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Manifold SACS Analysis Tutorial:

1.0

PRECEDE ............................................................................................................. 3

1.1
Working with Joints ......................................................................................... 5
1.1.1
Adding Absolute........................................................................................ 5
1.1.2
Adding Relative......................................................................................... 6
1.1.3
Adding Intersection .................................................................................. 8
1.1.4
Moving Joints ............................................................................................ 9
1.1.5
Deleting .................................................................................................... 10
1.1.6
Fixities ...................................................................................................... 11
1.1.7
Springs ..................................................................................................... 12
1.2
Working with standard members ................................................................. 13
1.2.1
Selecting members .................................................................................. 13
1.2.1.1 I-Beams, Channel, Angle, & Sq Tubing............................................ 14
1.2.1.2 Pipes & Round Mechanical Tubing .................................................. 16
1.2.2
Adding a member.................................................................................... 16
1.2.3
Adding a String of Members.................................................................. 17
1.2.4
Member Orientation............................................................................... 19
1.2.5
Dividing Members................................................................................... 21
1.2.6
Member K-values.................................................................................... 25
1.2.7
Member Releases .................................................................................... 26
1.2.8
Member Offsets....................................................................................... 28
1.2.9
Modifying Member ................................................................................. 29
1.2.10
Gap Members .......................................................................................... 30
1.3
Working with Plates ....................................................................................... 31
1.3.1
Adding Plates........................................................................................... 31
1.3.1.1 Triangular............................................................................................ 32
1.3.1.2 Quadrilateral ....................................................................................... 34
1.3.2
Plate Offsets............................................................................................. 34
1.4
SACS Model overview ................................................................................... 34
1.4.1
Displaying Labels .................................................................................... 34
1.4.2
Model Viewer .......................................................................................... 35
1.4.3
Select/unselect.......................................................................................... 36
1.4.4
Displaying Planes .................................................................................... 37
1.5
Setting Up the Analysis................................................................................... 39
1.5.1
Basic Loads .............................................................................................. 39
1.5.1.1 Self weight............................................................................................ 41
1.5.2
Combined loads....................................................................................... 42
1.5.3
Load Selection ......................................................................................... 45
1.5.4
Report Options ........................................................................................ 46
2.0
POSTVUE............................................................................................................ 49
2.1

Setting up the Runfile ......................................................................................... 49

2.2
Stress Checking ............................................................................................... 52
2.2.1
Displaying Member Unity Checks (UC) ............................................... 52
2.2.2
Displaying Member Stresses .................................................................. 53
2.2.3
Displaying Member Loads ..................................................................... 55
2.2.4
Displaying Plate Stresses ........................................................................ 56
2.2.5
Reviewing a member............................................................................... 57
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2.2.6
Reviewing a moment diagram ............................................................... 58
2.3
Deflection Checking ........................................................................................ 60
2.3.1
Displaying frame displacement: ............................................................ 60
2.3.2
Displaying Joint Deflections/rotations .................................................. 62
2.4
Displaying Reaction Loads............................................................................. 63
2.5
Displaying single load cases............................................................................ 64
2.6
Reports ............................................................................................................. 66
2.6.1
Joints ........................................................................................................ 66
2.6.2
Members .................................................................................................. 67
2.6.3
Plates ........................................................................................................ 68
3.0
Advanced SACS .................................................................................................. 70
3.1
Working with Special Geometries................................................................. 70
3.1.1
Ansys Creation ........................................................................................ 71
3.1.2
Creating a section.................................................................................... 72
3.1.3
Creating a Member................................................................................. 73
3.2
Lifting Analysis ............................................................................................... 76
3.2.1
Sling lift analysis ..................................................................................... 77
3.2.1.1 Applying the Loads ............................................................................. 77
3.2.1.2 Adding Boundary conditions ............................................................. 79
3.2.1.3 Incorporating the sling members ...................................................... 80
3.2.1.4 Adjusting the releases ......................................................................... 80
3.2.1.5 Selecting and Factoring the loads...................................................... 81
3.2.1.6 Interpreting the results....................................................................... 84
3.2.1.7 Iterating to correct tension in slings / Loads at fixities.................... 85
3.2.2
Manifold Constrained with loads applied to padeyes.......................... 85
3.2.2.1 Adding Boundary conditions ............................................................. 86
3.2.2.2 Apply 25/75 loading to padeyes ......................................................... 86
3.2.2.3 Reviewing the results .......................................................................... 86
3.3
Manifold Operational Analysis...................................................................... 86
3.3.1
Adding Boundary conditions ................................................................. 86
3.3.2
Defining the load cases............................................................................ 87
3.3.3
Load transfer........................................................................................... 89
3.3.4
Reaction loads.......................................................................................... 90
3.4
Manifold Impact Analysis .............................................................................. 90
3.4.1
Adding Boundary conditions ................................................................. 90
3.4.2
Establishing your frame stiffness .......................................................... 91
3.4.3
Working out your impact load in Mathcad.......................................... 92
3.4.4
Applying the loads................................................................................... 93
3.4.5
Reviewing the results .............................................................................. 93
3.5
Object Impact Analysis .................................................................................. 96
3.6
Joint Can...................................................................................................... 96
3.6.1
Punching Shear ....................................................................................... 96
3.6.2
Joint Can Input File................................................................................ 98
3.6.3
Running the Analysis............................................................................ 100
3.6.4
Reviewing your Results ........................................................................ 101
3.7
GAP ............................................................................................................ 103
3.7.1
Classifying Compression or Tension Members.................................. 104
3.7.2
Selecting Gap Options .......................................................................... 105
3.7.3
Reviewing the results ............................................................................ 105
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1.0 PRECEDE

To get started Double Click Model Icon.

For first time modeling click Create New Model then click OK

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Click on Noneand then click on OK.

You are now able to set up a model in PRECEDE

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1.1

Working with Joints

Joints are points in space representing an intersection of 2 or more


structural members. Joints always are always added as a default along the
SHEAR CENTER of an element

1.1.1 Adding Absolute


You can add joints to your model in the absolute of Global Coordinate
system

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Enter Joint location in X, Y ,Z coordinates

1.1.2 Adding Relative


You can add joints to your model in the Relative to another joint in the
Global Coordinate system

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1.1.3 Adding Intersection


You can add joints to your model at the intersection of 4 joints. When
members are present, this will divide the 2 members into 4 members.

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1.1.4 Moving Joints


Moving joints is as easy as adding a joint. You can move joints in
the same ways you are allowed to create them

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1.1.5 Deleting
To delete a joint just selects Delete, and then pick the joint to be
deleted

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1.1.6 Fixities
Fixities are costraints for joints. You can constrain joints in all
degrees of freedom. Joints that are fixed in SACS are represented
by a Triangle. A fixity of 0 means the joint is free to move within
that degree of freedom. A fixity of 1 means that that joint is fixed
from moving in that degree of freedom. SACS reads fixities as a 6
number binary system corresponding to dx,dy,dz,rx,ry,rz.
i.e. to constrain a joint only in the dx, dy, and dz directions:

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1.1.7 Springs
Springs are variable costraints for joints. You can apply spring
properties to any non fixed joints in all degrees of freedom. Joints
that are springs in SACS are represented by a SQUARE.

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1.2

Working with standard members


1.2.1 Selecting members
To create Structural members with mass properties of standard
shapes follow the pictures below

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1.2.1.1 I-Beams, Channel, Angle, & Sq


Tubing

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1.2.1.2 Pipes & Round Mechanical Tubing

1.2.2 Adding a member


Members are added to the model connected to 2 joints. The order
of the selected joints is important for use in more advanced
analysis using offsets and releases. The first joint selected will
always be the A joint and the second the B joint. A good rule
of thumb is always to create members by moving in the positive
direction within a coordinate system direction.

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1.2.3 Adding a String of Members


Members can be added to a model in a string of members rather
than adding one at a time.

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1.2.4 Member Orientation


The orientation of a member is important for open section
members. Bending of a beam along the Y-Axis has much higher
capacity than along the Z-axis

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To change the orientation of a member:

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1.2.5 Dividing Members


You can Divide any member in half, perpendicular to a joint, by
the global planes, as a ratio of its length, or by a specific distance
from the members A joint. The most beneficial of these is to
divide a member in half and to divide a member perpendicular to
another joint. To divide a member in half:

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To divide a member Perpendicular from a reference joint:

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1.2.6 Member K-values


K-values represent unbraced buckling lengths of members. When
you add intermediate joints to members, you must adjust the Kvalues of the member in order to take into account the unbraced
buckling length of the entire member, not just the single section of
the member.
You can select Ky, Kz, or Kz and Kz depending on which
direction of buckling you are trying to account for. K values
should only be set AFTER offsets have been added. Y and Z are
the orientation of the member in its local coordinate system. It is
important to note that Y buckling is a torsion about the Y axis, not
a linear Y direction buckling displacement. The same can be said
for Z-Buckling. For this example, we will set Ky/Kz
simultaneously.

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1.2.7 Member Releases


All members in SACS are connected to their joints rigidly in all
degrees of freedom as a default. Should you desire to release the
member from the joint (For example if it is a pinned connection)
SACS has a way to accommodate this. To ensure software
convergence, Releases should only be used on one joint of a
member. Releases are in the format of dx,dy,dz,rx,ry,rz, in binary
format, 1 meaning to release the degree of freedom, and 0 meaning

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to maintain the degree of freedom connection. To set the release


of a member other than its default of 111111:

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1.2.8 Member Offsets


Offsets of members are used to simulate geometries such as those
indicated below:

To simulate the geometry of the brace, we can offset the brace


from the joint the distance of the width of the chords flange.
You can add offsets to members in global or local coordinate
systems. To add an offset to a member:

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1.2.9 Modifying Member


To modify the attributes of any member:

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1.2.10 Gap Members


You can set up any member to be a tension only or compression
only:

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1.3

Working with Plates


1.3.1 Adding Plates
You can add plates to any model by setting them up as follows:

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1.3.1.1 Triangular
To add a triangular plate (gusset)

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1.3.1.2 Quadrilateral
To add a quadrilateral plate follow the same steps as adding
a triangular plate but select 4 joints instead of 3.

1.3.2 Plate Offsets


Plate offsets are the same as member offsets except you must
offset all joints of a plate.

1.4

SACS Model overview


1.4.1 Displaying Labels
An important part of SACS Precede is to be able to view the model
properties in its entirety. SACS has the ability to show individual
joint, member, plate, and load labelings through its display feature

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1.4.2 Model Viewer


SACS also gives you the ability to see the model in full geometry
as opposed to the point and line geometry. This is a handy tool to
use to verify beam orientation, verify offsets, and to visualize
structural geometries.

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1.4.3 Select/unselect
SACS allows you to select only those members or plates that you
would like to see, or unselect a group of members you would not
like to see:

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1.4.4 Displaying Planes


You can display a single plane of members and joints within a
complex 3-D structural geometry. For example to view just the top
face of the following structure:

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1.5

Setting Up the Analysis


1.5.1 Basic Loads
You can apply point loads to joints, distributed loads to members,
selfweight of the structure, or deflections to joints. The most
common use of basic loads is to load joints and utilize the
selfweight of the structure. To apply a load to a joint:

Select the joint then click APPLY. Then give the load a label and click ADD

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Apply your load in any DOF per the global CS

SACS will tell you the sum of all forces,


and the center of all forces for this basic load case

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1.5.1.1 Self weight


To determine the selfweight of the structure follow the steps
below:

Give the load a label by filling in the load condition and load ID then click OK

SACS will tell you how much your structure weighs and the CG of the selfweight:

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1.5.2 Combined loads


To Combine basic loads:

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To view your combined Center of Loads:

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SACS will then tell you the center of all the forces for your combined load case

1.5.3 Load Selection


To select which loads you want SACS to run:

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1.5.4 Report Options


You can tell SACS what information you would like to return from the
analysis run on your model:

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All precede files should be saved in the following format: sacinp.FILENAME

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2.0

POSTVUE
2.1
Setting up the Runfile
To run the analysis:

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2.2

Stress Checking
2.2.1 Displaying Member Unity Checks (UC)
To see if any structural member stress has exceeded Code
allowables:

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2.2.2 Displaying Member Stresses


To display individual member stresses (tension, Compression,
Bending & shear) do the following:

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2.2.3 Displaying Member Loads


To display individual member loads (Tensile force, compressive
force, Bending & shear ) do the following:

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2.2.4 Displaying Plate Stresses


To display individual plare Unity Check do the following:

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2.2.5 Reviewing a member


To review the stresses in an individual member:

Select the Member, then click Apply

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This is a very important Screen. It tells you what the unity checks of the member are just
due to the individual loads on the member. It also allows you to do a quick member
resizing check to see what size member would take the applied loads.

2.2.6 Reviewing a moment diagram


To review the load diagram through an individual member:

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Select the Member then click APPLY

The program default is to show Z shear and Y Moment

To flip the coordinate system and show Y shear and Z moment:

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2.3

Deflection Checking
2.3.1 Displaying frame displacement:
To view the displaced shape of the structure:

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2.3.2 Displaying Joint Deflections/rotations


To display individual joint displacement due to analyzed loads:

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2.4

Displaying Reaction Loads

To display Joint Reaction loads:

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2.5

Displaying single load cases

To display single load cases (if you have selected multiple in Precede)

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2.6

Reports
2.6.1 Joints
To report ALL details of joint reactions or displacements:

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2.6.2 Members
To report ALL details of Member loads or stresses:

As with Joints, Select the Members, you would like to be included in the report

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2.6.3 Plates
To report ALL details of Plate stresses, deflections, etc

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As with Joints, Select the plates you would like to be included in the report

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3.0

Advanced SACS
3.1
Working with Special Geometries
Sometimes there is a need to create special members to incorporate nonstandard geometries into our models. An example of which would be a
boxed in I-beam:

In order to incorporate this geometry into SACS, we must understand how


structural members are analyzed within AISC 316 (ASD) In order to add
the special member to SACS, we need to know 9 properties of the section:

Z dimension
Y-Y Shift
Y-Dimension
Y shear area
Z-shear area
Axial area
Torsional Moment of inertia
Moment of inertia through the Y-axis
Moment of inertia through the Z-axis

According to AISC, shear through a beam can only be taken up in the


specific areas of the beam, for example, for stress in a beam due to shear
forces in the Z direction only the shaded areas below can be used:

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Likewise for stress in a beam due to shear forces in the Y direction only
the shaded areas below can be used:

Y-Y Shift is the distance from the shear center of the member to the area
moment center of the member along the Z axis.
In order to determine the bending moments of the inertia, we can use the
parallel axis theorem. In order to determine the torsional moment of
inertia, we must use ANSYS.

3.1.1 Ansys Creation


To set up the area for Ansys, you can build the section in Ansys or
import the section from Autocad or Inventor. Assuming you have
imported the geometry from Ansys and Run the section tools in
Ansys, here is how you convert the ANSYS values to the ones
SACS uses:

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3.1.2 Creating a section


To add the custom section to your SACS Model:

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Input your values from Anays

3.1.3 Creating a Member


To create a member from a custom section:

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3.2

Lifting Analysis
A Manifold lift analysis is one of the most stringent parts of the
overall manifold frame analysis. There are 2 approaches to lifting
analysis, modeling the lift with slings, or modeling the lift with
forces.

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3.2.1 Sling lift analysis


3.2.1.1 Applying the Loads
The manifold Lift analysis should incorporate all the
expected loads during lift including but not limited to
header weight, insulation weight, pressure cap weight,
controls equipment weight, water filled header weight,
control fluid weight, etc The lift analysis should also
include all applicable amplification factors per ES-00450101 or per the project requirements whichever is more
stringent.
These amplification factors may include:

Dynamic Amplification Factor (1.4+)


Skew Factor 25/75 (1.5)
Weight Inaccuracy Factor (1.1)
Consequence Factor (1.35+)

Header weights Basic Load Case

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10 pressure Cap Basic Load Case

6 pressure Cap Basic Load Case

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Selfweight of the Structure Basic Load Case

3.2.1.2 Adding Boundary conditions


In order to stabilize the lift of the manifold, we need to set
some boundary conditions for the lift. Typically we
constrain a node in the center of the manifold directly under
the center of all vertical forces as well as fixing the lift
point of the sling:

When the analysis is run, it is good practice to check that


the reaction loads at these nodes are not too high (2 orders
of magnitude less than the lift)
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3.2.1.3 Incorporating the sling members


When performing a lift analysis with slings, you must
incorporate into the sling geometry the 25/75 lift
assumption. This design factor accounts for tolerances in
sling and structure geometry and states that 2 opposing
sling legs will take 75% of the entire load of the lift while
the other 2 opposing legs take 25%. This is only of
concern in 4 point lifts and not of 3 or 2 point lifts (Unless
lifting a spreader bar).
In order to account for a 25/75 sling distribution, we make
all slings in the model as pipe. We make all slings the
same diameter as the wire rope expected for use, and adjust
the wall thickness of the 25% slings legs to reduce the
capacity of these slings. .

Sling Cross Sections

3.2.1.4 Adjusting the releases


It is also important to release the moments on the padeye
side of each sling in order to simulate the shackle
connection

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Joint A Releases

Joint B Releases

3.2.1.5 Selecting and Factoring the loads


To combine and factor the loads:

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3.2.1.6 Interpreting the results


To verify the correct 25/75 assumption on the sling legs we
must look at the tension in the slings

You can see from the above picture that the two sling legs
carrying 57 kips are taking 75.7% of the combined tension
load of all 4 sling legs.

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3.2.1.7 Iterating to correct tension in slings /


Loads at fixities
When reviewing the tension in the sling legs it is
sometimes necessary to go back to the model and adjust the
wall thickness of the 25% legs to get the appropriate 25/75
distribution of the sling tension.

3.2.2 Manifold Constrained with loads applied to


padeyes
This type of modeling is similar to using slings, however it
involves replacing the slings with forces to simulate the
25/75 lift.

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3.2.2.1 Adding Boundary conditions


Similar to the Lifting with slings, the manifold should be
constrained directly below the lift point. This constraint
should be a fixed constraint. To allow for model
convergence

3.2.2.2 Apply 25/75 loading to padeyes


Apply the FX, FY, & FZ loads as the geometry dictates to
each padeye. The loads should approximate the 25/75
assumption in addition to any other amplification factors
present in the design

3.2.2.3 Reviewing the results


Review the results of the analysis as with any other
analysis. It is important to review the vertical load on the
fixed joint to ensure that the reaction is minimal. If the
vertical reaction is significant, adjust the loads at the
padeyes and re-run the analysis to correct.

3.3

Manifold Operational Analysis


3.3.1 Adding Boundary conditions
When constraining your manifold, you must decide how the
structure is supported. Is it supported by a central post? Does the
manifold have feet? Below are examples of different manifold
constraints.

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3.3.2 Defining the load cases


The load cases should be the resultant loads from your manifold
header analysis in ANSYS. The location of your piping supports
in SACS should match the location of your pipe supports in
ANSYS.
Below is a model of the ANSYS header:

Below is the header after pressure, temperature, and jumper loads


have been applied:

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Now we can extract the reaction loads at the nodes of support

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3.3.3 Load transfer


The reaction loads from ANSYS must be inverted, and applied to
the manifold at the locations of support:

And then we can combined the header loads with the self weight,
and any other external loads. In the case of this manifold, the
header loads are combined with the Self weight of the frame, the
weight of the HDU, the weight of the SCM and SAM.
If the total weight of the header loads on the frame does not match
the weight of the header with insulation from your inventor model,
you should scale the loads of the header appropriately to
accommodate this.

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3.3.4 Reaction loads


The reaction loads from your Frame can now be extracted and
supplied to the pile / manifold base supplier for their analysis.

3.4

Manifold Impact Analysis


3.4.1 Adding Boundary conditions
In order to simulate impact, you need to constrain your frame
model at the lift points in the vertical direction

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3.4.2 Establishing your frame stiffness


To establish your frame stiffness, you must apply a known load at
the point of frame impact. Do not include any selfweight or any
other loads to determine the stiffness of the frame

Now run the analysis to determine your Vertical deflection:

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So we know that the calibration load is 100000 lbs, and the


displacement is .090 inches.

3.4.3 Working out your impact load in Mathcad


Below is a sample mathcad file for converting the calibration load
into an impact load
Mass Manifold := 412000lb

<-------------------- MASS OF THE MANIFOLD (NOT WEIGHT!)

m
Vinstall := .5
s

<-------------------- INSTALLATION VELOCITY

CAL := 100000lbf

<-------------------- CALIBRATION LOAD

deflection := .090in

<-------------------- SACS DISPLACEMENT DUE TO CAL

K manifold :=

CAL
deflection

K manifold = 1111111
1
2

K manifold X

lbf
in

<-------------------- STIFFNESS OF THE MANIFOLD AT IMPACT


LOCATION

Mass Manifold Vinstall


2

Mass Manifold Vinstall

X :=

<-------------------- CONSERVATION OF ENERGY

K manifold
X = 0.61 in

<-------------------- DISPLACEMENT DUE TO IMPACT

F impact := K manifold X
F impact = 677829 lbf

<-------------------- FORCE DUE TO IMPACT

Load := F impact + Mass Manifold g


<-------------------- LOAD TO APPLY TO MANIFOLD
Load = 1089829 lbf
Gs :=

Load
Mass Manifold g
Gs = 2.645

<-------------------- # OFF ACCELERATIONS OF GRAVITY SEEN


BY MANIFOLD

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3.4.4 Applying the loads


The impact load should be combined with the installed weight of
the manifold as a combined load condition and ran.

3.4.5 Reviewing the results


Even though the members seem to be overstressed, the allowable
stresses during impact are greater than the allowables during
operation. You are allowed to go up to yield at impact so you must
review your results file.

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As long as the combined stress is below the yield strength of the


material and the shear stress is below 57% of the yield of the
material the member is sufficient to take the impact

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3.5

Object Impact Analysis


Object impact analysis is similar to manifold impact analysis in
that you constrain the manifold, determine the stiffness of the
manifold, and apply the impact and weight load of the object to be
impacted onto the manifold at the appropriate location. Allowable
stresses are the same as with the Manifold installation impact.

3.6

Joint Can
3.6.1 Punching Shear
The Joint Can portion of SACS is used to model punching shear
between intersection tubular members:

To illustrate the effects of punching shear:

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3.6.2 Joint Can Input File


To the joint along with the members, set up the file exactly as
explained in Section 1 of this document. After you have saved
your file in Precede:

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Click NEXT Then Finish Then the SAVE icon All files
should be saved in the format jcninp.filename

3.6.3 Running the Analysis


Set up your analysis like you had in the past by selecting your
precede file, selecting postview database, however, under the
Joint Check tab:

Then select your joint Can input file you created:

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Click OK Then RUN

3.6.4 Reviewing your Results


You can review your unity checks in Postview exactly as you have
been before:

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Select your joint, then click APPLY

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3.7

GAP
Gap is used when you are classifying certain members as tension
only or compression only Members in an analysis. Below is a
Tension only member.

A compression only member would be a manifold foot or leg


extension used for support

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3.7.1 Classifying Compression or Tension


Members
Select the following to change a member from Tension or
Compression:

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Then click APPLY

3.7.2 Selecting Gap Options


After you save your model you can tell SACS to run the GAP
program by selecting the following:

3.7.3 Reviewing the results


You can review the results of your input file the same as you
would any other postvue file. Gap will determine if the member is
in compression or tension and therefore allow the member to take
load or not based upon the attributes you assigned to the member.

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