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River Cities' Reader - Issue 806 - June 7, 2012

River Cities' Reader - Issue 806 - June 7, 2012

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 806 • June 7 - 20, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 806 • June 7 - 20, 2012 

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WORDS FROM THE EDITOR

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Our Turn to Soldier Up: Protect U.S. Troops

by Kathleen McCarthy km@rcreader.com

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am so done treading lightly for the sake of readers’ sensibilities. America is in dire need of honest, problem-solving patriots who can muster enough gumption to get civically involved and provoke action, especially on behalf of our troops. If you truly consider yourself a supporter of our soldiers, then turn off American Idol or whatever idiotic programming you normally watch, and instead watch the following four documentaries: The Ground Truth, Iraq for Sale: The War Profiteers, Rethink Afghanistan, and Severe Clear. If you cannot trouble yourself to do at least this much, then shame on you. You don’t deserve to be an American. There is so much need-to-know information that is deliberately withheld from us by the mainstream media cartel and our derelict cadre of politicians; the least you can do is dismiss their drivel and consume something relevant, important, and helpful to the troops many of you so ardently claim to support. Each of these documentaries addresses different aspects of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, mostly from the troops’ perspectives. These films provide essential information for every American to truly understand what we are demanding of our young men and women

– our “treasure” – and how our leadership is failing them en masse. Prepare yourself, because many of the policies and processes supporting the occupations of these countries are shattering. So it’s your turn to soldier up; you need this information going forward, especially with the looming election in November. If you decline to watch any of these films, then you are just as big a part of the problem – as big a coward and hypocrite as any war-mongering politician or Pentagon bureaucrat, and the worst kind of betrayer of the troops for ignoring their profound issues. War-contracting is a core contributor to the disgraceful conditions our troops endure in Iraq and Afghanistan. War contractors are permitted to operate under an entirely different set of rules from our soldiers. During the Bush administration, the number of mercenaries/hired guns reached 100,000. One of Barack Obama’s primary campaign promises was to end both the Iraq and Afghanistan wars in the first year. Instead, Obama has advanced the number of war contractors to 200,000 – double the number under Bush, and as the draw-down of

Continued On Page 19 letters@rcreader.com

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ongress passed and in December the president signed the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), which authorizes indefinite detention of U.S. citizens without due process. Upon quick inspection, it violates the First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Eighth amendments to the U.S. Constitution. The Founders must be screaming from their graves. Iowa Senator Charles Grassley voted for it. Federal court Judge Katherine Forrest issued a preliminary injunction that bars the government from enforcing section 1021 of the NDAA’s “Homeland Battlefield” provisions that permits indefinite military detention of U.S. citizens. At his Eldridge town-hall meeting, I asked the senator if he was aware that a federal judge overturned a portion of legislation he just voted for. He was not.

I asked a staffer at the senator’s Washington office why the senator wasn’t aware that a portion of the unconstitutional legislation he voted for was overturned by a federal judge. The staffer asked, “Is there anything else I can pass on?” That was his answer. We have a totally dysfunctional Congress. But more importantly, most Republicans and Democrats are dysfunctional; they don’t call out their representatives as along as they have that all-important “R” or “D” behind their names. The problem isn’t in Washington; it’s in Davenport, Dubuque, and Peoria. People need to hold their representatives in Washington, their states, their counties, and their cities accountable for their actions. Mike Angelos Davenport 

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 806 • June 7 - 20, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

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Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 806 • June 7 - 20, 2012 

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Pension Issue Falls to Leaders Instead of Rank-and-File Legislators
those against the bill. Some were told by the governor’s people that Mayor Rahm Emanuel supported the revised legislation, but the mayor’s Springfield crew was never given the word to work in favor of the proposal. Emanuel has pushed hard for the cost-shift plan, believing that the current system is unfair to Chicago schools – which pay their full share of employer pension costs. With the speaker voting “no” and Emanuel not working for the bill, it eventually became clear to the governor’s office that there was simply no way to pass the legislation. Cross told the House that this would be a “summer issue” and said that emotions needed a chance to cool down. The Republicans (and Downstate and suburban Democrats) are so completely against any talk of a cost shift – even one that phases it in over many years – that the issue appears almost impossible to resolve. But Madigan and Emanuel know that there’s probably no better vehicle to attach the idea to than the politically important issue of pension reform, so they’re not giving up, either. The solution might wind up being about more money for Chicago, perhaps done in a way that gives additional cash to education in general. Then again, there’s been little willingness on Speaker Madigan’s part this year to move forward with a bill that riles up teachers before an all-important election following redistricting. State and university workers and retirees are mostly concentrated in little pockets around the state, so their legislative political impact is limited. But public-school teachers and retirees are literally everywhere. And there are a lot of them. And they are very politically active. Whatever the case, bringing the entire General Assembly back to town is probably a really bad idea. The Senate showed that it can pass a pension-reform bill when it approved a plan last week to change the State Employees Retirement System on what appeared to be a carefully structured roll call. If the leaders can be put on the same page, then the members will undoubtedly follow. Rich Miller also publishes Capitol Fax (a daily political newsletter) and CapitolFax.com.

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t least for now, it doesn’t appear that rank-and-file legislators will have to spend much time in Springfield this summer, even though they failed to finish their work on public-pension reform last week. Aides to Governor Pat Quinn claim that they’ve learned from the mistakes of their predecessor, Rod Blagojevich, and won’t drag legislators back to the Statehouse for a grueling overtime session to find a solution to the pension problem, which has already overwhelmed the state budget. Blagojevich convened numerous overtime sessions, and they were all divisive political circuses. Plus, forcing legislators back to Springfield to just sit around and wait for the leaders to come to an agreement means they’ll have plenty of time on their hands to bad-mouth the governor to reporters, who won’t have much to do, either. Quinn himself signaled his understanding of this dynamic in an official statement issued after it was apparent that pension reform was dead in the water: “I will convene a meeting with President Cullerton, Leader Radogno, Speaker Madigan, and Leader Cross in the coming week so we can forge a pension-reform agreement as soon as possible and return to Springfield to enact it into law.” There’s really no need to convene the full General Assembly anyway, because the real problem here is a fundamental disagreement among the legislative leaders. House Speaker Michael Madigan is still insisting on shifting employer pension costs away from the state and onto Downstate and suburban school districts. The House and Senate Republican legislative leaders are adamantly opposed to the cost-shift idea, which would punish wealthier school districts that tend to have higher teacher and administrator salaries. Madigan handed off control of the pensionreform package to House Republican Leader Tom Cross earlier in the week and allowed the bill to be amended to strip out the cost-shifting language at the behest of the governor. The next day, which was the very last day of the spring legislative session, Madigan let it be known that he would be voting against the bill. That was all it took for his members to jump off the pension bill as well. Chicago House members were among

The Republicans (and Downstate and suburban Democrats) are so completely against any talk of a cost shift for teacher pensions that the issue appears almost impossible to resolve. 

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 806 • June 7 - 20, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Out of Time, Out of Place
David Plowden’s Iowa, through August 26 at the Figge Art Museum

COVER STORY

I

owa is hardly renowned for dramatic landscape or architecture. One can drive for miles with no sign of life other than a road and a tilled field. Bean Field & House, Grundy County, Iowa 2003 by photographer David Plowden dramatically depicts such a bare scene. Roughly 80 percent of the composition is sky, with sparse, fluffy clouds. At the bottom is a strip of dark land, with rows of crops running to the horizon. On the left side is a boxy house, which becomes an interesting subject when framed by the immense sky. The lines of beans bring the viewers’ eyes upward, emphasizing the void. The tininess of the house in the picture makes the viewer feel diminutive. Plowden’s composition illustrates that the beauty of Midwestern scenery often lies in its grand simplicity, and how that alters the sense of scale. The stark flatness of the land, only occasionally punctuated by trees or farm buildings, shifts our field of vision; the sky begins to seems bigger, and everything on the ground becomes smaller. David Plowden’s Iowa (at the Figge Art Museum through August 26) masterfully captures the scale-warping effects of the landscape, and the photographer ’s 47 images of rural and small-town Iowa ably document the Midwestern agricultural aesthetic. But he also manipulates and confuses viewers ’ perceptions – of size, distance, plainness, and even time – through artistic tools such as juxtaposition, viewing angle, and lack of context. Poweshiek County, Iowa 1986 demonstrates how the absence of contextual clues, such as houses or trees, can create a subtly unsettling disruption. Unlike Bean Field & House, this photograph is mostly gently rolling hills with a thin strip of cloudless sky at the top. The precise rows of crops accentuate the topography and create a sense of motion. Plowden sets up a Z-shaped composition to keep our eyes moving along the hills: We enter at the top left to follow along the horizon, then swoop down the hill to the left, then reverse to follow the crop rows out the bottom right corner. Architecture is also used to explore physical scale, and to highlight the significance of agriculture in Iowa. In Grain Elevators, Manson, Iowa 2004, the extreme one-point perspective of receding railroad tracks, framed by towering grain elevators, gives a sense of purpose, as we visually head toward the horizon. The

Coneys N’More Cafe, Fort Dodge, Iowa 2004
elevators lack the architectural frills of skyscrapers, and thus seem ultra-modern in their simplicity and functionality. Gravel takes the place of grass along the tracks, and there are only sparse trees in the background. Without humans or prominent plants, the scene seems lifeless, but the composition suggests objectivebased potential. Templeton, Iowa 2008 demonstrates how agricultural manufacturing can dominate a landscape. Quaint downtown buildings are dwarfed by nearby grain silos, and Plowden chose a low camera angle, so the collection of buildings creates a horizontal swath through the center of the photograph. The perceived vanishing point, to which the buildings’ facades aim, is a pair of shiny silver silos, creating a focal point; the commercial downtown thus seems insignificant, visually and conceptually. The old-fashioned appearance of the buildings, with only the new silos and two streetlights to give a sense of modernity, shows how context impacts our reading of time as well as space. Keota, Iowa 2004 offers the more modern face of agribusiness in an image of a processing facility. The recognizable form of the grain silo and the barn-like facades of the buildings in the background are contrasted with criss-crossing wires and a long line of parked pickup trucks. Plowden makes wise use of repetition, with the wires and trucks balanced by the large, flat areas of the pavement, the blank building sides, and the sky. Keota matches the nofrills agricultural aesthetic with complex mechanization. Plowden’s subjects include the architecture of semi-urban Iowa, as well. Factory Building, Muscatine, Iowa 2003 shows how structures conform to the landscape near the Mississippi, with the

Continued On Page 20

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 806 • June 7 - 20, 2012 

by Michelle Garrison michelle_m_garrison@hotmail.com

ABOVE: Poweshiek County, Iowa 1986 FAR LEFT: Factory Building, Muscatine, Iowa 2003 LEFT: Grain Elevators, Manson, Iowa 2004 

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 806 • June 7 - 20, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Vol. 19 · No. 0

“The Guitar Plays Me”
Richard Lloyd, June 14 at the Redstone Room

MUSIC

by Jeff Ignatius jeff@rcreader.com

June  - 0 , 01
River Cities’ Reader
532 W. 3rd St. Davenport IA 52801 RiverCitiesReader.com (563)324-0049 (phone) (563)323-3101 (fax) info@rcreader.com

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hat’s essential to know about the Redstone Room’s June 14 headliner can be summed up succinctly: Richard Lloyd was one of the guitarists of Television, the seminal band whose 1977 Marquee Moon is widely considered a great debut, an unmistakable influence on postpunk and alternative rock, and a classic, period. The All Music Guide calls it “a revolutionary album, but it’s a subtle, understated revolution. Without question, it is a guitar-rock album – it’s astonishing to hear the interplay between [singer/songwriter/ guitarist] Tom Verlaine and Richard Lloyd – but it is a guitar-rock album unlike any other,” composed entirely of “tense garage rockers that spiral into heady intellectual territory, which is achieved through the group’s long, interweaving instrumental sections ... .” But to reduce Lloyd to a member of Television – whose initial incarnation disbanded in 1978 after two sterling studio albums – is to diminish a more-thanrespectable career as a performer and songwriter outside of that band, and to rob the world of a fascinating person. Lloyd has released four proper solo albums of his own material, a set of finished but previously unreleased recordings (2010’s Lodestones), and a curious 2009 collection of faithful Jimi Hendrix covers that largely forgoes effects, studio tricks, and obvious selections. (It’s called The Jamie Neverts Story, and it’s kind of a long story. Suffice it to say that Lloyd might be called a secondhand student of the Voodoo Chile.) He also worked with Matthew Sweet (on the albums Girlfriend, Altered Beast, and 100% Fun) and John Doe (of X). With career highlights out of the way, it must be said that Lloyd considers himself as much a conduit as a creator. In a phone interview last week, he employed a wide variety of metaphysical metaphors

in a harmless way. He compared himself to the Norse berserkers of many centuries ago – “a group of northern-European people who go into a frenzy in war, so trance-like that they would often return to their own village and slaughter their own next of kin – without even knowing it. ... Rather than going berserk, I have discovered this outlet for that nature. The flaw of Photo by Brian Jenkins it is turned into a positive strength so that I can act – scientific, spiritual, historical – to describe beyond the grounds of reasonability that his creative process. usually people are hemmed in by. And that’s “I still play the guitar in a manner that what a performer is supposed to be on stage, leaves me agog,” he said. “My jaw drops do on stage. It’s ... shamanic ... . Finding when I come off the stage, and I say, ‘Why another dimension. Breaking the law.” did the guitar allow me to do that? What Lloyd has long had an interest in artists the hell happened?’ And when people ask who can perform that kind of magic with me, I say, ‘I don’t even play the guitar; the guitar plays me, while I fool around with the audiences, most notably the way the Beatles “create[d] a tsunami of energy around the electricity.’” globe that was the equivalent you could only He said he’s felt that way “all my life. find in war, only it was the opposite.” Because in the beginning, all I could do was That mesmerizing quality is certainly turn an amp up to 10 and approach it with evident in Television’s compositions and twin the tremolo and whammy bar. I couldn’t guitars, and more subtly in Lloyd’s sturdy even make chords except by moving my left solo work; his playing is somehow meaty and fingers with my right hand.” For more than three years, he said, he had grounded yet sublime and otherworldly, and it’s easy to get lost in the songs. studied drums – an instrument he found But Lloyd doesn’t claim responsibility for literally colorful because of a condition how audiences react. “It’s not an effect I have called synesthesia, a blending of senses on them,” he said. “It’s communal.” Instead that in Lloyd’s case gives sound a visual component. But, he said, “the color went out. of being like direct current from performer to audience, he said, it’s more like alternating Drained out, like somebody had pulled the current – an exchange. stopper out of the bottom of the tub while I This plays into an idea that Lloyd has was playing one day by myself. And I heard called the “grace” of songwriting. “Or the use an auditory voice that was not mine that I’ve of your radio,” he said in our interview. He heard occasionally, and it’s never told me anything incorrect. It said: ‘You need to play recalled playing with Ronnie Lane of Faces at South by Southwest. He said he had a tearful a melody instrument.’” And he chose the guitar: “For my money,” epiphany during “Ooh La La”: “No human being could have written that. That song he said, “the guitars were the magic wands, came from above. ... like Mickey Mouse in Fantasia uses the “People can ... learn the craft,” he broom. ... explained. But “the creative power, we have “We have a relationship, the guitar and I,” to become passive to it; it’s active.” he said, adding that the instrument allows him to channel violent negative energy

Publishing since 1993
The River Cities’ Reader is an independent newspaper published every other Thursday, and available free throughout the Quad Cities and surrounding areas. © 2012 River Cities’ Reader AD DEADLINE: 5 p.m. Wednesday prior to publication

PUBLISHER Todd McGreevy EDITOR Kathleen McCarthy
Managing Editor: Jeff Ignatius • jeff@rcreader.com Arts Editor, Calendar Editor: Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com Contributing Writers: Amy Alkon, Rob Brezsny, Lynn Campbell, Michelle Garrison, Rich Miller, Frederick Morden, Bruce Walters, Thom White, Grant Williams Account Executive: Jason Farrell • jason@rcreader.com Advertising Coordinator: Nathan Klaus Advertising rates, publishing schedule, demographics, and more are available at

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ADMINISTRATION

Continued On Page 17

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 806 • June 7 - 20, 2012

9

THEATRE

By Thom White

Pink and Green Mother from Outer Space
Little Shop of Horrors, at the Clinton Area Showboat Theatre through June 10

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he Clinton Area Showboat Theatre’s Little Shop of Horrors kicks off with the promise of a lot of fun. The opening, titular doo-wop number is full of spirit (aided by choreographer Brian Cowing’s homage to ’50s-era backup singers) and is well sung by the trio of street urchins – played by Monique Abry, Heather Botts, and Nyla Watson – who showcase impressive solo belt voices and tight harmonies. With my head bopping and my lips longing to sing along, I believed I was in for a raucous good time during Friday’s performance. However, the Showboat’s production wilts as the carnivorous plant at the center of the action grows. While some of the blame lies with composer Alan Menken and playwright/lyricist Howard Ashman for shaping their comedy/horror rock musical with the highest energy at the beginning yet dwindling humor and amusement as it progresses, my main issues with director Jalayne Riewerts’ production are the flat characterizations and limiting puppetry mechanics. As Seymour, the adult orphan and plantshop assistant who discovers a unique, blood-sucking, people-eating plant, Darian Lunsford is the quintessential nerd, from his habit of constantly pushing his glasses up his nose to his annoying laugh. Yet while Lunsford embodies Seymour’s dorkiness, he misses his heart, and is too one-note. That one note is impressive, but it lacks substance – without character shading and depth, it’s difficult to connect with Seymour and root for him to succeed – and when Lunsford’s character starts feeding people to the plant, the disconnect with Seymour widens, because as an accessory to murder, he’s easy not to like. And then there’s the plant, Audrey II. The pod’s first incarnation – as a smallish bud in a normal-sized houseplant pot – is eye-catching for its mix of shimmering, metallic green with pink trim. But while this look (which is either an inspiration of costume designer Dusty Shaffer or Riewerts or both, as the program doesn’t specify) works for the smaller versions of the plant, as Audrey II increases in size, the colors and metallic sheen of the plant’s “flesh” become too glamorous, taking a lot of edge off what’s supposed to be a threatening creature. While I quite like that Audrey II is female in the Showboat’s production – voiced with moxie and sung with amusing attitude by Nyla Watson – the pink-yarn pigtails that further display the plant’s gender are tacky and cheaplooking, and the large, pink lips in the final version are too luscious, rendering Audrey II more showgirl than murderous menace to the

human race. I will say that I was impressed by the design – I liked Audrey II’s color scheme, feminine characteristics, and wart-like bumps on the pod’s fourth incarnation – but still didn’t find the look appropriate for the character. On top of the design issues, whether due to mechanical limitations or lack of proper training, puppeteer Cole Mitchell Rauch didn’t move the final version of Audrey II’s mouth in sync with Watson’s deliveries during Friday’s performance. Standing inside Audrey II, Rauch pretty much just opens and shuts the plant’s mouth while speaking or singing, with seemingly no attempt to match the movements with the words. The effect is so distracting that it breaks the illusion of the plant being sentient, which kind of ruins the show, or at least derails it. All is not lost, though. The street urchins continue to be the most amusing part of Riewerts’ presentation, though none of their subsequent songs are as much fun as their opening number. Randi Garza ignores previous incarnations of Audrey – Seymour’s co-worker and love interest – by trading the squeakyvoiced-airhead routine for a more realistic woman with a consistent Brooklyn accent, and her song “Somewhere That’s Green” is the most emotionally stirring of the evening’s offerings. Garza starts the piece with a dreamy, happy tone, and eventually shifts to a sort of embarrassment over this silly dream, ending with a sad longing for something she seems to know she’ll never have. Anthony Sagaria’s dentist is the expectedly welcome jerk of a sadist, displaying a blend of creepiness and sexiness; Shaffer dresses him in a dental-uniform shirt with the short sleeves cinched at the top, showing off his biceps, which are also highlighted in Cowing’s choreography for Sagaria’s song “Dentist!” And as plant-shop owner Mr. Mushnik, Rob Engelson is in his prime during his number “Mushnik & Son.” As he sings of adopting Seymour, Engelson clearly portrays the entirety of his character’s limitations – his greed, insincerity, and self-interest. Still, the individual performances don’t add much dimension to the Showboat’s Little Shop of Horrors, which Menken’s and Ashman’s musical requires to be of interest beyond being a collection of pleasant songs and passing entertainment. Little Shop of Horrors runs at the Clinton Area Showboat Theatre (303 Riverview Road, Clinton) through June 10, and tickets and information are available by calling (563)2426760 or visiting ClintonShowboat.org.

10

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 806 • June 7 - 20, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 806 • June 7 - 20, 2012

11

Happily Grimm
SNOW WHITE & THE HUNTSMAN
The first words heard in Snow White & the Huntsman are “Once upon a time ... ,” and for the next 125 minutes, the movie unfurls like a malicious, exhilarating fairytale for adults – or a bedtime story for really, really naughty kids. In an age when most screen adaptations of familiar childhood stories quickly descend into camp – either intentionally (Mirror Mirror) or unintentionally (Red Riding Hood) – the intelligence and violence and emotional hunger of debuting director Rupert Sanders’ Snow White saga feel utterly welcome, and even somewhat revolutionary. By the film’s finale (and I presume this isn’t a spoiler), good has triumphed and evil has been vanquished, but the weight of the characters’ horrific experiences hasn’t been forgotten; it’s clear from their serene yet exhausted expressions that while Snow White and her kingdom’s subjects get their Happily Ever After, they’ll more likely be living Happily, Hesitantly, Ever After. In truth, I’m a little embarrassed to admit how enraptured I was by Sanders’ telling of his tale, because it’s pretty easy to imagine the Hollywood pitch meeting for Snow White & the Huntsman: “It’s like Braveheart meets Twilight ... but with dwarfs!” Snow White, you see, isn’t just an innocent at the mercy of the woods, a poisoned apple, and a wicked stepmother; she’s

Movie Reviews

by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com

hypnotically perverse that you may be shocked at how much legitimate empathy she engenders. Theron has always been a fearless performer – it would be Charlize Theron in Snow White & the Huntsman hard to name also a fierce combatant who rallies her another stunningly troops, at the climax, with a rousing beautiful movie star so seemingly speech that’s only missing the blue face disinterested in being likable on-screen paint and roar of “Freedom!!!” And while – and she’s delectably vicious here, this Fairest of Them All – played by Bella whether murdering her husband on Swan Cullen herself, Kristen Stewart their wedding night, or screeching at her – is dutifully given a Prince Charming creepily solicitous brother (Sam Spruell), in Sam Claflin’s William, there’s also a or lazily plucking out, and consuming, romantic near-rival in Chris Hemsworth’s the heart of a dead bird. Her frequently Huntsman, the smoldering, hardred-rimmed eyes, though, suggest the drinking, bad-boy alternative to Snow crazed need and panicky fear behind White’s courtly suitor. Ravenna’s malevolence. As a quick, Beginning, however, with the prelude’s dramatically essential flashback reveals, haunting imagery and stark, somber this queen is monstrous for a reason, and color palette – an evocative blend of without jettisoning any of the storybook reds, metals, whites, and blacks – it’s enjoyment inherent in the role, Theron apparent that Sanders and company mean manages to suggest the soul-crushing business with this thing. Adapted by Even weight of Ravenna’s plight. Stewart does a Daugherty, John Lee Hancock, and Drive fine job conveying Snow White’s delicacy screenwriter Hossein Amini, the Grimm and yearning and growing strength, and fairytale is presented with much the Hemsworth is sensationally appealing and narrative arc you expect. But its details provides a few necessary laughs, but this is (including its rather extraordinary visual Theron’s movie all the way. and makeup effects) are serious-minded At least, it is whenever the dwarfs and bold and ceaselessly thrilling, and in aren’t around. For among the film’s many Charlize Theron’s Queen Ravenna, the examples of ingenious technical bravado movie features a potentially unforgettable (and the enchanted-garden trek and nemesis, a figure so frighteningly, Ravenna’s transformation into a swirling

flock of crows both rank way, way up there), none delighted me more than the means by which those recognizable British character actors Bob Hoskins, Ian McShane, Ray Winstone, Nick Frost, Eddie Marsan, and Toby Jones became Snow White’s diminutive traveling companions. In his review of Sanders’ film, Roger Ebert expressed disappointment that these roles weren’t assumed by actual dwarf performers, and it’s a tough sentiment to argue with. Yet the audaciousness of the stunt – with the CGI enhancing the alreadyclever compositions that allow the little men’s portrayers to appear half their usual sizes – seems to me perfectly fitting with the magical realism of the entire movie. And besides, when the actors in question are as unabashedly marvelous as the seven (and, for a time, eight) dwarfs are here – gruff and weary and defiantly not adorable – what’s the point in complaining? Dark and menacing and terrifically exciting, Snow White & the Huntsman is a pretty spectacular achievement, a reminder that, oftentimes, dreams only come true after you’ve endured a lot of nightmares. For reviews of Men in Black 3, The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, For Greater Glory, Chernobyl Diaries, Tornado Alley 3D, and other current releases, visit RiverCitiesReader.com Follow Mike on Twitter at Twitter.com/ MikeSchulzNow.

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 806 • June 7 - 20, 2012 By Thom White

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Tuna Helpers

THEATRE

Greater Tuna, at the Richmond Hill Barn Theatre through June 10

B

ased on the reputation of the Tuna plays but also for her attitude. VanDeWoestyne easily and remembering how heartily I laughed handles Bertha’s sweeter nature, her only partially during a recent committed verbal production of A Tuna discipline of her Christmas, I expected children, and her the original piece in full-on anger, yelling the series, Greater at the family’s dogs Tuna, to be, well, every time they funnier. That’s not to sneak into the say that the Richmond house. Hill Barn Theatre’s All throughout production of this Greater Tuna, comedy isn’t without Carmen and laughs – they’re just VanDeWoestyne not side-splitting ones. differentiate their Still, thanks to the two various roles actors who impresremarkably well. Bruce Carmen and John VanDeWoestyne sively handle 20 roles While Carmen’s between them, director James Fairchild’s staging younger characters are a bit similar in the of authors’ Jaston Williams’, Joe Sears’, and Ed whininess of their voices, each of the actors’ Tuna Howard’s play is adequately diverting, and good townsfolk are easily, individually recognizable for an evening’s entertainment. for the way Carmen and VanDeWoestyne Basically a day in the life of the citizens of Tuna, change their vocal inflections, timbres, and Texas, the script requires two performers (Bruce mannerisms. Carmen’s Stanley − Charlene’s twin Carmen and John VanDeWoestyne, here) to brother − has a lisp similar to his sister’s, but the portray 10 characters apiece. There’s not much of actor differentiates him with an independent, a central plot, as the piece is a blend of vignettes, defiant attitude and a strut to match. And of sorts, connected by a location, with the same VanDeWoestyne’s Sheriff Givens has the swagger characters interacting throughout the play. The of a man who carries the power of his position in scenes are loosely built around the death of a his walk, towering over others with a “don’t mess judge in town – found in his bed wearing a 1950 with me” attitude while wearing a police uniform, turquoise, one-piece, Dale Evans swimsuit – and a straw cowboy hat, aviator sunglasses, and a gun provide some effective chuckles. But there are belt that’s off-kilter and hanging lower than his also some surprisingly tender moments along pants belt. the way, as the play’s humor relies less on pratfalls On Thursday, the actors also showcased and punchlines than on observations about the impressive talents for comic timing after a stereotypical “small minds” of small-town folk mistake. At one point, Carmen’s Vera Carp – the (which is likely the reason it elicits more amused town snob and vice president of the “Smutchuckles than laugh-out-loud gaffaws). Snatchers of the New Order” – fell asleep during The show starts and ends with a local radio VanDeWoestyne’s Reverend Spikes’ speech to the program on OKKK, featuring two hosts and a club. When VanDeWoestyne delivered a highseries of guests from the town, including the local volume line in Carmen’s direction, however,Vera gun-shop owner (VanDeWoestyne); humanejumped from her sleeping state, and whipped society employee Petey Fisk, who has a lisp and her head back so hard that Carmen’s wig and a sunny, though vague, disposition (Carmen); hat flew off his head. Carmen, obviously stifling and a disgruntled, chain-smoking woman laughter, stayed in character, but broke the named Didi Snavely (also Carmen). It should go fourth wall, scanning the audience with a look of without saying, then, that one of the highlights shocked embarrassment – combined with a tinge of Greater Tuna’s staging is seeing the two male of self-awareness at how hysterical the situation actors portray female townsfolk, and here, neither was. And moments later, Spikes delivered a line Carmen nor VanDeWoestyne disappoints. directly to Vera, with VanDeWoestyne ad lib-ing Carmen’s teenage wannabe-cheerleader “... and keep your hat on,” eliciting the night’s Charlene is a hoot; with her somewhat dimwitted biggest laughs. This funniest moment of the play, air and pouty, complaining attitude, Carmen however, was still an unintended one, handled overplays her personality traits to fine comedic with hilarious aplomb by actors who could effect. (It helps, too, that costume designers obviously manage far more hysterical material VanDeWoestyne and Jean Melillo have Charlene than Greater Tuna, but who at least nicely sporting denim pedal-pushers, a pink shirt, maneuvered their way through the amusing, and pigtails tied up with ringlets of metallic oftentimes touching material they’re given. pink ribbons matching the embellishments on her pink Converse high tops.) Meanwhile, Greater Tuna runs at the Richmond Hill Barn VanDeWoestyne’s Bertha – Charlene’s mother Theatre (600 Robinson Drive, Geneseo) through – reminded me of Mrs. Garrett from the sitcom June 10, and tickets and information are available The Facts of Life, mostly for her (wig’s) hairstyle, by calling (309)944-2244 or visiting RHPlayers.com.

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 806 • June 7 - 20, 2012

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What’s Happenin’
Music
O
The Split Livers
Rock Island Brewing Company Wednesday, June 13, 8 p.m.
n June 13, the Rock Island Brewing Company presents a concert with the recently formed collaborative duo the Split Livers, which I like to think of as the Reese’s Peanut Butter Cup of the acoustic-punk bluegrass scene. My reasons for this are twofold. (1) Like peanut butter and chocolate, the Split Livers blends two separate ingredients – Wayne Gottstine of Split Lip Rayfield and Danny Barnes of Bad Livers – to form one signature taste. (2) Have you ever had a Reese’s Peanut Butter Cup? Those things are freakin’ awesome. As fans will surely tell you, so are the Split Livers’ musicians. As the longtime mandolin player for the Kansas-based alt-county ensemble Split Lip Rayfield, Gottstine and his bandmates released their self-titled debut album in 1998, have since recorded six additional CDs – most recently 2008’s I’ll Be Around – and have earned scores of fans for their unique takes on traditional bluegrass sounds through rock, punk, and heavy-metal influences. The Texas-based guitarist and banjo player Barnes, meanwhile, formed Bad Livers in 1990, and the band’s alt-countryrock stylings were first heard in CD form in 1994’s Delusions of Banjer. Three additional Bad Livers albums followed, with Barnes eventually embarking on a successful solo career that has captured the attention of music fans, and musicians, nationwide; regarding his 2009 release Pizza Box, Dave Matthews is quoted as saying, “The music is smart and soulful, and the lyrics are profound. It is heaven and earth.” Put Gottstine and Barnes together and you have the Split Livers, a collaborative project between two of bluegrass’ most influential and experimental artists. Performing classic songs from their bands’ repertoires and brand-new compositions, the musicians’ RIBCO set is sure to be a blast – though if you see me there on June 13, don’t expect me to stay terribly late. I’m turning 44 that day, and after a few hours, my liver will no doubt be telling me to split. The Split Livers perform locally with an opening set by Chicago Farmer, and more information on the night is available by calling (309)7934060 or visiting RIBCO.com.

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 806 • June 7 - 20, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Theatre

Meet Me in St. Louis

Prospect Park Auditorium Friday, June 8, through Sunday, June 17

Legally Blonde: The Musical

Circa ’21 Dinner Playhouse Wednesday, June 13, through Saturday, July 28

T

he Quad City Music Guild will open its summer season with the Prospect Park Auditorium staging of the Broadway hit Meet Me in St. Louis, running June 8 through 17. The Circa ’21 Dinner Playhouse will open its summer season with the dinner theatre’s staging of the Broadway hit Legally Blonde: The Musical, running June 13 through July 28. And I know what you’re thinking as you read those sentences: “How will I ever tell the two apart?!” Sure, Meet Me in St. Louis focuses on a loving family on the eve of the 1904 World’s Fair (see photo), and Legally Blonde: The Musical focuses on an aspiring lawyer with an adorable pet chihuahua (see other photo). But your confusion regarding Music Guild’s and Circa 21’s latest presentations is certainly understandable: • Both are stage musicals based on hugely popular movies, with Meet Me in St. Louis a 1944 smash for star Judy Garland, and Legally Blonde a 2001 smash for star Reese Witherspoon.

1) “So Much Better” 2) “A Day in New York” 3) “Bend & Snap” 4) “Ireland” 5) “Touch of the Irish” 6) “Trolley Song” 7) “The Boy Next Door” 8) “Find My Way” 9) “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas” 10) “Omigod You Guys” A) Legally Blonde: The Musical B) Meet Me in St. Louis • Both enjoyed long runs on Broadway, with 1989’s Meet Me in St. Louis nominated for four Tony Awards (including Best Musical, Original Score, and Choreography), and Legally Blonde nominated for seven (including Best Leading Actress in a Musical, Best Book, and Best Costume Design). • Both local productions are by directors with numerous area credits, as Meet Me in Louis’ Tom Swegle helmed Music Guild’s George M! and the Playcrafters Barn Theatre’s Our Town and See How They

of co surpr five o Meet heard more in St. QCM Fo Legal 7733

, 6 – B, 7 – B, 8 – A, 9 – B, 10 – A. But oh, what I would’ve given to hear Judy Garland crooning

309-762-6610 www.qcmusicguild.com
Proudly Presents…

June 8·9·10 & 14·15·16·17
Prospect Park Auditorium, Moline Curtain Times: 7:30pm Thurs., Fri., Sat. & 2pm Sun.

For tickets call 309-762-6610 ∙ Tickets: $15 / Children $10

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 806 • June 7 - 20, 2012

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by Mike Schulz mike@rcreader.com

Run, and Legally Blonde’s Jim Hesselman helmed Circa ’21’s Hairspray, Peter Pan, and Smoke on the Mountain. • Both shows feature a number of talented newcomers to their respective stages appearing alongside a bunch of gifted veterans, with Meet Me in St. Louis showcasing performers Mark Holmes, Tom Morrow, Gregg O’Neill, John Donald O’Shea, and Lauren VanSpeybroeck, and Legally Blonde boasting performers Andrea Moore, John Payonk, Eddie Staver III, Tristan Tapscott, and Tom Walljasper. Throw in both two-act musicals boasting large-scale dance numbers, humor, sentiment, and female protagonists looking for love, and how is a reasonable person expected to tell one from the other? Why, through a quiz, ourse! Some are gimmes and some are risingly tough, but try deciding which of the 10 songs to the left are heard in t Me in St. Louis, and which five are d in Legally Blonde: The Musical. For e information and tickets to Meet Me . Louis, call (309)762-6610 or visit MusicGuild.com. or more information and tickets to lly Blonde: The Musical, call (309)7863 extension 2 or visit Circa21.com. Answers: 1 – A, 2 – B, 3 – A, 4 – A, 5 – “Omigod You Guys”!

Music
T

Sonny Landreth

The Redstone Room Saturday, June 16, 8 p.m.
he widely admired, Grammy-nominated blues guitarist Sonny Landreth will play a special concert at Davenport’s Redstone Room on June 16, performing in support of his first all-instrumental album, Elemental Journey. And it’s not difficult to find accolades for the 61-yearold and his considerable body of work, with AcousticMusic.com praising the musician’s “dervish finger-picking in combination with that unbeatable bottleneck slide,” and PopMatters.com raving, “Landreth makes his strings shimmer in a way that evokes laughter and crying at the same time.” But while critical plaudits for Landreth and his virtuosic slide-guitar style are all well and good, what’s even more impressive are the raves he’s amassed from those who understand, firsthand, what an extraordinary talent he is. Allow me, then, to share some quotes from those in the know. Veteran touring keyboardist Steve Conn called Landreth “a musical genius,” and says, “Sonny has perhaps been my biggest influence, musically and personally.” Drummer Michael Organ, who has performed with the likes of Jimmy Buffett and Bo Diddley, said, “The thing about Sonny is he’s a great artist, he’s a great musician, and he’s a great songwriter. And when he puts something down it’s going to have its own identity, its own pulse, its own

What Else Is Happenin’
MUSIC
Thursday, June 7 – Oh, Boy! The Music of Buddy Holly. Steve Lasiter performs a cabaret concert of Holly hits. Circa ’21 Speakeasy (1818 Third Avenue, Rock Island). 7 p.m. $10-12. For tickets and information, call (309)786-7733 extension 2 or visit Circa21.com. Friday, June 8 – The Coop. Electronica, dub, and rock musicians in concert with an opening set by Brothers Rage. The Redstone Room (129 Main Street, Davenport). 9 p.m. $7. For tickets and information, call (563)3261333 or visit RiverMusicExperience.org. Saturday, June 9 – Natural Oil, Dynoride, and As Big as a Mouse. Independent musicians in an all-ages concert. Rozz-Tox (2108 Third Avenue, Rock Island). 8 p.m. $5. For information, e-mail info@rozztox.com or visit RozzTox.com. Tuesday, June 12 – Lake Street Dive. Soul, R&B, and jazz in an Intimate at the Englert presentation. Englert Theatre (221 East Washington Street, Iowa City). 8 p.m. $15. For tickets and information, call (319)688-2653 or visit Englert.org. Thursday, June 14 – Richard Lloyd. Concert with the founding member of Television and his ensemble, featuring an opening set by Grand Stand. The Redstone Room (129 Main Street, Davenport). 7:30 p.m. $15. For tickets and information, call (563)326-1333 or visit RiverMusicExperience.org.

phrasing.” Six-time Granny Award winner Jerry Douglas raved of Landreth, “You can really make a guitar sound like a person, and he knows what that’s about.” Eric Clapton opined, “Sonny Landreth is probably the most underestimated musician on the planet, and also probably one of the most advanced.” And calling Landreth’s Levee Town album “a killer record by one of the most astonishing guitarists I know,” Bonnie Raitt said, “I’m a huge fan of Sonny’s singing and writing as well as his slide playing ... . Let’s hope this one finally gets him riding the acclaim he so deserves.” I can only presume Raitt was speaking about this What’s Happenin’ article.* I totally agree, Bonnie! Tickets to Sonny Landreth’s June 16 concert are $25 in advance and $30 on the day of the show, and can be reserved by calling (563)326-1333 or visiting RiverMusicExperience.org.

*Upon reflection, I suppose it’s possible that

Raitt was referring to the album, but why ruin a great closer?

Continued On Page 17

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 806 • June 7 - 20, 2012 Article and Photos by Bruce Walters

ART

Art in Plain Sight: Campbell’s Island State Memorial and Peace Garden

O

n Campbell’s Island is a war memorial side-by-side with an artwork dedicated to peace. One rises imposingly; the other is unassumingly low to the ground. Together, they give us a greater perspective on the area’s history than if we were to consider them separately. Campbell’s Island is just north of East Moline, accessible from Illinois Route 84. The island is named for U.S. Lieutenant John Campbell, who was leading three gunboats past it on July 19, 1814, when his boat was grounded during a storm. While vulnerable, they were attacked by an estimated 500 Sauk warriors allied with the British Army. The attack led by Black Hawk and the ensuing fight became known as the Battle of Rock Island Rapids – one of the most western battles of the War of 1812. In all, there were between 35 and 37 casualities (depending on the source) among Campbell’s men and their families – including the deaths of 14 men, a woman, and a child. In 1908, the Campbell’s Island State Memorial was dedicated on the site where the lieutenant’s CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Peace garden detail; peace garden; war memorial; and war-memorial boat lay derelict for bronze relief. years. The monument in the exact center of the relief. outline of a large turtle on the concrete is maintained by the Illinois Historic The middle section is flanked by surface. The turtle represents the Earth Preservation Agency as a state historic site. soldiers and warriors firing weapons. and ground to the Mesquakie tribe. The The granite memorial is primarily an Though the Sauk are much smaller and circle itself is a sacred symbol; among its obelisk, a four-sided shaft topped by a barely stand out from the surrounding many meanings, it represents the cycle of pyramid. Though not as monumental woods, the principal figures are placed life and the seasons. in scale as ancient Egyptian and Roman on both sides somewhat symmetrically. The Peace Garden was developed obelisks – another example of an The smoke rising from the burning sails under the guidance of artist and facilitator obelisk is the Washington Monument (Black Hawk later claimed to have shot Kunhild Blacklock with assistance from – its approximate height of 35 feet is the flaming arrows that set the fire) is Campbell’s Island residents, Mesquakie impressive and unexpected on a small, intersected by the diagonal edge of the spiritual leader Preston Duncan, and other residential island. boat and the falling flag. community leaders. It was dedicated in An eight-foot bronze relief is on the side Though the tight framing of the 1998, 90 years after the dedication of the of the memorial facing the Mississippi, soldiers and their raised muskets gives the state memorial. The Peace Garden was where the Rock Island Rapids were once composition a certain rigidness, the figures designed to honor the Native American located. It is attributed to Albert Louis Van are skillfully rendered – fluid and gestural, history of the Quad Cities – a marked den Berghen, a Chicago-area sculptor who with their facial expressions really bringing contrast to their depiction and role in the lived from 1850 to 1921 and is probably the event to life. The relief ’s surface is nearby war memorial. best known for a standing sculpture of active and is a welcome contrast to an Lincoln in Racine, Wisconsin, and the otherwise austere monument. Bruce Walters is a professor of art at Maryland Line Monument in Baltimore. Southwest of the memorial is the Peace Western Illinois University. The artwork depicts the rescue of Garden, a 30-foot circle with four benches men on Campbell’s boat while they are placed around a center fire grate. The This is part of an occasional series on the being fired on by muskets and arrows benches are decorated with mosaic-tile history of public art in the Quad Cities. If at close range. The middle third of the designs adapted from 19th Century Sauk there’s a piece of public art that you’d like to composition is dominated by three groups and Mesquakie beadwork and artifacts. learn more about, e-mail the location and a of figures. Lieutenant Campbell, shot Within the circle is an abstracted brief description to BD-Walters@wiu.edu. through his chest and wrist, lies wounded

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 806 • June 7 - 20, 2012 Continued From Page 15

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What Else Is Happenin’
Thursday, June 14 – Danielle Ate the Sandwich. Ukulele-playing singer/songwriter in an all-ages concert, with an opening set by Bethann Gavin. Rozz-Tox (2108 Third Avenue, Rock Island). 8 p.m. $10. For information, e-mail info@rozztox.com or visit RozzTox.com. For a 2011 interview with Danielle Anderson, visit RCReader.com/y/danielle. Friday, June 15 – JC Brooks & the Uptown Sound. Noted soul and post-punk musicians in concert. The Redstone Room (129 Main Street, Davenport). 10 p.m. $10. For tickets and information, call (563)326-1333 or visit RiverMusicExperience.org. Friday, June 15, and Saturday, June 16 – Hillcrest Music Fest. Featuring performances by Wild Oatz, Dirt Road Rockers, the Slough Buoys, Sinners & Saints, Wicked Liz & the Bellyswirls, Meet the Press, the Dani Lynn Howe Band, and a Saturday set with the Jimmie Van Zant Band. Hillcrest Event Center (16260 East 350th Street, Orion). Friday 5 p.m., Saturday noon. $40-50/both days; $100-200 VIP passes available. For tickets and information, call (309)755-6550 or visit Hillcrest-Resort.com. Saturday, June 16 – Martina McBride. Country-music superstar in concert. Riverside Casino & Golf Resort (3184 Highway 22, Riverside). 8 p.m. $35-65. For tickets and information, call (877)677-3456 or visit RiversideCasinoAndResort.com. Sunday, June 17 – Willie Pickens. Acclaimed jazz pianist performs and educates in Polyrhythms’ Third Sunday Jazz Workshop & Matinée Series, with special guests Ron Wilson and Manuel Lopez III. The Redstone Room (129 Main Street, Davenport). 3 p.m. all-ages jazz workshop – $5/adults, children free; 6 p.m. concert – $10-15. For tickets and information, call (309)373-0790 or visit Polyrhythms.org or RiverMusicExperience.org. Sunday, June 17 – Brontosaurus. Independent duo in an all-ages concert, with special guests Centaur Noir and Speaking of Secrets. Rozz-Tox (2108 Third Avenue, Rock Island). 8 p.m. $5. For information, e-mail info@ rozztox.com or visit RozzTox.com.

THEATRE

Thursday, June 7, through Sunday, June 17 – Guys & Dolls. Frank Loesser’s musicalcomedy classic. Timber Lake Playhouse (8215 Black Oak Road, Mt. Carroll). Tuesday-Saturday 7:30 p.m., Wednesday and Sunday 2 p.m., June 9 at 2 p.m. $15-23. For tickets and information, call (815)244-2035 or visit TimberLakePlayhouse.org. Thursday, June 14, through Sunday, June 24 – Into the Woods. Stephen Sondheim’s Tony Award-winning fairytale musical. Clinton Area Showboat Theatre (311 Riverview Drive, Clinton). Thursdays-Saturdays 7:30 p.m., Wednesday and Sundays 3 p.m. $16-23. For tickets and information, call (563)242-6760 or visit ClintonShowboat.org. Friday, June 15, through Sunday, June 24 – The Complete Works of William Shakespeare [abridged]. The Prenzie Players’ presentation of the comedy in which (most) all of the Bard’s works are performed in under two hours. directed by Catie Osborn. Fridays and Saturdays − St. Peter's Episcopal Church (2400 Middle Road, Bettendorf), 8p.m.; Sundays − The Establishment Theatre (220 19th Avenue, Rock Island), 2 and 7p.m. $10. For tickets and information, call (309)278-8426 or visit PrenziePlayers.com. Friday, June 15, through Sunday, July 8 – As You Like It. Shakespeare’s enchanted comic romance, performed in repertory with The Merchant of Venice. Riverside Theatre Festival Stage – Lower City Park (corner of Dubuque Street and Park Road, Iowa City). Scheduled performances Tuesdays-Sundays. $17-39. For tickets and information, call (319)338-7672 or visit RiversideTheatre.org. Friday, June 15, and Saturday, June 16 – Seussical Jr. The storybook musical comedy performed by students in the center’s summer camp for grades 3-12. The Center for Living Arts (2008 Fourth Avenue, Rock Island). Friday and Saturday 7 p.m., Saturday 2 p.m. $10 at

the door. For reservations and information, call (309)788-5433 or visit Center4Living.com. Saturday, June 16, and Sunday, June 17 – Don Juan in Hell. Genesius Guild’s presentation of George Bernard Shaw’s classic drama. Lincoln Park (11th Avenue and 38th Street, Rock Island). 8 p.m. Donations encouraged. For information, e-mail guild@genesius.org or visit Genesius.org. Saturday, June 16, through Saturday, June 30 – Jack & the Beanstalk. Bob Rafferty’s adaptation of the classic fairytale. Old Creamery Studio Theatre (3023 220th Trail, Amana). 1 p.m. Saturdays. $8. For tickets and information, call (319)622-6194 or visit OldCreamery.com.

DANCE

Friday, June 8, through Sunday, June 10 – Ballet Under the Stars. Annual outdoor production with the dancers of Ballet Quad Cities. Lincoln Park (11th Avenue and 38th Street, Rock Island). 8 p.m. Donations encouraged. For information, call (309)7863779 or visit BalletQuadCities.com.

EXHIBIT

Saturday, June 9, through Sunday, October 7 – Waxing Poetic: Exploring Expression in Art. Interactive exhibit pairs art from the Figge’s permanent collection with large-scale magnetic poetry, as visitors will be encouraged to tag works of art with descriptive words. Figge Art Museum (225 West Second Street, Davenport). Tuesdays-Saturdays 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Thursdays 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sundays noon-5 p.m. Free with $4-7 museum admission. For information, call (563)326-7804 or visit FiggeArt.org.

EVENTS

Friday, June 8, and Saturday, June 9 – Gumbo Ya Ya Festival. Annual outdoor celebration of Cajun culture featuring Cajun, zydeco, and New Orleans-style music and food, street performers, vendors, children’s activities, and more. The District of Rock Island. Friday 5 p.m.-2 a.m., Saturday 4 p.m.-2 a.m. $8/one

day, $12/two-day pass. For information, call (309)788-6311 or visit GumboYaYaFestival.com. For a full list of bands, see page 25. Saturday, June 9 – 2012 Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure. Annual 5K or 1.2-mile walk/run benefiting breast-cancer research and prevention programs. i wireless Center (1201 River Drive, Moline). 8 a.m. $25-30 registration, $17 for ages 14 and under. For information, visit KomenQuadCities.org. Saturday, June 9 – Fourth Annual BeeRME for Music Fundraiser. Beer-tasting fundraiser featuring tastings from a wide range of distributors, hors d’oeuvres, live entertainment, and more, with proceeds benefiting music-education programming. River Music Experience (131 West Second Street, Davenport). 5-8 p.m. $15-25. For tickets and information, call (563)326-1333 or visit RiverMusicExperience.org. Wednesday, June 13, through Saturday, June 16 – 18th Annual Mississippi River Motorcycle Rally. Outdoor celebration featuring contests, games, vendors, bike shows, live music, dancing, food, and more. Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds (2815 West Locust Street, Davenport). $5-20. For information, visit MRMRally.com. Saturday, June 16 – 2012 Dodgeball Showdown. Co-ed, eight-on-eight dodgeball competition with a $1,000 first prize, plus an evening concert with the Dirt Road Rockers and Grazin District. The Daiquiri Factory (1809 Second Avenue, Rock Island). Noon tournament; 7p.m. evening gates. Free tournament admission, $5 concert. For information, call (309)283-1809 or visit DaiquiriFactory.com. Sunday, June 17 – Ride the River. River Action’s 28th-annual Father’s Day riding event on bicycle routes of between 20 and 60 miles, featuring a Junior Duathlon, vendors, and more. Begins at Davenport’s Freight House (421 West River Drive, Davenport). 6 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $10-15 registration, children ride free. For information and to register, call (563)322-7433 or visit RiverAction.org.

MUSIC

Continued From Page 8

“The Guitar Plays Me”
Lloyd was similarly philosophical about the creation of Television. In Verlaine, he said, he saw the “elusive sublime. ... He had it, and I had it. I noticed [that] what he was missing I had, and vice versa. ... It’s better for me to join forces with someone so that we become more than the two of us could ever be separately.” If all this existential talk is worrying, know that Lloyd will be in the Quad Cities to perform a rock concert, and he promised selections from his solo albums, some Hendrix, and, yes, a few Television songs. He had his first rehearsal with his new band the day before we talked, and he said it was transcendent: “I just put my guitar on its stand, because they were churning – like the butter, or the whipped cream – so good, that I just began scat singing ... and man, what a rhythm section. ... It’s a great trio.” It includes Billy Ficca (Television’s drummer) and bassist Danny Tamberelli, best known for Nickelodeon’s The Adventures of Pete & Pete. (“He gets more people recognizing him than I do,” Lloyd said. “Just as many autographs.”) And know that the singer/songwriter/ guitarist has a sense of humor, too, with awe in his voice as related this tidbit: “It’s half of Television, and it’s Danny Tamberelli, who was on television.”

by Jeff Ignatius jeff@rcreader.com

Richard Lloyd will perform on Thursday, June 14, at the Redstone Room (129 Main Street in Davenport). Grand Strand opens, and tickets to the 7:30 p.m. show are $15 and available from RiverMusicExperience.org. For more information on Richard Lloyd, visit RichardLloyd.com.

1

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 806 • June 7 - 20, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com Photo by Joaquin Espejo

Featured Image from the Quad Cities Photography Club
(Editor’s note: The River Cities’ Reader each month will feature an image or images from the Quad Cities Photography Club.)

PHOTOGRAPHY

T

his image of a Masai warrior was given a top score in the May competition of Quad Cities Photography Club. Joaquin Espejo made the image during a visit to the Masai village in Amboseli National Park in Kenya. Joaquin says that some of the men and women have huge holes in their earlobes, which they decorate with beads made by the women. These holes are also used for transporting chewing tobacco. Circular scars on their faces are from burns that are part of their initiation ceremony. Joaquin took this picture with a Canon EOS 50D, with an EF 24-105millimeter lens. It was taken at 105 millimeters and 1/200th of a second at f/11 using 400 ISO. He used Lightroom 4 for the post-processing. The Quad Cities Photography Club welcomes visitors and new members. The club sponsors numerous activities encompassing many types and aspects of photography. It holds digital and print competitions most months. At its meetings, members discuss the images, help each other to improve, and socialize. The club also holds special learning workshops and small groups that meet on specific photography topics, and occasionally offers interesting shooting opportunities. The club meets at 6:30 p.m. the first Thursday of the month September through June at the Butterworth Center, 1105 Eighth Street in Moline. For more information on the club, visit QCPhotoClub.com.

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 806 • June 7 - 20, 2012

19

Our Turn to Soldier Up: Protect U.S. Troops
troops slowly proceeds, the number of war contractors is increasing at an exponentially higher cost to taxpayers. All four documentaries expose some level of dangerous undermining of our troops, whether by faulty equipment, inadequate food and water services, or incompetent linguists and interpreters – the list is long. For example, while our soldiers suffer 100-degree deserts that produce frequent debilitating sand storms and are struggling for survival with nothing but flimsy, mold-infested tents for protection, the war-contract employees are residing in luxurious Westernized comfort at 10 times the cost to taxpayers because of price-gouging and cost-plus contracting. This is a policy that encourages ever-increasing expenditures because the profit allowed is paid as a percentage of costs. The average soldier makes $35,000, while his war-contractor counterpart makes $160,000. How is this remotely equitable? As a taxpayer, are you willing to support this kind of gross discrepancy? It is one of the most absurd hypocrisies about war-contracting. The mercenaries can afford the best possible health-care coverage, but our enlisted troops must wait for more than a year to get their disability claims processed. Furthermore, 50 percent of our prisoner/ detainee interrogators are war contractors not covered by the Uniform Military Code of Conduct. The disconnect is so shameful, but because the media cartel ignores these huge inconsistencies, Congress and bureaucrats get away with their clear dereliction of duty in protecting our enlisted military personnel, while war contractors laugh all the way to the bank. During congressional hearings on war-contracting abuse, waste, and fraud, a commission study reported that 60 percent of the $150-billion budget for war-contracting expenditures in 2011 was either waste or fraud. Sixty percent! It is one thing to hear this figure during hearings, and quite another to see the results of this corruption via these documentaries. These films expose the systemic hardships and dangers the war contractors directly or indirectly impose on our military for the sake of profit. It is obscene by every moral standard, and largely criminal if we had willing law enforcement. For example, in Iraq for Sale, Halliburton was contracted to supply 67 separate watertreatment operations for the troops, and the water from 63 of them was found to be toxic and unsuitable for human consumption. Regardless, Halliburton continued to provide this contaminated water, exposing our troops to pathogens that leech into the bloodstream, whether by drinking, showering, or cooking. This is unconscionable. Halliburton’s own or unworthy leadership. Troops report that expensive vehicles Here is just a smattering of advocacy Web sites. Browsing come equipped with the Internet will turn up dozens more. no spare parts – not HomesForOurTroops.org even simple oil filters. IAVA.org (Iraq & Afghanistan Veterans of America) When the vehicles fail SoldiersAngels.org due to engine blowouts, TAPS.org (Tragedy Assistance Programs for Survivors) they are burned and USWoundedSoldiers.com the government is WoundedWarriorProject.org charged for brand-new replacements. It appears employees testified to this inhumanity, some to be common practice visibly shaking/weeping over their part in the to destroy all non-functioning equipment even travesty. They believed they were there to help though simple, inexpensive parts would keep the troops; instead they were participating in many vehicles viable for years. The pillaging exposing them to all manner of health risks is out of control, and there is no limitation to beyond combat. its outrageous practice because there are no There is also the endangerment of consequences for any of it. In other words, Halliburton and Blackwater employees. there are no cancellations of contracts – many Employees reported being deployed in of which are no-bid – or criminal prosecution dangerous convoys of empty trucks for the of these defense contractors that see any war sole purpose of billing the government. or military occupation as lucrative and endless Recall that in 2003, four civilian drivers cash cows. Nor has there been any legislation lost their lives in Fallujah, Iraq, in one such or a single amendment addressing any of these convoy. They were knowingly dispatched endemic problems. in spite of the danger, without armed trucks Why? Because the billions funneled to or the necessary complement of soldiers for the war contractors via defense budgets protection. It was nothing less than a massacre and appropriations come back to the for these civilian drivers and their families. entrenched career politicians’ campaign Meanwhile, just last month, congressional coffers in an endless loop. If you want hearings revealed that it is taking an average to see this loop for yourself, look up the of 394 days to process a soldier’s disability senators and representatives who occupy the claim once he/she is discharged! That is longer committee seats that govern defense budgets, than an entire year! How is this possible? The appropriations, procurement, and relative Veterans Health Administration (VHA) has oversight committees. You will find that the installed all-new IT systems, and hired an war contractors’ contributions are given to additional 1,600 employees to address this those specific congressmen, regardless of across-the-board failure, costing billions in party affiliation. Visit OpenCongress.org, tax dollars – all to reduce its response time GovTrack.us, VoteSmart.org, or OpenSecrets. by a mere 30 days to 364 days – a decidedly org, to name a few nonpartisan watchdog pathetic goal by any standard of care. organizations that provide detailed data on The VHA’s abominable track record is our elected officials, including comprehensive more indicting because it comes on the data on all legislation passed and pending. heels of a programming overhaul mandated In addition, examine the boards by Congress five years ago, at which time of directors, and often the executive the average turnaround time for a veteran’s management, of these war contractors, and disability claim was at an all-time high of you will see that former Pentagon employees, 360 days. (Back in 2003-4, veterans were military brass, and congressional bureaucrats, complaining about waiting 120 days.) So lobbyists, and politicians abound. The instead of improving things, VHA’s leadership conflict-of-interest tentacles and revolving made the response time worse! Conclusion: In doors are mind-boggling, and inherent in the 2012 and billions of dollars later, the VHA has dysfunction that defines the U.S. government. managed to further delay veterans’ disability The Iraq and Afghanistan wars have no benefits by increasing response time by 30 front or rear lines, no sanctuaries normally additional days to 394! available in traditional conflict theaters. War And what do you think the congressional is occurring in the streets of the cities, among response has been to the massive corruption innocent civilians who are dying in numbers that endangers our troops on a daily basis? not being factually reported by the military Not to mention the theft of billions of our tax or the media cartel. This makes these wars dollars every year? Nada! Not a single firing, difficult beyond imagining for our troops. demotion, or even a reduction in salaries for They are being pushed to unprecedented any of the incompetence, deliberate deception, human limits – not once, not twice, but three,

WORDS FROM THE EDITOR

Continued From Page 3

by Kathleen McCarthy km@rcreader.com

Resources to Help Troops

four, five, and even six times via countless deployments unheard of in past combat operations. Our National Guard & Reserve is now fully operational, another unprecedented occurrence in America’s history. The amputees alone are reaching astronomical levels, compared with past wars’ injuries. Worst, however, are the emotional wounds inflicted. Many of these soldiers cannot internally resolve the killing of so many innocents, including women and children. They dutifully execute such harsh orders, then are ultimately expected to transition back into civilian life after witnessing, participating in, and surviving conditions that are despicable by Western standards. These expectations are not only unreasonable; they are unreasoning. In honoring our country, these kids and their families are forced into situations and environments that profoundly and permanently change them, and then they are generally cast off to fend for themselves. Consider that less than 1 percent of Americans are directly involved in the military, let alone have even a clue about the troops’ real-life experiences. We are so removed, and the media cartel sanitizes all the horror and dread that characterizes these incursions. It is no longer acceptable for Americans to sit idly by and pretend to support our troops and their families when we are completely uninformed and ignorant about the huge majority of it! In late 2011, during congressional hearings on wartime casualties, statistics showed that more troops are committing suicide than are killed in combat, because they cannot live with what they were ordered to do in these two wars. For every al-Qaeda insurgent killed, there are seven civilians killed as collateral damage! These soldiers cannot resolve the inner conflict that haunts them for following orders. They cannot forgive themselves for their part in such gruesome and unjustifiable collateral damage. It is heartbreaking, and it is up to us to stand up and start protecting them. If these four films don’t deeply touch you, enrage you, and motivate you to action, then you most assuredly do not support our troops. You are heartless, and likely mindless. Just keep cheering at Democratic and Republican rallies and fundraisers, especially when the bragging starts over U.S. accomplishments in these God-forsaken, undeclared-by-Congress, and unconstitutional wars. But do so knowing you are largely duped by your favored politicians and the public-relations media cartel, because most of the information you think is so gloriously worth your applause is pure fiction. 

0

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 806 • June 7 - 20, 2012 Continued From Page 6

Out of Time, Out of Place

COVER STORY

Beltz House Kitchen, Jefferson Township, Greene County, Iowa 2009
factory building planted on a sloping hill street. The cropping of the image, with no visible sky or horizon, makes the composition feel anxious, enhanced by the dark shadows cast by the buildings and tree behind the camera. This also provides no clue about the full size of the building, and the removal of spatial and functional context creates an abstraction of a normally recognizable subject. This composition makes the building seem important – sturdy and strong – and suggests the power of industry. But the windows are boarded up, and the parking spaces on the street sit empty. Patches of weeds grow up through the cracks in the pavement. The photograph captures the simultaneous historical beauty and dereliction of many post-industrial downtowns. David Plowden’s Iowa also includes photographs of interiors and storefronts, especially those seeming out-of-time. Coneys N’More Cafe, Fort Dodge, Iowa 2004 shows a diner entrance, with handpainted window lettering and a large, lightup sign featuring a retro convertible. The scene appears to have not changed since the 1950s. The only indications that this photograph was taken in the past decade are the newspaper box and the overlapping oil stains in the parking spots. Plowden explores this timeless quality in domestic spaces, too. In Beltz House Kitchen, Jefferson Township, Greene County, Iowa 2009, we see a kitchen with its original fixtures. Plowden focuses on the stove, placing it at the center of the composition. He again employs perspective, arranging the image so that the receding transversal lines of the stovetop and ventilation hood angle toward the center of the photo. Dizzingly, the top of the stove and the bottom of the vent are slightly askew from

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 806 • June 7 - 20, 2012 by Michelle Garrison michelle_m_garrison@hotmail.com 

1

Grand Opening Sunday June 10th
2pm talk on Prohibition in Iowa by St. Ambrose’s George McDaniel

SUDS!
ABOVE: Templeton, Iowa 2008 LEFT: Keota, Iowa 2004

History of Brewing at the German American Heritage Center

712 W 2nd St. Davenport 563-322-8844 gahc.org

the true horizontal established by the cabinets and wall tiles, playing with our visualization of balance. The conceptual interest of this straightforward view of a stove comes from reading the date of the photograph: 2009. Without even hints of the contemporary, the picture looks like it was taken decades ago, again distorting time through decontextualized objects from daily life. The black-and-white format, in this as well as his other photographs, contributes to a sense of temporal vagueness.

In all these cases, Plowden plays with our expectations. Using basic tools that contribute to our understanding of a static image, he removes or changes context to alter how we look at them. He forces us to see common subjects as powerful and significant, and gives us joy as we decipher his puzzles. Plowden’s Iowa is less about what we see than subverting what we anticipate. Michelle Garrison is a mixed-media artist who teaches art and design at Geneseo Middle School. 

Ask

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 806 • June 7 - 20, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

the

My boyfriend of two months is a gem, but his house is a horror. The fridge and bathroom are disgusting, and the whole place is seriously messy. There’s this eerie feeling that the house was formerly homey, like nothing has changed since his wife left him three years ago – down to the box of sanitary pads in the bathroom cupboard and the very wife-ish folksy kitchen art everywhere. I wonder if the state of things reflects some inner devastation he’s feeling post-divorce. He takes pride in his home’s exterior, meticulously maintaining his lawn, and I don’t think he’s trying to impress the neighbors (not a pretentious bone in his body). He hadn’t changed his sheets in our two months together, so I removed the pillowcases and dropped them on the floor as a hint. He didn’t get it. It seems too early in the relationship to say anything. Still, I don’t feel I should have to keep faking that I’m comfy in his home and in his bed on sheets that feel like they haven’t been washed since the 1980s. – Yuck A woman can leave a man, but apparently, cows grazing on a field of gingham and “Rooster Crossing” signs are forever. And of course, nothing says a man’s open to a relationship like his ex-wife’s three-year-old box of Kotex. Welcome to the Museum of the Ex-Wife. At least, that’s how you’re seeing it, and that’s understandable. In trying to make sense of things, people have a tendency to look for some underlying deep meaning. And, sure, maybe the biohazards and lingering Kountry Kitchen Kwaintness are reflective of some inner darkness on his part (depression, inability to cope with his loss and move on). Or … maybe it was his job to care for the outside of the house and hers to care for the inside, and after she left, he never thought to fill in the blanks on the chore wheel. Before long, the place became Home Sweet Bacteria Rodeo. If you don’t see other signs suggesting he’s depressed or troubled, he’s probably just mess-blind. It’s hard for those who practice what would be considered ordinary tidiness and house hygiene to understand, but for

We’ll Always Have Parasites

Advice Goddess

BY AMY ALKON

some, all the chaos and grunge just blends into a big, benign whatever. The basic rule of this sort of laissez-faire housekeeping: If the crud isn’t so big and scary that it’s grabbing your ankle as you’re en route to the toilet, why get your last pair of clean underwear into a wad? It is cute that you thought dropping stuff on the floor – the floor of a man who basically lives in a two-bedroom landfill – would have an impact on his housekeeping standards. You should actually consider it a bit troubling that he apparently made no attempt to tidy up for you. Even the most squalor-inured tend to look at their living situation through new (and horrified) eyes when a new romantic partner is coming over and try to do something – get a backhoe in there, burn the bedding, crash a Febreze truck into the living room. I’m not suggesting you go all Joan Crawford on the man (“No. More. Wire. Hangers!”), but you can’t let him think it’s no big deal for you to get in bed onto sheets that feel like they haven’t been washed since the Reagan administration. (If you put out a message that anything goes for you, whether in the housekeeping department or any other, very likely, anything will.) Don’t be pulling on any rubber gloves, either. (Start cleaning up after him and you’ll keep cleaning up after him.) Instead, say something gentle but direct like “I think you’re a great guy, but I really need you to clean your place so I feel comfortable there.” There is a chance that he’ll break up with you over this. But what kind of man kicks the girl out of bed and keeps the cracker crumbs? Instead of trying to get him to clean up his whole act at once, take things step by grody step. Whatever effort he makes, keep letting him know you appreciate it. If the house isn’t getting to a civilized level of clean, gently suggest that it needs a woman’s touch – a cleaning woman’s: “Ever thought of getting a maid once a month?” Finally, address the ex-wife’s leftovers by joking that some of the decor doesn’t quite seem a reflection of him. In fact, you’re particularly confused by the box in the bathroom cabinet, but you’d like to be supportive: “A man’s first period is a very special time, and there’s no reason to feel ashamed about the changes in your body, which should soon have you turning cartwheels in a flowing white skirt.”

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 806 • June 7 - 20, 2012 

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY
ARIES (March 21-April 19): If your destiny has gotten tweaked by bias or injustice, it’s a good time to rebel. If you are being manipulated by people who care for you – even if it’s allegedly for your own good – you now have the insight and power necessary to wriggle free of the bind. If you have been confused by the mixed messages you’re getting from your own unconscious mind, you should get to the bottom of the inner contradiction. And if you have been wavering in your commitment to your oaths, you’d better be intensely honest with yourself about why that’s happening. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Diamonds are symbols of elegant beauty, which is why they’re often used in jewelry. But 80 percent of the world’s diamonds have a more utilitarian function. Because they’re so hard and have such high thermal conductivity, they are used extensively as cutting, grinding, and polishing tools, and have several other industrial applications. Now let’s apply this 20/80 proportion to you, Taurus. Of your talents and abilities, no more than 20 percent need be on display. The rest is consumed in the diligent detail work that goes on in the background – the cutting, grinding, and polishing you do to make yourself as valuable as a diamond. In the coming week, this will be a good meditation for you. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The pain you will feel in the coming week will be in direct proportion to the love you suppress and withhold. So if you let your love flow as freely as a mountain spring in a rainstorm, you may not have to deal with any pain at all. What’s that you say? You claim that being strategic about how you express your affection gives you strength and protection? Maybe that’s true on other occasions, but it’s not applicable now. “Unconditional” and “uninhibited” are your words of power. CANCER (June 21-July 22): What actions best embody the virtue of courage? Fighting on the battlefield as a soldier? Speaking out against corruption and injustice? Climbing a treacherous peak or riding a raft through rough river water? Certainly all those qualify. But French architect Fernand Pouillon had another perspective. He said, “Courage lies in being oneself, in showing complete independence, in loving what one loves, in discovering the deep roots of one’s feelings.” That’s exactly the nature of the bravery you are best able to draw on right now, Cancerian. So please do draw on it in abundance. LEO (July 23-August 22): In his book The Four Insights, author Alberto Villoldo tells the following story: “A traveler comes across two stonecutters. He asks the first, ‘What are you doing?’ and receives the reply ‘Squaring the stone.’ He then walks over to the second stonecutter and asks, ‘What are you doing?’ and receives the reply ‘I am building a cathedral.’ In other words, both men are performing the same task, but one of them is aware that he has the choice to be part of a greater dream.” By my astrological reckoning, Leo, it’s quite important for you to be like that second stonecutter in the months ahead. I suggest you start now to ensure that outcome. VIRGO (August 23-September 22): Harpo Marx was part of the famous Marx Brothers comedy team that made 13 movies. He was known as the silent one. While in his character’s persona, he never spoke, but only communicated through pantomime and by whistling, blowing a horn, or playing the harp. In real life, he could talk just fine. He traced the origin of his shtick to an early theatrical performance he had done. A review of the show said that he “performed beautiful pantomime which was ruined whenever he spoke.” So in other words, Harpo’s successful career was shaped in part by the inspiration he drew from a critic. I invite you to make a similar move, Virgo: Capitalize on some negative feedback or odd mirroring you’ve received. LIBRA (September 23-October 22): What is your relationship with cosmic jokes, Libra? Do you feel offended by the secrets they spill and the ignorance they expose and the slightly embarrassing truths they compel you to acknowledge? Or are you a vivacious lover of life who welcomes the way cosmic jokes expand your mind and help you lose your excessive self-importance and show you possible solutions you haven’t previously imagined? I hope you’re in the latter category, because sometime in the near future, fate has arranged for you to be in the vicinity of a divine comedy routine. I’m not kidding when I tell you that the harder and more frequently you laugh, the more you’ll learn. SCORPIO (October 23-November 21): In addition to being an accomplished astrophysicist and philosopher, Arthur Eddington (1882-1944) possessed mad math skills. Legend has it that he was one of only three people on the planet who actually comprehended Einstein’s Theory of Relativity. That’s a small level of appreciation for such an important set of ideas, isn’t it? On the other hand, most people I know would be happy if there were as many as three humans in the world who truly understood them. In accordance with the astrological omens, I suggest you make that one of your projects in the next 12 months: to do whatever you can to ensure there are at least three people who have a detailed comprehension of and appreciation for who you really are. SAGITTARIUS (November 22December 21): Yesterday the sun was shining at the same time it was raining, and my mind turned to you. Today I felt a surge of tenderness for a friend who has been making me angry, and again I thought of you. Tomorrow maybe I will sing sad songs when I’m cheerful, and go for a long walk when I’m

by Rob Brezsny
feeling profoundly lazy. Those events, too, would remind me of you. Why? Because you’ve been experimenting with the magic of contradictions lately. You’ve been mixing and matching with abandon, going up and down at the same time, and exploring the pleasures of changing your mind. I’m even tempted to speculate that you’ve been increasing your ability to abide with paradox. Keep up the good work. I’m sure it’s a bit weird at times, but it’ll ultimately make you even smarter than you already are. CAPRICORN (December 22January 19): Be on the alert for valuable mistakes you could capitalize on. Keep scanning the peripheries for evidence that seems out of place; it might be useful. Do you see what I’m driving at, Capricorn? Accidental revelations could spark good ideas. Garbled communication might show you the way to desirable detours. Chance meetings might initiate conversations that will last a long time. Are you catching my drift? Follow any lead that seems witchy or itchy. Be ready to muscle your way in through doors that are suddenly open just a crack. AQUARIUS (January 20-February 18): An article in the Weekly World News reported on tourists who toast marshmallows while sitting on the rims of active volcanoes. As fun as this practice might be, however, it can expose those who do it to molten lava, suffocating ash, and showers of burning rocks. So I wouldn’t recommend it to you, Aquarius. But I do encourage you to try some equally boisterous but less hazardous adventures. The coming months will be prime time for you to get highly imaginative in your approach to exploration, amusement, and pushing beyond your previous limits. Why not get started now? PISCES (February 19-March 20): According to my reading of the astrological omens, you would be smart to get yourself a new fertility symbol. Not because I think you should encourage or seek out a literal pregnancy. Rather, I’d like to see you cultivate a more aggressively playful relationship with your creativity – energize it on deep unconscious levels so it will spill out into your daily routine and tincture everything you do. If you suspect my proposal has some merit, be on the lookout for a talisman, totem, or toy that fecundates your imagination. Homework: Upon waking up for the next seven mornings, sing a song that fills you with feisty hope. To report results, go to RealAstrology.com and click on “E-mail Rob.”

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 806 • June 7 - 20, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

PEAKS AND VALLEYS - June , 01

May 24 Answers: Right

May  Crossword Answers

ACROSS 1. Ready and willing partner 5. Decrees 10. Legends 15. Rent 19. Cross in a church 20. Part of ASEAN 21. Sternward 22. Warhol’s Sedgwick 23. Mast on a ship 25. Unlimited 27. Tower 28. Old oath 30. Desists 31. _ and means 32. Golfer’s problem 33. Embezzle 34. Of the ear 36. Kind of appeal 37. Bugs 41. Analyzed a sentence 43. Honcho: 2 wds. 46. Stout’s Wolfe 47. A town and its lake 48. French department 50. Reckon 52. Relative of a pom 53. Gumshoe 54. Coquettish one 55. Less 56. Sign of life 58. Passable 60. Property claims 61. Road curvature 62. Corrodes 63. Race 64. Engine pt. 65. Old open carriage 67. Stuck 68. Crisp cookies 71. _ macchiato 72. Bays 73. An ordinal number 74. _ douloureux 75. Foofaraw 76. Mended 78. Ridge of rock 79. Caliber

80. Salespeople, for short 82. Cheers!: 2 wds. 84. Lodged 86. Certain natives of India 88. Employs 89. Overtake 90. Puts down 91. Airborne specks 93. Unchanged: 2 wds. 95. Le Guin or Andress 98. Part of a sultan’s household 99. Jalousie 103. Popular tunes: 3 wds. 105. Carp or flounder: 2 wds. 108. Wings 109. Poem part 110. Vers _ 111. Little-used preposition 112. Drove 113. Port city in Germany 114. Klensch and Maxwell 115. Sediment DOWN 1. The humanities 2. PC restart 3. Run 4. Sideways 5. Waste one’s time 6. British _ 7. Spooks’ org. 8. Vacation residuum 9. Gemsbok 10. Shop for Parisian smokers 11. Home 12. Certain muscles, for short 13. Newt 14. Race vehicle: 2 wds. 15. Supporting pillar 16. Pindarics 17. Hill 18. Promontory 24. Speedily 26. Rabin’s predecessor 29. The G in Bee Gees 32. Grunt 33. Skull cavity 34. Rowed 35. Horned dinosaur

36. Cubic meter 37. Sorcerer of old 38. Bygone fashion: Hyph. 39. Cancel 40. Like a judge, they say 41. Rights org. 42. Expand 44. Off the subject 45. Fool 49. Squats 51. Old Greek governor 54. Micromanaged 55. Slime anagram 57. Shield boss 59. Step down 60. City in Texas 61. Commander at Little Bighorn 63. Bolt 64. Hue 65. Bow or Barton 66. Chthonic god 67. _ Bianco 68. Certain sounds 69. Enervates 70. Like some cookies 72. Thwart 73. Makes level 77. Suspension 78. Gather together 79. Vainglorious 81. Showed respect for 83. Silent 85. Laudanum 87. Kind of chauvinist 91. Dull surface 92. Bean or Welles 93. Ad _ per aspera 94. Loafers 95. One of fifty 96. Function 97. Box 98. Buck’s mate 100. Tuning fork part 101. Punta del _ 102. Greek letters 104. Confident showman 106. Anoint 107. Cable channel

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 806 • June 7 - 20, 2012 

2012/06/07 (Thu)

ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA DJ Scott & Karaoke -Greenbriar Restaurant and Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL

THURSDAY

7

EmJay - Fast as a Cat -Cool Beanz Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL

Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ -Parker’s, 635 15th St Moline, IL Humming House - Marc Hans Showalter -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Jam Sessions with John O’Meara & Friends -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA

Jason Carl Band -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

Joe & Vicki Price -Herbert Hoover National Historic Site, off I-80 at exit 254 West Branch, IA Karaoke by Pieler Productions -The Pub, 4320 N. Brady St. Davenport, IA Live Lunch w/ Lojo Russo (noon) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Nervous Rex -Bass Street Landing Plaza, Moline, IL Oh, Boy! An Evening with Buddy Holly -The Circa ‘21 Speakeasy, 1818 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL The Avey Brothers -Rascals Live, 1418 15th St. Moline, IL Thumping Thursday w/ DJ Hypnotic and Patrick Rifley -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL Whoozdads? (6:30pm) -Bettendorf Public Library, 2950 Learning Campus Bettendorf, IA 2012/06/08 (Fri)

FRIDAY

8

45 on High -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St. Davenport, IA

ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA ABC Members-Only Karaoke -Moose Lodge - Davenport, 2333 Rockingham Rd Davenport, IA Big Funk Guarantee - The Donahues -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA CASI New Horizons Band -Bill Bowe Memorial Bandshell, Middle Park Bettendorf, IA Dueling Pianos at The Establishment -The Establishment Theatre, 220 19th St. Rock Island, IL Ecast Superstar -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St., Davenport, IA Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ -Parker’s, 635 15th St Moline, IL Friday Live @ Five: Jason Carl Band (5pm) -RME Courtyard, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Gary and Rick Show -Bleyarts Tap, 2210 E. 11th St. Davenport, IA Gray Wolf Band -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Greenbriar Bash w/ North of 40 -Greenbriar Restaurant and Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL Gumbo Ya Ya: Backwater Bayou Band (5:30pm) - Lil Brian & The Zydeco Travelers (8:45pm) - Honey Island Swamp Band (11pm) -District of Rock Island Great River Plaza Stage, 2nd Ave., between 17th & 19th Sts. Rock Island, IL Gumbo Ya Ya: Dennis Stroughmatt & Creole Stomp (6:30 & 8pm) - Dikki Du & The Zydeco Krewe (9:45 & 11:15pm) -District of Rock Island Jumer’s Casino & Hotel Stage, 2nd Ave., between 17th & 19th Sts. Rock Island, IL Joe & Vicki Price -The Cooler, 311 W. 2nd St. Rock Falls, IL Karaoke Night -Chuck’s Tap, 1731 W. 6th St. Davenport, IA

I Am the Avalanche @ Gabe’s – June 12
Karaoke Night -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL Karaoke Night -Roadrunner’s Roadhouse, 3803 Rockingham Rd. Davenport, IA Kooby’s Karaoke -Wide Open Bar & Grill, 425 15th St. Moline, IL Lee Blackmon (6:30pm) -Cool Beanz Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL Live Lunch w/ Tony Hoeppner (noon) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Richie Lee -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA Rob Dahms (6pm) -Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street Milan, IL Russ Reyman Trio (5:30pm) - Superfly Samurai (9:30pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Serious Business -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Sin City -River House, 1510 River Dr. Moline, IL Terry & the Loan Sharks -Missippi Brew, River Dr Muscatine, IA The Chris & Wes Show -Mound Street Landing, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA The Coop - Brothers Rage -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA The Fiyah -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL The Manny Lopez Big Band (6pm) -The Circa ‘21 Speakeasy, 1818 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL The Music of Dr. Joe Seng -Joe’s Club, 1402 W. 7th St. Davenport, IA 2012/06/09 (Sat)

SATURDAY

9

ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Cosmic -Mulligan’s Valley Pub, 310 W 1st Ave Coal Valley, IL DJ Scott & Karaoke -Greenbriar Restaurant and Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL Dueling Pianos at The Establishment -The Establishment Theatre, 220 19th St. Rock Island, IL Ecast Superstar -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St., Davenport, IA

Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ -Parker’s, 635 15th St Moline, IL Gray Wolf Band -Plumbers & Pipefitters Local Union 25, 4600 46th St. Rock Island, IL Gumbo Ya Ya: Main Avenue Jazz Band (5pm) - Dennis Stroughmatt & Creole Stomp (8pm) - Dikki Du & The Zydeco Krewe (10:15pm) -District of Rock Island Great River Plaza Stage, 2nd Ave., between 17th & 19th Sts. Rock Island, IL Gumbo Ya Ya: Mudbugs (5:30pm) - Honey Island Swamp Band (7:30 & 9:15pm) - Lil Brian & The Zydeco Travelers (11pm) -District of Rock Island Jumer’s Casino & Hotel Stage, 2nd Ave., between 17th & 19th Sts. Rock Island, IL Hi-Fi -Blu Shamrock, 311 S. 13th Ave. Cordova, IL Identity Crisis -River House, 1510 River Dr. Moline, IL Joe and Vicki Price -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Karaoke Night -Chuck’s Tap, 1731 W. 6th St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL Karaoke Night -Roadrunner’s Roadhouse, 3803 Rockingham Rd. Davenport, IA Kooby’s Karaoke -Headquarters Bar & Grill, 119 E. 22nd Ave. Coal Valley, IL Live Lunch w/ Dave Smith (11:30am) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Modern Mythology - Blackstones (6pm) -The Grove Tap, 108 S 1st St Long Grove, IA Mommy’s Little Monster -Generations Bar & Grill, 4100 4th Ave. Moline, IL Natural Oil - As Big as a Mouse - Dynoride -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL

Night People -Len Brown’s North Shore Inn, 7th Street and the Rock River Moline, IL North of 40 -The Pub, 4320 N. Brady St. Davenport, IA Open Mic Night -Downtown Central Perk, 226 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Retro Ron -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Ride for Kelly Benefit: North of 40 (2pm) -Kavanaugh’s Hilltop Bar, 1228 30th St. Rock Island, IL Rock the Grove: Photoshop Cafe - Steve Ernst -Long Grove Christian Church, 202 South 1st St. Long Grove, IA Russ Reyman, Pianist (7pm) -Phoenix, 111 West 2nd St. Davenport, IA Smooth Groove -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Songwriters in the Round (2:30pm) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Tapped Out (2pm) -Kavanaugh’s Hilltop Bar, 1228 30th St. Rock Island, IL The Chris & Wes Show -Shenanigan’s, 303 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA The Fry Daddies (6pm) -Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street Milan, IL The Tailfins -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA We Are Young: A Night of Rock ‘n’ Roll -The District Theatre, 1611 2nd Ave Rock Island, IL Wicked Liz & the Bellyswirls -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Widetrack -Tommy’s, 1302 4th Ave Moline, IL Zither Ensemble (10am) -German American Heritage Center, 712 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA

Continued On Page 26

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Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 806 • June 7 - 20, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Continued From Page 25
2012/06/10 (Sun)

SUNDAY

10

ABC Karaoke -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Do’s & Don’ts (2pm) -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA Five Bridges Jazz Band (10:30am) -Brady Street Chop House, Radisson QC Plaza Hotel Davenport, IA Funday Sunday with Dave Ellis (6pm) -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Karaoke for Kids (3-5pm) -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL Nova Singers’ Out of the Ordinary Concert: Remembering Brian Nelson (4pm) -First Lutheran Church - Rock Island, 1600 20th St. Rock Island, IL Russ Reyman, Pianist (10am-2pm brunch) -The Lodge Hotel, 900 Spruce Hills Dr. Bettendorf, IA Sunday Jazz Brunch at Bix Bistro (10:30am & 12:30pm) -Hotel Blackhawk, 200 E. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Wesley Winds (6pm) -Pearl Plaza, 208 W. 2nd St. Muscatine, IA 2012/06/12 (Tue)

I Am the Avalanche - Morning Exit (6pm) -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA Jam Night w/ Jordan Danielsen -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA Lake Street Dive -Englert Theatre, 221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA Open Mic Night -Cool Beanz Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL Open Mic Night -The Dam View Inn, 410 2nd St Davenport, IA Southern Thunder DJ Service (5pm) & Karaoke (9pm) -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL 2012/06/13 (Wed)

Nappy Roots -The Hub, 402 Main St Cedar Falls, IA Richard Lloyd - Grand Stand -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA

Rude Punch -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

The Avey Brothers -Rascals Live, 1418 15th St. Moline, IL Thumping Thursday w/ DJ Hypnotic and Patrick Rifley -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL Whoozdads? (6:30pm) -Moline Public Library, 3210 41st St. Moline, IL 2012/06/15 (Fri)

Friday Live @ Five: Public Candy (5pm) -RME Courtyard, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Funktastic Five -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Grand Larsony -Bobbie’s Diner & Nightclub, 1213 10th Ave. W. Milan, IL

Greatest Story Ever Told -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

WEDNESDAY

13

ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Acoustic Music Club (4:30pm) -RME (River Music Experience), 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) -O’Melia’s Supper Club, 2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock Island, IL

TUESDAY

12

A Party to Go Karaoke Night -Stacks Bar, 525 14th St. Moline, IL ABC Karaoke -Abblebee’s Neighborhood Grill - Elmore Ave., 3838 Elmore Ave. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -Barrel House 211, 211 E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Glen Templeton -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Jason Carl & Friends -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Jeanie B! and the Jelly Beans (9:30am & 1pm) -Deere-Wiman Carriage House, 817 11th Ave. Moline, IL Karaoke Night -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL

The Brat Pack @ RIBCO – June 16
Stroehle’s (6pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA The Chris & Wes Show -Mound Street Landing, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA The Pub Unplugged: Live Acoustic Acts -The Pub, 4320 N. Brady St. Davenport, IA Troy Harris, Pianist (10pm) -Red Crow Grille, 2504 53rd St. Bettendorf, IA 2012/06/14 (Thu) Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ -Parker’s, 635 15th St Moline, IL Jam Sessions with John O’Meara & Friends -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA James Kennedy & Friends -Herbert Hoover National Historic Site, off I-80 at exit 254 West Branch, IA Karaoke by Pieler Productions -The Pub, 4320 N. Brady St. Davenport, IA Mississippi River Motorcycle Rally Choppers Tent: Crossroads -Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds, 2815 W. Locust St Davenport, IA Mississippi River Motorcycle Rally Corona Stage: Stuart Mathews - Keep Off the Grass -Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds, 2815 W. Locust St Davenport, IA Mississippi River Motorcycle Rally Scooter Tent: Vigil Annie - High Drama - Dirt Road Rockers -Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds, 2815 W. Locust St Davenport, IA

Karaoke Night -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Open Mic Night -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114 1/2 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Open Mic Night -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Rocktastic 4 -Rascals Live, 1418 15th St. Moline, IL

Split Livers - Chicago Farmer -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

ABC Karaoke -Greenbriar Restaurant and Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Celtic Winds (6:30pm) -Bettendorf Public Library, 2950 Learning Campus Bettendorf, IA Danielle Ate the Sandwich - Bethann Gavin -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Dustin Cobb -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA

THURSDAY

14

ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA ABC Members-Only Karaoke -Moose Lodge - Davenport, 2333 Rockingham Rd Davenport, IA Bettendorf Park Band -Bill Bowe Memorial Bandshell, Middle Park Bettendorf, IA Brer Bucktown’s Traveling Tent Show -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Charley Hayes Trio (6pm) -Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street Milan, IL Cosmic -River House, 1510 River Dr. Moline, IL Danika Holmes -Hero’s Pub, 3811 N. Harrison St. Davenport, IA Dennis Florine -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St., Davenport, IA Dueling Pianos at The Establishment -The Establishment Theatre, 220 19th St. Rock Island, IL Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ -Parker’s, 635 15th St Moline, IL Firesale - Something to Do - Fairhaven -RME (River Music Experience), 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA

FRIDAY

15

Hillcrest Music Fest: Wild Oatz - Dirt Road Rockers - The Slough Buoys - The Dani Lynn Howe Band -Hillcrest Event Center, 16260 East 350th St. Orion, IL JC Brooks & the Uptown Sound -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA Justin Morrissey & Friends -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Chuck’s Tap, 1731 W. 6th St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL Karaoke Night -Roadrunner’s Roadhouse, 3803 Rockingham Rd. Davenport, IA Kooby’s Karaoke -Wide Open Bar & Grill, 425 15th St. Moline, IL Lucas Hoge -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA Mercury Brothers -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Mississippi River Motorcycle Rally Choppers Tent: Tronicity - The Tailfins - Sugar Nipples -Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds, 2815 W. Locust St Davenport, IA Mississippi River Motorcycle Rally Corona Stage: Wes Webber - The BMT Band - House Arrest -Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds, 2815 W. Locust St Davenport, IA Mississippi River Motorcycle Rally Scooter Tent: Corporate Rock - Natty Scratch - Geneva -Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds, 2815 W. Locust St Davenport, IA

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Hillcrest Music Fest: Sinners & Saints Wicked Liz & the Bellyswirls - Meet The Press - The Dani Lynn Howe Band - The Jimmie Van Zant Band -Hillcrest Event Center, 16260 East 350th St. Orion, IL John for Mayer -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Johnny Outlaw Band -The Lucky Frog Bar and Grill, 313 N Salina St McCausland, IA Karaoke Night -Chuck’s Tap, 1731 W. 6th St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL Karaoke Night -Roadrunner’s Roadhouse, 3803 Rockingham Rd. Davenport, IA Koiné (2pm) -Gethsemane Lutheran Church, 2410 E. 32nd St. Davenport, IA Kooby’s Karaoke -Headquarters Bar & Grill, 119 E. 22nd Ave. Coal Valley, IL Lee Blackmon -Bleyarts Tap, 2210 E. 11th St. Davenport, IA Lucas Hoge -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA Lynn Allen -River House, 1510 River Dr. Moline, IL Martina McBride -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA Mississippi River Motorcycle Rally Choppers Tent: The Funnies - Spike - Night People - Tri-Polar Xxxpress - Old 57’s -Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds, 2815 W. Locust St Davenport, IA Mississippi River Motorcycle Rally Corona Stage: Wes Weeber - Johnny Outlaw - 2nd Wind - The BMT Band -Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds, 2815 W. Locust St Davenport, IA Mississippi River Motorcycle Rally Scooter Tent: Nervous Rex - Pash-N-Brew - Hap Hazard - The Recliners - The King’s Kiss Farewell Show -Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds, 2815 W. Locust St Davenport, IA Funday Sunday with Dave Ellis (6pm) -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Jim Ryan (2pm) -Len Brown’s North Shore Inn, 7th Street and the Rock River Moline, IL Karaoke for Kids (3-5pm) -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL Past Masters (2pm) -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA Russ Reyman, Pianist (10am-2pm brunch) -The Lodge Hotel, 900 Spruce Hills Dr. Bettendorf, IA Sunday Jazz Brunch at Bix Bistro (10:30am & 12:30pm) -Hotel Blackhawk, 200 E. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Third Sunday Jazz: Willie Pickens (6pm) -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA 2012/06/19 (Tue) 2012/06/20 (Wed)

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 806 • June 7 - 20, 2012 

Night People (5:30pm) - Grazin’ District (9:30pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Russ Reyman Trio (6pm) -Phoenix, 111 West 2nd St. Davenport, IA Smooth Groove -Edje Nightclub at Jumer’s Casino and Hotel, I-280 & Hwy 92 Rock Island, IL Terry & the Loan Sharks -Mound Street Landing, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA The Music of Dr. Joe Seng -Joe’s Club, 1402 W. 7th St. Davenport, IA 2012/06/16 (Sat)

Open Mic Night -The Dam View Inn, 410 2nd St Davenport, IA Southern Thunder DJ Service (5pm) & Karaoke (9pm) -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL

WEDNESDAY

20

A Party to Go Karaoke Night -Wooden Nickel Saloon, 2042 W 3rd St Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Blackstones -Barrel House 211, 211 E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Blues Hounds -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Cosmic -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA Dennis Florine -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St., Davenport, IA Dirt Road Rockers - Grazin District -Daiquiri Factory, 1809 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL Dueling Pianos at The Establishment -The Establishment Theatre, 220 19th St. Rock Island, IL Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ -Parker’s, 635 15th St Moline, IL Funktastic Five -Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street Milan, IL Haddonfield - Those Dirty Thieves - Your Fallen Heroes - The Infinity Gauntlet -RME (River Music Experience), 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Hi-Fi -Schneid’s, 205 Washington Ave. Lowden, IA

SATURDAY

16

Richard Lloyd @ The Redstone Room – June 14
Mississippi River Motorcycle Rally: Night People (5pm) -Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds, 2815 W. Locust St Davenport, IA Night People -Tommy’s, 1302 4th Ave Moline, IL Nuclear Plowboys -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Open Mic Night -Downtown Central Perk, 226 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Russ Reyman, Pianist (7pm) -Phoenix, 111 West 2nd St. Davenport, IA Smooth Groove -Edje Nightclub at Jumer’s Casino and Hotel, I-280 & Hwy 92 Rock Island, IL Sonny Landreth -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA Tapped Out -Generations Bar & Grill, 4100 4th Ave. Moline, IL Terry Hanson Ensemble (2:30pm) -Moline Public Library, 3210 41st St. Moline, IL Wild Oatz -Jimmie O’s Saloon, 2735 Telegraph Rd. Davenport, IA Zither Ensemble (10am) -German American Heritage Center, 712 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA 2012/06/17 (Sun)

TUESDAY

19

A Party to Go Karaoke Night -Stacks Bar, 525 14th St. Moline, IL ABC Karaoke -Abblebee’s Neighborhood Grill - Elmore Ave., 3838 Elmore Ave. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -Barrel House 211, 211 E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -Ganzo’s, 3923 N. Marquette St. Davenport, IA Jason Carl & Friends -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL

The Brat Pack -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
The Funnies -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Them Som’Bitches & Busted Chandeliers -Bier Stube Moline, 417 15th St Moline, IL

ABC Karaoke -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Anthony Catalfano Quartet (10:30am) -Brady Street Chop House, Radisson QC Plaza Hotel Davenport, IA Brontosaurus - Centaur Noir - Speaking of Secrets -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Christopher Sheridan (4pm) -Broadway Presbyterian Church, 710 23rd St. Rock Island, IL Danika Holmes (2pm) -Wide River Winery, 1776 East Deer Creek Rd. Clinton, IA

SUNDAY

17

ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Acoustic Music Club (4:30pm) -RME (River Music Experience), 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) -O’Melia’s Supper Club, 2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock Island, IL Jam Night w/ Jordan Danielsen -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA Mike Blomme Group: Post-Gumbo Ya Ya Show -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL Open Mic Night -Cool Beanz Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL

Karaoke Night -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

Keller Karaoke -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Open Mic Night -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114 1/2 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Open Mic Night -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Rocktastic 4 -Rascals Live, 1418 15th St. Moline, IL Terry Stone (6pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA The Chris & Wes Show -Mound Street Landing, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA The Pub Unplugged: Live Acoustic Acts -The Pub, 4320 N. Brady St. Davenport, IA Troy Harris, Pianist (10pm) -Red Crow Grille, 2504 53rd St. Bettendorf, IA 

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 806 • June 7 - 20, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

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