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Table of Contents

Introduction Statement Mission Statement & Philosophy Gysbers Stakeholders & Advisory Board What does our community look like? Needs Assessment MEASURE of the Stepping Up Program Report Card School-Wide Action Plan Master Calendar 4th Grade Curriculum Calendar Bibliography Appendices Appendix A: Professional Disclosure Statement(s) Appendix B: Needs Assessment Surveys Appendix C: 4th Grade Curriculum Crosswalk Appendix C: Counselor/Administrator Agreement Appendix E: Steps to Respect Scope & Sequence Appendix F: Second Step Scope & Sequence Appendix G: Career Interest Awareness (CIA) Lesson Plan Materials 26 33 41 50 54 56 59 2 3 4 6 9 11 18 20 21 23 25

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INTRODUCTION STATEMENT Rationale Gysbers Elementary School has a comprehensive guidance program that supports the academic, career, and the personal/social development of each and every student. Our program is constantly evolving based on the data-driven needs of all students in order to prepare them to meet their fullest potential as members of our community. The comprehensive guidance program is founded on the ASCA and Oregon Frameworks as a transformed school counseling program. It is implemented by the school counselor, administrative staff, teachers, specialists, and support staff at the school. It is designed in accordance with school and district policies and expectations and complies with all relevant OARs. This year, Gysbers Elementary School has identified the following goals as part of the school's annual school improvement plan: 1. All students will read proficiently at each grade level as determined by state assessments. 2. All students will acquire the mathematical skills necessary to meet grade level benchmarks as determined by state assessments. 3. Students will learn to make productive life decisions. A thorough needs assessment conducted by the school counseling department at Gysbers identified several critical areas in which the guidance program could be utilized to support these goals utilizing evidenced-based curricula. These include:

Managing conflict and bullying; Identifying and improving individual learning, test taking, and study skills; and Respecting others and improving awareness of self and others' interest and abilities

In order for the school to: Improve state test scores in reading to 70% meeting or exceeding. Improve state test scores in mathematics to 67% meeting or exceeding. Reduce serious behavior concerns by decreasing the number of PBiS Tier 3 discipline referrals by 75% (8 referrals/week from tier 2 & 3).

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Portland Public School District Mission By the end of elementary, middle, and high school, every student by name will meet or exceed academic standards and will be fully prepared to make productive life decisions. Gysbers Elementary School Mission Gysbers is a caring community where everyone is challenged to excel. Students, staff, and families are expected to continually establish and reach academic, professional, and personal goals. Gysbers establishes dynamic partnerships and fosters the collaborative efforts of students, staff, parents, and community members to energize, diversify, and broaden our learning experience. Gysbers Elementary School Comprehensive Guidance Program Mission Statement The mission of the School Counseling Program at Gysbers Elementary School is to create a school climate and culture where each and every student will be challenged and inspired to achieve in every area (personal/ social, career, and academic) to their optimal potential. Philosophy At Gysbers Elementary School, we believe that all students can and will learn and that each student can make a positive difference in the world. Through the support of a comprehensive guidance program, students will leave Gysbers Elementary School with the knowledge and ability to help pursue their academic and career interests with the confidence and knowledge to do so as positive community leaders.

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Gysbers Stakeholders Students Our Comprehensive Guidance Plan is ultimately for the benefit of our students, and their role in its implementation cannot be overstated. Teachers Teachers cultivate and maintain a positive school climate for our students. Teachers are responsible for teaching guidance curriculum through Second Steps, Cooperative Problem Solving, and implementing school-wide behavior supports through PBIS. School District The objectives of our CGP directly align with the districts CGP. PBIS, Second Steps, and Cooperative Problem Solving are programs that are in place district-wide. Any change which we hope to foster in our school community must be achieved with the bigger picture in mind. Collaboration with district personnel as well as counselors and staff from other nearby schools is crucial for systemic change within our community at large. Administration School administrators model leadership, responsibility, and citizenship for the entire school community. Administrators are responsible for supporting the implementation of our Comprehensive Guidance Plan and fostering a school community that is receptive to positive change. Support Staff The responsibilities of Gybserss support staff varies according to the specific duties of each job. Support staff members are responsible for much of the work that occurs behind-the-scenes and enables the functioning of our school and its facilities. Many educational assistants have a good deal of student contact and are therefore responsible for implementing Cooperative Problem Solving skills and PBIS. Parents The involvement of parents in our school community is crucial to its health and vibrance as well as the success of our Comprehensive Guidance Plan. Parents provide at-home support for the academic, personal/social, and career development that occurs in the classroom. As a community, we trust our parents to donate their time and talents to the needs of our students. We trust them to become active members of our community through community/school events, parent/teacher conferences, and various parent organizations. Businesses and Community Support Organizations The Gysberss community is home to numerous businesses. Community partnerships through these local businesses will provide the resources and support we need to fully implement our CGP. Our school will utilize relationships with local community support organizations such as Boys and Girls Club, CASA START, Big Brothers/Big Sisters, Catholic Charities, and other Community Mental Health Agencies. Community Members Partnership with our community members will greatly enhance the implementation of our CGP. Though most of our volunteers and community members will be found through organizations, our school will have systems in place for individuals in our

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community who may want to contribute resources or time to our school community.

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Guppy Guild (Advisory Board) Name Gilbert Blythe Anne Shirley Rachel Lynde Position Principal Counselor School Board Member

Mathew Cuthbert First year teacher at Gysbers Ruby Gillis Diana Berry Josie Pye Charlie Sloan Jen Pringle Prissy Andrews Teacher (8 years experience at Gysbers) Parent Parent Parent Community member (nearby homeowner) Community owner) member (local business

7 What does our community look like?


Students Demographics There are approximately 510 students enrolled at Gysbers Elementary in grades K-5. Students at Gysbers come from a variety of different cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds, creating a vibrant community rich in diversity. Most students at Gysbers are part of an ethnic minority. All of Gysbers students are considered economically disadvantaged. Nearly one quarter of Gysbers students have limited English proficiency. Students with disabilities make up 14% of the student population at Gysbers.

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Achievement Last year students at Gysbers achieved OAKS scores lower than the state average in reading, math, and science. Furthermore, students at Gysbers earned lower scores than students enrolled in comparison schools across Oregon. Students with limited English proficiency show lower scores in reading. White students scored lower in reading and higher in math while Black students scored higher in reading, lower in math. In general, achievement at Gysbers needs to improve over the next year in order to meet federal standards for Adequate Yearly Progress.

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Discipline During the 2009-2010 school year, Gysbers students were given an average of 29 referrals each week. Of these referrals, 5 were given for tier 3 behaviors (more serious) and 24 were given for tier 2 behaviors (more minor infractions). Currently, Gybsers students are earning an average of 16 referrals each week, 2 for tier 3 behaviors and 14 for tier 2 behaviors.

Teachers There are 18.5 full-time teachers at Gybsers, each of them meet federal standards for Highly Qualified Teachers. Seventy-three percent of Gysberss teachers have earned a Masters Degree or higher. Teachers at Gysbers draw from a wealth of experience with an average of 11.4 years of teaching experience. Class sizes at Gysbers range from 15-30 students with an average class size of 26 students. Administration and Support Staff In addition to the teaching staff, Gysbers employs 13 support staff including custodians, food service workers, secretaries, and educational assistants. Gysbers has two full-time administrators, a principal and a vice-principal. Gysbers has one full-time school counselor.

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Needs Assessment
Background The Gysbers Elementarys school counseling advisory board, called the Guppy Guild, initially met to determine the barriers to student development and success. The school had not been successful in meeting satisfactory levels for state testing in the past three years, and many parents and teachers had expressed dissatisfaction with both behavioral concerns and a highly transitory population of both families and staff. The Guppy Guild wished to pinpoint several key concerns, in hopes of focusing the school community toward common goals. Purpose The purpose of this needs assessment was to determine the concerns of all stakeholders in Gysbers Elementary School in order to focus upon the most relevant barriers to student success. These concerns would then influence the creation of the Stepping Up Comprehensive Guidance Counseling Program for the school. It was hoped that the needs assessment would also stir up interest on the part of all stakeholders to be involved in the change process. Training and guidance was then provided to all stakeholders who expressed interest in taking part in the Gysbers community and the implementation of the comprehensive guidance program. Objectives of the needs assessment 1. 2. 3. 4. Assess the current concerns and barriers to student success Identify the interest of stakeholders in the Comprehensive Guidance Program Identify the current strengths within the school and community at large Prioritize concerns based upon needs and available support

Stakeholders providing input 1. Students (510 enrolled) 2. Teachers and support staff (18.5 FTE, 13 specials and support) 3. Parents and families, including Parent Teacher Association (317 households, 25 PTA) 4. Administration (Principal and Vice Principal) and School Counselor 5. Community members Methods Initially, a questionnaire was given to advisory board members and PTA members regarding the general concerns or issues that Gysbers Elementary students faced. This questionnaire consisted of 25 issues (i.e.- dealing with divorce, student safety, etc) to check off, then a request to rank the top five concerns and list any other concerns or needs. All ten advisory board members as well as the vice principal completed this survey, and fifteen surveys were returned by PTA members. The student, parent/ family, and teacher surveys were aligned to one another and are a shortened version of the empirically researched Intermediate Elementary Students Counseling Needs Survey, or IESCNS (http://www.schoolcounselor.org/files/7-1-

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35%20Thompson.pdf). All three versions consist of 25 questions on a four point, Likert-style scale, and ask questions regarding student perceptions and behaviors within the academic, personal/ social, and career domains. This survey was sent home within the introduction packets at the beginning of the school year to all parents and families with a return rate of 107 out of 317 households; it was also given to teachers at the first staff meeting, with a return rate of 28 out of 31 staff. In addition, Ms. Shirley administered the pre-test to all third through fifth graders when she visited their classroom the first week of school, with a completion rate of 242 out of 255 students. At the end of the year, 95 parents and families, 27 teachers, and 225 third through fifth graders completed the post-test. In addition, the Guppy Guild, led by the school counselor, analyzed demographics (gender, ethnicity, attendance, grade level, language proficiency, discipline referrals, and SES), teacher quality, and state testing results for the past three years. Findings From the results of these questionnaires, as well as a thorough analysis of the state testing results and demographics from the previous school year, the advisory board determined three areas of concern and need for improvement: 1. Students struggled to manage conflict or demonstrate concern for others. 2. Students had difficulty determining interests, abilities, and motivations and how these related to their future career options. 3. Students do not yet understand their own learning needs and where to find help. Essentially, the Advisory Board determined, students must learn to appreciate and respect their own and others unique strengths and areas of improvement. Recommended Goals When students improve in these areas: Managing conflict and preventing bullying; Identifying and improving individual learning, test taking, and study skills; and Respecting others and improving awareness of self and others' interest and abilities The school will then: Improve state test scores in reading to 70% meeting or exceeding. Improve state test scores in mathematics to 67% meeting or exceeding. Reduce serious behavior concerns by decreasing the number of PBiS Tiers 2 & 3 discipline referrals (from 29 to 16 referrals/week from tiers 2 & 3).

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MEASURE of the Stepping


Program
Background Information Name and Address of the School Gysbers Elementary School 237 N Prince Edward Way Portland, OR 97000 Principal Gilbert Blythe Name of Counselor Anne Shirley Enrollment 510 Students School Demographics 100% Economically Disadvantaged 58% Black 25% Hispanic 8% White 4% American Indian 3% Multi-racial/ Multi-ethnic

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STEP ONE: MISSION What is the connection between the school and district missions and the schools comprehensive guidance program? Portland Public School District Mission By the end of elementary, middle, and high school, every student will meet or exceed academic standards and will be fully prepared to make productive life decisions. Gysbers Elementary School Mission Gysbers is a caring community where everyone is challenged to excel. Students, staff, and families are expected to continually establish and reach academic, professional, and personal goals. Gysbers establishes dynamic partnerships and fosters the collaborative efforts of students, staff, parents, and community members to energize, diversify, and broaden our learning experience. Gysbers Elementary School Comprehensive Guidance Program Mission Statement The mission of the School Counseling Program Stepping Up at Gysbers Elementary School is to create a school climate and culture where each and every student will be challenged and inspired to achieve in every area (personal/ social, career, and academic) to their optimal potential.

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Gysbers Elementary School Comprehensive Guidance Program Philosophy At Gysbers Elementary School, we believe that all students can and will learn and that each student can make a positive difference in the world. Through the support of a comprehensive guidance program, students will leave Gysbers Elementary School with the knowledge and ability to help pursue their academic and career interests with the confidence and knowledge to do so as positive community members. STEP TWO: ELEMENT What critical data elements are you trying to impact? What is the baseline for the data elements? Where do you hope to move (goal)? Element: The Gysbers Elementarys school counseling advisory board, called the Guppy Guild, initially met to determine the barriers to student development and success.The school had not been successful in meeting satisfactory levels for state testing in the past three years, and many parents and teachers had expressed dissatisfaction with both behavioral concerns and a highly transitory population of both families and staff. The Guppy Guild wished to pinpoint several key concerns, in hopes of focusing the school community toward common goals. Baseline Data: 2009-2010 School Year Test Results

Discipline Referrals Based on Principals Report to the district for 2009-2010, the weekly average schoolwide was 26 discipline referrals. Of these, 3 were in Tier 3 (most critical issues) and 23 were Tier 2. These numbers are higher than the district average.

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Stepping Up Program Goal(s): When students improve in these areas: Managing conflict and preventing bullying; Identifying and improving individual learning, test taking, and study skills; and Respecting others and improving awareness of self and others' interest and abilities The school will then: Improve state test scores in reading to 70% meeting or exceeding. Improve state test scores in mathematics to 67% meeting or exceeding.

Reduce serious behavior concerns by decreasing the number of PBiS Tiers 2 & 3 discipline referrals (from 29 to 16 referrals/week from tiers 2 & 3).

STEP THREE: ANALYZE Baseline data collected through surveys given to students, teachers, and members of the Parent Teacher Association and the Guppy Guild (advisory board). In addition, the Guppy Guild analyzed demographics (gender, ethnicity, attendance, grade level, language proficiency, discipline referrals, and SES), teacher quality, and state testing results for the past three years. Initial Teacher Survey At the beginning of the school year, 28 of 31 classroom, special and support teachers completed this survey. This survey was administered at the first and last faculty meetings. The top 5 needs indicated by teachers at beginning of the year: 1. My students understand that doing well in school will help them do well when they get older (57% SD (strongly disagree), 15% D (disagree)) 2. My students understand that everyone is different (25% SD, 50% D) 3. My students know how to solve problems at school. (9% SD, 46% D) 4. My students decide on what grades they want to earn and makes plans on how to get those grades. (46% SD, 9% D) 5. My students feel that they are successful in school (29% SD, 61% D) Initial Student Surveys At the beginning and end of the school year, 225 of 242 students in third through fifth grades completed the survey. The top 5 needs indicated by students at beginning of year: 1. I like to find out more about something interesting I learned at school even if I do not need to. (69% marked SD or D, 155 students) 2. Before I solve a problem, I think about what will happen. (64% marked SD or D, 144 students) 3. The things I learn at school will help me with the job I do when I grow up. (57% marked SD or D, 128 students) 4. It is okay for others to act and think in a different way than I do. (55% marked SD or D, 124 students) 5. I work well with other students in teams. (40% marked SD or D, 90 students) Initial surveys- other stakeholders Parent Teacher Association (PTA) At the first PTA meeting of the year, Ms. Shirley distributed 25 surveys, 15 of which

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were returned. Of those 15, the following top five needs were reported by the parent sample: 1. Managing conflict with others (14/15) 2. Transient/ highly mobile families (13/15) 3. Study skills (13/15) 4. Bullying/safety (11/15) 5. Dealing with people of differing ethnicity (9/15) Guppy Guild (Advisory Board) At the first meeting of the schools advisory board, called the Guppy Guild, surveys were given to the eleven members. The top six needs reported by the Guild are as follows: 1. Study Skills/test taking (11/11) 2. Understanding their abilities, interests, and aptitudes (10/11) 3 (tie). Dealing with people of differing ethnicity (9/11) & Managing conflicts (9/11) 4. Coping with pressures from school, home, & friends (8/11) 5. Bullying/student safety (7/11) Findings from the surveys Needs most often mentioned by students, teachers, parents, and other stakeholders: 1. Managing Conflict/bullying (personal/social) 2. Independent learning/test-taking/study skills (academic) 3. Respect and awareness of self and others interests and abilities (career) STEP FOUR: STAKEHOLDERS-UNITE Stakeholder School Counselor Strategies

Presented Gysberss Stepping Up CGP to staff Educated students, teachers, and administration about the role of the school counselor and clarified specific job responsibilities. Assisted teachers in teaching guidance curriculum using Second Steps, Steps to Success, and Oregon CIS. Collaborated with teachers on the most effective methods of using Second Steps and Steps to Success curriculum in the classroom. Emphasized the importance of recognizing individual uniqueness through bulletin board design and Second Steps curriculum. Taught test-taking skills and relaxation techniques through Yoga Calm. Supported students through individual, small groups, IEP counseling, and 504 plans. Participated in faculty meetings. Facilitated advisory council meetings. Developed a comprehensive needs assessment to identify specific needs at Gysbers Elementary.

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Facilitated counseling groups of students with specifically identified needs throughout the school year. Prepared and taught a workshop for parents: Enrolling Your Child in Middle School Made regular visits to the parent room to meet with parents and discuss the needs of their students. Supported teachers through student discipline and reward systems Facilitated bi-weekly staff meetings Filled out needs survey Monitored OAKS testing Collected and reported data to teachers and staff through OAKS online Participated in Guppy Guild Supported counselors by assigning duties in line with the Stepping Up CGP Facilitated school assemblies related to CGP Taught Second Steps and Steps to Success Curriculum Provided regular feedback on classroom behaviors and needs through surveys Collaborated with counselors during IEP meetings Referred and allowed students to participate in small group counseling during the school day Actively participated in Second Steps and Steps to Success lessons Practiced independent learning skills in order to raise achievement and reach individual potential Decreased misbehavior led to fewer discipline referrals Participated in Guppy Guild Provided regular feedback through surveys and participation in Parent Room activities Maintained contact with teachers and staff Participated in Guppy Guild Provided mentoring to select students Volunteered in a variety of capacities within the school and classrooms Disaggregated testing data to identify needs of specific student subgroups Collected discipline referral numbers and reported progress monthly

Administrators

Teachers

Students

Parents

Community Members

School Improvement Team

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STEP FIVE: RESULTS Toward the end of the school year, data was again collected to begin to measure progress in reaching the Stepping Up goals. Surveys were given out to students and teachers in April 2010, and testing and discipline referral records for the current school year were analyzed. Concluding Teacher Surveys At the faculty meeting in April, 31 teachers and support staff were asked to complete a post- test. Of these, 27 surveys were returned. Teachers reported an improvement in the following areas: My students understand that doing well in school will help them do well when they get older. My students understand that everyone is different. My students know how to solve problems at school. My students decide on what grades they want to earn and make plans on how to get those grades. My students feel that they are successful in school. September 2009 57% SD, 15% D 25% SD, 50% D 9% SD, 46% D 46% SD, 9% D 29% SD, 61% D April 2010 40% SD, 19% D 11% SD, 41% D 7% SD, 33% D 41% SD, 11% D 19% SD, 55% D

(SD= Strongly Disagree; D= Disagree) Concluding Student Surveys In April, Ms. Shirley administered a post-test during her weekly visits to third through fifth grade classrooms. Of 230 students in these grades, 213 surveys were completed. Improvements were found in four of the five needs identified from the initial survey: September April 2010 (213 sur2009 (225 sur- veys) veys) I like to find out more about something inter155 159 esting I learned at school, even if I dont need to. Before I solve a problem, I think about what will 144 127 happen. The things I learn at school will help me with 128 114 the job I do when I grow up. It is okay for others to act and think in a differ124 95 ent way than I do. I work well with other students in teams. 90 86 (marking either not usually or never) State Testing Results

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Discipline Referral Reports Based on Principals Report to the district for 2009-2010, the weekly average schoolwide was 26 discipline referrals. Of these, 3 were in Tier 3 (most critical issues) and 23 were Tier 2. In the soon-to-be published Principals Report for the current school year, discipline referrals were down to 16. Of these the average for Tier 3 was 1.5 referrals, and 14.5 Tier 2 referrals.

Met Goal: ___ Yes __X_ No

STEP SIX: EDUCATE The school counselor will create a monthly report card to attach to the school newsletter. This report card will reflect the progress of the Comprehensive Guidance Program, and includes systemic changes, data, stakeholders, results, as well as anecdotes from program participants. A sample is provided below.

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GYSBERS STEPS to SUCCESS


Report Card for December 2010
Principal: Mr. Gilbert Blythe School Counselor: Anne Shirley

The Principal Steps Up


In September, our professional educators began teaching lessons from the wellknown Second Steps curriculum, as well as materials supplied by the school counselor. These lessons focus on the social and career skills that each Gysbers student needs in order to achieve maximum success.

The School Counselor Steps Up


As teachers have focused on specific social skills and individual interests, students have been making better choices! Students have been overheard giving positive feedback to one another. Also, there have been fewer discipline referrals so far this year than at the same time last year!

Taking Steps
One step forward would be our career interest lessons. Students completed two informal surveys in order to identify their own interests and skill sets. They were then asked to recognize the unique abilities of others, and create positive statements regarding the differences they discovered. These statements can be seen on the On a Positive Note bulletin board at the front office.

Moving Forward
Perhaps for the first time, students are acknowledging that it is okay for people to be different. As students appreciate the uniqueness of others, conflict is reduced and there are fewer behavioral concerns and office referrals.

Foot-

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prints
School-wide Discipline Referrals: A Comparison
Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 December 2009 26 30 28 December 2010 16 13 18

Steppers
Teachers: not only taught the Second Steps lessons, but have been actively encouraging students to provide positive feedback to one another. School counselor: created the On a Positive Note Board. As she visits classrooms to teach lessons, she collects students written comments about one another. Principal: recognizes students who are making positive changes by inviting them to have breakfast with him. He has also planned a On a Positive Note assembly, where students unique skills and positive changes were recognized. Parents: had the opportunity to discover their own and their childrens skills sets, attended PTA meetings regarding Second Steps, and reinforced positive feedback within the home. Students: learned more about themselves and others, and have been writing and telling others how appreciated they are.

Success!

The On a Positive Note Assembly was a big success! Two guests from the community, Dr. Lisa Aasheim and Mr. Greg Oden, shared their own unique skill set and how they have been encouraged and supported by the differences in others. The On a Positive Note bulletin board features over 100 compliments to students and staff, and are changed out weekly. Lydiana, a fourth grader, shared how the lessons have helped her to make better choices. Mr. Blythe invited us to his office because we have been saying nice things, not getting referrals, and making better choices. He even gave me hot chocolate!

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22 Gysbers Elementary School-Wide Action Plan Academic


Each student will take responsibility for his/her learning by acquiring and applying skills for academic success. Objective (Students will) 1. Identify and adopt attitudes that contribute to successful learning. 2. Demonstrate skills for independent learning. 3. Display motivation to achieve individual potential. ASCA Natl Standard NOICC Developmental Assets

A:A1.3; IV. 4; V.3; 21, 22, 24 A:A1.5; A:2.2; V.4 A:B1.1 A:A2.2; IV. 2; V.3; 23, 25, 32 A:A2.3; A:A3.2 V.4 A:A1.2; A: B1.1; A: A1.3 IV. 2; V.2; 21, 22, 37, 40 V.3, V. 4

Career
Each student will demonstrate increased awareness of individual skills and interests and how these relate to the world of work. Objective (Students will) ASCA Natl NOICC Developmental Assets Standard 1. Demonstrate knowledge of the C: A1.2; VI.5; VI.6; 40, 32, 14 wide variety of jobs available to C:A2.3; C: VI.7; V.1 them in the world of work. B1.4 2. Develop an awareness of C:A1.3; IV.2; VI.3; 37-40, 22 individual skills and interests. C:A1.9; VI.4; I.1; I.4; C:A2.5; C:A1.8 I.5 3. Develop skills to become better C:A1.4; VII.1; VII. 3; 33, 34, 35, 36, 9,26-31 workers. C:A2.5; VII. 2; VII.4; C:A2.8; C:A2.1 VIII.1

Personal/Social
Each student will recognize, respect, and appreciate individual differences. Objective (Students will) ASCA Natl Standard NOICC Developmental Assets 26, 33-36

1. Acquire communication skills. PS: A2.6; II.2; II.4; PS:A2.7; PS:A1.5; III.1; III.5; PS:A1.9 II.3

2. Demonstrate problem-solving PS: B1.1; II.3; II.4; II.6; 32, 36, 33 skills. PS:B1.2; PS:B1.4; III.5 PS:B1.6

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3. Display an appreciation for the contribution of others. PS: A2.2; II.7; II.4; II.3 33, 34 PS:A2.3; PS:A2.4; PS:A2.5

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Counseling Department Master Calendar Gysbers Elementary School 2011-20012 August Review 504 plans from previous year and establish schedule for renewals Staff trainingPresent CGP and review role of counselor & referral process February Teacher surveys/comments on Second Step program and updates on students in small groups/other small group referrals PbiS Awards Assembly Test preparation skills September Back to school night Teacher training on Second Step Review counseling schedule with teachers Test preparation skills Identify students in need of small group/individual services Advisory Council Meeting October April Second Step question and answer session with Teacher surveys/comments on Second teachers Step program and updates on students in small groups/other small group referrals Career Awareness November Teacher surveys/comments on Second Step program and updates on students in small groups/other small group referrals Conferences with parents PbiS Awards Assembly December Teacher surveys/comments on Second Step program and updates on students in small groups/other small group referrals Complete Second Step program Teacher discussion and survey on effectiveness of program June Teacher surveys/comments on Second Step program and updates on students in small groups PbiS Awards Assembly May Teacher surveys/comments on Second Step program and updates on students in small groups/other small group referrals March Teacher surveys/comments on Second Step program and updates on students in small groups/other small group referrals

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Advisory Council Meeting January Teacher surveys/comments on Second Step program and updates on students in small groups/other small group referrals Parent workshop: Enrolling your child in middle school Second Step question and answer session with teachers Advisory Council Meeting July

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4th Grade Curriculum Calendar Grade Level Guidance ASCA Curriculum Projecte Project Evaluation Lesson Domain and d Start/ ed Methods Content / Materials End number Standa Dates of rd Studen ts Affecte d Role of the Information 9/201185 Pre and School sheet 9/2011 Post Survey Counselor Organizati A:A2.1 School year 9/201185 Teacher on and A:B1.1 planner 6/2012 report Planning A:B1.3 A:B1.5 A:B2.3 A:B2.5 C:A1.7 C:A2.9 Empathy A:A1.4 Second 9/201185 Reduction and skills C:A2.5 Step: Unit 1 12/2011 of for PS:A2.2 behavioral learning PS:A2.3 referral. PS:A2.4 IESCNS at PS:A2.8 beginning and end of year. Interperso A:A1.1 Steps to 10/201185 Reduction nal A:A2.3 Respect: 6/2011 of Effectivene A:A3.1 Level 2 behavioral ss, A:A3.2 referral. Empathy, C:C2.2 IESCNS at and C:C2.3 beginning Getting PS:A1.9 and end of Along with PS:A2.6 year. Others PS:A2.7 Emotion PS:A1.5 Second 1/201285 Reduction Manageme PS:A1.8 Step: Unit 2 3/2012 of nt PS:A1.1 behavioral PS:A1.2 referral. IESCNS at beginning and end of year. Problem A:A3.1 Second 3/201285 Reduction Solving A:B2.5 Step: 5/2012 of C:A1.4 Unit 3 behavioral Implementation Contact Person

School Counselor

Classroom Teachers

Classroom Teachers in consultation with School Counselor

School Counselor

Classroom Teachers in consultation with School Counselor

Classroom Teachers in consultation with School Counselor

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C:C2.2 PS:A1.9 PS:B1.18 PS:C1.5 PS:C1.7 PS:C1.1 0 PS:A2.1 Anxiety, PS:A1.5 Yoga Calm Stress, and PS:A1.8 Anger PS:C1.1 Manageme 0 nt referral. IESCNS at beginning and end of year.

2/20123/2012

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Career A:A2.2 Awareness A:A2.4 A:B1.6 A:C1.3 C:A1.2 C:A1.3 C:A1.6 C:B1.2 C:C2.1 C:C1.3 C:C1.4

Career Interest Code Survey

4/20124/2012

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Reduction School Counselor and of Classroom Teachers behavioral referral. Improveme nt on OAKS test scores. Completion School Counselor of survey and What Is This Job Like activity

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Bibliography Sink, C.A., & Stroh, H. R. (2003). Raising achievement test scores of early elementary school students through comprehensive school counseling programs. Professional School Counseling. 6 (5) 350-364. Auger, R. W. & Blackhurst, A.E. (2005). The development of elementary-aged children's career aspirations and expectations. 8 (4) 322-328. Committee for Children (2011). Review of research: Kindergarten-grade 5. Second step: Skills for social and academic success. Retrieved from http://www.cfchildren.org/programs/ssp/research/. Durlak, J. A., Dymnicki, A. B., Weissberg, R.P., Taylor, R. D. (2011). The impact of enhancing student social and emotional learning: A meta-analysis of schoolbased universal interventions. Child Development, 82 (1) 405-432. American School Counseling Association. (2003). The American School Counseling Association national model: A framework for school counseling programs. Alexandria, VA: Author. Wittmer-Thompson, D., Loesch, L.C., Seraphine, A.E. (2003). Development of an instrument to assess the counseling needs of elementary students. Professional School Counseling. 7 (1) 35-39.

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Appendix A: Professional Disclosure Statements

30 Katrina de Boer, LSC LPC CADCI ATR-BC Gysbers Elementary School 237 N Prince Edward Way Portland, OR 97000 503-916-3235 SCHOOL COUNSELOR PROFESSIONAL DISCLOSURE STATEMENT This statement is provided to inform you about our school's counseling program and my role in the educational growth of the children who attend school here. Philosophy and Approach: As the school counselor at Gysbers Elementary School Counselor, it is my goal to help all students develop the skills needed to reach their fullest potential in their academic, personal and social, and career growth. Services provided by the counseling department include individual counseling, group counseling, and classroom guidance lessons. Additionally, assistance is offered as students encounter any of the many choices and challenges that their individual life situations require them to meet. The developmental level of each child is taken into consideration as assistance is offered. All students are entitled to access to counseling services and may be referred by their parent, classroom teacher or other school staff member, as well as by asking for counseling assistance by themselves. I am happy to provide community referrals for parents when their childs needs are outside of the realm of what the school and the counseling department can offer. Formal Education and Training: I hold a Masters Degree in Art Therapy from George Washington University and an School Counseling endorsement from Portland State University. Major coursework included foundations in school counseling, individual counseling, group dynamics, assessment of individuals, and behavioral analysis of adults and children with an emphasis on the use of art in the therapeutic process. I received additional training in career development from Lewis and Clark College. I hold a license as a school counselor which is issued by the Teachers Standard and Practice Commission of Oregon and an additional license in professional counseling issued by the Oregon Board of Licensed Professional Counselors and Therapists. I am also recognized as a level I Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor by The Addiction Counselor Certification Board of Oregon and as a registered and board certified art therapist by the American Art Therapy Association. Confidentiality Trust is important in any counseling situation and communication between

31 counselor and student and/or parent is confidential except in those instances covered by law. Those situations might include but are not limited to the threat of harm to another person or self or suspected child abuse or neglect. Parents and guardians of minor children have certain privileges and can be entitled to information about their minor children in a counseling relationship. Such information will ethically be given only in helpful ways, in the interest of maintaining the counseling relationship, and will be discussed with the student. In a school setting, it sometimes becomes necessary to inform the students classroom teacher or an administrator of information about a student. This will also be discussed with the student and will only be shared on a need to know and helpful basis. Confidentiality is harder to maintain in group settings. However, the students will be informed about confidentiality in developmentally appropriate ways when they join a group. Typically, they are told they may share things about themselves that they shared in group, but not about other people. Generally, parent permission is asked for when students attend groups where family topics are discussed. In groups where schoolrelated topics are discussed, permission is not necessary, however parents will be informed that their child is participating in a group. Parents are informed of individual counseling of their child on a case by case basis, depending on the seriousness of the issue their child is having and/or if informing their parent is determined to be necessary in order to be helpful. Fees: No fee will be charged for services provided by the counseling department at Gysbers Elementary School.

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Stephanie Graupmann, MS, LPC Gysbers Elementary School 237 N Prince Edward Way Portland, OR 97000 503-916-3235 Professional Disclosure Statement As your childs school counselor at Gysbers Elementary, I look forward to supporting the academic, emotional, social, career, and overall development of each student. It is my hope to work alongside family members and school staff to provide such support to your child. The following is brief summary of my role as the school counselor. Philosophy- As a counselor, I work primarily within the Control-Mastery Theory, an approach which assumes that every individual wants to gain control over their problems and to master negative thoughts. My goal is to help students to build up positive beliefs and thoughts through building warm, nurturing relationships. My approach will vary according to each childs needs, so I will also use techniques from narrative, art therapy, cognitive behavioral, and choice theories. It is my hope that you will feel free to talk with me about my approach at any point in the school year; I would appreciate your own thoughts, as well. Formal Education- I hold a Masters in School Counseling from Portland State University. I am a National Certified Counselor (NCC), a National Certified School Counselor (NCSC), and a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) through the State of Oregon. The Counselor Education Program at Portland State University is accredited by the Council on Accreditation of Counseling and Related Education Programs (CACREP). Further, I am committed to ongoing learning beyond my degree, in order to remain current in the field of school counseling. Previously, I received my Bachelors in K-8 Education from the University of Arizona, as well as a Certified K-8 Education License through the State of Arizona. With this certification, I taught fourth through seventh grades for six years in public schools. Your Rights and Responsibilities- As the parent/ guardian of a client of an Oregon licensee you have the following rights: To expect that a licensee has met the minimal qualifications of training and experience required by state law; To examine public records maintained by the Board and to have the Board confirm credentials of a licensee; To obtain a copy of the Code of Ethics; To report complaints to the Board; To be informed of the cost of professional services before receiving the services; To be assured of privacy and confidentiality while receiving services as defined by rule and law, including the following exceptions: 1) Reporting suspected child abuse; 2) Reporting imminent danger to client or others;

33 3) Reporting information required in court proceedings or by clients insurance company, or other relevant agencies; 4) Providing information concerning licensee case consultation or supervision; and 5) Defending claims brought by client against licensee; To be free from being the object of discrimination on the basis of race, religion, gender, or other unlawful category while receiving services.

Additionally, as a parent/ guardian you should be aware that as a school counselor, I comply with the American School Counseling Association (ASCA)s Ethical Standards, which include: Keeping information confidential unless disclosure is required to prevent clear and imminent danger to the counselee or others or when legal requirements demand that confidential information be revealed. Counselors will consult with other professionals when in doubt as to the validity of an exception (Standard A2b). Requesting of the court that disclosure not be required when the release of confidential information without a counselee's permission may lead to potential harm to the counselee (Standard A2d). Protecting the confidentiality of counselee's records and releases personal data only according to prescribed laws and school policies. Student information maintained in computers is treated with the same care as traditional student records (Standard A2e). Protecting the confidentiality of information received in the counseling relationship as specified by federal and state laws, written policies, and applicable ethical standards. Such information is only to be revealed to others with the informed consent of the counselee, consistent with the counselor's ethical obligation. In a group setting, the counselor sets a high norm of confidentiality and stresses its importance, yet clearly states that confidentiality in group counseling cannot be guaranteed (Standard A2f). Questions or Concerns- If you have any concerns regarding my services, I encourage you to speak with me or the school principal, Mr. Gilbert Blythe. If your questions have not been resolved, contact the Oregon Board of Counselors and Therapists at: 3218 Pringle Rd SE #250; Salem, OR 97302-6312; (503) 3785499. Final Thoughts- I look forward to working with your child as s/he participates in counseling programs provided at Gysbers. I encourage you to visit me at my office or contact me at 503-916 3235. Note that I do not charge fees in addition to my salary. Please sign and date below and return to your childs teacher. Thank you! I have read and understand the information above. Childs name: ________________________________________ Date _____________

34 Parent/ Guardian name (please print) _________________________________________ Signature: ______________________________________________________________

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Hi! My name is Ms. Crosby, and I am the school counselor here at Gysbers Elementary. You may be wondering what I do here at school, so let me take a minute to introduce myself. What is my job? It's my job to help you become the very best learner you can be. Sometimes it can be hard to do well in school when there are problems at home, in your classroom, or even if you're just feeling sad. I'm here to help you with any of these things that might be getting in the way of your learning. How can I help you? Sometimes I work with groups of students and sometimes I work with your teachers and parents. You will see me all around school: at lunch, in the hallways, in your classroom, and sometimes even at recess! If you ever feel like you need to talk to someone, please come and visit me, my office is right next to Mr. Blythe's blue door and I would love to talk to you! I promise... As your school counselor, I promise that anything you tell me will be kept just between us. However, there are a few exceptions to this rule. If I am concerned that you are going to hurt yourself or someone else, or if you are being hurt yourself, or if a judge asks me to tell what you've told me, I will share what you've told me because I want to make sure you are safe always. I want each of you to feel like you belong here and I'm so excited to meet you! ~Ms. Crosby

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Dear Parent/Guardian, I am so thrilled to be a part of the Gysbers Community! This is my first year as Gysbers's school counselor, and I am thrilled to be stepping into such a friendly and supportive school community. Prior to my training as a school counselor, I worked in the public schools as a substitute teacher and instructional assistant. I am passionate about education and thrive in the school community, which I strongly believe is brimming with hope and promise. I am licensed as a school counselor in Oregon and hold a Master's degree in School Counseling from Portland State University. In addition to my school counseling certification I have also earned a certificate in Couples, Marriage, and Family Counseling which I feel will greatly enhance the work I am able to do here at Gysbers. My role at Gysbers As Gybsers's school counselor, I coordinate our schools comprehensive guidance plan, that supports the academic, career, and personal/social development of each of our students. My job here at Gysbers has many different facets. I ensure that our schools guidance curriculum is being taught in each classroom, advocate for students who may be facing barriers to learning, collaborate with teachers, staff, and parents to meet the unique needs of each student, and counsel our students in small groups or individually as needed. What you can expect from me The majority of the work I do with students at Gysbers is done in small groups and classrooms. Though I am clinically trained in individual and family counseling, I spend relatively little of my time at Gysbers in this setting. If you feel your child needs counseling services beyond what I can offer at Gysbers, I would be happy to refer you to other area professionals more able to meet the needs of your child. Anything your child shares with me will be kept confidential, except when I feel she is in danger of harming herself or others, or if she is in danger herself, or if I am asked by a judge to reveal what has been shared. I will request your consent before including your child in any group counseling activities. I work from systemic viewpoint in my individual and group counseling, recognizing each student as part of his/her classroom, family, school, and community. I utilize a variety of therapeutic techniques at Gysbers to meet the needs of all students. Many of my techniques are very hands-on and centered around play. I strive to foster a safe and controlled therapeutic setting, always with your child's best interest in mind. If, at any time, you are concerned with my practice and/or techniques, please contact myself or Mr. Blythe. How to contact me My office is located just off the main office, right next door to Mr. Blythe. I am in my office and available to meet with you in person every Wednesday from 3-4:30 and on Tuesday mornings from 8-9. My email address and phone extension are listed below. It is such an honor to be working with your students and I look forward to meeting each of you as the year progresses! Sincerely, Kendra Crosby kendra_crosby@Gysbers.k12.or.us (458)563-6847 X 2448

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Appendix B: Needs Assessment Surveys

38

Initial Needs Assessment for Gysbers Elementary School


I participate in: _____ The Guppy Guild _____ Parent Teacher Association _____ Other

Please put a check next to the issues that you see as important to Gysbers students. _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. Bereavement/ grief Exploring future career choices Hygiene Setting and carrying out goals Managing conflict with others Coping with pressures from school, home & friends Transient families (who move often) Understanding their abilities and interests Dealing with divorce Asking for what they want or need in an assertive, respectful manner Improving independent learning and test- taking skills Drugs/ alcohol Bullying/ student safety Nutrition and healthy living Learning to live in a new culture Dealing with people of a different ethnicity, race, or religion Time management and organization Making friends How to express feelings Self-esteem Other: ___________________________________________

From the list above, please write the numbers of what you feel are the five most important issues at Gysbers. 1. _________ 2. __________ 3. __________ 4. __________ 5. __________ Please write additional comment, suggestions, or questions on the back of this paper.

39

Gysbers Elementary Student Counseling Survey


Date: __________ Grade (circle): 3 4 5

Read each sentence. Circle ONE answer that describes what is true for you. 1. I am successful at school. Always Sometimes 2. When I do well in school, I feel proud. Always Sometimes 3. I turn my homework in on time. Always Sometimes 4. I ask for help at school when I need it. Always Sometimes Not usually Not usually Not usually Not usually Never Never Never Never Never Never Never

5. I choose to have good behavior when I am at school. Always Sometimes Not usually 6. I learn from my mistakes. Always Sometimes Not usually

7. I share what I have learned with other students. Always Sometimes Not usually

8. I like to find out more about something interesting I learned at school even if I do not need to. Always Sometimes Not usually Never 9. I decide what grades I want to earn and make a plan on how to earn those grades. Always Sometimes Not usually Never 10. After school I finish my assignments and still have time to do other things I like to do. Always Sometimes Not usually Never 11. I know what I can do well. Always Sometimes Not usually Never

12. It is okay for others to act and think in a different way than I do. Always Sometimes Not usually Never 13. The things I learn at school will help me with the job I do when I grow up. Always Sometimes Not usually Never 14. I like myself. Always Sometimes Not usually Never

15. I know the difference between good behavior and bad behavior.

40
Always Sometimes Not usually Never Never Never Never Never Never

16. I get along well with family and students. Always Sometimes Not usually 17. I work well with other students in teams. Always Sometimes Not usually 18. Before I solve a problem, I think about what will happen. Always Sometimes Not usually 19. I know how to set goals for myself. Always Sometimes 20. I can make and keep friends. Always Sometimes Not usually Not usually

21. I do what I think is right even if my friends say I should do something else. Always Sometimes Not usually Never 22. I understand and follow rules set by my school, my family, and the law. Always Sometimes Not usually Never 23. When bad things happen in my life I know what to do to make them better. Always Sometimes Not usually Never 24. I understand that my interests and skills will help me to do well in the job I do when I grow up. Always Sometimes Not usually Never 25. I can tell friends and family what I feel or need. Always Sometimes Not usually Never

41

Gysbers Elementary School Counseling Needs Survey for Parents


Date: ______ Childs grade: _____ Childs name (optional): ______________________ Respond to each question by choosing one of the choices. 1. My child think s/he is successful at school. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree 2. When my child does well in school, s/he feels proud. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree 3. My child turns in homework on time. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree Strongly Disagree Strongly Disagree Strongly Disagree Strongly Disagree

4. My child asks for help at school when s/he needs it. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree 5. My child chooses to have good behavior at school. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree

6. When my child makes a mistake, s/he doesnt repeat it. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree 7. My child shares what s/he has learned with other students. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree 8. My child is interested in learning more about things s/he learned at school. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree 9. My child decides what grades s/he wants to earn and makes plans to earn those grades. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree 10. After school my child finishes homework and still has time to do other things. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree 11. I know my child can do well. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree Strongly Disagree

12. My child understands that everyone is different. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree

13. My child understands that doing well in school will help him/ her do well when they get older. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree 14. My child has good self esteem. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree

42
15. My child knows the difference between good and bad behavior. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree 16. My child gets along well with others. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree

17. My child works well with others when asked to work as a team. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree 18. My child knows how to solve problems at school. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree 19. My child knows how to set goals. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree Strongly Disagree Strongly Disagree Strongly Disagree

20. My child makes and keeps friends. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree 21. My child knows how to handle peer pressure. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree

22. If s/he got in trouble, my child is able to tell me why. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree 23. My child knows which adults can be trusted and which ones are not safe. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree 24. My child understands how their interests and abilities connect to higher education and the world of work. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree 25. My child can communicate well with family and others. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree What are some other ways the counseling department can support your child? Please return to the office before _____________________________.

43

Gysbers Elementary School Counseling Needs Survey for Teachers


Date: _________ Grade level (optional): ________ Respond to each question by choosing the ONE option which best suits the students in your current classroom as a whole. 1. My students think they are successful at school. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree

2. When my students do well in school, they feel proud. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree 3. My students turn in homework on time. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree

4. My students ask for help at school when they need it. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree 5. My students choose to have good behavior at school. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree 6. When my students make mistakes, they dont repeat it. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree 7. My students share what they have learned with other students. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree 8. My students are interested in learning more about things they learned at school. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree 9. My students decide what grades they want to earn and make plans to earn those grades. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree 10. I provide the appropriate amount and challenge when assigning homework. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree 11. I know my students can do well. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree

12. My students understand that everyone is different. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree 13. My students understand that doing well in school will help them do well when they are older. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree 14. My students have good self esteem.

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Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree

15. My students know the difference between good and bad behavior. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree 16. My students get along well with others. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree

17. My students work well with one another when asked to work in teams. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree 18. My students know how to solve problems at school. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree 19. My students know how to set goals. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree Strongly Disagree Strongly Disagree

20. My students can make and keep friends. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree 21. My students know how to handle peer pressure. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree

22. If they get into trouble, my students are able to explain why. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree 23. My students know which adults can be trusted and which ones are not safe. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree 24. My students understand how their interests and abilities connect to higher education and the world of work. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree 25. My students can communicate well with family and others. Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree What are some other ways the counseling department can support your efforts as an educator? Please return to Anne Shirley by __________________.

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Appendix C: 4th Grade Curriculum Crosswalk

46
Curriculum Crosswalking Tool ACADEMIC K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 0 1 1 1 2

SC K-12.2.1 Academic Development: Standard A Students will acquire the attitudes, knowledge, and sills that contribute to effective learning in school and across the life span. Improve Academic Self-Concept Articulate feelings of competence and confidence as a learner Display a positive interest in learning Take pride in work and in achievement Accept mistakes as essential to the learning process Identify attitudes and behaviors which lead to successful learning Acquire Skills for Improving Learning Apply time management and task management skills Demonstrate how effort and persistence positively affect learning Use communication skills to know when and how to ask for help when needed Apply knowledge of learning styles to positively influence school performance Achieve School Success Take responsibility for their actions Demonstrate the ability to work independently, as well as the ability to work cooperatively with other students Develop a broad range of interests and abilities Demonstrate dependability, productivity and initiative Share knowledge x SC K-12.2.2. Academic Development: Standard B x x x x x x x x x x

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Students will complete school with the academic preparation essential to choose from a wide range of substantial postsecondary options, including college. Improve Learning Demonstrate the motivation to achieve individual potential Learn and apply critical thinking skills Apply the study skills necessary for academic success at each level Seek information and support from faculty, staff, family, and peers Organize and apply academic information from a variety of sources Use knowledge of learning styles to positively influence school performance Become self-directed and independent learners Plan to achieve Goals Establish challenging academic goals in elementary, middle/junior high and high school Use assessment results in educational planning Develop and implement an annual plan of study to maximize academic ability and achievement Apply knowledge of aptitudes and interests to goal setting Use problem-solving and decision-making skills to assess progress toward educational goals Understand the relationship between classroom performance and success in school Identify post-secondary options consistent with interests, achievement, aptitude and abilities SC K-12.2.3 Academic Development: Standard C Students will understand the relationship of academics to the world of work, and to life at home and in the community. Relate School to Life Experiences x x x x x

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Demonstrate the ability to balance school, studies, extracurricular activities, leisure time and family life Seek co-curricular and community experiences to enhance the school experience Understand the relationship between learning and work Demonstrate an understanding of the value of lifelong learning as essential to seeking, obtaining, and maintaining life goals Understand that school success is the preparation to make the transition from student to community member Understand how school success and academic achievement enhance future career and avocational opportunities

Career Development

1 0

1 1

1 2

SC K-12.1.1 Career Development: Standard A Students will acquire the skills to investigate the world of work in relation to knowledge of self and to make informed career decisions. Develop Career Awareness Develop skills to locate, evaluate, and interpret career information Learn about the variety of traditional and nontraditional occupations Develop an awareness of personal abilities, skills, interests, and motivations Learn how to interact and work cooperatively in teams Learn to make decisions Learn how to set goals Understand the importance of planning x x x x x x x

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Pursue and develop competency in areas of interest Develop hobbies and vocational interests Balance between work and leisure time Develop Employment Readiness Acquire employability skills such as working on a team, problem-solving and organizational skills Apply job readiness skills to seek employment opportunities Demonstrate knowledge about the changing workplace Learn about the rights and responsibilities of employers and employees Learn to respect individual uniqueness in the workplace Learn how to write a resume Develop a positive attitude toward work and learning Understand the importance of responsibility, dependability, punctuality, integrity and effort in the workplace Utilize time- and task-management skills SC K-12.1.2 Career Development: Standard B Students will employ strategies to achieve future career goals with success and satisfaction. Acquire Career Information Apply decision-making skills to career planning, course selection, and career transitions Identify personal skills, interests, and abilities and relate them to current career choices Demonstrate knowledge of the career planning process Know the various ways which occupations can be classified Use research and information resources to x x x x x

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obtain career information Learn to use the internet to access career planning information Describe traditional and non-traditional occupations and how these relate to career choice Understand how changing economic and societal needs influence employment trends and future training Identify Career Goals Demonstrate awareness of the education and training needed to achieve career goals Assess and modify their educational plan to support career goals Use employability and job readiness skills in internship, mentoring, shadowing and/or other world of work experiences Select course work that is related to career interests Maintain a career planning portfolio SC K-12.1.3 Career Development: Standard C Students will understand the relationship between personal qualities, education, training, and the world of work. Acquire Knowledge to Achieve Career Goals Understand the relationship between educational achievement and career success Explain how work can help to achieve personal success and satisfaction Identify personal preferences and interests which influence career choices and success Understand that the changing workplace requires lifelong learning and acquiring new skills Describe the effect of work on lifestyles x x x

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Understand the importance of equity and access in career choice Understand that work is an important and satisfying means of personal expression Apply Skills to Achieve Career Goals Demonstrate how interests, abilities, and achievement relate to achieving personal, social, educational and career goals. Learn how to use conflict management skills with peers and adults Learn to work cooperatively with others as a team member Apply academic and employment readiness skills in work-based learning situations such as internships, shadowing, and/or mentoring experiences x x

Personal/Social Development

1 0

1 1

1 2

SC K-12.1.4 Personal/Social Development: Standard A Students will acquire the knowledge, attitudes, ad interpersonal skills to help them understand and respect self and others. Acquire Self-Knowledge Develop a positive attitude toward self as a unique and worthy person Identify values, attitudes and beliefs Learn the goal setting process Understand change as a part of growth Identify and express feelings Distinguish between appropriate and inappropriate behaviors Recognize personal boundaries, rights and privacy needs Understand the need for self-control and how to practice it x x x x

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Demonstrate cooperative behavior in groups Identify personal strengths and assets Identify and discuss changing personal and social roles Identify and recognize changing family roles Acquire Interpersonal Skills Recognize that everyone has rights and responsibilities Respect alternative points of view Recognize, accept, respect and appreciate individual differences Recognize, accept and appreciate ethnic and cultural diversity Recognize and respect differences in various family configurations Use effective communication skills Know that communication involves speaking, listening, and nonverbal behavior Learn how to make and keep friends x x x x x x x x

SC K-12.1.5 Personal/Social Development: Standard B Students will make decisions, set goals, and take necessary action to achieve goals. Self-Knowledge Applications Use a decision-making and problem-solving model Understand consequences of decisions and choices Identify alternative solutions to a problem Develop effective coping skills for dealing with problems Demonstrate when, where, and how to seek help for solving problems and making decisions Know how to apply conflict resolution skills x x x x x x

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Demonstrate a respect and appreciation for individual and cultural differences Know when peer pressure is influencing a decision Identify long- and short-term goals Identify alternative ways of achieving goals Use persistence and perseverance in acquiring knowledge and skills Develop an action plan to set and achieve realistic goals SC K-12.1.5 Personal/Social Development: Standard C Students will understand safety and survival skills. Acquire Personal Safety Skills Demonstrate knowledge of personal information (i.e., telephone number, home address, emergency contact) Learn about the relationship between rules, laws, safety, and the protection of an individuals rights Learn the difference between appropriate and inappropriate physical contact Demonstrate the ability to assert boundaries, rights, and personal privacy Differentiate between situations requiring peer support and situations requiring adult professional help Identify resource people in the school and community, and know how to seek their help Apply effective problem-solving and decisionmaking skills to make safe and healthy choices Learn about the emotional and physical dangers of substance use and abuse Learn how to cope with peer pressure Learn techniques for managing stress and conflict x x x x x

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Learn coping skills for managing life events

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Appendix D: Counselor/Administrator Agreement

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57

58

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Appendix E: Steps to Success Scope & Sequence

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Appendix F: Second Step Scope & Sequence

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Appendix G: Career Interest Awareness (CIA) Lesson Plan Materials

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CAREER INTEREST AREAS - What's your CIA code? You can find your favorite Career Interest Area (CIA Code) by doing this exercise. For each of the 66 items, choose which activity you would rather do. It doesn't matter if you love them both or don't like either - you have to pick the one you would rather do and circle it! Have fun!

WOULD YOU RATHER:

1.

A. Write a book B. Study the weather

2.

C. Work on a farm D. Fight fires

3.

E. Measure and grade logs (logging industry) F. Teach someone how to run a machine

4.

G. Use computer programs in an office H. Help people figure out where to go on vacation (travel agent)

5.

I. Cut and style hair J. Help someone find a new job

6.

K. Write a computer program L. Teach sports at a fitness center/athletic club

7.

C. Be in charge of replanting forests

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A. Teach drama (acting)

8.

B. Solve pollution problems D. Solve a burglary

9.

E. Design an airport G. Keep business records for a company

10.

F. Put a special tool together H. Sell advertising space for a newspaper

11.

I. Greet and help hotel guests K. Teach in a public school

12.

A. Teach art D. Supervise police officers

13.

C. Work on a ranch B. Do surgery to cure a sick animal

14.

H. Sell clothes E. Fix a car

15.

F. Check products in a factory to make sure they were made right G. Be in charge of people working in an office (office manager)

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16. I. Be the host or hostess in a restaurant L. Coach basketball

17.

J. Teach people who are blind or deaf K. Argue cases in front of a judge (lawyer)

18.

E. Drive a truck for a company A. Design a poster on a computer

19.

B. Test evidence used in crimes F. Help assemble (build) an airplane

20.

G. Use a calculator to figure out how much money a company makes each day C. Train animals

21.

D. Be in charge of security of a company H. Run a department in a big store

22.

J. Help people at a mental health clinic (counseling) L. Scout baseball players for a college or minor league team

23.

A. Take pictures for a newspaper or magazine F. Be in charge of factory workers

24.

B. Figure out why someone is sick and take care of him/her E. Fly an airplane

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25.

C. Manage a farm H. Sell cars

26.

I. Work as a flight attendant for an airline D. Guard prisoners

27.

G. Type, file and greet people for a lawyer J. Help take care of elderly people

28.

G. Help customers in a bank A. Draw and paint signs and billboards

29.

B. Help do medical tests in a laboratory H. Convince someone to buy something

30.

C. Take care of animals I. Serve meals to customers

31.

D. Give traffic tickets J. Help patients make injured arms and legs stronger (physical therapy)

32.

E. Bulldoze land for a new home K. Write for a newspaper

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33. F. Test electronics to make sure they were made right L. Perform in a circus

34.

H. Sell musical instruments A. Play a musical instrument

35.

G. Run a cash register B. Fill prescriptions in a pharmacy

36.

E. Operate heavy equipment on a road crew C. Manage a fish hatchery

37.

L. Coach a high school sports team A. Model for an artist or photographer

38.

I. Drive people in a limousine E. Cook in a fancy restaurant

39.

J. Help people with disabilities H. Help a customer decide what gift to buy

40.

A. Make jewelry I. Help people lose weight

41.

B. Do experiments with plants and animals I. Caddie on a golf course (carry gear for golfers)

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42.

C. Plant and trim trees J. Take care of children at a day-care center

43.

D. Guard money in an armored car K. Study why people do the things they do (psychology)

44.

E. Fix a TV set L. Run a tennis camp

45.

F. Fix controls in an airplane J. Help someone with a personal problem

46.

L. Be in charge of the timers at a track meet G. Answer multi-line phones for an office

47.

J. Help feed people in a hospital A. Pick and announce the music for a radio station

48.

K. Work to get someone elected B. Take blood from people for a blood bank (like the Red Cross)

49.

L. Referee a sports event C. Be the boss of a logging crew

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50. D. Be in charge of the boats in a harbor E. Do drawings for an architect

51.

I. Sell coffee in a coffee shop F. Use a machine to make something out of metal

52.

K. Set up concerts for a band G. Ask people questions for a survey

53.

B. Install, check and fix medical equipment in a hospital L. Keep score for a sports event

54.

A. Design a new product that will be made in a factory K. Run a health program

55.

J. Show and sell houses and land (real-estate) B. Test people to see if they need glasses

56.

F. Drive a forklift truck C. Be a commercial fisherman (fish for a living)

57.

D. Be someone's bodyguard G. Deliver mail

58.

K. Run a store F. Put together toys following written instructions

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59.

G. Be in charge of all the mail for an office I. Drive a taxi

60.

H. Sell supplies to dentists J. Judge a dog show

61.

F. Build a bicycle by following drawings D. Enforce fish and game laws (police officer for hunting and fishing)

62.

C. Find a home for abandoned animals K. Check buildings for fire hazards

63.

H. Sell sporting goods I. Collect tickets at a movie or play

64.

E. Manage a factory J. Work as a nurse

65.

K. Be in charge of a company H. Sell computers

66.

L. Teach people how to ski D. Make an arrest

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******************************************* Tally the number of times each letter was circled next to the letter below. Then match your top choices with the Career Interest Areas below. The 12 Career Interest Areas can help you match your interests with possible careers. Each Career Interest Area has hundreds of occupations, some of which are listed below.

************* A__________= ARTISTIC B__________= SCIENTIFIC C__________= PLANTS AND ANIMALS D__________= PROTECTIVE E__________= MECHANICAL F__________= INDUSTRIAL G__________= BUSINESS DETAIL H__________= SELLING I__________= ACCOMODATING J__________= HUMANITARIAN K__________= LEADING/INFLUENCING L__________= PHYSICAL PERFORMING

A. ARTISTIC - Interest in creative expression of feelings and ideas, in writing, music, art, acting, dance, crafts or modeling. LITERARY ARTS (novelist, poet, screenwriter, film editor, critic). VISUAL ARTS (commercial artist, cartoonist, florist, interior designer, photographer)/DRAMA (actor, announcer, disc jockey, drama teacher)/MUSIC (musician, music teacher, singer)/ DANCE (dancer, dance instructor)/ CRAFT ARTS (graphic artist, jeweler, model maker)/ AMUSEMENT (fortune teller)/ MODELING (model, modeling instructor)

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B. SCIENTIFIC - Interest in discovering, collecting and studying information about the world, and using findings to solve problems in medicine and science. PHYSICAL SCIENCES (chemist, environmental scientist, geologist, astronomer, mathematician, physicist, statistician)/ LIFE SCIENCES (biologist, botanist, food technologist, soil conservationist)/ MEDICAL SCIENCES (audiologist, dentist, optometrist, physician, psychiatrist, speech pathologist, veterinarian)/ LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY (emergency medical technician, medical lab technician, pharmacist, surgical technician)

C. PLANTS AND ANIMALS - Interest in caring for plants and animals, usually in an outdoor setting. MANAGERIAL WORK (farmer, forester, fish hatchery manager)/ GENERAL SUPERVISION (forester aid, logging supervisor, park workers supervisor)/ ANIMAL TRAINING SERVICE (animal trainer, groomer)/ PHYSICAL WORK (farm or ranch worker, lumber worker, logger, fisher)

D. PROTECTIVE - Interest in protecting people and property. SAFETY AND LAW ENFORCEMENT (detective, fish and game warden, police officer)/ SECURITY SERVICES (firefighter, park ranger)

E. MECHANICAL - Interest in using machines, tools or equipment, including making and fixing things. ENGINEERING (architect, electrical technician, engineer, tool designer, TV -radio technician)/ MANAGERIAL WORK (construction superintendent, production superintendent)/ ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY (drafter, surveyor, air traffic controller)/ AIR AND WATER VEHICLE OPERATION (airplane pilot, ferryboat pilot)/ CRAFT TECHNOLOGY (airplane mechanic, appliance repairer, auto mechanic, business machine repairer, carpenter, dental lab technician, dietitian, electrician, heating/refrigeration repair, computer technician, machinist, plumber, printer, dressmaker)/ SYSTEMS OPERATION (power plant operator)/ QUALITY CONTROL (safety inspector, test driver, log grader)/ LAND AND WATER VEHICLE OPERATION (deck hand truck driver)/ MATERIALS CONTROL (shipping-receiving clerk)/ SKILLED HAND AND MACHINE WORK (roofer, meat cutter, service station attendant, TV-radio service technician, scuba diver, bicycle repairer, film projectionist, cook-chef)/ EQUIPMENT OPERATION (bulldozer operator, miner)/ PHYSICAL WORK (building custodian, hotel maid, kitchen helper, tire repairer)

F. INDUSTRIAL - Interest in repeated, organized activities in a factory setting machine or computer/technology oriented. PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY (machine setter, watch

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repairer)/ PRODUCTION WORK (iron worker, assembly supervisor)/ PRODUCTION CONTROL (product tester)/ PHYSICAL WORK (buzz saw operator, book bindery worker, dry cleaner worker)

G. BUSINESS DETAIL - Interest in activities requiring accuracy and attention to detail, mostly in an office setting. ADMINISTRATIVE DETAIL (office manager secretary, clerktypist, driver license examiner)/ MATHEMATICAL DETAIL (accounting clerk, bookkeeper)/ FINANCIAL DETAIL (bank teller, cashier, ticket agent, postal clerk)/ ORAL COMMUNICATIONS (hotel clerk, receptionist, telephone operator)/ RECORDS PROCESSING (mail carrier, stenographer)/ (CLERICAL MACHINE OPERATION (word processor, computer operator, typist)/ CLERICAL HANDLING (file clerk, library page)

H. SELLING - Interest in persuading others, using sales and promotion techniques. SALES TECHNOLOGY (advertising worker, insurance agent)/ GENERAL SALES (automobile salesperson, real estate agent, retail salesperson, travel agent)/ VENDING (peddler, vendor)

I. ACCOMMODATING - Interest in providing services to others, usually 1-n-1, including helping others look good, have fun, travel or enjoy eating. HOSPITALITY SERVICES (flight attendant, host-hostess, recreation worker)/ BARBER AND BEAUTY SERVICES (barberhairstylist, cosmetologist)/ PASSENGER SERVICES (bus driver, taxi driver)/ CUSTOMER SERVICES (bartender, waiter-waitress)/ ATTENDANT SERVICES (massage therapist, caddy)

J. HUMANITARIAN - Interest in helping others with physical, mental, spiritual or social needs. SOCIAL SERVICES (psychologist, social worker, counselor, minister, caseworker)/ NURSING AND THERAPY SERVICES (nurse, dental hygienist, physical therapist, X-ray technician)/CHILD AND ADULT CARE (nursing aide, day care worker, homemaker, dental assistant, ambulance attendant, foster parent)

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K. LEADING-INFLUENCING - Interest in leading others, using words or numbers at a high level. MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS (computer programmer, financial analyst)/ EDUCATIONAL AND LIBRARY SERVICES (teacher, librarian, home economist)/ SOCIAL RESEARCH (employment interviewer, urban planner)/ LAW (lawyer, paralegal, personnel director)/ BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (business manager, bank office, administrator, purchasing agent)/ FINANCE (accountant, stockbroker)/ SERVICES ADMINISTRATION (institution director, athletic director, public health educator)/ COMMUNICATIONS (newspaper, reporter-editor, technical writer, newscaster, translator)/ PROMOTION (public relations worker, fund-raiser, lobbyist)/ REGULATIONS ENFORCEMENT (bank examiner, fire inspector) BUSINESS MANAGEMENT/ CONTRACTS AND CLAIMS

L. PHYSICAL PERFORMING - Interest in physical activities performed before an audience. SPORTS (professional athlete, coach, official sports instructor/ acrobat, juggler)

77 SCHOOL SUBJECTS AND CAREERS *Website: www.bls.gov/k12 Directions: Choose one of the areas that interests you, select it, and then choose one career from those listed and select it. For that job, read What is this job like? **Then complete the chart below by finding the information you need from How do you get ready?, How much does this job pay?, How many jobs are there?,and What about the future?

JOB INTEREST AREA (ex: Helping people)_____________________________________ JOB TITLE (ex: Teacher) _________________________________________________ How do you get ready for this job? ex: training, education, highschool degree, college, licenses $ How much does this job pay? (Hourly or salary) How many jobs are available for your JOB TITLE? In the future Is the need for this job growing fast, average or declining?

**If you have time, pick another career and complete the chart below:

78 JOB INTEREST AREA (ex: Helping people)_____________________________________ JOB TITLE (ex: Teacher) _________________________________________________ How do you get ready for this job? ex: training, education, highschool degree, college, licenses $ How much does this job pay? (Hourly or salary) How many jobs are available for your JOB TITLE? In the future Is the need for this job growing fast, average or declining?