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LTAD 2 - Fundamentals

LTAD 2 - Fundamentals

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Published by judobob
a description of the fundamentals stage of Long-term athlete development. Cover physical literacy and coaching ideas
a description of the fundamentals stage of Long-term athlete development. Cover physical literacy and coaching ideas

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Published by: judobob on Jan 04, 2009
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06/17/2009

Long-Term Athlete Development

The Fundamental Stage

Aims

Aims
• To discuss the aims of the fundamental stage

Aims
• To discuss the aims of the fundamental stage • To define the terms agility, balance, co-ordination
and speed (ABCs)

Aims
• To discuss the aims of the fundamental stage • To define the terms agility, balance, co-ordination
and speed (ABCs)

• To discuss the fundamentals of athletics

Aims
• To discuss the aims of the fundamental stage • To define the terms agility, balance, co-ordination
and speed (ABCs)

• To discuss the fundamentals of athletics • To discuss KGBs & CPKs

Aims
• To discuss the aims of the fundamental stage • To define the terms agility, balance, co-ordination
and speed (ABCs)

• To discuss the fundamentals of athletics • To discuss KGBs & CPKs • Discuss strength training for children

The Fundamentals stage

• Ages: 6-8 (girls) & 6-9 (boys)

The Fundamentals stage

• Ages: 6-8 (girls) & 6-9 (boys) • Children need to sample a wide range of movement
activities, in fun, playful environments

The Fundamentals stage

• Ages: 6-8 (girls) & 6-9 (boys) • Children need to sample a wide range of movement
activities, in fun, playful environments

The Fundamentals stage

• No sports-specific specialisation

• Ages: 6-8 (girls) & 6-9 (boys) • Children need to sample a wide range of movement
activities, in fun, playful environments

The Fundamentals stage

• No sports-specific specialisation • Emphasis on development of basic movement skills,
not formal competition

• Ages: 6-8 (girls) & 6-9 (boys) • Children need to sample a wide range of movement
activities, in fun, playful environments

The Fundamentals stage

• No sports-specific specialisation • Emphasis on development of basic movement skills,
not formal competition

• Parental involvement

• Ages: 6-8 (girls) & 6-9 (boys) • Children need to sample a wide range of movement
activities, in fun, playful environments

The Fundamentals stage

• No sports-specific specialisation • Emphasis on development of basic movement skills,
not formal competition

• Parental involvement • Speed power and endurance developed using fun
games and challenges

• Ages: 6-8 (girls) & 6-9 (boys) • Children need to sample a wide range of movement
activities, in fun, playful environments

The Fundamentals stage

• No sports-specific specialisation • Emphasis on development of basic movement skills,
not formal competition

• Parental involvement • Speed power and endurance developed using fun
games and challenges

• Opportunity for optimal development of speed

Windows of trainability
Chronological age General tra Training age

Chronological age

FMS, CPKs, KGBs, FSS

Agility

Agility

“The ability to change speed and direction rapidly” (Bloomfield, Elliot and Ackland, 1994)

Agility
• •
“The ability to change speed and direction rapidly” (Bloomfield, Elliot and Ackland, 1994) Or “whole-body changes in direction as well as rapid movement and direction changes in limbs” (Baechle, 2000).

Agility
• • •
“The ability to change speed and direction rapidly” (Bloomfield, Elliot and Ackland, 1994) Or “whole-body changes in direction as well as rapid movement and direction changes in limbs” (Baechle, 2000). When described by Chelladauri (1976) agility was broken down into simple, temporal, spatial and universal dependent upon the amount of uncertainty or extraneous variables in the skill.

Agility
• • • •
“The ability to change speed and direction rapidly” (Bloomfield, Elliot and Ackland, 1994) Or “whole-body changes in direction as well as rapid movement and direction changes in limbs” (Baechle, 2000). When described by Chelladauri (1976) agility was broken down into simple, temporal, spatial and universal dependent upon the amount of uncertainty or extraneous variables in the skill. In 2006 Sheppard and Young defined agility as “movement not only involving changes in speed and direction, but must also be an open skill, wherein a reaction to a stimulus is involved and the movement is not specifically rehearsed.”

Agility Vs Quickness

Agility Vs Quickness
• Sheppard and Young
(2006), “rapid changes in direction” an important element of this definition is that it requires no external stimuli.

Agility Vs Quickness
• Sheppard and Young
(2006), “rapid changes in direction” an important element of this definition is that it requires no external stimuli. planar or multi-directional skill that requires change of direction as well as rapid movement and directional changes of limbs.”

• Moreno (1995) who suggests quickness is a “multi-

Balance

Balance
• “minimising the displacements of the centre of

gravity while maintaining and upright stance, proper orientation, adapted locomotion and adequate gestures, figures or techniques” (Perrin et al, 2002).

Co-ordination

Co-ordination
• According to Schmidt & Wrisberg (2000)
co-ordination is “the ability to perform a number of complex movements simultaneously.”

Speed

Speed
• Speed is defined as “displacement over unit of
time” (Baechle & Earle, 2000).

Speed
• Speed is defined as “displacement over unit of
time” (Baechle & Earle, 2000). linear and lateral speed.

• In fundamental movement skills, speed relates to

The fundamentals of athletics

The fundamentals of athletics
• Running

The fundamentals of athletics
• Running • Throwing

The fundamentals of athletics
• Running • Throwing • Jumping

Throwing: O’Keeffe et al, 2007

Throwing: O’Keeffe et al, 2007

Investigated the concepts of transfer and specificityinapractical physical education setting.

Throwing: O’Keeffe et al, 2007
• •
Investigated the concepts of transfer and specificityinapractical physical education setting. Three practice groups: the fundamental group, the badminton group, the control group.

Throwing: O’Keeffe et al, 2007
• • •
Investigated the concepts of transfer and specificityinapractical physical education setting. Three practice groups: the fundamental group, the badminton group, the control group. Results indicated that there was transfer from the fundamental overarm throw to the badminton overhead clear and the javelin throw but that there was no transfer from the badminton overhead clear to the javelin throw.

Throwing: O’Keeffe et al, 2007
• • • •
Investigated the concepts of transfer and specificityinapractical physical education setting. Three practice groups: the fundamental group, the badminton group, the control group. Results indicated that there was transfer from the fundamental overarm throw to the badminton overhead clear and the javelin throw but that there was no transfer from the badminton overhead clear to the javelin throw. The results indicate that participants in the fundamental throw teaching programme showed significant learning effects not only in the fundamental overarm throw but also in the specific sport skills of the badminton overhead clear and the javelin throw.

Throwing: O’Keeffe et al, 2007
• • • • •
Investigated the concepts of transfer and specificityinapractical physical education setting. Three practice groups: the fundamental group, the badminton group, the control group. Results indicated that there was transfer from the fundamental overarm throw to the badminton overhead clear and the javelin throw but that there was no transfer from the badminton overhead clear to the javelin throw. The results indicate that participants in the fundamental throw teaching programme showed significant learning effects not only in the fundamental overarm throw but also in the specific sport skills of the badminton overhead clear and the javelin throw. They concluded that results support the notion of transfer between fundamental motor skills and sport specific skills. This has practical implications for the teaching of physical education.

KGBs

KGBs
• Kinaesthetic sense

KGBs
• Kinaesthetic sense • Gliding

KGBs
• Kinaesthetic sense • Gliding • Buoyancy

KGBs
• Kinaesthetic sense • Gliding • Buoyancy • Striking with an implement

CPKs

CPKs
• Catching

CPKs
• Catching • Passing

CPKs
• Catching • Passing • Kicking

CPKs
• Catching • Passing • Kicking • Striking with body
part

Strength

Strength
• Children should be encouraged to gain
strength through supporting and lifting their own body weight.

Flexibility

Flexibility

Flexibility

Flexibility

Flexibility

Flexibility

In summary

In summary
• Physical literacy can be defined as the
mastery of fundamental movement skills (FMS) and fundamental sports specific skills (FSS).

In summary
• Physical literacy can be defined as the • Thus FMS + FSS= physical literacy.
mastery of fundamental movement skills (FMS) and fundamental sports specific skills (FSS).

In summary
• Physical literacy can be defined as the • Thus FMS + FSS= physical literacy. • Strength & Flexibility
mastery of fundamental movement skills (FMS) and fundamental sports specific skills (FSS).

Fair play

Fair play

Fair play

Ideas

Ideas
• Chasing games

Ideas
• Chasing games • Team relays

Ideas
• Chasing games • Team relays • Running pathways round differently
coloured cones

Ideas
• Chasing games • Team relays • Running pathways round differently
coloured cones

• Activities involving picking up and putting

down beanbags responding to instructions

Ideas
• Chasing games • Team relays • Running pathways round differently
coloured cones

• Activities involving picking up and putting

down beanbags responding to instructions

• Ball exercises with different types of balls

Why is Fundamentals important?
Can’t catch won’t play

The consequences of missing fundamentals

Any Questions?

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