NOTICE: PHOTOCOPIED MAtERIALS MAY BE PROTECTEDBY COPYRIGHT LAW (TITLE 17, U.S. CODE).

'"'
o
"U

--I

:r

v;
zr:

o
"U

o o "

..../
Bilderberg Conference

'<

April 13, 1966

Mr. Walter P.. Reuther Pres1de.nt~ UAW

International Unlon

'9000 East Jefferson AVe,nus

Detroit 14" Mlohigan

Dear Mr. ,Reu,ther:
I appr,eclated vetymuch your letter and the copy of the polley deCllaraUon adopted by the 1965 meetin9 of the, Int.ernational Oenfederetten of Free Trade Unions.
You certainly did good work in that Situation •

Also, I a,pp,re,clated receiving the ,full statement
of thepropos~.l

o-f Review whioh seems to me to have @feat merit. The BUderberg OonferencegaV'EI, mea ,real opportunity to learn and widen my horizons. On.e afthe memorable highlight,s of the meeting wa 9 the opportunity teget to know and vlett. with you
4

for :the oJ:'eat1onof e, 'Prioe-Wage

Board

I. looJ~forward to Visiting with you again:

FRED R. HARRIS U. S. Senate
FRRlmb

o ,...
Q zr

o 3 o

'I

w

a
-0

t.. o w

r~o'1lthe"CnH~tl.!)n of rtfEHClN. PJ~;::~:' Hf\RRJS
Collection

--------------------------

Series

------------------

Box

-:-,0

Folder

--------

3D

NOTICE: PHOTOCOPIED

MATERIALS MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT

LAW (TInE 17, u.s. CODE).

(;
"0

-c

a.
3

0

CD
3

o

CD

~
:3 c -e
:>

2n

sr (1) o

SULIDAID'VY

e

Flrr

E OF '.VJrlilP.R.Jl:SIDEN'1'

:l. 0

c:
tr: ID

a:

~
5"!D

o
0
:l..

»
0= III
::!.

RO

Slil

11. ID a..

April

1, 1966

n
0

ee

:::l

iD
::>

~ O·
Q_

'" '"
(II (1)

0

Dear Senator

Harris:
z,

;::
0 ::>

zr: a..

It was a great pleasure and personal privilege to have had the opportunity of visiting with you during the Bilderberg Conference in Wiesbaden last week. I believe that these conferences serve a very useful purpose, for they do afford the opportunity for people with differ ent backgrounds to share their views on some of the important questions that we face in our troubled world. You indicated that you would like a copy of the policy declaration adopted by the 8th World Congress of the International Conf'ede r at.ion of Free Trade Unions. which met in .Am.sterdam during the period of July 7 16, 1965. The ICFTU represents roughly 60 million organized workers in free trade unions throughout the world and the Congress was attended by delegates from approximately 100 nations throughout Asia, Africa. Latin America. Europe, the U. S. and Canada. When I arrived at the Congress, I was advised by our friends that the.re was a great deal of emotional heat and misunderstanding concerning the U. S. position in Vietnam and that Americans ought to be prepared for a very stormy session when this matter came to the floor of the Congress. I served as the Chairman of the Committee on Economic. Social and Political questions during the last six World Congresses of the ICFTU and I was again elected to serve in this capacity at the Amsterdam Con.gr e s a, I advised the members of the Economic, Social and Political Committee that we would hold the discussion of the overall world situation and the Vietnam problem until last so that we could spend as much time on this as was necessary.

Z" a.. iii'
:>

(/l

'" n (1)
~
(lJ

n
0 :>

;
:>

'" 5'
Q_

»
i'l
ID
,In

:r

'':-

'" ' <
GO

C

:t

;;:

Q...

0
1)

"'" :::r
0

,0

3

~ 0

...
Q_
;:<:I

~ ::r:
0

::> ::>

0 3
N

1"
0-

0

w
0 "1 5'

CP
ee

0" :>

0 _Q..

?

3 0

z 0
0
3

g:
:r 0 0 '-l

w

g
-0

k. 0 w ~

Coliection

Series

Box

folder

_

NOTICE: PHOTOCOPIED MATERIALS MAY BE PROTEOED BY COPYRIGHT LAW (TITLE17-

u.s.

CODE).

-23

o

~
-c

[_
3 o
:>

Q_ 0(I)

n
"tI

o

iii'

a...

g
"tI

I held the Committee in session for eight continuous hours with only a coffee break, and after much persuasion and patience, I was able to get a unanimous decision from the Committee in support of the resolution entitled, "Resolution on World Political Situation, IT which, in a general way. supports the position of the United States on Vietnam and other important political questions. The following morning, after the unanimous action by the Economic, Social and Political Committee, I reported for the Committee to the full Congress, and after my presentation and a number of questions which 1 answered from the platform, this statement of policy was adopted by the unanimous action of the Congress. For your information, I am enclosing a copy of the resolution and a partial list of the members of my Committee. I also agreed to send you a copy of a proposal which I have advanced for the creation of a Price-Wage Board of Review. We are presently in a very difficult situation because the emergency is not sufficiently serious to justify rigid governmental wage and price controls, but on the other hand, we cannot afford the risk of inflation which sole reliance upon tbe blind forces of the marketplace would inflict upon us, My proposal to create a Price-Wage Board of Review is an attempt to stake out a middle ground whereby we could create the pressures of enlightened public opinion to discipline both labor and managem.ent in an effort to make their voluntary price decisions responsible in term.s of the public good. I hope that you will find this proposal of interest. I am also enclosing a copy of my testimony before the Kefauver Subcommittee some years back, at which time I outlined my general thinking on this matter.

::r
(I)

()

c

»
ff'

:J...

~
(Q

()

iil
c: n
It>

'" g
::l

o

a a...
a...

.. ci"
o

<!> <It>

'"
o ::l a...
Vl

o

c :> -e
Q'
?
:>

o ::r

0'

'"

::r

co...
()
CD ::l

g
"tI
(I)

~.
~
()

a n
a...
5'

o ::l -c

::l (Q

o

o

:r
!g
"tI

if ;:l o

~ ~ ::r
~'

iii

o ~

~.

-'"
;;;>

c
:C'

~ ~

Q.,

o ,....
0"
::r

_o

3

o

~ o
:>

" l!.

J" o "" o
3
IV

I

_N

o
0W

o

if
(Q

5"

s :>

_e...
o
o ?

o < z o ,....
a ::r
o
3
'l

3

o
W

o -o s, o ::3

Collection __

__:_

Series

Box

Folder __

---

NOTICE; PHOtOCOPIED MAtERIALS MAY BE PROTECTED IT COPYRIGHT LAW (TITLE 11, U.S. CODE).
-t :::r ;;:;"

-3-

Again, it was good to have seen you in Wiesbaden and I hope to have the privilege of seeing and visiting with you at some time in the future. Kindest personal regards and all good wishes ..

Sinc.erely,

WPR:ob oeiu 42

The Honorable Fred R. Harris United States Senator Senate Office Building Washington, D, C.

o
I

'" '" !a
.g,

,.,
o o
3

.tv 0w

o '" o
:::!.

?
OJ (C OJ

0" o .-

o -c

z o 3 o
o
o

.OJ

g
0" zr:
3
'-.I

w

o

"P f>o w :--

Colleclion

Series

Box.

Folder

_

NOTICE: PHOTOCOPIED MATERIALS MAY I.E PROTEClED BY COPYRIGHT LAW (TITLE 17,

u.s..CODE).

~
50

:r o

~.
ii
"C III

"

#

s _" :r iii'
::I

3 ~-.

RESOLUTION

ON WORLD POLITICAL,

SITUATION

c

[
![
'3 -c

n

" s
(II

Adopted by unanimous action of the Eighth World Congress meeting in Amatezdam :from,7.~16 July 1965.

of the IGFTU ,.

O"'

n
"C

o

s 0..
iii
c

RECOGNIZES

"C

a 0..
n
<II

0..

was founded, the higb hopes of the people for living in a world of peace, freedom and just.ice have not been realized, that serious political tensions and great, soctat injustice continue and that the peace remai.ns tnaecuz-ej

that twenty years after the United Nations

n o
«)

" "

~ o·

,.,
Q_

~:

THAT

the United Nations itself is in grave crisis, the vital work of 0 ", its General As<sembly paralyzed and the progre,sB which has ~ been achieved by the existence of a world organization de,signed~ '" to further world peace; economic development and social ;; betterment, threatened 9Y the re.fusal of the Soviet Uni.on and ~ other countries to meet their finandalobligatione: 0
. .

'" i'!
c

zr

o
@

(C

",
tl

THAT

ra.ce, which threatens mankind with nuclear deatructionand impedes the improvement in living standards everywhere, continues unabated and that Gom.munist China and France, having refused to sign the treaty on the partial ban .(;>n nu.clear tests which has beenra.t1fted. by virtually all otb.er independent countries, have undertaken, and plan to und-crtake further explosions of nu.c1ear devices: solemnly the wholehearted support whIch the governing bodies o·fthe International Coniederati,ofi. of Free Trade Unions have always given to the constructive and indispen.sable work ·0£ the Uni ted Nati.ons; to all member states of the United Nations to spare no effort to solve the con.stttutional and financialcrisLs of the world ol'ganiza.tion and. to enable it to perform its pea.ce-keeping, econorrric," andaoeial function.s as e£fectivelyas possible. in a truly democratic, progressive spiriti warmly the appeal made re,cently by the Disarmament Cornmission of the United Nations to extend the ban on nuclear weapona' tests to all countries and toa11 kinds of teats and endoz aea a.s well the invitation which the CommissIon haa extended to the 18~Na.ti.on Disarmament Committee in Gen.eva

the armaments

~,


Q_

~ n

~. _'"

:r

REAFFIRMS

g g: o
_is

APPEALS

~
o 3

::r:

,.,
o
I'V

_s
W

0-

o

ENDORSES

~' ~. 6" "
_!L

9
z o

~

3

o ,....
1)

o 3 o ...... w o

:r

-0

b. o w

;-'

Collection __

--'-

Series,

Box,

Folder

_

NOTICE: PHOTOCOPIED MATERIALS MAYBE PROTEOED BY COPYRIGHT LAW (TITLE 17, u.s. CODE).

or " o

c

0'
<>

o -c
"C

3

a.
c

!f s:
<1>

;;;-

::r

to reconvene as early as possible, to strive toward general ~ and complete disarmament under effective international if inspection and control, to prevent the proli.feration of nuclear ~ wea.pons, and to convert to programs of economic development and social prog-ress a subetanttal part of the resources which would be gradually re·leased 'by the reduction of military ~ expenditures i ~

s;

l!.
::J

r
t: 0'

...
"C
!D

a

Cl...

c ..,
!D

c,

:i' c
'<
::J

EMPHATICALLY STATES that the strengthening and the unity of the forces of free labor, which has always been in the forefront of the fight for bread, peace and freedom, are essential prerequisites for achieving these goals) VIEWS

e_ : l; ~ ~
Cl...
::> VI

..
::>

Q' zr: ?
"C

a
Q

o ..,
!D

~ o :r ~
"C

5' o

c...

with utrno st concern the number of trouble spots where world [ iii' peace is threatened by armed conflict, such as the serious and ;; growing conflict in Viet Nam, Indonesian aggression against ~ <I> Malaysia, the threat of further Communist-Chinese aggression ~ against India, and other armed conflicts or thre;:Ltening conflict~ all nati(;ms involved in such disputes to end the conflict by resolving their differences at the conference table; and calls upon the United Nations to strengthen and intensify its efforts to provide the leadership in bringing the nati,ona together in order to negotiate peaceful" settlements of disputes and to establish appropriate machinery through the United Nations to insure the eftective implern.entation and policing of such peace agreements so that further aggressian and conflict can be prevented in trouble spots throughout the wor ldj and
that the internationa.l trade union movement, as the spokesman for free labor everywhere, must r edcuble its effGrta and give the highest priority to strengthening the forces for peace, freedom. and social justice, wlthin the framework of a rational and responsible world community based on freedom for all nations and !Qr a.ll human beings and directed toward's rapid economic and social progress.
iil Il: 0'

URGES

a
}>

0>

iil

g,
0'

i'l ::r

,'"

<' !D

~

DECLARES

~ 5
~
o o
:;0

3

- ... -._-------,--_.14 July 1965

~

9
z o
~

,::J

o """ o zr:
c
3 c
'-J

w

o
-o
.f:,..

o w

Col Iection_

__

---'-

Series

-

Box

Folder

_

NOTICE: PHOTOCOPIED

MATERIALS MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT LAW (TITLE 17,

u.s. CODE).
;,;' ii>'
-I :r

~
0

'3'-

~ ~ ~ ~
-0 11>

o

\J :r

o
('>

s
o

-0

-c

3 r;;;"

? '3';;;'
0

'" 0'
3 iQ

INTER.NATIONAL CONFEDERA'tlON

OF FREE TRADE UNIONS

EIGHTH WORLD CONGRESS
Amsterdam, Report 0·£ the Economic, 7 - 16 July 1965 Social ~nd Political

..
Committee

S"
3 0 -c

2Il>
('>

:>

0-0

0

iii'
0...

1.

The Committee h-eld it.s first meeting on 10 July 1965 at 2:30 p. m. The Committee
Chairman:

0
-0

a
('>

~

a 0...
c:
<D

2.

elected the following officers:
W. Reuther B.. O. Fogam.

0...

(United States) (Cameroon)
(Netherlands)

5'
0

-c

::l

Vice - Chairmen:

_~
0'

0' '" :r

~ 0
....
('>

A. H. Kloos A. M. Villalba Rapporteur: P. P .. Na.rayanan

(Vene zue Ia] (Malaysia)

-0

011> 0.. :> 0 ::>

.,

-c 0
11>

3.

The Committee was composed of the following:
A. M. Haider

s....

@
-0

ATUC
Asociadon Bancaria

0

~

'" 5'

J. M. Pomares A. O. Saino
A. E, Monk

CGEC
ACTU

A. Benya

OGB STY FGTB
Teixeira CNTI

Aden Argentina. Argentina Australia
Austria

M. R. Arangutz
N. De Bock J. R. Fassbender R. Marinho J. H. Pollydore G. B. Fogam W. Mahone y S. Thondaman
W. H. Tang

'Basque Country Belgium Bra.zil
Brazil

CONTCOl?

BGTUC
CLC

British

Guiana.
o '" o
3 o _rv
0N

WCTUC

ewe CFL
eTC

J. R. Mercado

C arne r-oon Canada Ceylon China Columbia

w

o

g
co
::>

5'

;;

_!:L
Z

o <
o

3
?
Q

o ,....
or

1l

o
Q

3

" o
W

'P
o w

~

Collection

Series

Box

Folder

_

NOTICE: PHOTOC,OPIEO MATERIALS MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT LAW (TIlL,E.IT, U.S. CODE).

§
T

-t
0;'

:::l' 0;'

o

!;.

1:
'1J

~.

~

5" _~
~,

'"

"

.. 2..
A. Diaz GArcia A•. R.Klthima R. A. Siwa N. Z:i.vanas N. C. Taakln F. T. Tekie

~ t;;~
3

it

o

~
3
-<
Q

UTe CSLC FGTK

" 9tT <11
<"I

ewe
SAJ

(',(olumbia Congo (Leo) Congo (Leo)

CTTUF
CELU

Cyprus Cyprus,
Ethiopia Finland Finland Fr'snce Gabon Germany Great Britain lndla

"U (b'

o

CL

Q
;g
"U
C <"I
<1)

N. Wallar!
N. NUSB,on G. Vel'1tejol Es sone ... ' Dong N H. Beermann R. Smith

g_
CL 5'

SAl< COT-FO

CNTG

c -c "

c

nOB
HMS

."
::I

s0'
o

K. Manohar
K. Mukher jae

Tue

Q -g_
5·' o " -c o T

z, Levin
D .. COppa E. Dalla Chle sa K. Klbata A. Zeina..ti M...Hinterscheid P. H. A. V. M. P .. Narayanan Ratnnarain H. Kloos M.. L Jack A. Khatib

INTUC
HlSTADRUT

India
1ara.e1 Italy

o III
o => w
<I>

" c...
<11

-

CISL DOMEr
St.JL

n

" ~

UIL

Italy
Japan. Lebanon Luxembul' g Malaysia Ma:u.ritiu s Netherlands Nigeria Pakistan Pa~ma Peru Philippines Puerto Ri.co Puerto Rko Spain Sweden Switzerland

~
=>

0'

~
;g

a,

-0

»i'l :::l'
C

S

~

5'

COT
.MTUC MLC ULeN APCOL

~~
:<. "

NVV

-z:
7<""

3

9.,

o
o 3

a :r
~ o
=>

J .. B,ernal 5. Tamariz San.chez J. J. Hernandez N. Noguera s H. Marcano P. Tomas E.. Jansson H. Dttby H. M.Luande J. Figueiras W. P. Reuther A. M. Villalba

.0

CTP GTP
PTUC FLTP.R.

" !!!.
~
o

:r:

FTPR
'OOT

_~
3
"-J'

o ""

o

LO SOB

0-

w o
.."

UTUC
AFL-CaO GTV

Q

csn

Uga.nda
Urugu.ay United States Venezu.ela

co

".
=>

_£.. Z o

o " o <
3 o

_"

o
:3

'" C :r o
o
'-J
(,,>

2

-e o
w

Collection

Series

Box

Folder

_

NonCE: PHOTOCOPIED MATERIALS MAY BE PROTEOEDBY COPYRIGHT LAW (TiTlE 17, us, CO.D.E) •.

The following Congress

deleg,ates are substi.tute members ACTO

.of the Committee:

A. Hayes
A. Tesch!

CGB
STY

" AI.:Lstl'alia Austria
Basque Country Belgium
FriJ;nce Ohina Ge.r.many Germany Great Bri tain Israel

P. Herran D. Sm.ete
.A. Auxin

FOTS DOB

L. Kwang
D., W. C. M. Y. Bre.nner Hafe"rkamp Lowthian Ra.vid Yudin

GGT-Fe CF'L

DGB

HISTADRUT HISTADRUT erst, CISL LIOUE NVV

Tue

Israel
Italy Italy Lebanon Neth.er lands Sweden United States Venezuela

N. dePampWUa

Mrs. G. ~a.duel
A. Chlha.

H.. Bere'nds J. Os·tlund
P. Phillips J. O. Navarro

Teo

AFL-CIO
CTV

D. Benedic tand
C .•

C. Gasserini

IMF

Levi.neon

reF
PSI:

E. Kissel T. S. Savin

IFCGTE IFPAAW

P. Tofahrn
Ob servers from non ..afiUiated trade u.nionorganisations.~ (Mauritania)

E. M. Kane T. E. Mswa.k.a.

(SouthefD RhodeeLa

African

TUG)

oeiu4Z/dm 8 ..20 .. 65

Collecucn

Series

Box

Folder

_

NOTICE: PHOTOCOPIED MATERIALS MAY IE PROTEOED BY COPYRIGHT LAW (TITLE11, U.S, CODE).

::£
o
~,

s
if :::>
'tl ID

"C ::r

o

o -<

s n

"C

3

~.
P T o
(if

March 22, 1966

0'

,,' 3
:::!.

A PRICE~WAGE

BOARD OF REVIEW

9... 3 o -e
:::>

The rno at se.riQus \hre-at of inflation today is the danger af the abuse of economic power by the large corporations Motors and U. S. Steel which dominate whole industries to set the prices competitiveforcea. This Adminlstration has acted effectively and im.aginatively price increases, of their products. like General and are able

Q.
0" ID

n
'C

o

iii'

a... Q
'tl

iti

a a...
c: n
ID

well insulated from any real

a...

,,' o
-c

g
0'
::>

"

or

? Q
'tl

to curb the most flagrant atte.mptB at unjustifiable but the use of the President's

a n
ID

a...
o ::J -c

s
o
-t

authori.ty and prestige for this pu.rpose

suffers from three major limitations. 1. It can be brought into play only after a price increase has been announced. __ There i's no m.achinery for advance notice. 2. It puts the whole prestige each time. of the President damagmg , on the line this is a

:TID 'tl

iil
o
!e,

-:<

0'

One failure would be extremely
01'1

weapon that can be used only
3,

special occaetcns , in Yet the

It can db nothing to bring about price reductions

industries

with above-average

rates of productivity has repeatedly

advance.

Council of Economic Advisers reductions are essential

insisted
Gf overall

that such price pricestabi.llty, in
-c _Q..

to the maintenance

because they are needed to offset unavoidable price increases low-pl!'oductivity industries.

o
3
Z o

o ?

o
",.

C
zr o 3 o

'" S
to>

1. o w

0()

Collection

Series

Box

Folder

-

NOTICE: PHOTOCOPIED MATERIALS MAY BE PROTECTEDBY COPYRIGHT LAW (TITLE 17, U.S. CODE)•

. price.wage a

board of r'oview - page Z for example, in its 1964 r-epGl't the Council aaid:

Thul,

thi. yeu on BJlii~tll'eductionl.
sr:
Cl>

Q

to focul apoetal attention The auidepost. call for reduction. in thol. indult"l"ies who•• tl'end pl'o'ductivity gaiD e¥:ceed.. the n_noaal tre'nd. ••• If they are not iorthcomtng, averaU price .tability wi1l be rendered more difficult, aiQce price increAses are likely In. tndultrlea that are progl'elsing at a le ... -thanavellage :rate. II (en:J.phailbl ineriginal) " •••• It i8 appropdate the Couna1l laid:

Again in its 1966 report

IIWhU. individual prices will ri8e from tim.e to time. other', must fall if upward pre •• ue e eln the general priQe level is to be avoided .. II And Gardner to the Pharmaceutical Ackley, Chairman of the· Council.
01'1

in a apeeeh 1965, said!

Manufacturers

A_sodation

May as,

'1Mo.t bu.ine_8lmen •••• like to talk about the virtues llf a .table pri.ee 10..,.1. l hope they don'f; forget. the arithmetic whi!O'h ,a.y_ that it the average price level 11 to be stable. aa
many prices have to go do~ a. go up."
,

A. long ago a. January

38. 1958),. I propo.ed .,

in teatimmlY

before the Kefauver Com.mittee the eliltabli.lun~Dt of machinel'Y in the ior-m of a Prioe- Wage Boal"dof Review and Counsel to meet the problems economy. committee.
a:t1.

Office of GOI'l8UIXler price. in a free

""
o o
3

of administered

t..>

'"
0w
::1. ::J

o

The idea wall not original a very limil'ar

with me b~dau.ef all 1 told the

o
c,o

propoaal had been introduced in the form

?
0::J

of a bill by the late Senatot OIMahoney a8 early as July lB, 1948. It
was an idea which I felt deserved to be revived.

.~
Z

o

o ?

3
c

o ~
5
o ~ 'P J>. o w

3 o

'-I

w

Coliection __

_:__

Series

Box

Folder

_

NOTICE: PHOTOCOPIED

MATERIALS MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT LAW (TITLE 11, U.S. CODE).

Q

""0

::r

o 0"
n

a pric e ..wage board of l"eview - page 3

~

o

3 o

The proposal would e.stablish a Price~ Wage Board of Review to which the dominant company in any key industry required prices. to give advance ti.otice of any intention to increase w0111dbe its

[
3
-c

§: o

" 20lD

n
"'C

o

iii"

The Board would then hold a public hearing at which it all the pertlnent economic facts to be brought out.

0...

Q
(ij
"'C

would require

a

0...

c: n

ID 0...

The BGard would have no power to approve or disapprove a price increase, but it would publish a report of its findings and

:l'

~ o
III

Q

0" ?
:>

::r

recommendations, tiona.

together with the facts 8UpPGrt~ng its recommendawas not justifiable. wouldtmpose to follow. it the

Q
"'C
(1)

Q
n
0...

If the se facts showed that an increase

s
a

would be a rare increase

case in which a major corporation

~ o :r
!!!
"'C

and brave the publlcuproar of cases,

that would be sure

iii

~

0"

g.

In the great majority a price increase,

no corporation

would even propose

knowing that it would have to make pubUc the unless it: was (:Qnfiden.tthose facts

facts about its economi€:position, did justify

a price increase.
Unions would also be subject to the hearin.gsprocedure when elairned it would

appropriate.

Whenever a corporation

subject. to the procedure

that it would have to raise prices could so notify the Board, then be summoned fa-cta.

if it gave in to union demands;

and both the un-ion and the corporation

to a hearing and required

to produce the relevant

The 8 o,a1'1 , for e»ample, (

wodd find out just how the union i s

Coliection __

_:_

Series

Box

Folder

-

NOTICE: PHOTOCOPIED MATERIALS MAY BE PROTECTEDBY COPYRIGHT LAW (TITLE 17, U.S. CODE).

c

a price-wage

board Qf review - page 4

demands would affect the corporation's
3

profits;

whether wages ar
01'

~
3 -c

:l,

relev,ant binge average;

benefits

in the induatl'Y were above

below

9c
Q ".
(]"" (l)

whether the rate of productivity

advance in the induBtry facta.

n

-o

o

was above or below average,

and other pertinent

iii'

c,

The Council of Economic Advisers ha.s poihted out that there are circu.mstances does require given industry, were exorbitant, in which a wage increase 18 justified even if it

"C

iil
co

a o,
n

~
"<
:l

:i' a

a price increase,. the hearing

If this were tbe situa.tion in a
But if the union's demands

Q '" zr: 0' ?

would reveal it.

" Q
"2o
n
<II Q_

that would be revealed.

If. on the other hand, the

COnlpany could well afford to grant them. without raiSing pri.ces. that fact wOl.lld be made apparent. As in the ease of a hearing involving a corpo.ration alone,

5' o
"<

'"

2':T !1> .,
-0

iil

~

o !!!, 0'

the Board would publish a rep0rt containing its findings and l'e-eommendation$ and the su.pporting tacts. Both sides would then

go ba.ck to the bargaining

table free to act as they saw fit, but with and was equipped to pass The

the knowledge that the public had the facts, an informed judgment on the result

of their negotiations.

union and the corpolfation alike would be subject to the same dieeipline--the need to accept .fu11public responsibility which affect the public interest. for pr-ivate,

voluntary decisions

Collection __

...:...

------

Series

Box

Folder

_

NOTICE: PHOTOCOPIED MATERIALS MAY BE PROTECTEDBY COPYRIGHT LAW (TiTlE 17, U.S. CODE).
--I

:r
0;'

;;;.

o
"'C
tr:

o

0"

a price-wage

board of 'review - page 5

~

8
3

a.
;;;:r
(D

o

One fl1nction of the Consumer
3

Counlil'el would be to he coufd make a were too hlgh, and reduction.

if o·
cr-c

o c;

::I.

-c

Q... 3 o
:::0

initiate a he,aring befQre the Board whenever erima. j,acia e as e that prices that the relevant

a:::
sto
()

S.
n
"'C

in a given industry

o

"'-

go
iii"

economic facts justifieG a price

a...

The whale procedure would operate on the pl'inciple that in a free society interest private decisions which s,eriQusly affect the public of judgment by an the

should be subject to the discipline
In practice.

enlightened pubric opWcm. procedure

it iii ta be hoped.

would not only give the publh: the information

which it

would need in Qrder to fOl'm an intelligent price q"lestions. of the whole price

opinion as to. specific

but would also cQntrlbu.te to public understanding and wage system,

ana

would result

in the gradu.al

build.ing up and aceepta.nce by the pl1bUc of a body of reliable for the judgment of both price and. wage behavior. A rno're detailed outline of tbe proposal is attaehed.

criteria

_Q. z
o

o
3 o

_'"

o ,.,..
Q
:::r

o 3 o

" o
w

~

to

Coliection

Series

Box

Folder

_

NOTICE; PHOTOCOPIED

MATERIALS

MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT

LAW (TITLE 17, U.S. CODE).

s- HEARINGS ON ADMINISTERED ;;;"
3 o

ECONO

OUTLINE OF PROVISIONS OF BILL TO REQUIRE PRICE INCREASES IN ORDER TO MAKE PRIVATE C DECISIONS MORE RESPONSIVE TO PUBLIC NEED

~ ~
3
Q.

[_

"

1.

PurpOS,!
To bring
&11

0-

tt> n
"0

o iD"

imormed public opinion to bear 11poaprice pBlicy iD
&8

o,

Q
"0

adml.n1atered price luau.trio. influ.eace of competition

a Bub.titute for tho price-re.training

iil a..

(3

'"
o
-c

which i. lacking in .neh iDdu.trie ••

n (II o, 5"

..
s
'"

a
tr:

"

z.

Admintatrative (a)

Machinery on

-" " Q
""C

ei"

A Price- Wage Board of Review to conduct hearius_ pYiee merea.e. propoaea by certain corporatioll8.
COD.WIler

C

0...

-

5· o
'<

(b)

A COII.um.81" Couaael to repre. eDt the

and

o

!!!
iil "0 o
~"

s-

public tater. It in .uch beariD.a.
The relation.hip might be dmilar

~

0"

between the Board aDd the ConI'umer COUDsel
Board and

to tli8.t between the NatiODa~Labor RelatioDs

tbe General COUll •• l of the NLRB.

3.

Coverage The legialatioa Ihould cover corporations tnduatl'iea.
in a position to act

&8 "price criteria

leader."

in tb.e'ir respective

Speci£lc &lid objective

Ihould be dameel to determine eategory. Total coverage required

the corporatiODs that fall iDto tl1e Ibould be limited to t'he minimum the bailie pDrpo.ea of the

I!pr:lce leader'l

Dumber of corporation. bilL

to accompli.b.

Onepo8Bible criterion

{or coverage could be:

all corporatio8s

Collecticn

Series

'_Box

Folder

_

NOTICE: PHOTOCOPIED MATERIALS MAYlE

PROTEOED IY COPYRIGHT LAW (TITLE .7,

u.s. CODE) •

..2accou.nting for ZS percent or more of total salel in a major industry. (Such corporations
n
"U

:rIl>

could be identified

from data in the files of the Under this criterion, lndustries only a

()

o

:!...

o

Census Bureau,

the SEC and the FTC.)

,ii'
Q_

limited number of giant cOl'poraUona covered.

in major

would be

"U
<::

iD

a o,
n <I> n,
:>

r ...

c

4.

Advance Notification

of Proposed

Price I~crea8es

Coveli"ed corporations

should be required

to notify the Price ...
and should be

Wage Board of Review of intention to increase prohibited specified from putting such a price minimum period (perhaps increase

a price,

lAto effect for a long to and

60 or 90 days) sufficiently

permit the Board to hold hearing.

on the proposed price increase The corporations

to iSBue tts .flnding.a cO"Beerning such increaae. should be required to supply to the Board, filing of the notice,

slmulta.neous~y with their pertinent to the

o
7<"

all data which they oonsider

0"

o
_0

~
3

proposed price increase. has been received

The Boaz-dshould pllblish" the fact that notice
f01"

s: o
'" ~
:>

and make available

exalnination

by groups listed

I

~
o o 3
::0:1

below under ·'Other Appearancesll

the data filed with such. notice.

.!'-l

t5

s.

Waiver of Hearings Upon analyd. of. the data submitted with the notice, and alter

0w

o

d'
en

~ s:
5

a reasonable

time has been allowed for examination

of the data by all

fo.

'" o -c z o
3 o

_:>

o
7<'"

C zr: o
3

o

......
w "P
w o

o

~

Colleclion __

....:...

Series

Box

Folder

_

NOTICE: PHOTOCOPIED

MATERIALS

MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRJGHT LAW (TITLE 17, U.S. CODE).

3 o <D 3 o

SAt.rested

parties.

the Board. with the

COIlSeDt

of the Con.Ulner COUIl.el. the prOposed prlc.e however. setting the

[_

Ithould be empowered increase

t'O waive hearings

al'ld,permit

-< :::l g_
0lD

to go iDto effect immediately.

In such casee, a report

-0

o "
iii'
e..

Boardshmuld

be l'equi.red to publish promptly

tortb the

reucma {or so dom ... 6. Em.el'gency
Price

lacrease
in production coata createa prior to to an

UpODa claim that an increue emergen.cy e.qliratio requ.iring the corporation of the Dotice·period,

to raiae it. prices

the corporation

ahDU:ldbe permitted however, to make

raiee ita prieN within tb&t perlod.

In 8uehca.e.

the Board. finding as or not

in addition to ita other tlndiDg.. would be required to wbether
01'

not aut:h. an emergency ~

ill

fact " .xi.ted aDd whether .

the pric. increase production supported
COltl.

exceeded the amount required to meet illereaBed

It it fouad that the claim of eme-rge-ncy was not
the corporat.ion would be required to rebate equal to three

by the fact.,

to
time.

every ouato-rner who p id the price

iDcrea •• &unages

tae amount of such price increase for product. period.
In the evat the ultimatepurcha8er the corporatloa above.

lbippeddurlng the Dotiee

of the products ill question
a fine equal

could Dot be ascertained, to the triple damagel

would be 8u:bJectto If an emergency

specified

was foulld to exle'

o
Ci

z o
,OJ

3 o

o
7<C'

0'
zr o 3 o

'I

w

o

t: o
w ~

Collectlon __

___:__

Series

Box

Folder

_

NOTICE: PHOTOCOPIED

MATERIALS MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT LAW (TITLE 17, U.S. CODE).

3

o

ii

bu.t it wa

allO

fCI!lmd that the price
Dr

increaae

exceeded

the
eXC ••

COBt
8.

increaae,.

~

the triple aaJn,age. rebate

fine watlold ~pply tg the

1.
o ..,

Price ReduetioR H_al'ml .• The Consumer
COUll ••

t ahowd be empowered to inttiate
&

hea.l'ing •

when. in hiB Judgment. there is reason to believe that subject to the legislation This procedure higb ... rodl1ctivlty p price mere .....

corporation

should reduce the price of any of ttl prodllctB. in order to a •• uee the price redllctiona in

is essential

indu.str'ie8 which are eB.ential in low-prouu.ctivlty industries.

to offset !..U1avoidable

11 a corporation
price reduction,

r~8poi1deQ to the notice of a hearil'1g with an acceptable the hearing cOlAld, of
COlU'.e,

be cancellod.

8.

SLtbpoena

Power

The Conlwner Ccumsel 'Would have PGwer to· lubpoena wUnesses,
to examine tbem fully, and records.

net to reqllire

prodaction

of all po.rtinent books

9.

Involvement

of UniOn.8 price 'in.crease would

If a c:orporation cl.tm8 that it, propoled be. requbed as .. reault of granting union demana"

the Con,su:mer Couns-el of the: union.

would be empowered

to lubpoen.& and examine

repre.entaUvea

Colieclion __

.....:-

Series----------Box---Folder----

NOTICE: PHOTOCOPIED

MATERIALS MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT LAW (TITLE 17, U.S. CODE).

-.5·...

UnIon and corporation examine
(I>

representative.

would be pernlitted. to

Cr08&-

a.eb other.

r::r

10.

Other Appearuu:e. Reprea.ulativea of Wliofts, of con.~l' organlzationl. of

corporations

pa..rcbaatng products government

affect,ed by the propolled price lncrea.~i .tate, or local) should be

and of interested

agencies (federal,
voluntarily. witnel.e.

allowed to parti.cipate granted by the Boa,rd.

in the hearings Stich voluntary

subject to permission

warlld be :reqtJ.ired to

n ID
:::>

~ 8ubDlit to crolls"examinatlon

and wou.ld be per-mltte-d to cross-examine taken at the hea.ring. would be

n
o
e\ 0'

co " ;
:::>

corper

tion witnesses.

All teltimony

a,

tinder oath.

»-

n zr:

1!
11. Open Hearing.

<'

c
:::> :('

~ ~.

All hearing.
and television.

IIIbouldbe open to the pu,bUc, the preas.
of possible "confidentiality"

and radio
types
It

s, ~
o 3

(The matter

'of certain

0" ::r

,0

of data sboald be CODsidered in. drafting the propDsed legislation. sbQQld be kept in mind in thil connec:tden, i. premised on the absence of pric however.

~ o
;:I ::J

~

that: the logililation

I

~

competition

1n the In&utrles "competitive

""
o o 3
,"-1

o '"
0W

a.U'ected; that. therefore, Bearets"

there are not apt to b. genuine

o

related to COltl and pricesi
a8

and that the pllbUc intereat

is ••

~ :;:
(0

0'
::l

deeply involved

in pu.bl1c utility

rate hearing.

in which aU pertinent

,Q.

o
z o
3 o

,;:I

o
"""
o w

C ::r o 3

" 9
~ w ~

Colieclion

~ __

~

Series

~

Box

Folder

-

NOTICE: PHOTOCOPIED

MATERIALS MAY IE PROTECTED IY COPYRIGHT LAW (TITLE 17, U.S. CODE).

-6(acts are pubUcly available. certain types of information If. neverthele required •• , it eb..o-uldbe decided that

,

for purposes

of the hearings

should be treated as "con!lduti

1" the Board might be empowered to go

into ea.ecutive 8es.ton whUesllch iDformatlol'l was being presented and
cOllsldered with tb.e participant8 peaalUea for pubUc disclosure in 8uch executive liIesaioDa subject to of such imormatioD. )

IZ.

Finding After obtaining all the pertinent facta, the Board should publish together with the facti

a report

of ita finding. and recommeadatioos. To aad.t

Irupporting such reeommeAdatiou. each party to the beal'iDga--the
the UDicm. customer

the Board in this task. the Coasumer COUflael. a.ncI

corperatlon.
t

corporatiGIl.

cOllsumer or ganizaticms and government Buhmlt to the Board at the conclusion

agencies,

i.EallY are mvolved--mlght

of the hearings

a list of itl cODteati0ll8. and the Board could state ita to each of aueh coateatioDs.
of the notice period.

finding. with respect

The limlings should be

pubUabed before tbe expiration

13.

P·enaltie. Penalties should be provided for £at111!'. to give the required for failure to reapoDd to subpoenas, who te.tifiea, &ad for perjury.

notice of a propoaed price increase. for tald.Dg reprisal.

agai.u8t &By person

a
~

z o
3

C ,:I

0" ::r o 3 c
'-.I

o ,....

w

a

t: a
w , ,

Colieclion

Series

Box

Folder

_

NOTICE: PHOTOCOPIED

MATERIALS MAY IE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT LAW (TITLE 11, U.S. CODE).
-I ::.--

Ui"
0;"

o
"1J

zr:

o
"'0

a n
o
-c

-73

o

!f
3 a -<
:I

£:
Q.
I:T
(I)

The penalties

should be severe enougb (particularly

in the case of

fa.ilure to give notice) to deter vi.olations.

In the event of failure to for production of books.

n
"1J

o

respond promptly to subpoenas or to requests records, etc., or if the corporation

iii'
e...

is found to be engaging in other

"'0

ib

a o,
c: n
(I) Q_

dilatory tactics,

the Board should be empower-ed to extend the period

during which no change in pric,es would be permittedi

14.

No Price or Wage Con.trol Regardless
of any finding or recommendation

that the Board

may make, upon expiration of the notice period (or any extension of it), the corporation would be free to determine .its own pricee (to the extent

specified in its original notice or to any 1esBer extent), would be free to pursue its demands. corporation opinion. This procedure. of Presidential of course, The only restraint

and the union on the

and the union would be the restraint

of enli~htened pubUe

would not rule out the possibility insisted on

intervention

in a case where a corporation wbich the hearings the President

imposing a price increase unjustifiable. In that case,

had shown to be clearly

would then be in the position

of having a fully informed public opinion from which to mobilize support. In the great majority of casea, that no company would be prepared however,
it can be anticipated

~

o <
z o
3

to face the unfavorable publicity

a ?

o ,....
0" zr: o 3 o
'I
(.->

s:!
;,._
o
(.->

-0

:-'

Collection

Series

Box

Folder

_

NOTlCE:PHOlOCOPIED

MAURIALS MAY BE PROTECTEDBY COPYRIGHl LAW (TIlLE 17, U.S. CODE).•

..
o -c

--I
:3'"
"

(;;'

:3'"

o o -<
-c

1i
n

-8... botutdto rl.8efrom.uch wouldn.ot auac:t1on.

m. moat

ca.". it pr.ice i_rea

••

even be propo.ed,

·whe.D the company kDewa public headng it wu.urethat

wa. likely to .reeult. jaatily
aD

wee.

the ecollomlc (acta did

mer ... e,

ope.iu4Zafl ... .io c

Colieclion

Series

Box

Folder-----

NOTICE: PHOTOCOPIED

MATERIALS MAY IE PROTECTED IY COPYRIGHT LAW (TITLE 17, U.S. CODE).

BILDERBERG

Weisbaden, Germany

MEETING

MaTch

1966

3

o

ii 3 o
::l

[_
g,
<II

March 31, 1966

-c

<::r

-"Q. <II a.

8

9

VJl". Emilio G. Collado ,30 Rockefeller Plaza New york 20, Nell' York.

D~

Mr. Col1a:dn:c P

petroleum engineering gr duate from the University ot 'l\I.lsa.
The Bl1derberg .meeti.ns waea real edueat10n for me and I was grateful fOl" the Q11Portunlty to: get tQlm.ow and visit with ¥CU. next I hope' t.bQ.t wb.en you or Dr. Vazquez are ill Wasblngton you will givE,l1Ue a %ling.

concerning 1681'1'1: that

Thanks a million for the follow-up letter
Dll'• Biro Vazquez.

this

Director

! am fOOst proud to of your cOOJp'-.ny S' a 1

.

c:
::>

~. a. o z;
o zr o 3 Fl
::l
::l

~

SincerelY yours.
\

~ o
!t

U. S. Senate

FREDR.

HAlUUS

~
o

:::r:

"" o
3
IV

.!'-l 0w
=l

o

o

cl'
::l

co

s:

jL Z
o ?

a o .:
~

o ~

o :r o 3 o
'J
W

o
..0

J,..
W

o

Collection __

__;_

--

Series -

-----Boi'l

:<'

::.0

Folder ~O

NOTICE:

PHOTOCOPIED

MATERIALS

MAY

IE

PROTECTED BY COPY.RIGHT

LAW (TITLE 17, U.S. CODE).

in'

r.
3

§:. 3 o -c
:>

" ~

EMILIO
30

G.COLLADO
PLAZA

ROCKEF'ELLER

NEW YORK 20, N. Y.

Q.
0<II

n

"tl (ii'

o

c... Q

CP "tl c:

...

a 0..
n

c,

s
o
-c

'"

March 28, 1966

".
::J""

[' s:
?
;;;0

g
"U

0"
CII

" c...

The Honorable Fred R. Harris United States Senate Room 254 - Old Senate Building Washington~ DoC. Dear Senator Rarris: Recalling our conversation at Wiesbaden last week, I have checked 0n the biography of DrG Siro Vazquez, a Director of our Company, and find that indeed he did receive a degree of bachelor of science in petroleum engine¢ring from the University of Tulsa in 1933. I attach a brief biography of Dr. Vazquez. It was a great pleasure to be with you at the Bilderberg meeting" With best regards .. Sincere 1y yours,

Att"

_g_

o
o

z

_::.

3 c

0" :r
o 3

o .,...
o
""J

w

o
-0

r:

o w

t..

Collection

Series

Box

Folder

_

NOTICE: PHOTOCOPIED MATERIAlS MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT LAW (TITLE17, U.S. CODE).
-I ::r

~
s.
=<
(1) (II :;l

s0
~ ::!.
,

Oi' ;;;'

zr: " o
-o -c

a

0' n o

-o

_Ol

3 ;:;;' '" 5' :r ;:;;'
3 c

DR~, SIRO VAZQUEZ

Q... 3 a ii

g.

iA

zr:

'" 0:
Dr. Siro Vazquez. Corporation, a former director of Creole Petroleum
IT -<:
II>

iP
3
0
:::l

§:
-<

:r
n

a major affiliate

of Standard Oil Company (New Jersey). country to be elected to the

s,
» c=
::::. '"

9.
IT

is the first national of a Latin American board of directors Prior Producing of Jersey Standard,

iii' "

'" 0
(')

c,

-e

g ii1
e

to his- election as a director,

he had been Jersey

Standard reof

IS

a c,
n CD c,

Coordinator.

In that post since 1958, Dr. Vaaquez was the exploration and .I-'roduction activities

ap orrsib Ie for coordinating

s:
a
:::l

Jersey

Standard affiliates Born in Caracas

throughout the world, on February 10, 1910, Dr, Vazquez was graduated

-c

0'
: '"r
,:=I

if
::>

0 ., -o a
(') (II

in civil engineering and received

from the Central Unive.rsity of Venezuela in 1930 of science in petroleum engineering

the degree of bachelor

..
:::l

n

!f
o
:::l

-

a. :;' a
-c 0
::>

from the University management

of Tulsa in 1933.

Later he attended an advanced

n

ID

course at Harvard

University. career

~
Ol C

0'

:r
~
ii1
0
U>

Before joining Creole in 1937. when he began his industry as district engineer of the Quiriquire District,

"

5' ~

Or. Vazquez had been

for four years a petruleurp. inspector the same area. engineer, production

of the Venezuelan gov ez-nment in an assistant chief

With Creole he was suocessively engineer, assistant

chief petroleum

production

manager and He

manager ~ In 1953 he was el ected to the Creole boa r d , Standard's New York. headquarters

came to Jersey Coordinator

in 1958 as Producing

for the company.

In 1963, Dr. Vaaquee was given an honoJiary degree of Science by the UniverSity of Tulsa. a Knight of the Holy Sepulchre Dr. Vazquez is married Fa., and has four children: to the former

ot

:::r:

Doctor

s.
o c 3
>t>

He is also a Knight of Ma.lta and

tv

.!'"
0-

o
W

Clair~ Duff of Greensburg. Si.zo, Wesley Ann and

o

Gracia Claire.

James

~
~'

Richard Kim.

0'
::>

'f'
6/11/65

,9...
Z

o <
o

C _::>

~

o ,.,.
T

iJ

o 3 a

'-I w

9 -0 ~
W

o

Collection

___ .:__

-----Serl'es-----------Box~~-

-

folder-----

NOTICE: PHOTOCOPIED MATERIALS MAY IE PROTECTED

ay COPYRIGHT

(1"Jb1)-~

/"

.. V

LAW (TITLE 17, U.S. CODE).
J

~

~~

V
:r s:

". o
:r

""0

o
""0

o -c

s n

£..
3

c


;;;-

~

3" o <i" ::!. o c -c
3
::J

OJ""

II>

!i:

e.

• Joe lIeta...,. l400 ~ ..

o

n

.·14 !J»tt,cu_ ,_ ,.._J_ 77004 lfI'. W.i1:Ipr
..... )aU

W.ld Jaca

co iil t:

::l

s:
:>

..
Al

9...

II

of _ S,n),wrao1tot. cat10a of for 7OUI' Warld Iu~fu lI.ld Peac •• DU sa .at llillbttlDua uadaqtclua .. ·thatE _ ROt .. m • padtiOQ to.slv 110' Uma to. 1: ",11 foil raur !QttaD81t. ~, nth cob

.:or Cb:1a1daa

~ ~ o n :r
o
0..
:>

co.. s: '" o <I> ~
:>

V1

iDtenec..

c:

F.

U.J. Iaate

I. UMJ.

~.

::l

~

a..
i) zr:

o ,...
o 3

P :i:
o :>

~
o

:r
00

[

o 3

_IV

""
o

0W

o :::;. co

go

0:::>

_9...

o <
Z o

3 o _"
3 o

o
"...

0" ::r o

'J
W

o

o
w

e.

nmHON. FREDHARRIS
Collection __ -'Series 8ox

From the Collection of

30

Folder_8=- __

NOTICE: PHOTOCOPIED MATERIALS MAY BE PROTECTEDBY COPYRIGHT LAW (TITLE 17, U.S. CODE).
I

<

")

ti

WORLD
SPONSORED

INSTITUTE
BY THE

FOR
FOR

WORLD
PEACE

PEACE
INC.

~

/

,

_, ~
'" 0 "U zr: 0

WO:Rl.D INSTITUTE

FOUNDATION,

I

an
0

~
JO[

a.
3 o

WEINGARTEN AND PRESIDENT

FOUND[R

3
Q

ii
::J.

.. ..
[f
15'
sr:

c::: August 8, 1966
-<
0-

93 Q -<
:::>

2000

o Cl

..

:r
"-

,.,
"U

o

iii'

0..

Senator Fred R. Harris Senate Office Building Washington, D. C. Dear Senator: As one among many others who so enthusiastically endorsed Senator Robert Kennedy's speech before the Senate on June 23, 1965, I want to solicit your sponsorship 0.£ the World Institute for World Peace, which I have requested of Senator Kennedy, as you can see by the enclosed copy of the letter that I wrote to the Senator. also enclosing a copy of my last New Year's Message" which I ran in all Houston newspapers and in the Beaumont-Port Arthur paper s, where we also operate supermarkets.
lam

fj'

»-

~
:::> <0

n 0
~

'" 0'
00
Q

", a

"" til
n ;;r
a :::>
0.. til

C!

Q_

rf

..
::>

n
[
co
() 0 :::>

Assuring you that. I will deeply appreciate your sponsorship of the World Institute for World Peace,.whicb was created for the sale and only purpose. of creating conditions favorable to the establishment of a Just and 1.asting Peace for all Mankind, I am as ever,

~

o· :::>
n cr <' 00
c:

9-

»-

....

.;;

~
'" a.
0 3:
0 :::>

""" 0zr: c 3 P YW/si Enclosures P.s. Should you have any comments ot further questions, I shall be glad to have them. I will gre,atly appreciate your prompt reply. If I do not hear from you to the contrary, I shall consider your response as favorable. Thanks a million! " ~
0 0

_g,

:::r:

""
~ _~
0 0-

3

w

0

g
co

"t>

5"

0'
<

'" 0
123 a

z 0
0
"..

.=>

0'
Q Q

:r

3
'I W

!::!
-0 0

1w
:-'

Collecnon

Series

Box

Folder

_

~

- --~~,--------NOTICE: PHOTOCOP1El) MATERIALS MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT LAW (TITLE 17, U.S. CODE).

WORLD

INSTITUTE
7'700.

FOR

WORLD

PEACE

SPONSORED BY THE, WORLD INSTITUTE FOR PEACE FOUNDATION, INC•
•• 00 HERMANN ORIVI! HOU9'TON. T!!XAS UsA ARE:.A. CODe: 713 JACKSON 8~2.UIl3 CAI!t..1t UH1PAX

10E WEINGARTEN' FOUNOER ANO PRESIOtNT

.....

~,

.,

August 8, 1966

Senator Robert F. Kennedy Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. Dear Senator: Knowing of your deep commitment to World Peace, as evidenced so forcefully and dramatically in your speech in the Senate on June 23, 1965, I want your help in the furtherance of a project with exactly the same end in view -a Just and Lasting Peace for all the world.
I am the Chainnan of the Board of J. Weingarten, Inc., a supermarket chain of 66 supermarkets in Texas, Louisiana and Arkansas doing a volume in excess of $160,000,000. I am also former President of the Supermarket Institute. President Lyndon Johnson and I are-old friends of many years. I also refer you to both Senators from Texas', as well as Governor Conolly of Texas.

organized a World Institute for World Peace, and I want some prominent peace-minded people like yourself and those other Senators who endorsed your Peace talk so enthusiastically to sponsor the World Institute, along with some of the most prominent people in Houston and Vicinity. The underlying principle on which the World Institute was built is that it is my belief that World Peace must be achieved through the Minds of Men, especially those of the Educated Youth, both young men and women now in the leading univerSities, colleges and seminaries allover the world, for from this group in the next decade will come the World Leaders in every walk of life be it in Politics, Religion, Science, Business, Labor, Health, the Professions and what not. Our aim is to set up Centers for the Study and Discussion by these students of those tensions that may lead to War, and find possible solutions that will instead lead to a Just and Lasting Peace.

I have recently

C
:>

-<
o

~. ~.
s,

o z;
:r

o 3 _o o ::J
::J

~

!!.

:r: 6' o
3
IV

.,-

s,

::3
0W

o

-_
~-~-~.;=""'-

=========-~

--'=.,,-,-==-===----o ~
o zr:

o

5

'.J

w
l>.

o
'P

o ::!

Coliection __

__:

Series

Box.

Folder

_

NonCE: PHOTOCOPIED MATERIALS MAY BE PROTECTEDBY COPYRIGHT LAW

mru

17, U.S. CODE).

o

Senator Robert E. Kennedy

Page Two

3

c

ii)

o '" ,-

'<

5

~

1-,Te have already" established such Peace Study Centers in the Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan and in the Rice University in Houston, which will act as models or prototypes for other Peace Institutions, Regional, National and International. Six more colleges in the Detroit area have established such Peace Study Centers, S9 more universities and colleges, run by the State of New York, are engaged in this same program and Dr. 1. G. Petrovskii, Rector of the University of Moscow, and 13 other prominent educators from allover the world recently had a meeting at the University of Rome, which was sponsored by the 'Universities and the Quest for Peace', and by the 'World Institute for World Peace'. Dr. Petrovskii ' was most enthusiastic in support of the university Peace Study program and is confident of getting approval of establishing a Peace Study Center in every school of higher learning in Russia.
I am enclosing a copy of my New Year's Message on World Peace, and the World Institute for World Peace, together with a copy of your own Senate Speech of June 23, 1965 to every person that I am soliciting to act as Sponsor.

We hope to establish a World Institute for World Peace on an international scale in Switzerland or some other peace-loving, neutral country, as soon as this one is running smoothly and sufficient funds are available. Your sponsorship will be of great help and give added prestige to this World Institute for World Peace organization and will entai"l no further obligation of any kind whatsoever, financial or otherwise, except that you yourself of your own free will wish to incur. If you have any questions, I will be happy to answer them to the best of my ability. Trusting to hear from you at your ,earliest c.onvenience, I am,

JW/si Enclosures

"" o
o 3
_N

o
0-

N

w

3.
:::I

o 6'

(Q

WORLD

INSTITUTE

FOR

WORLD

PEACE

o =>

I

.---

.~

·---z
-"
3 c

~ _o

Q o

3

0:r o

o ~

w

'" to
<...l

o

Collection

series

BOx

Folder

_

....

NOTICE: P!"IOTOCOPIED

MATERIALS MAr

(Not printed at Government expense)

---

I

BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT

-_j_

~-"-1

LAW (TITLE 17,
I'~

----

u.s. CODEI.

~."""--~~------,

~

;?1
o:
0 '0

.. '1

. oj America

U aired States

O:ongrrssional Rtcord
PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE

n 0 '0

::r0 (;

-c

It
3
0

89th

CONGRESS,

FIRST

SESSION

~ <D
-c

o· .,
0:
IT

[

Hazards of Nuclear War
decision to use these weapons might be despite Prime Mlnlster Shastri's announced deciSion to-rerram from nuctear made by an unstable demagogue, or by OIl! al'mam.ent; his polieymay be reversed as the head.o~ one of the innumerable 2a result. If India does' a.cqUire nuclear month governments that plague so many weapons, Pa.ldstan will not be tar be- countries, or bY'an irresponsible milihind. Flnding Itself threatened by the tary commander, or even by an individIN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES Chinese, Australia might worl!: for nn- ual pilot. But if nuclear weapons spread, Wednesday, JUlie 23, 1965 clear capability-and in turn produce they may be thus set olf-for It is far Mr. KENNEDY of New York. Mr. the same fears and desires in Indonesia, more difficult and expensive to conPresident, I ask unanimous consent that The prospect of nuclear weapons in struct an adequate system of control and the germaneness rule =y be waived west German hands might result in great custody than to develop the weapons durmg the duration of my speech. pressures on Eastern European nations themselves. The VICE PRESIDENT. Without ob- to acquire or develop a counterweight o·f There could be no efl;'ective disarmajection, it is so ordered. their OW1l. Israel and Egypt each have ment-when each nation would want Mr. KENNEDY of New York. Mr. been deeply suspicious of the other for guarantees, not from one or two or five President, I rise today to w·ge action on many years, and further Israeli progress powers, but from a dozen or a score or the most vital Issue now facing this would certainly impel the Egyptians to even more nations. But 11nuclear weapNation and the world. Thl:s issue is not intel1sliy their present efforts. Sirollar ons spread, such guarantees would be in the headlines. It.is not Vietnam, or developments are possible all over the necessary. the Dominican Republi.C, or Berlin. It world. . ThInk just of the unparalleled opporrs the question of nuclear prollferationOnce nuclear war were to start, even of the mounting threat posed by the between small, remote countries, It would tunities for misebier: a bomb obliterates the capital city of a. ..nation In La.tin spread of nuclear weapons. be exceedil1&iy difficult to stop a step-byeven the Five nations now have the capacity to step progressicn of local war into a gen- America, or Africa, or Ast~r Soviet Union, or the United states. How explode nuclear bombs. This capacity eral connagratton, was It delivered-by plane? by missile? was developed at great cost, over a peEighty million Americans-cand hunby Cal', or trues, or ship? There is no riod of a generation. But at least a. dreds of millions of other people-would evidence. From where did it come=a dozen, perhaps a score, of other nations die within the first 24 hours of a, full- jealous neighbor? a.n internal dissident? are now In a. position to develop nuclear scale nuclear exchange. And as Chair~ a great power bent on stirring up trouweapons within 3 years. Two of these man Khl"UShchev once said, the survivors bl~or an anonymous madman? There nations-Israel and Inclia.-already pos- would envy the dead. is only speculation. And what can be sess weapons-gl'we 1lssiona.ble material, . This is not an acceptable futm·e. We . the response-What but a r·epl'isal and could fabricate an at6m1c device owe}t to ourselves, to cur children, to o~ giounded on suspiCion, leading in everwithin a few months. forebears and our posterlty,to prevent wlden.lng circles to the· utter destruction These natrona, moreover. can develop such an holocaust. But the prol11eration of the world we know: nuclear ca.pabUities at a fraction of 'past of nuclear weapons immensely Increases It 1~clear, in short, that the United costs. Within a vel'Y few years, an in- the chances tlmt the world might stumstates-and the entire world-)1.ave tbe vestment of a. few mJllion dollars-well ble into catalltrophe. most vital interest in preventing the wltl"r..1n the capacity even of private President Kennedy saw this clearly. scattering of nuclear weapons. Upon organizations-will produce nuclear He said. in 1963:· . weapons. Once such a capability is in I a.sk you to stop and th1nk Wll .t It would the success of this effort depends the . being, weapons will probably be pro- mean to have nuclear weapona In &0 many .only future our children will have. The need to halt the spread of nuclear duced for costs in the hundreds of hands. In the handB or countries large and small. stable and unstable, responsible and weapons must be a central priority of thousands of dollars each. Similarly. irresponsible. scattered throughout the American policy. 01 all our major indel very systems are far cheaper than they once were. Jet bombers can be world. There would be no rest tOT a.n.yone· terests, this now deserves and demands purchased from the great powers for a !=o:~t and no the greatest additional e.lf?rt. This ~ few millIon dollars. And our own . . a broad statement, for our Interests are The].'!! could be no stability anywhere. extremely broad. The need to be Minuteman missile is far less costly than nuclear weapons' strong-to meet .aggression in far-off were our earlier missiles, or even the in the world-when miGht be used between Greelcs and 'I'urk,s places-to work' closely With ames all B-52's thaL preceded them. these needs must be Nuclear capability, then. will soon lie over CyPl'tIB; between Arabs and ISl'aell.s over the world-all within the grasp of many. And it Is all over the Gaza··strip; between India and met. And the crises' of the moment Pakistan in ~e RallO of Kutch. But if often pose urgent questions, of grave too llkaly that if events continue on their nuclear weapons spread, it is dangerously Importance for national seew:ity. But present course, this technical capability likely that they wlll be so used-for these these Immediate problems, and ethers will be used to produce nuclear weapons. SJnce the explosion of the Chinese bomb, are matters of the deepest national in- LIke them, have been with us constanns for'2Q years-and will be with us far into for example, ·pressure to develop a terest to the countries involved. There could .be no security-when a the future. Should nuclear weapons counterpart has built steadily in India
SPEECH

~ <D ~

n
iT
0

»
~
;J

HON. ROBERT F. KENNEDY

n
co

<il

s ::>
Q_
<D

~

0 zr:
0

'" .. '"
0

g_1
u>'

C

...
:::l

iii'

Q..

n <D

!!
::J (0

0

n

..
::J

~


Q_

0

»

zr

s:
<D

<' <D
c: :J <:.
;;:

~

Q..

0
0 3

~I zr:
_0

s:~~;J~ ~:!m~~ty

',

~
.0
::J ::J

_0
>0

!.

I Q_ 0

~ _~
0 0W

3

0

779-203-98668

::; 5' co

d'

0 ::>
0

_< .0
_::J

0
Z

3 0
0
;<'"

0

0zr: 3

0

'I

w

0

f.

9

w

:-

Collecfion

-=--

Series

Box

Folder

_

,

NOTICE~

-

PHOTOCOPIED

. --,,- "";, r'~'"
~__..

MATER.IALS MAy
> .... ~ -

BE PROTECTED BY COP'{RIGH!
.,

LAW

---::-:.-=. ~.;-~~

••' ..-' •.;~'"

-----

~,!!TLE 17,
1""'1 -

U.S.

CO_D~).
,-

_

~

\9 .~
;;;'
0

~I

2

CONGRESSIONAL RECORD
other nations with nuclear capability or potentiaJ., looking toward a nonprolUeratfon treaty. T'nis treaty would bind the major nuclear powers not to tl'a.nsfer nuclear weapons or weapons capa\>llity to nations not now in pessession of them, And it would pledge nations without nuclear arms, on their part, not to acquire or develop these weapons. This pledge would require a third component: the extension to all nations foregoing nuclear weapons a guarantee against nuclear aggression or blackmail. We presently protect our allies against nuclear attack, But OUI' alltance umbrella does not extend to nonaligned nations such as India; and while, the President indicated that the United States woUld help them to resist nuclear blackmail, more specmc and definite measures are needed, If these nations are to forego nuclear weapons-s-especia.lly When their neighbors may possess them-they must be guaranteed against nuclear aggTession, To be efIective, such a guarantee would have to be extended by the United Sta.tes and the Soviet UniOll bila.tel'alJ.y-ol' better still, by a. group of nuclear powers, and, in fact, nonnuclear powers, as, well" But I would warn that such an umbrelI tf it is to be effective, and if it is not to lead bOgl'l'lat power confrontations all over the world-must be divorced from and superior to the other policy aims of the nations involved, We cannot protect only our friends from nuclear attack-or allow nations ,vith whom we are otherwise friendly to threaten others with nuclear weapons, We must stand againSt nuclear aggl'esS,ion-periOd. A treaty to prevent nuclem' spread, as Afi', Foster bus Indicated,1s manifestly in the paramount interest of the United States and. the Soviet Union, It is by far the most important .step we now can take to stop the spread of nuclear weapons, There have peen suggestions that the chief stumbling block to such a. treaty is the war in Vietnaln, But wholly apart. fl'om the strains l'esUlting from that war, I thlnk we ha.ve not ourselves done all we can to secure a nonproliferation treaty, The most PI'ominent example is the question of the multilateral force, and the variant Atlantic nuclear force. Tbe SOviet Union contends that either plan would give control over nuclear weapons to West Germany: although we disalm~e With that view, the Soviet Union has absolutely refused to conclude a nonproliferation agreement as long as vre go forward with the MLF or bhe ANF'. We have not abandoned the lVILF-ANF plans, because West Germany and other nations in Western Europe feel that they must have a gJ.·eater role In nuclear deterence. ' , But if a llonprolileration treaty' can be concluded, It will be in the national interest of every nation, We should tneretore continue ,vith increased concern. our search for a rorm of nuclear guarantee which, it Is now felt, requires participation by other nations, to West Germany and other countries of Europe which nieets their needs without meet~ng with rejection by the Soviet Unionsuch as might evolve from the allied COI)sultation device suggested at the NATO meeting by Defense Secretal'Y McNamaJra, just a few weeks ago, Second, we should immediately plore the creation of fonnal nuclear-free zones of the world. Right now. one of ow' greatest assets, is that there is not one nuclear weapon in all of Latin Amertcs or Africa, This situation can be preserved .if the nuclear powers pledge not to Introduce any nuclear weapons into these areas, the na.tions of the aJ:e3.S pledge not to aceuire them, and apPl'Oprlate machinery for the verification of these pledges is set up, Some na.tions-pa.rticularly in Latin Alnerica---llave alrI~aclyexchanged lnfonnal assurances to this etrec~, We should encourage them to go further in every possibJe w.ay, We should extend similar efforts in Africa, And if, these efforts are successful, we should. call on Israel and the neighbortng states of the Middle East. which might not be covered, to make the same commitment. I am not, however, suggesti.ng that, under the present circumstances, WEl could establish nuclear-free zones in the Far East or in Europe, Third. we should complete the partial test ban' agreement of 1963 by extending it to underground as well as aboveground tests, Since 1963, we have made considerable scientific progress In detectmg underground tests and in distingUisiJiJ:l,g many natural tremors from manmade exploslona, Witllout jeopardizing our security, we can now extend the test ban to certatn types of undergl:ound tests. Ati.d as soon as sCientiiic advance makes it Possible to extend the test ban to any other type or Size of underground. test without jeopardiZiJ'lg security, it is my judgment thllit it should be done, And we should also press all efforts to resolve the deadlock on inspections of those explosions which cannot be firmly Identified without inspection. So let us return to the conference table, for -the completion of this treaty would be a natural complement to a. nonprollferatton ail'eement, It would provtdean additional incentive to nonnuclear powers to forgo a weapons development program, And it would help to restore the momentum of the test-ban treaty itself, Ffmrth, we should act to hIlt and reo verse the growth of the nuclear capabmties of the United'States and the Soviet Union. both as to fissionable .matertal for military weapons purposes- and as to the strategic devices to deliver such matedal, Freezing these weapons at thetr present levels---which, as we all know, are more than adequate to destroy all' human life on this earth-is a prerequi'site to lowering those levels in the ruture, Moreover, it would be tn the direct selfinterest of the United States and the Soviet Union to cut back our nuclear forces, For, as Secretary McNamara has shown, we each have more than enough to destl'OYthe other nation-yet can never acquire enough to prevent our own destruction: And even substantial cutbacks would not affect our nuclear superiority over China in the foreseeable future, Most of all, it i~ essential that the two

'0 0

become generally available to the world. however, each such crisis of the moment might well become the last crisis ror all mankind, Thus none of the momentary crises are more than small parts of the larger question of whether our politics can g:row UP to our technology, The nuclear weapon. as ReIllY Stimson sadd, "constitutes merely a first step in a new control by man over the forces of nature too revolutlonary and dangerous to fit rnto the old concepts-it really caps the climax of the race between man's growing technical pOwer for destructiveness and his psychological power of, self-control and group control-his moral power." ' The United States took the 1n1t1atlve and made the maximum effort to secure the nuclear test ban treaty In 1963 because we knew that ow' securitr and the future of the world depended on halting' the arms race an.d exerting every possible effort toward peace, And we hailed , the tre.aty not principally for its specific benefits-important and necessary as they were-s-out for its value as the fint of many necessary actions to secure a lasting peace. It was "the fix-st step in a journey of a thousand mlles"-a journey to which President Kennedy was deeply committed, and to which President Johnson is deeply committed, But we have not yet taken the second step, The world has not moved, beyond the limited nuclear test ban itself, to halt the nroliferatron of nuclear weapons. If we are to leave our children a planet on which to live safely, to fulfill the brlght promise of their lives, we must resume the journey toward peace. And at the outset of this journey., we cannot allow the demands of day-to~day policy to obstruct our efforts to solve the problem of nuclear spread. We cannot wait ior peace in southeast Asia, which will not come untu nuclear weapons have spread beyond recall. We cannot wait for a general European settlement, which has not existed since 1914, We cannot watt until all nations learn to behave, for bad behavior armed With nuclear weapons is the danger we must try to prevent, Rather we must begin to move 'now. ' on as many fronts as poosible. to meet the problem. With every day tha.t passes, t.he likelihood. Increases that anotner nation will develop the bomb; and every new possessor will lead others to abandon the l:estl'aint that alone keeps them from acqull'ing a nuclear capability now, William Foster, head of the Arms control and. Dtsarmament Agency. has pointed out that as long as the problem involved onlS' the United States and the Soviet Union, a delay of a year or more was not fata.! to the conclusion of an agreement, But in the multination problem in 'which we now find ourselves, "a dela,y of a year or so, or perhaps even of months. , . could well mean the difference between failw'e and success." I therefore urge immediate acti:on along the following lines, Fil'st. we should 1nitiate at once negotla.tions with the Soviet Union and
779-203-98658

"..

n 0 -c

0'

-c
0

ex-

0 .....

3

if c'
(I>

s:

zr:

.![I
5(I>

c:::

g_
C'"

(')

~ ~
0 => @
:::l

n

<0

:;:

0'
Q_
:>C
III III

'" 0 n
:::l

;;r

0 o; til

C

a_

lb'

....

III :::l

n

iii -,.
:::l (0

bl
:::l

iii ... '" 0'

s,

n :::r <' ~
(I>

»
c;

" <'
(I>

-Z

;;:

Q.,

0 ,...
C
zr:
0

s
$:
0
:::l

3

::>

!!

_g,
3

:r:
:>C 0 0 I'-l

!'-'
0W 0

0

0
"Q

<0

5'

=I

0'

_£_
Z .?

" 0
~ 0
0
::r0

""" C
0
0

3
'-J W

9
-0 w

:.. 0
r:

Colledion

Series,

Box

Folder

_

-_- I

. :_ _ NOTICE: PHOTOC!lP~D MATERIALS MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT LAW (nnE

__ J.

I

CONGRESSIONAL RECORD
superpowers demonstrate to the world. forces, and those of our allies-so that by concrete example, their determinaif conflict comes, we need not choose betion to turn away from weapons of ab- tween defeat 'Bondmutual annihilation. solute destruction, toward a world 01'- We have not yet been fUlly successful: del' .based on other strensths, Here only the United states and West Geragain, President Johnson has taken the many have met their full conventional irJ.tiative with the slowdown in preducforce commitment to NATO. But we tion of plutowum and uranium 235, and shQUld continue to pursue this course. with the phasing out of certain bombers, For our efforts to induce others to forego Much more, however, remains to be done. nuclear forces depend in large part on Fifth. we should move to strengthen our ability and willingness to sharply and support tne International' Atomic limit the possible use of our own. Energy Agency. This agency is the only As to all these points-in all our eftruly international veh1cle for inspecting forts-we Will have to deal with one of peaceful atomic energy plants to assure the most perplexing and difli.cult questhat they are not used. for the prcduetions affecting American foreign polley: tion of weapons-grade material. The China. It is dlfficUlt to negotiate on allY IAEA Is the only forum ill wbic.h the question with the intransigent leaders of United States, the Soviet Union, and Communist China. And It is doubly Great Brttain have worked without sert- ltifficult when we are engaged In South ous friction and. without a Soviet veto. Vietnam. China Is profoundly suspiAheady It inspects· many reactors cious of and hostile to us-as we are throughout the world; and its impor- highly and rightly suspictous of her. tance was Increased last week when But China is there. China wUl have Great BritaIn, following an earlier U.s. nuclear weapons. And without her parinitiative, opened its largest reactor to ticipatlon It will be .infinitely more difIlinspection. cult, perhaps im.possij:lle in the long run, But the lAEA has not received the full to prevent nuclear proliferation. This support It merits and demands, The was recognized, just last week, by 70 reactor we helped India to build is sub- nattons at the Disarmament, Commission ject, by prior condition, to IAEA In- of the United Nations, who urged that spection, and it has remained peaceful, China be included in any nOD..-proilleraBut another reactor, built with CaIUl.lti.an non agreement. It has been recognized lJ,elp, 'Is not subject; to equivalent condi- by President Johnson, who has retions, and, in this reactor, the IndIans peatedy offered to ,negotiate With any may have produced their weaponsgovernment in the world as to the peace grade fissionable material. or southeast Asia. And It has been We shoUld insist, at a. minimum, that recognized by the American people, who all reactors bUilt with the help of other voted overwhelmingly in a recent poll for powers be subject to IAEA inspection. negotiations with the Chinese. Indeed, I thlnk the time has come to inAt an appropriate time and manner, sist that all peaceful reactors be subject therefore, we should. vigorously pursue to inspection. But we ourselves must negotiations on this subject with China. also stop assisting nations which refuse But If we must ultimatel:\' have the coinspection. In the past. for fear of anoperation of Cl11na, and the Soviet Union, ta,gonizing the Europeans, we have sold and France, and all other nations with enriched uranium to Euratom without any nuclear capability whatever,. it does requJring that its plants be open to IAEA. not follow that we should walt for that We have thus aided the construction of . cooperation before beginning our own reactors in France, Gerroa,DY, and Hol- efforts. We are stroneer, and theJ:efore land, all of which are closed to the out- have more responsibility. than any naside world. Until they are opened, all tioll on earth; we should make the first our assistance to their creation or funceffort, the gJ.·eatest effort, IUld the Jast t10ning should cease. In this connection, effort to control nuclear weapons. We I wouJd like to pay tribute to the work can and must begin Immediately. of the Jo!nt AtomiC Energy Committee. In this connection, I urge that the and partlcularly to Senators ANDERSON work of the Gilpatrlc Committee-which and P"STClU1,who have long insisted on Included many distinguished public seradequate internationa-l safeguards on our vants, such as Arthur Dean-appointed nuclear-assistance programs. by the President to study the problem of A stronger stand in support of IAEA nuclear proliferaticn be carried forward could have a major inhIbiting effect on by all concerned age~cies of the Governthe dIversion. of peaceful nuclear plants ment at once. It Is only by study and acto. weapons work-for example, in such tion by general concern throughout the countries as Sweden or Swit~erland. In Government, that the problem of nuclear fact, under the Pearson government. prollferatlon will remain where it beCan~da ~as shown the was by responstlongs-in our constant attention, the ply lnsistmg on guaranteed peaceful use object of aU of our principal concern oi any uranium that it sells. That Can- And we can and must continue to re: ada has lost certain sales thereby proves examine our own attltudes.-tc insure the value of this pollcy; clea,rly, the matethat we do not lapse back: Into the fatalrial might well have gone to weapons. !stle and defeatist belief that war is InWe should also work toward lAEA con- evitable, or that our course Is too :fixed to trol of fabricating and reprocessing of all be a.ffected by what we do--to remember fuel for peaceful reactors. as President Kennedy said, that "no Sb,th, it is vital that we continue government or SOCial system is so evil present efi'orts to lessen our own reliance that Its people must be considered as on nuclear weapons. SInce 1961, we lacking in virtue"-and to remember have worked to build UP our nomiuclear that "lntlle final analysis, our most basic
779-203-98668

----

17, U.S. CODE).

!t>1l
'-1

3
common Hnlt is that we all Inhabit this small planet We all breathe the same all'. We all cherish our children's future, 'And we are all mortal." Above all, we must recognize what is at stake. We must -face real1ties-however unpleasant the sigbt, however dlmcult the challenge they pose to all of us. And we must realize that peace Is not Inaction, nor the mere absence of war, "Peace," said President Kennedy "is a process-a way of .solving problems." It Is only as we devote om' every effort· to the solution of these proplems that we are at peace; It is only if we succeed that there will be peace for our children. Mr. MP..NSFIELD. Mr. PresIdent, will the Senator yield? Ml". KENNEDY of New York. I yield. MI'. MANSFIELD. I commend and compliment the disttnguished junior .Senator from New York for the speec.h which 11e has just made. It Is a. speech which required courage to give, because there will be much that many wlll disagree with, but it Is a Speech which I believe should have been given, because as long as we accent the status quo, the more we will continue to move backward. I remember when President Kelllledy came to the Northwest to speak on natural resources, in September 1963. He went into Wisconsin, Minnesota, North Dakote, and Wyoming. In those states he discussed the n.atural resources of our country. In those States he was received with enthusiasm and approbation. But when he reached B1l1ings, Mont., there was III crowd of 75,000 people there. That is more than one-tenth of the population of our Sta.te. There he did not speak so much of natura; resources, but rather of human resources. He spolte of the test ban treaty which the Senate bad approved the previous week. The pecple really.were interested In what the President had recommended and what the Senate bad done, and they showed their wholebea.rted approval of the action taken by this body. The same situation occurred in Great Falls'I\'l'lel'e 100,000 people-more than one-seventh of Montana's population-expressed ·.their 8,PPI'oval of the test ban treaty .
r

;;;. o
"C

'"

:r

an
"U

::r

o

o

-c

Q..

if

o

3

,i
:r n>

s:

o::r -< :T

0:

g_
~

.. o

0<1> :::l

'.

. Other Senators enthusiastic agreement: 'Senator Mansfield of Montana 'Senator Aiken of Vermont Senator Moss of Utah 'Senator Anderson of New Mexico Senator Pastore of Rhode Island Senator Cooper of Kentucky Senator Churc.h of Idaho Senator Pell of Rhode Island Senator McGee of Wyoming Senator McGovern of S. Dakota Senator Hart of Michigan Senator Proxmire of Wisconsin Senator Tydings of Maryland Senator Gruening of Alaska Senator Javits of New York Senator Harris of Oklahoma S~nator Clark of Penn~yJvania

in

o

z

.----,~

--

--

-

.?

3 o

Collection

-'-

Series

Box

Folder

_

NOTIC.E: PHOTOCOPIED MATERIALS MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT LAW (TITLE 17, U.S. CODE).

C'-.

..
-I

:r
'

I! .c

U)

GI

o
'U

..'

:r

o
'U

o n
o
'<

a.
3 o

~
-c

m

3 o

" Q.
n
-0

em

a

I-

o

a.

o --

en

:I
CI.I

·C '"

.

.a
CI.I

c-- •
CI)

Q.. 3 o

-s

o o

III

" .. a
U
::::II CI.I

U

5' c:
zr:

ii

a..
C".

ca CI)

~
<1>

a: '"

=t:::!..

~

n o

iii'

CL

Q
-0

'" a CL
c n
<I>

...,

CL

5' c
'<

"

['
:r

-... =
....
(I) (I)

CD .C2

...

," " Q
1;1

0'

..
n

0CL

50'
-c
:;l

o

• o ...
o
c

-.c

en -;.f en ~=

cu E

~

!!
" i:
o
0
...I:

cu " ~ -5

cu

...I: U

o '" o

o
en

..,_
\)J)

....

D~

o

::::II

-I;:

cu

o =t-

~
iii 'U o
!!:"

~

o

0° .!!C :eZ CI)
(1)_

.!!is

-=:l0~
:E .5
cu -

r . r.=1" i
a a cu
u
."

!

~

o

.a ::::II ." o ~ ." a
."

-= en
G.)

...I: U

= -en
en G.)
.c
G.)

c a

t~

U)

D-

o
U)

.a:

-.c
en ca

.a0

-f=a e
:E
CU

...
G.) Q)

n o " Ie
iii
~-

" a
:7

o

» ()
,'" "'
:C'

I-

c
I&.

-... >-

... a
U

cu

==

Z

::::II

c " ..... ao

..

'1 a

=

....

.2: w a

.. .. n
GJ

~

a'"

::I

"'" 0'
3 o

o

5"

'J w

9

t: o
,~

w

Colleclion

Series.

Box

Folder

_

NonCE:

PHOTOCOPIED M.ATERIALS MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT LAW [TITLE 17, U.S. CODE},

<no

"' .... a";
'" III

II!

... & of 0-;
0&0 1:Jt:.1: J:Jt:..

8" - ,.. .. •
~i~ ... i .!'.!:
;;
II::

"'.....~ ·
.:

.... ,.
, : 8

..

- ,. .
g~ e _0·
",-

.!' .. -

':tJ
!I:

.....
I:~II
• :

• ••

.... , -....!: .
:t 0" 0,. • &0

.

a iii

-a

,.

a

.a. E o ... ...
..c
lit

fU

= •: II :i ID

" .. .". '" " .. ~
-"

'; 0

c .;

E :: t ..
a. II
" A'il:10

...
..
u
iii III

II II

:u - .. 0D

.. :>

....:
fU

: A :;
Jt:.

..

.:'" o,

::z:
a

..c o

...

> a

.. ,. ..
oi
iii -

• !: o

:I:

to-

. ...."
.. a w,_
D•

'6-

...
~g

A

g

.!

g
(Q

5"

0"
:>

o _£.
o ?

z o
3

o
""..

0:r o 3 o
'oJ

W

to

o

~
w

Coliection

~

~

Series

Box-

folder

_

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful