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Published by Babita Krishnan
Design Matrix looks at and presents design and its source from a different perspective. It is about getting to know architects and designers a little better and make them more kenspeckle. The magazine aims to get to know these beautiful people, their creative genius and their creations much better.
Design Matrix looks at and presents design and its source from a different perspective. It is about getting to know architects and designers a little better and make them more kenspeckle. The magazine aims to get to know these beautiful people, their creative genius and their creations much better.

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JULY-AUGUST 2011 • DESIGN MATRIX 1

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PEOPLE • LI FEST YLE • DESI GN • I NT ERI ORS
March - April 2012
VOL. 2 • ISSUE 3 • `100
A presentation
JULIA
LUNDSTEN
SWATI
MEHROTRA
EDWIN
PI NTO
DESIGNS FOR
HAPPY FEET...
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 1 2/29/2012 3:56:05 PM
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 2 2/29/2012 3:56:24 PM
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 1 2/29/2012 3:56:27 PM
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 2 2/29/2012 3:56:34 PM
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 3 2/29/2012 3:56:40 PM
4 DESIGN MATRIX • JULY-AUGUST 2011

Publisher : Karan Jhunjhunwala

Managing Director : Manohar Jhunjhunwala

Editor-In-Chief : Babita Krishnan

babitakrishnan@designmatrix.co


EDITORIAL

Deputy Editor : Natasha Bohra

natashabohra@designmatrix.co

Asst. Editor CP : Priyanka Mathur

Brand & Strategy Manager : Riddhi Walia

Finance Controller : Manjari Ved

Head-Administration : Maria Fernandes


BUSINESS ENQUIRY

WEST : Sonali Parsekar

mumbai@designmatrix.co

EAST : Vishal Shroff

kolkata@designmatrix.co

NORTH : Ashok Bajaj

delhi@designmatrix.co

SOUTH : Abhishek P. Agrawal

blr@designmatrix.co

Nallari Rupana Reddy

hyd@designmatrix.co

T. Jayakrishnan

cochin@designmatrix.co


OVERSEAS ENQUIRY

UAE : Prem Mishra

dubai@designmatrix.co

USA : Kishore Dadlaney

usa@designmatrix.co

UK : Jayendra Ved

uk@designmatrix.co

Subscription : Shalini Sawant

subscription@designmatrix.co

ART

Art Director : Rahul Das

Designing : Brijesh Gajjar, Chittaranjan Modhave

Digital Imaging : Rohit Nayak

Production : Harish Suvarna, Mangesh Salvi,

Sandeep Borkar
PROJECT MANAGEMENT TEAM

Project Manager : Vishwanath Shanbhag

vishwanath@paprikamedia.com

Chief Operating Offi cer : Rajnish Rawat

rajnish@paprikamedia.com

Chairperson : Smiti Kanodia

smiti@paprikamedia.com
Distributed by IBH Books and Magazines Distributors Private Limited
Owned, Printed and Published by Karan M. Jhunjhunwala. Printed at Print House
India Pvt. Ltd., 6 Datta Mandir Road, Bhandup (W), Mumbai 400 078,India and
Published at MRJ Creations Pvt. Ltd., 201 Shyam Kamal ‘C’ Building, Agarwal
Market, Vile Parle(E), Mumbai 400 057, India. Editor: Babita Krishnan
A
&
venture
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 4 2/29/2012 3:56:43 PM
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Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 5 2/29/2012 3:57:26 PM
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 6 2/29/2012 3:57:50 PM
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 7 2/29/2012 3:58:27 PM
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 8 2/29/2012 3:58:43 PM
MARCH-APRIL 2012 • DESIGN MATRIX 9
N
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S
Now follow us on www.facebook.com/DesignMatrixMagazine
W
e asked the Design Matrix Group members on Facebook to guess the
connection between Design Matrix and Lady Gaga. While Naresh Mistry
felt that “both are vibrant”, Devesh Jaisinghani felt that “both have a daring
and out-of-the-box attitude”. We ‘like’ these simply because that is what we strive to
do with each issue and love the appreciation.
But there is one more connection – Julia Lundsten, Gaga’s shoe designer. She
is part of our cover story along with Edwin Pinto and Swati Mehrotra. Three shoe
designers drawing inspirations from diverse and totally unrelated things – while
Julia’s shoes are architectural, Edwin creates shoes inspired by Elves and Pixies and
Swati looks at the Zodiac Signs to create shoes for you! Conversing with them we see
how design goes beyond the apparent, down to what inspires and drives a creative
person.
There is a similar compulsion, again across continents, to do something for our
feathered friends as designers create habitats for birds. This entire issue is about
people, driven by passions beyond the usual, from diverse design felds – fashion,
cinema, architecture, technology and products – it is always about pushing the
envelope just a little bit more. I’m reminded of these lines I read somewhere – Life is
occupied in both perpetuating itself and in surpassing itself. If all it does is maintain itself,
then living is only not dying.
I would like to congratulate all the participants of Design Matrix-Ultratech Paints
Excellence Awards whose projects have been shortlisted for the fnal jury to be held
in New Delhi in mid-March. All of you will be informed individually by mail soon after
the jury is done.
Do keep those mails, messages, posts and calls pouring in. They help us improve
and give you what you want to read.
Until next time, ciao!

Babita Krishnan
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 9 2/29/2012 3:58:46 PM
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 10 2/29/2012 3:59:52 PM
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 11 2/29/2012 4:00:25 PM
12 DESIGN MATRIX • MARCH-APRIL 2012
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 12 2/29/2012 4:00:48 PM
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 13 2/29/2012 4:01:21 PM
CON
TEN
TS
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 14 2/29/2012 4:01:34 PM
MARCH-APRIL 2012 • DESIGN MATRIX 15
COVER STORY
A fascinating insight into the lesser known
genre of footwear design with Edwin Pinto,
Swati Mehrotra and Julia Lundsten. Pg 22
AR. AAMCHER
Ar. Aamcher is excited about the Esplanade
project in Mumbai initiated by Ar. Brinda So-
maiya and Shivjit Sidhu. Pg 32
LEISURE DESIGN
Ar. Khozema Chitalwala draws infuences
from Gujarat to create a vibrant decor for
The Fern in Ahmedabad. Pg 36
RESIDENTIAL DESIGN
An elegant and high on impact residential
space by Ar. Asit Karekar in Mumbai. Pg 44
CREATIVE IDEAS
More than a sneak-peak into the world of our
feathered friends – a world created by de-
signers as Bird Houses from across the world.
Pg 50
• Cover featuring: Edwin Pinto, Swati Mehrotra & Julia Lundsten
• Shoe designed by Julia Lundsten
• Photographs by: Tushar Rao (Edwin Pinto), Indrajit Sathe
(Swati Mehrotra), courtesy FINSK (Julia Lundsten)
40
60
92
CONVERSATIONS
Turquoise Mountains initiates a task to re-
store and revive Afghani art and culture.
Pg 66
EXHIBITION DESIGN
Ar. Jaydeep Ghag highlights the impor-
tance of designing stalls to represent the
client’s identity. Pg 74
DESIGN PROMO
Le Cdeor – a store that stands as a meta-
phor for contemporary lifestyle. Pg 80
DESIGN DIMENSION
An insightful understanding of the world of
changing fashion – or should we say revolu-
tion of fashion! Pg 84
PHOTO FEATURE
Goa – an experience, a personal project of
photographer Tanvi Madkaiker, giving in-
sights of the lovely State in a novel way.
Pg 88
ARTY-TECHTURE
Refection – a light-based interactive instal-
lation by Ivan Depena for a public space in
USA. Pg 96
MUSINGS
Art Cinema – a genre that is here to stay! Pg
100
TECH DIARY
The controversies, strengths and weakness-
es of the recently introduced Aakash – a low
cost tablet. Pg 106
PRODUCT LAUNCH
Interesting products to fatter your design
senses Pg 109
ETCETRA
Information and news from the design
world – happenings, product review, events
etc. Pg 115
92 92
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 15 2/29/2012 4:01:36 PM
16 DESIGN MATRIX • MARCH-APRIL 2012
Each issue, you have the chance to win a special gift courtesy
We would love to have your views, comments and/or suggestions
on what you would like to see or read in our pages. Please email to:
babitakrishnan@designmatrix.co or write to Design Matrix, MRJ Creations
Pvt. Ltd., C-201 Shyam Kamal Agarwal Market, Vile Parle (E), Mumbai-400
057 or Call on 022-26187132.
JULY-AUGUST 2011 • DESIGN MATRIX 1
PEOPLE • LI FEST YLE • DESI GN • I NT ERI ORS
January - February 2012
VOL. 2 • ISSUE 2 • `100
„I believe in doing thing better
rather than different.‰
Ashish
Gupta
A presentation
Thank you readers for ‘liking’ us on www.facebook/DesignMatrixMagazine.
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 16 2/29/2012 4:03:40 PM
MARCH-APRIL 2012 • DESIGN MATRIX 17
One of the best magazines I have come across.
All the best and keep it up.
Prashant Goel
via facebook
It was amazing to go through your last issue,
especially the cover story. It was just chance
that I had met someone dealing in yachts and
the very next day I received my copy of Design
Matrix. Ashish Gupta’s success story was really
interesting as it tells us that if you are creative,
sky is the limit, though in this case it should
be the sea! The rest of the magazine also, as
always, made for a very good read. My compli-
ments to the entire team.
Pradeep Amberkar,
Academy of Architecture, Mumbai
I have had the privilege to receive all copies
of Design Matrix and have seen it go from
strength to strength. Congratulations for this
fantastic achievement. While there is no end
to where the magazine can go, there was a
hiccup I noticed in the last issue, which I feel
needs to be pointed out. Pages 120 and 121 of
the issue, though connected to the previous
two pages, somehow seem to stand apart in
the absence of any text on these pages. Some-
how the required impact and notice ability of
this Page-3 kind of editorial seems to be less
due to a lack of connectivity with the previous
pages. I hope this can be conveyed to the cre-
ative team so that it can be looked into.
Praveen Pasricha,
Mumbai

I have been receiving Design Matrix regularly
since its inception. I really appreciate the con-
tent that it carries. It has defnitely broadened
my knowledge as a layman and novice in the
feld of design. One of the things that I have
always thought should be covered is Mod-
ern as well as Heritage hotels in India. Also, I
would love to read something about ancient
architectural practices/marvels of the world. I
would like to thank you for sharing the maga-
zine with me regularly.
Ketan Singhania,
Mumbai
I have been following the progress of your
magazine for the past one year and I must
congratulate the team on the contents put to-
gether in every issue. Not only the freshness of
the design stories but their presentation is also
very commendable. As a design professional, I
can safely say that fnally India has a true and
complete design magazine.
Chirashree Thakkar,
Ahmedabad
I loved the toy design and logo design sto-
ries as they showed me a dimension that I
had really no clue about. I have randomly
picked up a few of your issues in the past
and found each one of them different in
their approach and presentation. This, I feel,
keeps the reader guessing and hence main-
tains the curiosity about what would come
next. Even the photo spreads are very dif-
ferent and highlight the art of photography
in itself. Since I am a photographer as well,
I can really appreciate the effort, especially
from a design magazine.
Saurav Chakraborty,
Kolkata
I
N
B
O
X
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 17 2/29/2012 4:03:53 PM
18 DESIGN MATRIX • MARCH-APRIL 2012
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Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 19 2/29/2012 4:04:22 PM
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Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 21 2/29/2012 4:04:35 PM
22 DESIGN MATRIX • MARCH-APRIL 2012
Cover
story
A shoe was just an accessory
until some time back and the
only time one really paid heed
to it was at your own wedding!
Guided more by functionality
and comfort, you owned a
couple and waited for them to
serve their life till the next trip to
a shoe store. Well not anymore!
Meet Julia Lundsten, Swati
Mehrotra and Edwin Pinto, who
have taken footwear design to
a different level.
BEST
FOOT
FORWARD
Words: Babita Krishnan;
Images: Courtesy FINSK (Julia): Indrajeet Sathe
(Swati): Tushar Rao (Edwin)
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 22 2/29/2012 4:04:38 PM
MARCH-APRIL 2012 • DESIGN MATRIX 23
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24 DESIGN MATRIX • MARCH-APRIL 2012
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 24 2/29/2012 4:05:22 PM
MARCH-APRIL 2012 • DESIGN MATRIX 25
F
or the longest of time, buying shoes was a chore that one
simply had to get over with. But slowly, over the years, the
humble shoe has travelled a hard journey to becoming the
most important fashion accessory. Just as we have professionals
who are specialists in diferent genres of design – shoe, too, has
its own set of creative geniuses. We discovered that not only is
footwear design an independent industry but a fourishing one
at that where each one draws inspirations from diferent sources
and what comes of that is nothing less than a showstopper com-
plete with the “wow” element.
We met up with three such creative people – all in the busi-
ness of designing shoes – but with as diferent creative ideas as
any. While Edwin Pinto of Janota in Goa brings the Elves and Pix-
ies from the Fairy Tales to life, Swati Mehrotra of Swatimodo from
New Delhi might just design shoes according to your kundali and
then there is Julia Lundsten of the UK-based FINSK for whom
designing a shoe is no less than architecture – and has Lady Gaga
in her list of prominent clients. Let’s fnd out what drives them
to create these beauties without which, the best of ensembles
would be incomplete.
Babita Krishnan: Let us start with the obvious, why shoe
designing?
Edwin Pinto: I was born and brought up in East Africa and
I’m afraid, was never very academically inclined. But from the very
beginning I knew that I did not want to do something run-of-
the-mill. I loved to do things with my hands, carve, cut, etc. and
then when we moved to our ancestral home in Goa, I decided to
help my wife, who was working with Wendell Rodricks and her
own dressmaking business. I started with just making shoes to
complement some dress that she had made for a client and then
Wendell noticed some of my shoes and encouraged me to get
into designing shoes seriously.
Swati Mehrotra: My story is not as romantic, I’m afraid it
is pretty straightforward. Even as a little girl I was interested in
fashion and would draw clothes and make dresses. But when I
grew up, I realized that I wanted to do something more than just
becoming a darzi; I wanted to create something without which a
dress is incomplete and the natural answer to that is shoes!
Julia Lundsten: Like most teenagers, I did not want to fol-
low the same profession as my parents, so I decided to travel
to London and study fashion, rather than stay in Finland. After
completing my BA (Hons) at the London College of Fashion, I
did a Masters at the Royal College of Art specializing in footwear
design. I wanted to be unique and individual and it wasn’t until
later I realized that my main interest within fashion was the more
structural, architectural shapes and elements.
BK: So Julia, your parents are architects, how much did
that infuence your work?
JL: I had learned and listened to my parents who are so pas-
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 25 2/29/2012 4:05:33 PM
26 DESIGN MATRIX • MARCH-APRIL 2012
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 26 2/29/2012 4:06:52 PM
MARCH-APRIL 2012 • DESIGN MATRIX 27
sionate about their work that most dinner table conversations
were about design and architecture, so it was quite natural that
some of it would flter through to my work. I then specialized in
footwear for my MA as that seemed to be the perfect combi-
nation between architecture and fashion. I can’t really say about
the infuence bit but yes, they did shape me and my thoughts
towards design in general.
BK: Where do you draw your inspirations from? It is a bold
step, especially in India, to be experimental.
EP: For me it was really a very simple choice. I wanted to cre-
ate something chic, which is what Janota is incidentally derived
from. Also, I just wanted to do something diferent without hav-
ing to answer anybody. Everyone loves a Fairy Tale and most of us
have grown up either listening to or reading them. So I decided
to create a place where the Elves could come for their shoes
(laughs).
SM: You will be surprised how ready the Indian market is for
experiment, in any feld for that matter. If your idea is diferent
and appealing there will be a line of buyers at your doorstep.
While growing up, I was very fascinated by the Zodiac Signs and
their diferent characteristics. What makes every one diferent
from each other, even if you are born under the same sign! Then
we have our own janam kundali which rules most of the decisions
and events of your life. I started studying that and came up with
my collection which was an instant hit. Then I designed shoes for
my dog, just for fun, and someone heard about it, I got orders and
voila, I had my pet collection ready. So, it is more about following
your instincts and believing in yourself.
BK: Coming from someone so young, it is really amazing.
What is your design approach, if I may call it so? Are there cer-
tain guidelines that you follow?
JL: You can’t have a guide or instruction book and I com-
pletely agree with Swati. Always try something diferent, take
risks and don’t be afraid even if it doesn’t work out. It’s only by
taking risks that we can push design forward and create some-
thing truly new and unique.
SM: Thank you. It is a constant evolution and I try to keep
up with the mood of the customers, really pay attention to what
they are saying and more importantly how they are saying it.
“For us, the kind of material and leather
that we use, the silhouettes that we give
to the footwear means luxury; but the
clients feel that bling is luxury. So we
marry the two and create something
different.”
– Swati & Simar
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 27 2/29/2012 4:07:26 PM
28 DESIGN MATRIX • MARCH-APRIL 2012
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 28 2/29/2012 4:10:02 PM
Sometimes, we have to read between the lines to create a cus-
tomized footwear for a client because not everyone can explain
what they want. I believe in looking forward but moving one step
at a time (no pun intended!).
EP: I think I am more conventional when it comes to my
design approach. I know that the USP of Janota is its design and
durability. I work with some very senior craftsmen who have a
vast experience in the skill of shoemaking. For all of us, it is the
love of the craft more than it being a business that is important.
We concentrate on what we are known for and work towards
improving that.
BK: All your creations are so fancy and as an Indian, I have
this fxation for durability, how do you ensure that?
EP: My shoes are extremely durable – you will be surprised at
their life span. I have been wearing the same pair of shoes every-
day for the past three years and they have also weathered the
Goa Monsoon.
SM: You have to give the client value for money, if I am charg-
ing a client I have to ensure that she gets the money’s worth. I
guess that is the reason why my Swarovski Collection is such a
big success.
JL: Yes, it’s true. The client knows and is aware of the value
and worth of what he or she is buying. They could be paying for
the design, material, comfort, exclusivity, whatever.
BK: Julia, tell us something about your journey since you
launched FINSK?
JL: I launched FINSK for Spring/Summer 2005. The frst collec-
tion was very small but already had all the graphic architectural
elements that defne “the FINSK style” in it. In the beginning it
was considered a bit too diferent and perhaps too graphic. We
had comments from buyers saying “they look like small furniture,
not very shoe like”. This is exactly how I intended it, I did not want
to just design more normal shoes, as I thought there were plenty
of beautiful ones already in the market. I wanted to do something
diferent, but in the beginning it was probably too diferent so
it took us a while to get buyers to appreciate the diferent style.
And as the main shoe fashion became more and more diferent
it worked in our favour, suddenly FINSK was acceptable. (Smiles)
“Through Janota, I have managed to
glorify and bring dignity to the artisans
and craftsmen in this profession. I
remember when I was growing up, these
people would not be allowed inside the
house but today we are a part of the elite
creative group.”
– Edwin Pinto
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 29 2/29/2012 4:10:34 PM
30 DESIGN MATRIX • MARCH-APRIL 2012
BK: And how difficult was it for you guys, in India?
EP: Doing something new is never easy, especially when it is
different from the conventional. But I had people who believed
in me and encouraged me to stick to what I really wanted to
do till things got better. And since we do not advertise, word
got around and I now have customers who come not only for
their own shoes but brings friends and relatives along and rec-
ommend us to all who come to Goa. Now I even have you, Babita
on my list of janot clients. (Laughs. Incidentally, janot is a Konkani
word that means dapper.)
SM: I agree with Edwin, it is never easy in the beginning.
Thankfully, I had my family’s unflinching support and my fiancée
to encourage me to follow my dreams. Now of course, I also have
my partner Simar Kaur as a big support.
BK: Which has been your hallmark collection and the one
you had most fun creating and why?
JL: I don’t have a specific collection that I love above all the
rest, I have some styles in each collection that are usually a bit
more challenging technically so they become almost like a love/
hate thing, very challenging but if they work out it’s a triumph.
For example, the trademark FINSK wooden two part wedge took
several seasons to develop, the factory simply did not have the
right machines to make it technically, so when we finally got it
into production it felt extra special.
EP: For me each one of my shoes is special. When you pains-
takingly develop something, it tends to be close to your heart.
SM: I think my Pet Collection is the one that gives me the
most kick simply because you know that the pet is not going to
wear it and walk around, it’s just that there is such an ‘indulgent
feel’ to the concept. Also, when someone comes to me and says
that things are going right for him or her since they started wear-
ing the shoe that I designed for them, it is very satisfying. I have
a special affection for the shoes that we had designed for kids
suffering from polio. But I love all my creations and the best part
is that I enjoy the exchange of ideas between me and Simar as
that usually leads to a different level of creativity altogether.
BK: What do you keep in mind when designing for a spe-
cific client?
JL: It depends on the client, some clients come to us because
they want something really different from before, some come to
us for other reasons. I think it’s always important to have a proper
discussion and throw some ideas in the air so that it’s very clear
what the client wants. Then I get on with the actual designing,
the detail, colour, materials, shape, mood, but the client is the
starting point and a very important factor.
EP: I don’t really design for any particular client. If someone
has a specification then we incorporate it in the design.
SM: I love to innovate and offer that to my clients – like
my latest offering is the shoe laundry which is all about taking
care of your shoes. The customer plays a very important role by
expressing what he or she wants in their shoes and we ensure
that proper justice is given to their feelings and emotions by cre-
ating the shoe after a well-set process that guarantees its aes-
thetic value along with quality.
BK: Julia, tell us something about Project three. How was
it working with Lady Gaga? She has a huge fan following in
India.
JL: Yes I’m well aware of that. Project three was based on tri-
angles and pyramids, the whole shoe is made from these shapes.
It was initially just an experimental art project that I did for FINSK
without a client in mind, but Lady Gaga’s stylist saw it and it
went on from there.
BK: So what does the future hold for all of you? Do share
some of your plans with us.
EP: Now that my son Aaron is helping after college and
would soon be joining me, we want to expand and market our
brand. We feel there is a vast and appreciative clientele abroad
which is what we are going to look at. A year from now Janota
would definitely be a strong international brand.
SM: I am looking to expand in this year. We are already retail-
ing in New York and have had very positive response. Now we
want to open our own stores in India.
JL: India!
BK: Do you think India is ready for the change?
JL: India is an amazing country, very colourful and full of
passion and creativity. We would love India to be ready for the
change. We have been very well supported here, and indeed I
feel, yes, India is ready.
EP: Of course. We have evolved as a design appreciating
country. People are now aware and it is up to us to deliver.
SM: You will be surprised at how ready India is. The design-
ers have had to pull up their socks simply because the aware
client knows exactly what he wants. And that is a good thing.
When the designers feel that the country ready to welcome
change with open arms…maybe it is time to invest in a new pair of
shoes drawn from our inspiration!
“Always try something different, take risks and don’t be afraid even if it doesn’t
work out. It’s only by taking risks that we can push design forward and create
something truly new and unique.”
– Julia Lundsten
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 30 2/29/2012 4:12:59 PM
MARCH-APRIL 2012 • DESIGN MATRIX 31
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 31 2/29/2012 4:13:16 PM
32 DESIGN MATRIX • MARCH-APRIL 2012
T
he Mumbai Esplanade is a signifcant civic improve-
ment project connecting the city’s open spaces with
train stations and business/cultural districts; it will
create a single contiguous landscaped area of over 160 acres and
will have fexibility to transform itself for cultural and recreational
events. It is a people’s space for those who accesses the city centre
and is a safe and convenient environment for the pedestrians; espe-
cially connecting commuters alighting at Churchgate and Chhatra-
pati Shivaji Terminus.
Under this project, the citizen will step out into an open space
thoughtfully landscaped with walking paths, gardens, bio-diversity,
waterbodies, open grounds, recreational areas, toilet facilities, ven-
dor facilities and a bicycle track. The landscaping will be synchro-
nized with the heritage structures and plan of Mumbai’s central
business district. It also addresses pedestrian traf c as well as vehic-
ular traf c that will be directed under the plaza through a mod-
ern system of underpasses. Since it will only be used by cars and
fast-moving traf c, it will be devoid of encroachments. The project
designers have identifed alternate routes through which vehicular
traf c can have smooth egress and ingress during construction of
the project.
The Mumbai Esplanade Plaza is the outcome of many months
of creative research by, and interaction between, urban planners,
architects, civic authorities and citizens groups who are well aware
of the city’s needs and issues. The lead design architects are Brinda
Somaya and Shivjit Sidhu. The project has the potential to be one
of the most important developments in improving the availability
of open space in Mumbai city, and also be an example for citizen-
friendly spaces in other densely-populated cities of the world.
When completed, the Mumbai Esplanade will have connected not
only the 102 acres of existing maidans, but will have added on 51
acres new public open space to the city by linking the maidans of
the district to plazas, train stations and the central business district.
To share more such designs or experiences, positive or
negative, contact Ar. Aamcher at aamcher@designmatrix.co
The project can be implemented in four phases within a span of 2.5
years. The project phases allow for ef cient restructuring of traf c and
utilities during and after construction. The phases are:
Phase 1: Churchgate - Veer Nariman Rd
Phase 2: Regal Chowk - Cooperage Ground
Phase 3: Hutatma Chowk / Flora Fountain
Phase 4: CST - BMC / Azad Maidan Area
MUMBAI
ESPLANADE
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 32 2/29/2012 4:13:51 PM
MARCH-APRIL 2012 • DESIGN MATRIX 33
Ar. Aamcher
• 51 areas of landscaped pedestrian plaza, comprising of gardens, waterbodies, etc.
• Safer for pedestrians and automobiles without possibility of jaywalking
• Boon for disabled and elderly commuters who cannot climb subway steps
• Adheres to new anti-terrorism norms against crowds in confned public spaces
• 8 numbers of new toilet facilities
• Maidans connected by landscaped plazas for safe pedestrian mobility
• Provision for amphitheatre and cultural shows
• 2.5 lakh sq.ft. of ‘cultural’ space for sport and folk and fne art museums
• Short underpasses for vehicular traf c eliminate traf c lights at major crossings
• Smoother and faster traf c movement from Marine Drive to Fort
• 640 new parking spaces spread around Fort and Marine Lines CBD
• Reduction in noise and exhaust pollution
• Estimated total cost: Rs. 492 crores
• Estimated fund generation via public-private partnership for various projects within the
completed Esplanade: Rs. 1,239 crores
• Value of Open Space to City-Priceless
• Estimated timeline: 18 months (traf c rerouting: 3 months only)
• Architects and Planners: Brinda Somaya (Somaya and Kalappa Consultants Pvt. Ltd.) and
Shivjit Sidhu (Apostrophe Architecture & Urban Design Pvt. Ltd.)
Ar. Aamcher was invited by
Ar. Brinda Somaya to
understand the Mumbai
Esplanade Project and comes
back looking forward to a
people’s space in the city.
SALIENT FEATURES OF THE ESPLANADE PROJECT
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 33 2/29/2012 4:16:41 PM
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 34 2/29/2012 4:18:16 PM
A-88, Road No. 2, Mahipalpur Extension, New Delhi-110037 (India). Phone : +91 -11- 46138800 (100 lines), Fax: +91-11-46138880;
Website: www.dorsetindia.com, email: faucet@dorsetindia.com; Works : Gurgaon, Haryana.
Customer Care: +91 11 4613 8888, Toll Free No: 1800 102 2888
Corporate & Marketing Office:
s mo o t h
performance
foam
f l ow
7 years
warranty*
inbuilt
areator
l i ve l uxur y l i f e
* conditions applied
DISTRIBUTORS: ANDHRA PRADESH: Maheshwari Traders,Hyderabad : 040-24741120; BIHAR: Ma Vaishnavi Enterprise, Patna: 93 0481 5199; DELHI: Ripana-O-Furo, GK-II: 011- 6660 1468-69; D Nath & Co, Chawri Bazar: 011-2326
1896; Goel Paints & Sanitary Store, Pitam Pura: 011-2701 5593; Asian Bath Collection, Jagatpuri: 93 1249 1668; Atul Enterprises, Jagatpuri: 93 1022 3230; Bath Concepts, Hauz Khas: 011-4165 5260; Style Bath, Mangol Puri: 98 1895 9937;
Mega Ceramics, Raja Garden: 92 1228 6677; V.N.G. Bath Planet, Neb Sarai: 98 1017 9619; Gotu Bath India (p) Ltd. Ghitorni Village: 96 5418 7010; Asian Industries, Chawri Bazar: 92 1267 9563; GOA: Lochan Trading Inc.: 93 2612 7353;
GUJRAT: Pratik Enterprises, Ahmedabad: 90 9934 4374; KARNATAKA: Shree & Co.: 96 1114 2629; KERALA: Superlative Agencies,Thiruvananthapuram: 0471-2354 461; MADHYA PRADESH: Agarwal Associates, Indore: 2432 063;
MUMBAI: Enaar Enterprises: 98 2086 5211; Home Display: 98 9257 9031; Vaastu Trade: 98 2007 0467; ORISSA: Sani Plaza, Bhubaneswar: 94 3700 5188; PUNE: Hari Om Ceramics: 98 5056 6635; PUNJAB: Parsvnath Udyog, Jalandhar:
0181-4610 997; RAJASTHAN: Jai Shree Ram Enterprises, Jaipur : 99 2892 9190 ; UTTARAKHAND: Shiva Sanitary, Dehradun: 97 1921 9146; UTTAR PRADESH: Roop Sons, Agra: 0562-2810 137; Hi-Tech Trading Co., Lucknow: 94 1501
7206; WEST BENGAL: Classica Sales & Marketing Pvt Ltd, Kolkata: 033-2243 1951;
0181-4610 997; RAJASTHAN: Jai Shree Ram Enterprises, Jaipur : 99 2892 9190 ; UTTARAKHAND: Shiva Sanitary, Dehradun: 97 1921 9146; UTTAR PRADESH: Roop Sons, Agra: 0562-2810 137; Hi-Tech Trading Co., Lucknow: 94 1501
7206; WEST BENGAL: Classica Sales & Marketing Pvt Ltd, Kolkata: 033-2243 1951;
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 35 2/29/2012 4:18:52 PM
36 DESIGN MATRIX • MARCH-APRIL 2012
Leisure
design
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 36 2/29/2012 4:19:11 PM
MARCH-APRIL 2012 • DESIGN MATRIX 37
Drawing from local nuances, Khozema
Chitalwala gives The Fern a decor that
celebrates its location – in the vibrant heart
of Gujarat – Ahmedabad.
Words: Babita Krishnan; Images: Prashant Bhat
ETHNIC
FLAVOURS
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 37 2/29/2012 4:19:28 PM
38 DESIGN MATRIX • MARCH-APRIL 2012
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MARCH-APRIL 2012 • DESIGN MATRIX 39
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40 DESIGN MATRIX • MARCH-APRIL 2012
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MARCH-APRIL 2012 • DESIGN MATRIX 41
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42 DESIGN MATRIX • MARCH-APRIL 2012
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 42 2/29/2012 4:23:01 PM
MARCH-APRIL 2012 • DESIGN MATRIX 43
T
hat it is an ‘ecotel’ hotel which
endeavours to protect and preserve
the environment through certifcation
on ecological parameters goes without saying;
but what is the most striking feature of The
Fern, in Ahmedabad are the local favours that
are refected in practically every turn of the
property. “This hotel was conceptualized as
a very modern and contemporary one with
the accentuation on Ahmedabad favours and
culture,” says Khozema Chitalwala, the Mumbai-
based architect, as he prepares to take us
through the design journey of The Fern.
To anyone even remotely aware of Gujarat,
the State is synonymous with the Navratri &
the Kite festivals, heritage architecture, jewel-
lery, beautiful tourist destinations and a vibrant
culture and people. The public corridor and lift
lobby refect just that! The lift lobby of every
foor has mural and collages narrating stories
to refect the rich culture and heritage that one
associates with Gujarat.
But the references begin much before that!
The back of the reception wall is inspired from
the architectural tree of life beautifully etched
on back-painted glass. One fnds traces of the
famous Ahmedabad jaalis and details as screens
for glass windows in the guest corridors, and
also on the room number plates, lift lobby, etc.,
“The lobby of this property was very narrow
and looked more like a corridor due to its width
and certain architectural restrictions of the
building,” Khozema reveals. “In order to achieve
some volume, we proposed two arches with the
view to impart a space profle in the lobby.”
Since The Fern was designed to be an eco-
tel, most of the materials used in interior are
green in nature. “As the design unfolded, we
realized that the only way to be true to the basic
design ethos here was to celebrate vibrancy
in every fold of the property and that’s exactly
what we did in each space,” smiles the architect.
And that is what you would find from the
moment you enter the property and through-
out your stay, each area – from the most
mundane to the most significant – is pulsat-
ing with colours and design motifs that the
design team has included in the decor high-
lighting the soaring celebratory note that one
has come to expect from anything from, of or
in Gujarat
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 43 2/29/2012 4:23:23 PM
44 DESIGN MATRIX • MARCH-APRIL 2012
Designed by Asit Karekar, this
residence in Thane mirrors a sense of
eclectic chic with a touch of class
resulting in an elegant space.
Words: Natasha Bohra;
Images: Rahul Pawar, courtesy the architect
Perfect
Picture
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 44 2/29/2012 4:23:53 PM
MARCH-APRIL 2012 • DESIGN MATRIX 45
Residential
design
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46 DESIGN MATRIX • MARCH-APRIL 2012
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 46 2/29/2012 4:24:37 PM
MARCH-APRIL 2012 • DESIGN MATRIX 47
T
he very essence of the word ‘de-
sign’ implies planning, organization
and aesthetics. And a designer’s
most important skill is the ability to listen
and execute the expectations of the client.
Designed by Ar. Asit Karekar, this residence
in the central surburbs of Mumbai is many
things – simple, elegant, modern and pretty.
But most importantly it suggests more than
what it shows. The picture perfect areas of
the 3-BHK apartment are a refection of the
clients’ lavish lifestyle and the designer’s
tasteful choices.
“My mentor Ar. Ajit Shilpi, with whom
I worked for over four years and am grati-
fed for everything I know today, trained
me to not ape the work of others but rather
emerge with originality. This is what I follow
and I love it this way,” shares Asit for whom
this residence stands out as a favourite proj-
ect at the start of his independent career.
Together with the keen and active
involvement of the client, Asit bestowed
a home after being absolutely certain of
what he wanted to deliver. With a common
thread running through the design in the
form of materials, colours and lighting, each
area blends in with the other yet stands out
individually.
Some element of drama has been
added in almost every area either with the
use of a certain material or with the applica-
tion of a strong colour giving it a distinctive
identity. For e.g., the common bathroom is
highlighted with a backlit artwork covering
almost the whole wall, while the passage
is dominated by a strong olive green wall
highlighted by black and white artwork
as well as a collage of photographs of the
daughter. The guest bedroom witnesses
extensive use of black and white with a
touch of red while the daughter’s room is
done up in shades of lilac. The master bed-
room is dominated by the use of veneer
wherein the headboard of the bed made
of a barcode-style print, adds an interesting
element to the design of the room.
A strong design element in the dining
area is the jaali that behaves as a separator
from the kitchen. The pattern of the jaali
continues in diferent areas – you fnd it as
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 47 2/29/2012 4:25:49 PM
48 DESIGN MATRIX • MARCH-APRIL 2012
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 48 2/29/2012 4:26:49 PM
MARCH-APRIL 2012 • DESIGN MATRIX 49
ABOUT THE FIRM:
Auk Design Studio established in 2010,
by Ar. Asit Karekar, a graduate from GICED,
Mumbai, designs and creates spaces with
aesthetics and functionality put together
providing inspiration and delight to its
users. As a company philosophy the stu-
dio consciously does not follow any single
motto thus allowing exploration and exper-
iment in every aspect of design.
the dining table top as well as the light, all
of which have been customized.
Talking about the colours used in the
home, Asit comments, “I have always want-
ed to use a dark and bold colour palate.
A right balance was required in between
the bold appeal of veneer and softness of
fabrics. The colours compliment the use of
materials perfectly well.”
Design is a highly subjective matter;
however, this project’s intrinsic power lies
in its simplicity and right combinations. Asit
adds, “Like any successful implementation
of a good idea, the credit for this beauti-
fully turned out home has to be shared as
it was a coming together of many things
and people – the client for believing in our
concept and letting us go ahead with it,
and the entire contracting team of Mandar
Adivarekar along with the carving interiors
contractor, who gave form to my design.”
With its bold palette and use of opulent
materials the decor of this home fourishes
with understated elegance and proves to
be a mystic circle that surrounds comfort
and virtues
Website: www. aukdesignstudio.com;
Email: info. auk@gmail.com
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 49 2/29/2012 4:28:02 PM
50 DESIGN MATRIX • MARCH-APRIL 2012
It’s time someone took matters seriously and
find a housing solution for the displaced bird
population of the urban areas of the world.
Thankfully, some designers care enough to do
it, we discover.
Fancy
Flight
of
Words: Babita Krishnan; Images: Courtesy the designers
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 50 2/29/2012 4:28:54 PM
Creative
ideas
MARCH-APRIL 2012 • DESIGN MATRIX 51
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52 DESIGN MATRIX • MARCH-APRIL 2012
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 52 2/29/2012 4:28:57 PM
MARCH-APRIL 2012 • DESIGN MATRIX 53
I
believed I could fy if I tried really hard…
till I fell and got a few stitches on my
chin! This was a long time ago – when
our house had a backyard and a garden
with various trees that were teeming with
birds of diferent kinds and every evening
was a cacophony before they all retired after
sunset. Now all that has been replaced by
high-rises with negligible green spaces and
trees are more grey than green, covered as
they are with the soot and pollution grime.
I don’t have anything against urbanization,
but my problem is with its sad efect on our
feathered friends. I’m talking about the ones
that visit our back yards, porches, balconies
and neighbourhoods.
Birds have three major requirements –
food, water and shelter for their eggs and
chicks. Most birds build nests that are used
as cradles, and are placed in locations such
as trees, eaves of a house, phone poles etc.,
in an attempt to protect them from preda-
tors. Some birds nest on the ground and try
to conceal their nests by camoufage. With
a change in residential architecture and
urban planning, the birds have lost their
habitat and we have been deprived of their
company.
So the question here is do we need to
put houses out for birds to survive when
they have been surviving for millions of
years without our help? Bird houses attract
birds as do bird feeders and bird baths and
we try to attract birds by fulflling their three
major requirements, because birds are a
source of pleasure, they are interesting and
fun to watch, they fll our hearts with joy
with their songs and chirping.
There is a whole lot of designers who
follow their heart and have over the years
done their bit for our feathered friends,
designing safe houses and feeders that
have resulted in their increased number
over the years. We bring you insights from
some of them who have endeavoured to
make an efort.
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 53 2/29/2012 4:29:11 PM
54 DESIGN MATRIX • MARCH-APRIL 2012
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 54 2/29/2012 4:29:30 PM
MARCH-APRIL 2012 • DESIGN MATRIX 55
Born in Lisbon, Portugal and raised in the green valley
of Alenquer, the village that saw him fall in love with things
– from the multicoloured river pebbles, to the abandoned
mills that rest on top of the mountains, to the roads painted
in autumnal colours by the leaves blown away by the wind,
to the sweet music of the night, Luis Porem has a strong
attachment to all that nature has to ofer. After fnishing the
fve-year degree in industrial and interior design at Univer-
sidade Lusófona de Humanidades e Tecnologias in Lisbon,
Portugal, he was granted the Leonardo da Vinci scholar-
ship. After his internship at Estudio Mariscal, in November
2008, Luis collaborated in the studio of Martín Azúa.
“I started developing this project, after I received the
unexpected visit from a small sparrow outside my window.
At that moment I was able to admire it carefully. He showed
his white chest while peeking inside the house. I wanted
to open the window but he probably wouldn’t accept my
invitation. So I thought to myself – at the next visit I’ll have
a place to receive you!” reveals Luis Porem about his bird
house that is called Abrigo Para Aves (APA). APA welcomes
small birds that are passing through and want a shelter for a
while. APA can be established in various ways and serve dif-
ferent situations. Made in ceramic, it is available in various
colours while the branch is in metal.
ABRIGO PARA AVES
– Luis Porem
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 55 2/29/2012 4:29:40 PM
56 DESIGN MATRIX • MARCH-APRIL 2012
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MARCH-APRIL 2012 • DESIGN MATRIX 57
A city for a mixed bird community, Bird City has 33 nest-
ing boxes, catering for the housing needs of 33 diferent
species of birds, to form a breeding ground for the winged
inhabitants of the city. The design requires a delicate touch:
since diferent species have diferent needs. While one type
of bird wants a squat and wide little house, another may
prefer a tall and narrow one. Vogelstad ofers something
for everyone. “Every city is a big nest. Every nest is a small
city. The diversity of birds in urban areas is often large and
they specifcally come to the city for its warmth, garbage/
food and shelter. A part of all the birds that live and breed in
the city, only breed in holes (voids, cracks, nest boxes) and
not in an open nest,” explains Eveline Visser. In June 2010,
Eveline graduated with her project ‘Bird City’ at the Design
Academy Eindhoven (The Netherlands). After positive reac-
tions during the Dutch Design Week, the project has been
exhibited in London (Selfridges), Milan (Salone del Mobile),
Amsterdam (Woonbeurs) and at the Architecture Biennale
Tallinn (Estonia). After graduation, she started (together
with Lucas Zoutendijk) Studio 1:1 that focuses on design
and research in public space.
The concept was of one frame with 33 diferent nest box-
es, as a small city, for all types of birds that live in urban areas
and breed in nest boxes. By putting all ‘urban nest-box breed-
ers’ in one frame, birds get a more urban adapted accommo-
dation. Hereby you can look at this object as a Demo-City,
where every diferent resident has a for him/her adjusted envi-
ronment. The diversity of the urban environment is not only
visible in the variety of cultures or architectural styles present,
but can also be witnessed in the range of fauna that inhabits
the city. But urban fauna is a far from recognized city feature.
“Although the city as constructed human habitat
seems to oppose the concept of wild nature and animals,
these two are more interrelated than expected: the urban
environment is still expanding, leading to greater and more
important manifestations of wildlife in the city. Since we
humans conduct spatial planning, we should be informed
about our urban neighbours,” Eveline believes. “As bio-
diversity is an important measuring stick to indicate the
health of an ecosystem with clear advantages for man, the
role that urban fauna plays in increasing and guarantee-
ing the biodiversity of the city ofers a clear message to be
communicated to the general public. Increasing the visibil-
ity of urban fauna in a manner that does not inhibit their
natural behaviour can allow people to acknowledge their
presence and recognize their value.”
BIRD CITY – Eveline Visser
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 57 2/29/2012 4:30:24 PM
58 DESIGN MATRIX • MARCH-APRIL 2012
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MARCH-APRIL 2012 • DESIGN MATRIX 59
Gathering inspiration from shoefti or shoe tossing, three
pairs of shoe-shaped birdhouses became a public art instal-
lation in Lillehammer, Norway. The main goal behind this art
project was to ofer a temporary housing solution for the
Pied Flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) a migrant bird that win-
ters in West Africa, while at the same time create a debate
about the human relationship with nature in an urban con-
text. “As an artist I use vernacular urban elements to address
issues such as belonging and immigration. The Birdhouse
Project gathers inspiration from shoe tossing onto power
lines, a common sign in America and Europe. This is an urban
element that usually bears negative connotations. I was
interested in giving it a new interpretation by using its place-
ment and aesthetics to open a discussion about what kind of
city one wants to live in, and at the same time to present the
issue of migration in a subtle way,” says Christian Bermudez.
As a Costa Rican who is an immigrant and has been living in
Norway for almost 10 years, it was important to him to cre-
ate a metaphor of the migratory birds and human immigra-
tion. “Everybody loves (migratory) birds, but the same does
not necessarily apply to (human) immigrants,” he feels. “With
The Birdhouse Project my intention was to design and build
a temporary house solution to a specifc bird that comes
every year to Scandinavia and Russia all the way from Africa. I
wanted the city to welcome them and ofer some hospitality
after a long journey.”
The shoe-shaped birdhouses hung from the power lines
and street lamps at diferent spots in Lillehammer from the
last week of April 2011, until the frst week of September 2011.
There were a series of requirements for the birdhouses in
order to be produced and used by the birds. These included
materials, dimensions, porosity, permeability, as well as the
specifc week when they have to be hung, height from the
ground, weight, etc. The shoes were entirely produced in
certifed wood, using glue to join the 28 laser cut plywood
layers that make every birdhouse.
The sole can be detached in order to clean the bird-
house after the breeding season. An additional compart-
ment was also created to place a webcam for future use. This
was a rewarding experience where design, science, technol-
ogy and contemporary art came together to create a new
concept of street art, that became a practical object for the
birds while at the same time giving some local colour to the
urban landscape. “When a pair of birds decided to make a
nest in one of the shoes, the project was of cially success-
ful,” he says proudly. The Birdhouse Project received support
from Arts Council Norway and ‘Kunstnersenteret i Oppland’.
BIRDHOUSE PROJECT
- Christian Bermudez
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60 DESIGN MATRIX • MARCH-APRIL 2012
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MARCH-APRIL 2012 • DESIGN MATRIX 61
Frederik Roijé is an international design agency which
designs diverse products for brands and for market as for
private clients. The of ce is renowned for its creativity and
innovative designs and its approach is to reach a new level
in product or space. Frederick Roije graduated in 2001 from
the renowned Design Academy in Eindhoven where his
preference for interior products was already visible. Dur-
ing his studies Frederik did his internships at prestigious
design studios as Piero Lissoni, Milan and Marcel Wanders,
Amsterdam. In 2003, he started his own design studio
based in Amsterdam – a studio that specializes in interior
and product design, where concept and renewal are the
main points.
The latest design (2011) from the design studio is Dish of
Desire – a series of bird feeders inspired by beautiful table-
ware and delicious food. “As the summer has come to an
end and the cold winter days will arrive, we must not forget
the birds,” says Fredrick Roije, who feels that birds need a
varied menu which is hard to fnd during wintertime. “With
Dish of Desire you can provide the birds a varied dinner
in your tree or on your balcony.” Based on the number of
courses, four diferent models are designed, a one course,
two course, three course and fve course bird feeder.
Each model is assembled out of aluminium parts com-
bined with the fnest bone china and red cedar wood. All
materials are weather resistant for outdoor use, so we can
“make a feast for our feathered friends!” But Frederick’s
concern for nature and especially birds could be seen even
earlier when he designed a bird house called Holy Homes
in 2007. “It is my belief that there will be peace,” says the
designer. Fascinated by the value we attach to symbolism
and love of nature, these sacred houses were designed to
be made from the fnest porcelain ceramics by local crafts-
men. The branch is made of blown glass and gold and the
house is available in white and gray.
DISH OF DESIRE
-Frederick Roije
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62 DESIGN MATRIX • MARCH-APRIL 2012
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MARCH-APRIL 2012 • DESIGN MATRIX 63
Living Typography, which was nominated for the
Cannes Festival in 2010, was a self-promotion activity for
Water Design Studio. “I grew up around nature and always
had a special place in my heart for birds. When I moved
to Mumbai, I was both shocked and saddened to realize
that sparrows, the birds which live around and with us
are gradually reducing in number. The few which are left
always seem faraway, almost nonexistent,” reveals Nishant
Jethi. With an inclination towards creating art installations
which interacted with people, let them have fun but still
manage to leave behind a message in their minds, he
envisioned this project. He found that the main reason
behind the decline in the number of sparrows is the lack
of nesting and breeding spaces. With high-rise buildings
and malls coming up everywhere, the birds have been dis-
placed from what they once called home. “This lead to the
‘Living Typography’ idea – hollow wooden 3D alphabets,
which also act as bird houses, were created.” Appropriate
alphabets were sent to friends and family members to be
kept outside homes as nameplates or house numbers. Thus
Living Typography had a dual function – becoming a well-
designed name plate and providing shelter to sparrows.
Working with local painters and sign board artists as
a childhood hobby taught Nishant a lot about design and
typography which led him to M S University of Fine Arts.
Later he continued experimenting with typography in art
installations and design. “As the Living Typography idea
grew in my head, I began sketching it frst on a notepad
then the computer. I built 3D typefaces of each character
and later analyzed it; got a few samples made by a manu-
facturer in wood and after four months of grueling work,
a complete set of alphabets was ready to be installed,” he
beams. The project was sponsored and immensely sup-
ported by both Mudra (Nishant’s employers) and Water
Design Studio and he started with installations in and
around the Mudra building. As the project grew, they were
sent to clients and interested friends and members of fam-
ily. Then with the help of an NGO which worked towards
providing shelter to sparrows, areas in Mumbai with the
least number of sparrows were identifed and these type-
faces were installed. Living Typography gained tremen-
dous attention and there have been numerous inquiries on
the availability of these typefaces. Nishant plans to collabo-
rate with a few international design studios and production
houses to run this project on a larger scale and platform.
LIVING TYPOGRAPHY
-Nishant Jethi
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Nature Forever Society is a conservation organiza-
tion that has been working for the conservation of house
sparrows for the past four years as well as the common
birds of India and their habitats. To involve the common
man in the conservation movement, it initiated adop-
tions of nest boxes and feeders which has been very
successful. The aim is to create wildlife-friendly habi-
tats and involve the common man in the conservation
movement to save India’s rich biodiversity. The society
has initiated nationwide projects like Adopt nest box
and bird feeders, Help the birds in Summer Campaign,
Ban the Catapult, etc. to name a few. World Sparrow Day,
which is an international celebration, is also initiated by
Nature Forever Society.
NFS Nest boxes and feeders provide a safe and
comfortable place for birds to roost and nest. These are
made from sustainable, recycled wood so they’re safe for
birds and have good insulation properties, making them
warm in winter and cool in summer. “We carefully design
our nest boxes to have the correct dimensions and venti-
lation that birds need. Our nest boxes don’t have decora-
tions that predators could cling to and threaten the birds
inside,” says Mohammad Dilawar.
Mounting bird houses around the yard can provide
hours of enjoyment for bird watchers and aviary enthu-
siasts, while offering benefits to the feathered creatures
themselves. Houses provide nesting birds safe shelter to
lay eggs and raise fledglings. Houses are also a means
of sheltering birds from harsh weather conditions when
they are not raising young birds. As human popula-
tion grows and new developments are built, birds are
forced away from their natural habitats. Bird houses are a
replacement for trees and other natural structures where
birds once nested. You can mount bird houses with an
eye toward keeping predators away.
So if you love birds and want to do your bit for
nature, adopt a bird house and feeder today
NATURE FOREVER
SOCIETY
-Mohammed Dilawar
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Conversations
MOU
MOVIN
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In war-torn Afghanistan, Turquoise Mountain aims to do what seems
to be the impossible – to revive and restore the country’s lost art and
culture through its numerous initiatives.
Words: Priyanka Mathur; Images: Jason P. Howe for Turquoise Mountain
UNTAINS
NG
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A
fghanistan, Circa 2001 – the Taliban
carries out the destruction of two
monumental statues of Buddha,
carved into the side of a clif in the Bamiyan
valley, deeming them to be idols and
therefore, unIslamic. As the international
community cried out in protest, the art
community could do nothing but watch
helplessly as thousands of years of ancient
history got reduced to rubble. In a country
that has known little else than war, it is
dif cult to imagine how an arts and culture
scene could have ever existed, let alone
survived. It is dif cult to imagine that cities
like Herat, Kabul, and Bamiyan were, at
one point, centres of cultural learning; a
place where men and women alike were
encouraged to learn about art, history,
culture and poetry!
Today, the Afghanistan shown on tele-
vision channels is a far cry from the coun-
try which once boasted of art infuences
fowing in from regions like Greece, Iran,
Mongolia and the Far East, to name a few.
A nation that once produced fne carpets,
diferent art and music forms, magnifcent
architectural wonders, now seems to exist
only in the minds of those who lived in a
pre-war era. Iconic works of art, such as the
Buddha statues of Bamiyan, which refected
a vibrant and fairly liberal art scenario, have
fallen prey to Taliban’s fanatical regime.
Today, though the grip of the Taliban is
slowly weakening, evidence of their regime
is still widespread. Their intolerance towards
music, arts, and culture has forced thou-
sands of artists to either practice their trade
in secret or give it up altogether.
However, as the world grows increas-
ingly aware of the problems in Afghanistan,
eforts are on to revive its lost glory. One
such organization that strives to do so is
Turquoise Mountain. Established in 2006 by
British politician and writer Rory Stewart at
the behest of England’s Prince Charles and
Afghan President Hamid Karzai, in Kabul,
Turquoise Mountain is a non-proft organi-
zation that aims to rebuild the nation’s art
and culture through various development
activities. The name ‘Turquoise Mountain’
refers to the great indigenous Afghan capi-
tal of the Middle Ages – Firuzkuh, which
was eventually destroyed by Gengis Khan in
1216 and lost to history. The only evidence
to prove that a city did once exist there is
the magnifcent Minaret of Jam, known for
its intricate calligraphy, geometric patterns,
and verses from the Quran.
The organization, through its numerous
initiatives, aims at restoring the erstwhile
glory of the historic old city community of
Murad Khane, which was once the hub of
artists and poets, by educating the youth in
both the traditional Afghan forms of art and
architecture, as well as the contemporary
forms. Through its eforts, the organization
hopes to promote and develop contem-
porary art as an emerging movement in
Afghanistan and beyond.
In 2006, Turquoise Mountain estab-
lished the Institute for Afghan Arts and
Architecture in Kabul. The institute compris-
es of four schools: The School of Calligraphy
and Painting, The School of Woodwork,
The School of Jewellery and Gem Cutting,
and The School of Ceramics. At present, the
school has a total student population of
200, who are taught by master artisans.
Adul Wahab, the cultural director of Tur-
quoise Mountain, talks about the school’s
current curriculum, “The Institute for Afghan
Arts and Architecture ofers a three-year
education programme, in which students
can specialize in one particular school of
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art and eventually graduate with both an
Afghan and International certifcation. The
key focus of the institute’s programmes is
the arts of Afghanistan, both traditional and
contemporary. In traditional art, subjects
like calligraphy and painting, woodcutting
(both classical and Nuristani), ceramics (Ista-
lif style) and jewellery making are taught.
In contemporary art, the Turquoise Moun-
tain Afghan Contemporary Art Prize (which
has been running successfully for the last
three years) has been set up to encour-
age a national interest in contemporary art
and draw out artistic talent from across the
country. The institute also provides theo-
retical and practical workshops in contem-
porary arts, and works to create opportuni-
ties for Afghan artists to engage with the
international art world, and contribute to
the development of contemporary arts of
Afghanistan.”
Wahab describes a time in his country
when traditional art fourished. He explains
how the country was home to countless
artefacts of Mongol art, miniature paintings
from the once-renowned Bahzad School
and the art of wood carving. Due to Afghan-
istan’s strategic location on the ancient Silk
Route, Gandhara art or Buddhist art, was
introduced by Buddhist monks who passed
through the area. He also speaks of a time
when classical music was practiced freely.
“But everything changed when the
war began,” he says. “Practicing art freely
became dif cult, and this only worsened
with the invasion of the Taliban. Everything
– architecture, art, as well as our historical
heritage, was adversely afected. The Tal-
iban imposed bans on anything related
to the arts and culture, deeming them as
unIslamic. They destroyed the Buddha stat-
ues in Bamiyan, the National Gallery, and
the National Museum of Aghanistan.”
With the destruction of the National
Gallery and the National Museum, great
works of art have been lost forever, some
dating as far back as the 1st century AD.
Today, with the Taliban forces gradually
being driven out of Afghanistan, there is
hope once again of reviving and rebuilding
the country’s rich cultural heritage. How-
ever, the road to recovery seems to be full
of obstacles.
Wahab explains, “Right from 2000
till now, we have plans of rebuilding and
restoring the National Gallery and National
Museum. However, it is not an easy task at
all. So far, on the war front, we have not seen
any changes at all. Security continues to be
a major problem in many of the provinces,
and due to this, we have not been able to
realize any of our restoration plans.”
However, Wahab continues to remain
optimistic. He believes that it is the youth
who can make a diference in his country.
By introducing high quality education, art
and cultural activities, he strongly feels that
there is hope for Afghanistan and we say
amen to that
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SHORTLIVED
ATTRACTIONS
Though a temporary, stalls need to be well-
thought out creations that reflect the brands
at their best, reveals Jaydeep Ghag.
Information & Images: courtesy Sain Konzepte
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Exhibition
design
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T
he word ‘stall’ does not usually
have a very positive connotation
for marketing a product, as it is
usually known to be small enclosure for
the display and sale of product. But with
the passage of time, exhibitions and their
stalls have become bigger and better. For
the participating companies or brands, the
stall becomes its face value – which means
that in the presence of so many other
contenders from the same industry, one
needs the right design to underline their
presence. Exhibitions are a major platform
for the brand-client interface and attract
thousands of prospective customers whose
interest needs to be generated; hence the
stall should speak for itself.
That designing and building a stall is
an art goes without saying, and Sain Konz-
epte with six years of in-depth knowledge,
is now nearly an expert in making optimal
use of available space for creating maxi-
mum visual impact. Along with the print
display, it is essential to communicate the
visual representation associated with a
brand and organization, which Jaydeep
Ghag, who heads Sain Konzepte, has been
doing with ease for prestigious clients like
Man Infra, Muktistar and many other infra
structure giants.
“The biggest challenge in an exhibi-
tion is not only delivering an extraordi-
nary design but to build it in a very short
span,” Jaydeep explains, “Timed delivery is
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the most crucial aspect of a trade fair stall
design and the maximum one gets is four
to fve days.” A feat Sain Konzepte seems to
be achieving if its reputation in this niche
is any indicator. Constantly climbing up
the charts, winning design awards at MCHI
(Maharashtra Chamber of Housing Indus-
try), getting associated with bigger brands
and being present at nearly all the impor-
tant exhibitions across the country for stall
design and construction.
In 2011, at the REIFBS Exhibition (Real
Estate Investment Forum & Business Spaces)
organized by The Economics Times, Sain
Konzepte got the opportunity to design one
of the biggest stalls at the property exhibi-
tion – measuring around 3,600 sq.ft. for
Muktistar, which was participating in exhibi-
tion with the concept of developing Char-
kop (a western Mumbai suburb) into city like
London. Participating for the frst time, the
client wanted maximum impact on the visi-
tors to the stall. Jaydeep along with his 3D
visualizer Siddhart Shirodkar designed and
build an ultra modern stall with an element
of London i.e. the London Eye-concept and
other organic forms in fve days. The material
used in building these stalls are eco-friendly
and re-useable hence harmless to nature.
The next time you visit an exhibition,
don’t be surprised if you gravitate towards
the most outstanding stall and when you
do, look around to see what has gone into
making it
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Exhibitions are a major
platform for the brand-
client interface and attract
thousands of prospective
customers; hence the stall
should speak for itself.
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Design
promo
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A
dding a touch of class to the interiors is indeed an ongoing
endeavour. Located in the heart of suburban Mumbai, the
Le Cdeor store is a metaphor for contemporary lifestyle
combining new age efervescence with a sophisticated intricacy of
style and design.
The latest addition to its immaculate and aesthetic collection
of artefacts is the stunning metal series, conceptualized and pro-
duced by Philippines-based Miguel Jr. A. Prado. Human fgurines,
vases and interesting artefacts made out of recycled metal are only
some products from the fne-line collection at the store. Available
for the very frst time in India, they have the potential to beautify
any space with their queer quaintness, with a raw yet stylish look.
The collection is a part of enchanting works of art that constantly
refect a global trend with its perfect blend of colour and its har-
monious marriage of diverse materials craftily executed in its fne
line of giftware, accessories, home and garden decor. And the most
astounding part is that you have the option of enhancing your
space – big or small; personal, commercial or public – all by being
completely eco-friendly!
The Le Cdeor store in essence ofers basic, limited edition prod-
ucts that enjoy eternal style. The collection available at the store
seamlessly blends beautiful looks to create a contemporary living
experience. The rustic, earthy mediums are put together in unusual
chic with classic appeal. Beautiful lamps, attractive crockery, exotic
candle stands, wall hangings, and more present a beautiful array of
home decor options sourced from all over the world.
The design store Le Cdeor, is undoubtedly the new bid of home
decor, introducing a sophisticated collection of products that are sure
to enhance the decor of your living spaces at very afordable prices.
ATYPICAL
CREATIONS
Introducing Le Cdeor – a store
that enhances living experiences.
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Design
promo
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For bulk & trade
enquiries contact:
artifacts@mrjgroup.in
Le Cdeor, 8/H, Laxmi
Industrial Estate,
New Link Road,
Versova, Andheri (W)
Mumbai 400053;
Tel: 26327733/34;
Mobile: 09867675556
Email: jalaramvnf@gmail.com
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Design
insight
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BEAST
OF
GLITZ
It is the age of the bold and, well, not so
beautiful. Fashion designers across the globe
today are willing to experiment with new
trends in ways never thought of before. Like it or
not, it is very much here to stay, as we find out.
Words: Gaauri Shah; Images: courtesy www.fashion.about.com
M
ost call it ‘fashion’; some refer to it as style, glam, vogue or glitz; but how many
of us really understand what fashion really means? What are the parameters that
defne it? What are the factors that infuence new fashion trends? Most of what
we know about fashion is from what we see, observe and note. Often, even self-proclaimed
experts don’t really understand the fne intricacies of the word; it has become a mainstay in
our lives; dress-up has stolen the limelight and today, it’s gotten bigger, maybe better and
defnitely bolder!
Over the centuries, fashion has gone through its evolution, but the turn of the cur-
rent decade has borne witness to an entirely diferent revolution. With designers becoming
increasingly experimental, there is a steady shift from the known into the unknown. Now,
fashion ramps world over showcase styles that exude distinct vibes – be it demure, peek-a-
boo, wicked, louder-than-life or plain eye-widening!
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Accessories undoubtedly clinch the fnale. Hats are back with a bang; so whether the
fedora, the delicate beret or even a sporty one; inculcate these on combinations. Let your
hair speak volumes, literally. Big hair is back; throw out the blow-dried straight-up look
and go all out. Nails are dominating the scene with funky colours and nail art. Diamonds
have been deserted by women as their best friend, and have been replaced by shoes!
The bigger, higher and spunkier the better – it’s the ‘no limit’ era.
Let’s let fashion take its highest trip yet, shall we?
THE WILD, WILD WEST
The 2010 MTV Music Awards was rewarded with a sight so bizarre
by designer Franc Fernandez that the world went into frenzy when Lady
Gaga unveiled her much publicized ‘meat dress’—an ensemble made
up of beef! Every animal rights group protested as a refex, but this dress
goes down as one of the boldest fashion statements in the history of
global fashion!
Alexander McQueen left behind a bang, even in death. His last
collection (“incomplete” some protested) created a wave that could not
be ignored – feather-bottomed underwear for the male population and a
sprinkling of X-ray pyjamas for the ladies; he breathed his last in complete
style. His quirky funk lives on through this bedroom collection.
TINSEL TOWN
Closer home, we aren’t lagging too far behind either. The fashion capital of the
country has had a taste of the wild pie, deliberately so in some cases.
Akshay Kumar, the (self-proclaimed) ‘good boy’ of the flm fraternity, revealed
his wild side grappling eye balls when he strutted down the ramp for Tarun Tahiliani
and lovingly asked wife Twinkle (in the audience) to unzip him, which she obliged
willingly with a grateful blush! The collection shot into spotlight in an instant!
Sherlyn Chopra got her ffteen minutes of fame when she was fortunate
enough to donne on 30-carat diamond bikini for an item number!
WILD CHILD
ACESSO-SPEAK
It would be presumptuous though to contain the ‘wild’ defnition of fashion
to only a few meat diamante stick-ons. Style, if asked to be described in one word,
would have to be ‘individualistic’; but that’s the biggest contradiction actually. Simple
because even so-called designers play copycat ever so often; after all imitation is
the best form of fattery they defend. The best element of fashion is its mystery; the
more layers you unearth to understand that many more appear. So it’s safe to say that
nobody will ever be able to grasp the very core; however each one of us creates our
own connotation of it.
Is psychedelic legging with balloon shorts and an orange shirt with yellow boots
your look? If you have the ability, confdence and carriage to carry it of – that’s exactly
what you should do! Wrapping a saree? Tie that drape around your waist instead. Make
style all about being the odd one out; standing out has suddenly become dapper!
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Experience!
An
Socegado (meaning calm, tranquil, serene in Spanish), is a
series of photographs of Goa by Mumbai-based Fashion and
Advertising photographer Tanvi Madkaiker. A mixture of
landscapes and abstract imagery, ‘Socegado’ aims to evoke
a feeling of tranquility and calm by capturing quiet little
‘moments’ that refect Goa’s relaxed attitude towards life.
To view more of Tanvi’s work visit www.tanvim.com
Photo
feature
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R
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Ivan Depena creates a
light-based interactive
installation that will
respond to your
movements and will
even remember it later –
to share with others.
REFLECTIVE
I N T E R A C T I O N
Words: Babita K; Images: courtesy Ivan Toth Depena
Arty
techture
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T
he Stephen Clark Government
Center Lobby in Miami, USA saw the
unveiling of Ivan Toth Depeña’s light-
based permanent installation “Refection”
in November 2011. Commissioned by the
Miami-Dade Art in Public Places initiative,
the work illuminates the dynamism of the
lobby space and encourages a sense of
discovery in the visitors. “This dynamic art
work is designed with the idea of welcoming
visitors and employees to Government
Center in a fun and interactive way,” said
Michael Spring, Director of the Department
of Cultural Afairs. “It will energize the lobby
and symbolize the County’s commitment
to be informative and responsive to our
citizens.”
Miami-Dade Art in Public Places is a
programme of the Miami-Dade County
Department of Cultural Afairs that is
responsible for the commission and pur-
chase of artworks by contemporary art-
ists in all media. It is one of the fst public
art programmes in the country that was
established in 1973. Depeña is an artist and
designer whose studio practice is based on
his multi-disciplinary approach to envision-
ing work. With a Masters Degree in Archi-
tecture from Harvard University’s Graduate
School of Design, Depeña’s output as an
artist is informed by his experience in art,
architecture, technology and design. Com-
bining many sources of media, technology,
form and materials, he seeks to blur bound-
aries and create work that exists within a
new and amorphous hybrid of various cre-
ative disciplines.
As a main stop in Miami’s MetroRail
system, the space serves as a hub for com-
muters; so incorporating the notion of daily
circulation into his piece Depeña uses sen-
sors and light to focus on the communal
nature and circulatory qualities of the lobby.
The project engages the building’s visi-
tors and references the idea of community
through various means of refection, group
interactivity and high-tech playfulness. The
basis of the project are custom-designed
LED light boxes placed at specifc locations
throughout the lobby space. These light
boxes interact and respond to the commut-
er’s movements and gestures via camera
tracking, creating an energetic and vibrant
artwork.
Custom software has been developed
to complete Depeña’s vision and the LED
nodes have been individually programmed
to anchor the work’s responsiveness and
interactivity. Passers-by will have their imag-
es captured by several infrared cameras; the
installation’s software will then abstract that
image in real time, displaying this abstrac-
tion on the light covered columns. The
resulting image will create an ethereal mir-
ror that testifes participation of the audi-
ence and the activity of the space. Colour-
ful lights of the installation engage those
beyond the lobby — as some columns face
the public plaza — and the installation will
remain functional even when there are no
active participants, as the light panels retain
the “memory” of users’ interactivity. This is
a key element in the conceptual infrastruc-
ture of the installation. The “memory” gives
the space added life and allows the com-
munity to be a part of the constantly evolv-
ing artwork.
Sensitive enough to detect the difer-
ence between multiple and single users, the
system will vary the output and scale of the
display to the number of visitors, and the hues
will change according to the time of the day.
All visitors will experience the vibrancy of
Depeña’s work, have the ability directly afect
the piece or simply witness the patterns pro-
duced by other users, elaborating on the idea
of time and memory in the space
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CINEMA
T H E F I N E A R T O F
Once a domain of the caviar and Chardonnay-quaffing
intellectual, art cinema has transformed itself into a genre that
is widely appreciated. We explore the vagaries of mainstream
cinema’s much-misunderstood cousin.
Words: Hayden Scott
Musings
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L
ast year saw the release of
Terence Malick’s Tree of Life, an
expressionist tour de force several
decades in the making. However, despite
rave critical reviews and clinching the
coveted Palme D’Or at Cannes, audience
reactions to the flm were polarized.
So much so that a theatre in Stamford,
Connecticut, was forced to put up a sign
reiterating the establishment’s no-refund
policy to angry cinemagoers who “just
couldn’t get what the flm was about”.
That, in a sense, defnes an art flm –
parallel cinema aimed at a niche market
and possessed of its own conventions;
typically realism, social relevance and a
greater emphasis on a director’s unique
vision and style.
Risheeka Upadhyay, an independent
flmmaker and associate director with
director Dibakar Bannerjee (of LSD and
Khosla ka Ghosla fame), adds, “Art flms
are often ambiguous. Not for any rea-
son other than the fact that the genre
demands that an audience think for itself
and draw its own inferences from a flm;
quite unlike mainstream cinema that
functions on the premise that emotions
and reactions need to be spoon-fed to
viewers.”
While many debate the true origins of
art cinema, the general consensus points
to the 1925 release of Sergei Eisenstein’s
Battleship Potemkin. A Russian propagan-
da flm, Battleship served as a vehicle to
further Eisenstein’s groundbreaking theo-
ries on flm editing. At around the same
time, Luis Bunuel and artist Salvador Dali
began to toy with the idea of cinema as
a dynamic medium for the surrealist art
movement. The result was 1929’s infu-
ential Un Chien Andalou (The Andalusian
Dog), a flm that was essentially a series of
disjointed and often disturbing images
held together by the most tenuous of
plots.
While one part of Europe reveled in
the abstract, Italy ravaged by the efects
of the Second World War, started to
produce cinema that brought into spot-
light the economic and moral dilemma
of the Italian working class. Dubbed the
“neorealist” movement, many consider
it to be one of the turning points in the
history of art cinema. Vittorio De Sica’s
Bicycle Thieves is one of the best-known
examples of this genre. The simple tale
of a father and son searching the streets
of Rome for a stolen bicycle and their
only means of livelihood inspired an
entire generation of flmmakers in India.
S Prakash Lakkoju, an independent flm-
maker whose flm Hide and Seek opened
UK’s Dow Film Festival in 2008 concurs,
“De Sica and the Italian neorealists can
be credited with kick-starting the Indian
New Wave. One only needs to watch
Bimal Roy’s Do Bheega Zamin and Satya-
jit Ray’s acclaimed Apu Trilogy to under-
stand the infuence.”
The 1950s saw the brewing of a new
kind of revolution in France. The French
New Wave, helmed by Francois Truf-
faut, Jean-Luc Godard and others, was a
movement started by former critics of the
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 102 2/29/2012 4:57:12 PM
MARCH-APRIL 2012 • DESIGN MATRIX 103
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 103 2/29/2012 4:57:16 PM
104 DESIGN MATRIX • MARCH-APRIL 2012
infuential Cahiers Du Cinema magazine.
These critics were staunch supporters of
the Italian neorealists and flms produced
by the Hollywood studio system. They
put forth a theory stating that the direc-
tor is to a flm what an author is to a book.
This “auteur” theory resulted in many
flms of the time bearing the distinctive
stamp and identity of the director. The
decade that followed saw the increasing
import of European cinema to American
shores. This was in direct response to the
American public’s growing disinterest in
traditional Hollywood fare. This led to the
formation of “arthouse cinemas”, institu-
tions dedicated to ofbeat and non-main-
stream movies. It is here that the term art
cinema is believed to have originated.
These days, use the term “art flm” in
enlightened company and you are likely
to be sneered at. “Art flm today is almost
a derogatory term. The genre has meta-
morphosed into what we now call inde-
pendent cinema,” says Risheeka Upadhy-
ay. “The era of big studios is over. With the
advent of digital, almost anyone with a
good story and a camera can make a flm.”
Last year, flmmaker Ram Gopal Varma
broke every industry convention by making
the Telugu feature Dongala Mutha (Den of
Thieves) in all of fve days, the frst Indian
flm of its kind to do so. Today, big studios
have set up smaller independent studios to
support and produce indie (independent)
cinema. The release (and success) of inde-
pendent flms, like Death at a Funeral, In
Bruges and closer to home Udaan and Shor
in the City, prove that despite the allure
of mainstream gloss, content ultimately
decides box-of ce success.
Lakkoju sums up, “Audiences are the
only things that remain unchanged in
the flm industry. They have never been
and will never be interested in genre tags.
They will watch whatever ofers them the
best balance of content and entertain-
ment.” We couldn’t agree more. Indepen-
dent or art cinema, whatever the correct
term, the fact remains that it is indeed
here to stay
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 104 2/29/2012 4:57:25 PM
MARCH-APRIL 2012 • DESIGN MATRIX 105
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 105 2/29/2012 4:57:29 PM
106 DESIGN MATRIX • MARCH-APRIL 2012
Tech
diary
A
STEP
FURTHER
Akash, the much-talked-about tablet
– the cheapest in its segment – is
trying to make a mark.
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 106 2/29/2012 4:57:35 PM
MARCH-APRIL 2012 • DESIGN MATRIX 107
I
n the late 1980s, disruptive technology
of the moment was the fax. It was pos-
sible to send a document from one end
of the world to another in seconds. After
which came the internet that succeeded
the fax in areas more than one. The frst
iteration of the World Wide Web was stat-
ic – like a library full of published books, it
was just another medium to put words on.
Many companies and organizations soon
realized that they could reach a wider audi-
ence through this new medium; after all,
between December 1995 and December
2000, the number of users on the Inter-
net had grown from about 16 million to
an impressive 361 million. According to
Google, their frst index in 1998 had about
26 million webpages. In 2000, that index
had hit the 1 billion mark. By mid-2008,
approximately ten years after Google’s frst
index, they hit a new milestone of 1 trillion
webpages on the Internet.
With such an advance in technology
and mainly the sheer reach of the internet,
smart devices are gaining popularity with
a wider mass of people. Apple started the
tablet culture with their Ipad and since then
there is no looking back. India’s ultra aford-
able tablet was unveiled sometime in Octo-
ber of 2011 but has been in development
since mid 2010. Since its of cial unveiling,
Akash has generated quite a large amount
of publicity. This low-cost Android-pow-
ered tablet has been specifcally designed
for the country’s large student population
with a commercial model to be produced
for the masses called Unislate 7.
The frst versions of Akash took shape at
the Indian Institute of Technology, Jodhpur
as a part of a government-backed under-
taking to bring afordable computers to
students in the country. Human Resources
Development Minister Kapil Sibal, who
has been a supporter of science and tech-
inspired approaches to education before,
has been its vocal federal front. Prem Kumar
Kalra, professor at IIT Kanpur, began engi-
neering the tablet in 2009 with a target
price of $50. He brought his work to Jodh-
pur when he moved to IIT Rajasthan to lead
the new campus as its director. About 170
students lead by professors are involved in
various parts of the still growing project.
The IIT team picked parts that would
meet some basic performance specs, while
keeping the overall cost low. The team had
a pre-manufacture proof-of-concept of the
tablet by August 2010, but the university
lacked the ability to mass produce it. Mon-
treal-based company Datawind bought
the design and created their version of the
tablet. According to the IIT team, it lacks
the built-in speaker and video conferenc-
ing facility that the original design had
but it runs on a more advanced version of
Android (Froyo, or 2.2).
Datawind designed and developed the
$35 Akash tablet. Suneet Singh Tuli, CEO of
Datawind, states, “It’s a small percentage
of people who have received the device,
so the number of users is low. The initial
devices reached colleges, and probably the
expectations of the students were diferent
from those of average users. So, it is neces-
sary to set the right expectations. The key
areas of the usage of the Akash tablet is web
surfng, multimedia HD quality and abil-
ity to run select Android apps. In all these
aspects, if you were expecting an iPad, then
you will be disappointed. The device is for
those who cannot aford an iPad.”
Akash is targeting a segment of the
Indian market that has not been tapped
and probably will not be either. They are
going after those people whose average
monthly income is Rs. 10,000. However, the
product has been in the limelight ever since
talks about it frst began surfacing, but as
of today, the tablet has been plagued by
controversies and criticism. Several users
complained of a less than satisfactory expe-
rience and there are debates questioning
the demand for a tablet in that segment.
But with the impending launch of the
upgraded version, users can expect things
to change for the better.
Quality is all about meeting expec-
tations and going beyond them. Akash
might, might not stay for long. But what it
has done is opened up a whole new sec-
tion of the market for companies to target
in the future
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 107 2/29/2012 4:57:41 PM
L
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 108 2/29/2012 4:57:46 PM
MARCH-APRIL 2012 • DESIGN MATRIX 109
P
R
O
D
U
C
T
L
A
U
N
C
H
The Chaise Lounge collection from Living In Style features one-armed loungers having a low
back, half back or no back at all and have been designed with a creative fair. These lounges are
available in vibrant colours and sizes and will efortlessly blend with your style of decor, be it
traditional or contemporary. A true indulgence, these chaise lounges can be placed at a variety
of spots to create a cozy reading nook or add an extra seating in your bedroom or living room.
Living In Style ofers these lounges in an array of fabrics like luxurious leather, velvet, suede,
traditional damask, etc.
Tel.: 022 28752174
Living In Style unveils Chaise Lounges
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 109 2/29/2012 4:57:54 PM

G
old
en Touch
We all love beautifully crafted, precious and thoughtful
gifts that do not wither away with time. Golden Touch
is a concept store which of ers luxury products for
your loved ones in 24 carat gold! Be it idols of worship
or home decor accessories, name initials, playing
cards or jewellery – patra or gold leaf is used to create
delectable, pretty things which will neither tarnish nor
go out of vogue. The technique involves hammering
pure gold into extremely thin sheets which is often
used for gilding. Each piece is cut and engraved to
design by precision lasers and then assembled by
expert craftsmen for months. Golden Touch ensures
premium quality of its products employing state-of-the-
art technologies for gold leaf ng. The polycarbonate
coating applied on both sides of the gold foil not only
preserves the precious metal from turning black even
after years of exposure to air, but also enables the
craftsman to mould it into any desired shape. With ideas and concepts so unique, they have something for every
taste at showrooms in Delhi, Jaipur, Kolkata, Indore,
Ahmedabad and Singapore.
www.goldentouchgifts.com
Samsonite, the leading global luggage
brand, introduces India to a fabulous
new range of hard-side bags and a lock
system for the future – the Aerial collec-
tion with the newly developed innovative
integrated card lock system. The interior
lining inside each Aerial piece is easily
removable and washable. The card lock
system works like a hotel key card, and
each Aerial suitcase includes a designated
credit card-sized key card that easily f ts
into a wallet or a purse. Locking the suit-
case is as simple as sliding the card into
the designated slot, which turns the small
indicator light red. To unlock the suitcase,
simply insert the card and the indicator
light will turn green. All Aerial pieces are
constructed of an ultra-thin polycarbon-
ate shell which of ers the benef ts of
lightness, strength and durability. Priced
from `11,450 onwards, Aerial is available as
a spinner in three sizes and two fashion-
able colours – Metallic equinox grey and
metallic midnight plum.
www.samsonite.com
Samsonite Aerial Collection
Love with
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 110 2/29/2012 4:58:01 PM
Celebrate with Episode’s new line of sil-
verware that has products ranging from
bar accessories such as wine cooler, ice
buckets, bottle stoppers, etc. and home
decor products like candlestands, lanterns
and tealight holders. Hand-crafted sterling
silver and silver-plated, this range is go-
ing to leave you wanting it all. Episode’s
innovative styling showcasing an exclu-
sive repertoire of over 10,000 designs is a
legacy of a century of silversmithing, and a
work force of generations of crafting skills.
More than 30 years of exposure to work-
ing with renowned designer brands like
Armani, Sabattini, Ralph Lauren, etc. and
an in–house modern manufacturing facil-
ity, helps Episode to live up to international
quality parameters.
www.episodesilver.com
Home Collective brings Chewdriver, a handy tool to f x all the problems with kids while eat-
ing dinner. Open your Chewdriver toolbox and you’ll f nd everything you need. The three
magnetic utensils snap securely into the tool-style handle and can be changed at will. Priced
just right, with the Chewdriver dinner is one meal that your children will look forward to. The
store also has quality products for children, including animal-face hooks, cutlery and more.
All the products have been sourced from 27 dif erent trusted brands. Check out the store
and you’re sure to be impressed with the quality and design of the products on of er. To
experience beauty, utility and af ordability, Home Collective is the place to be!
www.homecollective.in
Bar Silverware from
Episode
Hom
e
Collective
Chewdriver from
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 111 2/29/2012 4:58:43 PM
112 DESIGN MATRIX • MARCH-APRIL 2012
KIWA is proud to present its latest Amber styled modular kitchen that ensures the holistic satisfaction of style
and design conscious connoisseurs in India. This range
of modular kitchens can be designed with a base unit
equipped with aluminium grip-groove to give the
utmost linearity at the composition. The Amber Modular Kitchen brings forth new textures, elegant colours and
breakthrough elements and is styled with f ery and
bold lacquered doors with a combination of glass and
veneers. Amber kitchens are innovated by the idea of
well organized space and easy accessibility and give you the feeling that one can have a graceful looking kitchen
with lots of storage. Tremendously modish, the cabinets have ample space design and colour options like Matt
white, ivory, corda, gloss white, black, etc. To maximize
space and functionality, KIWA of ers accessories, multi
functional work island that is equipped with open units
and professional work tops.
www.forzzafurniture.in
Amber Kitchens from
KIW
A
Ebco Kitchen Drawer Management System
of ers innumerable options and f exibility
to a kitchen designer as well as the end
user to organize each drawer in a kitchen to
its best use in terms of storage and utility.
The system consists of drawer trays made
of Polypropylene, for dif erent standard
widths. There are utility products such as
spice holder, knife holder, cutting board,
roll holder with inbuilt cutter for paper/foil,
etc. and storage options like plate holders,
bottle racks, and container set of four to f t
in these drawer trays. Alternatively, you can
use the divider of dif erent sizes to make
your own layout. These inserts and dividers
are compatible with dif erent size options
available for the drawer trays. Elegantly
designed, these accessories are ideal to be
used with the Ebco Pro-Motion drawer slides.
However, it has a f exibility to trim the border
and use it for wooden drawers as well.
www.ebco.in
Ebco
KDMS from
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 112 2/29/2012 4:58:53 PM
MARCH-APRIL 2012 • DESIGN MATRIX 113
Pergo is reputedly one of the toughest laminate f ooring available to be accorded
with Class 34 rating, making it the perfect choice for heavy traf c and commercial ar-
eas. As a part of technological advancement Pergo has introduced new features for
reduction of sound with its professional soundbloc technology and also has other
unique features. One of the patented feature is the “Triple Protection” system or Ti-
tanX advanced technology with multiple armed overlays of aluminium oxide spray
known to be the second hardest substance after diamond which provides the f oor
with incredible wear resistance. Another unique feature is the patented “Scratch Re-
sistant Surface” developed for highest demands in commercial and residential areas.
Also, due to its unique “Multi Layer Build-up System” it is a high-impact resistance
f oor that meets the needs for (various applications) the toughest requirements.
www.pergo.com
Pergo with
Class 34
certification
Nas Home
To give your walls an interesting and classy feel, Nas Home introduces an assortment of
brilliant wallpapers from renowned international brands such as Casamance, Casadeco,
Zimmer & Rhode, Designers Guild, Harlequin and Elitis to name a few. The collection
ofers an array of varied patterns, colours and textures. With prices ranging from `50 to
`500 per sq. ft., there is a whole host of stuf to choose from. The collection also consists
of bold and timeless patterns in environment friendly wallpapers under their eco–chic
trade mark. Acrylic coated and easily washable, this range lends a touch of class to any
interior. Welcome urban and contemporary landscapes into your house; play with the
light, be it with the pocketed fabric and the matt/shiny efects or with the wallpaper.
www.nashome.net
International
Wallpapers from
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 113 2/29/2012 4:59:09 PM
114 DESIGN MATRIX • JULY-AUGUST 2011 114 4 114 114 114 114 44 14 14 114 11 114 114 1114 14 114 114 114 111 114 111111 114 14 4444 1114 11 11 1114 114 114 11111444 111 111111111 DES DES DES DES DES DES DES DES DES ES EE DE DES DES DES DES DES DES E DES DDES DESS DES DES ES E DE ES DE DDES ES E DES ES ES DES ES DES ES DES EES DES E DES DESS ES ES DES DDES ES S ES SSSS ES SSIGN GN IGN IGN GN GN GN IGN IGN IGN IGN IGN IGN GN IGN GNNNN GN IG IGN IGN GN GN N GN IGN GNNNN GN GN N IG IIGN G IGGNN GGN IGN GNN MA MA MA MA MA MA MA MA MA MA MA MA MA MA M MMA MMMA MA MA MA MMA MA MMA MA MA AAA MA MA A MA A MA MA AA MMMA MA MA MAA MA MA MA MMA A MA MA MA MATRI TRI TRI TRI TRI RRI TR TR TRI RI TRI TRI TTRI TRI TRI TRI TTRI R TRI TRI R TR TR TRI TRI TTTTTTR TRI TTRI TRR TR TRI TR TR TRI R TTR TTR TTTR TR TRI TRRR TR TR TTTRR X • XX • X • X • X • X • X • X • XX • X • X • X • XXXXXX • X • X • X • XXXXXX • XXXXXXX • • XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX JU JU JU JU JU JU JU JU JU JU JU JU U JU U JU JU JU JJU UUUU JU JU U JU JJU JJU JU JU UU JJJJU JU JU JJU JJU JU JJU JJJJJJJJ LY- - LY- LY- Y- Y- Y- LY LY LY LY YY LY- LY- LLY- LY Y LY YY LY- Y- LY- LY- YY LY LLY LY LY LY- LY- Y LY LY YY LY LY LY- LY Y LY LY YY LY Y LY LLY YY AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG AAUG AUG AU AU AAUG AU AAUG AUU AUG G AUG AU AUG AUG AUG AUG UUG AU AUG UG G U AU AAUG UUG G AAUUUUG U AUUG G U AUG GG UG GGGGG UGGG U UST UST UST UST UST UST US UST UST UST UUUST UUUST UST UST UST T UST UST UST US UST UST US ST S UST ST UST UST UST T ST T UUS ST ST T UUST UST ST ST S UST USST TT UST T ST ST STTT USTTT UUS STTT UUST UU TT 20 220 20 2220 220 20 220 20 20 20 200 20 0 20 200 220 220 20 20 20 20 220 200 20 20 220 0 220 20 2220 2011 11 11 11 1111 11 111 11111 11 11 1 11 11 111
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 114 2/29/2012 4:59:34 PM
JULY-AUGUST 2011 • DESIGN MATRIX 115
etc.
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 115 2/29/2012 4:59:50 PM
116 DESIGN MATRIX • MARCH-APRIL 2012
Happenings
O
O
O
O
O
O
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 116 2/29/2012 5:00:05 PM
MARCH-APRIL 2012 • DESIGN MATRIX 117
J
alaram, Veneers & Floors in association with Design
Matrix, hosted a casual wine and cheese evening, at their
showroom in Andheri. The idea was to bring together a
select few designers of the industry and talk about design as
a part of their lives. While doing so, Karan Jhunjhunwala and
Pooja Goswami Kulkarni of Jalaram walked the guests around
the showroom, introducing them to the various oferings by
the international brands at Jalaram.
The evening was attended by guests such as Sandeep
Shikre, Manjunath Shenoy, Ketan Sheth, Ashish Gupta, Manish
Dixit, Bhavya & Neilesh Kenkare, Amit Khanolkar, Rajesh and
Ujwala Kumthekar, Ilyaz Yusuf & Sakina Rangwala of Dreams
Furnishings, Kushal Bajaj of Geeta Aluminium, accompanied
by Babita Krishnan, Editor and Natasha Bohra, Deputy Editor of
Design Matrix. Cherry on the cake was a quick walk into the Le
Cdeor showroom, a few blocks away - a store with exquisite
artefacts and home accessories.
The evening concluded with a feeling of wanting more.
Surely, more to come!
JALARAM
VENEERS
& FLOORS
Prominent architects and
designers share interesting
insights about design over
wine & cheese, on a casual
evening, at the Jalaram
showroom in Mumbai.
1. Karan Jhunjhunwala, Suman Shah, Ar. Ketan Sheth 2.
Sakina Rangwala, Babita Krishnan, Ar. Manish Dixit 3.
Pooja Goswami Kulkarni, Rajesh and Ujwala Kumthekar
4. Sakina Rangwala, Ilyaz Yusuf, Ar. Manish Dixit, Ashish
Gupta 5. Neilesh & Bhavya Kenkare 6. Karan Jhunjhun-
wala, Ar. Amit Khanolkar 7. Ashish Gupta, Kushal Bajaj
and colleague 8. Ar. Manjunath Shenoy, Ar. Sandeep
Shikre 9. Suman Shah, Ar. Sandeep Shikre, Ar. Manju-
nath Shenoy, Babita Krishnan.
O
O
O
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 117 2/29/2012 5:01:49 PM
118 DESIGN MATRIX • MARCH-APRIL 2012
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 118 2/29/2012 5:02:57 PM
MARCH-APRIL 2012 • DESIGN MATRIX 119
T
he crème de la crème of architecture
fraternity were seen together on
5
th
February honouring the best
projects in fve diferent categories. Hon’ble
Minister of Urban Development Sh. Kamal
Nath gave way the prizes at a glittering
event which culminated with a musical
show hosted for more than 1,000 members
of IIA at Siri Fort Auditorium in New Delhi.
These awards carry a special signifcance
as are given by IIA that was founded in
1917 as the representative national body
of architects and currently has more than
20,000 members.
This year’s jury that was held in
November at Sir JJ college of Architecture,
Mumbai, comprised of eminent members:
Ar. Prafulla Kharkhanis from Nasik (President
IIA), Ar. Aaashish Kumar Moitra from New
Delhi (former Director of School of Planning
& Architecture, New Delhi), Ar. Rajiv Mishra
from Mumbai (Principal Sir JJ College of
Architecture, Mumbai), Ar. Mohandas from
Calicut (winner All India Design Trophy
1983 & 1984, and All India President of The
National Association of Architecture), Ar.
Debabarata Ghosh from Kolkata (Hon. Jt.
Secretary, IIA).
“The IIA awards aim to encourage,
acknowledge, appreciate and honour
the signifcant contribution of member
professionals in the feld of architecture,”
explains Ar. Vijay Garg Chairman organizing
committee. The Chief Guest Sh. Kamal Nath
addressed the audience and also announced
nomination of IIA representative in Delhi
Master Plan committee. Ar. Karkhanis,
President IIA thanked the Minister for his
unfinching support, which he added, was
very encouraging.
For the frst time in IIA Awards,
eight eminent architects were inducted
into the ‘Hall of Fame’ for their lifetime
achievements. The inaugural Hall of
Fame inductees are Ar. Raj Rewal, Ar.
M.R. Agnihotri, Ar. Ajoy Choudhury,
Ar. Ram Sharma, Ar. C.N. Raghvendran
(Padmashree), Ar. M.M Rana (Padmashree),
Ar. Jai Rattan Bhalla (Padmashree), and Ar.
Balbir Verma
Happenings
AWARDS
THE IIA
Instituted in 1989, the IIA Awards that are
bestowed upon professionals for excellence
in architecture in India, this year celebrated
with the honourable minister Sh. Kamal Nath.
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 119 2/29/2012 5:03:51 PM
120 DESIGN MATRIX • MARCH-APRIL 2012
SHOE
WHEEL
I
have often wondered, where would
Imelda Marcos keep her shoes if she
was not living in the Presidential
Palace? What would she do if we shifted
her to a 1,000 sq. ft. apartment in one of
our metros? She would probably leave
most of her shoes behind. A few of my
friends who have a wide collection of
footwear (especially the women), are
always complaining about the lack of
space – for their shoes!
One of the most important yet least
looked into accessory – the shoe – is
more often than not, struggling to find a
space it can call its own. In most homes,
it has to share space with the old papers
that are stored to be given off at the end
of the month. Well not any more.
Shoe Wheel, probably the most inno-
vative and compact shoe storage in the
world, has arrived in India. Brought to the
domestic market by Navitas International,
it is a storage solution for those who have
had enough of the conventional shoe
racks. Quite literally, spinning free of tra-
dition, the Shoe Wheel is an indigenously
designed mobile storage unit with 20
expandable pockets that can hold up to
30 pairs of shoes (depending on the shoe
type of course!).
And it is not complicated to use
– shoes are inserted into the pockets
through elastic bands, which secure them
snugly into place. Best of all – these pock-
ets are easily adjustable to fit your entire
footwear range – sneakers, high heels or
flats.
So once you have found the right
space to roll your shoe wheel in, lock the
swivel wheels and just rotate to take your
pick
For more information log on to www.navi-
tasintl.com or mail to sales@navitasintnl.
com/navitasintnl@gmail.com
or call 022 65930825
Not only does it occupy less space but
it is almost a conversation piece in itself
– Shoe Wheel a novel solution to shoe
storage problems!
Words: Babita Krishnan; Images: Courtesy Navitas International
Product
review
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 120 2/29/2012 5:04:20 PM
MARCH-APRIL 2012 • DESIGN MATRIX 121
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 121 2/29/2012 5:04:25 PM
122 DESIGN MATRIX • MARCH-APRIL 2012
Space
review
36
OAK & BARLEY
All day dining in Mumbai, satiates
your favourite comfort food craving!
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 122 2/29/2012 5:04:31 PM
MARCH-APRIL 2012 • DESIGN MATRIX 123
I
f you do not mind a bit of glamourous
drama to accompany your meal, head
to 36 Oak & Barley. Dressed as it is in
chic red, this elegant eatery set in the heart
of Mumbai at Kemps Corner, spells a well-
designed grace that is a most welcome
backdrop to an equally delectable and
fresh menu.
Red walls, polished wooden foors
sporting brass accents and hints of unusual
yet chic details create a very “New Yorkish”
look, as my widely-travelled fellow diner
commented, tucking into the chilli-cheese
toast. A truly original menu ofers comfort
food including an array of appetizers, main
courses, desserts and much more.
What also impressed us was that the
simple recipes were served in a gourmet
style – complete with lovely presentation.
The restaurant takes great pride in the
simplest of dishes such as Akuri on toast or
a chilli-cheese toast. Every recipe has been
perfected and served with great emphasis
not only on the presentation and prepara-
tion but also on freshness of the ingredi-
ents. An elaborate food menu with intrigu-
ing choices of new-age delicacies, also
gives an interesting contrast like a simple
Ham & Cheese sandwich. But our personal
vote goes to the signature 36 O&B Fondue
which is a plain cheese fondue served with
chopped onions, tomatoes and green chil-
lies. If you are a weight-watcher, do not
worry as there are great choices for you as
well! And you can wrap-up the meal with
a pick from the dessert menu – the good
old-fashioned jelly custard or something a
bit more exotic, and a cofee.
While elegant comfort is the theme
of the eatery, the drama is not far behind.
In fact you will fnd it at the bar, where a
gleaming and purposefully angular sculp-
ture of a Jaguar is ready to leap at you
from behind the Bar. The cat adds just
the required touch of attitude to a decor
that makes you want to experiment with
the exotic.
So take your pick of alcoholic or non-
alcoholic drinks to accompany your meal. It
is the right place to enjoy an evening with
people you love to spend time with
36 Oak & Barley, 76, August Kranti Marg,
Gowalia Tank, Mumbai 400036;
Tel.: 23811010; Email: hello@36ob.com;
Website: www.36ob.com
A gleaming and purposefully angular sculpture
of a Jaguar is ready to leap at you from behind
the Bar. The cat adds just the required touch
of attitude to a decor that makes you want to
experiment with the exotic.
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 123 2/29/2012 5:04:35 PM
124 DESIGN MATRIX • MARCH-APRIL 2012
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 124 2/29/2012 5:04:45 PM
MARCH-APRIL 2012 • DESIGN MATRIX 125
A
rchitect Koka Sharath Kumar has a well-established
practice, Lakeer Architects and Interior Designers,
in Hyderabad. Four years ago, he designed a gated
community near a village called Kowkoor, about 12 kms away
from Secunderabad, a place even he calls home as he, too,
lives there. This is what he has been observing and wanted to
share the simple beauty with all of us.
“I have to pass through the village Kowkoor to reach
my home in the new development. Every year, during the
Sankranti festival one particular house in the village displays
and sells kites. The simple display of the kites and their abun-
dance of colours add joy to everyone who lays their eyes on
them. It is just a way of a simple villager, to spread love and
light all around. I found this especially appealing since it is
such an important part of what could be termed as ‘rural
design’ and has been around for ages, we just haven’t had the
time to appreciate it.”
This is a photograph taken by the architect to celebrate
simplicity that is stunning by just existing! Maybe it’s time for
us to celebrate design of a diferent kind
Ar. Koka Sharath Kumar can be contacted at
lakeerarchitects@gmail.com
Reader
contribution
Sometimes a simple element
makes life colourful, as Ar. Koka
Sharath Kumar shares with us.
RURAL
COLOURS
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 125 2/29/2012 5:04:50 PM
126 DESIGN MATRIX • MARCH-APRIL 2012
International Footwear
Industry Suppliers Fair Aysaf
2012
International Footwear Industry Suppliers
Fair Aysaf is an event that brings together
some of the best designs in the footwear
industry today - both national and interna-
tional. Last year, as many as 30 European and
far-eastern companies displayed their prod-
ucts, ranging from footwear accessories to
wallets and belts, at the exhibition.
This year’s exhibition holds tremendous
promise as well, and will showcase the latest
designs and trends in the footwear indus-
try. Footwear soles, moulds, machinery,
leather, footwear sub-industry, accessories,
and chemicals will be showcased this time
around. Foreign brands such as Travetti SLR
(Italy) that manufactures accessories for bags
and luggage, Ching Long (Hong Kong) and
Borpelle (Poland) that manufacture women
accessories and equipment, and Super Tan-
nery (India) that manufactures leather for
footwear, wallets, belts, and furniture, will be
setting up their stalls at this year’s exhibition.
Date: February 29 - March 3, 2012
Venue: Istanbul, Turkey
Colombo International Yarn
and Fabric Show – 2012
The third Colombo International Yarn and
Fabric Show (CIF), organised by CEM Global,
is the only exhibition of its kind to be held
in Bangladesh, Indonesia and Sri Lanka. The
third edition of CIF provides an ideal platform
for the textile business, as well as for show-
casing the latest trends in fabrics. Exhibitors
from all over the world will get the chance
to present their fabrics, which can be used
for various applications, such as garments,
accessories, industrial use, etc.
CIF – 2012 aims to cater to the requirements
of the growing Sri Lankan apparel industry,
and will showcase cotton and synthetic fab-
rics, natural fabrics, yarn and fbre, home tex-
tiles, accessories and more.
Date: March 1-3, 2012
Venue: Colombo, Sri Lanka
Design Indaba Expo 2012
Presenting the very best in art and design
– Design Indaba Expo 2012 showcases
design across all disciplines such as advertis-
ing, architecture, craft, decor, flm, fashion,
graphic design, interior design, jewellery,
visual media and product design. What
makes this expo diferent from others of
its kind is the fact that all products that are
showcased here are quintessentially South
African - derivatives and imports do not fea-
ture here. The event attracts both local and
international buyers, creating a platform for
productive trade relationships.
This year, visitors will also be able to attend
all-day fashion shows, short flms and
Pecha Kucha presentations and chat with
the designers. The Design Indaba Expo
coincides with Design Indaba Conference,
thus ofering visitors a week of creative
rejuvenation.
Date: March 2-4, 2012
Venue: Cape Town, South Africa
Sugarloaf Crafts Festival
2012
For the last 30 years, Sugarloaf Crafts Fes-
tivals have been dedicated to providing
a low overhead platform for artists and
designers to come together and display
their works. This year, with as many as
250 artisans showcasing and selling their
works, Sugarloaf Crafts Festival 2012 has
a lot to offer. Apart from designs created
by top national artists, the festival will
also see the works of new and upcoming
artists. Visitors can view new creations in
pottery, sculpture, glass, jewellery, fash-
ion, home decor, furniture and home
accessories, garden products, and pho-
tography.
A series of interactive sessions have also
been planned this year, during which arti-
sans will show visitors how they create
their art. Some of the sessions planned
include wheel thrown pottery, wood
turning, metal spinning, fantasy furniture,
stone sculpting, among others.
Till date, events organized by the Sugar-
loaf Craft Festivals have attracted as many
as 175,000 visitors from all over the United
States. This spring, The Sugarloaf Craft
Festivals has lined up a number of similar
events across the United States.
Date: March 9-11, 2012
Venue: Somerset, New Jersey
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 126 2/29/2012 5:04:54 PM
MARCH-APRIL 2012 • DESIGN MATRIX 127
Australian Toy, Hobby &
Nursery Fair
The Australian Toy, Hobby and Nursery Fair
is an annual event that aims at promot-
ing the positive benefts to children and
families of toys, games, and hobbies. This
year’s fair will provide a platform for retail-
ers, wholesalers, promoters and marketers
to come together to display, demonstrate,
and sell toys, games, hobbies, nursery
products and licenses from around the
world. It is expected that over 210 exhibi-
tors will be a part of the fair. Among the
participants will be big brands such as Has-
bro, Lego, Moose and Toyworld, among
others. On display will be a vast range of
products such as educational toys, models,
jigsaws, kites, nursery products, videos, arts
and crafts, playground equipment and sta-
tionery.
Apart from this, the four-day fair also
includes a toy collection programme as
part of its social obligation towards chil-
dren with special abilities.
Date: March 6-9, 2012
Venue: Melbourne, Australia
The Art of Video Games
2012
An important event to look out for this
month is GameFest. A three-day festival,
GameFest includes talks by video game
pioneers, panel discussions between
designers and artists, movie screenings,
costume photo-ops, and hands-on play.
The Art of Video Games exhibition aims
at exploring video games as an artistic
expression and will focus on striking visuals
and the creative use of new technologies.
It also highlights the works of infuential
artists and designers over a period of fve
eras of gaming technology. The exhibition
also focuses on the interplay of graphics,
technology and storytelling through some
of the best games for various gaming sys-
tems, including Atari VCS and Playstation 3.
A series of interviews with developers and
artists have also been lined up.
Date: March 16-18, 2012
Venue: Washington D.C., USA
Salone Internazionale del
Mobile
The Salone del Mobile is the global bench-
mark for the home furnishing sector. It
made its frst appearance in 1961, designed
to promote Italian furniture and furnish-
ing accessories on the export market, and
has continued to do so ensuring that the
quality of Italian furniture is known to all
four corners of the earth, with half of all its
visitors coming from around the world. 
The 51
st
edition of the Saloni this year,
will showcase products for the global
market, reaf rming Milan’s rightful place
as the international capital of furnish-
ing. As always, there will be a tantalising
panoply of collateral events throughout
the city. The 2011 edition was attended by
282,483 trade operators, 177,964 of whom
came from 154 Countries; 32,870 members
of the general public and 5,967 communi-
cations operators. 
Date: 17-22 April, 2012
Venue: Milan, Italy
Bright Lights: The AIGA
Awards
“Bright Lights: The AIGA Awards” is an
annual celebration to honour the distin-
guished practitioners, educators and role
models whose creativity, intelligence,
perception and skill have inspired and
shaped the entire design profession.
Proceeds from the event beneft the AIGA
Design Archives, Worldstudio AIGA Schol-
arships and the Legacy Fund, an endow-
ment to secure the future of AIGA, the
professional association for design.
AIGA’s design community in New York City
presents the second annual “Bright Lights:
The AIGA Awards” celebration, honouring
the extraordinary lives and careers of four
AIGA Medalists whose exemplary work has
inspired and defned the profession: Ralph
Caplan, infuential author and design
advocate; Elaine Lustig Cohen, pioneer-
ing graphic designer, artist and archivist;
Armin Hofmann, legendary Swiss graphic
designer and educator; and Robert Vogele,
ground-breaking design entrepreneur and
mentor.
Date: April 19, 2012
Venue: New York, United States of America
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 127 2/29/2012 5:04:56 PM
128 DESIGN MATRIX • MARCH-APRIL 2012
IFC: Ultratech Paints & Textures
F 213A/1, Lado Sarai,
Old M. B. Road, New Delhi – 110030
Tel: (011) 46061549/50
Email: info@ultratechpaints.com
www.ultratechpaints.com
Pg. 1: Ebco Pvt. Ltd.
402-3, Hyde Park,
Saki Vihar Road, Mumbai 400072
Tel: (022) 67837777
Email: info@ebco.in
www.ebco.in
Pg. 2 & 3: Durian Industries Ltd.
401, The Summit, Western Express Highway,
Vile Parle (E) Mumbai 400057
Tel: (022) 26269000
Email: info@durian.in
www.durian.in
Pg. 5: Natural Veneers
Turakhia Overseas Pvt. Ltd.
307, Traf c Lite,
Next to Bank of Baroda, M.G. Road
Ghatkopar (West), Mumbai- 400 086
Tel: (022) 25114285
Pg. 6: Neumec Group
Email: sales@neumec.com
www.neumec.com
Pg. 7: Astral Poly Tecknik Limited
207/1, Astral House, B/h. Rajpath Club,
Of. S.G.Highway, Ahmedabad – 380 059.
Tel: (079) 66212000
Email: info@astralcpvc.com
www.astralcpvc.com
Pg. 8: SHAH CREATION PVT. LTD.
Building No.2, Gala No.8,
Ram Mandir Industrial Estate,Ram Mandir Road,
Goregaon (E), Mumbai 400063
Email: shahcreations@hotmail.com
Hasmukh Shah: 9820228852
Pg. 11: Geeta Aluminium Company
Pvt.Ltd.
D/4, Ansa Industrial Estate,
Saki Vihar Road, Saki Naka,
Andheri (East), Mumbai – 400072.
Tel: 9930806685
www.geetaaluminium.com
Pg. 12: Uniply Elementz Decorative
Veneers
Uniply Industries Ltd
#52, Harleys Road, Kilpauk, Chennai - 6000010.
Tel: (044) 26605995
Email: info@uniply.in
Pg. 13: Grescasa Ceramics
Grescasa Ceramics Limited
5-E, Laxmi Industrial Estate, New Link Road,
Andheri (W), Mumbai – 400053,
Tel: (022) 26313096/66992409
Pg. 17: MEGAVENT Technologies
Pvt Ltd
#118/22, 2nd Cross, Sajjepalya,
Near Magadi Main Road – Ring Road Junction,
Bangalore-560091
Tel: (080) 23211201
Email: info@megavent.in
www.megavent.in
Pg. 18: Le Cdeor
MRJ Trading Pvt. Ltd.
201, Shyam Kamal ‘C’ Bldg., Agarwal Market,
Vile Parle (E), Mumbai – 400057.
Tel: (022) 26187132 / 26131442
Email: artifacts@mrjgroup.in
Pg. 19: DECOREX SOLUTIONS
PVT LTD
New Patel Sawmill Group
204/B, Vertex Vikas,
M V Road, Andheri (East),
Mumbai – 400069.
Tel – (022) 2683095
Email: decorexsol@gmail.com
decorexsol@in.com
Pg. 20 & 21: Durian Office Furniture
Durian Industries Ltd.
401, The Summit, Western Express Highway,
Vile Parle (E) Mumbai 400057
Tel: (022) 26269000
Email: info@durian.in
www.durian.in
Pg. 34: Uniply ATS Plywood
Uniply Industries Ltd,
#52, Harleys Road, Kilpauk,
Chennai-6000010.
Tel: (044) 26605995.
Email: info@uniply.in
Pg. 35: Dorset Luxury Faucets
A-88, Road No.2, Mahipalpur Extension,
New Delhi – 110037
Tel.: (011) 46138800(100 Lines)
Email: faucet@dorsetindia.com
www.dorsetindia.com
Pg. 101, 103 & 105: Le Cdeor
8/H, Laxmi Ind. Estate, New Link Road,
Versova, Andheri (W), Mumbai – 400053.
Tel: (022) 26327733 / 34
Email: jalaramvnf@gmail.com
Pg. 108: MRJ Flooring
MRJ Marketing Pvt. Ltd.
201, Shyam Kamal ‘C’ Bldg., Agarwal Market,
Vile Parle (E), Mumbai – 400057.
Tel: (022) 26187132 / 26131442
Email: fooring@mrjgroup.in
IBC: Jalaram Veneers:
• Agar Bazar S. K. Bole Road, Dadar (W),
Mumbai 400028. Tel: (022) 24318444/555
Email: jalaram_timber@yahoo.com
• 9/b & 9/k, Laxmi Ind. Estate, New Link Road,
Versova, Andheri (W), Mumbai – 400053.
Tel: (022) 26327733 / 34
Email: jalaramvnf@gmail.com
BC: DANSANI Bathroom Furniture
Ultramine Group
Chatterjee International Centre,
33A, J. L. Nehru Road, 6th Floor,
Suite #10, Kolkata 700071
M: 9874430000
Email: indiadansani@vsnl.net
www.dansani.com
GLOSSARY
FORM IV
Statement of ownership and other par ticulars about magazine entitled – Design Matri x to be published in the first issue ever y year af ter the last day of Februar y.
1. Place of publication: MRJ Creations Pvt. Ltd., 201, Shyam Kamal 'C' Building, Agar wal Market, Vile Parle (E), Mumbai - 400057
2. Periodicity of it s publication: Bi-Monthly
3. Printer’s Name: Mr. Karan Jhunjhunwala, Nationality: Indian, Address: MRJ Creations Pvt. Ltd., 201, Shyam Kamal 'C' Building, Agar wal Market, Vile Parle (E), Mumbai - 400057
4. Publisher’s Name: Mr. Karan Jhunjhunwala, Nationality: Indian, Address: MRJ Creations Pvt. Ltd., 201, Shyam Kamal 'C' Building, Agar wal Market, Vile Parle (E), Mumbai - 400057
5. Editor-in-Chief ’s Name: Ms. Babita Krishnan, Nationality: Indian, Address: MRJ Creations Pvt. Ltd., 201, Shyam Kamal 'C' Building, Agar wal Market, Vile Parle (E), Mumbai - 400057
6. Names and addresses of individuals who own the newspaper and par tners or shareholders holding more than one per cent of the total capital.
a) Karan Jhunjhunwala, MRJ Creations Pvt. Ltd. 201, Shyam Kamal ‘C’ Building, Agar wal Market, Vile Parle (E), Mumbai - 400057
b) Manohar Jhunjhunwala, MRJ Creations Pvt. Ltd. 201, Shyam Kamal ‘C’ Building, Agar wal Market, Vile Parle (E), Mumbai - 400057
I, Karan Jhunjhunwala – Publisher (Design Matri x), hereby declare that the par ticulars given above are true to the best of my knowledge and belief.
Date: 1st March, 2012
Sd/-
Mr. Karan Jhunjhunwala
Publisher
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 128 2/29/2012 5:04:58 PM
TM
9/b, k, laxmi ind. estate, new link road, versova, andheri (w), mumbai - 400 053. Tel.: (022) 2632 7733 / 34 e mail: jalaramvnf@gmail.com
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 129 2/29/2012 5:04:59 PM
Design Matrix_Mar-April 12.indb 130 2/29/2012 5:05:07 PM

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