BEYOND BASICS

KEITH WYATT

Editor; Aaron Stang Additional Text and MusIc Examples: Kenn Chlpkin Artist Photography courtesy of EbetRoberts Slide Photography Courtesy of Shelly LUtgen and the BigHeart SI.lde Co. Art Design: Joseph Klucar

WARNER

BROS. PUBUCATIONS

- THE GLOBAl.

LEADER

IN PRINT

USA: 15800 NW 48th Avenue, Miarnl, Fl33014

e 1997 WARNER

iBROS. PUBUCATIONS All Rights Reserved

Any duplication, .adaptation or arrangement 01 the compositions contained in this collection requires the written consent of the Publisher. No part of this book may be photocopied or reproduced in any way without permission. Unauthorized uses are an infringement of Ihe U.S. Copyright Act and are punishable by law.

CONTENTS
Intro Music Tuning Notes Foreword , Page #
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Section I':Types of SHdes Section 2: Intonation/RIght and Left Hand Technique Example I Example 2; Pick Pros and Cons Example 3,: Damping Example 4., Example 5 " Example 6 "

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Section 3: Phrasing and Vibrato Examp'le 7 Example 8 "" Example 9 Example 10 Example I 1 Example 12" Example 1.3 Example 14 Example 15:Transposing licks EX'ample 16 Example 17 Section 4: Transposing Shapes ..' Ex.ample 18 Example 19 , "

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Section 5: Limiting to One Position Example 20 , Example 21 Example 22 , Example 23 , Section 6: Open Tuntngs Example 24: Drop "'0" Tuning Example 25 Section 7: "Open E"Tuning Example 26 Example 27 " Example 28 Example 29 Example 30 Example ,31 Section 8: Slide In Other Styles Example 32 Coda: Blues. inE. (Example 33) "' " " "

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Publications . The sound of "bottleneck" guitar was piercing.Foreword 3 FOREWORD Electric slide guitar has its roots deep in the Mississippi Delta. This book is designed to get you started by detailing the basic patterns and tuninqs that comprise the common musical foundation shared by al'l the great slide players. territories . Warner Bros. And now. musicians such as Dave Tronzo andRy Cooder continue to expand the boundaries of slideinto new and exciting. and it easily cut through the din of a crowded bar. Aaron Stang Editor. It's no surprise that as the electric guitar came to dominate the music industry the techniques of the country-blues bottleneck slide players were quickly adapted to the needs of the new urban blues and rock musicians. loud and emotive. It was there that early acoustic blues guitarists discovered that a broken bottle neck could be used to elicit sounds and qualities from steel strings that matched the soul and intensity of their music. Players like Duane Allman. Bonnie Raitt and Johnny Winter brought electric slide guitar to the attention of the rock generation..

For purposes of demonstration in this book.ing WBS used as a slide. everything and anything conceivable glass or metal slides. For a big fat sound use the diameters depending on which finger you thick heavier slide. and are often made from a type of medical or surgical and created from the tops of wine bottles. But g. str.ass slides is the thickness of the glass itself . with a "Hawaiian" ancestry include the "Dobro. The slide should fit rather should be able to bend the finger as well. place the slide on the snugly up to the first knuckle and you types 4th finger of your left hand.4 Section 1: Tvpes of Slides SECTION 1: TYPES OF SLIDES The first subject to be addressed Primitive appendages sophisticated with slide guitar playing is the slide itself. glass." or resonator guitar. The main with gl.. A variation of this Steel" guitar - made completely out of steel and extremely toud. Try different and experiment but you should stick with one kind and feel comfortable with the slide you use. . Over the years to make a sound on a. such as a bone or a knife were used as opposed to today's more Specialized slide guitars guitar is the "National which utilizes a metal resonator on the top that amplifies the sound. and action are for that "down home" sound a standard steel string acoustic The acoustic guitar in general is well suited for slide because the strings almost natural requisites in duplicating the "slide sound." The strings and the action [the distance frets so that when you playa Glass slides are inexpensive between the strings should be fairly heavy and the neck itself) should be a little off the note with the slide you don't hear any fret buzz. Earlier glass slides were homemade difference An option would be the big heavy brass slide but the most popular is the glass slide.uitar is best. They also come in different prefer to use the slide.

JOHNNY WINTE.R .

.D.. ~" .Try these random notes on different strings and beqin to get used to visualizing the notes as being found directly over the frets. charismati. fingered notes to notes played with the slide . The first advantage of using one is that you probably already know how to.. Secondly.S Section 2: Intonation/Right and Left Hand Techniques SECTION 2: INTONATION/ RIGHT AND LEFT HAND TECHINIQUES The slide guitar can be thought of as "one-finger. the attack of plastic on metal is loud and clear.. Placinq the slide between the frets where you are used to putting your fingers will render the notes flat and out of tune.•..'" ~. :~ . cause unwanted noise if you are not careful.. It can.." The slide is your "finqer-.. CD CD Example 1 Start by comparing. /'" ~'" . ~ .. 11: ~ ~ ~ t. fretless guitar.. .!l. i-li g Pick Pros and Cons It is ultimately your choice whether to use a pick or not. - ..~ '''' " .ight slide glissando from a random point on the string below the note.'" ..- .re it is comfortable for you./~ /~ /~ /~--. 1\ .-hand approach.. Without the pick." and the frets help as visual cues while you intonate all your notes by ear.. ~'" . .J .. The high D note on the 2nd string I 15th fret is approached by a sl.. ". however. . flesh on strings tends to have a warmer. This makes for a more "vocal" sound.. -.jj. ~ " ~'" .. The downside is you may have to spend time learning a new right.. and therefo. It is important to realize that you must place the slide directly over the fret to produce the note you need.. ~ "I" .c tone and will allow for rnexirnurn control..

the first played without the pick.." " w . " /:" w .........0...---. part of slide guitar technique.. Phrase 2 (w/pick) ~ . . . _1Il_ . ~ Do . .~ . I\J.... ·""' ..... ". • ..... " V "... / ."' " " g -."f/!" v T' A ! .. .. '" .. • . " Example 4 Let's now add the 4th string. The technique is accomplished by either bringing the pick down to rest on the string you have just played. . ....... v " .•~ ~f'3 •n ~. n n /v .. ... - B_ " """ " - . .- . Examp/e2 Phrase I (w/fingers) o!!': Check out these two phrases." . " ..". .. ..... • T ..Section 2: Intonation/Right and Left Hand Techniques 7 o CD _. .... IIliIll). lIghtlysomewhere near the bridge. . >- .~it I:J i .. '" " .. .. w .. v v . '" f " . /f'-/f'. ... . ....I. o CD Example 3 • You can practice string damping with this example on the 2nd and 3rd strings... For overall damping. /f'-/f'-~f'- ~ .. . w Damping String damping (preventing unplayed strings from ringing) is a difficult..'" III _ •• .-..- .. ..... ... Continue to mute unplayed strings with the damping technique.. n L- - ............... - . v" ~" .. the second with. • ... keep the heel of your picking hand placed on the strings....~. ./ '" .". " . .. •• ..... or by aHowing your thumb (or another finger} to come into contact with the string..- .~ 3 U" ........"..../ ./W o CD ~1'I... but essential.. t. 3 " .. causing it to be dampened.. ....

.o CD ~"'J.. ...j. 41\ . ... ~...j... without sliding into the notes.. ..../ /I 1# (B7) (A7) ~~ ~~~ ~' .-!!:.... _.. ~ LA ... See the suggested finger assignments below. ..At first. ... ...' )-fL .. 0 .... . . III~. D n w ~ .-II: 1# o!'I' '.. .oIf -11:1'7' l' . . .~ . First.... b.' ~~ ~' r.itar sound........... ..~ ~n I~ p.... ..... It is inspired by an old! one-string instrument called the "Diddley Bow" which was invented by the original blues musicians down in the Mississippi Delta. n CD CD Example 6 This final intonation exercise involves a 12-bar blues melody in the key of E.. lose the pick and use your fingers. . (A7) fr' ~.... Q... T i m w m m .- i-'- ../ '" " n n . (E7) _. . B Section 2: Intonation/Right and Left Hand Techniques Example 5 Imitating bugle calls is a good way to get a handle on slide intonation. . "" . n .on the 2nd string.. g ~ r: ." A ~ n.. .r.. begin to add the expressive slide glissando and vibrato [coming up next]. oIf' -It: '.. .. b... ...~ .1'7 • .... l'~ 4n _ft.. g. ... . D.1 T T i i n ' i n j .I/lJ.. -11:.. -II: • RH: T T i • i i j • i 1\ -fL • m n ~ .r- f- ~~~ i-'- r- i-'- ~~~ i-'- r..---fL • In j t. t:).. III T 1. ... .p:.. n . g ...I/lJ. (E7) i-'- (E7) . These imitative vocal techniques are the true charm of the slide gu...r...Mo.. .. .~... . tJ "I" A . Without the pick. ........v • i 171 i>.. . IV and V] chords in a 12-bar blues progression . n . ..... "I" .. . you should "assign" one finger per string.. .. Next. "" ... try this bugle call with the pick. .. play the notes with the emphasis on good intonation only... The note choices reflect all three [I.-II: . .. ..._ ~A 4'" ..G· r-: b....... .. ..... n ...c:. After you accomplish that. u ! .. played only...j.. m . .oifl'.. F''-'F'' .

DICKY BE.TTS .

and also adding vibrato. These are the root. -'ft~ti: ~ tJ I _or Pi g a n . ft -. " . ... F~ and G~... 3rd and 2nd strings). The three notes we are going to play with the slide in this example are E.. . . To sound like blues. o CD Example 7 We are going to begin by using an E chord shape at the 7th fret as a basis for some licks. J . E and G# on the 4th.. g A ! . This means using slide glissandos from beneath and above a note. b7th (0) and 5th (8) of an E Minor Pentatonic Scale IE GAB OJ on the 3rd and 4th strings.ow for a three-note combination involving the root (EJ.... tJ 'or : ..... 2nd and 3rd degrees of an E Major Pentatonic Scale [E F# G# B C~].. you will want to phrase and think like a singer. n v • .. .f. @ CD ExampleS N.j. -'_I'l .. This is an opportune shape because it has three notes across one fret that can all be played at once by the slide-all of which are chord tones [8. .10 Section 3: Phrasing and Vibrato SECTION 3: PHRASING AND VIBRATO We need to develop a neck position or two that will inspire a vocabulary of licks which can be trusted to work at any time.

¥ . . r""'" 1\ ."". You will find thereare many different ways to ex-press one noteand those ways define your individual sound... Notice the deliberate usa of slight slide glissandos. D . . • a ...10 .. . A lower root (E) iis found on the 5th string. .. a D .0. .. Experiment with varying degrees of speed and width concerning your vibrato..Section 3: Phrasing and Vibrato 11 @ CD Example 9 This pattern adds four more notes to Example 8.. $ "'. .!'- ~ tJ I ... .. . now play the b 5th (B b 1... .'I\.. Descending down the 4th string.. ..... ... " 1t. Alternative possibilities for the b 3rd (G) and b 5th (8 b) are now played on the 2nd string. "" . ... ••• . . . . ~... ~~...."'" .. @ CD Example 10 This last group of notes involves a chromatic climb up the 2nd string . . . ... let's check out a few licks connected together in and around the 7th position E chord shape.. n OJ . Be especially attentive to damping and muting when playing on low strings-unwanted noise tends to be heard more prevalently there.extending the area of the E chord shape.. ...... - •• 4 t • -• tJ .. . 4th (A) and a b 3rd (8).IIoti: ..~ .....110 1t I I I . ...... ' ~ ~ y ..•."ff... .. .... . ~ .... .. ft _ ..~ . .ft'1l...... .... .... D CD . @ Example 11 For the purpose of phrasing with a "human quality..... as well as vibrato.

.... p A L'U . and approached with a glissando.ng_ and Vibrato @ CD Example 12 A good phrasing idea is to surround a particular note with upper and lower neighboring notes....et deeper into learning about phrasing by way of a "call and response" session... 'T . -It: .. -~ . the 3rd [G#1 is the chosen note for surrounding .. ~ ... E7 _ .~ _ . ~ .... n V 'T ! --....-" n n n ~ @ CD Example 13 Another common technique is to quickly slide into a note from above...... n A . '''' . CD .. In this case.. . . . In this case. 4 $i 3 ~ ....12 Section 3: Phras.... ... " ... The phrases you hear will all be based on the note combinations we have established. 3 "..." . the b 7th (OJ is highlighted as you slide quickly from the root [E) above it. p""" " J.. .. ~IiIIII!"'... -1I ..... Listen carefully for subtle inflections of glissando and vibrato as well as what the tonality (major or minor) of a 'lick sounds like.. This entire example is played over an E Blues shuffle feel with only one chord-f7. " " @ Example 14 We are now going to g....... both a 1/2-step away in either direction... .......... In the space following the phrase try to spontaneously recreate what you hear....j....n .

. '_L_'" " . . _...~.~ '''' " - ." v. - ... I ' .... ........ - L_____ 3__j ' . . '.._ n . '_ f •..- n '" - " ._ ~ .1:1:.... f " .. +!: u: I . '!!' +I- ~ ~ ~II-~/~ /~ • ...._ r" J'l ." " --~~~ /(1- ... ... .e... "..... slide tJ .............10 ~ -til b.. ..... 'V ........ _- /~ . or 'l[ . ... " .v I . ~ it t . :r _l _. ... b..:D ... '-'" ._ f" ~1:I:~/p... .0...I I -4' ... . --. . .. ... ... ...ft w " " •• .. .... 1'1 .. w " w w .. '.7.. " - ... ....~ .... /~ ...v . ....... f'" -$" ........ . • " ~#~P- .w ~ .. .. -- "~" - ._ " .... t. 1Iio1lll_""" D """"'1'1.. ~ .... - .1±.. v -_A ... _ _.. " '1) . .." ~ . . ~ . v .... 'w ..or I .J ---.'" ~ . .. D .. /~ ~ ~/~ ~bo~o grad. ....10* /1'- bJ(I-".. •n ~ 'V....Section 3: Phrasing and Vibrato 13 ~ "........ _ ... . +III ~~ II.0. " ... ........_. --.".. • ft '" . . .. f' ...... _... ....". tt.......J 'i II .... .... ~ .~ -. - .. ..... ..... "'D . I ._ _ ~........_ "'_.... 1\ . . . ..0. '" . .. -.. ....._ .

..."" r .. . .. ' .n _ _ ....J •• /fL_ w/slide fL F /fL fL F/F . .. .... \.. ~ ... • ...... ....111... _ . Compare the two versions. ..n . . . Oett • n - - ... .. . 1111_" III _I'L .P f..._. ' " " .... .. .. •• . • . W/OUl "'" T I / i I A ._ •1 . / ~ f:: f- !: - fL ...w 111-- ..... . I~..._ . ._ } -~ ~J~ ... _ .. _ /fL . .. - . .D. ! ... .ft g @ CD Example 16 Here is an example of a typical blues lick transferred over to slide with an alteration along the way that makes it sound as if it were originally played with a slide. X " x '"" ® CD Example 15 Another good way of stocking your vocabulary is to take licks that you play normally (with your fingers] and imitate them with the slide. - .Ii .-.. /- ...n .. .. I " .. . r III . .._ ". 1\ » . ..- ._ .... ..... ...R _ . " .". ...... ~ . w/slide .o 'Ii " .droit.. it.) F . other times the difficulties may lead to cool solutions or even unexpected creativity.. •• t$' • _ .) /F ..... . .. III" ....... "'._ ~ . III...w . w/out slide ""I'" .. / . .... ... /~ _"fI~oIt 1= ~ f:: fL . Sometimes it will work out nicely..".... Here's a classic lick that is relatively easy to recreate on slide.1*" ..14 Section 3: Phrasing and Vibrato " ".."...-... - ._ . ..iI"'.. / .. b. " .. g ..... . The alteration is a simple re-finqerinq.. . +I: ~~- fL slide F ~... _._ .. .'_ I II l1li . " .. / . ....... """'" ~ JI.. Notice how the phrase takes on a whole different feeling. •• . ~~.. .. . .. . ..._ .tt: ..... _ . _ ' '" ... ..... _ n ...

Section 3: Phrasing and Vibrato 15 THE BLUES PROGRESSION Before moving: on. The chord changes for a blues progression are derived from the I. An often heard variation is called "the quick change. while the rest of the form remains the same.) IV I I v IV I II .. V for 1 bar. the I is E. let us quickly review the standard 1. Forex. The most common 12-bar blues progression has the I for 4 bars. Roman numerals represent the chords that are built from the 1st.ample.2-bar blues progression.. IV for 1 bar and I for 2 bars-adding up to 12 bars. (Quick change: IV I CD I .7 etc. IV and V chords In the key. back to I for 2 bars. the IV is A and the V is B. IV for 2 bars. @Example 17 . in the key of E." where the 2nd bar of I is replaced by a IV chord. 4th and 5th degrees of the tonic key's major scale.

. • Ln v "... 4 /~/~ . 1IIIIi'' ' ". .. 1\ .. .. -.1 b• .I." . .'" ... ... ./~/f:. ft '" L- '" .~~" A '" 1111 1])3 ><1 2fr ... "l1li11l1li _or. . in rhythm.. g .- _.. .ft .. f'-. ........ .. ! It. tJ .... 4" .- 4" 4.v . so you can get accustomed to connecting the chords in a musical context . .. 13J 3 ~I'I<lo-tt t • • • 3 ... 4" ' ......'" .... ? ._ L...16 Section 4: Transposing Shapes SECTION 4: TRANSPOSING SHAPES The simple process of transposing the basic "shapes" and note groups established thus far will enable you to play over the I... "" /f!:_ ~/~/~ f'J .. I (EJis moved to IV (A) and V (8). It.... A ... @ CD Example 18 This example clearly lays out the process of transposing a lick based on the visualaid of the movable chord shape.. /n • • . IV and V chords of the blues progression.. g ".~'' .~ '" .....It -It /~ .. A~ .. . .. .._....... Take the lick through the progression.._ . .. _. take your E chord shape licks and move them up to the A and B chord shapes.. . So in effect.. ". • ..

. .. ........ /._".... slide ..."li""... -it: t) ---r:. /- ..t .~_.. t . --- ---f:. --... or A _ft g -. ... . • \-1. _"'I" ..... -g . '" ..ao~ . ~>.. - -.. . g " ... '" • . ...... ......II..I4..6.." ....' _ .... .... .. . .. 6. ? ./~ .. A or ~ ... .. - .- ... ....... ....."""f'L .. .. II". .. 3 .. E7 .. . " .-.... 1 1o[. -III II .Section 4: Transposing Shapes 21 @ CD Example 19 Here is an improvised 12-bar blues solo based on moveable chord shapes... .._ ... ..... .... " .._ ..!.'. .. J --.... -.. ...~ _#f_ • . ""-Ii'" --grad. n A7 '" " " ..... ! 'g .. -. ~ 'W..' t $ *. A ! ... " " - ... ... 'i'"..---..'" .A . 1-:1........ _/~ ~ !L~ fL b'fL . /- '" g E7 r-" ... l1li _ ...._..... e "" ..f ..... " .. n "". ... ...-f:- ~-.... "' ... .. . . ~ _1±.... ..- . IA A' /~ ..IIo-it: to ... .. . • ._ ..D... --.~ ....... . -_ -_' J B7 ~ " .n /- A7 ...."'" I . .. ••• . .. .....-.iI. _"A. +1:.: ._ _"' . n w . '" .. ¢ . Study the exact moments that connect one chord to the next.. ""lI~-. --.~ . n ~ ~. "~ .. " ..... "' ...w .. ... . . w .. .. 1Ii~"'" '" . -II: --a .. "' . 4't:J .. E7 • " _.. • .. n 'T .. r"'I'I.. +1:. .. ... ............

.'" n A II '" ... in order to concentrate on what sets the two chords apart from each other."'.... IIJ...~ .. III!. "" '" .. w .. "I ~ ~ b• tttm 1243 !lIt' 1324 . " e: . " . ...... or .. ":::' . . f..I...22 Section 5: Limiting to One Position SECTION 5: LIMITING TO ONE POSITION You now know how to transpose shapes and ideas through the I... n " - n ~ n' ...1111_411'" " '" v·v _D.I... " n ... "..-II: tJ ...I\~-I!: tJ ..-II: • 3 _? b... .. '" . .. E CD .... Continue visualizing the chord shapes as you study the lines.I..1. -"I..... " ....... ... We will then convert it to an A7 shape and proceed to view it as a basis for licks.."~~~"""""'" tJ .. ~"'..... . IV and V chords... . A '" - .. -II: g " ~ ~ J. if:..~ .t . ! ... . ... ~~~~I". ..II~ . n 1/" ..'" '" n . . . " n .I .. @ Example 21 It is now time to break the progression down to a simple I (E] to IV [A7).a... ... .. : ...n . C..~"'. I . you will clearly hear the phrases changing to fit them. . As the chords change..... ~ ~~#~ ?- . CD @ Example 20 Check out how this new A chord shape falls right within reach of the E.." ....0.. .. . A7 x Ilr x 1333 E xx SlE17f A xx r A7 ..... ~ " ... 011:.. .. 1I I.. n " . _-3 3 n /~ A7 b. b. Another useful approach is to limit chord shapes and licks to a single position or area of the neck..... ... " .. ~ n !!II... ..

.. I " " .t./fI. ..jj.... . n •• IIIi ... ~ n ... n " I . " . I eJ 11 -B7 131211 7f • "iii....... L_" " . ... Limiting to One Position 23 @ CD Examp/e22 Continuing with this logic... " . • . .. Q_ .· ..... ... . 1. • ....Sectiol1 5.... ...• ~t- • .ft IJ 121 I - ~ fL... ' ·~ft _"" ...... A . the V (87) chord that we are going to use also sits right near the E... and the licks are once again going to be derived directly from that shape... - . ... ..n • ¥O:.. .. tJ I . /- .... .. ./- .• $ - I ./ " .. It's a bit trickier to catch the notes of this chord with the slide because no two are at the same fret simultaneously. . Il ft_ _" " . ffnrr ..... B7 7ff ..-... with phrases that foHow their shapes....n '- .IIo 011: _1*" .. ~ . This example lays bare the difference in sound between the .. ft. • _1_" 4 •••• ..... . .•• .ft "... . ...... . L_n . ...1 and the V.. . " n L_ .. -._ b.. ~I\.. ~~~~.1 3 t..~ 3 •• . I '" .....

B7 _..e: n - --" - '" " . e n u -" .. u . .. -... -..n . .. . n ... .. E7 1"""".. . ~ --"0.. from chord to chord....~'t:o.... ~ .. -.. '" I '''''.. .... E7 .ft " ..--.. ~ oil: . -- --lr. •• ...ioI-1l: : ..4r.. -~ ~ _n 3 3 . .J - .. with a quick change to assist ln learning good phrasing...... ~ ~' .." ... "!III" v .. " .. _n ........."'_ ~........ . n -n ~ .... ~ ....... . A .n .. ..Io ...." Jt.. ~/ . - A7 ....'.. .. v .. ~ .. . ... ..v . E7 ." .... ." . v • . . . or . .... '" " " _.. 't ._ " ...... A7 .24 Section 5: Limiting to One Position @ CD Example 23 Here's a 1 2-bar blues in E.._Jt.0.'" n .. . u . I I --"0.0.... .. ... A7 I""""fI. n .. ... .v " .... :e . . I E7 I . I ~.... 1 I .. .0.. . ..__....

JOEWALSH .

.. III •• "' /'" ."'" ' n.... . • ... -- ..1..n n ~ .... . /v / .fL ~ fl- --J .. ..... v .. - ..". 'I11III"".. • •••• $ •• (Wi(1~ /& /& J /_&blJ• . A "G" chord is heard from the 4th string up to the 1st string: @=OCl)=G@=B(D=D @ CD' Example 24 First.....» oft: - /~ /fL . .... A A ...... - " ~ " n ~ ~ A .1.:.. . with the B note [that we had to reach to the 12th fret for] now being right at the 9th fret under the slide.... .. v i> . Partial because it only involves tuning the 1st string down from E to D.. ::: ..+t E • . A .. ..n /i\. ... "Drop 0" Tuning "Drop 0" tuning is a common" "partial" open tuning. bl.J 3 .. ~ ...~ " I ."..... - . This way you no longer have to jump up or down to other frets to play notes that belong to a chord.. . .. v "I &l .. .. $ 4··_~~· . ~ .. " ~ - ~. ""..... ...'". . E ... When combined with the 2nd and 3rd string double-stops.. a great deal of melody harmonizations become possible-like this one: """"". ... check out these useful double-stop 3rds on the 1 st and 2nd strings which were not available in standard tuning . . These alternative tunings allow you to simultaneously group more chord tones under the slide.. @ CD Example 25 Next.26 Section 6: Open Tuning5 SECTION 8: OPEN TUNINGS A study of slide guitar would not be complete without a look at open tunings. They also enable you to come up with note combinations that are not possible in standard tuning . . let's look at how the "bugle call" lick now falls in a more convenient way../~ ." n.." • -.

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with the low root on the 6th string..- I::: I::: . I:. I:. Duanne Allman can be said to have written the book on modern electric slide playing with the help of this tuning.::: #. @ ""B. G CD = E @ CD Example2S The most accessible shape in E tuning is the big major chord using all 6 strings. . and so on..on .60 . i" I::: iii '. Key of A at the 5th fret... G) . you would spot the low 0 root (6th string! 10th fret) and place the slide across the 10th fret. To begin in the key of 0. Open E Tuning: ® = E. u - -& 'T ! . Now we must learn a new set of shapes and licks associated with them. 0 = E.n i" I:. your slide would be across the 12th fret.. the 4th string (0) is tuned up a whole step to E and the 3rd string [G) is tuned up a half step to G#: this completes an E major chord (E G# B)-with doublings on the root and 5th.. G) == H.. To begin playing a blues in the key of E..-ft- Jl. Key ofE r-"f'l -.28 Section 7: "Open E" Tuning SECTION 7: "OPEN E" TUNING The "Open E" tuning matches the sound of an open position E chord. The 5th string (A) is tuned up a whole step to 8.All of the shapes and licks we have been working on in standard tuning go out the window because of the re-tuned strings. I would strongly recommend that you check out his playing with the Allman Brothers and try and pick up on his signature licks. ...J Key ofD Key of A 0 II 1tH -& .Q g .

.~'I:.~ >' . " 3 ... 1. .1+- ...It t~) (~7) . ! A g '. g ..v -3 ..! A .."lo . . 'v I. g . .n ._ ~ •• 'Ii.. 5 '" ~7 I ... ft .~ ~~"'." _ .. ..._ n .ao!f.I....p •• ... A '.. ~ ~~ ~ _.. Jj. "T" . Get used to this pattern. --' I...lf:!. '..." ..~ IA .... '" .. \-1 I'" ~ In . J... 'ft ~ ....... ""..... ft .n ...ft ..... .' . A . .._ .u .IItJ '. .. .. ~ .Section 7: "Open E" Tuning 28 o CD Example 27 Here are some licks based on the most commonly used E tuning. 1 2 3 4 5 b 7 1 J... ft ..v o Examp/e2B CD The most accessible and stylisticallv common notes in E tuning occur within a limited fret span on the neck.. ..'n 3 " 1ft 4 .'tI i i. ..." 'v ... .. . ~ ft ! ~" .J. t.) '... we will talk about the notes that are being used.~ . . ' • 3 .. ft." In •n .. .. and in the next example..~ --' t...'" . We are in the key of 0 (at the 10th fret where a 0 major chord is found under the slide).." .. .'''. ._ ....ft /'" . . ... ft v . ...... ft II1II. ... .... ._"''''. .3 1....l /..if'... '" ........ I • 3 4 5 ~7 I 2 ..l..... 'I'".io'tlotaot.~ IA . .. This pattern can be transposed easily to other keys.~ • . . ~.... . Check out how this pattern works out as a valuable blues scale [the intervals spell..io.n .......... 3 . .- ft 4n /'" in .....n .. l1':li . . ~A /'" 4A 'v --'"... A . ..... . L-3__j .I .~ 4A . .. D 1ft -." /'v /.. .... neck pattern.

.. .-'- ..'" .. ~ --..... ._ /f:. g ...... f:...- •n -- . 2 3 A • b7 .....- ."" ~ .. _ H' . tr-- ~ t: • .n ..0.~ .._ ...- _.. ..11- .. .~ 5 ..- ... D /~ -"11.. "I" f:--:~ --~ .rn..v .- '" .'> _. It can be thought of as an "extension" to the previous patte.... Q... g . ._ ~ 'A . Ii.. ....f:: »: - II. .'_ .... -._ . 'or . ~ -..: • . ..0.. "~".- .'''''''''''''''''''-'' ~ ~ /(11.......n / --~ ..I"""'''''''.'- . r . .30 Section 7: "Open E" Tuning @ CD Example 29 This next pattern maintains the same intervals in a higher neck position.. -::.. """11.. .. . "........- .. .. .11- - - - 3 - ~..... .... -" ·v '" '" .. ~ "... .w ft.~. ~ ~ .. . »: ..- @ CD Examp/e30 Let's put this extension pattern to work with a few good licks that fluidly mel'd both patterns together..".- •n -... 3 _.. ~ 1I...w.. ~"'. ... ! . I b7 ~ rot. • 4 3 I 4 .. . ~ f'- :~ . ... 111111" g ...

..... ff /e: /e: r- r- r= .f'- •~ J :·"'-"'0 " .: g ..... .. . r= b~r= /..... ' . _" .. .. ..110... / 'n .."'_ . . A g T .r ~~ r=..... Optionally... . -' 1\.et started: D -'1I. what you need to do is obvious: transpose the previous patterns to where the G and A shapes sit on the neck.. . ..- A . ' . .... A !II~ f: '" . .. tJ ............. . . _. /... . '" .."..." '" . -'1.. . ..D..' . " . ......... .. .f'- ..._r= /~ lie.. -- . ...- .. . . .. .. you can take the 17th and 15th fret material down an octave to the 5th and 3rd frets.f'...Section 7: "Open E" TUIllng 31 @ CD Example 31 To play over the IV and V chords [G & A] in a D blues.....~ r= . .- " g A '" . '" ...... -_3 'n '" . . "...'" '" ..•......'tp·_ t~ ..y ..n .... '" t- . '" ... ..~~ • '" '''' . ~ ---....5th fret and your A [V chord} licks at the 17th fret. •. ~.._ ._" ..".. .. G /~ ~/...110 • /...'7 . .." ... '" .. 3 L • ... - i.... .. . . ~.. . "''''../~ /f!:. / F / f!:. •. ... . .. .. " _ ••• ..._ L.. /-f'L • 3 I.= .. . .. _.... '" -fL~ .'" .....j1.. '" or .D. ... Begin your G [IV chord] licks at the 1. '" ._.................../fL /1'..'" •.......110 /11. .... Try these ideas to g... .. ~ . '" . . . . ''tt~'''~. -~/~ /:f!: ~ ~ ~ . . .. ...._ '''' ..

. ...it.. Listen to players like Jeff Beck. - Dm I -. -. Am r-" It " 1.. however..... the phrasing. i (Am).. Am I . Georpe Harrison and Ry Cooder for inspiration outside of the blues genre. 'tJ . VI (Fl. Try improvising your own solo over this progression after getting this example happening..• ° ••.... It has been heard extensively in country..otio •• -••• I .. . . ~ -r• I ~.. .. V (E). e_ """ '" '" . in this case. . i (Am).. the sky is the limit concerning how and where you choose to use ... v " u .32 Section 8: Slide in Other Styles SECTION 8: SLIDE IN OTHER STYLES Although slide guitar playing is most commonly associated with blues. @ CD Example 32 This chord progression in A minoris heard in blues.. . '''. rock and pop... Blues music is a good place to begin honing your technique and feel.iv (Om). ."~"'i' . . we are going to go back to standard tuning... The progression is i (AmJ... or perhaps even a jazz standard. In these concluding examples.. _I i.. I . classical or folk melody.. Note how the melody of the phrases follows these chords specitically... but once you become somewhat comfortable with using the slide. it is certainly not limited only to that style.-:. note choice and general melodic approach point more in the direction of a traditional.

n w ft w . ........ A .. .. ... .. ....:" ... .. " _T -- f:--~ ........- ". . n it..... ....."" ...... .. Dm ..'.. .- ... ...... . .. ...... " '....' .... g . ..... "".... . 1- ~ ?. ..... ...... .. . . "- W/OUI 3 slide ... . ._1liii....~.... .~ ....w. .. .....'''' . . ................ I .. ......... ~if". " ......... .-~ • ". .... .0... A n .._ ~I\ fL t. .. • 60 '" . ."' . "... ...." .-..... .. ...... . 1ft I.'" ../1\ ? ..- '" .ft "I' . r ------I .. . ... . .....J _ T . '.... . . .... F ~ ~ ~ ~--~~ . .. II! I E ... III"'" " .. .. ... '''' t: ... • w 'n .. ...0...... . ~ ..~~ . . . I Am .." 1ft . '" . '" '" .. .. "I' ."". ~ .. ~-~ ~ . f::J ~-~~~ .. ..... . .. . ...".......n - 4ft . . .. ........ ........"'-""'? ----...."'''".. ...... ""'--1--....(T ... ..... '" ..iot).l1li'" ~..w ~ t.. .. I• A-f:..._ ......-.._ I. Am . . '4111l1li lllilfl . ..... D . ...e..~ ..... ....__ .._ ... ..... .. g . " ....... E ... ..~ ·w . . -- ... ." " .....J . . .0. . .... n •• 111111.. ... .... "... .. c: A ~ - ..... ...... f:..- t:\ -e-...... f:--~ ~ . . .. .0. . .....--......... ........ ... . . f'- f'---f:- ~ .. .." .... Am ....."". ...Section 8: Slide in Other Styles 33 ~I\ F .......~~~ .I. ....._ '" .n .-~ ~ . .. c: - . ..'.ft . f:-~~'--~' -~ ~ f:- ~ t: .w In - '" ~"I ..'> '" '" ...... 'III... "I' • 1111 g .." .

" ". "II1II..._ 3 ---- ."' x n ".-v ... " ... 1\ . - ---'"l.ft ft v . - .' on 4 . ..._. eJ ... II1II'" • ~ "..~If....... .:- .-"' •• '" cII_ _.. -..b.... - . '" 4A ~ ..- _h... . D .. . /- . $ ~..."...._.lil1II! n w _....... . " . ... .• ".-III" .... .. . .._ I• . tt • . I... 4A b... I!.-.. .. ~ . '"' _...n .... " ...... on .- •• ..- A'. ..v . ._ ..... . .J .... ...... ~-... ~ A7 ". .... ... .. . ...-- .._ ... ... D _....-.. . • .-. I .... -J' x /w - .j 11· . b• JI~ . ••• -. ' ...."' - ... ...." JIo +f: ... "' .. • n ~ ". ..-..0..# ~~-~ ~/~ ...."' ..... 'tII~~If"J... 1± -- i"- f'- ~---t. A.III)" .... . ... "' - .v . tJ -.. ...... . .I. E7 ""-"JIo+f: ..... .. _. Blues in E CODA: BLUES IN E ® CD Example 33 This final example is in standard tuning and brings together everything we have discussed so far.. . . . . II on ._ 1':1:.0.. . .. fI: -. .. - ill Jj.x .... - A7 .. . ---::-. ....'..J ---- .......... 'Y!". ...."..."" E7 . IL_1::... •• A'" . n ."......... ..- -~ D "'" B7 ..- "'n n lL_ft_ 1. n I -3 .II1II...34 Coda.

... ...j.... . A B7 -+r .J... ~ .......:.Coda: Blues in E 35 _. -.A '" 3 . A ~ "- A " . .. # E7 ----t-I . ... A 'iT. . -f: I ~ -.Il ~ ~ ~ .- .. .'A ... E7 B7 Fade ...--.

RYCOODER .