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2012 Si10k Journal

2012 Si10k Journal

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HISTORIC EVANS K.

GRIFFING HOUSE
Shelter Island. Circa 1922, this historic stucco home with barrel tile roof sits off the road behind a large privet hedge, 6 acres, 6 bedrooms, completely renovated with period architectural details throughout, 2 story barn with full bath and 3-car garage. Co-Exclusive. $1.9M WEB# 25462

CHARMING FARMHOUSE ON HORSE FARM
Shelter Island. This recently built farmhouse located in the center of the island borders a preserve and working horse farm. House features a heated pool, 3 bedrooms and 3 full baths. Master bedroom has a large bath, walk-in closet and wood burning fireplace. Exclusive. $610K WEB# 43311

WATERVIEW CUSTOM BUILT
Shelter Island. This is a property immediately ready for living. Gracious entry hall, 4 lavish bedrooms and 3 full baths, glorious sunsets over Peconic Bay, colorful landscaping and heated 20x40’ gunite pool with spa. Located in desirable Silver Beach. Exclusive. $1.595M WEB# 39859

Peter McCracken , SVP, Associate Broker
631.774.0107 pmccracken@corcoran.com Member Multi-Million Dollar Club

NORTH FORK

SHELTER ISLAND

THE HAMPTONS

Equal Housing Opportunity. The Corcoran Group is a licensed real estate broker. Owned and operated by NRT LLC.

2 2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal

Welcome everyone to the 33rd annual Shelter Island 10K Run
It is a privilege and an honor to welcome each participant, volunteer, sponsor and spectator to the 33rd Shelter Island Run. Thank you Shelter Island for opening your hearts, homes and community to some of the nicest people on the planet. And thank you to the “nicest people on the planet” for bringing your joy, energy and money to us. What a special relationship Shelter Island has with the running community. As you know, this is an Olympic year. We are especially proud that one of our own, Amanda Clark-Nissen (not related to writer) and her teammate Sarah Lihan of Ft. Lauderale, Florida, are going to London in the 470 Class sailing competition. (See article on page 14.) In honor of them we invited to this year’s 10K some of the greatest Olympic runners of all time: Frank Shorter, Joan Benoit Samuelson and Bill Rogers. Along with our own Amanda, they’ll be here to breathe the Olympic spirit into our own Shelter Island event. Who can forget Munich 1972 when 24-year-old Munich-born American Frank Shorter pulled away from the field by more than two minutes to win gold in 2:12:19? He was the first American marathoner in 64 years to win Olympic gold. No American male has since. Who can forget Los Angeles 1984? The marathon for women was being contested for the first time in the Olympics. A gritty, petite 27-year-old named Joan Benoit from Cape Elizabeth, Maine, in a white painter’s cap, toed the starting line with USA emblazoned on her singlet. Twelve weeks after major knee surgery and only four miles into the race, she had the audacity to take the lead from Rosa Mota, Ingrid Kristiansen and the late Grete Waitz — all legends in their own right and favorites over Joanie in this race.
Th The 10K Journal J l is a publication of the

No one dared go with her. Everyone thought she would fade. But 22 miles later, she entered the Los Angeles Coliseum 90 seconds clear of Grete and more than two minutes ahead of Mota to win gold in 2:24:52. No other American woman has repeated that feat. And who can forget the years 1975 through 1980 when “Boston Billy” Rogers won four New York Marathon and four Boston Marathon titles and set the American record twice in the process? No person has ever done that. He is still the last American-born runner to win New York, male or female. His best shot at an Olympic gold medal was in 1980 when he made the Olympic team again — he’d competed in 1976 with an injury — but the U.S. boycotted for political reasons and he never got his shot. Represented by these athletes, the triumphs of Munich, Los Angeles, Boston and London will meet for a time on Shelter Island. In American running circles, these three giants of our sport are not forgotten. During this weekend, they will be mixing with other runners and encouraging Amanda and Sarah in their quest for gold in London. What will these amazing women bring back with them from England that will never be forgotten? They are the best in America — will they prove to be the best in the world? Stay tuned. Follow them at teamgosail.org and help fund them if you can. Our official charities are: East End Hospice, the Shelter Island Run Community Fund and the Timothy Hill Children’s Ranch. Please take time to look them up online and stop by their booths on race day to pick up literature. They are all great. Good luck to all runners and to Team Go Sail. CLIFF CLARK Co-Founder
ART DIRECTOR

contents
3 Welcome to the 10K 4 Event details All you need to know before, during and after the race. 5 Race weekend schedule 10 Course map 14 ‘Joey’s Mile’ becomes official The final mile is dedicated to Joe Theinert, a Shelter Islander serviceman killed in Afghanistan. 18 2011 race wrap-up Africans dominated top 10K finishers in 2011. 22 Registrars extraordinaire Jackie Tuttle and Diane Kilb have been the friendly faces of the 10K race from the start. 26 When in Rome… We do things a little differently around here. Here are a few helpful tips. 32 2012 10K Pawprint Course humor by Peter Waldner. 41 Hosting the elite Islanders open their homes every year to top athletes. 42 Olympic spirit in the air This year’s 10K connects to the Summer Games. 46 Running for a cause Gwen L. Kosinski Foundation teams up with the 10K. 48 Race beneficiaries Local charities make the difference between race statistics and real 10K results. 50 Racing by the numbers 2011 10K winners 52 Who makes the race happen The 10K is supported by a legion of local volunteers. 54 Thanks to our sponsors The companies that give the 10K what it needs to keep on going.

EDITOR

PROOFREADERS

PHOTOGRAPHY

CONTRIBUTORS

Peter Boody
PUBLISHER

Barb Pfanz
SALES

Andrew Olsen

Ken Allan Adam Hashagen

Archer Brown Jo-Ann Robotti JoAnn Kirkland

Garret Meade Eleanor P. Labrozzi Tom Touw Beverlea Walz

Julie Lane Bob Liepa Jocelyn Murray Jo-Ann Robotti Joanne Sherman Peter Waldner

2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal 3

2012 RACE LOGISTICS

Everything you need to know
Here’s an overview of all the working parts of the 10K run and 5K walk to help participants make the most of both events.
CHECK IN
Runners should arrive on Shelter Island by 3 p.m. Saturday, June 16 for packet pick-up and check-in at the Shelter Island School gymnasium. Packets are available starting Friday, June 15 from 5:30 to 8 p.m. and on Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Your “Champion Chip” GPS tracking device will be included with your packet. After the event, hold onto your race number, which grants you admission to Saturday night’s post-race party. Please note that strollers or baby joggers are not permitted on the course.

THE RACE
USA Track & Field Certified Course STARTING INSTRUCTIONS The 10K race starts at 5:30 p.m. sharp, Saturday, June 16, rain or shine, on Route 114 near the traffic circle in front of the Shelter Island School. The staging area is on the school grounds. School Street is a detour for through traffic — please cross with caution and do not delay vehicle traffic. Do not gather on Route 114 near the starting area until called by the official starter, David Katz of Finish Line Road Race Technicians (FLRRT). When called, enter the section that indicates your anticipated average pace per mile. SPLITS Splits are measured at each mile mark. A digital clock will be on display on the right side of the road at the 5K mark. WATER HYDRATE, HYDRATE, HYDRATE! Water will be available outside the school from 2 to 5 p.m. Runners are strongly urged to take fluids within one hour of the start of the race. Water will also be available at 2, 4 and 5 miles and at 1.5 miles for 5K walkers. Signs will alert runners to official water stations. DO NOT ACCEPT FLUIDS from unofficial sources along the course.
BEVERLEA WALZ PHOTO

5K WALK The 5-kilometer community walk begins at 5:45 p.m., 15 minutes after the 10K. It is a non-competitive event. All entrants will receive a runner’s packet and T-shirt. THE ROUTES Both the 10K Run and the 5K Walk begin on Rte. 114 at the Center round-about and head southward. Turn left on St. Mary’s Rd. and continue to the next round-about. •The 5K Walk goes left at the roundabout onto Manwaring Rd. to Rte. 114, then north to West Neck Rd. where the 5K merges with the 10K to the finish field behind the American Legion Hall. • The 10K Run goes right at St. Mary’s round-about onto Ram Island Rd., left up Cobbetts Lane, then right on Manhanset Rd. until Manhanset becomes Shore Rd. Keep right of the Dering Harbor Village Hall on Shore Rd. until Shore becomes Winthrop Rd. • Follow Winthrop across the bridge to Rte. 114. Go left on 114 to West Neck Rd. • Make a right onto West Neck and a quick left onto Midway Rd. Follow Midway to Bateman Rd., go left on Bateman for 200 meters and exit right onto the school athletic field behind the American Legion Hall and around to the finish line. See page 28 for a map of the course. FINISH AREA Racers cross the finish line at the Shelter Island School’s playing field, Fiske Field, behind the American Legion Hall.

Manning the grill at the post-race party at Island Boatyard last year.
4 2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal

FIRST AID A professionally staffed medical tent will be open from 12 noon until after the race on the finish field.

S.I. 10K RUN & 5K WALK RACE DAY CALENDAR
FRIDAY, JUNE 15
8:15 a.m.
MOTIVATIONAL CHAT Elite

SATURDAY, JUNE 16
11:30 a.m.
LIBRARY CHAT WITH BILL RODGERS hosted by Shelter

5:15 p.m.
RACE DEDICATION*

7-11 p.m.
POST RACE PARTY at the Island Boatyard, South Menantic Road. Mixed grill barbecue, live music by Who Dat Loungers and dancing. Proceeds to benefit Shelter Island School student programs. Free to all registered runners who bring their race number, modest fee for non-registered guests.

runner Bill Rodgers speaks with Shelter Island students in the school auditorium. For students only. 3–4 p.m.
LIVE RADIO BROADCAST

Island Library Director Denise DiPaolo and open to the public. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. RACE CHECK-IN at the Shelter Island School gym. 1 p.m.
FREE SHUTTLE BUS SERVICE

A moment of silence will be observed for all the troops during the race dedication and the National Anthem will be sung by Sara Mundy. 5:30 p.m. SHARP!
START OF THE 33RD ANNUAL SHELTER ISLAND 10K

WLNG (92.1 FM) live radio broadcast from Gubbins Running Ahead in East Hampton featuring Bill Rodgers, Barbara Gubbins and Cliff Clark. 5–8:30 p.m.
RACE CHECK-IN

starts between North Ferry and the school, by a Sunrise Coach Lines bus until 11 p.m. 2 p.m.
FREE SHUTTLE BUS SERVICE

In front of school; no jogging strollers allowed. 5:45 p.m.
START 5K FUN WALK

11 p.m.
LAST SHUTTLE BUSES TO NORTH AND SOUTH FERRIES

(non-competitive) 7 p.m.
AWARDS CEREMONY FOR TOP FINALISTS

12:45 a.m.
LAST BOAT FROM NORTH FERRY

In the Shelter Island School gym. Pick up T-shirts and goody bags. 5:30–8 p.m.
PRE-RACE PASTA BUFFET

starts between South Ferry and the school, provided by Hampton Jitney. Shuttle from the school to Post-Race Party at Island Boatyard. 2–4 p.m.
DJ MUSIC at the starting line in

At Fiske Field. Other awards will be presented at the Post Race Party.

1:45 a.m.
LAST BOAT FROM SOUTH FERRY

Hosted by the 6th and 7th grades of the Shelter Island School at the American Legion Hall to benefit student activities. Meet elite runners and enjoy the food of Chefs Sebastian and Julie Bliss. Tickets $15 in advance, $20 at the door; $5 children under 12; $30 maximum per family; $15 for Shelter Island residents.

front of the school. 4 p.m.
KIDS FUN RUN

Free, at Fiske Field. Medals for all ages, 4-10. 4:30 p.m.
PRE-RACE STRETCHING CLINIC

on the school lawn with Suzette Smith from Shelter Island Pilates.

* A note about the 2012 10K Race Dedication: This year’s race is dedicated to Shelter Island’s own Olympian, Amanda Clark and her team Sarah Lihan, who will be racing in the 470 sailing competition in London in July. It is also dedicated to all the Island’s service men and women, those who are participating today and those who are still in active service. Shelter Island’s own 1st Lt. Joseph Theinert, who was killed on June 4, 2010, in Kandahar, Afghanistan, when an improvised explosive device was detonated near his dismounted patrol, is being honored from this day forward with the permanent dedication of Joey’s Mile, the final leg of the 10k.

RACE DAY LOGISTICS
SHUTTLE BUS SERVICE There will be free shuttles between North & South ferries starting at 1 and 2 p.m. respectively, provided by a Sunrise Coach Lines bus and Hampton Jitney. The Jitney will provide a service to the Post-Race Party; both Sunrise and the Jitney will shuttle to the ferry depots until 11 p.m. PARKING Signs will direct drivers from each ferry to a parking area behind the school. PLEASE DO NOT PARK ANYWHERE ON ROUTE 114! It’s part of the race course. Park on side streets and keep all driveways clear. RESTROOMS Portable toilets will be located outside the American Legion Hall and near the finish line. DRESSING/SHOWERS & BAG CHECK Free showers and a bag check for all race participants will be available at the Shelter Island High School gym, hosted by the Class of 2014. Tips are appreciated.
BEVERLEA WALZ PHOTO

RACE LOGISTICS CONTINUED ON PAGE 6

Loosening up at the pre-race stretching clinic.
2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal 5

2012 RACE LOGISTICS

RACE LOGISTICS
CONTINUED FROM 5

PRIZES
Prize money is raised through corporate and private donations. OPEN DIVISION First-place male and female runners receive free round-trips for two on Jet Blue Airways. First through 5th men and women receive, respectively, $1,000, $500, $300, $200 and $150 and a trophy; places 6 through 10 receive $75 cash and a medal. A bonus of $1,500 will be awarded for breaking the course record (28:41/33:12); $50 bonus for leader at miles 2-6. MASTERS RUNNERS 40-plus-years-old First-place masters male and female runners receive free round-trips for two on Jet Blue Airways, $300 and a custommade medal; $200 will be awarded to 2nd place male and female; $100 to 3rd place male and female. A $300 bonus will be awarded for breaking the course record (30:37/35:16). OTHER AWARDS A ribboned medal will be given to all finishers. Custom-made medals will be awarded to the first three finishers in the following categories, male and female: 19 and under, 20-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, 40-44, 45-49, 50-54, 55-59, 60-64, 6569, 70-74,75+, Shelter Island residents, and wheelchair racers. No duplication of awards; higher award prevails. RANDOM DRAWINGS Jet Blue Airways and Apple Honda will offer random drawings at the awards ceremony. • Jet Blue will sponsor two round-trips on any Jet Blue non-stop flight destination from New York. • Apple Honda of Riverhead will award $500 to sponsor a registered runner and $500 for a registered walker. You must be a registered runner or walker and present at the awards ceremony to be eligible.

GENERAL
BENEFICIARIES Over the course of its history, the annual Shelter Island Run has donated more than $600,000 to various local charities. The goal this year is to continue this tradition in order to meet the ever-expanding needs of these organizations. This year’s race will benefit the East End Hospice, Timothy Hill Children’s Ranch and the Shelter Island Run Community Fund. East End Hospice in Westhampton Beach has assisted thousands of patients and their families during the final period of terminal illness. Timothy Hill Children’s Ranch provides assistance to hundreds of at-risk adolescent boys placed by Long Island family courts, social services and juvenile justice authorities. The Shelter Island Run Community Fund engages in a variety of charitable activities for the benefit of Shelter Island residents and organizations. RADIO The official Shelter Island Run radio stations include WLNG 92.1 FM, WEHM 92.9 and 96.9, BEACH 101.7 and WBAZ 102.5. The race will be broadcast live with pre-race coverage starting at 3 p.m. on Saturday by WLNG 92.1. Interviews will be given the entire week before the race. LI Radio will be promoting the race through commercials and 15-second community calendar messages, live DJ mentions of the event, on-air interviews and social media promotions.

BEFORE AND AFTER
KIDS FUN RUN Free 200-meter run through the official Shelter Island Run finish line for children 4 to 10 years old. Free souvenir T-shirt and medal for all participants. Bring the kids to Fiske Field at about 3:45 p.m. for the run, which begins at 4 p.m. FREE STRETCHING CLINIC A stretching and warm-up clinic will be held from 4:30 to 5 p.m. on the front lawn of the school, near the starting line. POST-RACE PARTY Let the fun continue after the race. Head to the Island Boatyard near the end of Menantic Road. Free to registered runners, the party will feature a mixed grill barbecue, music and dancing; $20 for non-participant guests.

PACE GROUP
40-MINUTE PACE GROUP Harry Hackett III of Merrill Lynch in Southampton is sponsoring a 40-minute pace group led by elite runner Joan Benoit Samuelson. The group will try to break a 40-minute time for the 10K course. Anyone who thinks they can run a 6:25 mile is welcome to sign up at the registration site to run with this group. All participants will be given a special number and singled out for recognition at the finish line.

COURSE RECORDS
OPEN DIVISION Alena Reta 28:41, 2007 Maria Luisa Servin, 33:12, 1997 MASTERS (40 AND OVER ) Graeme Fell, 30:37, 2000 (Long Island record) Marina Belyeava, 35:16, 2000 (Long Island women’s record) Alena Reta, 28:41, 2007 Maria Luisa Servin, 33:12, 1997 RACE RESULTS Times will be posted at www.FLRRT.com

The Kids Fun Run.

6 2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal

BEVERLEA WALZ PHOTO

2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal 7

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2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal 9

10K RACE MAP

The Shelter Island 10K Certified Race Course
• Start at the Presbyterian Church building heading south on Route 114. • Turn left onto St. Mary’s Road to traffic circle and bear right onto Ram Island Road. • Turn left onto Cobbetts Lane and follow to Manhanset Road. • Go right on Manhanset past golf course entrance – a sharp right on Havten’s Road and follow around bend to Sylvester Road. • Sylvester Road to Dering Harbor Village Hall. • Enter Shore Road north of Village Hall and follow south to Winthrop Road, across bridge to Route 114. • Turn left on 114 (south) and then right on West Neck Road, then a quick left on Midway Road. • Follow Midway 1/2 mile to Bateman Road. • Go about 100 yards on Bateman and leave pavement to the right onto finish field and then a half a lap around the school athletic field.
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10 2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal

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2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal 11

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2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal 13

JOEY’S MILE

The final mile is dedicated to an Islander who died in Afghanistan
This year ‘Joey’s Mile’ becomes a permanent part of the 10K course
BY JO-ANN ROBOTTI

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ile five through six of the Shelter Island 10K will officially and permanently be designated as “Joey’s Mile” as of this year’s race, according to 10K board member and Race Director Mary Ellen Adipietro. The stretch, which runs north of the intersection of Route 114 and West Neck Road, along Midway Road and down Bateman to the finish line at Fiske Field, will commemorate Army 1st Lieutenant Joseph (Joey) Theinert, who was killed in action in Afghanistan in June 2010. “It will forever be ‘Joey’s Mile,’” Ms. Adipietro said, “and everyone who sees it will be reminded of him.” Only six weeks into his deployment, Lt. Theinert was killed by an improvised explosive device while on a dismounted patrol in Kandahar. In recognition of his heroic actions, Lt. Theinert was posthumously inducted into the New York State Senate’s Veterans Hall of Fame in Albany on May 22 this year. Just three weeks after his untimely death, the 2010 10K was formally dedicated to Lt. Theinert in a ceremony in front of the Shelter Island School, from which he graduated in 2004. Twenty-four school children, who symbolized the 24 years of his life, each stood beside the starting line holding a balloon. The dedication was followed by moment of silence and the singing of “God Bless America” by Sarah Mundy. In 2011, the Race Committee hung a banner dedicating the last mile to Joey, and Ms. Adipietro and Lt. Theinert’s mother, Chrystyna Kestler, organized Is-

landers to help line the route with Ameriflags in place, Ms. Kestler and Ms. Adcan flags. “It looked great,” Ms. Adipietro ipietro enlisted Island school children to recalled, “and everyone — runners and help out in a “grassroots kind of effort, non-runners alike — just loved it.” with one kid telling another, ‘Hey, come “A lot of people said that it inspired out to the flag placing party,’ so it became them in that last mile” of the race, said a joyous kind of thing,” said Ms. Kestler. Ms. Kestler. The two women said there was a “teachThis year, the Kestler family proposed ing moment” involved, as well, because to the Race Committee that the same it give kids a chance to learn the proper stretch become a “Veteran’s Mile.” Desetiquette for handling and hanging an ignation would be given American flag. to the Island’s Gold Star While she looks to the families, those who have Once again this year, flags as a wonderful way lost a family member on American flags will to commemorate her active duty, and Blue Star young son’s service and families, who have some- line the route. sacrifice, Ms. Kestler said one currently serving on she also sees the dedicaactive duty. “But the board decided that tion of “Joey’s Mile” as a very visible affirthey wanted to name the mile after Joe. mation of all the youth of Shelter Island. They said that the Island kids really wantCiting the accomplishments of Olympic ed to do it,” Ms. Kestler said. contender Amanda Clark, who will sail So once again this year, American flags on the U.S. team this summer in England, will line a portion of Route 114, then Ms. Kestler said, “These flags are really all onto Midway and Bateman Roads, right about the great things our Shelter Island into Fiske Field. To put each one of those children do.”

Celebrating ‘Joey’s Mile’: From the left, Billy, Jimbo and Jim Theinert, Chrystyna and Frank Kestler.

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BEVERLEA WALZ PHOTO

14 2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal

Frank A. Kestler, D.D.S. and the Kestler family “Good Luck to All Runners” Thanks for participating in the Shelter Island 10K
51A North Ferry Road Shelter Island , NY 11964 Telephone (631) 749-0539 Fax (631) 749-0087
11535 Main Road (Rte. 25) Mattituck, NY 11952-0904 Telephone (631) 298-5021 Fax (631) 298-0044

2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal 15

Where Value & Great Prices Come Together!

SHELTER ISLAND RUN
WHILE YOU CELEBRATE YOUR 33RD ANNIVERSARY WE CELEBRATE OUR 53RD ANNIVERSARY!

I

would like to express my sincere thanks to all our loyal customers, close circle of friends and the many East End families and businesses that made our 53rd Anniversary possible. We could not have done it without each of you. Your business is appreciated and important to us and we look forward to serving you and your family for the next 53 years.

Regards, Irwin L. Garsten President, Apple Honda
16 2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal

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SOUTH FERRY
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T HE O RIGINAL S PONSOR
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2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal 17

2011 RACE REVIEW

Africans dominate top 10K finishers in 2011
BEVERLEA WALZ PHOTO

Kumsa Adugna of Ethiopa, a runner-up in the 2010 10K, won in 2011.

The runner-up from 2010 dashes to victory
BY BOB LIEPA

A

frican runners must like something about Shelter Island because they keep winning, posting quality times and dominating the Island’s annual 10K race. They did so again in the last running of the 10K on Saturday, June 18, 2011. Kumsa Adugna, 25, of Ethiopia, who was the runner-up in 2010, was the winner of the 32nd annual Shelter Island 10K Run. Adugna, running a 4-minute, 47-second mile pace, bolted across the finish line, completing the course in 29:44. He nudged out Harbert Okuti of Uganda by two seconds and third-place Keteme Nigusse of Ethiopia by three seconds in a close finish. “I’m happy. I like,” Adugna, whose English is limited, told reporters afterward. Adugna ran with the lead pack the whole way. He was first among a distinct group of six runners at the front that was later whittled down to three. Adugna, who said he had felt confident, took the lead on the grass during the final sprint to the finish line. Seven of the top eight finishers were Africans. Girma Tolla of Ethiopia was fourth in 30:04, Mourad Marofit of Morocco was fifth in 30:24, Abiyot Endale

Worku of Ethiopia was sixth in 30:49 and Demesse Tefera of Ethiopia was eighth in 32:50. Tefera followed seventh-place Birhanu Feysa of Silver Springs, Md. (31:18). The first Long Islander last year was Matt Walsh of Wantagh. He was ninth in 34:52, which was 13 seconds ahead of 10th-place Christopher Koegel of Malverne. The women’s champion also had an

Among the field of 22 elite runners last year were seven Ethiopians, four Moroccans, a Ugandan and a Kenyan.
African connection. Although Tezaya Dengersa, 30, is Turkish, she lives in Ethiopia with her husband and their two children. In clocking a winning time of 34:17, Dengersa for the first time finished ahead of her rival, second-place Malika Mejdoub of Morocco, who turned in a time of 34:40. Dengersa said she had pushed herself as hard as she could. Perhaps she needed to. Speaking of Mejdoub, Dengersa said, “She’s strong.” Mejdoub said the two of them ran the first three miles together before Dengersa made her move. “Actually, I didn’t run well,” Mejdoub said. “I was a little tired this week, but

it’s OK. I took second place. I’m happy.” Caroline Bierbaum of New York City came in third at 34:43. Michele Buonora of Sayville was the first Long Island woman with a time of 40:52 that brought her 10th place. Among the field of 22 elite runners last year were seven Ethiopians, four Moroccans, a Ugandan and a Kenyan. Dr. Frank Adipietro, the race’s medical director, said, “I’m going to have to say this is the strongest field we’ve had in the 32-year history of the race.” Shelter Island’s fastest male runner was Charley Stark with a time of 35:49, putting him in 22nd place. The fastest Island woman was Jodie Brewer with a time of 47:30, which put her in 182th place. Not counting Dengersa, Mejdoub was one of four Africans to place among the top eight in the women’s race. Among them were Salome Kosgei of Kenya (fourth in 36:15), who was followed by Aileen Barry of New York City (37:41) and Jane Finck of New York City (38:47). The next three female finishers were Muluye Gurmu of Ethiopia (38:57), Ilham Batal of Morocco (39:19) and Jenny Malik of Rochester (40:18). The event featured more former Olympians than it has ever had — four — with Bill Rodgers, Joan Benoit Samuelson, Girma Tolla and Dengersa taking part. Other big names from the running world participated, including Kim Jones and Jon Sinclair. “There are so many good runners today,” said Rodgers, who has won four

18 2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal

Boston Marathons, four New York City Marathons and ran the marathon in the 1976 Olympic Games in Montreal. “It’s not like 30 years ago, and so many good, older runners today, all ages, and that’s what you see here.” The warm, sunny weather early in the day of last year’s run faded away as the 5:30 p.m. starting time approached. It got cloudy, protecting runners from the sun. But it was muggy, not so easy on the runners. As they made their way along the American-flag-lined final mile dedicated to 1st Lt. Joe Theinert, the Islander killed in Afghanistan in 2010, overhanging trees offered welcome shade for some of the way and smiling spectators lined the route, offering refreshments, applause and encouragement. “It’s a celebration of our sport,” said Samuelson, who won the first Olympic women’s marathon in 1984 in Los Angeles. Still, the conditions must not have been right for a record: Alena Reta of Ethiopia set it at 28:40 in 2010 when he won the race for the second time in four years. Many reasons can be cited for the

Africans’ dominance in long-distance running. Samuelson gained a first-hand appreciation for that a few weeks ago when she visited Kenya. “I was really impressed with the way they trained,” she said. “They just run everywhere. If I went for a run, kids would jump off the backs of trucks or would run out of the schoolyard and they would run alongside us.” The affable Rodgers, who figures he has run some 165,000 miles over the course of his career, made his third appearance in the race as part of a celebrity pace group. “I was glad to not have to push as hard as I could because this was hard enough,” he said. “I’m getting a little creaky.”

Tezaya Dengersa, a Turkish citizen who lives in Ethiopia, was the women’s top finisher last year.
GARRET MEADE PHOTO

2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal 19

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2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal 21

10K BEHIND THE SCENES

First faces of the 10K
Jackie Tuttle and Diane Kilb are the people whom runners first see when they register
BEVERLEA WALZ PHOTO

The faces of the 10K when runners register: Jackie Tuttle and Diane Kilb.
BY JO-ANN ROBOTTI

F

or the 33rd year in a row, participants in the Shelter Island 10K will be greeted by a phalanx of volunteers in the school gymnasium who will give them their numbers and packets and answer any and all questions from the important to the mundane. Since the start of the race in 1980, this process has been the responsibility of registrar extraordinaire, Jackie Tuttle. Race organizers and participants alike credit her, and her longtime associate, Diane Kilb, with helping to make the Shelter Island race not only an extraordinarily efficient event but a highly personal one as well. Ms. Tuttle, who was a school teacher in East Hampton before her retirement, recently recalled how she became involved when the 10K began. Referring to the president of South Ferry Co. and a 10K co-founder, she said, “I saw Cliff Clark on the ferry one day and he started telling me about the plans being made for the run. I told him that the Special Olympics was one of my favorite charities. Then, the night before the race, Cliff called and said ‘I really need some help with the registration,’ and that’s how it all began.” A last-minute request of that nature would have floored most people but Ms. Tuttle, who has been characterized by one race volunteer as “unflappable,” rose

to the occasion with aplomb. “That first year we had some 500 to 600 people who came in to register. Somehow, we just handled it all.” And she has kept on handling it. “My involvement just kind of grew. I had no idea at the time that I’d be in it so deep.” LOOKING FOR HELP A long-time Islander who had been active in many facets of the community, Ms. Tuttle quickly realized that a key to the race’s success was getting the support of Island residents. There was a vocal minority “who complained about the inconvenience, the crowds, the ferry lines, everything connected with the race, so we wanted to come up with ways that would involve them, make them feel special and compensate them in some way” for the problems they might encounter. “We wanted to make sure that they had happy memories of race day and would talk it up instead of complaining about it,” explained Diane Kilb. “We wanted extra-good local publicity to come from this race.” Ms. Tuttle hit upon the idea of designating numbers 100-200 for locals (the first 100 numbers go to the elite runners) and reserving those same numbers for them every year. “If you saw number 101 on the road,” said race founder Cliff Clark, “you instantly knew it was a Shelter Islander. It really personalized the whole experience.”

“Jackie was ‘inclusive’ before the word became part of the vocabulary,” said Ms. Kilb. “She was accommodating and inclusive to everyone, but especially to kids and Islanders.” She was also extremely organized. “In the days before computerization, she devised a crossregistration system so we could look up a runner by his or her name, or number, or by category. If something went afoul, we would always track them.” “Jackie and Diane brought organization to the registration program,” said Mr. Clark. “They brought structure to the registration program; both of them were very good at detail. But it was their compassion that made this process so special. They knew the people. They looked forward to meeting them every year. They were hostesses rather than simply registrars. They made everybody who came through the door feel welcome and honored,” said Mr. Clark. WHERE’S THE ATM? For Ms. Tuttle, working the race was not only an opportunity to support a favorite cause but a way to meet friends new and old. “We got to see the same people every year, off-Islanders and locals, and a lot of families. Runners we started with in their 20’s began bringing their kids with them and some of those kids now have kids.” She recalled being on the island of Anguilla one year and seeing a man with a Shelter Island run T-shirt. “I went up to

22 2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal

him, introduced myself and asked him why he hadn’t registered for this year’s race.” Over the years, the volunteers would gather two to three nights a week at registration headquarters — the Tuttles’ dining room table — to sort and process the applications. By the 10th year, there were 2,200 runners, Ms. Tuttle recalled, and “we were still doing it all by hand. But Diane Kilb held it all together. She would work nights, sorting the applications into piles, male, female, ages, groups.” One year, bedridden with back problems, Ms. Kilb continued to “slice open envelopes” during her recuperation. During the 1980s, with the running trend at its peak, race day registration was temporarily suspended as an option but the team of volunteers in the gymnasium would make an exception for “anyone with a Shelter Island connection.” Both Ms. Kilb and Ms. Tuttle laughingly recall the stories people used to tell on race day; “I have an uncle who lives here” was a popular one. “People would say anything to be allowed to register.” Ms. Kilb remembered. Payment was a sticky wicket in those early years, when registration fees had to be paid in cash or by check. ‘Don’t you

take Master Card?’ was one of the biggest questions we would get, followed by ‘Where is the ATM?’ We trusted a lot of people to send in their checks and, surprisingly, most did,” said Ms. Kilb. THE COMMUNITY FUND In addition to handling the logistics of registration, the team of Tuttle and Kilb took on the process of securing non-profit status for the race’s Community Fund.

‘They made everybody who came through the door feel welcome and honored.’
While event proceeds benefited the Special Olympics and later, other charities, the revenue from the 10K Journal was designated solely for Island projects. “We wanted to be able to give something back to the community,” said Cliff Clark, “to compensate in some way for the inconveniences of the race.” Ms. Tuttle and Ms. Kilb decided that they would do the paperwork to create the non-profit organization themselves. “We didn’t hire a lawyer; the two of us just plugged away at it ourselves,” Ms.

Tuttle reminisced. “We worked two winters getting it all organized.” According to the fund’s current treasurer, Clarissa Tybaert, $228,000 has been given away since 1982 in support of programs and needs on Shelter Island. The Community Fund also awards a sizeable scholarship or scholarships to graduating Shelter Island High School seniors, which are generously matched by Ken and Donna Wright of Shelter Island. In 29 years, the fund has given scholarships to 82 Shelter Island seniors. Making the presentation at graduation each year, Ms. Tuttle likes to make a point of mentioning exactly how much the fund has donated to students. “I like people to know how much has been given back,” she said. Even after 33 years of working the race, the thrill and the enjoyment hasn’t faded for either of these women. “I love going to see the start of the race,” said Ms. Kilb. “All those feet pounding the pavement; it’s always so exciting.” As for Ms. Tuttle, “The race is a big part of my life now. I haven’t been active in other things and even my garden has taken a back seat. I just don’t have time for gardening when we’re working on the race.”

2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal 23

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2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal 25

2012 ISLAND QUIRKS

When in Rome ... or on Shelter Island
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We do things a little differently around here. Don’t be confused. Here are a few helpful tips ...
BY JOANNE SHERMAN

I

f you have never before visited Shelter Island, you should know that everything here is just a little bit different than it might be in other places. Some people have even used the word “odd” — but of course, they mean it in a good way. Here are just a few things it helps to know about this Island and the people who make it their home. GETTING DIRECTIONS In other places people usually give directions like this: “St. Gabriel’s Retreat House? Sure. Bear to the right, then turn left on Congdon, right on Cartwright and right on Burns. Bingo! You’re there.” It’s not like that here, because here the locals seldom use street names. We locate places by either who lives there, what used to be there, or what happened there. So, directions to the retreat house might sound like this: “Oh, you mean the monastery (because that’s what it used to be). Okay, follow the road to right at the place where that little yellow sports car flipped, then turn
26 2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal

left where the road always floods, then left again right before you get to the retired fourth-grade teacher’s house, then right at the field where the firemen have their chicken barbecue in August.” A few years ago a visitor from Minnesota asked a local for directions. She said he told her to go straight until she came to ‘where the big tree used to be.’” “Used to be?” she asked. “Yup. Really big tree,” he said. “Biggest one on the Island. But it’s gone now.” “Okay. So, should I be looking for a really big stump then?” “Naw,” he said. “Not any more. They dug out that stump a long time ago.” As she drove away, she kept an eye out for a place where there was no big tree, no stump and someone else to ask Need directions? Here’s what you do: First, find a map, then ask a local to point to the “you are here” place on the map, and the place you’re trying to get to. He or she will still tell you to go past where the hay barn burned down (right before World War II) but at least you’ll have a general idea of where you are and where you want to be. Maybe.

WATCH FOR ‘THE WAVE’ No, not a tsunami wave but the “odd” way drivers here acknowledge one another as they pass in opposite directions on our roads. In other places people wave in the traditional way of saying “Hey, how ya’ doin,’” because we’ve all seen it: a hand in the air or out the window is quite normal. But when you see a driver on Shelter Island wave in that manner, you know he or she is not a local. Locals who recognizes a familiar vehicle coming at them will always wave but there is no hand flapping involved. Ever. Someone explained once that there’s a little too much New England in these Islanders to let them be so demonstrative. Instead, they raise a finger off the steering wheel, usually (but not always, so be warned) it’s the index finger and it’s a quick, subtle movement. That’s it. Finger up, finger down. At no time does the palm of the hand break contact with the steering wheel. On rare occasions, you might see an enthusiastic driver lift two fingers, but most often that’s just someone who’s waving and stretching another finger at the same time.

And it’s important to note that it’s the familiar vehicle that gets the wave, not the person behind the wheel. So if you borrow a local’s car, expect to get that odd Island “salute” and make sure you salute right back (finger up, finger down) because that’s the way we do it here. SIX DEGREES OF SEPARATION? The theory goes that we are all separated — and not just from Kevin Bacon, but everyone else — by a mere six degrees. People are tighter than that here on Shelter Island. It’s more like four degrees, or fewer, so be careful what you say, and to whom, because we are pretty much all connected. There’s a favorite and oft-told story about a visitor to Shelter Island who got a speeding ticket. Unaware of the four degrees (or fewer) that separate us here, he was on his way off the Island and complained to the ferry purser that he had to come back because he was going to fight a ticket. Obviously the blankity-blank cop didn’t know what he was doing. “Good luck in court,” the ferry guy told him. The perp did come back to face the judge, and sitting at the bench, holding the gavel, the story goes, was the ferry guy. Yes, he was also the judge. But wait, it gets better. That blankity-blank cop? Yeah, you know what’s coming, don’t you. He was the judge’s son. ‘Nuf said? A ‘HARELEGGER’ BY ANY OTHER NAME The term “harelegger” refers to a person born here. One theory for how that moniker came about is it refers to the way Islanders had to run “like rabbits” to make the last ferry from Greenport. There is another theory, though it’s not at the top of the local theory list: back in the days when several New York City German beer barons had summer

Go straight until you come to ‘where the big tree used to be.’
homes on the Island, they used to arrive on the big steamboat ferry. Wagons would be sent to meet them and, instead of holding up signs with names, the way limo drivers do now, the wagon drivers would shout out “Herr Lager!” (Mr. Beer, get it?) General Island consensus among hareleggers themselves, though, is on the side of the rabbits. Whatever way the word came about, it defines a person who was born on Shelter Island, which also must mean born at home because there is no hospital here. It’s a nickname that true hareleggers wear proudly. This is a place of many nicknames

such as Tink, Easy, Chair, Stovie, Bluto, Toots, Pencil, Peach and Punch. Up until he died just last year, one of our most well-known and beloved locals was a guy called Scratchy. Many people didn’t even know his real name until they read it in his obituary. Though it’s mostly men with those unusual and colorful names, sometimes Island women get them, too. There was one called Bird and there’s Smoke and Queen. She got her nickname because she was the oldest girl where she grew up in a part of the Island called Eel Town. Did you even know there’s a place here called Eel Town? It’s easy to get to; just take a right where that big tree used to be and follow the road past the field where the firemen have their chicken barbecue in August.

2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal 27

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2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal 33

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36 2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal

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Best Wishes for Fast Times and A Fun Weekend

T H E C O L E S F A M I LY

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Holy Mass:
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2012 Community Events
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ATHLETE HOSTS

Hosts serve Shelter Island hospitality to elite runners
BY JOCELYN MURRAY AND JO-ANN ROBOTTI

Joseph Kibor, in T-shirt at center, won the 2000 Shelter Island 10K. He still sends Eleanor Oakley, in whose Island home he stayed, snapshots of himself, family and friends in his tiny Kenyan village. hosted women from Ethiopia “whose stories are simply incredible.” “We don’t really think about the fact that this is a career for these runners; it’s their livelihood and how they support their families,” Ms. Oakley said. “They travel from place to place all around the globe so they can send their winnings home.” While host families are required only to provide breakfast and a clean, safe place to stay, many go above and beyond what is asked of them. “If they want to do more, they are certainly welcome to do so,” said Cliff Clark, one of the original architects of the hosting program, which is now headed by Race Director Mary Ellen Adipietro. Some families, according to Mr. Clark, make all the runners’ meals. Others host post-race dinner parties to which they invite the athletes. Still others transport them around the Island during the weekend or take them out sailing or fishing. Because of hosts like the McDowells and Ms. Oakley, Ms. Adipietro said that many runners request to stay with particular families about whom they have heard rave reviews. “The great thing about Shelter Island is, as we all know, that it is an amazingly close and warm community,” said Mr. McDowell. “And one of the great reasons the race itself is so successful is not only is it a picturesque place to run but people who come here feel the friendship of Shelter Island.” As for Ms. Oakley, she is looking forward to finally being re-united with Joseph Kibor next year. “One of my children is moving to Kenya and when I go to visit I’ll see Joseph, as well. I just love the fact that some place in Kenya, in a very poor village, there is some mention and memory of Shelter Island.”
2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal 41

T

he Shelter Island 10K is known for attracting large numbers of elite runners every year, many of whom travel great distances to participate. One of the hallmarks of the race organization has been the annual participation of host families who open their homes to these runners, ensuring they will have a truly unique Shelter Island experience. Of the legions of volunteers who make the 10K a reality, the host families have a unique role in the race’s success. According to Janelle Kraus-Nadeau, who heads the elite runner program, race organizers are always looking for more volunteers every year. “It almost always works out that the demand is greater than our supply,” she said. In 2012, there will be 12 runners in the elite field and Ms. KrausNadeau said she hoped to place each one with an Island family. As late as the end of May, Ms. Kraus-Nadeau said, “We still have athletes contacting me for assistance.” Heights residents Paul and Susan McDowell have been one of the most stalwart of host families, accepting as many athletes for the past several years as they can fit in their home. “We really enjoy it,” Mr. McDowell said. “Over the past couple of years we’ve hosted runners from Kenya and Ethiopia and a few other places. They typically come on Friday night and the race is Saturday. They may or may not stay over Saturday night and leave sometime Sunday but we invite them to stay as long as they like.” With their lives dictated by running and competition, the athletes have strict schedules that often prevent them from spending more than a few hours with

their Shelter Island hosts. “These runners’ lives are pretty monastic,” Mr. McDowell said, “They get up, run, take a nap, run and go to bed.” But the McDowells try to interject a little fun into the visit and show them some aspect of the Island beyond the scenic 6.2-mile course. “When they get to Shelter Island, we take them out on our boat and do a few different things with them. They enjoy it tremendously, and we do, too.” Eleanor Oakley hosted her first runners in 2000 and has “an on-going friendship with one of the first runners who stayed with me; it’s gone on for 12 years now,” she said. The runner, Joseph Kibor, who won the men’s race that year,

Some place in Kenya, in a very poor village, there is some mention and memory of Shelter Island.
comes from a poor village in Kenya and regularly sends Ms. Oakley photos of his family (“My real mother,” he writes on the back of the pictures, to distinguish her from Eleanor, whom he calls his “American mother”). He has called and emailed Ms. Oakley from different places around the world to report on his running career, his family, his service with the UN troops in Somalia and his life back in Kenya. “I’m passionate about this program,” said Ms. Oakley. “It’s an incredible experience to exchange information about our families with these young people. Rather than see them in isolation, having them stay in your home lets you see them as part of a family.” She has also

COURTESY EL

EANOR OAKL

EY

2012 OLYMPIC HOPES

Olympic spirit fills the air as 10K runners convene
THOM TOUW PHOTO

Sarah Lihan and Shelter Island’s Amanda Clark competing in 2011.

Islander Amanda Clark will be sailing for a medal in Weymouth this summer
BY JULIE LANE

his year’s 33rd Annual Shelter Island 10K Run and 5K Walk has a special connection to another athletic event: the 2012 Summer Olympics in London, England. Because Shelter Island is the hometown of U.S. Olympic sailing team member Amanda Clark, the organizers of the 10K have dedicated the run this year to the spirit of the Olympics. Ms. Clark, 30, learned to sail as a child at the Shelter Island Yacht Club and is a 2000 graduate of Shelter Island School. She qualified as an Olympic alternate in the 470 two-person dinghy in 2004, as a competitor in 2008 and this year she did it again in a world qualifier in Perth, Australia in December with her crew Sarah Lihan of Ft. Lauderdale. The pair went on to win a silver medal in world cup sailing in the Semaine Olympique Française regatta in Hyères, France in April. Ms. Clark lives on the Island with her husband Greg Nissen when she is not traveling the world to sail, train and raise
42 2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal

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funds. She has said she intends to retire from Olympic competition after the Olympic races in Weymouth, England this summer. With runners entered in the 10K seeking to raise funds for their Olympic efforts, Ms. Clark and Ms. Lihan — also known as “TeamGoSail” — plan to be

Ms. Clark and Ms. Lihan plan to be here for the 10K to run for their Team Go Sail.
here for the 10K to cheer them on and sell Olympic paraphernalia, according to 10K Race Director Mary Ellen Adipietro. Ms. Clark is not the only Shelter Islander with an Olympic connection. Cliff Clark, a founder of the 10K, was a contender in 1972 and Island running star Janelle Kraus (now Kraus-Nadeau) was a contender in 2008. Ms. Clark has gone the furthest, however, in winning a spot on the U.S. Olympic team. Ms. Clark made it in 2008 with her former crew, Sarah Chin, but Ms. Chin opted not to compete this year, forcing Ms. Clark to go in search of a new teammate. Enter Ms. Lihan, who brought height, strength and experience as a solo sailor to TeamGoSail, Ms. Clark said.

It was an uphill battle at the start. American competitors Erin Maxwell and Isabelle Kinsolving Farrar were favored to win in Perth. With many locals glued to coverage of the racing via the Internet, the Clark-Lihan team edged MaxwellKinsolving Farrar to secure an Olympic berth. “We did it!” was the triumphant message on TeamGoSail’s Facebook page. Since that December victory, TeamGoSail has continued to train and compete in races both in the United States and abroad. With their second-place finish in April in the International Sailing Federation’s World Cup event in Hyères, they showed they could medal facing the same competitors who will be in Weymouth this summer. They prefer heavy wind and seas, which are typical at Weymouth in mid-summer. They got those conditions in Hyères. CLIFF CLARK While the Shelter Island 10K celebrates TeamGoSail’s Olympic dream, it also honors Mr. Clark and Ms. Kraus-Nadeau, who brought their share of Olympic hope to the Island in past years. Mr. Clark refers to his Olympic effort as his “trials and tribulations.” “It was a great experience,” he said. He still relives his trials in Eugene, Oregon,

in 1972 when he came in one place behind what he needed to make it to the Munich Olympics. “Forty years later, I can still get my adrenalin rush thinking about being among the best” who competed in the 5000 meter and steeplechase finals. It was during the trials that he became fast friends with Olympian Frank Shorter, who will be running in the Shelter Island 10K this year. He placed fifth in the steeplechase; three runners and an alternate went to Munich. He remembers his time in the steeplechase at 8 minutes and 36 seconds. Had his pace been two seconds faster, he would have made it to the Olympics. Ironically, it was the 5000 meter race on which he had set his hopes, but he finished further back in the pack with a run of 13 minutes and 54 seconds. JANELLE KRAUS-NADEAU In 2008, Mr. Clark stepped forward to help Janelle Kraus-Nadeau in her effort to compete as a marathoner in the Olympics in Beijing. Ms. Kraus-Nadeau was training with Ray Treacy of Providence College, but Mr. Clark, who had coached her on Shelter Island, “was always able to offer great advice whenever I asked for it,” she said. “Coach Clark has remained a trusted mentor and friend,” she said. She made it to the finals in her trials but a hip injury spoiled her training program, Mr. Clark said. Ms. Kraus-Nadeau said in an interview that she “did not perform as I would have hoped” because of the injury. It happened about six or seven weeks before trials began and “from that point on, I felt like more of my time was spent going to physical therapists, chiropractors and message therapists,” she said. She told a reporter at the time, “I am certainly going to give it my best, but I am not going to walk away from the experience and think of myself as a failure if I am not in the top three.” Looking back, she said in May, “It would have been a serious long shot for me to make the 2008 team even if I was healthy. I was more shooting to finish in the top five.” Competing in the trials was still a source of pride, Ms. Kraus-Nadeau said. She trained along side the man who would become her husband, Bill Nadeau, who was prepping to run in the Boston Marathon that year. They trained together and when they in different cities they would follow identical training schedules. Her name first became nationally known when she posted a 2:35:15 time in the 1979 Boston Marathon, setting an American women’s record. She set a world record of 2:22:43 in the Boston Marathon in 1983, despite having undergone surgery two years earlier on both Achilles tendons. She set American records in 1983 in the 10-kilometer, half-marathon, 10-mile and 25-kilometer races. Bill Rodgers was a cross-country runner at Newington High School in Connecticut who went on to compete in marathons in 1973. He competed in the 1976 Olympic Marathon in Montreal but was hampered by a metatarsal problem in his right foot. While he stayed with the leaders of the pack for the first 25K, he dropped off the pace and finished 40th with a timing of 2:25:14. In 1980, he thought his opportunity for Olympic success was finally near but the United States opted to boycott the games because of Moscow’s invasion of Afghanistan, putting an end to his personal Olympic quest. Keith Brantly was a five-time participant in Olympic trials in the 5K, 10K and marathon, before competing in the 1996 Olympic Marathon in Atlanta. His fastest career marathon run was 2:12:31. Other personal bests include 42:50 in 15 kilometers; 28:02 in 10 kilometers; 13:36 in 5 kilometers; and 3:40:7 in 1500 meters. He is an eight-time United States National Roadracing Champion in the 10K, 20K, 25K and marathon and was inducted into the Road Runners Club of America Hall of Fame in 2005 and the University of Florida Athletics Hall of Fame in 2004. He remains a member of the United States Olympic Team Mentoring Program.
2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal 43

She was a four-time All American at Wake Forest University and a member of Team USA during the 2001 World University Games in Beijing, China, and in Chiba, Japan in 2002. Today, she and her husband live in Madison, Connecticut and Ms. Kraus still runs most mornings and occasionally jumps into a road race. TOP RUNNERS HERE Along with Shelter Island’s local ties to the Olympics, the Shelter Island 10K has a long history of attracting many of the world’s great runners. Olympians in this year’s race, besides Mr. Shorter, are Joan Benoit Samuelson, Bill Rodgers and Keith Brantly. Mr. Shorter won the 1972 Olympic marathon with a finish more than two minutes ahead of his competition. He placed fifth in the 10,000 meter race. Thanks to his Olympic marathon win, he earned the nation’s Sullivan Award as the top amateur athlete. He followed up his 1972 gold medal with a silver medal in the 1976 Olympic marathon and was elected to the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame in 1984. Ms. Benoit Samuelson won gold in the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles, beating the great Greta Weitz, who had bested Ms. Benoit Samuelson in 10 previous marathons. Ms. Benoit Samuelson was subsequently inducted into the Olympic Hall of Fame.

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44 2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal

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Is proud to support the 33rd Annual Shelter Island 10K
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2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal 45

MINDS OVER MATTER

Kosinski continues its link to the 10K
Foundation raises funds for brain cancer research
BY JULIE LANE

For the third successive year, the Gwen L. Kosinski Foundation and its Minds Over Matter Running Team returns to the Shelter Island 10K to continue raising money for research vital to curing brain cancer. Launched in May 2002 by the Kosinski family of Sag Harbor in memory of Gwen Kosinski, 48, who lost a two-anda-half-year battle with brain cancer, the foundation has been hailed by fundraising developers at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center as a pioneer in fundraising for brain tumor research. The foundation has provided grants to major cancer centers, including Memorial Sloan-Kettering, the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston and Cedars Mt. Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. Foundation money has also gone toward scholarships for those pursuing studies in cancer-related health fields. Foundation leaders believe that money is all that stands in the way of finding a cure. Money has also been dedicated to improving the quality of care for brain tumor patients and their families. Since its founding, the organization has raised more than $500,000 through

its annual Gwen L. Kosinski Memorial Golf Tournament and the Minds Over Matter Sag Harbor 5K Run. In 2011, after a successful experience with a team running in the 2010 Shelter Island 10K, it abandoned its own Sag Harbor run to concentrate on the Shelter Island run.

Since its founding, the organization has raised more than $500,000 to fight brain cancer.
“We are proud to be joining charitable forces with the Shelter Island Run,” according to a statement on the foundation’s website at glkfoundation.org. Running is a major focus of fund raising for the foundation, thanks to Gwen Kosinski’s friendship with the late Bob Connelly, a runner who was a 25-year survivor of brain cancer. He and Ms. Kosinski met in a brain tumor support group. It was Mr. Connelly who organized the first Minds Over Matter Sag Harbor 5K after his friend’s death. When

Mr. Connelly became too ill to carry on the run, the foundation, under Ms. Kosinski’s daughter, Jaime, took over the race organization and kept it going until joining forces with the Shelter Island 10K race. “It’s a new decade and the time has come to do something different and bigger,” Jaime said at the time. She saw the alliance with the nationally recognized Shelter Island 10K as a means of gaining more prominence for the foundation. The decision was in line with Mr. Connelly’s original vision of having Minds Over Matter teams participate in major races all over the country. The first MOM team made its debut at the 2001 New York City Marathon. In December 2011, a MOM team ran in the Voices Against Brain Cancer 5K Run/ Walk in New York City’s Central Park. The Gwen L. Kosinski Foundation Benefiting Brain Tumor Research is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization. Contributions are tax-deductible. To support the foundation, contributions can be made through the foundation’s website at glkfoundation.org or checks payable to the Gwen L. Kosinski Foundation can be mailed to the foundation at 318 Roanoke Avenue, Riverhead, NY 11901.

Congratulations!
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46 2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal

The Gwen L. Kosinski Foundation Benefiting Brain Tumor Research, Minds Over Matter and the East End Financial Group

are proud to support the 2012 Shelter Island Run!
2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal 47

BENEFICIARIES

Race beneficiaries
The Shelter Island 10K is more than a celebrated athletic event known all over the world. It’s also a fundraiser that has provided financial support close to home for the Shelter Island 10K Community Fund, Timothy Hill Children’s Ranch and East End Hospice.
10K COMMUNITY FUND Since its inception in 1981, the Shelter Island 10K has generated more than $600,000 in race proceeds to benefit regional organizations. But locally, the race has generated more than $228,000 for the Shelter Island 10K Community Fund. It benefits the Shelter Island community, including scholarship recipients, youth programs and community organizations. Shelter Island High School seniors are among the many who benefit from the 10K. The 10K Community Fund grants sizeable scholarships to graduating seniors, thanks to matching funds given annually by Ken and Donna Wright of Shelter Island. Thousands of dollars have been given to a wide range of youth programs. Funds generated by the 10K have helped maintain basketball courts and a local playground. Money has gone to support Project FIT, the Island’s physical recreation center, to provide school sports uniforms and to pay for Girl Scout and Boy Scout activities. The Scouts have been perennial volunteers for the Shelter Island 10K. Community groups supported by race proceeds include the Shelter Island Historical Society, the ambulance squad, the Shelter Island Public Library, the Nature Conservancy’s Mashomack Preserve, the American Legion’s Mitchell Post 281 and local senior citizen’s programs. TIMOTHY HILL CHILDREN’S RANCH Timothy Hill Children’s Ranch in Riverhead has transformed the lives of young men on the East End, including some from Shelter Island. Timothy, the brother of Thaddeaus Hill, the executive director of the ranch, died tragically in 1972 but his dream of a farm home for troubled boys lived on in the ranch his family founded and has run for more than 35 years. It has been part of the 10K run story for eight years now but what many 10K regulars may not know is the close relationship between the ranch and a key Island family. Cliff Clark, co-founder of the Shelter Island 10K and president of South Ferry Company, is the vice president of the ranch’s Board of Directors. His father, Bill Clark, was vice president of the ranch board for 11 years before him. The ranch organization was formally established in 1976 and its first house for boys opened in 1980. In addition to its resident program, the camp offers a counseling center and a day camp for local kids. For more information on the ranch, visit the timothyhillranch.org. EAST END HOSPICE The 10K Board of Directors values the commitment of East End Hospice to helping patients and families during their most trying times. The organization has been a race beneficiary for the past seven years. East End Hospice is a New York Statecertified hospice serving terminally ill patients and their families on the East End. No patients are ever denied services due to inability to pay, leaving hospice with an annual deficit of more than $850,000 and a continuing need for financial support. In addition to end-of-life care, hospice also provides bereavement counseling, community education and a free-ofcharge summer day camp on Shelter Island called Camp Good Grief for children who have experienced the loss of a loved one. For more information on hospice, call 288-8400 or visit its website, eeh.org.

The pasture at Timothy Hill Children’s Ranch in Riverhead.

COURTESY PHOTO

48 2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal

2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal 49

2011 WINNERS LIST

2011 Shelter Island 10K Winners
WHEELCHAIR 1 PETER HAWKINS 2 WILLIAM LEHR 47 MALVERNE, NY 53 SHELTER ISLAND 32:36 35:57 MALE OVERALL WINNERS 1 KUMSA ADUGNA 25 2 HARBERT OKUTI 25 3 KETEME NIGUSSE 30 4 GIRMA TOLLA 35 5 MOURAD MAROFIT 29 6 ABIYOT ENDALE WORKU 26 7 BIRHANU FEYSA 29 8 DEMESSE TEFERA 28 9 MATT WALSH 26 10 CHRISTOPHER KOEGEL 27 FEMALE OVERALL WINNERS 1 TEZAYA DENGERSA 30 2 MALIKA MEJDOUB 29 3 CAROLINE BIERBAUM 27 4 SALOME KOSGEI 30 5 AILEEN BARRY 29 6 JANE FINCK 30 7 MULUYE GURMU 27 8 ILHAM BATAL 25 9 JENNY MALIK 32 10 MICHELE BUONORA 22 MALE AGE GROUP: 25-29 1 BRYAN KNIPFING 27 MILLER PLACE, NY 37:46 2 SHAWN ANDERSON 28 HUNTINGTON STA., NY 38:02 3 DENIS JUDGE 26 NEW YORK, NY 38:02 FEMALE AGE GROUP: 25-29 1 MICHELLE RORKE 27 NEW YORK, NY 2 CHRISTINA SCHAEFER 26 LAKE GROVE, NY 3 CHRIS MCDONOUGH 26 WASHINGTON, DC MALE AGE GROUP: 30 -34 1 JAY BARRY 33 NEW YORK, NY 2 PHILIP SHEA 30 BEACON, NY 3 SAL NASTASI 31 BABYLON, NY FEMALE AGE GROUP: 30 -34 1 JEANNA COMPOSTI 30 NEW YORK, NY 2 TINA FREY 33 NEW YORK, NY 3 DANIELLE MESSINGER 33 OYSTER BAY, NY MALE AGE GROUP: 35-39 1 GREGORY PEZOLANO 36 NEW YORK, NY 2 JAMES LEFRAK 37 NEW YORK, NY 3 BOBBY CAMERON 39 SHIRLEY, NY 44:53 45:49 47:25 35:13 35:16 36:09 41:06 41:34 42:29 37:37 38:25 38:43 FEMALE AGE GROUP: 50 -54 1 ELIZABETH WAYWELL 53 DIX HILLS, NY 2 DOLORES DOMAN 54 DIX HILLS, NY 3 FRANCES WALTON 52 NEW YORK, NY 47:31 47:31 48:30 ETHIOPIA 29:44 UGANDA 29:46 ETHIOPIA 29:47 ETHIOPIA 30:04 MOROCCO 30:24 ETHIOPIA 30:49 SILVER SPRING, MD31:18 ETHIOPIA 32:50 WANTAGH, NY 34:52 MALVERNE, NY 35:05 TURKEY MOROCCO NEW YORK, NY KENYA NEW YORK,NY NEW YORK, NY ETHIOPIA MOROCCO ROCHESTER, NY SAYVILLE, NY 34:17 34:40 34:43 36:15 37:41 38:47 38:57 39:19 40:18 40:52 35:21 37:15 38:17 44:58 45:17 49:25 40:55 41:38 42:13 41:44 44:53 46:33 MALE AGE GROUP: 55-59 1 MIKE BOTTINI 56 EAST HAMPTON, NY 42:03 2 GERALD SCHMIDT 55 MARIETTA, MN 45:09 3 BRUCE HOTCHKISS 57 RIVERHEAD, NY 45:38 FEMALE AGE GROUP: 55-59 1 KATHY LEE 55 NEW YORK, NY 49:06 2 JANE KENNEY 55 SHELTER ISLAND, NY 52:14 3 SUSAN HARMS 56 HUNTINGTON, NY 59:38 MALE AGE GROUP: 60 -64 1 BOB MORITZ 62 MEDFORD, NY 2 JOHN MORRIS 64 SOUND BEACH, NY 3 DAVID DEMPSEY 61 NEW YORK, NY 45:53 45:53 47:45

BEVERLEA WALZ PHOTO

FEMALE AGE GROUP: 60 -64 1 ELLEN CLARK 60 SHELTER ISLAND, NY 59:11 2 CHRISTINE BRAKEL 63 BRIGHTWATERS, NY 1:02:40 3 SHERRY BELLOVIN 64 MASSAPEQUA, NY 1:03:59 MALE AGE GROUP: 65-69 1 RICHARD MOHLERE 65 SHELTER ISLAND, NY 53:04 2 ALAIN ROIZEN 66 SHELTER ISLAND, NY 55:42 3 BLAINE LAWSON 69 STONY BROOK, NY 56:08 FEMALE AGE GROUP: 65-69 1 SUSAN MCCLANAHAN 65 NEW YORK, NY 1:02:17 2 FRANCOISE MALLOW 67 SHELTER ISLAND, NY 1:10:57 3 MARILYN BORNEMEIER 68 EAST ORLEANS, MA 1:11:29 MALE AGE GROUP: 70 -74 1 S LOMVARDIAS 70 SHELTER ISLAND, NY 1:07:14 2 DON STRONG 70 SETAUKET, NY 1:17:25 3 ANDREW CARLSEN 72 SHELTER ISLAND, NY 1:19:47 FEMALE AGE GROUP: 70 -74 1 FRAN WALKER 70 OYSTER BAY, NY 1:13:22 2 BECKY KOTLER 72 MANCHESTER CTR., VT1:14:59 3 BARBARA CARLSEN 72 SHELTER ISLAND, NY 1:19:49 MALE AGE GROUP: 75-99 1 BLAIRE STAUFFER 78 SAG HARBORR, NY 1:00:28 2 AMERICO FIORE 81 SOUTHAMPTON, NY 1:07:39 3 LARRY LIDDLE 75 SOUTHAMPTON, NY 1:07:50

FEMALE AGE GROUP: 35-39 1 SHONTEL JUNG 35 BROOKLYN, NY 44:01 2 DANYA PERRY 39 NEW YORK, NY 44:02 3 ERIN TINTLE 39 EAST HAMPTON, NY 46:27 MALE AGE GROUP: 40 -44 1 KEN RIDEOUT 40 SHELTER ISLAND, NY 38:10 2 GREG FINCK 42 NEW YORK, NY 38:19 3 RAY STRONG 41 SOUTHOLD, NY 39:21 FEMALE AGE GROUP: 40 -44 1 MARY LEONARD 43 NEW YORK, NY 2 KAREN MCGLADE 43 AMAGANSETT, NY 3 FIONA MOORE 41 NEW YORK, NY MALE AGE GROUP: 45-49 1 JHONNY CAMACHO 48 BOLIVIA 2 ALEC RAINSBY 49 BROOKLYN, NY 3 DJ BOUZOURENE 46 OLD BETHPAGE, NY 47:46 47:50 47:58 40:35 42:02 43:56

MALE AGE GROUP: 1- 19 1 TIMOTHY GRUBER 16 HUNTERSVILLE, NC 2 MICHAEL BRANNIGAN 14 E NORTHPORT NY 3 KEVIN LIANG 18 WATERFORD, NY FEMALE AGE GROUP: 1-19 1 AUDREY KELLY 16 WADING RIVERNY 2 BIANCA JACKSON 18 GLENCOE, IL 3 NATHALIE IVERS 18 CHATHAM, NJ MALE AGE GROUP: 20 -24 1 TYLER BRITTON 22 EAST QUOGUE, NY 2 CRAIG PRIESTLY 24 HOLBROOK, NY 3 GREG HOFFMAN 24 MERRICK, NY FEMALE AGE GROUP: 20 -24 1 BRENN DONNELLY 22 EUGENE, OR 2 ABBY FRENCH 24 NEW YORK, NY 3 ELIZABETH BURKHARD 24 WANTAGH, NY

FEMALE AGE GROUP: 45-49 1 SUSAN BAYAT 46 NEW YORK, NY 44:47 2 SHARON MCCOBB 47 EAST HAMPTON,NY 45:26 3 GRACE MAGUIRE 45 NEW YORK, NY 49:17 MALE AGE GROUP: 50 -54 1 RICK BUCKHEIT 53 SOUTHOLD,NY 2 BARRY AUSKERN 51 GREENFIELD, MA 3 RUDY AFANADOR 52 MEDFORD, NY 40:18 42:39 43:27

50 2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal

2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal 51

2012 VOLUNTEERS

The 10K:Who makes it happen
Every year, many volunteers and sponsors turn the 10K into a reality. Among them are the following:
SHELTER ISLAND BANKING/ BOOKKEEPING VOLUNTEER T-SHIRTS PASTA PARTY POST-RACE CLEAN-UP

10K BOARD
EMERITUS

Kathy Sullivan
VOLUNTEER COORDINATORS

GLK Foundation (Minds over Matter)
MEDALS

Cliff Clark John Byington
MEMBERS

Mary Ellen Adipietro Kevin Barry Don Bindler Doug Broder Rick Denning James Eklund Harry Hackett III Janelle Kraus-Nadeau Bill Lehr Jackie Tuttle Jennifer Wissemann
REGISTRARS

Judy Sherman Jackie Tuttle Mary Ellen Adipietro Jennifer Wissemann
PRESS COORDINATORS

South Shore Outdoor Dr. Frank Adipietro (Kids Fun Run)
FIELD SET-UP/ BREAKDOWN

Sebastian Bliss & family SI 7th and 8th grade classes Betsy Martin Ginny Gibbs Sysco & DiCarlo Food Service
PRE- & POST-RACE REFRESHMENTS

Shelter Island youths and John Kneeland, “Miscellaneous Men”
RACE INFORMATION

631-774-9499 shelterislandrun.com
ELITE ATHLETES

Donald Bindler Mary Ellen Adipietro Harry Hackett III WLNG Dr. Frank Adipietro
HOUSING

James Eklund Christian Johnson Chuck Kraus
MEDICAL

Frank Adipietro MD Linda Kraus RN Stony Brook Ambulance
SCHOOL LIAISON

Jackie Tuttle Jennifer Wissemann
REGISTRATION

The Chequit Inn Dering Harbor Inn
WEBSITE

BJ Ianfolla
WATER STATIONS

Jamie Danza, Timothy Hill Children’s Ranch Dave Johnson, East End Hospice Shelter Island IGA Bozzuto’s Fresh House Produce Pepsi Coca-Cola
POST-RACE PARTY

Janelle Kraus-Nadeau, chair Lorraine Gorman John Lupski
AWARDS AND RUNNERS’ PURSE

Janelle Kraus-Nadeau Lorraine Gorman Kathy Sullivan
SOUND COORDINATOR

Joe Capuano
HEADLINERS

Louise Clark, graphic designer
CLERKS OF COURSE

Diane M. Kilb Kathy Sullivan
FIELD COORDINATOR

North Fork Water Greg Raymond Tom Hashagen
SHOWERS

Kevin Barry Cliff Clark
FINISH-LINE SERVICES

Judy Sherman David Katz/FLRRT

Shelter Island H.S. Sophomore Class

Island Boatyard Greenport Harbor Brewery James Braddock James Cogan Stephanie Sareyani and Michelle Rice & Shelter Island H.S. Students Sunrise Bus Hampton Jitney Sysco & DiCarlo Food Service

Harry Hackett III Frank J. Adipietro MD
GOODY BAGS

9th grade / National Honor Society Hampton Jitney pop chips

Peter Hawkins of Malverne topped the field in the wheelchair division last year.

ELEANOR P. LABROZZI PHOTO

52 2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal

Quality Cancer Care Close to Home

Alexander Zuhoski, M.D. Board Certified in Medical Oncology and Hematology

Louis J. Avvento, M.D. Board Certified in Medical Oncology and Hematology

Deepali Sharma, M.D. Board Certified in Medical Oncology

Here to serve you at two locations:
1333 East Main St., Riverhead, NY 631-727-8500 325 Meeting House Lane, Southampton, NY 631-204-9700
Eastern Long Island Hematology/Oncology, P.C.
Riverhead & Southampton
www.eliho.com

East End Cardiology, P.C.
• John W. Pearson, MD, FACC • Thomas A. Falco, MD, FACC • Fulvio Mazzucchi, MD, FACC • John M. Crean, MD, FACC • Mark Saporita, MD, FACC • Robert P. Dougherty, DO, FACC • Ricardo J. Monserrate, MD, FACC • William J. Buckley, MD, FACC • Jenny Lowenthal, ANP
1279 East Main Street, Riverhead, NY 11901 Phone (631) 727-2100 • Fax (631) 727-2646 201 Manor Place, Greenport, NY 11944 Phone (631) 477-2701 • Fax (631) 477-8893

2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal 53

2012 RACE SPONSORS

The 10K: Brought to you by ...
GOLD MEDAL SPONSORS
The Hackett Family
The 10K committee is grateful to have The Hackett Family as a gold sponsor again this year, Ms. Adipietro said. Harry L. Hackett, III is a financial advisor and senior vice president of investments with Merrill Lynch Wealth Management. His office is at 57 Hampton Road in Southampton. Call 631-204-8663.

South Ferry Co.
The South Ferry Company has been linking Shelter Island and the South Fork through generations of Clark family ownership. Company President Cliff Clark, a noted Air Force runner in his day, is a co-founder of the 10K and past president of its board of directors. Just as South Ferry is an integral part of the Shelter Island community, the South Ferry Company has been a key supporter of the 10K race from the beginning.

Hampton Jitney
Runners will travel from across the world to participate in the 33rd annual Shelter Island 10K Run and 5K walk on June 16. If they happen to be travelling from Manhattan, they might have caught a ride out on the Hampton Jitney — and some might have found themselves aboard the Jitney’s specially wrapped 10K bus, part of an ongoing effort by the Jitney to promote the race and the charities it supports. Wrapped in a stick-on “paint job” so it can function as a 10K Run billboard, the bus was unveiled in 2011 at the Jitney’s headquarters in Southampton. The eye-catching blue and purple design includes the names of the race beneficiaries East End Hospice, Timothy Hill Children’s Ranch and the Shelter Island Run Community Fund. It features the 10K logo. The bus has been hard to miss rolling up Third Avenue, down Lexington, or on the Long Island Expressway or along either of Long Island’s forks. “We’re fortunate to have such a great sponsor,” Race Director Mary Ellen Adipietro said. “The owners of the Jitney are actually avid runners and love the local charities that are involved in the run.” Geoff and Andrew Lynch are president and vice president of the company. In 1974, the Jitney got started with one van. Today its fleet of modern buses serves both forks of Long Island. The Jitney has many corporate clients but prides itself on working with Cub Scout Pack 455, St. Andrew’s School, the Jewish Center of the Hamptons, John Drew Theater of Guild Hall and the Riverhead Fire Department. For more information on the Jitney, check outhamptonjitney.com.

JetBlue
This is the fifth year that JetBlue Airways has been a Gold Medal corporate sponsor of the 10K and the 10K board is delighted the company continues to be a major force in making the event happen, Ms. Adipietro said. The low-cost airline headquartered in Queens makes JFK its primary hub. Philanthropy is an integral part of its bottom line. According to a company spokesperson, “Our commitment to the cities we serve is to support and align ourselves with not-for-profit organizations that focus on children, education, communities and the environment.” For more information, visit jetblue.com.

Shelter Island Reporter
The Shelter Island Reporter has served the Island as its weekly newspaper for more than 50 years. It strives to cover Island life, issues and events thoroughly and fairly. Just as Shelter Island itself has a proudly independent nature, its weekly paper of record maintains its local editorial independence as one of the East End weeklies owned by Times/Review Newspapers of Mattituck, which acquired the Reporter in 2000. The Reporter staff produces this 10K journal.

Dr. Frank’s Pain Management
What runner doesn’t live with pain now and then? Dr. Adipietro specializes in alleviating it at his pain center at Eastern Long Island Hospital. Well-known throughout the region, he is the hospital’s head anesthesiologist and is certified with five national medical groups. Epidural steroid injections, diagnostic discography and endoscopic diskectomy are some of the minimally invasive procedures and treatments offered. Since 1998, Dr. Frank, as he is known in his hometown of Shelter Island, and his medical team have treated more than 12,000 patients. More information is available at elih.org/painmanagement.

East End Financial Group
The East End Financial Group combines almost 100 years of experience in the investment advisory, financial, estate and retirement planning fields. Its mission is “to help our clients achieve their financial goals and objectives.” It is located at 318 Roanoke Avenue in Riverhead and can be reached at 631-727-8111.

54 2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal

SILVER MEDAL SPONSORS

Chequit Inn / Ram’s Head Inn
Housing sponsor of this year’s 10K, The Chequit (it’s pronounced CHEE-QUIT) is a charming Victorian country inn in the Island’s historic district, Shelter Island Heights. It has a lively atmosphere and superb restaurant with an extensive wine and beer selection. The Ram’s Head Inn on the shore of Coecles Harbor out on Ram Island is an inviting seaside getaway with a relaxing atmosphere. Its stunning and private location has made it a popular site for weddings, business retreats and other private functions.

BRONZE MEDAL SPONSORS
New York Road Runners
The NYRR are dedicated to promoting the sport of distance running and enhancing health and fitness. Together with their magazine and website, nyrr.org, they promote professional and recreational road races and other fitness programs.

Long Island Radio Broadcasting
WEHM • WBAZ • WBEA

GLK Foundation Minds over Matter
The Gwen L. Kosinski Foundation was established in May 2002 by the Kosinski family of Sag Harbor after Gwen lost her battle with brain cancer at the age of 48. The foundation’s board is comprised of friends and family of the Kosinskis who believe in the importance of finding a cure for brain tumors.

DERING HARBOR INN

2012 Shelter Island 10K Journal 55

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