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Overview ................................................................................................................10–2 Major System Monitoring Tools ..........................................................................10–2 Specific Transaction Monitoring Overview ......................................................10–32 System Message (SM02) ....................................................................................10–51

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This chapter will help you understand how to monitor your system. It is crucial that a system administrator gets a quick overview of the system status and is quickly notified of critical situations. In this chapter, the reader will learn about the following items: < < < < Some CCMS tools Major tasks Specific transactions System messages

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The major tools of system monitoring provide a quick mechanism to monitor your system. The two major tools, the CCMS Central Alert Monitor and the System Administration Assistant (SAA), perform two different functions. The CCMS Central Alert Monitor is primarily an alert monitor. The SAA is a control panel from which you can directly access the specific monitoring tools and be notified of any alerts. If you have time constraints, these major tools provide a quick overview of the system status and notify you of critical situations that warrant your immediate attention.

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Transaction RZ20 is a centralized alert monitor. With this transaction, you can monitor the servers in your landscape, such as development, QA, testing, production, etc. You no longer have to individually log into each system to search for alerts. If there is an alert, the monitor will link to many of the other transactions in this guidebook. You can do many of your system monitoring tasks with the Central Alert Monitor. To find Alert Monitor documentation, from the menu bar, choose: 1. Help → SAP Library. 2. SAP Library → Basis Components → Computing Center Management System (BC-CCM) → BC-Computing Center Management System 3. BC-Computing Center Management System → the Alert Monitor. The Central Alert Monitor is not a replacement for examining the other checklist tasks. Certain alerts, such as Microsoft SQL Server and TMS have not yet been integrated into the Central Alert Monitor.

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An alert indicates a potentially serious problem that should be quickly resolved. If not contained, these problems could deteriorate into a disaster.
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1. In the Command field, enter transaction RZ20 and choose Enter (or from the SAP standard menu, choose Tools → CCMS → Control/Monitoring → RZ20-Alert monitor). This screen is the standard display. We will use a modified display with most of the monitor sets suppressed.

We will be using this monitor set display. See the configuration section later in the RZ20 section to learn how to configure your display.

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$FFHVVLQJ WKH &&06 $OHUW 0RQLWRU 5= 1. From the CCMS Alert Monitor screen, we have the display with only two monitor sets: < SAP-delivered SAP CCMS Monitor Templates < User-created SystemAdmin docu

2. Click the node (+) to expand the monitor sets. 3. In the SAP CCMS Monitor Templates, there are predefined monitors to use 6 as your starting point. These monitor templates cannot be modified. To modify them, copy them into a customer monitor set and modify the monitor there. 4. In this example, we copied the Entire system monitor from the SAP CCMS Monitor Template into SystemAdmin docu. This step allows us to modify the monitor. 5. Select a monitor. (In this example, we selected Entire system.) 6. To load the monitor, choose .
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This is the “monitor screen.” 7. The monitor contains the alerts for a single system/SID. 8. Here, we can see the application servers in that system. Here we show the following: a. pa100767_SAS_00, the central instance b. pal101003_SAS_00, the application server

7 8 8a

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&XUUHQW 9LHZ DQG $OHUW 9LHZ The display has two modes: < < The current system status This mode shows the alert situation right now. Open alerts This mode shows alerts that have been generated but not yet “acknowledged.” In this mode, alerts are collected over time.

The recommended process is to look for: 1. Immediate problems (current system status) 2. Prior or transient problems (open alerts)

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6ZLWFKLQJ %HWZHHQ WKH &XUUHQW DQG $OHUW 9LHZV On the View: Current system status screen: 1. To view alerts, choose Open alerts.
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2. On the View: Open Alerts screen, to return to the current status view, choose Current status.
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)LQGLQJ DQ $OHUW From the monitor screen: 1. Look for red node text. If a node text is highlighted in red, there is an alert somewhere below that text. 2. Drill down to the bottom node. Here, the alert node is Percentage Used of the file system on drive H. 3. Select the node text. 4. Choose .
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5. Scroll to the bottom of the screen or choose .

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6. At the bottom of the detail screen are two tables. These table show the alert values over the last: < 30 minutes < 24 hours These tables can be of significant value in troubleshooting.
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To display a graph of a timetable: 7. Select the table to use (for example, last 24 hours). 8. Choose .
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The graphical display shows how the values changed over a 24-hour period. 9. Choose Back when you have finished.

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10. Choose Performance history. The batch job that collects historical data must be running. The default is that the job will not run. But, 13 running this job will add more data to the database and affect database growth. For more information, see Configuring the Batch Job to Collect Historical Data (RZ21) on the following page.
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11. Enter a “from” and “to” period in any of the time frames. 12. Choose , which returns you to the screen above. 13. Select the history items to display. 14. Choose .

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&RQILJXULQJ WKH %DWFK -RE WR &ROOHFW +LVWRULFDO 'DWD 5= The batch job that collects historical data must be running. The default situation is that the job will not run. But, running this job will add more data to the database and affect database growth. The batch jobs provide the data for the performance history option above.

Do not run this batch job unless you want performance history data (RZ20).

1. In the Command field, enter transaction RZ21 and choose Enter (or from the SAP standard menu, choose Tools → CCMS → Configuration → RZ21-Alert Monitor). 2. From the menu bar, choose Technical infrastructure → Performance Database → Define Background Job.

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3. This user ID is the user ID that was used to log in. 4. Enter the time to run the job. The job will run every six hours. 5. Choose Save. 6. Choose Next step.
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This screen shows the second of the two jobs that will be scheduled. 7. Choose Back.
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9LHZ WKH $OHUWV 1. Choose Display alerts.

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2. The alerts are listed in order of priority (Red at the top and yellow below).

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$QDO\]H WKH $OHUW 1. Select the alert. 2. Choose .
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3. The specific analysis tool that is started is node dependent. (In this case it is the OS Monitor.) These tools that are individually covered in the remainder of this guidebook. If no tool is assigned, you will get a “No method assigned” message.

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$FNQRZOHGJH WKH $OHUW 1. From the detail screen, choose Display alerts.
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This screen is the same screen where you start to analyze an alert (see previous page). 2. Select the alert to acknowledge. 3. Choose Complete alert.
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4. Note the message at the bottom of the screen. 5. There is one less alert displayed.
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You still have to perform a task based on the alert. Acknowledging the alert only means that you received the alert notification.

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6. When all alerts and warnings are acknowledged, the alert will change color to green.

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3URYLGH 6\VWHP &RQILJXUDWLRQ ,QIRUPDWLRQ 7UDQVDFWLRQ 5= 1. Under the SAP CCMS Monitor Templates, select System Configuration. 2. Choose .
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The various nodes will provide a variety of information about: < Clients < SAP license < Database

As shown here, a monitor can be configured to display multiple systems. Note that this monitor has been configured to monitor the following systems: < SAS < RW8 < BSK

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The alert threshold is the point where the alert indicator changes color from: < < < < Green to yellow Yellow to red Red to yellow Yellow to green

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Each installation is different, so the point at which an alert changes color depends on the individual installation. Sample situations where you would want to change the threshold levels when: < < A high amount of paging is a cause for concern on the production system, but it is expected on the development system. The only file on a drive may be the database file, which is completely filling the drive. A “filesystem full” alert on that particular drive is of no concern, because the database would have been configured to take up the whole drive.
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1. Click the node (+) of the specific alert that you want to change the threshold. 2. Select an alert. 3. Choose Properties.
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4. If the displayed values are for a group, an indicator field will appear in the screen. In this case the group indicator means that the values displayed apply to all drives, not just the selected drive. 5. To switch to group or individual: < Group: From the menu bar, choose Edit → Properties → Use from MTE class/group. Individual: From the menu bar, choose Edit → Properties → Use for individual Monitoring Tree Element (MTE).
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5

<

6. Choose

.

7. The threshold value field will change color from grey to white.
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8. If the transaction is set to group mode, an information screen will 8 appear. 9. Choose .
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10. Enter new values for when the alerts will change (for example, 98). These threshold values are specific to the alert you indicated. 11. Choose Save.

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+LGLQJ 6$3 6WDQGDUG 0RQLWRU 6HWV The monitor sets that are being “hidden” are not usually needed. 1. On the CCMS alert monitor screen, from the menu bar, choose Extras → Activate maintenance function.

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2. Expand all the monitor sets. 3. Under Public sets, select a monitor set (for example, SAP Business Communication). 4. Choose .
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5. Deselect Public (visible for all users). 6. Choose .

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7. The monitor set will disappear from My favorites and Public sets. 8. The set still exists under SAP. Therefore, if it is needed, this set could be “unhidden.”

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9. Repeat the steps until the only SAP standard set remaining is SAP CCMS Monitor Template.

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Once the extra monitor sets disappear, this screen shows how the CCMS monitor sets will look.

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&UHDWH D 1HZ 0RQLWRU 6HW 1. On the CCMS alert monitor screen, from the menu bar, choose Extras → Activate maintenance function.

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2. Select Public sets. 3. Choose .

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4. Under Monitor set, enter a name for the new monitor set (for example, SysAdmin 2). 5. Select Public (visible for all users). 6. Choose .

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7. The new monitor set is in the Public sets and My favorites. 8. To turn off maintenance, from the menu bar, choose Extras → Deactivate maintenance function.

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9. The new monitor set (SysAdmin 2) now appears on the screen.

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$GG D 0RQLWRU WR WKH 0RQLWRU 6HW 1. From the menu bar, choose Extras → Activate maintenance function.
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2. Select the Monitor set (for example, SysAdmin 2). 3. Choose .
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4. Expand the monitor design tree. 5. Select the nodes (+) that you want to include in the monitor (for example, Background under both RW8 and SAS). 6. Choose Save.
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7. Under Monitor, enter a relevant name for the new monitor (for example background-SAS+RW8). 8. Choose .
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9. The monitor definition is saved.

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10. Expand the monitor set to see the new monitor. 11. To turn off maintenance, from the menu bar, choose Extras → Deactivate maintenance function.

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12. Select the new monitor. 13. Choose .

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14. Expand the monitor tree. 15. This new monitor shows only the nodes you selected. This monitor is monitoring background service on two different systems (SAS and RW8).

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The System Administration Assistant (SAA) was developed as part of the Ready-to-RunR/3 project. The core of the SAA has been brought into standard R/3 and is now available. The SAA lists all the R/3 administrative tasks and tracks tasks that need to be done. It also provides documentation on each task and displays critical, and non-critical, alerts.
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It helps the system administrator track work by providing a point of reference for all relevant system administration transactions.
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1. In the Command field, enter transaction SSAA and choose Enter (or from the SAP standard menu, choose Tools → Administration → Monitor → SSAA-System Administration Assistant). 2. Choose Entire View tab.

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3. Choose

.

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4. Choose

.
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5. From the menu bar, choose View → Transaction code to display the transaction codes on the right side.

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6. If a task needs to be performed, a red square will appear next to it. 7. To execute the task, choose on that line (for example, R/3: Checking Background Jobs).
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8. The associated transaction is started. The specific transaction code selected is node dependent. The task to execute the transaction will be specific to the started transaction. 9. When you have finished, choose Back.
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10. The list is updated, and the task has a green circle indicating that it has been performed. 11. To see if there are any alerts in each task, choose List Current Alerts.
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12. Critical and noncritical in each task are displayed.

alerts

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An update terminate (or failed update) is an update to the database that failed. These terminates occur when a user entry or transaction is not entered or updated in the database. The following example should help clarify this concept: ([DPSOH 1. The accountant gives a file clerk a folder (similar to the “save” in a transaction). 2. The file clerk gives the accountant a receipt (similar to the R/3 document number). 3. On the way to the file cabinet, the clerk falls and gets hurt. The folder in not filed in the cabinet (the failed update). 4. The end result is that the folder is not in the cabinet—even though the accountant has the receipt. This same end result occurs in an update environment, the document is not in the R/3 System—even though the user has a document number.

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For performance reasons, the database update is done in an asynchronous mode. In this mode, the user continues to work while the system takes over the update process and waits for the database update to complete. In a synchronous mode, users would have to wait until the database has successfully updated before they could continue to work.
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Users assume that when they receive a document number, the entry is in the system. But it is not. Even if the users received a document number, because of the update terminate, no trace of it exists in the system. ([DPSOH Even though a sales order document number is generated, the order does not exist. Therefore, customers would not receive their order, and no trace of the order would exist in the system.
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Check the system for failed updates several times a day. During a dayshift, the checks can be distributed: < < < < First thing in the morning Late morning Early afternoon Late afternoon

If you have a global operation, your schedule should be adjusted to account for other time zones and someone in that time zone should participate in the monitoring. The longer you wait after the update terminate has occurred, the more difficult it is for users to remember what they did when the update terminate occurred. If you wait too long, the user will not remember. When things go wrong, they can really go wrong. For example, in one situation, there were over 600 update terminates that occurred in a 30-minute period. The system administrators were not alerted to the problem so prompt action was not taken. Therefore, normal business transactions continued to be entered and each one was terminated. On Windows NT, from R/3 Release 3.0F and higher, system log entries are written to the NT event log. You might consider configuring an “event log monitor” to page you when an update terminate occurs. This step reduces the need to constantly check transaction SM13. It also reduces the exposure between the time the update terminate occurs, when you find out about it, and when you can get to the user. The following message appears: “You have express mail in you inbox.” This message means that an update terminate has occurred on the user’s transaction.

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1. In the Command field, enter transaction SM13 and choose Enter (or from the SAP standard menu, choose Tools → Administration → Monitor → SM13-Update). 2. In Client enter *. 3. In User enter *. 4. Under Status, select All. 5. In From date, change the date to a year ago (for example, 09/07/1998). 6. Choose .
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2 3

4

5

7. In the Status column, look for entries with an Err. These entries are failed updates or update terminates. You may also see other entries listed without the Err status. If you have no failed updates, stop here. If you have failed updates, continue with the next section, Managing Update Terminates.

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0DQDJLQJ 8SGDWH 7HUPLQDWHV 1. Double-click on an entry with an Err status.

1

2. This screen shows in what module (Mod.name) and where in the process (Mod.ID) that the update terminate occurred. 3. Double-click on the entry with an Err status.
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3

4. Choose ABAP short dump. If a short dump exists, it will appear.

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5. After choosing ABAP short dump in the previous screen, you will see one of the following screens: a. If you have an ABAP dump, you will see this screen.

b. If a short dump does not exist, you will see: < A dialog box (titled Update Status). < The message No ABAP/4 short dump exists which appears either in the inactive Update Modules window or a separate dialog box. Do not attempt to reapply the failed update! There are conditions under which this reapplication can lead to corruption of the database. Always advise users to reenter the transaction.

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Some of the problems that can occur with an update terminate include: < No short dump In this case, the only clues you have are the: Œ User ID Œ Date Œ Time Œ Transaction Difficulty reading the short dump Do not be discouraged because you cannot understand a short dump. The ability to read a short dump comes with experience and practice. Some of the content is only useful to the developer. You may recognize a pattern of characters as a part number, document number, vendor code, etc. Short dump with little usable information Update terminate occurring “downstream” from the actual transaction The data in the short dump may be of little value in finding the root of the update terminate. (For example, if the terminate occurred in the FI posting of an SD transaction, you will not know which SD transaction document caused the problem.) Update terminate occurring in a batch job There is no indication of which batch job (by job name) caused the update terminate. SAP is aware of the inability to identify the batch job which was the source of an update terminate.

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6. The users need to be contacted. 7. The users should check for the missing entry and reprocess the missing transaction. 8VHU 7UDLQLQJ When a user receives the following message, “You have express mail in your inbox,” usually signals a problem. The user should immediately stop and get assistance to determine what happened. R/3 uses “express mail” to notify the user of a failed update. It is during this “window” (immediately after the error has occurred) that the user has the best chance of correcting the problem.

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The system log is the R/3 System’s log of events, errors, problems, and other system messages.
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The log is important because unexpected or unknown warnings and errors could indicate a serious problem.
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You should check the system log several times a day.

The ability to properly monitor the system log comes with experience. Over time, you will become familiar with what log entries “normally” appear in your system log, and recognize the unusual ones that need investigation.
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1. In the Command field, enter transaction SM21 and choose Enter (or from the SAP standard menu, choose Tools → Administration → Monitoring → SM21-System log). If you select Problems only, you will see this screen. 2. You can get more information on certain entries. In this example, double-click on the “short dump.” Proceed to step 4.
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If you select All messages, you will see this screen. 3. Notice that the warning messages on this screen (indicated by the yellow highlight under the column MNo), and the text Perform rollback) did not appear in the previous screen.
3

What to look for: < Unusual entries For your installation for a specific system, before you can recognize the unusual entries, you will need to become familiar with “normal” entries. < Column MNo for the error status Errors are in red and pink, and warnings are in yellow. These entries may have been examined when you did the Alert Monitor (RZ20). To minimize the video processing overhead, many NT servers are configured with a video color depth of 16 colors. On these servers, increase the video color depth to 256 colors to see the alerts in color, or view the log from a computer that has the video set to at least a color depth of 256 colors.

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4. Choose Analyze runtime errors.

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This screen is the short dump. You can access this screen using transaction ST22.

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A “lock” is a mechanism that prevents other users from changing the record on which you are working. The example below illustrates the importance of using this function. ([DPSOH You are changing a customer mailing address, while someone is simultaneously changing the customer’s telephone number. You first save your change; then the other person saves his or her change. The other person’s change overwrites your change, and your change will be lost.

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There may be “old” locks still in place from transactions that did not release, or from when the user was cut off from the network. Unless cleared, these locks prevent access or change to the record until the system is cycled. The easiest way to locate these locks is to look for locks from prior days.

We presume that the profile parameter rdisp/gui_auto_logout has been set. This parameter defines an automatic logout of the user if there is no activity for the set number of minutes. Setting the auto_logout parameter is recommended for security. It is also an item for which your external auditors may test. The parameter is a global setting that applies to all users on the instance. You cannot have different logout times for different groups of users on the same instance. The only way to have different logout times for different groups of users is to have specific groups (for example, Finance) log in to specific instances (for example, the Finance application server) where this parameter is set in the instance profile of that instance.

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1. In the Command field, enter transaction SM12 and choose Enter (or from the SAP standard menu, choose Tools → Administration → Monitor → SM12-Lock entries). 2. In Client enter *. 3. Clear the User name field. 4. Choose .
4

2 3

5. In the Time column, look for locks from previous days. The presence of a lock from a previous day could mean that the user was “disconnected” from the network and the R/3 System.
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Deleting a lock is a dangerous task. Do not delete a lock without checking first to see if it is being used. If you delete a lock that is in use, you risk corrupting the database.

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The following process should be followed before deleting a lock: Task Is the user logged on any of the servers? Transaction Code that Completes this Task < < Transaction SMO4 (without application servers) Transaction AL08 ( with application servers)

If the user is not on the system, but transaction SM04 shows them on the system, delete their sessions as described in chapter 9, Deleting a User’s Session. This step, alone, may clear the lock. Are there are processes running under the user ID? < < Are there batch jobs running under the user ID? Are there updates in process for that user ID? < < Transaction SM50 Transaction SM51 Transaction SM37 Transaction SM13

Also see the Processes section later in this chapter. Also see the Background Jobs section in this chapter. Also see Failed Updates section in this chapter. Once you know that there is no activity using the user’s ID: 1. Select the lock entry for deletion. 2. From the menu bar, choose Lock entries→ Delete. < < < Double-check the user ID of the entry that you selected to delete. If you delete the wrong lock, you could corrupt the database. Clear only one lock entry at a time. Do not use the mass delete option. This option will delete all the locks, not just the ones for the user you have selected.

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These transactions display all the users who are currently logged on to the system. They show both the user’s ID and terminal name.
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In a smaller company, the administrator can recognize user IDs logged on to “unfamiliar” terminals. An unfamiliar terminal may indicate that someone—other than the designated user—is using that user ID.

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A user logged on to more than one terminal may indicate that the ID is being used: < < Used by someone else Used/shared by several people

Here are some reasons not to share user IDs: < If a problem arises, you will not know who created the problem. This situation makes the problem difficult for you to fix and prevent from happening again. Prudent security practices do not allow for the sharing of user IDs. Your external auditors may also perform this test to test your security.

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Release 4.6 allows you to prevent concurrent sharing of user IDs by activating the disable_mult_gui_login system profile. We recommend that you activate this parameter.
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Transaction SM04 may show a user as active, when the user has actually logged off. Because the user session was not properly closed, the system “thinks” that the user is still logged on. This condition can be caused by one of the following: < < A network failure, which cuts off the user. Users who turn off their computer without logging off from the R/3 System.

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1. In the Command field, enter transaction SM04 and choose Enter (or from the SAP standard menu, choose Tools → Administration → Monitor → System monitoring → SM04-User overview). 2. Select the user ID (for example, GARYN) to view the session the user has opened. 3. Choose Sessions.
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The Overview of Sessions screen shows what sessions the user has opened. 4. Choose .

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If you have several instances in your system, using AL08 is easier, because you can simultaneously see all users in all instances on the system. 1. In the Command field, enter transaction AL08 and choose Enter (or from the SAP standard menu, choose Tools → CCMS → Control/Monitoring → SM66-All work processes. 2. From the menu bar, choose Goto → Global users overview. 3. The Current Active Users screen shows all the instances in your system. 4. For each instance, a list of the users logged onto that instance/ application server is also provided.

3

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Process overview transactions allow users to view the status of work processes and monitor for problems. Transaction SM51 is a central transaction from which you can select the instance to monitor. SM51 starts transaction SM50 for each application server, which is used for a system without application servers.
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Transaction SM51 is one place to look for jobs or programs that may be “hung,” which maybe indicated by long run times. If batch jobs are not running, transaction SM50 may provide a hint of the problem, if all the batch work processes are in use. )RU D 6\VWHP ZLWK $SSOLFDWLRQ 6HUYHUV
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1. In the Command field, enter transaction SM51 and choose Enter (or from the SAP standard menu, choose Tools → Administration → Monitor → System monitoring → SM51-Servers). 2. Select the instance you want to view (for example, pawdf071_Q99_75). 3. Choose .
2 3

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This screen shows the Process Overview transaction (SM50) for that instance.

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In the Command field, enter transaction SM50 and choose Enter (or from the SAP standard menu, choose Tools → Administration → Monitor → System monitoring → SM50-Process overview). What to look for: a. Dialog work processes (DIA) that have long Time values. These values could indicate a problem or a long running step in batch programs, which sometimes start dialog work processes. b. In the Status column, work processes that say stopped, can sometimes be a problem because a process may have stalled or failed. The columns are defined in the table below.
b a

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Column Text No Ty PID
b

Definitions Work process number Type of work process OS PID (Process ID) number Current status of the work process Number of detected errors in the work process Cumulative CPU time that the current process is taking Cumulative “wall” time that the current process is taking Name of the ABAP program Client number User ID that is using the work process Table that the action is being performed on

Status Err CPU

a

Time Program Clie User Table

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An ABAP dump (also known as a short dump) is generated when a report or transaction terminates as the result of a serious error. The system records the error in the system log (transaction SM21) and writes a snapshot (dump) of the program termination to a special table. This transaction can also be called from the system log (transaction SM21).
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An ABAP dump is used to analyze and determine why the error occurred and take corrective action.

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1. In the Command field, enter transaction ST22 and choose Enter (or from the SAP standard menu, choose Tools → Administration → Monitor → ST22-Dump analysis). There are two selection methods to display the list of dumps: < < For a simple selection, Today or Yesterday (proceed to step 2) For a free selection (proceed to step 5)

6LPSOH 6HOHFWLRQ 2. Under No. of short dumps, if you see a value other than zero (0) in Today or Yesterday, dumps have occurred that need to be examined. 3. Select Today. 4. Choose .

4

3

2

Proceed to step 8.

)UHH 6HOHFWLRQ 5. Choose Selection.
5

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6. Enter your selection criteria in the ABAP Dump Analysis screen. 7. Choose .
7 6

8. Double-click on the dump you want to analyze.

8

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This screen shows the “short dump.”

Despite being called a “short dump,” ABAP dumps may be more than 75 pages long. We recommend you save the dump locally and print out only the portion you need. If the SAP hotline asks for a copy of the short dump, rather than fax the entire dump, it is easier to e-mail or upload the file (see SAP note 40024).

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A system message is a popup that users see when they: < < First log on to the R/3 System Move between screens

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To send a broadcast message to everyone on the system (for example, “SAP will be down for scheduled maintenance from 6:00 p.m. PST Friday, October 23 to 12:00 p.m. PST Saturday, October 24.”). To inform the user about the system they are logging on to. This information is recommended for systems other than the production system, such as development, test, sandbox, training, etc. (for example, “You are logging into QAS, copy of PRD as of Nov-1-98 at 0100 PST”).

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1. In the Command field, enter transaction SM02 and choose Enter (or from the SAP standard menu, choose Tools → Administration → Administration → SMO2-System messages). 2. Choose Create.

2

3. Enter your message in System message text. 4. Optionally, you may also enter text in the following fields: a. In Server, choose and select the instance on which the message should appear. b. In Client, enter the client number, for a client specific message. 5. In Expiry on, enter the message’s expiration date and time. 6. Choose .
3 4a 4b 5 6

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To prevent the message from expiring, enter a date several years in the future. When referencing the time for an event, always enter the specific time, time zone, and date (for example, 0230 PDST-Mon–Jun 8,1998). Entering vague information (such as “in 15 minutes”), creates confusion as to when and where an event has been scheduled. Some examples of confusion that may arise includes: < < < < 15 minutes (from when?) 0230 (which time zone?) 6:00 (a.m. or p.m.?) Monday (of which week?)

7. The message in the status bar indicates that your message has been saved.

7

The System Messages popup window will appear.

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1. In the Command field, enter transaction SM02 and choose Enter (or from the SAP standard menu, choose Tools → Administration → Administration → SM02-System messages). 2. Select the message. 3. Choose Change.
3 2

To delete the message from this screen, choose Delete, not Change.

4. Enter your changes. 5. If necessary, change the following: a. ServerName b. Client c. Expiry on 6. Choose .
4

5a 5b

5c 6

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7. The message in the status bar indicates that your message has been changed. 8. Check the changed message.
8

7

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An R/3 system administrator will need to execute certain reports and programs to apply a note or in relation to everyday duties and tasks.
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1. In the command field, enter transaction SE38 and choose Enter (or from the SAP standard menu, choose Tools→ ABAP workbench → Development → SE38-ABAP Editor). 2. In Program, enter the report or program name (for example, RSPARAM). 3. Choose .
3 2

Be careful when executing reports and programs because it may affect and change your system. Make sure you are executing the correct program, and you know what the program is going to do.

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4. This program has a variant screen where you can indicate whether you want parameters that cannot be substituted to also be listed. 5. Choose .

5

6. The report is run. In this case, the report displays the profile parameters. 7. Choose Back.
7

)RU ,QIRUPDWLRQ $ERXW D 3URJUDP RU 5HSRUW 1. In the Program, enter RSPO0041. 2. Select Documentation. 3. Choose Display.

1

2 3

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The screen displays information about the program RSPO0041.

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