � CA
FREE Locals’ Card
Entitles you to…
$
100 regular rate
$
80 mid day rate
$
60 twilight rate
$35 9 hole rate
(a�er 5pm)
Golf for up
to 2 players
Book up to 3
days in advance
Must show proof
of residency
Every Thursday evening…
Call for details and sign up!
Join our Men’s Club
10 play package sold for
$
750
Good for the purchaser only.
Hosting ESPN Golf Challenge
on Sunday, June 17th.
Please call the Golf Shop to sign up.
Tahoe Paradise
Golf Course
• Challenging Par 66 Mountain Layout
• Call about Twilight Rates after 3PM
• Also Early Bird & Super Twilight rates
• Practice green
• Power Carts with Ice Chests
• Equipment Rentals
• Pro Shop with Experienced Staff
3021 US Hwy 50
Next to Lira’s Market in Meyers
See our exclusive
online specials
• View the course layout
• Book your tee times
• Save on green fees
18-Hole Executive
Golf Course
www.TahoeParadiseGC.com
▼ soutH sHore
EDGEWOOD TAHOE GOLF COURSE
100 Lake Parkway, Lake Tahoe NV
775-588-2787 • www.edgewoodtahoe.com
This George Fazio 18-hole design on the edge of Lake Tahoe has become world re-
nown for hosting the 1985 U.S. Senior Open and the American Century Championship
since 1990. With a variety of tee lengths, golfers of all abilities can enjoy some of the
most breathtaking views in golf.
BIJOU MUNICIPAL GOLF COURSE
1180 Rufus Allen Blvd. South Lake Tahoe, CA
530-542-6097 • www.recreationintahoe.com
This nine-hole family course with easy access provides beginners and intermediate
players par-3 and par-4 holes that test many of the shots in the bag. Affordable rates and
no tee reservations allow for last-minute rounds.
LAKE TAHOE GOLF COURSE
2500 Emerald Bay Rd, South Lake Tahoe, CA
530-577-0788 • www.laketahoegc.com
One of only two 18-hole championship courses on the South Shore, this mountain
meadow layout provides spectacular views of nearby Mount Tallac and a challenging
array of shots. Players can also spend ample time honing their games at the course’s
expansive practice facilities.
TAHOE PARADISE GOLF COURSE
3021 U.S. Highway 50, South Lake Tahoe, CA
530-577-2121• www.tahoeparadisegc.com
This par-66, 4,034-yard executive course nestled in the Sierra challenges the player
to make accurate shots. The scenic par-3 and par-4 holes are made up of rolling,
pine-lined fairways, ensuring an enjoyable test of golf. ▲
TAHOE CITY GOLF COURSE
251 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City, CA
530-583-1516 • www.tahoecitygolf.com
Enjoy a view of Lake Tahoe from every hole at this
nice course. Initially designed by May Webb Dunn in
1917, making it the oldest course in the Tahoe basin, the
course is 5,261 yards.
TAHOE DONNER
11509 Northwoods Blvd., Truckee, CA
530-587-9440 • www.tahoedonner.com
Tahoe Donner 18-hole Championship Golf Course is
located high in the Sierra. Cradled among the towering
pines, the course narrow fairways and numerous creeks
place a strict demand on accuracy for a challenging and
enjoyable round of golf. This semi-private course was
designed by Roy Williams and Bill Bell Jr. and opened in
1975.
WHITEHAWK RANCH GOLF CLUB
1137 Hwy 89, Clio, CA
800-332-4295 • www.golfwhitehawk.com
Another natural beauty, the course blends harmo-
niously with its spectacular surroundings. Streams
meander through magnificent pines, cedars and aspens
to create ponds and waterfalls. Immaculate fairways are
framed with native grasses, California poppies
and blue lupine. Named 18th Best Course in
California by Golf Digest and recently ranked
the 11th Best Public Golf Course in California
by Golfweek magazine.
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 103 5/12/2012 1:17:12 PM
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 105 104 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
recreation camping
Campgrounds
DL Bliss State Park
Highway 89, 17 miles south of
Tahoe City. This state park camp-
ground has water, restrooms,
showers, group sites, swimming
and a max RV length of 18 feet.
530-525-7277
Sugar Pine Point State Park
Highway 89, 8 miles south of Tahoe
City. This state park campground has
water, restrooms, showers, swim-
ming, and can take RVs up to 30 feet.
530-525-7982 or 530-525-7232
Emerald Bay State Park
Highway 89, 21 miles south of
Tahoe City. This state park camp-
ground has water, restrooms,
showers, swimming, and can take
RVs up to 21 feet. 530-541-3030
Meeks Bay Resort
7941 Emerald Bay Road off of
Highway 89. This camp ground
provides water, restrooms, show-
ers, RV hookups, swimming, a boat
ramp, and can take RVs up to 60
feet. 877-326-3357 or 530-525-6946
Campground by the Lake
1150 Rufus Allen Boulevard, South
Lake Tahoe. This City of South
Lake Tahoe campground has wa-
ter, restrooms, showers, hookups
bike trails and access to the lake
and a boat launch. 530-542-6096
Zephyr Cove Resort
Four miles north of Stateline on
Highway 50. This campground
offers water, sewer, electrical, TV
and telephone hookups for RVs up
to 40 feet long, as well as walk in
campsites with access to laundry,
restrooms, showers, and vending.
775-589-4906
Camp Richardson
Highway 89 north of South Lake
Tahoe. This campground has wa-
ter, restrooms, showers and access
to Lake Tahoe, a marina with boat
rentals, a restaurant, general store,
and other options. 800-544-1801 or
530-541-1801
Nevada Beach
Two miles east of Stateline on
Highway 50. This campground has
water, restrooms, and access to the
lake. 775-588-5562
Tahoe State
Recreation Area
In Tahoe City off
Highway 28. This
state parks camp-
ground has water,
restrooms, show-
ers, swimming
and can take RVs
up to 27 feet long.
530-583-3074
William Kent
Two miles south
of Tahoe City
on Highway 89.
This campground has
water, restrooms, swimming and
can accommodate up to 40-foot-
long RVs. 530-583-3642
Kaspian
Five miles south of Tahoe City on
Highway 89. This campground
offers water, restrooms, swimming
and has space for RVs up to 20 feet
long. 530-583-3642
KOA Lake Tahoe
760 Highway 50, South Lake
Tahoe. This campground has full
RV hookups, tent sites, restrooms,
showers, laundry, a general store
and heated pool. 800-562-3477
Fallen Leaf Campground
Where: 2165 Fallen Leaf Road,
South Lake Tahoe. This forest
service campground has water,
restrooms, showers, a camp store
and access to Fallen Leaf Lake.
530-544-0426
Bayview Campground
Highway 89, north of South Lake
Tahoe, above Emerald Bay. This
forest service campground has
restrooms. 530-544-0426
Donner Memorial State Park
East end of Donner Lake, Truckee,
off Donner Pass Road. This state
park campground has water, re-
strooms, showers, swimming and
space for RVs up to 28 feet long.
530-582-7892
Upper Little Truckee
Highway 89 north of Truckee. This
forest service campground has wa-
ter and vault toilets along the little
Truckee River. 530-587-3558
Lower Little
Truckee
Highway 89 north of Truckee. This
forest service campground has wa-
ter and vault toilets along the little
Truckee River. 530-587-3558
Sagehen
Highway 89 north of Truckee. This
forest service campground has
vault toilets and water must be
taken from Sagehen Creek, which
should be treated before use. 530-
587-3558
Lakeside
Highway 89 north of Truckee. This
forest service campground has
water and vault toilets, and has
access to Prosser Creek Reservoir.
530-587-3558
Prosser Family Forest Service
Truckee, off Prosser Dam Road
north of Interstate 80. This forest
service campground has rest-
rooms, swimming and access to
a boat ramp on Prosser Reservoir.
530-587-3558
Prosser Group Forest Service
On Prosser Creek Reservoir, off
Highway 89 north of Truckee. This
forest service campground has
water and vault toilets, and access
to Prosser Creek Reservoir. 530-
587-3558
Logger Forest Service
In Truckee, off the Hirschdale
Exit from Interstate 80. This forest
service campground has water,
restrooms, swimming and access
to a boat ramp. 530-587-3558
Granite Flat Forest
Service
Between Truckee and Tahoe City
on Highway 89. This forest service
campground has water, restrooms,
swimming, river access and can
take RVs up to 40 feet long.
530-587-3558
Goose Meadows Forest Service
Between Truckee and Tahoe City
on Highway 89. This forest service
campground has water, restrooms,
swimming and access to the
Truckee River. Fits up to 24-foot
RVs. 530-587-3558
Silver Creek Forest Service
Between Truckee and Tahoe City
on Highway 89. This forest service
campground has water, restrooms,
swimming and river access on the
Truckee River, and can take RVs up
to 40 feet long. 530-587-3558
Boca Rest
Off the Interstate 80 Hirschdale
exit in the Truckee area. This forest
service campground has water,
restrooms, showers and fishing.
530-587-3558
Boyington Mill
Off the Hirschdale exit from Inter-
state 80 in the Truckee area. This
Forest Service campground has
restrooms and can take RVs up to
15 feet long. 530-587-3558
Lake Forest
In Tahoe City on Lake Forest Road.
This campground has water, re-
strooms, swimming, a boat ramp
and space for RVs up to 20 feet
long. 530-581-4017
Camping in recreational
vehicles is popular in Tahoe,
but navigating the two-lane,
twisting roads can be tough.
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 104 5/12/2012 1:17:15 PM
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 105 104 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
inclinerecreation.com
• aquatic center
• ftness classes
• workout room
• massages
• gymnasium
• cycle classes
• 11 tennis courts
• senior activities
• youth day camps
• starlight cinema
Your family
deserves the
best vacation
possible!
bring in this ad and receive 1/2 of a
one-day pass to the Incline Village
Recreation Center
(up to a
$
7
50
value)
1/2 OFF
Incline Village
Recreation
Center
Mon-Fri 6am-9pm ■ Sat & Sun 7am-8pm
980 Incline Way ■ 775.832.1300
Also, check
out Incline
Village’s
two 18
hole golf
courses!
You reserve the campground and Acker RV
Rentals will deliver and set up your vacation
rental RV trailer at any of the following Lake
Tahoe area RV Parks/ Campgrounds:
Tahoe Valley RV Resort
(530) 541-2222
(877) 717-8737
RVontheGO.com
At the entrance to South Lake Tahoe,
Tahoe Valley Park is a favorite for RV
Vacationers. Full hook-up sites with cable
TV, heated pool, general store and more.
Zephyr Cove Resort
(775) 589-4907
1-800-23-TAHOE
zephyrcove.com
Located on the Nevada Side of Lake
Tahoe’s South Shore, Zephyr Cove Resort
offers a full service RV Park and all the
amenities of the Zephyr Cove resort
complex.
Other Tahoe Area Parks:
Nevada Beach
(775) 588-5562
(877) 444-6777
Camp Richardson Resort & Marina
(530) 541-1801
(800) 544-1801
camprichardson.com
Campground by the Lake
(530) 542-6096
recreationintahoe.com
Fallen Leaf Lake
(530) 544-0426
(877) 444-6777
KOA of South Lake Tahoe
(530) 577-3693
(800) KOA-3477
laketahoekoa.com
ACKER RV RENTALS
P.O. Box 1325 Zephyr Cove, NV 89448
775-721-0234
800-476-0351
Acker RV Rentals at Lake
Tahoe offers you deluxe RV
lodging accommodations at
fixed campground locations
in the greater Lake Tahoe
area. We’ll have everything
set up and ready for your
arrival. It’s like having your
own RV vacation home with
Mother Nature just outside
your front door.
Your Vacation is where YOU PARK it!
Check out our RVs at www.ackerrvrentals.com
Martis Creek
Martis Creek Road off of High-
way 267, south of Truckee. This
campground operated by the Army
Corps of Engineers has water and
restrooms. 530-639-2175
Mt. Rose
On Highway 431, 7 miles from
Incline Village. This forest service
campground has drinking water,
restrooms, and can take RVs up to
35 feet. 775-331-6444 or 530-694-
1002
Sandy Beach
6873 North Lake Boulevard, Tahoe
Vista. This campground has water,
restrooms, showers, RV hookups,
swimming and can take RVs up to
35 feet long. 530-546-7682
Tahoe Donner
13813 Alder Creek Road, Truckee.
This campground has water,
restrooms, showers, RV hookups,
laundry and can take up to 32-foot
long RVs. 530-587-9462
United Trails
Off the Interstate 80 Hirsch-
dale Exit, Truckee area. This RV
campground has water, restrooms,
showers, hook ups and laundry.
530-587-8282
Tahoe Valley
West of South Lake Tahoe on High-
way 50. This campground offers
RV and tent camping with full RV
hook-ups, a general store, heated
pool, playground and meeting
facilities. 530-541-2222 ▲
Canvas tents are available for rent at the Campground By The Lake in South Lake Tahoe.
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 105 5/12/2012 1:17:19 PM
Mountain Bikes • Sales & Service • Clothing & Accessories
New
Location!
475 North Lake Blvd. Ste. 111
Tahoe City • Cobblestone Center
Tahoegravityshop.com • 530.581.3558
Check us out on
MOUNTAIN BIKES
ROAD BIKES
BMX
BEACH CRUISERS
BOULDERING ACCESS.
CLIMBING SHOES
SALES • RENTALS • REPAIRS
955 EMERALD BAY ROAD SOUTH LAKE TAHOE, CA
[530] 544-RIDE
southshorebikes.net
106 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
recreation biking
By Ty Polastri
Tahoe Magazine
Interested in spending
one of your vacation
days in beautiful Lake
Tahoe on your road or
mountain bike?
Here are five great
reasons why you should.
1 a ride For
every biCyClist
Whether you ride for endur-
ance, adventure, competitive
ranking or cruising around the
neighborhoods on your way to
visit parks, beaches or shopping
centers, Lake Tahoe has an ideal
bike facility and events to match
your interests and riding skills.
Tere are literally miles and
miles of paved bikeways in and
around the Lake Tahoe region
that range from dedicated bike
paths, lanes, routes and well-
maintained rural roads with
little vehicular traf c. Tere are
43 miles of bike paths (share-
used separated from highways),
21 miles of bike lanes (on
highways), and 22 miles of bike
routes (signed shared roadways)
for a total of 86 miles.
A bicyclist can easily locate
an appropriate bikeway to match
his or her riding interests by ei-
ther getting the free Lake Tahoe
Bike Trail Map or visiting a bike
shop for suggestions.
2 sCeniC mountain
bike trails
Mountain biking in Tahoe brings
to mind the Flume Trail – voted one
of the top 10 mountain bike trails in
the U.S. because of its awe-inspir-
ing panoramic views perched 1,500
vertical feet above the lake. And
that is just the beginning. Tere
are about 260 miles of single track
trails and an additional 205 miles
of double track/fire roads managed
on National Forest Service lands
within the Tahoe Basin.

Riding bikes is an
alternative to trying to park
at one of the beaches near Camp
Richardson. Photo: Michelle Morton






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TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 106 5/12/2012 1:17:31 PM
106 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
A new kind of
outdoor store,
just for the
South Shore.
B
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Outdoor Gear

Apparel

Local Knowledge
& Resources

1023 Emerald Bay Rd.
At the “Y”
South Lake Tahoe, CA
530-541-1027
lakeoftheskyoutfitters.com
Look for
special offers
Mention this ad
and receive
$5 OFF
any purchase
over $20
3 bike parks
Test your riding skills against
others, win awards, qualify for
higher-level competitions or just
further develop your skills with
family and friends when riding
these specially built bike parks
that can challenge you and move
you toward your personal goals
and enjoyment. Northstar Resort
Hike & Bike Park, Kirkwood Bike
Park, South Lake Tahoe BMX
Track and the Truckee BMX Track
are four tremendous options.
4 CyCling events
For more than 20 years, Tahoe
has been the preferred location for
major rides around the lake that
both ofer personal challenges and
raise funds for important health
related causes. Te ofcial cycling
season kicks of with June as
Tahoe Bike Month and continues
on well past September with many
events. Tere are supported rides,
triathlons, mountain bike races,
festivals, and small localized races
throughout the summer. For more
details, check out the event calen-
dar at www.TahoeBike.org.
5 building a
biCyCle Community
For nearly 30 years, public
agencies have been planning,
funding and building bikeways
throughout the region. Most
recently, the new “Lake Tahoe Re-
gion Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan
2010: Establishing the Founda-
tion for a World-Class Bicycle and
Pedestrian Community at Lake
Tahoe” has been completed and
sets the guidelines and policies for
Tahoe’s cycling future in the basin.
Since its founding in 2005,
the Lake Tahoe Bicycle Coalition
has helped get South Lake Tahoe
and North Lake Tahoe nationally
designated as a Bicycle Friendly
Community. Te organization
has also produced the Lake Tahoe
Bike Trail Map, Lake Tahoe Bicycle
Film Festivals, Tahoe Bike Chal-
lenge to Work, School and Play
and June is Tahoe Bike Month. For
more details about Tahoe bicy-
cling and how you can help shape
Tahoe’s future visit, LTBC’s web
site at www.Tahoebike.org.
— Ty Polastri is Founder/President
of the Lake Tahoe Bicycle Coalition.
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 107 5/12/2012 5:08:31 PM
recreation rock climbing
Lake Tahoe area is a rock-climbing Mecca
....continued on page 110
Carnelian Bay resident Sean Bunnel ascends a diffcult route at the Old County boulder feld on the North Shore.
The Lake Tahoe Basin and surrounding Sierra
Nevada first catapulted into national and interna-
tional consciousness as a result of the 1960 Winter
Olympic Games at Squaw Valley.
Since, the renown surrounding the region most
often relates to the unsurpassed natural beauty of
the lake and the world-class ski and snowboard
terrain offered in the backcountry and at the
abundance of resorts throughout the region — both
will always be an integral part of the equation in
bringing tourists to the region.
Yet, recently, an expanding portfolio of summer
recreational activities has helped make the basin
a more diversified magnet for visitors, and due
attention has been devoted to the emergence of
Lake Tahoe as an ideal spot for bicyclists, whether
it be of the road or trail variety. Similarly, the drive
to promote and market emergent sports such as
stand-up paddleboarding has increased over the
past few years.
However, in all the recreation hullabaloo, rock
climbing has consistently flown under the radar,
which can be surprising considering the sport’s
dramatic increase in popularity in recent years
combined with the Lake Tahoe Basin’s ability to
provide an ideal setting for practitioners of the
sport, particularly for beginners.
A field of misconceptions
To the uninitiated, the sport of rock climbing
may conjure more myth than actuality, experts say,
the most prevalent being it is exceedingly dangerous,
and scaling a cliff is a death-defying act reserved for
the brave (or crazy) few.
By Matthew Renda
Tahoe Magazine
“I see plenty of
weightlifters struggle
to get up a cliff.
Really, balance,
good footwork and
all-around strong
technique are more
important (than
strength).”
— Annie Ballard,
Alpenglow Sports
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 109
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 108 5/12/2012 1:17:34 PM
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Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 109
Where to climB
soUth shore — loVer’s leAp
Lover’s Leap is on par with Donner Summit as a world-class climbing destination. The area
features more than a hundred routes and is located near the town of Strawberry, Calif., on
U.S. Highway 50 toward Sacramento. Horizontal dikes striating the rocks make steep climbs
relatively approachable, meaning climbers of moderate skill can get vertical exposure of up to
600 feet without undue strenuous effort. There is bouldering, but the classic climbs are all of the
free-climb multi-pitch variety.
West shore — 90-foot WAll
This aptly named top area is by far the most popular in the Lake Tahoe Basin, which can create
crowds of climbers. However, the south facing wall offers spring season climbing and a variety
of routes that range from straightforward to moderate. The scenic vistas of Emerald Bay are an
added benefit. To reach the wall, drive to Eagle Falls Picnic Area. Take the Eagle Lake Loop to the
Vista and head right to the wall. One can walk to bolted anchors to set up a top rope.
north shore/trUckee — donner sUmmit
Donner Summit can keep a climber of any ability busy for a long time. The clean granite offers
some of the choicest terrain anywhere. School Rock is an ideal top roping spot for beginners,
with some easy lines. Green Phantom is another popular area. Both are located near Rainbow
Bridge off Old Highway 40.
eAst shore — spooner crAg, BAllBUster rock
Spooner Crag, located near the intersection of Highway 28 and Highway 50, offers plenty of moder-
ate to moderately difficult climbs. Ballbuster Rock, farther north on Highway 28, is ideal for begin-
ners and is less-crowded than other more classic spots. The rock’s proximity to the highway does not
make for an ideal setting, but the terrain is challenging and affords a few routes for beginners.
Tahoe City resident Ming Poon climbs
high above Donner Lake.
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 109 5/12/2012 1:17:49 PM
Come Fly With Us
For a unique experience, come to Soar
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above the Sierra Nevada mountains. Our
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530.587.6702
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Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 111 110 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
However, conscientious use of
the safety equipment associated
with the sport renders the enter-
prise relatively safe.
“I think the injury rate for rock
climbers is less than that of moun-
tain bikers and even road bikers,”
said Annie Ballard of Alpenglow
Sports, an outdoor outfitter shop in
Tahoe City.
Yet, Ballard and others recognize
that safety is relative to the degree of
a climber’s competency. Setting up
anchors, tying proper knots, placing
protection and finding an attentive
partner who you trust are critical
components to a safe experience.
Jeff Dostie, also of Alpenglow,
said the potential for drastic conse-
quences brings safety into focus.
“When you’re hanging off a cliff
hundreds of feet off the ground,
you’re saying, ‘If I don’t tie this knot
properly I will fall to my death’
— and you tend to tie the knot
properly,” he said. “Because the con-
sequences are higher if you make a
mistake, there is more of an effort to
avoid mistakes.”
Another frequent myth is rock
climbing entails superhuman
strength, Ballard said.
“I see plenty of weightlifters
struggle to get up a cliff,” she said.
“Really, balance, good footwork and
all-around strong technique are
more important (than strength).”
Getting mileage on a rock and
simply practicing is the best way to
improve technique, Ballard said.
“Everybody starts out the season
weak,” he said. “There’s nothing
that gets you strong for climbing like
climbing. You just have to log hours
on the rock.”
getting stArted
There’s debate in the arena of
climbing about whether top-roping
or bouldering is the best introduc-
tion to the sport.
For Ballard, it’s top-roping — a
form of climbing which runs from
a belayer (a term meaning the
securing of a rope on a rock or other
projection) at the foot of a climbing
route to an anchor system at the top,
and then down back to the climber,
usually attached to his or her har-
ness.
“I’m
interested in ver-
tical climbing,” she said. “But
for people who are afraid of heights
bouldering might be a better ap-
proach. It’ll give you confidence on
the rock before starting to get high
off the ground.”
Bouldering is more difficult,
Dostie notes, as the easiest of
routes would be rated as some of
the more difficult vertical climbs.
On the other hand, a bouldering
setup is significantly less expen-
sive than all the gear associated
with top-roping. For bouldering,
climbing shoes and a crash pad
— a portable gymnastics mat
— are all one needs to begin.
With top-roping, one needs
shoes, a rope, a harness, carabin-
ers and a few pieces of protection
— the expense can quickly escalate.
Furthermore, top-roping requires
a technical understanding of how
to establish anchor systems, how to
properly belay a climber and other
facets necessary to ensure safety.
Bouldering requires little
technical understanding from an
equipment standpoint. To begin
top-roping, one must first consult
either a guide book or a professional
regarding the technical details
involved in the sport.
the eXperts
For those who don’t want to be-
gin climbing without the benefit of
professional expertise, Alpine Skills
International — a comprehensive
all-terrain rock and alpine climbing
and ski mountaineering guide ser-
vice based in Truckee — provides a
nine-step progression of courses.
Climbing guides at ASI can help
a family without equipment looking
for a fun day of recreation, or an ad-
vanced climber wanting to hone his
or her technique or expand abilities,
said
Bela G.
Vadasz, technical director
at ASI.
Vadasz said he understands
many young athletic individuals get
introduced to the sport via boulder-
ing with their more experienced
friends, but as a professional service,
he strongly believes top-roping is
the best option for beginners.
“Beginners get hurt bouldering,”
he said. “It’s important to be safe-
guarded with a top-rope. Boulder-
ing requires highly gymnastic
maneuvers done off the ground.”
Vadasz said Donner Pass is the
ideal place to begin learning the
tricks of the climbing trade.
“The quality of granite is varied,”
he said. “You can climb up cracks or
do some traditional face climbing and
there is moderate as well as advanced
terrain. Climbers from all over the
world come to climb at Donner.”
Regardless of how one wants to
begin learning the sport, all the in-
dividuals interviewed emphasized
the great personal responsibility
that comes with rock climbing.
Staying within one’s ability level
and cultivating a thorough under-
standing of the safety equipment
are essential in avoiding serious
injury or fatalities. For those with
a technical savvy, there are many
books with detailed instructions
on how to prevent injury by setting
up roping systems on the rock. For
those who prefer more hands-on
instruction, enlisting a certified
professional guide in the early going
is highly recommended. ▲
To set up an appointment with
Alpine Skills International call 530-
582-9170 or visit alpineskills.com.
Climb ... from page 108
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 110 5/12/2012 1:17:51 PM
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 111 110 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
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Where to BoUlder
soUth shore — pie shop
Widely considered to be one of the best bouldering areas in the Lake Tahoe
Basin, Pie Shop offers a wide variety of granite climbing in the area, ranging
from beginner to very advanced. The area is named after a pastry shop that once
operated on the corner of U.S. Highway 50 and Sawmill Road. Once on Sawmill
Road, park in the turnouts across from the houses and take the trail to the right.
West shore — d.l. Bliss stAte pArk
Bliss has three distinct bouldering areas. The ladder, by the Kiosk;
Middle Boulders near a pullout off Highway 89; and North Boulders at a
pullout farther north on the highway. The area features gritty granite with
many slab and arête routes.
north shore — old coUnty
Several boulders strewn unevenly around a foliage-laden hillside
provide an abundance of problems. To reach this area, take Old County
Road in Carnelian Bay until it dead-ends. Follow a well-worn path a short
distance before taking a left on a climber’s trail. That will meet with a
wide trail at which take a left until you see boulders between the trees.
The rock is volcanic and sharp and can shred fingers.
eAst shore — spooner crAg, BAllBUster rock
Spooner Crag and Ballbuster Rock are better suited for top-roping.
However, the entire East Shore abounds in boulders. While the area
may lack a wealth of established bouldering routes, it rewards those
willing to wing it and find their own way to the top of the rock.
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 111 5/12/2012 1:18:06 PM
A
s the blanket of snow melts and the trails slowly begin to
emerge, trail runners far and wide feel the calling of the
high-country trails of Tahoe. Each are beckoned for different
reasons — some for the quick tour of a ridge line, others for epic
journeys that will demand days. But what they all have in common
is the dream of cascading through these evergreen forests littered
with aged granite boulders and pine-needle bedding.
The window of time is short. Often from mid-October through
late June, most of the high-elevation trails are buried. Bits and
pieces show themselves and the brave tackle them with snowshoes
in hand and a pocket-full of patience. Me, on the other hand, I
wait for more melting to take place and enjoy trails at the lower
elevations first.
l
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....continued on page 114
dreaming of
tahoe trails
dreaming of
tahoe trails
recreation running
By Peter Fain
Tahoe Magazine
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 112 5/12/2012 1:18:12 PM
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getting there
emigrAnt trAil: Three
miles north on Highway 89. Park at
Donner Picnic site. Restrooms avail-
able and plenty of parking.
BUrton creek: The park has
two entrances from Tahoe City. The
Bunker Drive entrance has park-
ing; the Tamarack Lodge entrance
presents both access and parking
difficulties.
flUme trAil: Tunnel Creek
Station just off of Highway 28. Park
on the side of the road, take care to
read the parking signs. This is locat-
ed right at the large parking area for
the now closed Bonanza movie set.
shirley cAnyon: Drive all the
way in to Olympic Valley and park by
the old fire station. The trailhead is
the right of the station.
WArren lAke trAil: Exit at
Boreal off of Interstate 80. Drive up
the eroding road. Once you reach
the gate, park. If the gate is open,
don’t drive in; help protect the area.
f
u
n
f
a
c
t
:
38 h
ou
rs 30 m
in
u
tes:
e tim
e it took
Kilian Jornet to run the
entire 165 m
iles of the
Tahoe Rim
Trail.
Author Peter Fain runs on an offshoot of
the Emigrant Trail north of Truckee. Photo:
Grant Barta.
Kilian Jornet competes in the 2011 Western
States Endurance Run. He won the historic
100-mile race from Squaw Valley to
Aururn. Photo: Joe McCladdie
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 113 5/12/2012 1:18:15 PM
114 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
the emigrAnt trAil
One of the first clear trails in the Truckee
area is the Emigrant. This trail commemo-
rates the historic wagon road that led so
many travelers across the Sierra in the late
1840s. By 1869 the Transcontinental Railroad
was completed and most wagon trails fell
into disrepair. We can still enjoy the scenic
byway via this relatively flat single-track trail
(probably the flattest trail in the entire area).
This trail is very popular. It offers rolling
hills through high desert scenery with mead-
ows, early-season creeks and plenty of Jeffrey
pines to filter the sun.
This is best run as an out and back. Start-
ing at the Donner Picnic site (actual camp
site of the Donner family), the round-trip
journey to Stampede Reservoir is about 25
miles.
BUrton creek trAils
Another early-season spot is in Tahoe
City. The Burton Creek trail system is a
spaghetti bowl of trails intertwining the
somewhat hidden state park. The trails in
the park are a combination of well-mani-
cured single-track and fire roads. There are
many trail signs that will give you a little
guidance as to where you are.
the flUme trAil
Probably one of the
more famous stretch-
es of trail in Tahoe,
the Flume Trail is
often done as
a point-to-
point. The
eastern
exposure
allows
for a
quick
departure of the winter snows. To limit driving,
I usually start my run in Incline near the old
Bonanza set.
The trail starts with a three-mile climb up
a fire road. Once up, the Flume is nearly flat,
traversing several steep sections that drop
quickly down to the lake. Once to the far end
of the trail you will have reached Marlette
Lake. If you’re up for it, take a quick swim
and begin the journey back or continue on
to bag Marlette Peak.
The trail continues around the lake and
links to the Tahoe Rim Trail. Here, you
stay on the Rim Trail up and over the peak
and to Tunnel Creek. There will be a sign
pointing you down to where you started.
The second half of this often has snow in
to late July. Be prepared for a lot of sun.
shirley cAnyon (AkA
grAnite chief trAil)
This is my second-favorite run in the area.
Squaw Valley has great skiing and is also
the home to the start of the famous Western
States 100-Mile Endurance Run. What those
runners are missing is just over to the right
about 400 meters from where they start. Just
behind the old fire station is the
trailhead. My preferred route is
the right side of the canyon. The
left side can be done too.
This trail challenges your
footing, your lungs and your
will. Just when you think you’re
at the top, there is another turn.
At just about four miles to the
Pacific Crest Trail junction, this
is often the point of comple-
tion for many. From here your
options are endless. A short 12
miles north and you will be at Old
Highway 49 overlooking Donner Lake, or
1.5 miles south and you can crest under the
Granite Chief chairlift. Either way, this will
be one of the more difficult runs you do, but
also incredibly rewarding.
WArren lAke trAil
I’m finishing with my favorite loop to run.
The Warren Lake Trail is only one portion
of this loop, but I don’t think the loop has a
name.
This trail is best run in early August. Most
of the snow will be melted, the creeks will
still be flowing and the wildflowers will be
out of control. The vistas are endless and the
sheer backcountry experience is something
rarely found this close to a major freeway.
When I run it I like to park near the
Castle Peak meadow. Just before the
meadow a gate blocks the road.
Run about a half-mile down the
road and cut right into the meadow. You will
link to a trail when you cross the creek. The
trail will take you into the woods where you’ll
reach the Pacific Crest Trail. Turn right. Note,
you will be returning to this spot from the
left.
You’ll have an easy mile or so warm-up,
after which it gradually begins
to climb. Soon the gradual
climb gets steep. Continue
upwards until you reach a
ridge line, about 3.6 miles from
the start where you can either
summit to look down on Frog
Lake or continue on the trail
down. The trail winds across
many creeks and wet mead-
ows, all the while forcing you
to navigate steep inclines and
declines. At about the sixth
mile, there is a junction lead-
ing down to Warren Lake. I turn
left heading towards Paradise Lake.
A short connector and you link onto a
steep, poorly marked trail that heads up to
Basin Peak. Once at the top, run an epic ridge
line that connects you to Castle Peak. A steep
scree trail down and you’ll quickly be on the
Pacific Crest Trail again, heading back to
where you started. It’s a mere 12- to 13-mile
loop, but it’s the best loop around.
It’s hard to narrow down the choices for trail
running in Tahoe. The options are limitless.
I barely mentioned the Tahoe Rim Trail, the
Donner Lake Rim Trail or Desolation Wilder-
ness. The point is, Tahoe is a trail runner’s
dream. ▲
— Peter Fain is a member of the La
Sportiva Mountain Running Team and races
for Atlas Snow-Shoe Company in the winter.
This year he’s training to compete in his first
100-mile race, the Wasatch Front 100 in
Utah.
Running ... from page 112
“Tahoe
is a trail
runner’s
dream.”
— Peter Fain
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Chris Luberecki and Elisa Myzal run with their dogs
on an offshoot of the Emmigrant Trail. Photo: Grant Barta.
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114 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
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TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 115 5/12/2012 1:18:19 PM
The Lake Tahoe Basin features
hundreds, if not thousands, of
miles of trails, that wind through
some of the most pristine moun-
tain country in the world. If you’re
looking for a place to take life one
step at a time, here’s a few of the
many paths worth wandering.
tAhoe rim trAil
The grandaddy of the region’s
hikes, the Lake Tahoe Rim Trail
is more of a multi-day excursion
than a walk in the park. Winding
around the rim of peaks that sur-
rounds Lake Tahoe, the 165-mile
loop rises and falls thousands of
vertical feet and can take weeks
to complete. It can be divided
into sections for those who aren’t
inclined to spend large chunk of
their summer on the trail. About
49 miles of the trail overlaps with
the Pacific Crest Trail. Thru hik-
ers who’ve completed the entire
loop can join the Tahoe Rim
Trail Association’s 165-mile club.
There is a an official thru-hike
sponsored by the TRTA, but it fills
up quickly. The Tahoe Rim Trail
can be accessed from a variety
of points, including near Tahoe
City, Brockway Summit, Mt. Rose,
Spooner Summit, Big Meadow,
and Echo Lakes. For more infor-
mation see the Tahoe Rim Trail
Association website at
www.TahoeRimTrail.org.
Distance: Up to 165 miles
Type: Loop or segment
Difficulty: Varies
fAllen leAf lAke
Miles of trails surround the
South Shore’s Fallen Leak Lake.
Most are fairly flat and meander
through aspen groves and along-
side Taylor Creek. In the fall, it’s
a great place to watch the red and
green Kokanee salmon spawn.
Location: From Highway 89,
turn onto Fallen Leaf Lake Road.
Lake Tahoe’s
many trails
have something
for almost
every hiker
By Dylan Silver
Tahoe Magazine
recreation hiking
Fallen Leaf Lake
and Lake Tahoe
can be seen from
Floating Island
Trail. Photo:
Michelle Morton.
“In every walk with nature one
receives far more than he seeks.”
— John Muir
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 117
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 116 5/12/2012 1:18:27 PM
14255 Highway 88 • Hope Valley, CA 96120 • 1-800-423-9949 or 530-694-2203
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 117
Hikers can park in any of the numerous pullouts or head to Glen
Alpine Falls at the end of the road for more challenging hikes.
Difficulty: Easy to Medium
Length: Varies
VAn sickle Bi-stAte pArk
Just a few minutes from South Lake Tahoe’s casino core, Van
Sickle Bi-State Park straddles the California-Nevada
border. Dozens of miles of trails wind through the pine
forest. Views of Carson Valley and a cool waterfall are
rewards for hikers that take the time to reach the
top of the ridge.
Location: To get there, turn off Highway 50 in
Stateline onto Lake Parkway and follow it to the
end. There’s parking at the top of the road.
Type: Loop or peak trails
Difficulty: Easy lower trails to more dif-
ficult peak trails
Length: 0.5-5 miles

AlohA lAke
In the shadow of Pyramid Peak, the sprawling shallow high-
mountain reservoir is dotted with hundreds of tiny granite islands.
Various trails converge on the Aloha’s shores, the perfect end to a
hot hike up from the basin floor.
To camp at the lake, make sure you get a Desolation Wilderness
permit from the U.S. Fore Service offices in South Lake Tahoe.
Location: Lake Aloha can be accessed from trails beginning at
Echo Lakes or near Glen Alpine Falls.
Difficulty: Medium to Hard
Length: 6-7 miles
WArd cAnyon to pAige meAdoWs
Once you start the trail up Ward Canyon, which has a smooth
climb and the best single-track, you can enjoy the peace, quiet and
simplicity of this mountain meadow with a unique variety of wild-
flowers from June through August. The second trail loops around
the meadow and is a great place for dogs.
Location: To get to Ward Canyon, drive south on Highway 89 to
just past Sunnyside, turn right on Pineland Drive, then left at the
“Y” where it says Ward Valley. Follow the trail 2 miles to the Tahoe
Rim Trail trailhead on the left at the sign to Paige Meadows. You
... continued on next page
A hiker climbs the
last 100 yards to the
top of Mt. Tallac, to
enjoy amazing views
of Lake Tahoe. Photo:
Michelle Morton.
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 117 5/12/2012 1:18:30 PM
118 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
can also turn left at Silver Tip
Drive in the Talmont subdivision
and follow the road until it ends
to get closer to the meadows.
Type: Loop/Single track
Difficulty: Easy to Medium
Length: 1.4 miles round trip
(starting from Ward Canyon)
moUnt rose
The 10,778-foot-high Mt. Rose
is one of the highest peaks near
Lake Tahoe and offers breath-
taking views of the lake, Reno,
and the Nevada desert. A three
mile-long dirt road leads to a
lodgepole cloaked forest. If you
take the right-hand route from the
trailhead you take the most direct
route to the summit. Weathered
pillars of volcanic rock rising on
both sides of you, a waterfall and a
creek crossing are just some of the
highlights on the trail. A log book
is located at the summit.
Location: Take SR 431 (Mt.
Rose HWY) north of Incline Vil-
lage. Park at the trailhead, which
is located one mile south of the
summit. You’ll find the trailhead
behind the restrooms at the
Mount Rose Pass. You can also
take the chairlift to mid-moun-
tain or the top of the mountain
for a $5-fee.
Type: Semi loop
Difficulty: Medium
Elevation gain: 2,100ft
(from 8,900 - 10,776 ft)
Length: 6-10 miles
shirley cAnyon to
shirley lAke
The trail follows Squaw Creek
about 2.5 miles each way to
Shirley Lake, passing gorgeous
waterfalls and canyon boulders.
A good hint to keep in mind is
to stay to the left of Squaw Creek
as you are going uphill. Going
downhill, stay to the right. A
massive granite slab where the
route is roughly marked by a
series of rock cairns will arise
and the lake will only be a few
minutes away.
Location: Located in Squaw
Valley, the trail starts at the end
of Squaw Peak Road. From the
Squaw Valley parking lot, walk
down the road and find the
trailhead on the left as the road
curves to the right.
Type: Loop trail
Difficulty: Medium to
Difficult
Length: 5 miles round trip
stAteline lookoUt
(north)
Free telescopes are located on
the top. A self-guided tour on a
short nature trail is also starting
from the lookout and explains
Tahoe’s history.
Location: From SR 28 on the
North Shore of Lake Tahoe, turn
north on Reservoir Drive, east of
the old Tahoe Biltmore Casino.
Turn right on Lakeshore Avenue
and left on Forest Service Road
1601. Park just below the lookout
and make sure to talk to one of
the knowledgeable volunteers
that give visitors advise during
the summer months.
Type: Lookout
Difficulty: Easy
Elevation 7,017ft
Length: 0.5 miles minimum
mArlette lAke
If you don’t want to share the
trail with bikes and horses, use
the new upper single track trail
is just for hikers. The uphill hike
leads you through the beautiful
North Canyon, lined with as-
pens, and a meadow of wildflow-
ers until you get to Marlette Lake.
The route provides also access to
the Flume Trail, a popular moun-
tain biking trail, which starts at
Marlette Lake Dam.
Location: Park at the Spooner
Lake parking lot for a small fee.
Plan on having a full day off for
this hike.
Type: Mountain trail
Difficulty: Medium
Elevation: 1200 feet
Length: 9.5 mile round-trip ▲
Hiking ... from page 117
Horsetail Falls near Highw
ay 50 at
Tw
in Bridges is one of the m
any
access points to Desolation W
ilderness.
Photo: M
ichelle M
orton.
The Lam Watah Trail connects
Stateline to Nevada Beach.
Photo: Michelle Morton.
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TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 118 5/12/2012 1:18:36 PM
118 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
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TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 119 5/12/2012 5:16:27 PM
For Reservations:
Please call 775.831.4386 or visit www.awsincline.com
• Boat & Jet Ski Rentals
• Kayak & Paddle Board Rentals
• Guided Fishing Charters
• Wakeboarding, Water Skiing
& Surfing Lessons
• Thunderbird Lodge
Lakeshore Water Tours
$
5 Off
Sierra Cloud
12pm Cruise Only
Monday - Friday
Not good with any other offer.
Not valid during Holiday Periods.
• Catamaran Cruises
• Formula Yacht Charters
120 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
recreation boating
Folks looking to experience a
peaceful view of Lake Tahoe’s blue
will find the seat of a kayak a great
place to start. Choose between
guided tours, self-guided day trips
or the monster self-supported,
five-day circumnavigation of the
entire lake.
emerald bay
Get up close and personal with
Tahoe’s only island on a tour to
Emerald Bay. Treat yourself to a
treasure hunt and you just might
find a sunken bathtub or a couple
of ships while gliding over the
sandy bottomed bay. On land, visi-
tors can explore Fannette Island
and its historic tea house on foot.
While hordes of crowds pack the
overlook on Highway 89 hundreds
of feet above, accessing Fannette
Island and Emerald Bay by kayak
is an unforgettable and much less
chaotic experience.
by Moon
There are few things as beautifully
surreal as Tahoe by moonlight, but
unfortunately motor boaters feel
the same way. Be safe when travel-
ing on the lake under moonlight
and go with a tour. Tahoe City
Kayak offers monthly dates for
plying the cool, black waters under
the silver glow.
Truckee river
wildlife Tour
Get the best of both estuarine envi-
ronments by paddling through the
largest marsh and river estuary on
the lake with Kayak
Tahoe from South Lake Tahoe. A
haven for avian life, this trip is a
birder’s must-do.
MarInas,
boaT renTaLs,
CharTers &
waTer sporTs
equIpMenT
Bleu Wave Charter
325 Highway 50 Round Hill, Nev.
Round
Hill Pines Beach &
Marina
866-413-0985 •
775-588-WAVE (9283)
Email: info@tahoebleuwave.com
Camp Richardson
Resort & Marina
1900 Jameson Beach Road
Highway 89, 2.5 miles north of
South Lake Tahoe
800-544-1801 • 530-541-1801
....continued on page 122
INCLINE BOAT
STORAGE & MARINE
775-831-5625
WWW.INCLINEBOATSTORAGE.COM
LAKE TAHOE HIGH
PERFORMANCE MARINE
775-831-5622
WWW.LAKETAHOEHIGHPERFORMANCEMARINE.COM
• Full Mechanical Repairs
By Certified Mechanics
• Pick-Up & Delivery Service
• Winterizing & Summerizing
• Custom Builds
• Supercharger Installation
• Six-drive Setup
inclineboatstorage@sbcglobal.net
875 Oriole Way • Incline Village, NV
(North Lake Tahoe)
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 120 5/12/2012 1:31:57 PM
120 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
INCLINE BOAT
STORAGE & MARINE
775-831-5625
WWW.INCLINEBOATSTORAGE.COM
LAKE TAHOE HIGH
PERFORMANCE MARINE
775-831-5622
WWW.LAKETAHOEHIGHPERFORMANCEMARINE.COM
• Full Mechanical Repairs
By Certified Mechanics
• Pick-Up & Delivery Service
• Winterizing & Summerizing
• Custom Builds
• Supercharger Installation
• Six-drive Setup
inclineboatstorage@sbcglobal.net
875 Oriole Way • Incline Village, NV
(North Lake Tahoe)
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 121 5/12/2012 1:31:57 PM
122 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
Local & Long Distance Truck Rental
• Sizes: 5x5 thru 10x50 •
• 24-hour Access - Security Gate •
• Household & Commercial Storage •
• Boxes, Moving Supplies •
• Freight Elevator to Upper Levels •
• RV, Boat & Snowmobile Storage •
1060 Tahoe Blvd. Incline Village, NV 89451
“CALL THE SELF
STORAGE PROFESSIONALS”
(775) 831-3322
recreation boating
Cave Rock State Park
Highway 50,
north of Zephyr Cove, NV
775-831-0494
Boat ramp and launch facility only

Echo Lake Chalet
9900 Echo Lakes Road,
Echo Lake, CA
530-659-7207

Fallen Leaf Lake Marina
400 Fallen Leaf Road,
South Lake Tahoe, CA
Located past Camp Richardson
530-544-2628
Fallenleafhouse.com

Kayak Tahoe
3411 Lake Tahoe Blvd.
Timber Cove Marina
530-544-2011
KayakTahoe.com

Lake Tahoe Boat Rides
530-545-1223
Tahoeboatrides.com
Lake Tahoe Yacht Charters
260 Beach Drive
530-541- 0248

Lakeside Marina
4041 Lakeshore Blvd. South Lake
Tahoe, CA
530-541-6626

M.S. Dixie II Paddlewheeler
760 Highway 50, Zephyr Cove, NV
800-23-TAHOE, 530-543-6191,
or 775-589-4906

Round Hill Pines Beach
& Marina - H2O Sports
Highway 50 at Round Hill
Zephyr Cove, NV
775-588-4155 • 775-588-3055
info@roundhillpines.com
Sand Harbor
Hwy 28, 2 miles south of
Incline Village,NV
775-831-1494
Launching of all trailer able boats,
restrooms, picnic areas, beach.
Ski Run Boat Company
900 Ski Run Blvd. Ste. 101
South Lake Tahoe, CA
In Ski Run Marina
530-544-0200

Ski Run Marina
900 Ski Run Blvd.
South Lake Tahoe, CA
530-544-9500

South Lake Tahoe Recreation
Area Boat Ramp and Parking
Lakeview Avenue, off US Hwy 50,
Stateline, NV
530-542-6055

Tahoe Keys Marina
Off US Hwy 50, South Lake Tahoe, CA
2435 Venice Drive
530-541-2155

Tahoe Queen
900 Ski Run Blvd.
Lake Tahoe Cruises
800-238-2463 • 530-543-6191

Tahoe Thunder
3411 Lake Tahoe Blvd.
Timbercove Marina
530-541-7245

The Tahoe Star
800-786-8208

Timber Cove Marina
3411 Lake Tahoe Blvd.
South Lake Tahoe, CA
530-544-2942

Woodwind Cruises
760 Highway 50, Zephyr Cove, Nev.
888-867-6394

Zephyr Cove Marina
760 Highway 50, Zephyr Cove, Nev.
775-589-4908
Coon Street Boat Launch
Coon St. & Hwy 28, Kings Beach, CA
530-546-4212
Launch,
pier, parking/launch fee,
bathrooms, sandy beach, park,
playground, water sports rentals
nearby.

Homewood Marina
5190 West Lake Blvd., Homewood, CA
530-525-5966
Full service marina with boat sales
& service, storage, buoys, launch-
ing, fuel, supplies, and rentals.
Mini mart.
Lake Forest Boat Ramp
2500 Lake Forest Rd., Tahoe City, CA
530-583-5544 x 7
Launch all trailer able boats, park-
ing for vehicle with trailer only.

Meeks Bay Resort & Marina
7941 Emerald Bay Rd., Meeks Bay, CA
530-525-5588
www.meeksbayresort.com
Slips, launch, snack bar, camp-
ing & lodging available, rentals,
watersports.

National Avenue Beach
Hwy 28 at National Ave.,
Tahoe Vista, CA 530-546-4212
Launching of all trailer able boats,
picnic area, kayaks & paddle-
boards available.

North Tahoe Marina
7360 North Lake Blvd.,
Tahoe Vista, CA 530-546-8248
www.northtahoemarina.com
Fuel, moorings, slip, storage,
fishing charters, rescue vessel, no
launching.

Obexer’s Boat Co.
5355 West Lake Blvd., Homewood
530-525-7962
www.obexersboat.com
Fuel, moorings, slips, storage,
launch, lift.
... from page 120
....continued on page 124
A man paddleboards with two children
on Angora Lake. Photo: Michelle Morton
530-544-1221
www.laketahoeballoons.com
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 122 5/12/2012 1:32:00 PM
122 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
530-544-1221
www.laketahoeballoons.com
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 123 5/12/2012 1:32:00 PM
124 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
www.adrifttahoe.com
530.546.4112
SUP Sales
SUP, Kayak &
Personal Outrigger
Canoe Rentals
8338 N. Lake Blvd.
Kings Beach, CA 96143
Cope & McPhetres Marine
Tahoe City Marina Mall
760 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City
775-786-7071

High Sierra Water Ski School
1850 West Lake Blvd., Tahoe City
530-583-7417
Meeks Bay Resort & Marina
7901 West Lake Blvd., Tahoma
530-525-5588
www.meeksbayresort.com
North Tahoe Cruises/Tahoe Gal
Lighthouse Shopping Center
850 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City
800-218-2464
www.tahoegal.com
Breakfast, scenic shoreline, cock-
tail & dinner/dance cruises. Pri-
vate charters up to 150. Weddings.
Reservations suggested.
Tahoe Sailing Charters
700 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City
530-583-6200; www.tahoesail.com
Daily sailing and sunset cruises.
Emerald Bay Sunday brunch
cruises departing from Tahoe City
Marina from May-October. Private
charters also available.
heLICopTer Tours
HeliTahoe
1901 Airport Rd Ste 106
South Lake Tahoe, CA 96150
Phone: 530-208-5247
Email: claudio.helitahoe@gmail.com
Lake Tahoe Tours
888-838-8923
Sierra Air Helicopters
Truckee-Tahoe Airport
530-823-7400
gLIdIng
SoaringNV
1140 B Airport Rd. Minden NV
775-782-9595
info@soaringnv.com
Hang Gliding Tahoe
775-772-8232
paul@HangGlidingTahoe.com
Soar Truckee
Truckee
info@soartruckee.com
530-587-6702 or 866-762-7875
Thermal Sky Sports
775-391-5133
contact@thermalskysports.com
Lake Tahoe Paragliding - Senic
Tandem Flights
530-318-1859
Laketahoeparagliding.com
mitch@laketahoeparagliding.com
parasaILIng
Action Watersports
3411 Lake Tahoe Blvd.,
South Lake Tahoe, CA 96158
530-544-5387
Operating from Timber Cove Marina
Ski Run Boat Company
900 Ski Run Blvd. Ste 101
South Lake Tahoe, CA
530-544-0200
Operating from Ski Run Marina
H20 Sports
350 Hwy. 50, Round Hill, NV
775-588-4155
Operating from Round Hill Pines Beach
info@tahoebluewave.com
Zephyr Cove Marina
Zephyr Cove, NV
775-589-4908
Operating from Zephyr Cove Marina
North Tahoe Water Sports
950 North Lake Blvd.
530-583-7245
Operating from Tahoe City Marina
Kings Beach Aqua Sports
Kings Beach State Beach
530-546-2782
Operating from the pier across
from the Taco Bell
North Shore Parasail
Kings Beach, CA
530-546-7698
Operating from Steamers Pizza
hoT aIr
baLLoon rIdes
Lake Tahoe Balloons
Operates year round with
lake flights from May thru
September and Carson Valley
flights operating approximately
October thru April. Reservations
are necessary and accepted up
to one day in advance, based on
availability. All flights are weather
permitting. Call 800-872-9294 or
530-544-1221. s
recreation water & sky
Sierra Boat Co.
5146 North Lake Blvd.,
Carnelian Bay, CA 530-546-2551
www.sierraboat.com
Full service marina. Fuel, moor-
ings, slip, storage, lift, repairs,
sales, restoration, boat launch.

Ski Beach Boat Launch
967 Lakeshore Blvd.,
Incline Village, NV 775-832-1310
www.inclinerecreation.com
Daily watercraft launch passes for
boats, jet skis, kayaks and canoes
are available to residents with a
valid recreation photo ID.

Sunnyside Marina
1850 West Lake Blvd., Tahoe City, CA
530-583-7201
www.sunnysidemarina.org

Tahoe City Marina
700 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City, CA
530-583-1039
www.tahoecitymarina.com
paddLeboards
Adrift Tahoe
8338 N. Lake Blvd., Kings Beach
530-546-4112
www.adrifttahoe.com
South Tahoe Standup Paddle
3115 Harrison Ave., South Lake Tahoe
530-416-4829
www.SouthTahoeStandupPaddle.com
CharTers/CruIses
Action Watersports
at Meeks Bay Marina
7941 Emerald Bay Rd., Meeks Bay
530-525-5588
www.action-watersports.com

... from page 122
Lake Tahoe Balloons.
Photo: Jean Eick.

Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 125
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 124 5/12/2012 1:32:02 PM
124 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
Cope & McPhetres Marine
Tahoe City Marina Mall
760 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City
775-786-7071

High Sierra Water Ski School
1850 West Lake Blvd., Tahoe City
530-583-7417
Meeks Bay Resort & Marina
7901 West Lake Blvd., Tahoma
530-525-5588
www.meeksbayresort.com
North Tahoe Cruises/Tahoe Gal
Lighthouse Shopping Center
850 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City
800-218-2464
www.tahoegal.com
Breakfast, scenic shoreline, cock-
tail & dinner/dance cruises. Pri-
vate charters up to 150. Weddings.
Reservations suggested.
Tahoe Sailing Charters
700 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City
530-583-6200; www.tahoesail.com
Daily sailing and sunset cruises.
Emerald Bay Sunday brunch
cruises departing from Tahoe City
Marina from May-October. Private
charters also available.
heLICopTer Tours
HeliTahoe
1901 Airport Rd Ste 106
South Lake Tahoe, CA 96150
Phone: 530-208-5247
Email: claudio.helitahoe@gmail.com
Lake Tahoe Tours
888-838-8923
Sierra Air Helicopters
Truckee-Tahoe Airport
530-823-7400
gLIdIng
SoaringNV
1140 B Airport Rd. Minden NV
775-782-9595
info@soaringnv.com
Hang Gliding Tahoe
775-772-8232
paul@HangGlidingTahoe.com
Soar Truckee
Truckee
info@soartruckee.com
530-587-6702 or 866-762-7875
Thermal Sky Sports
775-391-5133
contact@thermalskysports.com
Lake Tahoe Paragliding - Senic
Tandem Flights
530-318-1859
Laketahoeparagliding.com
mitch@laketahoeparagliding.com
parasaILIng
Action Watersports
3411 Lake Tahoe Blvd.,
South Lake Tahoe, CA 96158
530-544-5387
Operating from Timber Cove Marina
Ski Run Boat Company
900 Ski Run Blvd. Ste 101
South Lake Tahoe, CA
530-544-0200
Operating from Ski Run Marina
H20 Sports
350 Hwy. 50, Round Hill, NV
775-588-4155
Operating from Round Hill Pines Beach
info@tahoebluewave.com
Zephyr Cove Marina
Zephyr Cove, NV
775-589-4908
Operating from Zephyr Cove Marina
North Tahoe Water Sports
950 North Lake Blvd.
530-583-7245
Operating from Tahoe City Marina
Kings Beach Aqua Sports
Kings Beach State Beach
530-546-2782
Operating from the pier across
from the Taco Bell
North Shore Parasail
Kings Beach, CA
530-546-7698
Operating from Steamers Pizza
hoT aIr
baLLoon rIdes
Lake Tahoe Balloons
Operates year round with
lake flights from May thru
September and Carson Valley
flights operating approximately
October thru April. Reservations
are necessary and accepted up
to one day in advance, based on
availability. All flights are weather
permitting. Call 800-872-9294 or
530-544-1221. s
tAHOE PEOPLE
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 125
Positively charged
With an optimistic frame of mind, Incline Village native Grant Korgan
continues inspirational recovery from a spinal cord injury
By Sylas Wright
Tahoe Magazine
Grant Korgan pushes his sit-ski across Velcro-like snow and ice on his way to the South Pole
this past January. He and a team covered about 75 miles in 12 days before arriving at the geographic
South Pole on the 100th anniversary of Captain Robert Falcon Scott’s Terra Nova Expedition.
Photo: Keoki Flagg; www.gallerykeoki.com
Grant Korgan could whip his former self in an arm-wrestling match.
“Yeah,” he said with a good-natured chuckle, “my guns are bigger
than they were before.”
Te 2010 snowmobile accident that left Korgan paralyzed from the
waist down clearly did not dampen his sense of humor. If anything, it
may only have enhanced it, just the same as his uber-positive, glass-
half-full disposition.
In fact, as those who know the man will attest, there may not be a
more positive soul on the planet.
“Grant has the most positive, infectious vibe to him. It’s almost
like when you see Grant, you are coming into experiencing royalty.
He’s emanating all this positive energy. You can instantly feel it,” said
Truckee’s Roy Tuscany, whose own spinal cord injury — and recovery
— inspired him to create the High Fives Non-Proft Foundation to help
support injured winter athletes.
“He’s slowly turning into this ginormous ball of positivity. You
just get near him and it’s like, ‘life is so good — every day.’ It’s
amazing. I can’t even explain it.”
“beyond grateful”
Korgan has that kind of efect on people. It’s part of the
reason the 34-year-old Incline Village native has received such
an outpouring of support — charity from High Fives to Spine
Nevada to complete strangers who are touched by his story.
With that support, a resolute Korgan has achieved
checklists of ambitious goals, including regaining feeling
down to his kneecaps thanks to a rigorous workout regimen,
and walking again with the assistance of arm crutches. Tis
past winter, he executed a 12-day traverse 75 miles across
Antarctica to the South Pole on the 100-year anniversary of
Captain Robert Falcon Scott’s Terra Nova Expedition — pushing
a sit-ski across Velcro-like snow in brutally cold conditions.
...continued on next page
Summer 2012
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G
rant K
organ
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 125 5/12/2012 1:32:11 PM
tAHOE PEOPLE
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 127 126 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
Grant Korgan paddles on Lake
Tahoe last August as part of
a four-day training fundraiser
for his expedition to the South
Pole, called The Push.
Photo: Keoki Flagg;
www.gallerykeoki.com
Grant Korgan ...from previous page
“I’m beyond grateful. My gratitude is
through the roof,” Korgan said from Kauai,
where he was preparing to compete in a
tandem surf-ski race from one island to
another. “Both High Fives and Spine Nevada
down in Reno are two amazing groups of
people. Tey have enabled and powered
my workouts. I can’t even put words to the
amount of love, light and humanity that
people have given to me. It’s absolutely
beautiful.”
One might think it was that humanity that
led Korgan to adopt his positive outlook. Not
so, said Olympic Valley-based photographer
Keoki Flagg, who accompanied Korgan on the
South Pole expedition, called “Te Push.”
“I made the foolish mistake to think
that his positivity was the result of his
determination to overcome the obstacles that
he experienced with his accident,” said Flagg.
“And he immediately stood up and said, ‘You
know, we didn’t know each other before my
accident, but I think you need to know that
I’ve always been this person.”
Korgan explained that, while he “evolves”
with every passing day and becomes more
aware of his consciousness, it was his
mountain lifestyle that instilled in him a sense
of positivity from a young age.
“I grew up in Incline Village, so I had this
amazing upbringing,” he said. “I got to live in
this recreational paradise, and I was always so
grateful for it. Te glass was always half full,
and I was always so stoked no matter what was
happening.”
Korgan was flming with Alpine Assassins
in the Sonora Pass backcountry when he
overshot the landing of a jump, violently
shattering his frst lumbar vertebrae upon
impact more than 100 feet from the takeof.
Life throws a curve
After graduating from Incline High
School in 1996, Korgan attended Western
State College in Colorado before taking his
studies to University of Nevada, Reno, where
he graduated with a degree in mechanical
engineering in 2004.
A professional-caliber snowmobiler
and white-water kayaker, among other
outdoor sports, Korgan started a mechanical
engineering company after college while
acting as co-owner of the Alpine Assassins
snowmobile team. He also met the love of his
life, Shawna, and was married. Times were
good.
Everything changed on March 5, 2010.
Korgan was flming with Alpine Assassins
in the Sonora Pass backcountry when he
overshot the landing of a jump, violently
shattering his frst lumbar vertebrae upon
impact more than 100 feet from the takeof.
“(I was) lucky to be riding with my ultra
bros and now personal heroes Duncan Lee,
Ryan Oddo and Ken Evens,” Korgan wrote
on his Alpine Assassins bio. “Tese superstar
snow safety professionals made all the correct
decisions, in all the right order, at all the
perfect times, without hesitation, and a deep
backcountry helicopter rescue saved my life
and allowed me to begin the long process of
recovery.”
Korgan was rushed to the intensive care
unit, where he spent nine days. He then spent
a full month in a rehab hospital. Shawna
became his personal trainer as he underwent
multiple forms of recovery. Slowly but surely,
the hard work paid of as Korgan regained
feeling in his upper legs, then to his kneecaps.
He began using hand crutches to get around.
And he began dreaming bigger dreams.
In the summer of 2011, Korgan brewed up
plans as part of his active recovery along with
Truckee’s Doug Stoup, who’s recognized as
the world’s most well-versed polar explorer,
and helicopter ski guide Tal Fletcher for an
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 126 5/12/2012 1:32:14 PM
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 127 126 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
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expedition to the geographic South Pole. A
date was set for Jan. 17, 2012 — the 100-year
anniversary of the frst successful expedition
to the southernmost point.
Backed fnancially by High Fives, Korgan
and crew set out to accomplish a series of
smaller adventures in preparation for “Te
Push,” from Alaska to Patagonia and back
to Lake Tahoe, where Korgan and a fellow
adaptive athlete paddled kayaks 50 miles
around the lake in four days.
Inhospitable landscape
Te South Pole is not for wimps.
Korgan’s team was greeted by temperatures
ranging between minus-30 and the mid
minus-50s, with bitter winds that created
blinding whiteout conditions. Korgan,
travelling on a custom-made sit-ski,
discovered what he was in for on his frst push.
“Every stroke, because the snow was like
Velcro or Styrofoam — there was no glide at all
— every inch of that 75, 80 miles was earned,”
he recalled. “Tere was no glide whatsoever.
You stuck the poles in and struggled to pull
yourself through, then you stuck the poles in
again and did the same thing. And nine hours
later you jumped in a tent and tried to sleep,
then woke up and it was Groundhog Day. You
did it all over again.”
It wasn’t fun, Korgan said. He’d crawl into
his tent at night, trying to thaw his bones as his
muscled barked at him, knowing full well that
quitting was not an option.
“My muscles got super sore, but at the end
of the day I wouldn’t listen to anything in my
head that didn’t serve me. So when I got in
the tent, yeah, my muscles were screaming at
me, yeah I’m totally freezing, yeah I’m tired.
But none of that was going to help me get rest
and get up the next morning and do it again,”
Korgan said. “Frankly, there was no option.
It came down to mental toughness. You put
yourself in whatever space you need to be in
to perform, and that’s what I had to do. I had
to fat-out perform.”
With a teammate feeding him snacks every
15 minutes, Korgan chewed and he pushed
until eventually arriving some 12 days and
75 miles later at the South Pole. For the fnal
100 feet, with the sun beaming light, Korgan
shufed across the ice to the geographic South
Pole with the assistance of Stoup and Fletcher.
A crowd of more than 100 scientists from
the Antarctic’s research center provided an
audience.
Te poignant moment reached a storybook
crescendo when Shawna Korgan appeared
from the crowd, shocking her husband to
tears.
Choosing a path of positivity
Amid all the adventure and recovery,
Korgan has work to do.
He recently completed a book called “Two
Feet Back,” which chronicles his accident and
recovery process leading up to the South Pole
expedition. And he has already outlined a
second book detailing “Te Push.”
“Who knows? Maybe there will be a book
three,” he said.
Aside from writing and promoting on
book tours, Korgan travels to public speaking
engagements to share his story. He focuses his
talks on the power of positivity.
“Every day we’re choosing recovery, and
every day we’re manifesting more healing,” he
said. “And I believe in my heart that no matter
how long it takes, I will get to 100 percent
recovery. My goal is 120 percent recovery. I
want to be stronger than I was, and I believe I
will make it.”
Who’s going to doubt him?
“If anybody is going to do it, Grant Korgan
is going to do it,” said Tuscany. s
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 127 5/12/2012 1:32:16 PM
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 129 128 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
tAHOE PEOPLE
“Tahoe Beneath the Surface” is a
must-read book for anyone who has an
interest in Lake Tahoe.
An easy and entertaining read, the
book by Foothill College professor Scott
Lankford is divided into 15 topics,
each thoroughly researched. Te
author thought it would take maybe
six months to write. It instead took 10
years.
“I honestly believe that every one
of those chapters could have been
a book on its own,” Lankford said.
“Te advantage of my book is you
get this huge overview, the pivotal
nature of Tahoe in a national
perspective.”
Civil rights
and wrongs
For example, Lankford might
have expected a chapter about the
television program “Bonanza” to be mostly about it
being the frst network show broadcast in color along
with details about specifc flm set locations.
Instead, Lankford research revealed a
revolutionary view about Civil Rights. An American
Indian’s point of view had never before been
presented in a positive or poignant way on this
nation’s big or small screens.
“I’ll tell the story of the Chinese railroad or I’ll
tell the story of John Muir going camping at Lake
Tahoe, and every single time I would discover what
I thought was a hidden and far more pivotal story,”
Lankford said. “I’m the guy who kept asking, What
does this have to do with national politics or national
conservation? What does this have to do with
American literature? On a large scale, not just a small
scale. It was that wide-angle lens that kept surfacing
stories that were always there to be told.”
Te chapter about the “Truckee Method” is the
most disturbing societal piece of history in the book.
“Who would have dreamed that some of the
bloodiest race riots in U.S. history had its epicenter
at our little town of Truckee?” Lankford said. “It
shocked the hell out of me. I had no idea. I cannot
believe I’m reading this, but it’s all so thoroughly
documented that there’s no getting around it.”
environmental landmarks
Lankford also describe John Muir’s failed attempt
to make Lake Tahoe a national park. Although was
narrowly defeated by Congress, there was an upside
for advocates of the environment.
“In many ways Muir’s failure to create the Tahoe
national park triggered a giant expansion of the
national forests in California,” he said. “So it’s kind of
a victory snatched out of the jaws of defeat.”
“(Muir) came very, very close to victory in 1899,
just a few votes away. He had the railroad lobby
behind him, he had Duane Bliss, timber baron
turned tourist baron, and it just fell apart at last
minute in Congress.”
A return to Tahoe inspired Muir to become a
champion of environmental causes. After leaving the
Sierra he became a fruit rancher and family man, a
lifestyle that depressed him.
“He came back to mountains with his hiking
buddies to kind of heal his soul,” Lankford said. “To
his horror he saw that in his absence (Tahoe) had
been raped and left for dead. Te timber strips had
ground up what was left of the topsoil, the fsheries
By Tim Parsons
Tahoe Magazine
“The advantage of
my book is you get
this huge overview,
the pivotal nature of
Tahoe in a national
perspective.”
— Scott Lankford
The TruTh
abouT
Lake Tahoe
‘Beneath the Surface’ details
deep history, debunks myths
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 128 5/12/2012 1:32:19 PM
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 129 128 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
The TruTh
abouT
Lake Tahoe
‘Beneath the Surface’ details
deep history, debunks myths
Lake it. Love it.
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All our vacation properties are equipped with full kitchens, TV,
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Publishers: Heyday and
Sierra College Press, 2010
were in collapse. It really was a catastrophe and it made him angry.
“Instead of healing his soul, it lit a fre under him that propelled
him all the way to the founding of the Sierra Club and the creation
of many, many national parks, including Yosemite and Redwood
National Park.”
Lankford is close to fnishing a book about Paris, and although
both explorer John Frémont
and author Mark Twain
spent time in the French
city, Tahoe anecdotes
are not included. He’s
saving that for the next
book, which he intends
to research three years,
visiting the largest lake on
each continent.
“We’re going to continue
the Tahoe story, I hope at a
global level,” said Lankford,
who has established
contacts with Tahoe
environmental researchers,
all who are students of Dr.
Charles Goldman.
“(Goldman’s) like the great
wizard of lake science worldwide,” Lankford said. “His students have
fanned out across the globe to save the rest of the world’s lakes. So if
you know those guys, you have a door opener to all the things on the
planet to what are we doing to save lakes. Tahoe is the world standard
for how you save a large lake.” s
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 129 5/12/2012 1:32:20 PM
Lake
Tahoe
Airport
Sand
Harbor
Meyers
To Markleeville
South
Lake Tahoe
Heavenly
Alpine
Meadows
Squaw Valley
Northstar
Gardnerville
Hope Valley
Sierra-at-Tahoe
North
South
West East
Sugar
Bowl
GUIDE to towns & resorts surrounding Lake Tahoe
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 131 130 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
If you live here long enough, you stop seeing the lake
as a region. It’s because all those little communities
surrounding the lake (from the 25,000 people in South
Lake Tahoe to the 250 in Carnelian Bay) have fierce
local identities they do not want to lose. This guide
will help you understand where you are, as you tour
the area.
InCLIne VILLage
This luxury village is home to some of the wealthiest people in
the world. When you drive through, take Lakeside Drive to view the
large estates that border the lake on the northeast side of the lake.
Only five miles from the casinos, and 30 miles from Reno, Incline
Village offers private beaches to its residents and some guests, and
beautiful views of the West Shore.
kIngs beaCh
Just west of Incline Village, Kings Beach sits atop Lake Tahoe.
With easy access to Truckee, the casinos and the lake, Kings Beach
truly lives up to its name. And it’s only going to get better. With $48
million in improvements scheduled for the downtown corridor, the
future of Kings Beach will see easy access for visitors between the
shopping areas and the recreation area, filled with volleyball courts,
sandy beaches and barbecue spots. Also, look for the free concerts
and art shows this summer.
norThsTar
Just north of Kings Beach on Highway 267, halfway
between Truckee and the lake, Northstar is an up-
and-coming resort area that is filled with summertime
activities. Best known for its shopping (jewelry, kids’
clothing, outdoor gear, you name it) and its mountain
biking, Northstar is perfect for an afternoon with the
kids. Also home to the $300 million Ritz Carlton, Lake
Tahoe, and a multi-million-redeveloped base area,
Northstar will play host to a number of fun summer
festivals and events.
TruCkee
The town of Truckee is the gateway to the lake.
With a rich history of saloons, gunslingers and other
wild west fantasies, it works hard to keep its local
charm while playing host to the thousands of guests
who stay in the area each year. With nearby Donner
State Memorial Park and a downtown shopping area,
Truckee can entertain visitors with some time on
their hands. In the summer, the town comes out every
Thursday in the downtown area to show off area mer-
chants, share stories and hang out as a community.
squaw VaLLey
Halfway between Truckee and the lake on Highway
89, Squaw Valley USA is best known as a great winter ski
resort and home of the 1960 Winter Olympics. But the little-
known secret is that Squaw’s summers are pretty fun, too. The Tram
Car takes visitors up to the top of the mountain to enjoy wonderful
lake views, a swimming pool, restaurant, bar and, on occasion, live
music. The base area provides shopping and family activities, and
plenty of parking.
aLpIne Meadows
Just a couple miles south of Squaw, Alpine Meadows is a moun-
tain area that offers plenty of hiking, biking and exploring. Paired
with a laid-back local feel, Alpine Meadows is worth a stop in the
summer. And if you ski, definitely make a trip back for “Cornology”
— what the resort calls its science of skiing spring snow.
Tahoe CITy
On the northwest side of the lake, Tahoe City is a perfect little
hamlet for visitors to enjoy the quiet of the lake while having plenty
of entertainment options close by. With good restaurants and easy
access to a public beach, Tahoe City has everything you need. Try
the free Sunday afternoon concerts on the beach, and the best golf-
ing deal around at Tahoe City’s nine-hole course.
hoMewood
On the West Shore just south of Tahoe City lies Homewood, a
small winter ski resort that hosts concerts and other entertainment
in the summer. Homewood is one of the most beautiful places to
stay, as it is surrounded by old-growth elm and pine trees, and sits
just yards from the lake.
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 130 5/12/2012 1:32:29 PM
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 131 130 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
MacDuf ’s Public House
Lake Tahoe
SKI RUN MARINA
VILLAGE
S
K
I R
U
N
B
L
V
D
R
u
f u
s
A
l l e
n
B
l v
d
.
Lake Tahoe Blvd.
El D
orado County
Library
LakeView
Plaza
F
R
E
M
O
N
T
A
V
E
.
Sandy Way
T a
k
e
l a
D
r i v
e
MacDuf’s Pub
1041 Fremont Avenue
Check out our
great reviews on
Open 7 Days a Week
1041 Fremont Avenue
South Lake Tahoe, CA
530.542.8777
macdufspub.com
deliciously brilliant.
Traditional Scottish Pub Fare
Wood-Fired Pizza • Great Burgers
Come watch your favorite teams play on 4 screens
Available for catering and private parties
Meeks bay
This little neighborhood on the West Shore offers luxurious
views of the lake, and great access to nearby state parks. Meeks
Bay has its own fire station, one of the few developments other
than homes in this classic Tahoe vacation spot.
souTh Lake Tahoe/sTaTeLIne
The largest of the cities around Lake Tahoe, South Lake has a
large variety of entertainment options. The area’s biggest casinos
bring in the area’s biggest acts (including Lady Antebellum last
summer) so if nightlife is what you’re looking for, make a trip
to South Lake. If you want to stay out of the car, South Lake is a
bicycle-friendly designated community, so rent a bicycle and
enjoy the region’s many scenic rides.
Meyers
Just south of South Lake Tahoe, Meyers is a funky town that is
home to many locals in the region. If you’re looking for a trip off
the beaten path, try lunch or dinner in Meyers, and come back
telling about the “real” Tahoe.
kIrkwood
About one hour south of the lake, Kirkwood is a ski resort with
plenty of summertime options, including shopping, lodging,
biking, hiking and fly fishing.
heaVenLy
Heavenly Village also offers shopping selections and gondola
rides during the summer, and is perfect for a family. The gondola
will take you to gorgeous views of the lake, and the hike back to
town is perfect for those who are in shape — or want to be.
Zephyr CoVe
Located on the southeast part of the lake, Zephyr Cove is a
historic area. Businesses nearby offer a slew of fun activities,
including cruises aboard the M.S. Dixie or Tahoe Queen, to
horseback riding, to kayaking, parasailing or boating.
gLenbrook
On the East Shore of Lake Tahoe, historic Glenbrook
epitomizes the idea of rural and lake. Only 150 acres of the
town have been developed, leaving homeowners and visitors
undisturbed serenity and unique recreational opportunities.
sand harbor
With a sandy beaches, boat launches, picnic spots and access
to world-class biking, hiking and fishing, it is no wonder Sand
Harbor is one of the most popular spots on the lake. You can
catch the Flume Trail and the Tahoe Rim Trail nearby, while
exploring the backcountry between Lake Tahoe and Carson City.
as it is surrounded by old-growth elm and pine trees, and sits just
yards from the lake. And if you get a chance, talk to some of the
locals — they are the definition of “tight-knit community,” and
you might learn a thing or two from them, especially about our
curious bear population. s
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 131 5/12/2012 1:32:30 PM
calendar South Shore special events
W
hile July offers perfect summer days to spend playing
a round or two on the golf course, it also brings a great
chance to watch a few rounds.
The American Century Championship returns to Edgewood
Tahoe Golf Course on the South Shore, July 17-22, for the 23rd
time. Various celebrities — including actors, athletes and even
politicians — will participate in the made-for-TV event.
The event kicks off on Tuesday, with the Lake Tahoe Visitors
Authority Celeb-Am Tournament, followed by a practice
round on Wednesday and the American Century Celeb-
Am Tournament on Thursday. Things get serious starting
Friday, as the three-round American Century Celebrity Golf
Championship begins and wraps up on Sunday.
You can watch the event on NBC and its various channels,
but if you plan on coming to Tahoe to watch in person, here are
some tips:
PARKING: Parking on site at Edgewood is severely limited to
players and members of the working media. After the first day,
parking passes are needed to get through the gates at Edgewood.
Parking is permitted along Lake Parkway which crosses in front
of the gates to Edgewood. Located directly across from the gates
is the back lot at Horizon Resort and Casino. Parking there is
$10. Most casinos in the Stateline corridor will offer free shuttles
to and from the tournament. Shuttles will drop spectators off at
two different locations once inside the gates at Edgewood.
BLEACHERS: Those looking for an elevated view of a tee
or green can find bleachers at a couple locations around the
course. Two large grandstands border the 18th green while
also allowing a view of the leader board that will be updated
throughout the tourney with scores. There is a bleacher located
at the 164-yard par-three 7th hole as well as another at the first
tee block and No. 9 green. The entire course is walkable; how-
ever, spectators must remain behind the ropes at all times dur-
ing play.
SKYBOX: Company skyboxes are located along the 17th hole
which offers some of the best views of Edgewood’s signature
hole. American Century, Harrah’s, Korbel and the Lake Tahoe
Visitors Authority are all sponsors of these skyboxes and guests
must be permitted by sponsors to spectate from these areas.
RESTROOMS: There are five restrooms located on the
course. There is one at the par-three 5th hole tee block, another
between the 13th green and No. 3 tee block, one more at the
first, one at 17 and the final one located near the First Aid station
along the one fairway.
CONCESSIONS: There are four locations for spectators to
find food and beverage. There is one located directly outside of
the Edgewood’s clubhouse doors bordering the first tee. There is
another on the No. 3 tee block, one more behind the No. 5 green
and the final along the 17th hole.
BEACH/BOAT ACCESS: Boats are permitted on the lake
near the 17th and 18th hole; however, they will be monitored.
Please take lake levels into consideration if planning on mak-
ing a home on the beach outside of Edgewood. Come early.
First-come, first-served. s
CELEBRITY
SIGHTINGS
American Century Championship brings athletes and entertainers to Tahoe
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 133
Tony Romo thanks
the crowd for their
support after finish-
ing his final round
of the American
Century Champion-
ship in 2008.
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 132 5/12/2012 1:32:32 PM
Homes
Looking for a Home?
We’ve just made it easy…
Stop by for a list of ALL the homes for sale and a Map OR view all
properties on-line at www.WeSellTahoe.com! Drive around on
your own or save gas and let us drive. Picking up a list will just take
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1034 Emerald Bay Road, South Lake Tahoe CA 96150
in the Raley’s & K-Mart center @ the corner of Hwy 50 and Hwy 89
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Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 133
Here’s a partial list of players scheduled to participate
in the 2012 American Century Championship:
Jared Allen — Minnesota Vikings defensive end
Ray Allen — NBA All-star and Boston Celtics guard
Charles Barkley — former NBA all-star
Shane Battier — NBA and Miami Heat forward
Brian Baumgartner — actor: The Office
Jerome Bettis — former NFL Pro Bowl running back
Martin Brodeur — NHL all-star and New Jersey Devils goalie
Tim Brown — former NFL all-pro wide receiver
Joe Carter — former MLB all-star outfielder
Brandi Chastain — former women’s soccer player
Vince Coleman — former MLB all-star outfielder
Stephen Curry — Golden State Warriors guard
Vinny Del Negro — former NBA guard & LA Clippers head coach
Trent Dilfer — former NFL all-pro quarterback
Herm Edwards — former NFL head coach
John Elway — former NFL all-star quarterback
Mike Eruzione — captain, 1980 U.S. Hockey team
Marshall Faulk — NFL Hall of Fame running back
Ryan Fitzpatrick — Buffalo Bills quarterback
Robbie Gould — Chicago Bears kicker
Goose Gossage — MLB Hall of Fame pitcher
Anfernee Hardaway — former NBA all-star
Rodney Harrison — former NFL Pro Bowl safety
AJ Hawk — NFL Pro Bowl and Green Bay Packers linebacker
Dennis Haysbert — actor: 24, Major League
Priest Holmes — former NFL Pro Bowl running back
Oscar de la Hoya — legendary boxer
Oliver Hudson — actor: Rules of Engagement
Brett Hull — former NHL all-star
Dan Jansen — former gold medal speed skater
Michael Jordan — former NBA all-star & Charlotte Bobcats owner
David Justice — former MLB all-star
Jason Kidd — NBA All-star and Dallas Mavericks guard
Kenny Lofton — former MLB all-star outfielder
Tino Martinez — former MLB all-star first baseman
Bruce McGill — actor: Animal House
Jim McMahon — former NFL Pro Bowl quarterback
Kevin Millar — former MLB first baseman and outfielder
Bode Miller — Olympic gold medalist
Mike Modano — former NHL all-star
John O’Hurley — actor/host: Seinfeld
Carson Palmer — NFL all-pro and Oakland Raiders quarterback
Digger Phelps — ESPN analyst, former basketball coach
Christian Ponder — Minnesota Vikings quarterback
Dan Quayle — former U.S Vice President
Dan Quinn — former NHL all-star
Rick Rhoden — former MLB all-star pitcher
Alfonso Ribeiro — actor: Fresh Prince of Bel Air
Jerry Rice — former NFL all-pro wide receiver
Ray Rice — NFL Pro Bowl and Baltimore Ravens running back
Aaron Rodgers — NFL Pro Bowl & Green Bay Packers quarterback
Jeremy Roenick — former NHL all-star
Ray Romano — actor: Everybody Loves Raymond
Tony Romo — NFL Pro Bowl and Dallas Cowboys quarterback
Mark Rypien — former NFL Pro Bowl quarterback
Bret Saberhagen — former MLB pitcher and World Series MVP
Joe Sakic — former NHL all-star
Sterling Sharpe — former NFL all-pro wide receiver
Alex Smith — quarterback of the San Francisco 49ers
Mike Smith — Atlanta Falcons head coach
John Smoltz — former MLB all-star pitcher
Steve Spurrier — University of So. Carolina head football coach
Vinny Testaverde — former NFL Pro Bowl quarterback
Joe Theismann — former NFL all-pro quarterback
Billy Joe Tolliver — former NFL quarterback
Justin Tuck — NFL Pro Bowl and New York Giants defensive end
Jason Witten — NFL Pro Bowl and Dallas Cowboys tight end
Jack Wagner — actor: Melrose Place
David Wells — former MLB all-star pitcher
Ken Whisenhunt — Arizona Cardinals head coach
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 133 5/12/2012 1:32:33 PM
SIX SUMMER SESSIONS AVAILABLE
MONDAY - FRIDAY, 9AM-4PM
.
JULY 2 TO AUGUST 10, 2012
ZEPHYR POINT PRESBYTERIAN CONFERENCE CENTER
FOR MORE INFORMATION & TO REGISTER TODAY,
CALL 775.588.6759 OR VISIT zephyrpoint.org
Summer
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3140 Hwy 50 | South Lake Tahoe, CA 96155
Located conveniently on your way to
Sierra at Tahoe and Kirkwood Ski Areas
530-577-5132 | www.GetawayCafeTahoe.com
We specialize in Alpine comfort cuisine, and serve
delicious dinners Wednesday through Sunday in
the summer. We are family friendly, affordable
and dedicated to delivering outstanding service.
Dine in or sit outside in our patio garden and
relax over a great glass of wine or one of our
20 specialty beers.
Gourmet Burgers, Pasta,
Steak, Seafood, Salads,
Fresh Sauces and the Best
Soup on the South Shore
calendar South Shore special events
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 135 134 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
June
June 2
Wild Tahoe Weekend
South Lake Tahoe
Annual Lake Tahoe Bird Festival with birding,
presentations and expeditions.
www.tinsweb.org
June 2-3, 9-10
Valhalla Renaissance Faire
Camp Richardson Historic Resort
Take a step back in time and lose yourself in
the family-friendly magic and merriment.
Shows, music, dancing, actors, staged battles,
merchants and craftsmen.
www.valhallafaire.com
June 2
American Hiking Society’s 20th annual
National Trails Day - Meet at the back of the
Harrah’s Casino parking lot, Stateline, Nev.
Volunteers of all skills and physical abilities
are invited to help build trail with Tahoe Rim
Trail Association.
775-298-0239
June 2-10
Highway 50 Association
Wagon Train
Zephyr Cove, Nev.
Bi-state wagon train will
ride from Zephyr Cove to
Placerville for art, enter-
tainment and barbecue.
www.hwy50wagontrain.
com
June 3
America’s Most
Beautiful Bike Ride
Start and finish at Lake
Tahoe Horizon
Casino Resort
This annual event is known for its spectacular
scenery, support and good food. Event fea-
tures a boat cruise/35-mile fun ride, a 72-mile
ride around the Lake and a 100-mile ride.
www.bikethewest.com/AMBBR.html
June 3
Tahoe Bike Day Parade & Festival
Police will escort the Tahoe Bike Day Parade
up Highway 50 to Pioneer Trail and down Ski
Run Boulevard to Ski Run Marina, where the
festival will be held. Participants are encour-
aged to dress up.
www.tahoebike.org
775-586-9566
June 5 – Oct. 9
Farmers Market — American Legion Hall
parking lot, 2732 Lake Tahoe Blvd.
Tuesdays, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 134 5/12/2012 1:32:35 PM
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 135 134 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
Lake Valley
Properties
(530) 544-7010 • (800) 634-3397
1151 Emerald Bay Rd. • South Lake Tahoe
www.lakevalleyproperties.com
Long Term Rentals • Vacation Rentals
Ski Leases • Real Estate Sales
Family Owned & Operated for over 30 years
June 9
DeCelle Memorial Lake Tahoe Relay - The 48th annual running relay
will take place around Lake Tahoe. The 72-mile course is divided into
sections for seven-member teams. Proceeds will benefit high school
running programs.
www.laketahoerelay.com
June 21-24
Corvettes at Lake Tahoe
MontBleu Resort Casino & Spa, Stateline, Nev.
Old, new, stock and custom Corvettes will be on display during the 10th
annual event. www.laketahoecorvetteclub.org
June 23
Historic Home Tour — The American Association of University Women,
South Lake Tahoe Branch, will host a tour of eight restored homes in the
Al Tahoe neighborhood. Proceeds will go toward scholarships for local
women and math and science camp grants for seventh-grade girls.
775-309-3911. www.southtahoehometour.eventbrite.com
Summer’s here.
Reserve your seats today.
In case you haven’t noticed,
the days are getting a bit longer,
the sun a little brighter. Yes, it’s that
time of year to enjoy friends and family
at the lake. And we have that special
place to call home during a summer
visit. But don’t miss out—we can only
hold your seats for so long.
530.542.5850 1.800.344.9364
tahoelodging.com
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 135 5/12/2012 1:40:48 PM
Built on the belief that pillow talk should
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an evening of whispers, laughter and other matters of
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Serving South Lake Tahoe
136 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
calendar South Shore special events
June 23-24
GeoTahoeSouth
Bijou Community Park, 1201 Al Tahoe Blvd.
Explore South Lake Tahoe on a family-friendly,
high-tech treasure hunt. Prizes will be granted
and a raffle will be held.
http://geotahoesouth.eventbrite.com
June 23-24
Lake Tahoe Paddle Festival
Meeks Bay Resort
Fourth annual festival will be held from 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m. and host a celebration of the World
Tribal Canoe Project.
www.meeksbayresort.com
June 29 – July 1
Rolling Chrome/Tahoe Thunder Car
& M/C Show
Heavenly Village Gondola at Highway 50 at
South Lake Tahoe, Calif.
M/C & Car show. Event will feature trophies, a
poker run, sidewalk sales and 50s music.
www.goodsamsaferide.com
June 30 – July 1
Race The Lake of the Sky
South Lake Tahoe at El Dorado Beach
Open race, SUP Cross, Grom race, Emerald
Bay distance race and team relays will be
held. Live surf band and bonfire will be held
Saturday. www.racethelakeofthesky.com
JULY
July 4
Lights on the Lake Fireworks - The larg-
est synchronized fireworks display west of
the Mississippi will begin about 9:45 p.m.
Fireworks can be seen around town.
www.tinyurl.com/tahoefireworks
July 4
Meeks Bay 4th of July Swim Race
Meeks Bay Resort & Marina
Races held parallel to the beach. Categories for
youth and adults. Cash prizes.
530-525-6946
www.meeksbayresort.com
July 8
Music on the Lawn — Valhalla Grand Lawn
Bring a picnic basket, lawn chairs and sun-
screen and listen to music on the Lake Tahoe
shoreline. www.valhallatahoe.com
PILATES STUDIO LAKE TAHOE
COMP R E H E N S I V E I N T E G R AT I ON OF MI N D, B ODY A N D S P I R I T
GRAND OPENI NG SUMMER 201 2
PILATES STUDIO LAKE TAHOE is conveniently located on the south shore of beautiful Lake Tahoe.
Our studio ofers a peaceful, elegant and warm environment in which you can focus on your personal
wellness, conditioning, & fitness. Our Studio provides state of the art equipment and
the best training professionals in the industry. Let us customize a program to attain
your goals and to support your active mountain lifestyle.
PILATES STUDIO LAKE TAHOE is a full service Pilates & Yoga studio and the vision of owner
Tara Farrah, certified Pilates Trainer and lifelong Student of Fitness and Healthy Living.
Call now to reserve your space - 775.580.6463
www.PilatesTahoe.com
THE PENTHOUSE
31 HIGHWAY 50
STATELINE, NEVADA 89449
Exclusive Margarita
Fitness Wear Boutique
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 136 5/12/2012 1:40:50 PM
136 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
PILATES STUDIO LAKE TAHOE
COMP R E H E N S I V E I N T E G R AT I ON OF MI N D, B ODY A N D S P I R I T
GRAND OPENI NG SUMMER 201 2
PILATES STUDIO LAKE TAHOE is conveniently located on the south shore of beautiful Lake Tahoe.
Our studio ofers a peaceful, elegant and warm environment in which you can focus on your personal
wellness, conditioning, & fitness. Our Studio provides state of the art equipment and
the best training professionals in the industry. Let us customize a program to attain
your goals and to support your active mountain lifestyle.
PILATES STUDIO LAKE TAHOE is a full service Pilates & Yoga studio and the vision of owner
Tara Farrah, certified Pilates Trainer and lifelong Student of Fitness and Healthy Living.
Call now to reserve your space - 775.580.6463
www.PilatesTahoe.com
THE PENTHOUSE
31 HIGHWAY 50
STATELINE, NEVADA 89449
Exclusive Margarita
Fitness Wear Boutique
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 137 5/12/2012 1:40:50 PM
(775) 720-8501
4087 Westwood, Carson City
This elegant property with city views, in a wooded area
is a must see, one of a kind! Gourmet kitchen with
hardwood floors and granite counters. 5 car garae,
1.5 acre lot, tons of
amenities throughout
this 5 bedroom, 5 bath
home. Call today!
$789,000
7003 Franktown, Carson City
38.63 acres, 2127 sf, 2 independent living areas, 2
kitchens, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 wood burning stoves and
2 car garage. 60 acres feet of water rights. Apple orchard
and well established pine
trees. This is the last of
its kind on this side of
the Sierra’s history.
$995,000
2974 Gentile Court, Carson City
Silver Oak - new homes starting in the low $300s, open
floor plan with your design help. Energy efficiency, front
yard landscaping and rear fencing included. New model is
almost done. Call for info
today. It will give you
something to talk about.
225 Sadie Lane, Zephyr Cove
This home offers 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2 car garage
with 1568 sf in beautiful Cave Rock Nevada. Close to
boat ramp, skiing and recreation. Nestled in the pine
trees with easy access to
Lake Tahoe for kayaking,
water skiing and hiking,
mountain biking, etc.
$269,900
1622 W. Wellington, Carson City
3 bedroom, 3 bath, 3 car garage, 3750 sf of living space.
Open floor plan that offers a gourmet kitchen of granite
counters, 5 burner gas top, double convection ovens,
built-in refrigerator, all
opens to family room,
breakfast nook and
formal dining room.
800 Old Clear Creek
Carson City
Clear Creek Storage complex. Great location above
Costco in Carson City. 112 mini-storage units and 28
vehicle storage with
living quarters and
great cash flow.
$725,000
$1,189,000
starting in the low
$300,000’s
calendar South Shore special events
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 139 138 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
July 14
Tour of the California Alps — Death Ride 2012
Recognized as one of the premier cycling
events in America’s West, Death Ride includes
five passes and 129 miles.
www.deathride.com
July 17-22
American Century Celebrity Golf
Championship — Edgewood Tahoe Golf
Course. Professional athletes and Hollywood
celebrities will compete in the 23rd
annual tournament.
www.tahoecelebritygolf.com
July 27-28
South Tahoe Wooden Boat Classic
Tahoe Keys Marina & Yacht Club -
Wooden and classic boast will be on dis-
play in a vintage boat show.
www.tahoewoodenboats.com
July 28-29
Wa She Shu It Deh Native American
Arts Festival — Valhalla Grand Lawn
Traditional American Indian dancers
and drum performers, basket weaving dis-
plays, art and food will be part of the festival,
which honors Washoe culture and heritage. A
basket-weaving competition will feature more
than 14 different categories.
www.valhallatahoe.com
July 29
Lake Tahoe Historical Society Garden Tour
Lake Tahoe Historical Society will host its
annual garden tour from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The
tour will feature seven gardens, some of which
are in the Angora Burn area. Proceeds benefit
the historical society and museum. Tickets can
be purchased for $20 at local nurseries and at
the museum. 530-541-5458
AUGUST
Aug. 3-5
Hot August Nights
MontBleu Resort Casino & Spa
Classic cars, rock ’n’ roll, free family entertain-
ment, automotive exhibits, a sock hop awards
and competitions will be held in South Lake
Tahoe.www.hotaugustnights.net
Aug. 7-12
Hot Tahoe Cruisin’ South Shore Car Show
Heavenly Village
Sidewalk sales, trophies, poker run, special
music will be held during the car show, which
is open to all cars, trucks and bikes.
www.goodsamsaferide.com
Aug. 11
Murder Mystery Radio Theatre
Valhalla Arts, Theatre & Music Festival 2012
Tallac Historic Site, South Lake Tahoe
Play about the Roaring Twenties’ South Shore
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 138 5/12/2012 1:40:51 PM
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 139 138 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
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Aug. 12
Great Gatsby Festival
and Tea — Tallac Historic Site
Vintage car shows, wander-
ing musicians and jugglers
are part of the fun sched-
uled for the weekend at the
Pope and Baldwin Estates.
www.valhallatahoe.com
Aug. 19
Music on the Lawn
Valhalla Grand Lawn
Bring a picnic basket, lawn
chairs and sunscreen and
listen to music on the Lake
Tahoe shoreline.
www.valhallatahoe.com
Aug. 23-26
Lake Tahoe Adventure Motorcycle Ride
and Rendezvous
MontBleu Resort Casino & Spa, Stateline, Nev.
All riders and makes of bikes welcome.
Cocktail party, barbecue on the beach, guest
speakers, off-road, high desert and pavement
rides.
www.tahoeadventuremoto.com
Aug. 25
Lake in the Sky Air Show
South Lake Tahoe Airport
Vintage warbirds, military
aircraft, experimental
aircraft and others will
be on display during this
family-friendly event.
Demonstrations and fly-
bys will also be conducted
during the show.
www.lakeintheskyairshow.
com
SEPTEMBER
Sept. 2
Labor Day Weekend Fireworks Extravaganza
South Lake Tahoe
Show features a variety of pyrotechnics in vari-
ous patterns, shapes and designs. Show will
begin about 8:30 p.m.
www.tinyurl.com/labordayfireworks
Sept. 2
Sample the Sierra
Ski Run Boulevard between Larch and
Tamarack
Local wine, food, products, art, talent and pro-
duce. Children’s activities and music will also
be on site.
www.samplethesierra.com
775-588-1728
Sept. 8-9
Tahoe Expo 2012 — Celebrate the lake by
experiencing guided adventure treks all
around the Lake Tahoe Watershed. There are
eight different treks to choose from at various
experience levels, all connecting you to local
wildlife, culture/heritage mountains, forest,
rivers, air and water.
http://tahoeexpo.com/

Sept. 9
Tour de Tahoe — Bike Big Blue
Lake Tahoe Horizon Casino Resort on
Highway 50 in Stateline, Nev.
Ride your bike 72 miles around Lake Tahoe.
Event also features food and entertainment.
This year’s event will benefit the Juvenile
Diabetes Research Foundation.
www.bikethewest.com/tourdetahoe.html
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 139 5/12/2012 1:40:55 PM
140 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
calendar South Shore special events
Sept. 14
A Celebration of Writers around the Lake
Grand Hall at Valhalla
Tahoe writers Works will host talent from the
lake and beyond in a smart, funny and inspira-
tional night of prose.
www.valhallatahoe.com
Sept. 16
Athleta Iron Girl
South Shore
Female athletes will compete in a 400-
meter swim, 24K bike ride and 5K run.
www.irongirl.com/events/Lake_Tahoe_
South_Shore.htm
Sept. 28-30
Lake Tahoe Marathon
Event includes a marathon, marathon
walk, five- and two-person marathon
relays, a 20-mile power walk, a half
marathon, a 10K, 5K, three-day Tahoe
Triple Marathon, three-day Lake Tahoe
Triathlon, 72- 35- and 20-mile bike rides
and races, kayaking, swimming events
and speed golf.
www.laketahoemarathon.com
OCTOBER
Oct. 6-7
Kokanee Salmon Festival
South Lake Tahoe
Celebrate the annual fall migration of the land-
locked Kokanee Salmon of Lake Tahoe.
www.fs.usda.gov
Oct. 6-7
Oktoberfest
Camp Richardson Resort
Annual festival features food, music, fam-
ily games and activities and a beer and wine
garden. www.camprichardson.com s
For the latest listings of Tahoe events, visit www.tahoe.com
FOR MORE DETAILS, ASK YOUR LOCAL DEALER,
SEE TREX.COM OR CALL 1-800-BUY-TREX.
TRUE
For thè nèarly 4C million /mèricans with oècks, warm wèathèr mèans
èn|oying oinnèr al írèsco, hosting nèighborhooo gèt-togèthèrs ano
rèlaxing outsioè unoèr thè sun or stars. Tooay's savvy homèownèrs
arè èxtènoing thèir living spacè outooors with oècks ano backyaros
that rènèct pèrsonal tastès ano intèrèsts. To makè thè most oí your
outooor living spacè, consioèr thè íollowing tips írom Trèx:
MAKE MATERIALS MATTER.
lí you want to spèno morè timè èn|oying - rathèr than maintaining - your
oèck, choosè matèrials that nèèo only a simplè soap ano watèr clèaning to
kèèp a ¨likè nèw¨ appèarancè íor oècaoès. Vooo-altèrnativè oècking likè Trèx
Transcèno
®
rèsists íaoing, staining, scratching ano molo growth - èvèn aítèr
yèars oí hèavy íoot traínc ano èxposurè to thè èlèmènts.
¨For long-lasting bèauty, choosè high-pèríormancè wooo-altèrnativè oècking
that oííèrs thè natural look oí wooo whilè rè¢uiring minimal maintènancè
- so you nèvèr nèèo to worry about sanoing, staining or painting,¨ says
/oam Zambanini, vicè prèsioènt oí markèting at Trèx, thè worlo's largèst
manuíacturèr oí wooo-altèrnativè oècking ano railing prooucts. ¨/lso, look
íor a proouct with supèrior wèar-rèsistancè ano a 25-yèar warranty, which
guarantèès ènouring gooo looks.¨
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Expano your èco-consciousnèss to thè grèat outooors by choosing wooo-
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housèholo plastics likè nèwspapèr slèèvès, sanowich bags ano thè wraps
arouno papèr towèl rolls that othèrwisè might èno up in lanonlls. Vith
growing consumèr intèrèst in ènvironmèntally-íriènoly prooucts, a ¨grèèn¨
outooor living spacè also can incrèasè thè rèsalè valuè oí a homè.
DESIGN WITH DISTINCTION.
Vhèthèr lakè íront rètrèat or mountain cabin, sèlèct a stylè ano color schèmè
íor your oèck that bèst complèmènts your homè's èxtèrior ano rènècts
thè natural ènvironmènt. For instancè, Trèx Transcèno íèaturès sèvèn rich
saturatèo colors inspirèo by outooor èlèmènts - such as oèèp-burnishèo
bronzè, èarthy brown, pristinè grèy, ano spicy rèo, as wèll as strèakèo boaros
that mimic thè look oí tropical harowooos. ln tèrms oí shapè, rèmèmbèr that
oècks no longèr nèèo to bè simply s¢uarè.
HIT THE DECK!
Simple Tips to Spruce Up Your Outdoor Living
Space for Summer
¨Think 'outsioè thè box' ano consioèr an outooor living
spacè that spans multiplè lèvèls or wraps arouno two or
morè sioès oí your homè,¨ suggèsts Zambanini. ¨Vith
nèarly limitlèss oèsign options, it's important to takè timè
to èxaminè proouct samplès ano sèèk out onlinè tools to
èxpèrimènt with oiííèrènt prooucts, nnishès ano layouts.¨
REMEMBER FINISHING TOUCHES.
Tooay's outooor living spacès may bè outnttèo with
luxuriès likè stainlèss stèèl appliancès, nat scrèèn
tèlèvisions ano stonè nrè pits - or morè simplè touchès
likè built-in nowèr boxès or bènchès. Crèatè subtlè
warmth with ènèrgy-èínciènt LED oimmablè Trèx
DèckLighting¨, or crèatè thè bèst sèat in thè housè with
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tablès, èach piècè is comíortablè, wèathèr rèsistant ano
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¨Dèck out¨ your summèr with Trèx prooucts that
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Lumber Company
¹C242 Church Strèèt
Truckèè, C/ 96¹6C
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Truckee-Tahoe
Lumber Company
3¹5 North lakè Plvo
Tahoè City, C/ 96¹45
Phonè 53C-583-373¹
salès§ttlco.com
Tahoe City Lumber
7¹5 V Rivèr Roao
Tahoè City, C/ 96¹45
Phonè 53C-383-4248
tahoècitylumbèr§hotmail.com
Spitsen Lumber Company
¹C54 Tahoè Plvo
lnclinè Villagè, NV 8946¹
Phonè 775-83¹-¹¹4¹
gspitsèn§spitsènlumbèr.com
TREX PRODUCTS AVAILABLE AT THESE DEALERS:
PAID ADVERTISEMENT
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 140 5/12/2012 1:40:59 PM
140 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
FOR MORE DETAILS, ASK YOUR LOCAL DEALER,
SEE TREX.COM OR CALL 1-800-BUY-TREX.
TRUE
For thè nèarly 4C million /mèricans with oècks, warm wèathèr mèans
èn|oying oinnèr al írèsco, hosting nèighborhooo gèt-togèthèrs ano
rèlaxing outsioè unoèr thè sun or stars. Tooay's savvy homèownèrs
arè èxtènoing thèir living spacè outooors with oècks ano backyaros
that rènèct pèrsonal tastès ano intèrèsts. To makè thè most oí your
outooor living spacè, consioèr thè íollowing tips írom Trèx:
MAKE MATERIALS MATTER.
lí you want to spèno morè timè èn|oying - rathèr than maintaining - your
oèck, choosè matèrials that nèèo only a simplè soap ano watèr clèaning to
kèèp a ¨likè nèw¨ appèarancè íor oècaoès. Vooo-altèrnativè oècking likè Trèx
Transcèno
®
rèsists íaoing, staining, scratching ano molo growth - èvèn aítèr
yèars oí hèavy íoot traínc ano èxposurè to thè èlèmènts.
¨For long-lasting bèauty, choosè high-pèríormancè wooo-altèrnativè oècking
that oííèrs thè natural look oí wooo whilè rè¢uiring minimal maintènancè
- so you nèvèr nèèo to worry about sanoing, staining or painting,¨ says
/oam Zambanini, vicè prèsioènt oí markèting at Trèx, thè worlo's largèst
manuíacturèr oí wooo-altèrnativè oècking ano railing prooucts. ¨/lso, look
íor a proouct with supèrior wèar-rèsistancè ano a 25-yèar warranty, which
guarantèès ènouring gooo looks.¨
GO GREEN.
Expano your èco-consciousnèss to thè grèat outooors by choosing wooo-
altèrnativè oècking maoè írom rècyclèo matèrials. Trèx oècks contain
housèholo plastics likè nèwspapèr slèèvès, sanowich bags ano thè wraps
arouno papèr towèl rolls that othèrwisè might èno up in lanonlls. Vith
growing consumèr intèrèst in ènvironmèntally-íriènoly prooucts, a ¨grèèn¨
outooor living spacè also can incrèasè thè rèsalè valuè oí a homè.
DESIGN WITH DISTINCTION.
Vhèthèr lakè íront rètrèat or mountain cabin, sèlèct a stylè ano color schèmè
íor your oèck that bèst complèmènts your homè's èxtèrior ano rènècts
thè natural ènvironmènt. For instancè, Trèx Transcèno íèaturès sèvèn rich
saturatèo colors inspirèo by outooor èlèmènts - such as oèèp-burnishèo
bronzè, èarthy brown, pristinè grèy, ano spicy rèo, as wèll as strèakèo boaros
that mimic thè look oí tropical harowooos. ln tèrms oí shapè, rèmèmbèr that
oècks no longèr nèèo to bè simply s¢uarè.
HIT THE DECK!
Simple Tips to Spruce Up Your Outdoor Living
Space for Summer
¨Think 'outsioè thè box' ano consioèr an outooor living
spacè that spans multiplè lèvèls or wraps arouno two or
morè sioès oí your homè,¨ suggèsts Zambanini. ¨Vith
nèarly limitlèss oèsign options, it's important to takè timè
to èxaminè proouct samplès ano sèèk out onlinè tools to
èxpèrimènt with oiííèrènt prooucts, nnishès ano layouts.¨
REMEMBER FINISHING TOUCHES.
Tooay's outooor living spacès may bè outnttèo with
luxuriès likè stainlèss stèèl appliancès, nat scrèèn
tèlèvisions ano stonè nrè pits - or morè simplè touchès
likè built-in nowèr boxès or bènchès. Crèatè subtlè
warmth with ènèrgy-èínciènt LED oimmablè Trèx
DèckLighting¨, or crèatè thè bèst sèat in thè housè with
bèautiíully craítèo Trèx Outooor Furniturè¨. From classic
rocking chairs to porch swings ano hanosomè sioè
tablès, èach piècè is comíortablè, wèathèr rèsistant ano
maoè írom ninèty pèrcènt rècyclèo matèrials.
¨Dèck out¨ your summèr with Trèx prooucts that
combinè stylè, ourability ano hasslè-írèè gooo
looks. For morè ioèas ano tips, visit www.trèx.com.
Truckee-Tahoe
Lumber Company
¹C242 Church Strèèt
Truckèè, C/ 96¹6C
Phonè 53C-587-92¹¹
salès§ttlco.com
Truckee-Tahoe
Lumber Company
3¹5 North lakè Plvo
Tahoè City, C/ 96¹45
Phonè 53C-583-373¹
salès§ttlco.com
Tahoe City Lumber
7¹5 V Rivèr Roao
Tahoè City, C/ 96¹45
Phonè 53C-383-4248
tahoècitylumbèr§hotmail.com
Spitsen Lumber Company
¹C54 Tahoè Plvo
lnclinè Villagè, NV 8946¹
Phonè 775-83¹-¹¹4¹
gspitsèn§spitsènlumbèr.com
TREX PRODUCTS AVAILABLE AT THESE DEALERS:
PAID ADVERTISEMENT
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 141 5/12/2012 1:40:59 PM
calendar North Shore & Truckee special events
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 143
F
or all that has changed in the Lake
Tahoe area the past three decades, its
world-class summer racing scene real-
ly has not. Look no further than the Donner
Lake Triathlon for a prime example.
“It’s a classic, so it’s hard to mess with,”
said Todd Jackson, whose Kings Beach-based
Seventh Wave Productions, owner of Big
Blue Adventure, purchased the long-
running triathlon in 2009.
Now in its 31st year, the Donner
Lake Triathlon endures as one of the
Tahoe area’s staple summer races,
drawing nearly a thousand par-
ticipants each July. They come from
near and far, from average Joes to
whippet-like endurance athletes
and triathlon specialists.
“I think it has a lot to do with
the venue,” Jackson said, try-
ing to explain why the triath-
lon — one of the oldest in the
country — has thrived over
the years. “It’s a great venue,
and the course is one-of-a-kind.
A lot of triathlons are flat, or flatter. We
have altitude plus climbing, and somewhat of
a technical descent on the bike.
“So it’s not your normal experience. And
then I think with just the scenic value of it, it
all combines to make it a classic course that
people want to do.”
Indeed. The Donner Lake Triathlon has its
share of devoted participants.
In recent years, Steven Sexton, a Team USA
triathlete from Davis, Calif., has dominated
the men’s international-distance field, while
Truckee’s own Shannon Rahlves has done
the same on the women’s side. Michael Smith
returns year after year from Southern California
to defend his title in the sprint distance.
The event website includes race results and
records dating back to 1999 (Sexton and Holly
Nybo own the course records, of 2:06:04 and
2:24:51, respectively). But while the triathlon’s
roots dig much deeper, the early years are some-
what obscure. Even Jackson, who purchased
the race from longtime owner A Change of Pace
Foundation, was curious about the nascent years
of the triathlon.
“I would love to know more about that stuff,” he
said.
TRACING THE ROOTS
Luckily, the area’s racing history is preserved
in the archives of the Sierra Sun and Tahoe World
newspapers, which documented the Donner Lake
Triathlon’s inaugural year, and every race there-
after.
The event debuted in 1982 — eight years after
the first-ever triathlon in the country was held
in San Diego. It attracted more than 300 partici-
pants and was produced by local resident Sherry
Griswold-Reed.
The big news, according to the Sierra Sun article
covering the event, was that then — Donner Lake
resident Lyle Nelson, an Olympic biathlete who
dominated area races in the early 1980s, did not
win. “Now that’s news,” it read.
Grant Boswell and Dean Harper, both from
Reno, tied for the overall title with identical times
of 1:32:30. Nelson won the men’s over-30 title in a
time of 1:35:41.
The finish times were significantly faster than
present day because the course was shorter in
the early days. While the starting line at West End
Beach was the same, the opening leg sent ath-
letes on a half-mile, point-to-point swim to the
boat launch, as opposed to the 0.9-mile loop used
today. After emerging from the water, they ran the
6.89 miles around the lake, then finished with a
15-mile cycling leg up Old 40 to Donner Summit
Lodge, where they turned around and finished in
the Sugar Bowl parking lot.
By Sylas Wright
Tahoe Magazine
Shannon Rahlves of
Truckee races down Old
40 during the cycling
portion of the
2011 Donner Lake
Triathlon. Photo:
Sylas Wright.
Donner Lake’s Historic Triathlon Endures After More Than 30 Years
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 142 5/12/2012 1:41:05 PM
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 143
Now, the biking portion
— a 24.8-mile haul up Old 40 to
Kingvale and back — follows the
swim, and the race concludes
with the run around the lake and
a finish at West End Beach.
Co-director T.D. Short was
quoted after the inaugural race.
“I think for it being the first
time, it went really well. The
majority of comments we
received were positive,” Short
said, adding that the only glitch
was some confusion with the
timing, which was resolved by
Monday. “It was a really tough
event to time because of the
number of participants and the
number of divisions involved. But
all in all, it went really well.”
Participation increased to 350
by the second year as Ray Renati
of Sunnyvale and Karen Banks of
Sparks won individual
titles. The top local fin-
isher was Holly Beatie
of Olympic Valley, who
was third among women,
while the Tahoe City
team of Susan Blanfield,
Steve Gregor and Mark
Gregor won the relay cat-
egory. The weekend also
included a 10-kilometer
running race.
Scott Miller of Auburn
won from 1984 to 1986
as the Donner Lake
Triathlon reached a high
of 400 participants in
1985. Numbers waned in
the following years, how-
ever, reaching a low point
in 1988 before Griswold sold
the event to A Change of Pace.
The new ownership provided
an immediate boost, with the
1989 race drawing more than 600
athletes. A Change of Pace also
tweaked the course to its current
state.
“I think it went just great and
was a complete success. We had
several comments that the event
was more professional than it had
been in the past,” said then-race
coordinator Jennifer Cowden of
A Change of Pace. “We thought
of this year as a rebuilding year
that we could get our feet wet.
Next year we hope to improve the
event even more.”
The Donner Lake Triathlon
continued to grow throughout
the 1990s and into the 2000s
“The Donner Lake
Triathlon isn’t just a
competition, it’s a
gathering for local
and regional
athletes, as well as
the community.”
— Todd Jackson,
Donner Lake Triathlon producer
...continued on page 144
Swimmers exit the water and head to their bikes for the second leg of the 2005
Donner Lake Triathlon.
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 143 5/12/2012 1:41:07 PM
Sun., 6/17 Burton Creek Trail Runs:
Marathon, 1/2 marathon, 5 & 10k
Sun., 6/24 Run To Squaw 10K, 12K
Wed., 7/4 Run To The Beach 5 & 10k
Sun., 7/8 Truckee Running Festival:
1/2 mile, 5K, 10K, 1/2 marathon
Sat., 8/12 Northstar Mountain Run:
12K, 1/2 marathon
Sun., 8/25 Big Blue Trail Run 5 & 10k
Sun., 9/16 Emerald Bay Trail Run 12K
Sat., 10/6 Octoberfest Trail Run 12K
Info and sign up at: TahoeTrailRunning.com
These runs are fun, beautiful and open to all!
N
o

r
a
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144 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
under A Change of Pace, which, after the race’s only
cancellation in 2008 due to heavy smoke in the area,
sold it to Jackson in 2009 after two decades of owner-
ship.
“We’re thrilled to be a part of such an established
and popular event,” Jackson said at the time of pur-
chase. “The Donner Lake Triathlon isn’t just a com-
petition, it’s a gathering for local and regional ath-
letes, as well as the community.” s
Triathlon ... from page 143
Swimmers head out in a mass start at the Donner Triathlon.
UFC fghter Nick Diaz of Stockton
reaches the fnish line of the triathlon
in 2011. Diaz, who placed 36th, has
competed in the triathlon six or seven
times. Photo: Sylas Wright.
Modern Times:
Te Donner Lake Triathlon, which now
includes a Kids Triathlon as part of the
festivities, is as big a deal as ever. In the 30th
edition of the race in 2011, it even attracted
a world-class mixed martial arts fghter,
Nick Diaz, and a former Major League
Baseball player, Eric Byrnes.
“Well, I like Tahoe, and this is the
best road race in Tahoe,” Diaz said after
recording a respectable 36th-place fnish,
explaining why he’s made the trip from
his Stockton home “six or seven times” to
compete in the Donner Lake Triathlon.
“It keeps me in great shape. I’ll be in great
shape when I start training camp.”
Steven Sexton, who captured the win for
the ffth straight year in 2011, said with the
demanding hill climbs and high elevation,
which ranges from about 5,900 feet to over
7,000, the triathlon never gets any easier.
“It’s tough,” he said. “You can’t fake this
race, with all the hills and the elevation. So
it hurt. Always does.”
Te 31st annual Donner Lake Triathlon
takes place Sunday July 15, 7 a.m., at West
End Beach.
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 144 5/12/2012 1:41:12 PM
144 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
JUNE
June 2
Bay to Bay Clean Up Day — Te Kings Beach,
Tahoe Vista, Carnelian Bay and Crystal Bay com-
munities will take to the streets to pick up trash,
9 a.m.-1 p.m. Registration will begin at 9 a.m.
Maps will be on hand to designate clean up areas.
Volunteers can also look for Golden Items; golden
wrench, golden disk, golden computer mouse
and a golden cofee cup and win prizes! Please
join the NTBA for this annual community event.
www.northtahoebusiness.org
June 2
National Trails Day — Celebrate by helping the
Tahoe Rim Trail Association build trail at the Van
Sickle Bi-State Park.
Van Sickle CA/NV State Park
www.tahoerimtrail.org 775-298-0012

June 2
Fur Ball — Pet Network Humane Society’s
annual fundraiser, the Fur Ball’s 2012 theme is
FurEver Yours and is always a favorite fundraiser
at the Te Hyatt Lake Tahoe Lakeside Ballroom.
info@petnetwork.org
775-832-4404

June 3
Movies on Commons Beach — Tahoe City
Lakeside Movie Series, presented by the Tahoe
City Public Utility District Wednesday nights at
dusk. June 27: Spaceballs, July 4: No movie due to
freworks, July 11: Adventures of Tintin, July 18:
Goonies, July 25: Te Perfect Game, Aug. 1: Surf’s
Up, Aug. 8: Big Miracle, Aug. 15: Hugo, Aug. 22:
Puss in Boots, Aug. 29: Dolphin Tale. Inclement
weather, tune to KTKE Radio (101.5fm) for 5 p.m.
announcements, or friend them on Facebook at
Radiant Blue Events. Win some fun!
www.visittahoecity.org
June 9
7th Annual Truckee Brew Fest — Te Truckee
Optimist Club’s 7th Annual Truckee Brew Fest
will feature tasting of specialty brews
from Northern California and Nevada
breweries, live music by Drop Teory, a
popular local Funk-Rock band, 1-5 p.m.
Brews, brats, silent auction, collector
tasting glass and lots of fun on the lawn at
Truckee Regional Park. Advance tickets
$25, $30 at the gate. Tickets available at
Truckee Community Center, Dickson
Realty and Optimist Club members. Must
be 21; no dogs allowed. Designated drivers
admitted free, taxis available, overnight park-
ing permitted. All proceeds beneft programs,
sponsorships, grants and major scholarships
for the youths of Truckee. Truckee Regional Park,
Brockway Road.
www.truckeeoptimist.com 530-582-9062

June 10
Girls on the Run 5K and 10K — Join Girls on
the Run- Sierras for the 5K and 10K presented
by Silver Sage Sports Performance.
Te event is open to the entire com-
munity — runners, walkers, kids and
strollers are all welcome (please no
dogs). Race day registration is $15
for youth (5-18) and $30 for adults
for the 5K and $20 for youth (13-
18) and $40 for adults for the 10K.
Race day registration opens at
8:30 a.m., 5K and 10K start at 10
a.m. Register online and save at
www.girlsontherunsierras.org .
Truckee River View Sports Park,
12200 Joerger Drive Truckee.
www.girlsontherunsierras.org
530-567-2144

June 13
Open House and Anniversary Celebration
— Te community is invited to celebrate the
10th Anniversary of the opening of the Donald
W. Reynolds Community Non-Proft Center. Te
event includes tours of the building, refreshments
and hors d’oeuvres with ice cream provided by
Susie Scoops. Donald W. Reynolds Community
Non-Proft Center.
www.parasol.org 775-298-0184

June 14 - Aug. 23
Truckee Tursdays — Live music, arts, food and
activities, Downtown Truckee, 5-9 p.m. Truckee
Tursdays is an 11-week outdoor Tursday
evening event held during June, July and August.
Activities include a certifed organic Farmers’
Market, live music, arts and
crafts vendors,
beer garden,
sidewalk sales,
outdoor dining,
and family/chil-
dren’s activities.
www.historic-
truckee.com/
truckee-thursdays.
phpcom

June 15-June 24
Solstice Festival
— Tahoe City Down-
town Association’s
Annual event, featuring
freworks and Street Dance, Father’s Day Concert
on the Tahoe Gal, Classic Car Stroll, Mark Twain
Mystery, Aaron Wilson Comedy, Concerts at
Commons Beach opening day, and weeklong
Adventure Sports activities.
www.visittahoecity.org
Calendar North Shore & Truckee special events
W
a
n
t m
o
re
d
e
ta
ils?

For m
ore inform
ation, visit ...
w
w
w
.gotahoenorth.com

w
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.visittahoecity.org
w
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.visitinclinevillage.com

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.northtahoebusiness.org
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estshoreassoc.com
Photo: Derrick Ament
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 145 5/12/2012 1:41:17 PM
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 147 146 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
June 15-24
Adventure Sports Week Tahoe
— Lake Tahoe’s premier outdoor
lifestyle event. Experience 10 days of
competitive adventure sports, clinics,
flm, live music and outdoor activities
for all ages.
www.AdventureSportsWeekTahoe.
com

June 15-17
Tahoe Biltmore Rod Run and Bike
Bash for Cash — Te Motorcycle
and Car show is held in the Tahoe
Biltmore parking lot. It is open to all
years and makes of cars, trucks and
motorcycles. Events include a Sat-
urday barbecue and other activities.
Contact Tom Argo at 530-541-7300
to enter your car or motorcycle.
www.goodsamsaferide.com 530-
541-7300

June 16
Lake Tahoe 4 and 8-Hour Mountain Bike Race — Four and eight-hour
mountain bike race, solo or teams. Course explores North Lake Tahoe single
track above Tahoe City.
www.AdventureSportsWeekTahoe.com
June 17
Tahoe Waterman Challenge — A unique event featuring Stand
Up Paddle (SUP) board racing, swimming and running.
www.AdventureSportsWeekTahoe.com

June 17
Burton Creek Trail Run — 5K, 10K, half marathon, marathon trail
running courses.
www.TahoeTrailRunning.com

June 21
Te Great Mark Twain Controversy Discussion — Where did
Mark Twain camp on Lake Tahoe, Nevada or California? Two au-
thors of books who disagree about this will discuss their proposed
sites at Gatekeeper’s Museum, 6:30 p.m., then you decide. Books
and maps of the proposed sites are available and the public is
invited to weigh in with their opinion as to which is the actual site.
Mark Twain is rumored to be planning to attend.
www.northtahoemuseums.org

June 21
Current Toughts on the Economy 2012 — Te popular and in-
formative series on the economy is updated with the 2012 version.
Event is free at the Donald W. Reynolds Community Non-Proft Center,
Incline Village, Nev. www.parasol.org
775-298-0184

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MATSON
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Call of Nature
Sea Life
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Another Day in Paradise
The Boatworks Mall • Tahoe City
530.581.5111 • www.jhg4art.com
Calendar North Shore & Truckee special events
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 146 5/12/2012 1:41:19 PM
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 147 146 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
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June 23
Tahoe City Wine Walk and Solstice Festival — Tahoe City’s signature
event welcomes you to summer in the Sierra. Enjoy wines with a view and
all the charms of downtown Tahoe City at the sixth annual Tahoe City Wine
Walk, noon-4 p.m. Te Tahoe City Wine Walk features 30 tasting locations
at shops and businesses along the sidewalk and at lakeside in downtown
Tahoe City. Tickets are available TahoeCityWineWalk.com, $35 in advance
and $45 day of and includes admission, wine tastes and small treats at every
location, a commemorative wine glass and a “gift bag” of coupons and gifts
from sponsors. TahoeCityWineWalk.com 530-525-5201

June 23
Tahoe City Of-Road Duathlon — An of-road duathlon featuring a 13-
mile mountain bike ride and 3-mile trail run.
www.BigBlueAdventure.com

June 23
XTERRA Tahoe City Of-Road Triathlon — An of-road duathlon featur-
ing a 750-meter lap swim, 50-meter beach run, 22-mile mountain bike ride
and 5-mile trail fun.
www.BigBlueAdventure.com

June 23
Tahoe City Of-Road Triathlon — Te shorter version of the XTERRA
course. An of-road duathlon featuring a 750-meter lap swim, 50-meter
beach run, 13-mile mountain bike ride and 3-mile trail fun.
www.BigBlueAdventure.com

June 23
Run to Squaw — A 7.9 mile run along the beautiful Truckee River. A perfect
run for all abilities.
www.TahoeTrailRunning.com
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 147 5/12/2012 1:41:21 PM
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calendar
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 149 148 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
June 24
Truckee Chili Cookof — Truckee Sunrise
Rotary Club will hold the Tird Annual Truckee
Chili Cookof, a community fundraiser provid-
ing a day of inexpensive family fun with chili
tasting, non-stop entertainment, food and
beverages and a host of activities for adults
and children. Te area’s best chili cooks will
compete for top honors in these categories:
Restaurants, Nonprofts and Individuals plus
Best Overall. In addition, a People’s Choice
award will recognize the chili garnering the most votes
from attendees and there will be an award for best cooking team theme.
All proceeds beneft Truckee-North Tahoe programs addressing the needs
of youth, economically disadvantaged and elderly. Truckee River Regional
Park, 10500 Old Brockway Road, noon-4 p.m. to support local and interna-
tional projects. Cost is $15 for adults and $3 for children under 12.
www.truckeechilicookof.org
June 19
Free watercraft day at West End Beach — Experience the beauty of Don-
ner Lake from the water. Try stand up paddleboarding, kayaking, pedal boats
and canoe paddling equipment free for a limed time. Free admission also.
West End Beach, Donner Lake.
www.tdrpd.com 530-582-7720
June 27, July 25, 7 and Aug. 15, 7:30 p.m.
Ponderosa Long Drive Series — Who is the longest driver in town? $20
entry to each event to qualify for the fnals. First 50 entries only. Prizes for all
age groups. 9th hole, Ponderosa Golf Course, Truckee.
www.tdrpd.com 530-587-3501
June 30
Tahoe Twenties! — Te Tahoe Maritime Museum is presents a new free
public program that is fun, educational and family friendly, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Join a Swinging Summer Night following the day of fun; an evening of food
and fashion. Spend the evening immersed in everything ‘20s while helping
the museum raise funds for their next exhibit. Fee for evening. Tahoe Mari-
time Museum, 5205 West Lake Blvd., Homewood.
www.tahoemaritime.org
530-525-9253
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 148 5/12/2012 1:41:23 PM
calendar
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 149 148 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
North Shore’s Complete Family Recreation Center
920 Southwood Blvd. • Incline Village • 775.831.1900
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Sand Harbor 8732 North Lake Blvd.
• Custom framing
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10099 Jibboom St. 530-587-1409
Open Tues. - Sat. 10 -5
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Seafood Specialties • Live Maine Lobster
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Open Seven Days
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Sun: Noon -10:00 p.m.
(775) 833-3663
June 30 - July 3
Beth Weber Arts & Crafts Fair — Te fairs are on the lovely cobblestone
Kings Beach Plaza right on the beach, 10 a.m.- 5 p.m. 50 yards from the water
and have been running for more than 30 years. Tey feature the fnest quality
local artisans as well as artisans from all over the country. All of the work has
been created by each artist. Surrounding the fair there are many shops and
restaurants.
www.northtahoebusiness.org 530-546-2768

June 30
Squaw Valley Fine Arts & Crafts Festival — Kick of summer with the arts,
11 a.m.-5 p.m. Stroll through the Village at Squaw Valley on Saturday and
Sunday and peruse the incredible paintings, photographs, ceramics, jewelry
and other fne arts presented by California’s fnest professional artists. Tere
will also be live music and the Village’s shops and restaurants open. Brought
to you by www.pacifcfnearts.com and www.squaw.com

JULY
Northstar California summer biking — In addition to the return of North-
star’s cross-country and downhill race series events, the summer season is
already flling up with a variety of amateur, professional and signature bik-
ing events, including: Gene Hamilton BetterRide Downhill Mountain Bike
Camps, June 29-July 1 and Aug. 10-12; Tahoe Trail 100k (qualifying event for
the Leadville 100) July 20-22; Pro Gravity Tour, Aug. 3-5; Tara Llanes Classic,
Sept. 28-30.
www.NorthstarCalifornia.com

July 3
Fireworks Show and Deck Party
Enjoy the sandy beaches of Kings Beach and watch the freworks show on
Lake Tahoe beginning at 6:30 p.m. Tis event is free and put on by the North
Tahoe Business Association for thousands of smiling faces. Make it an eve-
ning by purchasing tickets to NTBA’s Deck Party to enjoy premium seating,
food vendors, live music and a no host bar.
www.northtahoebusiness.org
530-546-9000.
July 4
Tahoe City Fourth of July Fireworks
Celebration — Join the north shore
community for the annual spectacular on
Commons Beach, downtown Tahoe City.
Go early to picnic, meet your neighbors
and claim your spot on the beach. Fire-
works start time is around
9:45 p.m.
www.visittahoecity.org
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 149 5/12/2012 1:41:29 PM
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Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 151 150 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
calendar North Shore & Truckee special events
July 4-7
Red, White and Tahoe Blue — Incline Village celebra-
tion over four days celebrating America’s freedom.
Lions pancake breakfast, Optimist Club carnival and
barbecue, USAF Air National Guard training mission,
patriotic chalk drawing contest for the kids, Tainted Love
80s cover band concert, a compelling tribute to veterans,
spectacular freworks display over Lake Tahoe and
much, much more.
www.redwhitetahoeblue.org
July 4
Tahoe Firecracker Trail Trek — Te second annual
5K Run/Walk & Kids Race, the Tahoe Firecracker Trail
Trek, to beneft the Incline High School Boys and Girls
Cross Country team. Te Race is held on July 4 as part
of the Red White and Tahoe Blue activities and includes
separate races for kids and adults; this event is perfect
for the entire family at Incline Middle School.
www.tahoefrecrackertrailtrek.com
July 4
Run to the Beach — 5K and 10K runs from the North
Tahoe Regional Park to beautiful Kings Beach.
www.TahoeTrailRunning.com

July 4
Firecracker Mile — Event starts 10 a.m. by US Bank
and fnishes by the train station in Truckee, 1-mile gravi-
ty fed fun event for all ages and abilities. Run through the
crowds waiting for the parade. Fundraiser for Auburn
Ski Club Nordic programs.
www.truckeefunrun.com
July 4
Truckee 4th of July Parade — Donner Pass Road,
10 a.m. Old-fashioned hometown parade ending up in
historic downtown Truckee.
530-587-2757. www.truckee.com

July 4
Truckee 4th of July Fireworks — Donner Lake, West
End Beach. Dusk. www.tdrpd.com
530-582-7720

July 5
Village at Squaw Valley
Free Outdoor Summer Movie
Kung Fu Panda, 8:30-10 p.m. Starting July 5, families and
friends can snuggle up under the stars while enjoying
new releases and family classics on the big screen in the
Events Plaza at Te Village at Squaw Valley. A diferent
movie shows every Tursday in July and August. All
movies start at 8:30 p.m. www.squaw.com
Don’t miss Lake Tahoe’s
biggest celebration!
6th Anniversary
June 30 - July 7, 2012
See the complete schedule
of daily events at the website:
www.RedWhiteTahoeBlue.org
Fun for the whole family!
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or call 775-298-1010
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 150 5/12/2012 1:41:30 PM
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 151 150 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
calendar North Shore & Truckee special events
Do You and Your Luxury Home Deserve Special Treatment?
PREVIEW OF SERVICES
• Professional Brochure
• Professional Photography
• Direct Mail Marketing
• Professional Virtual Tour
• Staging Consultation
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• Targeted National &
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• Enhanced Placements on
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SELECT FINE
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Search tahoedine.com by:
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tahoe dine member today.

July 7,
Truckee Tahoe Air Fair and Family Festival — Free entry and parking,
7 a.m.-4 p.m. Featuring on the ground static aircraft displays, pilot docents,
aircraft fly bys, hot air balloons (weather permitting), free flights for children,
live music, kids activities and festival, food court, beer garden, airport sou-
venirs, vendors and much more family fun. Truckee Tahoe Airport, 10356
Airport Road, Truckee. For information contact Air Fair Chair Tim LoDolce
at 530-386-3100 or flyingtiger05@yahoo.com
www.truckeetahoeairfair.com 530-386-3100

July 7
Red, White & Tahoe Blue Events — Flag raising, North Lake Tahoe Fire
Protection District pancake breakfast, kid’s bike parade, community parade,
community fair, Doggie Dress Up contest, ice cream social, veteran’s lunch
and ceremony, rubber duck races, flag retirement, concert.
www.redwhitetahoeblue.org
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 151 5/12/2012 1:41:31 PM
Goldfsh Properties at Lake Tahoe is
a full-service property management
company in Incline Village, NV since
2003 specializing in vacation rentals
and long term leases. We are pleased
to announce that we have just ex-
panded our prominent services across
North Lake Tahoe and the greater
Truckee area to better serve you.
We do one thing and one thing only:
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GoldfshProperties.com | 1-800-948-7311 | info@goldfshproperties.com
920 Incline Way, Suite A, Incline Village, NV | 10056 Spring Street, Truckee, CA
Now Serving All of North Lake Tahoe and Truckee!
calendar North Shore & Truckee special events
Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine 153 152 Summer 2012 TAHOE magazine
July 7
Soaring Kites and Music Festival at Squaw
Valley — High Camp located above Lake Tahoe
at 8200’ at the top of the Cable Car, ofers one of
the most spectacular and unique kite flying loca-
tions in the world. Watch high flying kites perform
stunts in a stunning alpine setting. Squaw Valley
is proud to be hosting the 11th year of this special
event featuring kite flying demonstrations, kids’
kite building seminars, and general kite mania,
featuring great live music at High Camp.
www.squaw.com

July 8
Truckee Running Festival — Try a 5K or 10K
along the Legacy Trail or a 1/2 marathon featur-
ing beautiful and scenic trails of Waddle Ranch.
www.TahoeTrailRunning.com

July 10
Tahoe City Downtown Association’s — Sec-
ond Annual Farm to Table Dinner — A TCDA
signature event, the Farm to Table Dinner will be
held lakeside at Commons Beach in downtown
Tahoe City. Guests will be treated to passed
hors d’oeuvres, a four-course menu prepared by
Douglas Dale (Wolfdale’s), Scott Yorkie (Jake’s),
Elsa Corrigan (Mamasake) and Lee Kresy (Sun-
nyside), with desserts by Allison Sayles (Sugar
Pine Cakery). Wine from Foothill
wineries will be served and live music
by George Souza will round out this
elegant evening.
www.visittahoecity.com

July 13-Aug. 26
Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival
Presents — Te Two Gentlemen of
Verona, Sand Harbor
Shakespeare’s Te Two Gentlemen
of Verona is sure to enchant the
entire family at Sand Harbor. Bosom
buddies Valentine and Proteus are
Verona’s closest comrades, but their
friendship is put to the ultimate test
when Proteus forsakes his beloved Julia and com-
petes for the afections of Valentine’s newfound
love, the strong-willed Silvia.
www.laketahoeshakespeare.com
July 14
Art, Wine, & Music Festival at Squaw Valley
— Squaw Valley’s base Village will burst with
color, taste, and sound as fne artists, craft makers,
performers and musicians come to participate in
this fun, two-day annual event,
11 a.m.-5 p.m. Te event fea-
tures two performance stages,
restaurants and shops, and a
cobblestone-village lined with
fne art booths and exhibits.
Wine tasting 2-5 p.m., $25 per
person per day.
www.squaw.com
July 14-15
Fifth annual Relay for Life
of Truckee-Tahoe — At Relay,
teams of people camp out at
the site and take turns walking
or running around the track. Each team is asked
to have a representative on the track at all times
during the event. Because cancer never sleeps,
Relays are overnight events up to 24 hours.
Truckee High School practice feld parallel to
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 152 5/12/2012 1:41:34 PM
Summer2012 TAHOE magazine153 152 Summer2012 TAHOE magazine
Traditional Swiss Lakewood
Favorites and New Summer Fare
Continental Cuisine
On the West Shore of Lake Tahoe
Private Parties, Banquets and Weddings
Open Nightly from 5:30 p.m. • Closed Mondays
5055 West Lake Blvd. • Homewood, CA
530-525-5211 • Call for reservations
All In-Stock Furniture,
Lamps & Accessories
Floor Sample Sale
20% Off
Full Service
Design Center
Free In-Home
Consultation
SHOP LOCAL
FREE DELIVERY
20% Off
Free Measure & Installation
VILLAGE CENTER • 797 Southwood • INCLINE VILLAGE, NV
Open Mon-Fri 10-5 uSat. 10-2
775 7812204
Donner Pass Road. Opening ceremonies will begin at 9 a.m. on Saturday and
closing ceremonies will be at 9 a.m. on Sunday. A fundraiser for the Ameri-
can Cancer Society to fund cancer research, patient support, and cancer
education for the community at large.
www.relayforlife.org/truckeeca
530-277-3639

July 14
5th annual Beerfest & Bluegrass Festival — For the ffth consecutive
year, the Beerfest & Bluegrass Festival returns to Northstar California, 3-7:30
p.m. in the Village at Northstar featuring live music from the nation’s top
bluegrass bands, more than 30 local and regional breweries on tap, special
children’s treats and activities, and so much more!
www.northstarattahoe.com

July 15-19
Youth Backcountry Camp — Tahoe Rim Trail Association, Sierra Nevada
Journeys and Tahoe Institute for Natural Science 5-day backpacking trip for
ages 14-17.
www.tahoerimtrail.org

July 20-22
Beth Weber Arts & Crafts Fair
Te fairs are on the lovely cobblestone Kings Beach Plaza right on the beach,
10 a.m.-5 p.m., 50 yards from Lake Tahoe and have been running for more
than 30 years. Tey feature the fnest quality local artisans as well as artisans
from all over the country. All of the work has been created by each artist. Sur-
rounding the fair there are many shops and restaurants.
www.northtahoebusiness.org
530-546-2768
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 153 5/12/2012 1:45:36 PM
• July 3 Fireworks &
Deck Party
• Run to the Beach
• Arts & Crafts Shows
• Paddleboard
Festival & Races
• Wooden Boat Show
• Passport To Dining
530.546.9000 • NorthTahoeBusiness.org
FRIDAYS
July & August
FREE
Abundant Beaches, Plentiful
Lake Access and Fun Events
Win a Tahoe Bay to Bay Getaway!
facebook.com/TahoeBaytoBay
calendar
Summer2012 TAHOE magazine155 154 Summer2012 TAHOE magazine
July 22
Lake Tahoe 100K Mountain Bike Race
A 33-mile lap course that starts and fnishes at Northstar Resort. Tis event is
part of the Leadville Qualifying Series.
www.BigBlueAdventure.com
July 26-29
Wanderlust — Wanderlust is a one-
of-a-kind festival bringing together the
world’s best yoga and wellness teachers
and top musical acts and DJs, all in a
setting of breathtaking natural beauty.
We’re talking about fun in the sun and
dancing under the stars. Getting’ your
down dog on at the top of the moun-
tain and sipping poolside cocktails
with your crew. Early morning medi-
tations and all-night chakra spinning
musical performances.
www.wanderlustfestival.com
July 27-28
Relay for Life — Te annual com-
munity fundraiser for cancer returns
to Preston feld. Pets are again
welcome at the event.
775-842-7952, 775-828-2210
July 28
Living History Day — Sugar Pine Point State Park, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. All events
free, parking $10.
www.laketahoelivinghistory.com 530-583-3074.
July 29-31
Youth Backcountry Camp — Tahoe Rim Trail Association, Sierra Nevada
Journeys and Tahoe Institute for Natural Science fve-day backpacking trip
for ages 14-17.
www.tahoerimtrail.org
July 31
Adventure Risk Challenge (ARC) — Presents Voices of Youth. ARC invites
you to celebrate a group of extraordinary teens who share their insights
on self, family and community. Experience the “voices of youth” as they
embrace and explore their 40-day wilderness experiences and share their
transformational essays and poems. “Voices of Youth” is ARC’s ninth annual
public poetry reading, a proven evening of inspiration in support of youth.
Cedar House Sports Hotel, 10918 Brockway Road, Truckee, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
AUGUST
Aug. 3-5
Hot Tahoe Cruisin’ Car Show — Te event is open all years and makes of
cars, trucks and motorcycles. Tere will be a barbecue on Saturday, Aug. 4th
from 11am-2pm with hamburgers, hot dogs, soda, water and draft beers. Te
event sponsors the Good Samaritan Safe Ride.
Tahoe Biltmore parking lot
www.goodsamsaferide.com
530-541-7300
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 154 5/12/2012 1:45:39 PM
calendar
Summer2012 TAHOE magazine155 154 Summer2012 TAHOE magazine
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DELI • PIZZA • CONVENIENT STORE •
SIT DOWN DINING • BAR
In One Location
Gourmet
Deli
Pizza
Full Bar
“Voted North Tahoe’s Best Restaurant”
Open nightly for dinner at 5. Happy Hour nightly until 6.
Outdoor Dining & Live Acoustic Music
Fine dining, comfort and camaraderie
10142 Rue Hilltop, Truckee, CA.
www.cottonwoodrestaurant.com
(530) 587-5711
Aug. 3
Lake Tahoe SummerFest Opening Orchestra Concert — Dvorak:
Serenade Opus 22; Dvorak: Romance Opus 11: Jaime Laredo, soloist.
Bragato: Tango: Sharon Robinson, soloist; Vivaldi: Concerto for Violin and
Cello RV487: Jaime Laredo, Sharon Robinson, soloists; Schubert: Symphony #5.
Sierra Nevada College, Incline Village, Nev. www.tahoesummerfest.org
775-298-0245

Aug. 4
32nd Annual Squaw Mountain Run — For the past 31 years, on the frst
Saturday of August, hundreds runners and hikers have made the annual
pilgrimage to the top of Squaw Valley to enjoy a great workout with stunning
views of Lake Tahoe and the Sierra. Starting at the base of Squaw Valley USA
(6,200’) the course climbs the 3.6 mile Mountain Run to High Camp (8200’)
where awards, rafe, music, light refreshments and beer are provided. Par-
ticipants can choose to run or take a more leisurely pace and hike or Nordic
walk (hike with poles). For the less energetic – let the cable car do the 2,000-
foot elevation gain and join knowledgeable guides for the beautiful fower
walk on easy rolling terrain. Fundraiser for Auburn Ski Club, and 20 percent
is donated to Te Tahoe Forest Health System Foundation.
www.squawmountainrun.com
Aug. 4
Lake Tahoe 24 and 26 Hour Adventure Race
An amazing adventure race up and down Tahoe’s rugged terrain featuring
kayaking, orienteering, trekking and biking.
www.BigBlueAdventure.com

Aug. 5
Martis Camp Home Tour — Benefting Tahoe Truckee Excellence in Edu-
cation Foundation. Spend the day exploring remarkable custom homes at
Martis Camp and help raise money to beneft local schools during the Excel-
lence in Education Home Tour, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Excellence in Education has
partnered with Martis Camp and the Tahoe Sierra Board of Realtors for this
event that showcases a group of distinct homes. Discover many of the latest
trends and creative ideas in luxury home building as envisioned by several of
the region’s premiere architects, builders, designers and landscapers. Tickets
for the tour are $40 in advance, $45 day of event. Please note, the fnal tour
departs at 2 p.m.
www.ExinEd.org, 530-550-7984

Aug. 5
Lake Tahoe SummerFest family concert
Tchaikovsky: Serenade for Strings; Mozart: Symphony #39 K543; Beethoven:
Concerto for Violin, Violoncello and Piano: Jaime Laredo, Sharon Robinson,
Joseph Kalichstein, soloists.
Sierra Nevada College, Incline Village, Nev.
www.tahoesummerfest.org , 775-298-0245

Aug. 10-11
Concours d’Elegance — Te Lake Tahoe Concours d’Elegance Wooden
Boat Show, founded by members of the Tahoe Yacht Club in 1972 and host-
ed by the Club’s Foundation since 1994, is regarded nationally as a premier
event for maritime enthusiasts. Heading into its 40th year, the Founda¬tion
has selected Riva Aquarama, celebrating its 50th anniversary, as the 2012
featured Marque Class.
www.LakeTahoeConcours.com, 775-851-4444

Aug. 10
Lake Tahoe SummerFest orchestra concert
“All About Beethoven” Beethoven: Overture to Te Creatures of Prometheus;
Beethoven: Concerto #4 for Piano: Joseph Kalichstein, soloist; Beethoven:
Symphony #3 Opus 55 “Eroica”
Sierra Nevada College, Incline Village, Nev.
www.tahoesummerfest.org , 775-298-0245
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 155 5/12/2012 1:45:40 PM
calendar North Shore & Truckee special events

Aug. 11-12
2012 Quiksilver TA-HOE NALU Paddle Festi-
val — “Come Paddle the Big Blue” in Kings Beach
State Park. All ages and skill levels elite race with
$10,000 purse. Check new lower e-ticket prices
at www.tahoenalu.com . Race free 12 and under
free, beginner instructions, live concert on the
beach, Friday, Aug. 10, 6-9 p.m. Registration and
reception party on the beach.
Aug. 11-12
Te Village at Squaw Valley Brews, Jazz &
Funk Fest — With a
great selection of beer
for guests to sample
and an incredible
line-up of music both
days, the Brews, Jazz
& Funk Fest is your
chance to make
some great summer
memories, 2-8 p.m.,
$5 entry donation,
$4 beers. Entry and
beer sales beneft
the Humane Society
Truckee-Tahoe.
www.squaw.com

Aug. 11-12
Heritage Trail
Eighteen participating museums from Roseville
to Tahoe will showcase history in a fun and
entertaining way. Admission is free to all visitors.
Placer County, which crosses the majestic Sierra
Nevada was home to a thriving Native American
culture, the California Gold Rush, the construc-
tion of the Transcontinental Railroad, and an
agricultural paradise, which shipped high quality
fruit around the world.
theheritagetrail.blogspot.com
530-889-6500

Aug. 12
Northstar Mountain Run
A classic 10.2K run starting
at the Village At Northstar
and fnishing at the top of
Mt. Pluto.
www.TahoeTrailRunning.
com

Aug. 17
Lake Tahoe SummerFest
orchestra concert
“Summer in Italy”
Rossini: Overture to
L’Italiana in Algieri: Kate Lindsay, soloist; Rossini:
Una voce poco fa (from Il Barbieri di Siviglia):
Kate Lindsay, soloist; Rossini: In si barbera (from
Semiramide): Kate Lindsay, soloist; Vivaldi:
L’estate (Summer) from La Quattro Stagione:
Laura Hamilton, soloist; Mendelssohn: Sympho-
ny #4 (Italian)
Sierra Nevada College, Incline Village, Nev.
www.tahoesummerfest.org
775-298-0245

Aug. 17
Zepparella
All female Led Zeppelin tribute band, 7th annual
appearance at the River Ranch summer outdoor
concert series. River Ranch Lodge and Restau-
rant, 9 p.m., Highway 89 at Alpine Meadows
Road, 21 and over.
www.riverranchlodge.com

Aug. 18
Lake Tahoe Open Water Swim
A half mile, 1.2 mile, 2.4 mile and 10K course
set up just off the beach of the scenic Ehrman
Mansion on Lake Tahoe’s West Shore, Ed’ZBerg
Sugar Pine State Park. A celebration of the natural
environment.
www.LakeTahoeOpenWaterSwimming.com
www.lamberthconstruction.com I 530-583-4350 CA I 775-830-4350 NV
LAMBERTH CONSTRUCTION
C O R P O R A T I O N
NV Lic. 041947
Unique rather than Uniform for over 20 years ...
CA Lic. 643558
Summer2012 TAHOE magazine157 156 Summer2012 TAHOE magazine
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 156 5/12/2012 1:45:42 PM
Summer2012 TAHOE magazine157 156 Summer2012 TAHOE magazine
“The Best Tasting, Most Authentic Mexican Food on the North Shore.”
Open 7 Days a Week
For Take-Out Call: (530) 546-0310
Custom Cut Meats
including Carne Asada
Fresh Produce
Mexican Pastries & Churros
Mexican Soft Drinks
Beer & Liquor
Groceries & Ice






Tacos
Burritos – try our
famous Wet Burritos!
Breakfast Burritos
Tortas
Chimichangas





Enchiladas
Quesadillas
Tamales
Tostadas
Nachos
Chile Rellenos
Vegetarian Dishes







8515 Brook Ave. • Kings Beach, CA • Behind Taco Bell & Plumas Bank • Across from the Kings Beach State Recreation Center
FREE
MEXICAN TACO
One Free Mexican Taco. No purchase necessary.
Original coupons only. One coupon per party per day.
Management reserves right to rescind ofer at any time.
Exp 12/1/2012
Aug. 18
Fourth annual Summer Sunset Pool Party
Children of all ages can enjoy a bounce house,
double Slip n’ Slide, Screamer Extreme water
slide, corkscrew water slide and a baseball bat-
ting sports cage noon-4 p.m. For adults 21 and
over, enjoy the adults-only pool party, 10 a.m.-8
p.m. Also listen to a DJ and enjoy barbecue food,
noon-4 p.m. to round out the day.
Tahoe Biltmore parking lot
kfreeto@tahoebiltmore.com
800-245-8667
Aug. 19
Wine on the
Water
Lone Eagle Grille
and the Hyatt Re-
gency Lake Tahoe
Resort, Spa and
Casino announce
the third annual
Wine on the Water
charity event; a
food and wine
festival on the shores
of Lake Tahoe. Featuring more than 25 celebrated
wineries and more than a dozen local restaurants,
the annual event will include exclusive tastings of
some of the region’s best food and wine, live mu-
sic and a noteworthy silent auction. Cost $65 in
advance, $75 at the door, 1-5 p.m. Hyatt Regency
Lake Tahoe Resort, Spa and Casino.
www.Tahoe.ActivityTickets.com
Aug. 19
Lake Tahoe SummerFest family concert
Mozart: Overture to Le Nozze di Figaro; Mozart:
Voi che sapete (from Le Nozze di Figaro): Kate
Lindsay, soloist; Mozart: Non so piu cosa son
(from Le Nozze di Figaro): Kate Lindsay, soloist;
Mozart: Eine Kleine Nachtmusik; Mozart: Sym-
phony #40 in G minor.
Sierra Nevada College, Incline Village, Nev.
www.tahoesummerfest.org
775-298-0245

Aug. 19
Lake Tahoe Duathlon
A 3-mile run, 24-mile bike, and 6.9-mile run on
Lake Tahoe’s West Shore.
www.LakeTahoeTri.com

Aug. 19
Lake Tahoe Triathlon
A sprint and Olympic distance triathlon along
Lake Tahoe’s West Shore.
www.LakeTahoeTri.com

Aug. 23-26
National Summer Biathlon Championships
Te Auburn Ski Club will host the 2012 USBA
Summer Biathlon National Championships
at Donner Summit, the 25th annual summer
biathlon championships, which combines run-
ning and marksmanship. Similar to the Olympic
winter sport of Biathlon, summer contestants
run (rather than cross country ski) then shoot at
drop down targets. For each missed shot, an extra
150m penalty loop has to be completed before
heading out onto the course.
www.auburnskiclub.com
Aug. 25, 2012
Second Annual Truckee River Downhill
- Teams of 1-6 persons will paddle their own ca-
noe, kayak or raft 7 miles down the Truckee River
to beneft Disabled Sports USA and youth and
social programs sponsored by the Kiwanis Club
of North Lake Tahoe. Entry fee is $35 per person.
Outftter-provided rafts, infatable kayaks and
equipment will be available for rental. Trophies
will be awarded for various categories. Partici-
pants will put in at the Silver Creek campground
and takeout at the Granite Flats campground
with return transportation provided.
530-581-2441
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 157 5/12/2012 1:45:45 PM
calendar North Shore & Truckee special events
Summer2012 TAHOE magazine159 158 Summer2012 TAHOE magazine
The most
progessive
art gallery
on
Lake Tahoe
Vista Gallery & Framing Contemporary Art & Nostalgic Images
7081 North Lake Blvd. Tahoe Vista, CA 96148 | 530-546-7794 | Open Wed.-Sun. 10-5:30 www.vistagallery.com
www.facebook.com/Vista Gallery
Sand Harbor Sunset 1 by Tony Spiker
Aug. 25-26
Te Village at Squaw Valley Peaks & Paws
— Treat your dog to the best weekend featuring
live music and on-mountain fun, all benefting
the Truckee-Tahoe Humane Society. Enjoy art,
wine and beer tasting, pet friendly activities and
continuous live bluegrass/Americana music. Six-
teen wineries will be offering tastings the entire
weekend, cost is $25 ticket, per day, includes a
commemorative glass.
www.squaw.com
Aug. 25
XTERRA Lake Tahoe — One of the all-time
XTERRA courses. Two 750-meter swim laps with
a 50-meter beach run, 22-mile bike, and 6-mile
trail run.
www.BigBlueAdventure.com

Aug. 25
Flume Trail Off-Road Triathlon — Te sprint
version of the XTERRA Lake Tahoe.
www.BigBlueAdventure.com

Aug. 25
Family Fun Day at the Tahoe Maritime
Museum and TMM Birthday — Free event.
Bring the family in and learn all about water,
what foats, how streams fow, and more. Plan on
getting wet! Also celebrating the 25th birthday
of the Tahoe Maritime Museum, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Friends’ Mixer. Friends of the Museum join us a
lovely end of the summer get together. Fee.
www.tahoemaritime.org
530-525-9253
SEPTEMBER
Labor Day Weekend
Anniversary of Teaser’s Gold Cup Regatta was
for the International Trophy win. Celebrate the
racing history of this legendary boat and learn
more about her short, but amazing racing story.
Teaser will be on display in the museum’s parking
lot. Family activities will be held throughout the
museum. Tahoe Maritime Museum, 5205 W.
Lake Blvd., Homewood.
www.tahoemaritime.org
530-525-9253
Sept. 1
I-CAN RUN 2012
A collaborative event with the Incline After-
School Organization and the Incline High School
Athletic Program continues a long community
race tradition.
Incline High School
www.i-canrun.org
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 158 5/12/2012 1:45:46 PM
Summer2012 TAHOE magazine159 158 Summer2012 TAHOE magazine
Goldfish Twins...
Selling what we believe in.
Jamie Golden and Kristi Fisher are two of the fortunate few
who have had the privilege of growing up in beautiful Lake
Tahoe. They graduated from Incline High School, and then both
headed to San Diego State, where Jamie received a degree in
marketing and Kristi graduated with a degree in economics. They
joined their mother and father in the real estate business in 1992.
Both are now raising their families here and know first-hand the
benefits of living in Incline Village. As a team, they can help you
realize how lucky it is to be living in one of the most beautiful
places in the world.
Jamie Golden
(775) 843-9891
jamie@InclineVillageSales.com
Kristi Fisher
(775) 843-9892
kristi@InclineVillageSales.com
Sept. 7-9
27th Annual Lake Tahoe Autumn Food & Wine Festival
Te Village at Northstar
Enjoy three full days of cooking seminars and demonstrations, culinary
competitions, wine tastings, grape stomp, and more at the 27th annual Lake
Tahoe Autumn Food & Wine Festival in the Village at Northstar. Tickets to
the 2012 Autumn Food & Wine Festival will be on sale soon.
1-800-GO-NORTH

Sept. 9
Dog Day of Summer — Take your best friend (dog) to West End Beach for
a day of games and pictures. Take your dog out for a paddle or a picture on
the life guard stand. Dogs free with paid companion. West End Beach, Don-
ner Lake, Truckee.
www.tdrpd.com 530-582-7720

Sept. 15
Tahoe Big Blue Adventure Race — Lake Tahoe’s original adventure race.
Featuring kayaking, mountain biking, orienteering and running.
www.BigBlueAdventure.com

Sept. 16
Emerald Bay Trail Run — A 7.5 mile course starting at Eagle Point and
routing around Emerald Bay, up the Rubicon Trail to D.L. Bliss State Park
and fnishing at Lester Beach.
www.TahoeTrailRunning.com

Sept. 24
Alpen Wine Fest — Wine tasting, live music, silent auction and raf e, 2-5
p.m. for a beneft wine tasting, $40 includes a commemorative wine glass
and tasting from more than 40 vineyards. Also peruse the huge silent auc-
tion and raf e, and enjoy free live music all to beneft Can Do MS, a founda-
tion providing wellness and education for people with multiple sclerosis.
Squaw Valley. www.squaw.com
Sept. 28- Sept. 30
Tahoe Biltmore’s Run for the North Shore Fall Colors - Car and Mo-
torcycle Show located in the Tahoe Biltmore’s front parking lot. Te event is
open to all years and makes of cars, trucks and motorcycles. Come out and
see the cars and motorcycles on display. Tere will be a barbecue on Satur-
day, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. with hamburgers, hot dogs, soda, water and draft beers.
Enter your car or motorcycle.
Tahoe Biltmore Parking Lot
www.goodsamsaferide.com
530-541-7300
OCTOBER

Oct. 13-14
Explore the Paths of History
Oct. 13 and 14 celebrates Truckee’s
rich history with a weekend of
hikes. Reservations are required.
Guided hike, hamburger lunch and
afternoon Chautauqua with David
Fenimore portraying Captain John
Sutter. Special lodging packages are
available.
www.truckee.com
866-443-2027
530-587-2757

TBD
Squaw Valley Oktoberfest
Traditional Bavarian music and folk dancers, beneft beer garden, brats,
kraut and games, 2-6 p.m. All entertainment at the event is free. Proceeds
beneft the Tahoe Truckee Lacrosse Association. ▲
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 159 5/12/2012 1:45:47 PM
Accommodation Station ..............................................135
Acker RV Rentals ...........................................................105
Action Water Sports of Incline Village ........................120
Action Watersports ...........................................................5
Adrift Tahoe...................................................................124
Altitude Salon & Spa .......................................................73
Alpine Mini Storage ......................................................122
Aramark Cruises/Tahoe Queen & M.S. Dixie ...............83
Ann Nichols & Co. ........................................................147
Austin’s Restaurant ......................................................147
Avalon Lodge ................................................................136
Backstreet Framers ......................................................149
Bar Bar Bar Pizza ..........................................................115
Barifot/Baricolor ............................................................56
Barton - Tahoe Center for Orthopedics .......................71
Beacon Restaurant .........................................................65
Blue Coyote Bar & Grill ..................................................76
Bite ................................................................................144
Big Blue Adventures .....................................................144
Bluestone ..................................................................37, 57
Bowl Incline ..................................................................149
Brothers Bar ....................................................................75
Buckingham Properties .................................................13
Burger Me! .......................................................................61
Camp Richardson ......................................................5, 65
Cedar House Sport Hotel ..............................................51
Century 21 At Tahoe Paradise .......................................13
Century 21 McGregor Realty .......................................115
Chamber’s Landing ........................................................49
Chapel Of the Bells ........................................................22
Chase International North Shore Ofces......(North) 163
Chase International Zephyr Cove.................(South) 163
China Wok ....................................................................149
Char -Pit .......................................................................149
Coldwell Banker Incline Village Realty .................10, 151
Chart House, Te .............................................................6
Churchhill Vineyards .....................................................69
Cobblestone Center .................................................36, 37
Coldwell Banker Rentals (McKinney) .......................136
Cottonwood Restaurant ...............................................155
Coyote Moon Golf Course ...........................................103
Crosby’s ..........................................................................61
DA Photography ...........................................................140
Dead Sea Warehouse....................................................115
Decorating Den ..............................................................86
Dickson Realty Truckee .................................(North) 164
Dimaggio’s at the Lake .................................................155
Dockside Wine Bar & Grill .............................................47
Double Dog Deli .............................................................47
Dress the Part(y) ...........................................................115
Edgewood Tahoe ...................................... 67 (South) 164
E-Learning Cafe ...........................................................148
Elk Grove Subaru ............................................................41
Events Ink ........................................................................25
Factory Stores ..................................................................35
Fiberglass Specilaties .....................................................47
Fire Sign Cafe .................................................................49
Flight Deck Restaurant & Bar.........................................66
Fredlund, Bob ...............................................................138
Fresh Ketch Restaurant ..................................................65
Getaway Cafe .................................................. 67, 118, 134
Gateway Urgent Care ....................................................111
Geared for Games ..........................................................57
Glow .................................................................................22
Goldfsh Properties.......................................................159
Goldfsh Property Mgmt. & Vacation Rentals .............152
Granlibakken .................................................................48
Gravity Shop .............................................................36,106
Hartnett, Marynell ..........................................................48
Harrah’s & Harvey’s Lake Tahoe ......................................7
Heavenly Resort ................................................................4
High Sierra Gardens .......................................................24
Horizon Casino Resort ...................................................78
Hunan Garden ................................................................79
Incline At Tahoe Realty ..................................................79
Incline Boat Storage & Marine .....................................121
Incline Builders.............................................................115
Incline Car Wash.............................................................40
Incline Vacation Rentals ..............................................129
Incline Spirits & Cigars ................................................147
IRIE Rafting Company ....................................................54
IVGID Diamond Peak ..................................................162
IVGID Recreation center ..............................................105
IVGID Utilities ..............................................................106
James Harold Galleries .................................................145
Jason’s Landing ...............................................................59
Jenay Aiksnoras ..............................................................28
Jeunesse Fine Clothing ..................................................35
Kalifornia Jean Bar ..........................................................37
Kings Beach Car Wash ...................................................40
Kirkwood Mountain Resort ...........................................99
Dr. Karen Kucharski .......................................................28
Kunst Wood Furniture ....................................................37
La Mexicana ..................................................................159
Lake of the Sky Outftters .............................................107
Lake Tahoe Cigar Company ...........................................76
Lake Tahoe Hot Air Balloons ......................................123
Lake Tahoe Holidays Gift Store ...................................129
Lake Tahoe Lockshop .....................................................34
Lake Tahoe School .........................................................87
Lake Tahoe Speciality Stove & Fireplace .....................109
Lake Tahoe Watersports .................................................53
Lake Tahoe Wedding & Honeymoon Assoc. ................23
Lake Valley Properties ..................................................135
Lakeshore Realty Associates ..........................................11
Lakeside Eyes ..................................................................36
Lakeside Inn & Casino ...................................................82
Lakeside Pizza ..............................................................153
Lamberth Construction ...............................................156
Lampe Real Estate ..........................................................71
Land Rover ......................................................................55
Lather & Fizz .............................................................25, 36
Te Law Ofce of Adam Spicer ......................................59
Log Furniture .................................................................30
Lupita’s Mexican Restaurant........................................115
MacDuf’s Pub .............................................................131
Mayas Mexican Grill ....................................................129
Mountain Hardware .......................................................70
Mountain Postal Pack & Ship ......................................133
McKinney & Associates .................................. 77, 133, 136
Mountain Home Center ................................... (North) 2
Montbleu Resort Casino & Spa .........................(South) 2
Montbleu - Opal Ultra Lounge .....................................81
NaturaMed ......................................................................27
New & Used Tahoe Sports ..............................................37
North Lake Tahoe Historical Society .............................57
North Lake Tahoe Airport Express ................................39
North Lake Tahoe Water Shuttle ...................................39
North Tahoe Business Association ..............................154
North Tahoe Water Sports ..............................................53
Northstar-at-Tahoe ...........................................................3
Obexer’s General Store ..................................................49
Overland Meat, Seafood & Deli .................................139
Pablo’s Framing ..............................................................36
Pacifc Fine Arts ............................................................143
Paco’s Truckee River Bicycle .......................................107
Parasol Tahoe Community Foundation .......................45
Paradise Timeshare Resale Inc. .......................................9
Passaretti’s Italian Restaurant ........................................66
Pawfection Pet Salon ......................................................40
Pete N Peters Sports Bar .................................................57
Pilates Tahoe ................................................................137
Postal Express ...............................................................115
Ready 2 Heal ...................................................................30
Red, White & Tahoe Blue Inc. ......................................150
Rookie’s ...........................................................................62
Royal Forever Clothing .............................................12, 36
Rufes & Rufnecks ...................................................37, 57
Sam’s Place ......................................................................73
Scusa! Italian Ristorante .................................................63
Sidestreet Boutique .....................................................119
Sierra Aero ....................................................................150
Sierra Mountain sports ..................................................50
Sierra State Parks Foundation .......................................48
Sierra Verde Group ......................................................153
Ski Run Boat Co. .............................................................44
Sowing Basil ..................................................................150
Sport Haus .......................................................................90
Suddenlink Communications .......................................77
Svadhaya Yoga ................................................................28
Swiss Lakewood Restaurant ........................................153
Sugar Pine Gifts (formerly Lauren’s Garden) ..............35
South Shore Bikes .........................................................106
Soar Truckee .................................................................110
Sorensen’s Resort .........................................................117
Soule Domain ..............................................................129
Sul Lago Italian Restaurant ............................................74
T’s Mesquite Rotisserie ................................................148
Taco Bell .........................................................................45
Tahoe Adventure Company ...........................................54
Tahoe Bike & Ski .............................................................28
Tahoe Bleu Wave Cruises .............................................161
Tahoe City Downtown Assoc .........................................56
Tahoe City Boat Rentals .................................................47
Tahoe City Marina ..........................................................47
Tahoe Deliver ................................................................151
Tahoe Donner Association ............................................19
Tahoe Forest Hospital ......................................................6
Tahoe Keys Marina ........................................................43
Tahoe Marine Supply.com .............................................47
Tahoe Maritime Museum ..............................................49
Tahoe Mountain Brewery ..............................................37
Tahoe Rental Connection ...........................................127
Tahoe Paradise Golf Course .........................................103
Tahoe Sailing Charters ...................................................47
Tahoe Sport Fishing ........................................................50
TahoeWakeboarding.com ..............................................47
Tahoe Youth Ballet ..........................................................36
Tahoma Lodge ...............................................................48
Te Store .........................................................................57
Te Treehouse ................................................................35
Te Studio Lake Tahoe ...................................................22
Tunderbird Lodge ........................................................10
Tomaato’s Pizza, Pasta, Salads .......................................79
Trex Products ................................................................143
Uncorked Tahoe City ......................................................36
Village Center (Incline Village) ...................................115
Village Center (South Lake Tahoe) ................................29
Village Market ...............................................................115
Dr. Charles Virden ..........................................................17
Virginia City Convention & Tourism ............................89
Vista Gallery & Framing ...............................................158
WaterCop/DynaQuip Controls .....................................44
West Shore Association ............................................48, 49
West Shore Sports ..........................................................49
Wild Alaskan ...................................................................69
Zephyr Point Presbyterian Conference Center .........134
Advertisers Directory
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 160 5/12/2012 1:45:48 PM
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 161 5/12/2012 1:45:48 PM
Incline Village 775 831 7300
917 Tahoe Boulevard, Suite 100
/ChaseInternational @ChaseRealEstate
Local
Expertise
International
Exposure
Extraordinary
Results
K A R E N
BRUNO
775
232 4109
T RACY
COHN
775
443 6488
J A N E
RUBSAMEN
775
843 0312
T R A C Y
SAUNDERS
775
772 1630
D A N
SCHWARTZ
775
832 4626
K E R R Y
DONOVAN
775
750 2190
M E G A N
WARREN
775
303 2672
E D E E
CAMPBELL
775
232 5262
CHARLENE
MEENAN
775
450 1249
D E B B I E
HANSEN
775
772 2743
D O N N A
TONKING
775
722 6726
K U R T
CARLSTEDT
775
690 4935
T E R R Y
H U N T
COSTACOS
775
848 3346
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 162 5/12/2012 1:45:50 PM
Incline Village 775 831 7300
917 Tahoe Boulevard, Suite 100
/ChaseInternational @ChaseRealEstate
Local
Expertise
International
Exposure
Extraordinary
Results
K A R E N
BRUNO
775
232 4109
T RACY
COHN
775
443 6488
J A N E
RUBSAMEN
775
843 0312
T R A C Y
SAUNDERS
775
772 1630
D A N
SCHWARTZ
775
832 4626
K E R R Y
DONOVAN
775
750 2190
M E G A N
WARREN
775
303 2672
E D E E
CAMPBELL
775
232 5262
CHARLENE
MEENAN
775
450 1249
D E B B I E
HANSEN
775
772 2743
D O N N A
TONKING
775
722 6726
K U R T
CARLSTEDT
775
690 4935
T E R R Y
H U N T
COSTACOS
775
848 3346
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 163 5/11/2012 11:53:07 AM
Zephyr Cove 775 588 6130
190 Highway 50
South Lake Tahoe 530 544 2121
989 Tahoe Keys Boulevard
/ChaseInternational @ChaseRealEstate
Two
States
P A M
LUSBY
775
843 9688
One Great
Company
MONI CA
PORTER
530
400 4484
A D E L E
LUCAS
530
545 0888
J I M
WIRE
530
314 9008
B R E N T
JOHNSON
530
416 2625
MARGE
HAUGE
775
720 5153
SHEI L A
EDNER
530
545 0392
S C O T T
PEARCE
530
318 1030
RYON
GRAY
530
318 9274
J ENNI FER
FORTUNE
530
318 9286
A N J A
BUCHHOLZ
530
318 4179
BROOKE
HERNANDEZ
530
314 9766
S T A R
BROOKS
530
318 5818
D O U G
ROSNER
530
314 9221
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 167 5/11/2012 11:50:08 AM
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 164 5/11/2012 11:59:26 AM
TahoeSumr12_working 5-1.indd 168 5/11/2012 11:49:16 AM

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