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'News: Radio Audience Research: Shorter Commercial Breaks Lose Fewer Listeners' by Grant Goddard

'News: Radio Audience Research: Shorter Commercial Breaks Lose Fewer Listeners' by Grant Goddard

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Published by Grant Goddard
News story about new market research of radio audiences from the US that has demonstrated that fewer listeners tune away from a radio station when its commercial advertising breaks are shorter, written by Grant Goddard in February 2005 for The Radio Magazine.
News story about new market research of radio audiences from the US that has demonstrated that fewer listeners tune away from a radio station when its commercial advertising breaks are shorter, written by Grant Goddard in February 2005 for The Radio Magazine.

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Categories:Types, Research
Published by: Grant Goddard on Jun 09, 2012
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11/20/2013

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NEWS: RADIO AUDIENCE RESEARCH: SHORTER COMMERCIAL BREAKS LOSE FEWER LISTENERS by GRANT GODDARD

www.grantgoddard.co.uk February 2005

New research has shown that the longer a radio advertising break is, the greater the proportion of car radio listeners who switch to a different station. The study, by American research company Navigauge, demonstrated that while only a fifth of the station’s audience is lost after two commercials, more than half is lost after six consecutive adverts. It also found that the length of a commercial affects the audience’s likelihood to tune out. If the first spot in an advertising break is 30-seconds rather than 60-seconds, the erosion of the audience is reduced considerably, regardless of how many spots are in the break. Only 9% of the audience is lost after the first commercial if it lasts 30 seconds, whereas 13% is lost if the first spot is 60-seconds.
1 spot 88% 2 spots 79% 3 spots 71% 4 spots 64% 5 spots 56% 6 spots 48% 7 spots 46%

Audience retained after X spots

This study has immense significance for the radio industry because of the size of the sample – 500 respondents listened to 46,000 commercial breaks comprising 127,000 spots over a three-month period in Atlanta last autumn – and because the research used passive electronic monitoring to measure car drivers’ reactions. It is known that car drivers have a greater propensity to switch channel because of the proximity of the radio to their hand and because car radios have pre-set buttons and/or a 'search' facility to find radio stations. In the UK, car radio listening is not tabulated separately in RAJAR radio ratings data, although it had been in its predecessor, JICRAR.

[First published in 'The Radio Magazine' as 'Shorter Ad Breaks = More Listeners', #670, 12 February 2005]

Grant Goddard is a media analyst / radio specialist / radio consultant with thirty years of experience in the broadcasting industry, having held senior management and consultancy roles within the commercial media sector in the United Kingdom, Europe and Asia. Details at http://www.grantgoddard.co.uk

News: Radio Audience Research: Shorter Commercial Breaks Lose Fewer Listeners ©2005 Grant Goddard

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