First published in 2012 By University of Greenwich School of Architecture, Design and Construction Mansion Site Bexley Road London

SE9 2PQ Copyright c University of Greenwich All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system without permission in writing from the publisher. ISBN: 978-1-909155-00-8 Editorial: Nic Clear, Simon Herron and Neil Spiller Design: Mike Aling Printed by Astra Printing Group in the UK

University of Greenwich School of Architecture, Design and Construction Mansion Site Bexley Road London SE9 2PQ

INTRODUCTION

FREEDOM AT POINT ZERO

INTRODUCTION

PROFESSOR NEIL SPILLER

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A million years ago, well about 20, Peter Cook, back from German exile, did a lecture. The lecture imagined an architecture school as an Ark. Cook detailed the pairs of animals, rarefied architectural animals that would enter two by two, they included Cedric Price, John Hedjuk and Zaha Hadid. Some of these animals and other more evolved species are today altering the magnetic field around Greenwich’s architectural Dreadnought. Let us describe the Dreadnought. Not only is it a battleship but it is sleek and fast and after its refit it will pack a massive punch. A punch whose echoes will be felt around the world. The Dreadnought’s gravity will attract small craft to develop flotillas of associations around the globe. The ship is not just architecturally refined, its decks are also gardens that are designed to cosset the rare breeds that inhabit it and to protect its fragile ecology – a fragile ecology that will establish itself whilst developing new flora and fauna for a new world. A world that is ecologically sustainable, that doesn’t shy away from the realities of the 21st century and that will require its architectural, landscape and digital designers to be mentally dexterous, far thinking and have an understanding of their role in this new world. A role predicated on recalibrating Gaia’s metabolism whilst maintaining human

health, liberty and ambition. So as we reset the compass, so it can take up to new found lands, we offer you our first chartings. There will certainly be dragons some fearful, some surprisingly toothless. As time goes on these maps will become full of detail, showing us how to get from here to there. In recent months the School has been actively hosting the Green Forum, the Future Cities conference, the Architectural Students’ Network, the CIOB Challenge, the Annual Meeting of the Urban Design Group, the AGM of the South East London Society of Architects, as well as hosting international open lectures. It has also created rumblings as new highly reputed visiting professors and staff have joined us. This will continue. For now, we commend our brave explorers and wish them luck on their onward journey. We know they will always remember the mothership and how it gave them freedom at Point Zero. Professor Neil Spiller Dean School of Architecture, Design and Construction June 2012

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ACADEMIC LEADER IN DESIGN STATEMENT

DESIGNING THE FUTURE

ACADEMIC LEADER IN DESIGN STATEMENT

NIC CLEAR

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Over the past twelve months there have been significant changes on the Architecture Programmes at the University of Greenwich, changes that have seen us embark on a journey to establish an environment that fosters an experimental and speculative approach toward Architectural Design appropriate for the second decade of the 21st century. We are putting excellence in Architectural Design at the heart of our activities by developing programmes and courses that will encourage, challenge and inspire students in equal measure. We are creating an environment where students are able to acquire skills and practices that will extend well beyond their time at University and beyond the discourse of Architecture itself, however we are also trying to make sure that even in such demanding circumstances students are given space to flourish as people. A key aspect of our attitude is to develop architectural designs that fully engage with the impact of advanced technologies such as virtuality, exploring fully immersive, mixed, augmented and synthetic environments; time based digital media, through video, animation and motion-graphics; nano and bio

technology, developing micro landscapes and invisible architectures; reflexive and cybernetic systems and environments, incorporating ethical and sustainable ecologies. Such an approach to design aims to address global environmental and technological challenges and bring to the fore cutting edge strategies conceived within the context of an efficient and ethical use of resources that will define new trends and knowledge within the discourse of Architectural Design. Through the development and application of a wide variety of communication and representational strategies, both analogue and digital, we aim to posit new aesthetic systems and new codes of representation for Architectural Design. We are endeavouring to achieve this by implementing an innovative and rigorous design framework strongly supported by theoretical and technical components. At the University of Greenwich we are designing the future, a future that not only has to deal with what Architecture is and was, but more importantly we are looking forward to set an agenda for what Architecture could be. Nic Clear Academic Leader in Design

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ACADEMIC LEADER IN TECHNOLOGY STATEMENT

THE FUTURE OF THE FUTURE

ACADEMIC LEADER IN TECHNOLOGY STATEMENT

SIMON HERRON

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In his open lecture ‘The Year 2000’,1 Buckminster Fuller speculated on the consequences of the exponential growth in the pace of technological change and discovery as we approached the new millennium, against the consequential difficulties of predicting 35 years into the future with any degree of confidence or accuracy. A year latter in February 1967, an edited version of this lecture formed the foreword to an issue of Architectural Design magazine, ‘2000 +’ presented to an un-expectant ill prepared Architectural audience. Sandwiched between adverts for everyday building materials were articles examining the latest in outer and inner space hardware, to the ultimate in integrated augmented Bio-Technologies in Man+, all posited as Architectural Futures, as ordinary and as common place as the context in which they were framed. Reading this lecture now seems so current; climate change, population explosion, resource scarcity, growing political and financial unrest. Uncomfortable questions arise where established predetermined sets of answers fall short. Against this backdrop, how, as Architects, do we evolve? How do we develop new tools of Practice and appropriate strategies capable of engaging with such uncertainty?

As a school we aim to lead this research and debate, to recognize Environmental Responsibilities as a core component of Architecture and the Professional Work of Architects. Students should be asked to consider whether technology is the means or the meaning informing their work. The school constructs an environment where Students, Academics and Professionals alike are encouraged to reflect on an evolving world, searching out an Architecture and attitude towards Applied Architectural Technology that is relevant to their time. We have to take responsibility for how technologies are used and deployed. For architects to remain relevant they need to become, and remain, more aware of the technologies impinging upon their function. Technologies should not simply dictate the forms of human environments, but be deployed imaginatively to determine the kinds of environments that are endlessly desirable. Simon Herron Academic Leader in Technology
The Year 2000, lecture by R. Buckminster Fuller, San Jose State College, California, USA, March 1966.

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DIPLOMA IN ARCHITECTURE

UNITS 19, 16, 15, 11 & X

DIPLOMA IN ARCHITECTURE

UNITS 19, 16, 15, 11 & X

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Course Co-ordinator: Ed Frith

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Adis Dobardzic, United Nations, Stratford City.

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UNIT 19

UNIT 19

PROFESSOR NEIL SPILLER & PHIL WATSON

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For centuries the simple rule for making highly finished architecture or products has been to make it somewhere other than from its point of use - the medieval masons’ yards, the baroque sculptor’s studio, the 19th and 20th century factories, for example. As the distance between use and manufacture becomes greater and greater and as skills are replaced by mechanisation, building skills have become undervalued and consequently mostly lost. Coupled with notions such as ‘fast track’ construction techniques (where the imperative is to limit ‘wet’ trades as much as possible and build with ‘dry’ prefabricated elements that ‘click’ together), the skill sets of site operatives have been emaciated to almost nothing. This denudation is now at the point where no one really expects anyone on a building site to have any skills apart from the most simple. Prefabrication brings with it an obsession with ‘tolerance’ - how far a product’s actual dimension differs from the idealised dimension due to inaccuracies in the factory process, the inherent qualities of a material or the inexactitudes of site setting-out and measurement and how we can ‘cover’ these variations. Much technological innovation has been aimed at reducing these margins of error in the fabrication and construction

process to achieve cheap, easily quantifiable outcomes that are quick and easily erected. These ideas also predicate a view of the world and the sites of architecture as mostly ocular-centric, anthropocentric, ubiquitous, non-site-specific - lacking in difference and fighting against nature. Proposed here is the opposite paradigm - one that fosters a view of the world that is bottom-up, wet, microscopic, chemically computational, maximalist and ecological. It also changes the economics and procurement dynamics we are so used to within the realms of traditional construction. Further, it is a ‘ReCant’ technology; it takes less than it gives back in relation to carbon, energy and contextual damage. It is not inert or finely honed, yet is fecund, highly sensitive and safe. This year Unit 19 designed a Porchester Baths for the twenty first century. Unit 19 would like to thank A Studio (Practice tutor: Richard Hyams), along with Dr Rachel Armstrong for her support.

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Matt Cannon, Alchemical Tower.

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UNIT 19

UNIT 19

WETWARE AND BESPOKE CONSTRUCTIONS

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Dip Y1 PT: Todor Demirov. Dip Y1: Chandni Modha, Will Lamburn, Erica Pereiravaz. Dip Y2 PT: Adam Leatherbarrow. Dip Y2: Aidan Walsh, Matt Cannon, Kar Ho Chan, Neal Tanner, Alex Kraniotis, Adam Edwards, Olly Stubbs. Dip Y3 PT: Blaise Kay.
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Neal Tanna, Slam Laboratory, Orb Emergence Through a Smokescreen. Neal Tanna, Slam Laboratory, Phase Space Chronometer: Etching the Mirrored Sphere. Blaise Kay, Steam Punk Abbey.

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Matt Cannon, Alchemical Tower. Alexandros Kraniotis, The Botanical Library. Chandni Modha, Rave Boutique. William Lamburn, City Morphosis Research Institute.
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UNIT 19

WETWARE AND BESPOKE CONSTRUCTIONS

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UNIT 16

UNIT 16

SIMON HERRON & SUSANNE ISA

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Unitsixteen continues it’s research into the myths of the near future. This is not a Gateway [2010-11], a journey along the A13, an examination of an unfamiliar hinterland, explored the consequences of the failure of an over dominant industry on its host city. Detroit Michigan, motor city USA, was taken as a model, a city with a self inflicted dependency culture running deep into the zeitgeist of its past and future. London’s own dependency on an over extended service sector was pictured against imagined banking failures and mass civil unrest, leading to unprecedented urban flight in which an abandoned London falls into protracted decline. At its peek London’s population reached approximately 7.5 million. Revised estimates suggest a core population of around 2.4 million remain, although accurate figures are somewhat speculative. Inner London less city like, more a series of dispersed rural settlements, semi autonomous neighborhoods, locally generated, pre-dominantly unregulated experiments in social organization... Out East, Stratford City emerges as a fresh new world of dreams, unparalleled unnatural beauty and wonder. Within this context the unit has proposed a series of New Institutes, a collective experiment in life and art.

The site: plot N24, Zone 3, left abandoned, adjacent to Stratford International Station, at the boundary between the commercial district of the Westfield Centre and the Olympic Village development E20. Do you simply insert your projects amongst this existing commercial setting, adjusting or adapting? Do you propose an alternative future, which may or may not include retaining the existing ruin? Is shopping the new social model? What is the difference between say the Design Museum and the Conran shop? Consider the New Institute. Is it a place of study, a place of science, a place of retreat, an archive, a window onto an unrealized utopian dream? Consider the projects as a bridge between two worlds, a hybrid structure which tries to arbitrate between opposing pressures of use and ideology? Blog: Solar Systems and Restrooms http://unitsixteen.blogspot.com Unitsixteen would like to thank AHMM (Practice tutor: Philip Turner), along with our critics: David Crookes, Hareth Pochee, Nicholas Szczepaniak and John Walker.
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Adis Dobardzic, United Nations, Stratford City.

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UNIT 16

UNIT 16

NOSTALGIA FOR THE FUTURE

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Dip Y1 PT: Hayley Poynter, Sarah Primarolo. Dip Y1: Matthew Gaster, Nicholas Gibbs, Ryan Holland, Felix Lai Sin Fung, Niels Wergin-Creek, Alexander Winter. Dip Y2 PT: Joseph Edwards, Adam McLatchie. Dip Y2: Leoni Brooks, Adis Dobardzic, Vickram Ramkhelawon. Dip Y3 PT: Jodie Hill, Chris Holt.
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Vickram Ramkhelawon, The Social Bath House and Laundrette. Joseph Edwards, Broadcasting House E20. Adis Dobardzic, United Nations, Stratford City.

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UNIT 16

UNIT 16

NOSTALGIA FOR THE FUTURE

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UNIT 15

UNIT 15

NIC CLEAR & MIKE ALING

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“It was here in the crosshatch that the students might stand, scandalously, touching distance from a foreign power, a pornography of separation.” 1
In China Mieville’s ‘The City and The City’, Beszel and Ul Qoma are independent cities occupying the same geographical space. However, citizens of one city are forbidden to acknowledge the existence of the other; the autonomous populations learn to ‘unsee’ elements of the other city that they habitually interact with. If they fail to do so, citizens will be subject to the strictures of ‘Breach’. All cities engender forms of experiential editing through the tactics of exclusion, division and dissuasion. These means are either deployed explicitly, through propertarian, legal or surveillance mechanisms, or implicitly through social, economic and cultural mores. Often areas that are geographically contiguous may as well be in different cities. Arguably, no city encapsulates these divisions more explicitly than London and in no area are those divisions so radically apparent than in the eastern fringes of the City of London. It is an area where extremes of poverty and wealth, race and class clash in a frenetic cultural mish-mash. While such fragmentation

is often romanticised as the rich mix of the urban life, one can see that such extremes are fuelling a mutant psychotic urbanism that is on the verge of implosion. Using Mieville’s writing as a starting point, Unit 15 have explored the divided city, whether those divisions are based on class, race, gender, sexuality or haircut. We have challenged ideas of the ‘inclusive’ city that have been perpetuated as a neo-liberal myth and have sought to locate alternative strategies in the city itself. Unit 15 use film, animation and motion graphics to generate, develop and represent architectural concepts and interventions. Unit 15 would like to thank Waugh Thistleton Architects (Practice tutor: Andrew Waugh, assisted by Marie Abela, Angela Hopcraft, Alastair Ogle, Anthony Thistleton, Kieran Walker and Tom Westwood), along with our critics: Jonathan Gales, Mark Garcia, Paul Nicholls, Neil Spiller, Ben Sweeting, George Thomson and Simon Withers.
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China Mieville, The City & The City, Pan (London), 2010, p315. Nicolau Faria, Spit & Bang! Chronogram.

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UNIT 15

UNIT 15

THE CITY & THE CITY

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Dip Y1 PT: Natasha Clarke. Dip Y1: Tommy Clarke, Vipin Dhunnoo, Laura Edwards, Madonna Florides, Ross Galtress, Chris Kelly, Kieron Peaty, Neil St John, Georgia Tsoulou, Prince Yemoh. Dip Y2: Laura Jane Barden, Nicolau Faria, Vimbai Caroline Gwata, Mauricio Ilerena-Tamayo, Isabelle Laliberte, Olver Thorarinsson, Lynsey Williams. Dip Y3 PT: Max Fraser, Annie Lieu, Melody Morton.
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Melody Morton, Biotechnological Soup Kitchen, Trabecular Structure. Laura Jane Barden, Spitalfields Desalination District. Laura Edwards, Bangla State Border Control. Ross Galtress, Corporation of London Public Reference Library/Citizenship School, Chronogram. Vimbai Gwata, Baartman House: Gallery for the Cultural Other. Lynsey Williams, London Digitocracy. Chris Kelly, Energy Harvesting Cinema, After Hours, Chronogram. Prince Yemoh, Osborn Centre for the Creative Arts, Chronogram. Mauricio Ilerena-Tamayo, The Redacted City.
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Vipin Dhunnoo, Shoreditch Game Space. Neil St John, Augmented Reality Community Facility. Olver Thorarinsson, Immersive Virtual Ecstatic Experience.

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UNIT 15

UNIT 15

THE CITY & THE CITY

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UNIT 11

UNIT 11

ED FRITH & PATRICK LEWIS

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Diploma Architecture is a time for big questions about society, technology and the building of the future. Finding new representational processes and approaches to making via performance and psycho-geographic games, are all part of Unit 11’s research. In 1593 Christopher Marlow was murdered near Deptford Creek. Anthony Burgess’s ‘A Dead Man in Deptford’, played on Marlow’s political and theatrical interests; an early modern world of the body and shifting and rotating urban politics. The Thames Gateway has been Unit 11’s field of operations for the last seven years, many stories have been found and retold, in a narrative architecture that seeks to re-engage with the body and of the rotation of London, land and body to the east (see Dicken’s rotation of Pip by Magwitch). A special exhibition about this was held at the Stephen Lawrence Gallery. (see www.11gg2011. wordpress.com, including students blogs). This year’s site was at the pivoting centre, Deptford Creek. A visit to Venice followed and projects carried books, gardens, filmmakers and crabs into the Creek. Year 1 undertook a design realization of a working tower adjacent to the Prior’s wharf of aggregate and concrete production. Some used Sinclair’s Isle of Doges, ‘It works like New York, feels like

New York’, as a geographical pivot, rotating around a concrete London, or Ballard’s architect Maitland’s jag and developer Shylock. The body and its relationship to architecture via drawing and movement workshops, part of the BAM [Body Architecture Movement] research group, saw broader application in the final year projects; with Laban associations, footballing, mudlarking and a sensing psoas. Project’s ranged from the obscurely poetic Kafka book archive, up the hill from the Danube in Prague, a Wonderland theatrical shaft and garden leading down to the new mega-sewer under Greenwich, to a reworking of Folkestone, also questions of crossing the line in football and a Deptford open prison. The constructive energy of Mel & Harry at Wilkinson Eyre, was appreciated by all. The thinking and making continues. Unit 11 would like to thank Wilkinson Eyre Architects (Practice tutors: Harry Bucknall & Melissa Clinch), Benji Frith-Salem, Jake Humphrey, Nick Jackson, Tim Knowles, Heidi Lee, Massimo Melloni, Leo Robert, Caroline Salem and Eric Sturel.
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Adam Bell, Psychogeographic Axis, Between the ‘Isle of Doges’ to a New Privy Council Liberty Building on Deptford Creek.

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UNIT 11

UNIT 11

ROTATION - GATEWAY GAMES 6

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Dip Y1 PT: Adam Bell, Rosica Kirkova, Donna Staples. Dip Y1: Charlie Barnard, Eleana Beuke, Rosa Coloute, Dorine Kuok, Constantina Makridou, Laurence Yorke. Dip Y2 PT: Fizaa Esmail, Carolyn Garden. Dip Y2: Kelly Chan, Athanasios Christofides, Anya Grodzka, Sarah Medway, Dimitra Papadopoulou. Dip Y3 PT: Ashley Gendek, Turan Karamanoglu, Anita Nice.
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Constantina Makridou, Mirror & Light Installation. Rosa Coloute, Sugar and Brass Model for Shylock’s Weighing Building. Dorine Kuok, Weaving Research into the Chinese Crabs of the Creek. Carolyn Garden, Water and Tidal Pressure Studies for New Performance Arena. Rosica Kirkova, Venetian’s Bathing Club. Charlie Barnard, Ballardian Hotel: Mixing Crash, The Drowned World and Concrete Island. Kelly Chan, Alice in Wonderland meets the Super Sewer Access Shaft. Turan Karamanoglu, The Absence of Presence. Ashley Gendek, Folkestone Pier meets Roger de Haan, Turns the Corner and Regenerates.
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Unit 11, Gateway Games exhibition at the Stephen Lawrence Gallery. BAM piece by choreographer Caroline Salem with performer Rachel BirchLawson. Rotating London project by Laurence Yorke and Athanasios Christofides. Turan Karamanoglu, The Absence of Presence.

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UNIT 11

UNIT 11

ROTATION - GATEWAY GAMES 6

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UNIT X

UNIT X

KEVIN RHOWBOTHAM & ELIZABETH WILLIAMS

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The forlorn intra-city interchange, a disregarded and excluded landscape of a pragmatic futurism, establishes the possibilities for new and emergent programmes available for insertion within the complex geometry of the intra-change structure. Unit X projects examined the parasitic possibilities of formal and programmatic interventions and the possibilities for extended urban connections within the immediate context of the intra-change. With the collocation of varied paths of movement, extended environs include the perspectives of emerging economies, environmental difficulties and perpetuated ecologies. Confronting the capabilities of unconsidered urban boundaries, the unit examined the space of the intersection as that which contends the geometries of ordinary formal relationships. Entertaining the possibility of forbidden sites, the work explores the prospective futures made possible with the acceptance and encouragement of dirt and grime. A corporate agenda is reinforced by this utilization of the system; the desires of the sector are questioned by an intoxicatingly familiar degeneration amongst the urban condition.

Locations for the varied implications made apparent through devices of the everyday, these clashes of antithetical direction exemplify the romance of the insoluble object against the quotidian agenda. Dynamic formalisms established a set of new formal vocabularies amongst the filth of collision in the city, encouraging a consideration for the impurities in the rhythms of the everyday. The associations between the eloquent description of the thing, the seductive qualities of form and surface, and how it actually engages with the surroundings, the candid reality of impurity and corruption, require a disparate investigation into considerations for constructed ambitions. The unit focused upon the intra-urban interchange as a site ‘between cities’ and as a site that divides the city. The urban intra-change as a paradigm opportunity for redevelopment of new transport-specific programmes. Unit X would like to thank Fluid Structures (Practice tutor: David Crookes) and Michael Chadwick.
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Mascia Gianvanni, The Tale of Two Towers.

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UNIT X

UNIT X

THE INTRA URBAN INTER-CHANGE

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Dip Y1 PT: Heather Cliffe, Kristina Kehayova, Jyoti Sharma. Dip Y1: Robin Bennet, Oriana Koumbarou, Carl Pike, William Tsan, Nick Varey. Dip Y2 PT: Christopher Quirk, Delroy Thomas. Dip Y2: Fotianna Filita, Mascia Gianvanni, Niroshan Gunasingam, Niloofar Madjlessi, Kehinde Adetunji Oyelekan, Naira Sarkison.
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Niroshan Gunasingam, Static Movement. Mascia Gianvanni, The Tale of Two Towers. Nick Varey, Favela Pods. Carl Pike, Repurposed. Carl Pike, Repurposed.
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Niroshan Gunasingam, Static Movement. Naira Sarkison, Metropolitan Encampment. Will Tsan, English Cultural Centre Shanghai. Mascia Gianvanni, The Tale of Two Towers. Carl Pike, Repurposed.
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UNIT X

UNIT X

THE INTRA URBAN INTER-CHANGE

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Poster for OMA/Progress exhibition at Barbican Art Gallery © Barbican Centre >

APPLIED ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGY

SIMON HERRON

APPLIED ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGY

SIMON HERRON

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Applied Architectural Technology is considered to be an integral part of the design process running vertically throughout the school, engaging students with the underlying theoretical, historical, cultural, professional and material considerations of Architectural Technology and Practice. In first year students explore how buildings exist and interact with the physical world, how they are produced and constructed. Students are introduced to a range of environmental tools, methods of building construction, exploring material properties, structural principles and design and fabrication techniques. This is supported by lectures, workshops, and dedicated technical tutorials. Second year is seen as an experimental year to prepare students for third year. Students are introduced to the evolving global challenges of an uncertain world, through design, technology and professional considerations. In third year students consolidate their knowledge, demonstrated through an Applied Architectural Technology and Professional Study of their principle building design project of the year. The project provides a reflective lens through which we ask students to critically examine and develop their

projects in detail, considering their position on the inter-relationship between, technology, the environment and the profession. This is taught within individual design units and supported by a dedicated lecture program. This year we have augmented the course by introducing a practice based tutor program, each design unit has been paired with a major London Architectural Practice. In Diploma year one, City and Landscape Studies [CLS], Architectural Professional Studies [APS] and Design in Detail [D&D] provides a framework to view and collectively reflect on the principle building design project developed within individual design units. Together they will form a ‘suite’ of documents, seen collectively as a Design Realisation report, which aims to critically frame the major building project of the year. Final year students produce a similar reflective technical document highlighting the key technical drivers of the project. As with third year, we have augmented the existing course structure by introducing a practice based tutor program. Each design unit has been paired with a major London Architectural Practice, as consultant, mentor and critic to the unit and students alike. Simon Herron Academic Leader in Technology

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Matt Gaster, Artificial Photosynthesis Research Laboratory.

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APPLIED ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGY

BA (HONS) ARCHITECTURE

APPLIED ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGY

DIPLOMA IN ARCHITECTURE

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BA Year 1 Technology Co-ordinator: Luke Olsen. BA Year 2 Technology Co-ordinators: Howard Gilby & Roger Seijo. BA Year 3 Technology & Professional Studies Co-ordinators: Rahesh R. Ram & Tony Clelford.

Diploma Technology & Professional Studies Co-ordinators: Simon Herron & Tony Clelford.
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Prince Yemoh, Osborn Centre for Creative Arts.

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APPLIED ARCHITECTURAL THEORY

NIC CLEAR

APPLIED ARCHITECTURAL THEORY

NIC CLEAR

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Applied Architectural Theory encompasses histories and theories of architecture and urbanism, critical theory, cultural studies and theories of architectural technology. Together they provide a powerful toolkit for students to examine and interrogate architectural ideas and practices. A school of architecture has to balance the need to consider a wide range of ideas and theories with the responsibility to allow students from a diverse set of backgrounds to develop their own distinct position. The theory courses offered within the Architectural Degree and Diploma programmes establish a comprehensive theoretical framework that allows students to develop a core understanding of mainstream architectural theories and practices while giving them the opportunity to explore more speculative ideas and to pursue their own interests. The Architectural Degree Programme develops a coherent theoretical narrative over a three year period starting with a broad cultural reading of architectural ideas at the beginning of first year, this year students looked at the C20th house. The subject’s become more focused through a series of survey courses, and culminate in the third year with the students writing their own

individually developed dissertations within the context of five themed groups. The Diploma Programme uses the design Unit as the central vehicle for allowing students to critically engage with the ideas that underpin their design work. This year the ‘Influences, Theories and Techniques in Architecture’ course under the theme of ‘Architecture and Its Representations’ dealt with specificities of architectural representation in relation to each Diploma Unit’s agenda delivered through a lecture series from the Unit staff, the course co-ordinator and augmented by invited lecturers. For students in their final year the Architectural Dissertation gave them the opportunity to develop an in-depth research subject of their own choosing, often supporting their Major Design Thesis. This year the relationship between theory and design practice was emphasised throughout the School as both Degree and Diploma Design Units were asked to host a one evening slot in which they could either present a lecture themselves, invite a guest or use the opportunity to show a film or present a performance. Nic Clear Academic Leader in Design

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APPLIED ARCHITECTURAL THEORY

BA (HONS) ARCHITECTURE YEAR 3

APPLIED ARCHITECTURAL THEORY

DIPLOMA YEAR 1: INFLUENCES, THEORIES AND TECHNIQUES IN ARCHITECTURE

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BA (HONS) ARCHITECTURE Year 1 Co-ordinator: Nicholas Boyarsky Year 2 Co-ordinator: Dr Marko Jobst Dissertation Course Co-ordinator: Dr Corine Delage Year 3 Dissertation Tutors: Duncan Berntsen Dr Corine Delage Dr Marko Jobst Roger Seijo

DIPLOMA IN ARCHITECTURE > Theories of Architectural Design Co-ordinator: Dr Teresa Stoppani Diploma Year 2 & Year 3 PT Dissertation Co-ordinators: Nic Clear & Dr Teresa Stoppani Diploma Dissertation Tutors: Unit 19: Dr Rachel Armstrong Unit 16: Dr Corine Delage Unit 15: Nic Clear Unit 11: Dr Marko Jobst Unit X: Dr Teresa Stoppani

THE TRACEUR: PARKOUR AS REPRESENTATION Chris Kelly Parkour is representational, a way of reading the city. It could be argued that parkour can only be understood kinaesthetically. The traceur practices moves over and over, but when utilised whilst moving across the landscape, each one is different, each based upon the interaction with objects; their solidness, texture, temperature. Layla Curtis’ video ‘Traceurs: to Trace, to Draw, to Go Fast’ uses thermal imaging cameras to capture the moments traceurs come into contact with objects and the marks they leave upon them. These interactions are usually so quick that the eye cannot process them, however the thermal image remains implanted on the surface after the traceur has moved on. The intensity of the mark shows the intensity of touch on the surface, different surfaces produce different types of mark so it represents both the act of the traceur, their effect on the object as well as the effect the texture, surface and shape of the object on the interaction. Multiple traceurs move over the same position and each of their marks are different. The moves cannot be given the same name as each one is performed differently. The film captures the live motion of the traceurs, but at the same time slows down their interaction with their environment. It is a successful representation of the motion in multiple ways in the same instance. Photography and film typically depict the ‘performance’ of parkour, something that it did not set out to be recognised as. Parkour intends to challenge perceptions of use and function and the recognizable image created by these mediums allows the shock factor to be expressed when someone is challenging these perceptions. Notation is a record of what has already happened, or a set of instructions on how to perform something in the future. Notations’ dry method does not portray the emotive aspect of parkour; it is a mindset of the ever-present as well as a movement.

COLLAGE FOR ARCHITECTS: RISK, COLLISION AND ORDER Nicholas Gibbs The political significance of collage as a representational tool lies in its freedom (afforded by an age of prolific imagery) to subvert preexisting images and objects through manipulation and juxtaposition at the author’s will. In their criticism of object and space fixation, Rowe and Koetter advocate architectures which, rather than act independently, engage with their surrounds and are ‘digested in a prevalent texture or matrix’.1 This suggestion resonates with Nicholson’s argument that ‘collage cannot be ghosted into existence as a drawing’.2 Just as the architect is presented with an urban context in which to work, the collagist must work within the parameters set by both the limits of the source material and the fragments already on the page and is unable to adjust or redefine these elements in the same way a drawer or painter can. The control and limitations inherent in the process and the opportunity for risk and chance encounters, at first appear paradoxical. However the element of risk has its origins within the restrictions of the process, which are to a large extent beyond the manipulation of the author, and so the roles of risk and control in collage are inexorably intertwined. The collagist’s lack of control of the intuitive selection of materials and the irreversible processes of cutting and gluing can, through precision and technique, be manipulated to create what Francis Bacon described as a ‘deeply ordered chaos’.3 It is the skilled negotiation of risk, without its full eradication, that makes collage such a valuable tool for the architect.
Colin Rowe and Fred Koetter, Collage City, MIT Press (Cambridge), 1983, p 83. Ben Nicholson, Appliance House, MIT Press (London), 1990, p21. D, Hinton and M, Bragg. ‘Francis Bacon’ [TV series episode]. The South Bank Show.

YEAR 3 DISSERTATION: Tutor: DUNCAN BERNTSEN Le Corbusier and Theatres & Performances
Le Corbusier’s Graphic Legacy: Exploring the Importance of Drawing Le Corbusier and the Holy Mountain of Athos: Myth or Reality? Thinking Like Le Corbusier Learning from the Mistakes of Modernism The Relationship of Taste and Beauty: Questioning Le Corbusier’s Modular Journeys of Visions Free Plan: Le Corbusier The Principles and Ideas in Le Corbusier’s Design: Implementation in Buildings The Misunderstanding of Modernist Concepts: The Failure of Post War Social Housing Nature and Plans: Passion Towards Nature at the Heart of the Modern Movement Theatre Beyond the Stage Optimising Acoustic Performance within Concert Hall Design Societal Change and Theatre Architecture The Craftsmanship Involved in Theatres The Relationship Between Theatre and Politics Theatres in London and West End Theatreland Theatre in the Round to Proscenium Arch The Revolution of the Republic: Liberating Performances Theatres of Varying Urban Density: Interaction in Public Space The Use of Narrative in Architecture Stepping Over the Line: Carnival Street Performance to Traditional Theatre

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Tutor: DR MARKO JOBST Architecture & Contemporary Art

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The Uncanny: Whiteread & Salcedo Film, Architecture & Contemporary Art Public Intimacy: Deterritorializing Public Space Graffiti Art Illusion Architecture Perception is Reality Balancing the Intangibles Flexible Space Modern Monuments Art, Space & Architecture Towards a New Museum How does the Weather in Art Affect Architecture? Digital Art in Architecture The Blurring of Boundaries Surrounding Art & Architecture ... Just a Memory? The Unfolding Space Living in a Painting How Architecture, Buildings & Spaces Transform into Art Architecture as Co-Protagonist Navigating the Urban Fabric of the City Art at the Borderlands 20th Century Office Planning: No Place for Play Immersive Intensity of Human Imagery

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Tutor: DR CORINE DELAGE Public Spaces

Shared Space: The possibility of Enhancing the Genius Loci Public Space and Democracy Modern Approaches of Security & Crime Deterrence: Theory & Design for an Inner City Park How can Public Space Respond to the Needs of Teenagers? Water Features in Public Places Litter Bin in Context of Public Space The Experience of Markets as Public Spaces Carnival: The Social & Urban Aspects

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Energy for Cities: The Renewable Energy Revolution Green Walls: Are Green Walls a Possible Future Technology in Urban Space? Bioclimatic Design from Dr Ken Yeang: Why & How it Influences our Future Co-existing with Animals Architecture with a Positive Environmental Impact Architecture as a Solution to Self-Sufficient Homes Information Diaspora: Environmental Sustainability Designing Natural Homes Growing Architecture Competitive Space: The Void Between Spectator and Spectacle Changing Perception of Sustainability Architecture: Future Technology & Sciences The Reclamation of Urban Non-Space Slums Up or Slums Down Global Games Affecting the Reality of Local Life: London 2012 An Analytical Study of Garden Relating to Architecture & Nature in England & China

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APPLIED ARCHITECTURAL THEORY

DIPLOMA YEAR 2

APPLIED ARCHITECTURAL THEORY

DIPLOMA YEAR 2

053

ARCHITECTURE MOVES [?]: FORM AS A SNAPSHOT VIEW OF A TRANSITION Mascia Gianvanni Tutor: Dr Teresa Stoppani What is ‘time’ in architecture? Andrew Benjamin takes up this question in Time, Function and Alterity in Architecture, referring to Eisenman’s ‘time-space relationship’: “An interruption within repetition ... a staging of time.”1 A contrasting repetition within objects depends on the object’s history and complex temporality. If time is considered as repetition, then a pause within the repetition explains the discontinuity and continuity in architecture, making architecture be affected by time as a dimension. The notion of the repetition opening up function is interesting because: “the opening up of repetition and thus the possibility of its displaced retention becomes […] the inscription of the future into the present.”2 Function relates future and present. Function, formed by repetition, has a strong link to time. This can create a relation because repetition recurs and repeats itself, implying that repetition could link past to present to future. But it is not only the relationship between function and time that incorporates the repetition and explains the notion of time in architecture. Architecture is experienced through movement within space in a time duration constraint. As time is always moving forward and anything experienced as recent becomes a matter of the past matter of the past immediately, the constant advance of time creates an imaginary loop where past and future are so close that they almost touch, and only the microscopic distance between the two is the present. Paintings and photography have the ability to show a freeze-frame of time. They are the result of movement capture, frozen and immobile.

With architecture it is different, as time duration is part of its life. An architectural drawing or the picture of a building will always frame the architecture in a timeless dimension. When writing about utopias in her essay Embodied Utopias: The Time of Architecture,3 Elizabeth Grosz summarises, after analyzing utopian ideas from Plato’s republic to Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis, that utopias are a reflection of the past or a projection of the current sociopolitical situation into the future. This places the utopia in a still timeframe, where the only way for it to exist is to have no time.

FABRICATING REALITY Nicolau Faria Tutor: Nic Clear The inevitability of progress implies that we are often asked to make a choice between saving the old and creating the new. Nevertheless, there is an evident contradiction today, in many urban environments of the developed world, that we search for uniqueness and relish authenticity when, simultaneously, we allow the erasure of historical places and buildings within our cities. Similarly to the stories we tell others about ourselves, societies tend to select memories of what they want to remember as their past, inventing traditions, fashions and styles on the go, as a form of increasing social cohesion of groups who share the same ideals. More recently however, we are increasingly inclined towards the simulation of an idealized image of the past to its minutest details, exaggerating even elements of shabbiness and decay. Various authors, among whom Umberto Eco and Jean Baudrillard, have extensively argued that today we are unable to clearly distinguish reality from its simulation. This paradigm, which has been coined hyperreality, stems from the growing reliance of contemporary societies on the use of technology, digital imagery and instant communication in everyday life, all of which are substitutes of much of our social lives, our physical interaction and the individual witnessing of the world.1 Currently, the virtual appearance of this technology predominantly takes the form of screens, whether through televisions, computers or phones; speculation on the future forms that these interactive environments may take is extensive, and current developments in technology foresee the advent of much greater interactivity in the near future. In addition, it has been argued that these technologies can only contribute to the future disintegration of many of the social aspects of society, speculating on a future scenario of a home-based society interacting through screens 2 or physical avatars.3 However, this essay attempts to draw attention to the implications of hyperreality in

the built environment, and how it contributes to the amplification of a sentimentalist production of physical memories of our past, discussing how the reliance of technology in conjunction with the misinterpretation of reality and its simulation can only result in the loss of our referential past, and trigger a desperate attempt to reassert the feeling of this same reality, which is being lost.4 In addition, the essay argues how contemporary attitudes of repression, overstatement and ultimately the fabrication of historical memories in urban environments are enablers of the manipulation of our vision of the past, and often not sustained by historical accuracy - a stance that is becoming noticeable in current fashions and in contemporary preferences for the old, vintage, worn, natural, and handmade qualities of objects, and the design of many interiors and buildings which are often made to look considerably older and in worse condition than what they actually are. All of these aspects are symptoms of a trend towards the fabrication of a past, which can only contribute to a further loss of the actual history and eventually of reality itself.5
Thomas Frank, “The New Gilded Age” in Commodify your Dissent; Salvos from the Baffler, W. W. Norton & Co (New York), 1997. J. G. Ballard’s short story The Intensive Care Unit (1977) speculates on a world where each person lives in an individual room and all contact with other people throughout life is made through television screens. Jonathan Mostow’s film Surrogates (2009) explores a world where people live at home and use “humanoid remote control vehicles” as avatars for everyday interaction; although the androids in Surrogates may look extremely realistic, an American company called Anybots began marketing a simple version of similar type robots last year, mainly promoted to telecommuters. Jean Baudrillard, Simulacra and Simulation, University of Michigan Press (Michigan), 2010. Ibid.

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Andrew Benjamin, ‘Time, Function and Alterity in Architecture’, in Architectural Philosophy, Athlone Press (London), 2000, p6. Ibid. Elizabeth Grosz, ‘Embodied Utopias: The Time of Architecture’, in Elizabeth Grosz, Architecture from the Outside: Essays on Virtual and Real Space, The MIT Press (Massachusetts), 2001, pp131-150.

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SPEAKERS: RACHEL ARMSTRONG NIC CLEAR ARNE HENDRICKS SIMON HERRON JOHN HOPKINS MARK MORRIS NATHAN MORRISSON CARLOS OLGUIN SIMON PARK NEIL SPILLER KIBWE TAVARES TERRY WAGHORN PANEL DISCUSSION: MARK GARCIA (CHAIR) MIKE DUFF RICHARD HYAMS TERESA STOPPANI LIAM YOUNG FOR THE FIRST TIME IN HUMAN HISTORY WE ARE WITNESSING THE ADVENT OF MEGACITIES – SEEMINGLY ENDLESS URBAN EXPANSES THAT HOUSE MORE THAN 10 MILLION DENSELY PACKED INHABITANTS SEEKING JOBS IN THESE ECONOMIC HUBS OF ACTIVITY, SOME OF WHICH EVEN WARRANT THEIR OWN BUILDINGS. BUT THESE CITIES ARE NOT THE PRODUCT OF INGENIOUS DESIGN. MEGACITIES SPREAD LIKE WEEDS ACROSS THE LANDSCAPE STRAINING ALREADY STRESSED MODERN INFRASTRUCTURES TO BREAKING POINT AND CAUSING POTENTIALLY LIFE THREATENING ISSUES SUCH AS, CRIME, HOMELESSNESS, WASTE & RESOURCE MANAGEMENT, DISEASE, TRAFFIC CONGESTION AND POLLUTION. BY THE MIDDLE OF THIS CENTURY THERE WILL BE ANOTHER THIRD AGAIN OF PEOPLE TAKING UP RESIDENCE IN CITIES AND WE ARE FACING A CRISIS CAUSED BY HUMAN DESIGN – OR LACK OF IT. THE FUTURE OF HUMANITY DEPENDS ON THE PROSPERITY OF CITIES AND MANY STAKEHOLDERS ARE EXPLORING NEW WAYS TO CREATE BUILDINGS, FINDING FRESH APPROACHES TO MANAGING INFORMATION TO HELP FIND ORDER IN CHAOS AND ENCOURAGING BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS TO REVITALIZE THE HEALTH OF OUR CITIES – AS AN ATTEMPT TO CHANGE THE PATHWAY TO CATASTROPHE THAT WE’VE ALREADY SET IN MOTION THROUGH GLOBAL INDUSTRIALIZATION AND RELATIVE URBAN PROSPERITY. THIS TWO DAY EVENT EXPLORES SOME OF THE ISSUES THAT OUR FUTURE CITIES ARE FACING AND PROPOSES A WAY FORWARDS THROUGH A NEW WAY OF THINKING ABOUT CITIES THAT WE HAVE CALLED ‘REFLEXIVE URBANISM’. THIS IS A SYNTHESIS OF TECHNOLOGIES (BOTH VIRTUAL AND ACTUAL), CONTEXTUAL URBAN STRATEGIES AND THEORIES OF URBANISM THAT IMBUE THE ENVIRONMENT WITH LIVELY INFRASTRUCTURES AT ALL SCALES OF THE CITY. THESE URBANISMS ARE HIGHLY DYNAMIC, CHEMICAL AND RESPONSIVE. ‘REFLEXIVE URBANISM’ IS THE PRELUDE TO NIBC CONVERGENCE, WHICH WILL BE DEPLOYED TO SOLVE THE BIGGEST ISSUE OF THIS CENTURY - MEGACITIES AND THEIR ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ON OUR CLIMATE. THIS APPROACH EMBRACES NEW TECHNOLOGIES, DYNAMIC INFRASTRUCTURES, ‘AGILE’ ARCHITECTURES AND ALTERNATIVE FORMS OF ECONOMICS TO HARNESS THE RADICAL CREATIVITY POSSESSED IN URBAN ENVIRONMENTS. THIS CHANGE IS BROUGHT ABOUT BY OVER-PRESCRIBING TOP-DOWN IMPERATIVES, SYSTEMS OF CONTROL OR SCIENTIFIC/ENGINEERING ABSTRACTIONS. ‘REFLEXIVE URBANISM’ WORKS WITH THE MESSINESS OF CITIES, THEIR VIBRANT NATURES AND THEIR INHERENT SUBVERSION, TO IDENTIFY NEW SOLUTIONS FOR THE PRACTICE OF THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT IN A RESOURCE CONSTRAINED WORLD. REFLEXIVE URBANISM PROPOSES THAT CITIES OF THE FUTURE ARE NOT MADE BUT EVOLVED. THESE CITIES DO NOT OPERATE LIKE MACHINES BUT BEHAVE ACCORDING TO SURREALIST AGENDAS OPERATING THROUGH A PORTFOLIO OF ADVANCED, COMBINED TECHNOLOGIES. THE PORTFOLIO OF NEW TOOLS, WHICH ARE HYBRIDS OF SYNTHETIC BIOLOGY, AUGMENTED REALITY AND COMPLEXITY CHEMISTRY, SETS THE SCENE FOR A NEW GROUP OF MATERIALS AND ARCHITECTURAL INTERVENTIONS THAT BLUR THE DISTINCTION BETWEEN BUILDING AND LANDSCAPE AND CONSTITUTE SYNTHETIC URBAN ECOLOGIES. THESE ‘LIVING TECHNOLOGIES’ CAN EVOLVE THE CITY FABRIC IN CONJUNCTION WITH ITS COMMUNITY OPERATING AT MANY SCALES RANGING FROM THE MICRO SCALE, TO THE CITY. IMPORTANTLY THESE ARCHITECTURES RESULT FROM THE STRATEGIC APPLICATIONS OF LIVING TECHNOLOGIES AND ARE BASED ON REAL WORLD EXPERIMENTS, FROM THEIR MATERIALS, INFRASTRUCTURES AND COMMUNITIES. UNIQUELY THIS EVENT BRINGS TOGETHER A DIVERSE RANGE OF STAKEHOLDERS FROM ACADEMIA AND BUSINESS THAT WILL BE INVITED TO ENGAGE WITH SOME OF THE BIGGEST CHALLENGES THAT WE FACE TODAY. THE FIRST DAY IS DEDICATED TO A PUBLIC FORUM AND CONFERENCE WITH SPEAKER PRESENTATIONS AND A MODERATED ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION EXAMINING MANY IMPORTANT URBAN AND ARCHITECTURAL ISSUES. THE SECOND DAY IS ONE OF FACILITATED CONVERSATIONS AND IDENTIFICATION OF NEXT STEPS TOWARDS ESTABLISHING A FUTURE CITIES PLATFORM BASED IN ACADEMIA, WHICH WORKS ALONGSIDE INDUSTRY TO RESEARCH, EXPERIMENT AND PROPOSE ALTERNATIVE APPROACHES TO THE REJUVENATION AND SUSTAINABILITY OF OUR CITIES VITAL FOR AN INTEGRATED, VISIONARY APPROACH IN ADDRESSING THIS GLOBAL GRAND CHALLENGE.

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THE ACT OF BUILDING TURNS OUR LANDS AND ECOSYSTEMS INTO COMMODITIES FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION. DOES THIS COMMODIFICATION OF NATURES’ WONDERS DILUTE ITS POWER AND SYMBOLIC VALUE OR CAN IT BRING ABOUT A BETTER APPRECIATION OF THE NATURAL WORLD AND ITS WILDNESS, TO A SOCIETY PRESENTLY DETACHED FROM NATURE AND IMMERSED IN DIGITAL COMMUNICATION? PLEASE JOIN US TO DISCUSS THIS AND OTHER IMPLICATIONS THAT WE SHOULD CONSIDER WHEN DESIGNING WHILST CARING FOR THE EARTH. SPEAKERS: MARK TITMAN UNIVERSITY OF GREENWICH NOEL FARRER FARRER HUXLEY LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS LIAM YOUNG TOMORROWS THOUGHTS TODAY MARTA POZO ARCHITECT, MVRDV 7:20 - 8:00PM EXHIBITION GREENWICH FORUM 2012

BA (HONS) ARCHITECTURE

UNITS 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 & YEAR 1

BA (HONS) ARCHITECTURE

UNITS 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 & YEAR 1

059

Course Co-ordinator: Reenie Elliott Year 1 Co-ordinators: Susanne Isa & Adriana Cobo Year 2 Co-ordinator: Francois Girardin Year 3 Co-ordinator: Cordula Weisser

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Christopher Pattison, Excavating The Electric Mountain.

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UNIT 7

UNIT 7

MATTHEW BUTCHER, MELISSA APPLETON & ROGER SEIJO

061

EAST - EDGE - DRIFTS. Our sense of a place is formed by a multitude of divergent and contradictory factors: one of these defining factors could be said to be not what a place is but what it is not. To determine what is natural we must first determine what is unnatural, what is inside is only determined by our understanding of what is outside. It is sometimes only by turning away from a place, returning to its edges, or navigating its perimeters that we gain a more complete perspective on the environments we choose to inhabit. It is in order to investigate our individual and collective understanding of what constitutes a place - that this year unit 7 will explore the phenomenon of edge conditions and design the very particular architectures that could occupy them. In particular we seek to utilise cross border phenomena and create a passage to other places in order to help define individual architectures, readings of site as well as a new understanding of the urban environment. LAND, WATER, TRADE, GAS AND OIL. The main point of departure for Unit 7 this year was the city of Marseille and in particular its identity as one of Europe’s major ports. The port is the third largest in Europe, servicing trade as well movements of people

globally. The historical nature of this city as a port has been central to defining the city’s diverse religious, social, cultural and urban identity, an identity that is primarily informed by the large and diverse immigrant and African communities within the city as well as dramatic differences between the rich and poor. These characteristics have profound effect on the urban condition, characterised by hybrid conditions but also strong and distinct divisions. As part of our investigations we sought to explore, record and understand this distinct urban make up, and how the communities that define and inhabit the city inform it. These studies will became integral to informing architectural, spatial and temporal propositions. Unit 7 would like to thank our practice tutor Caireen O’Hagan, along with our critics: Steve Baumann, Chris Cox, James A. Craig, Omar Gahzel, Simon Herron, Alex Hill, Susanne Isa, Luke Jones, Thomas Klassnik, Hugh McEwan, Tom Noonan, Matt OzgaLawn, Khyle Raja, Tom Reynolds, Catrina Stewart, Elly Ward and Elizabeth Williams.

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Alexander Johnstone, Port of Marseille Ship Recycling Works.

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UNIT 7

UNIT 7

CROSS BORDER PHENOMENA

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Y2: Steven Alexandrou, Salwa Al-Waili, Jake Brockwell, Thomas Brown, Sinem Camur, Dominic Davis, Sarah Dowdall, Inese Kalnberza, Dean Kirby, Christian Likenyule, Filston Manuella, Betul Maras, Kally Raouf, Hannah Theodorou, Zaheer Varyawa. Y3: Alex Allin, Beau Byron, Sathien Ganesan, Jenny Jackson, Mitchell Johnson, Alex Johnstone, Lucy Jones, Prashant Raniga, Andrea Scalco, Billy Valencia. Y4 PT: Scott Ellisdon, Simon Woodward.
Dominic Davis, Voyeurs Bath House. Salwa Al-Waili, Gateway Into Marseille. Lucy Jones, Marseille Salt Auction.

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Dominic Davis, Voyeurs Bath House. Dean Kirby, Marseille Union Headquarters. Alexander Johnstone, Port of Marseille Ship Recycling Works. Simon Woodward, The Outer Trial Bank Land Observatory.

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UNIT 7

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CROSS BORDER PHENOMENA

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UNIT 6

UNIT 6

CORDULA WEISSER & RAHESH R. RAM

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Unit 6 structured the academic year around a series of workshops that aimed to expose students to the competing material, urban, social, economical and formal forces that shape architectural thinking and practice – to empower students with the technical and intellectual skills required to think about these conditions at this stage of their education. The year started with morphology and archetypal space exercises, leading onto a series of models. The models produced were examined at a variety of scales as architectural and urban fragments, and formed the basis of an exploration of the social experience and occupation of spatial form and surface. This resulted in a proposal for a townscape-masterplan for the area around Hackney Wick Station, currently subject of a new Area Action Plan as part of the Olympic Legacy plans. This was accompanied by a series of workshops including a study trip to Berlin and group research of ecological system technologies and theories. We also studied David Harvey’s definition of the “right to the city” as a “right to change ourselves by changing the city”, to help to critically examine this Action Plan as well as existing developments in Stratford and more generally the laws of supply and demand

that have become the primary forces for urban development. Under the premise that these forces are increasingly leading to a void of spaces for democratic engagement and alternative models, the students were guided to individually develop programmes and models for an urban fragment specific to the local conditions. Proposals took clues from the initial townscape designs, ‘Ecology Diagrams’ capturing flows and processes of the site and an imagined future scenario forming a further context for the buildings designed. Projects range from a ‘social condenser for the 21st century’, a chocolate factory including a townhall, a Hackney Wick archive and story collector, a canal boat market as a performance place to a new take on the public bath house. Unit 6 would like to thank our practice tutors Justine Bell and Adam Cole, along with our critics: Christoph Heinemann, Chee-Kit Lai, Daniel Lee, Holly Lewis, Anna Ludwig, Hillary Powell, Christoph Schmidt, Thomas Schneider, Adam Shapland and Robert Thum.

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Daniel Silva, Civic Chocolate Factory.

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UNIT 6

UNIT 6

LANDSCAPES OF EM(POWER)MENT

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Y2: Kimon Athanasiadis, Sonam Dahya, Emmanuel Fonkwen, Bozhidar Georgiev, Parisa Ghorani, Waqas Javed, Dinesh Kutowaroo, Petya Nikolova, Alexandra Okoh, Baboo Rughoo, Amar Vara. Y3 PT: Romana Bellinger, Matthew Oliver. Y3: Bilkan Ali, Haroulla Georgiou, Mark Hodges, Hitesh Karatela, Abdelhamid Khogali, Thelma Mannion, Megha Menon, Anna Mikkonen, Gamze Ozevlat, Daniel Silva, Murat Surucu, Anastasios Tsertikidis.
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Bilkan Ali, Playcraft Park. Randeep Thanid, Parkour Townscape: Morphology Study. Petya Nikolova, Hackney Wick Archive, Wall of Whispers. Sonam Dahya, Light Park, Barbeque Pavillion. Gamze Ozevlat, Hackney Curiosity Shop. Daniel Silva, Civic Chocolate Factory. Anna Mikkonen, Social Condenser: Public Domestics.
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Abdel Khogali, Materia Growing Tower. Sonam Dahya, Light Park. Abdel Khogali, Materia Growing Tower. Mark Hodges, Canal Boat Market and Theatre.

m-n Mark Hodges, Canal Boat Market and Theatre.

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UNIT 6

LANDSCAPES OF EM(POWER)MENT

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UNIT 5

UNIT 5

MARK TITMAN & JEFFREY JAMES

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The zero carbon house has been achieved; so now the social imperative is to create buildings that are both physically and emotionally uplifting. Also the modern urban dweller is becoming sterile as he becomes increasingly immersed in data, living alone and remote from nature. We ask if there can be an architecture of wildness, risk and even danger, like that of a hungry lion or a snapping crocodile: a space for 21st Century tribes and their power animals that can empower a neighbourhood, revitalise a street, energise a square. We want to bring individuals face to face again using animals and their bodies, social activity and character as an inspiration. All creatures say their names. The identity/ iconography of a nation, team or tribe is often symbolised with an animal or creature. Animals reflect human qualities, their vitality and character offer inspiration. Consider the mascot, totem pole, heraldry and flags. These are known as power animals. The characters, legends and dynamics of a chosen creature have often offered groups an expression of their social identity and focus for their rituals. The forms of buildings today are often abstract and lacking in meaning. It seems that a lot of the abstract forms of architecture today not only lack meaning but

also lack any coherent visual composition and articulation. Consider Hadid, Gehry and the parametric architects. Now consider how animals could help form an architecture of significance and social dynamic. Within this context we have been designing what we loosely term Village Halls; using a creature to empower a specific group of people in and around Soho. The complex and intriguing adaptive behaviours creatures display provided new forms of engaging architecture and programmes. We explored the capacity for a creature to sense and act on the environment, noting how animals’ ability to sense, think and act on the world creates their form as does the environment itself. Unit 5 would like to thank Arup Associates (Practice tutor: Kim Quazi), Gareth John, Kathryn Findlay and our critics: Derek Draper, Gihan Karunaratne, Ben Rogers and Jyioti Sharma.

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Veysel Karkin, [Homing Pigeon] Back Packers’ Hall. Michael Smith, [Mimic Octopus] Music Hall.

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UNIT 5

REVITALISING SOHO

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Y2: Andrew Brown, Joshua Browning, Farzana Choudary, Hmaza El-Ghaoubar, Suraj Gadar, Katy Kavanagh, Eva Lliopoulou, Aysenur Macit, David Pow, Sharis Valdez, Matthew Wells. Y3 PT: Evgeny Korchesvtsev. Y3: Flor Arango, Jennifer Asiedu, Alexia Christodoulou, Andri Hadjichristou, Darius Januska, Veysel Karkin, Sherien Mechail, Michael Osei Smith, Margarita Sarkisian, Yudish Shegobin, Mario Shimbov, Astrita Vula, Hoi Yin Yip. Y4 PT: Anthony Richardson.
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Mario Shimbov, [Vampire Squid] Games Hall. Astrita Vula, [Swan] Wedding Hall. Suraj Gadar, [Lion] Homeless Self Build. Eva Lliopoulou, [Salamander] Fire Hall. Flor Arango, [Resplendent Quetzal] Carnival Hall. Andrew Brown, [Wolf] Homeless Theatre Hall. Michael Smith, [Mimic Octopus] Music Hall. Astrita Vula, [Swan] Wedding Hall. Andrew Brown, [Wolf] Homeless Theatre Hall. Veysel Karkin, [Homing Pigeon] Back Packers’ Hall. Hoi Yin Yip, [Ant] Shopping Hall. Joshua Browning, [Meercat] Artists Hall.
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Veysel Karkin, [Homing Pigeon] Back-Packers’ Hall. Anthony Richardson, [Bat] Arts Club. Evgeny Korchesvttsev, [Chameleon] Brothel Hall.

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UNIT 5

REVITALISING SOHO

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UNIT 4

UNIT 4

FRANCOIS GIRARDIN & MARK GARCIA

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“There is not enough flying in architecture.” 1
Architecture has always been the primeval art of the mastery and struggle between materials, structures and gravity. It is the ancient subconscious dream of architecture to free itself from the ground and to fly. Caught between an environmentally burdensome and sprawling horizontality and an internationally puerile and energy-limited race for the tallest vertical erection, Unit 4 explores the critical architectural powers and meanings of the cantilever, of all of the oblique and diagonal angles between 1 and 89 and between 91 and 179 degrees. Pioneeringly anchored in a variety of awkward, difficult and extreme contexts around the globe, these sublime and everyday projects operate with architectural qualities of suspense, parasitism, ascent, diagonality, precariousness, descent, elevation, extrusion, torsion, elasticity, propulsion and flotation. Developed with technical research supported by the architectural practice MAKE, a brinkmanship between materials, technology, structure, sustainability, energy, services, climate, engineering, construction, use, reuse and place is realized into a multisensory and intrepid set of experiments and proposals. Probing cantilevers emerge at a variety of scales ranging from details and interiors to buildings and infrastructures.

Post-industrial, mixed-use complexes are examined and produced through a hybridizing and crossprogramming of functions that include the private, minimal, residential highdensity and more public and hyper-modern activities and lifestyles. These constraints manufacture tensions between the social, economic, cultural and political qualities and narratives of the projects and between the sensual and the practical needs and desires of the body and of the community. This is an architecture that is engineered to force us (through materials, technology, structure and in function) to realize that the future, life, death and rebirth, both of ourselves and of the planet, hang in a precipitous, poetic and prosaic balance, everyday and night of the year. Unit 4 would like to thank MAKE Architects (Practice tutor: Jonathan Mitchell), along with our critics: Rachel Armstrong, Nic Clear, Reenie Elliott, Howard Gilby, Simon Herron, Phil Hudson, Thomas Klasnik, Benjamin Koslowski, Mohammed Muhsam, Rahesh R. Ram, Phil Watson and Cordula Weisser.
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Jan Kaplicky, late director of Future Systems, Confessions, Wiley (London), 2002. Thomas Phillips, European Alpine Research Laboratory: Temporary structure on the Mattherhorn.

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UNIT 4

UNIT 4

CANTILEVERS - FLYING ARCHITECTURE

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Y2: Jordaan Clarke, Thomas Farquhar, Joshua Joannou, Hristiana Kirova, Kinga Matura, Marietta Paraskevaidi, Thomas Phillips, Danielle Purcell, Jason Reid, Ivan Semedo Teixeira, Dawid Wojcik. Y3 PT: Jack Baron, Adam Jackson, Arshad Mahmood. Y3: William Barnett, Anthony Bartolo, Drew Chapmen, Wayne De Abreu, Isabella Iacinschi, Stephen Judge, Armand Layne, Flamur Shalaku, Tandolwetu Siwisa. Y4 PT: Jekaterina Krackovskaja.
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Danielle Purcell, Glass Factory: The Suspended Glass House. Wayne De Abreu, Vertical Central Park: View of the Ice Ring. Thomas Farquhar, Mont Saint Michel Monastry: The Water Pilgrimage. Dawid Wojcik, The Open Theater: A Repository of Theater Sets. Drew Chapmen, The New London Crematorium: Courtyard leading to the Gardens of Remembrance. Flamur Shalaku, Rio de Janeiro Olympics: The Favela Training Ground. Drew Chapmen, The New London Crematorium: The Open Public Chapel.
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(Title image) William Barnett. Thomas Phillips, European Alpine Research Laboratory: Radiation Measurement.

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UNIT 4

UNIT 4

CANTILEVERS - FLYING ARCHITECTURE

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UNIT 3

UNIT 3

REENIE ELLIOTT & JIM CURTIS

085

Students were asked to delve into misused material and tainted histories, exploring time and action along the vanishing cartographies of an abandoned slate quarry in Wales. We explored fictional tangents and wrote makeshift manifestos. Drawing, making and other tactical representations delved into the potential of material and site: purity and impurity, safety and danger. Students constructed kaleidoscopic archaeologies, sifting through sheared time. They excavated myths, rituals and social structures, slicing sections of material and time, in a landscape of vertical transience. They discovered itinerant utopias as they inhabited the landscape and it’s voids, scratching and projecting means of escaping it. This landscape was shaped by mythical wells, fractured ground, and the lost worlds of quarries and mineshafts. There were multiple incisions and erosions of the notion of mountain and myth, technology and culture. We viewed the largest waterwheel on mainland Britain, crossed the pass to the ancient church, and saw the sacred fish in the well. We documented the turning of time, water, industry, and beliefs. We surveyed the machinery that produced the slate. We listened for the dragon in the mountain, the hidden hydroelectric power station; a modern industrial wonder of Wales!

We surveyed boundary distortions. We researched hairy escapologies. Itinerant utopias were projected along the fractured archaeologies in the activation of a ‘distillation field’. These explorations culminated in the design of a retreat for 40 people. Within reconstituted materials, students found spaces and voids, a vortex of junk. They were the new Vorticists. They made their own manifestos for the modern world. The disposition of their excavated images revealed new spaces, and other aspects of the discarded culture. Itinerant utopias retreated into synthetic weather, seasonal shifting, strobbing landscapes, shearing revisions, and olfactory topography. Itinerant utopias were found to contain immigrant dystopias, disjointed itineraries and ruined horizons: an amusement-scape of cumulative proportions. Unit 3 would like to thank Grimshaw and Partners (Practice tutor: Joe Laslett), along with our critics: Francesco Belfiore, Kelly Chan, Nic Clear, Scott Ellis, Michail Floros, Howard Gilby, Simon Herron, Gihan Karunaratne, Runa Mathiesen, Silvia Pizzini, Claudia Rath, Josephine Rehayem, Esther Rivas Androver and Roger Seijo.
<

Katie Browne, Farewell Tower.

084

UNIT 3

UNIT 3

ITINERANT UTOPIAS

087

Y2: Muhammad Abd Rahman, Margarita Andreeva, Megan Ellis, Timothy Evans, Stephanie Finch, Christiana Karamalli, Lyuba Pekyanska, Sarala Perera, Trang Pham, Christopher Singh, Dunya Thaer Hatem. Y3 PT: Christo Kapourani. Y3: Katie Browne, William Davis, Ayden De Luca, Nathalie Hawkins, Markos Kornaros, Mario Markarov, Mohammed Miah, Adaku Obi, Christopher Pattison, Yiannis Stylianou. Y4 PT: Matthew Adams, Neil Goodhew.
(Title Image) Dunya Hatem, Sensory Retreat: Musical House. Muhammad Abd Rahman, System of Beliefs. Ayden De Luca, Anti-Capitalist Retreat.

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Christopher Singh, Itinerant Foundry. Markos Kornaros, Floating Distillery. Ayden De Luca, Anti-Capitalist Library. Markos Kornaros, Landscape Pilgrimage. Christopher Pattison, Excavating the Electric Mountain.

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086

UNIT 3

UNIT 3

ITINERANT UTOPIAS

089

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UNIT 2

UNIT 2

CAROLINE RABOURDIN, PASCAL BRONNER & HOWARD GILBY

091

“Granted, [Barnabas] goes into the bureaux, but are the bureaux part of the real Castle? And even if there are bureaux actually in the Castle, are they the bureaux that Barnabas is allowed to enter?” 1
This year Unit Two has been working on Kafkaesque constructs of architecture and fiction, drawing its themes from Metamorphosis and The Castle. These somewhat surreal novels raise important questions about our interaction with space and human relations. The former novella deals with perception and estrangement in one’s immediate environment, whilst the latter deals with territories and governance, in the then AustroHungarian Empire. The novels enabled us to progress from the scale of the individual to a wider concern of State representation on foreign territory through speculations about new possible functions of the Embassy. Diplomats are often accused of having lost touch with their home country for having been posted abroad for too long; Sir Harrold Nicholson describes them as “denationalised, internationalised and therefore dehydrated, an elegant empty husk”. Here the Unit focused on Austro-Hungarian protagonists and studied the condition created by their displacement to the UK as ‘ambassadors’.

The Embassy as thematic typology ranged from designing a house for an Ambassador through to larger public proposals. Our sites were characterized by a history of displacement. The first site in North London used to house the ‘Lanterndl’, an Austrian theatre company during WW2, whilst the second site in Aston Abbott is a rural village in Buckinghamshire where the Czech government lived in exile during the same period. This year the unit emanated the Uncanny; a term which Freud coined in reference to a scenario which is both familiar and foreign at the same time! Unit 2 would like to thank David Morley Architects (Practice tutors: Mark Davies and Chris Roberts), along with our critics: Mike Aling, Kate Davies, Ricardo De Ostos, Pedro Gil, Simon Herron, Thomas Hillier, Susanne Isa, Steve Johnson, CJ Lim, Yorogs Loizos, James O’Leary, Jean Baptiste Ruat, Adam Shapland, Bob Sheil, Will Trossell, Taro Tsuruta and Dean Walker.
1

Franz Kafka, The Castle, Penguin (Middlesex), 1957, p165. Natasha Hutchinson-Fuat, Aston Abbott International.

<^

090

UNIT 2

UNIT 2

KAFKAESQUE ARCHITECTURES

093

Y2: Bianca Baciu, Razna Begum, Fernando Cano Larios, James Cocker-White, Michaela Hammond, Natacha Hutchinson-Fuat, Helen Inyang, Rania Kavxlopoulou, Niccolo Leogrande, Elen Liskova, Sara Murray, Chris Parker, Neela Patel, Hafsah Sharif. Y3: Humma Louise Akram, Gunes Bagdali, Ho Chuen Cheuk, Zoe Mavromati, Kichon Nam, Nishma Patel, Sidra Yaqub, Deyi Zhang. Y4 PT: Nurun-Naher Hussain, Charlie Trevorrow, Andy Weightman.
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Charlie Treverrow, Elindul: The Travller’s Therapy Centre. Razna Begum, Countess Bathory’s Bath. Elena Liskova, Schlumberger’s Terroir. Helen Inyang, The Stage Banquet Rooms, Eton Avenue.

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Razna Begum, Countess Bathory’s Bath. Helen Inyang, The Stage Banquet Rooms, Eton Avenue.
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092

UNIT 2

UNIT 2

KAFKAESQUE ARCHITECTURES

095

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UNIT 1

UNIT 1

DUNCAN BERNTSEN & FRANZISKA WAGNER

097

Unit 1 this year charted the demise of educational polemic: from Gordon Brown’s understanding of education as a ‘great liberator’ and ‘the greatest force for social progress’, to the cynical attitudes of those who consider it no more than a ‘finishing school for the middle classes’. It is assumed by many that the current situation and governing attitude towards education is the end of the road for a liberal system that has primarily sought the expansion of learning within policies of publicly funded, ever wider access. For many however, the situation offers a creative opportunity; not simply to clear out the dead wood of defunct regimes and past epochs, but to genuinely energise new learning interfaces within a ‘Big Society’ that has to find new ways of preparing its youth for arguably the most competitive economy our population has ever seen. It is these new and often hybrid learning interfaces that Unit 1 has concerned itself with this year. The Unit reviewed educational ideologies in the contemporary political context, focusing on the ‘youth’ or the transition age group of 14 to 24 as it contemplates how to adapt to the new learning landscape of individual fee paying, public sector cuts and learning focused primarily towards the getting of jobs.

Working with the proposition that our towns and cities in all their diversity offer opportunities for new forms of programmatic learning hybrids, students focused on Lambeth in Central London as their laboratory, working along the historic streets of ‘The Lower Marsh’ and ‘The Cut’ with all their potential ancillary sites. The students extensively explored the locale and its spatial, cultural and economic dimensions. Students were encouraged to identify their own programme and configure hybrid spatial typologies to frame them among the Unit’s pedagogy, where no overarching architectural dogma was prescribed. After undertaking a number of exercises to excavate personal philosophical positions between individual learning experiences and the current national learning agenda, students have developed entrepreneurial propositions that seek to exploit the city as a tool for learning. Unit 1 would like to thank Allford Hall Monaghan Morris (Practice tutors: Sam Harvey and Philip Turner), along with our critics: Veatrili Bania, Swen Geiss and Derek Mok.
<^

Mitul Chuasama, School for Streetdance.

096

UNIT 1

UNIT 1

BECOME AN EDUCATIONAL RACONTEUR

099

Y2: Sahar Allahverdi, Hasan Chattun, Mitul Chuasama, Amilia Fragkedaki, Eirini Laskaridou, Balraj Rai, Mitish Kooshant Rambarassah, Lennon Leo Rychunski, Eleni Triantafyllidou, George Aboagye Williams. Y3 PT: Kevin Baker, Deone Costley, Kirsty Phipps. Y3: Mubarak Al Faheem, Konstantina Balomenaki, Liam Ellmers, Greg Galerakis, Andja Kacori, Craig Pallett, Antony Pike, Peter Ravenscroft, Becci Standley. Y4 PT: Dexter Dowse, Jon Mills, David Parish, Matt Samways.
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Matt Samways, International Food and Cooking School. David Parish, School for Theatre Studies. Mitul Chuasama, School for Streetdance. Mubarak Al Faheem, International Language School. Gregorious Galerakis, School for Theatre Studies. David Parish, School for Theatre Studies. Mitul Chuasama, School for Streetdance. Jon Mills, School for Theatre Studies. David Parish, School for Theatre Studies.

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Jon Mills, School for Theatre Studies. Amilia Fragkedaki, Theatre school for Children.

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n, o Mitul Chuasama, School for Streetdance. h

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098

UNIT 1

UNIT 1

BECOME AN EDUCATIONAL RACONTEUR

101

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BA (HONS) ARCHITECTURE YEAR 1

BA (HONS) ARCHITECTURE YEAR 1

103

Year 1 Students: Martin Aberson, Saud Ahmad, Aysun Ahmed, Samuel Ajibola, Abbas Akbarally, Dogus Akin, Elise Alden, Sara Al Mandil, Sandra Asante, Laura Ashdown, James Ashendon, Vienna Barbetti, Jordi Brady Ocampo, Kamilla Bronisewska, Joseph Burgess, Oliver Cannon, Martha Carini, Daniel Chernis, Theodoros Constandinou, Darina Dimitrova, Sumeyye Dinleyici, Larisa Dobie, Nabil Ebrhimgeel, Peter Efe, Imad El-Asmar, Felipe Erazo Trujillo, Kyriakos Eliades, Joanna Fabikun, Chester Field, Simona Fratila, Serhat Gok, Edward Grace, Martin Hall, Jessica Hlavackova, Vlad Ion, Nelly Ireri, Justine Johnson, Ali Karim, Izaad Khodabocus, Anna Kokkota, Uttam Limbu, Flair Maitland, Haseeb Majeed, Malgorzata Malus, Jelena Malyseva, Mariana Marques Da Silva, Patrick Mawson, Kymberly Micua, Mohammad MK Nejad, Abdul Mokul, Abdul Mujahid, Kenneth Molekoa, Tim Ng, Marei Nithianadhan, Aaron Ogunniya, Oleg Pavlov, Kieran Peart, Siyana Petrova, Ainsley Pretlove, Steven Roe, Nicholas Shackleton, Parisa Shahnooshi, Dimitrios Sifakis, Monika Sowa, Heather Stokes, Rodostina Stoyanova, Ionna Tamas, Dovydas Talacka, Tsvetlina Todorova, Dan Trenholme, Mohammad Uddin, Alexander Vavantakis, Julian Vifor, Emeli Yakimova.

PT Year 1: Craig Alexander, Daniel Meredith, Jennifer Scarfe, Iason Triantafyllidis. PT Year 2: Nilufer Ayres, Stephen Bateman, Claudia Farmer, Maria Georgakaki, Sam Guidotti, Danica Hammond, Araz Mamand, Michael O’Donell, Grant Perry, Ross Sadler, Jaroslava Valasheek, Frantz Wellington.

‘By seeing London, I have seen as much of life as the world can show.’ 1
The built environment is something we are all familiar with, but just what is Architecture? The first year of study in degree is where critical and analytical thinking, along with a speculative and experimental exploration of architecture must take place. The world we live in, and could live in, should be seen as an opportunity to think about the possibilities for Architecture. The first year programme and it’s teaching staff are here to enable the students to materialize their varied interests and aspirations. Prejudices are called into question, as are ideas about the past, present and the future. The encouragement of students to deploy a variety of ‘ways of seeing’ is a priority in first year, along with manifold issues such as resolution, scale, drawing and making. This year we have been focusing on London and Tourism.
Samuel Johnson, quoted by James Boswell (11th October 1773) in Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D (London), 1791.

Year 1 Co-ordinator: Susanne Isa. Design Tutors: Mike Aling, Matthew Butcher, Adriana Cobo, Susanne Isa, Tim Norman, Caroline Rabourdin, Rob Rosling and Ben Sweeting. Technical Tutors: Max Dewdney, Mark Hatter, Luke Olsen, Geoff Ward and James Wignall. History & Theory: Nicholas Boyarsky. Design & Communication Co-ordinator: Adriana Cobo. Design & Communication Tutors: Genevieve Closuit, Sybille Heil, Jim Hobbs, Shona Illingworth, Caroline Isgar, Liane Lang, Sarah MacDonald, Sally Mould, Sion Parkinson, Wendy Smith, Elinor Stewart and Athul Vohora. With many thanks to our critics: Chris Allen, Kelvin Ang, Luke Chandresinghe, Nic Clear, Maya Cochrane, Howard Gilby, Kieran Hawkins, Simon Herron, Ben Masterton Smith, Theo Molloy, Jonny Muirhead, Charlotte Raleigh, Neil Spiller and Cordula Weisser.

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BA (HONS) ARCHITECTURE YEAR 1

BA (HONS) ARCHITECTURE YEAR 1

WELCOME TO LONDON!

105

a b c d e f g h i j k

Simona Fratila Patrick Mawson Kyriakos Eliades Martin Hall Abbas Akbarally Elise Alden Mohammad MK Nejad Maria Georgakaki Larisa Dobie Jelena Malyseva Jaroslava Valasheek

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Simona Fratila Malgorzata Malus Michael O’Donell Tim Ng James Ashendon Ionna Tamas Dan Trenholme Ed Grace Larisa Dobie Sam Guidotti Elise Alden
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a

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104

BA (HONS) ARCHITECTURE YEAR 1

BA (HONS) ARCHITECTURE YEAR 1

107

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BA (HONS) ARCHITECTURE YEAR 1

BA (HONS) ARCHITECTURE YEAR 1

WELCOME TO LONDON!

109

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LECTURES 2011-12

LECTURES 2011-12

111

LECTURES 2011-12

LECTURES 2011-12

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INDEX

STAFF AND THANKS TO

INDEX

STAFF AND THANKS TO

117

STAFF THANKS TO A Abela, Marie Adlington, Susan AHMM Aling, Mike Allen, Chris Ang, Kelvin Appleton, Melissa Armstrong, Rachel Arup Associates A Studio B Bali, Ronke Bania, Veatrili Barker, Shelagh Barr, Alistair Barrie, Lucy Baumann, Steve Belfiore, Francesco Bell, Justine Berntsen, Duncan Boyarsky, Nicholas Bronner, Pascal Brookes, Adele Butcher, Matthew Bucknall, Harry C Chadwick, Michael Chan, Kelly Chandresinghe, Luke Clarke, Ivan Clear, Nic Clelford, Tony Clinch, Melissa Closuit, Genevieve Cobo, Adriana Cochrane, Maya Cole, Adam Collins, Susan Cox, Chris Craig, James A. Crookes, David Cross, Chris Curtis, Jim D David Morley Architects Davies Kate Delage, Corine Denning, Eric De Ostos, Ricardo Dewdney, Max Draper, Derek Duff, Mike E Elliott, Reenie Ellis, Scott
025 019 025, 091, 102 102 102 061 013, 042, 050, 054, 079 073 013

F Farrer, Noel Finch, Paul Findlay, Kathryn Floros, Michail Fluid Structures Frith, Ed Frith-Salem, Benji G Gahzel, Omar Gales, Jonathan Garcia, Mark Geiss, Swen Gil, Pedro Gilby, Howard Girardin, Francois Green, Joe Grimshaw and Partners H Harrington, Marion Harvey, Sam Hatter, Mark Hawkins, Kieran Heil, Sybille Heinemann, Christoph Hendricks, Arne Henry, Maire Herron, Simon Hill, Alex Hillier, Thomas Hobbs, Jim Hopcraft, Angela Hopkins, John Hudson, Phil Humphrey, Jake Hyams, Richard I Illingworth, Shona Isa, Susanne Isgar, Caroline J Jackson, Nick James, Jeffrey Jobst, Marko John, Gareth Johnson, Steve Jones, Luke K Karunaratne, Gihan Klassnik, Thomas Knowles, Tim Koslowski, Benjamin L Lai, Chee-Kit Laidler, Peter Lang, Liane Laslett, Joe

057 110 073 085 037 011, 031 031 061 025 025, 054, 079 097 091 046, 079, 085, 091, 102 059, 079 102 085

Lee, Daniel Lee, Heidi Lewis, Holly Lewis, Patrick Lim, CJ Loizos, Yorogs Ludwig, Anna Lyall, John M MacDonald, Sarah MAKE Architects Marchant, John Masterton Smith, Ben Mathiesen, Runa Max Fordham Engineers McEwan, Hugh Melloni, Massimo Mitchell, Jonathan Molloy, Theo Mok, Derek Morris, Mark Morrisson, Nathan Mould, Sally Muhsam, Mohammed Muirhead, Jonny N Newell, Pauline Nicholls, Justin Nicholls, Paul Noonan, Tom Norman, Tim O Oakley, Bryn O’Connor, Helen Ogle, Alastair O’Hagan, Caireen O’Leary, James Olguin, Carlos Olsen, Luke Ozga-Lawn, Matt P Park, Simon Parkinson, Sion Pizzini, Silvia Pochee, Hareth Powell, Hillary Powers, Alan Pozo, Marta Q Quazi, Kim R Rabourdin, Caroline Raja, Khyle Raleigh, Charlotte Ram, Rahesh R. Rath, Claudia Rehayem, Josephine Reynolds, Tom

067 031 067 031 091, 110, 111 091 067 113 102 079 102 085 061 031 079 102 097 054 054 102 079 102

Rhowbotham, Kevin Rivas Androver, Esther Robert, Leo Rogers, Ben Rosling, Rob Ruat, Jean Baptiste S Salem, Caroline Schmidt, Christoph Schneider, Thomas Scott, Paul Seijo, Roger Shapland, Adam Sheil, Bob Simkova, Simona Smith, Wendy Smith, Zoe Spiller, Neil Stanton, Alan Stewart, Catrina Stewart, Elinor Stoppani, Teresa Sturel, Eric Sutherland, Charlie Sweeting, Ben Szczepaniak, Nicholas T Tavares, Kibwe Thirlwell, Fiona Thistleton, Anthony Thomson, George Thum, Robert Titman, Mark Trossell, Will Tsuruta, Taro Turner, Philip V Vohora, Athul W Waghorn, Terry Wagner, Franziska Walker, Dean Walker, John Walker, Kieran Wall, Phillipa Ward, Elly Ward, Geoff Watson, Phil Watts, Jonathan Waugh, Andrew Waugh Thistleton Architects Weisser, Cordula Westwood, Tom Wignall, James Wilkinson Eyre Architects Williams, Elizabeth Withers, Simon Y Young, Liam

037, 056, 110 085 031 073 102 091 031 067 067 112 046, 050, 061, 085 067, 091 091 102 005, 013, 025, 042, 054, 102 061, 111 102 042, 050, 052, 054 031 025, 102 019 054 025 025 067 056, 073 091 091 019, 097, 112 102 054 097 091 019 025 061 102 013, 079 112 025 025 059, 067, 079, 102 025 102 031 037, 061 025 054, 057

097

061, 111 085 067 050, 097 050, 102, 111 091, 110 111 061, 102 031 037 085 102 007, 025, 042, 049, 050, 053, 054, 079, 085, 102 046 031 102 059, 102 102 067 061 061 019, 037 085 091 091 050 091 102 073 054 059, 079, 085 085

097 102 102 102 067 054 009, 019, 042, 045, 046, 054, 061, 079, 085, 091, 102 061 091 102 025 054 079 031 013, 054 102 019, 059, 061, 091, 102 102 031 073 050 073 091 061 073, 085 061, 079 031 079 067 112 102 085

112 025 061 102

025 061 091 054 046, 102 061 054 102 085 019, 113 067 057 073 091, 102 061 102 046, 067, 079 085 085 061

116

http://www.gre.ac.uk/stockwell-street

121

120

Cover Image: Matt Cannon, Alchemical Tower.

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