Frank Sinatra

The Complete Guide

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Contents
Articles
Overview
Frank Sinatra 1 1 20 20 39 39 43 45 46 48 50 52 57 59 60 62 63 65 67 70 71 73 75 76 79 80 82 83 85 86 88

Discography
Frank Sinatra discography

Studio albums
The Voice of Frank Sinatra Frankly Sentimental Songs by Sinatra Swing and Dance with Frank Sinatra Songs for Young Lovers Swing Easy! In the Wee Small Hours Songs for Swingin' Lovers! Close to You A Swingin' Affair! Where Are You? A Jolly Christmas from Frank Sinatra Come Fly with Me Frank Sinatra Sings for Only the Lonely Come Dance with Me! No One Cares Nice 'n' Easy Sinatra's Swingin' Session!!! Ring-a-Ding-Ding! Come Swing with Me! I Remember Tommy Sinatra and Strings Point of No Return Sinatra and Swingin' Brass All Alone Sinatra Sings Great Songs from Great Britain

Sinatra–Basie: An Historic Musical First The Concert Sinatra Sinatra's Sinatra Sinatra Sings Days of Wine and Roses, Moon River, and Other Academy Award Winners America, I Hear You Singing It Might as Well Be Swing 12 Songs of Christmas Softly, as I Leave You September of My Years My Kind of Broadway A Man and His Music Moonlight Sinatra Strangers in the Night That's Life Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim The World We Knew Francis A. & Edward K. The Sinatra Family Wish You a Merry Christmas Cycles My Way A Man Alone Watertown Sinatra & Company Ol' Blue Eyes Is Back Some Nice Things I've Missed Trilogy: Past Present Future She Shot Me Down L.A. Is My Lady Duets Duets II

89 91 93 95 96 98 100 101 102 104 106 108 110 112 114 116 118 119 121 122 124 126 128 130 131 132 135 137 141 143 147 147 149 151 154 155 157

Live albums
Sinatra at the Sands The Main Event – Live Sinatra Saga Sinatra Saga, Vol. 2 Sinatra & Sextet: Live in Paris Sinatra 80th: Live in Concert

Frank Sinatra with Red Norvo Quintet: Live in Australia, 1959 Sinatra '57 in Concert Live from Las Vegas Sinatra: Vegas Frank Sinatra: The Greatest Concerts Live at the Meadowlands Sinatra: New York Best of Vegas

159 160 162 163 167 170 172 175 178 178 179 181 182 184 186 187 188 190 192 194 195 197 200 201 203 205 206 209 211 212 214 215 217 219 220 221 222

Compilation albums
This Is Sinatra! This Is Sinatra Vol. 2 Look to Your Heart All the Way Sinatra Sings of Love and Things Sinatra '65: The Singer Today Frank Sinatra's Greatest Hits Frank Sinatra's Greatest Hits, Vol. 2 Portrait of Sinatra – Forty Songs from the Life of a Man Sinatra–Jobim Sessions All-Time Greatest Dorsey/Sinatra Hits, Vol. 1-4 Capitol Collectors Series The Capitol Years Sinatra Reprise: The Very Good Years Sinatra Sings the Songs of Van Heusen & Cahn Sinatra: Soundtrack to the CBS Mini-Series The Best of the Capitol Years Christmas Songs by Sinatra Gold Collection Frank Sinatra Sings the Select Johnny Mercer Frank Sinatra Sings the Select Rodgers & Hart The Complete Recordings Nineteen Thirty-Nine Sinatra 80th: All the Best Everything Happens to Me Frank Sinatra Sings the Select Cole Porter Frank Sinatra Sings the Select Sammy Cahn Greatest Hits: Early Years The Very Best of Frank Sinatra

Portrait of Sinatra: Columbia Classics The Columbia Years 1943–1952: The V-Discs Frank Sinatra & the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra Lucky Numbers Classic Sinatra: His Greatest Performances 1953–1960 Super Hits My Way: The Best of Frank Sinatra Love Songs Greatest Love Songs Christmas with the Rat Pack The Real Complete Columbia Years V-Discs Frank Sinatra Christmas Collection Romance Duets/Duets II: 90th Birthday Limited Collector's Edition Romance: Songs from the Heart Sinatra at the Movies Nothing But the Best Seduction: Sinatra Sings of Love Classic Sinatra II Sinatra: Collector's Edition Christmas with Sinatra & Friends 36 Greatest Hits! Come Fly Away Sinatra/Jobim: The Complete Reprise Recordings Sinatra/Basie: The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings Sinatra: Best of the Best

224 226 229 232 234 236 238 241 242 244 245 248 250 252 254 256 257 259 261 263 264 266 268 269 271 273 275 275 277 278 279 279 280 282 283 287

Soundtrack albums
High Society Young at Heart Robin and the 7 Hoods

Other albums
Frank Sinatra Conducts the Music of Alec Wilder Frank Sinatra Conducts Tone Poems of Color The Man I Love Sleep Warm Frank Sinatra Conducts Music from Pictures and Plays

Syms by Sinatra

289 291 291 293 297 305 313 317 331 332 336 340 349 351 362 364 364 366 367 369 373 375 375 376 379 381 382 384 385 386 386 390 392 393 394

Box sets
The Voice: Frank Sinatra, the Columbia Years (1943–1952) The Reprise Collection Concepts The Columbia Years 1943–1952: The Complete Recordings The Song Is You The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings Screen Sinatra The Complete Capitol Singles Collection The Best of the Columbia Years: 1943–1952 The Capitol Years Reprise Musical Repertory Theatre Frank Sinatra in Hollywood 1940–1964 Frank Sinatra: The Reprise Years

Tribute albums
A Jazz Portrait of Frank Sinatra Perfectly Frank Manilow Sings Sinatra Allow Us to Be Frank Bolton Swings Sinatra

Singles
"All or Nothing at All" "Imagination" "East of the Sun (and West of the Moon" "The One I Love (Belongs to Somebody Else)" "Stardust" "Oh! Look at Me Now" "Without a Song" "Let's Get Away from It All" "Blue Skies" "Pale Moon (An Indian Love Song)" "Embraceable You" "How About You?" "There Are Such Things"

"Night and Day" "The Night We Called It a Day" "The Song Is You" "Close to You" "You'll Never Know" "Sunday, Monday, or Always" "People Will Say We're in Love" "Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin'" "A Lovely Way to Spend an Evening" "White Christmas" "Saturday Night (Is the Loneliest Night of the Week)" "I Dream of You (More than You Dream I Do)" "Ol' Man River" "Stormy Weather" "When Your Lover Has Gone" "Dream" "If I Loved You" "You'll Never Walk Alone" "Mighty Lak' a Rose" "Nancy (With the Laughing Face)" "America the Beautiful" "Day by Day" "Full Moon and Empty Arms" "Soliloquy (Part 1 & 2)" "Begin the Beguine" "Silent Night" "Adeste Fideles" "Jingle Bells" "September Song" "Sweet Lorraine" "Time after Time" "Mam'selle" "Almost Like Being in Love" "Tea for Two" "My Romance" "So Far" "A Fellow Needs a Girl" "But Beautiful"

395 398 398 399 399 400 401 404 404 405 412 412 414 419 422 423 425 427 432 433 434 440 442 443 444 448 451 455 462 464 465 466 467 468 469 471 472 472

"I've Got a Crush on You" "All of Me" "Nature Boy" "Everybody Loves Somebody" "My Melancholy Baby" "Autumn in New York" "Why Can't You Behave?" "Some Enchanted Evening" "Bali Ha'i" "Let's Take an Old Fashioned Walk" "I Only Have Eyes for You" "Goodnight, Irene" "Nevertheless (I'm in Love with You)" "Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow!" "We Kiss in a Shadow" "April in Paris" "I Could Write a Book" "The Birth of the Blues" "I'm Walking Behind You" "I've Got the World on a String" "My One and Only Love" "South Of The Border (Down Mexico Way)" "Young at Heart" "Don't Worry 'bout Me" "Three Coins in the Fountain" "The Gal That Got Away" "Someone to Watch Over Me" "Melody of Love" "Two Hearts, Two Kisses (Make One Love)" "Learnin' the Blues" "Love and Marriage" "(Love Is) The Tender Trap" "You're Sensational" "True Love" "Well, Did You Evah!" "Mind if I Make Love to You?" "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?" "All the Way"

473 474 476 479 480 482 487 488 491 493 494 497 500 501 502 503 505 505 506 507 508 509 510 511 511 512 515 518 519 520 520 521 522 522 524 525 525 526

"Chicago (That Toddlin' Town)" "Witchcraft" "French Foreign Legion" "High Hopes" "Old MacDonald" "My Blue Heaven" "I'll Remember April" "I Love Paris" "Granada" "I'll Be Seeing You" "I'm Getting Sentimental Over You" "Polka Dots and Moonbeams" "Come Rain or Come Shine" "I Left My Heart in San Francisco" "Me and My Shadow" "Call Me Irresponsible" "I Have Dreamed" "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas" "My Kind of Town" "Softly, as I Leave You" "I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day" "The Little Drummer Boy" "It Was a Very Good Year" "Strangers in the Night" "Summer Wind" "You Make Me Feel So Young" "That's Life" "Somethin' Stupid" "The World We Knew (Over and Over)" "My Way" "Goin' Out of My Head" "Something" "Bein' Green" "Send in the Clowns" "Theme from New York, New York" "Here's to the Band" "To Love a Child" "Teach Me Tonight"

527 529 531 532 534 538 542 543 544 547 549 550 550 553 555 557 558 560 564 568 569 571 577 579 582 583 583 584 588 589 594 595 602 604 611 615 616 617

"Mack the Knife" "It's All Right with Me" "Until the Real Thing Comes Along"

618 623 624 625 625 653 654 655 659 659 661 662 663 667 669 670 674 679 683 683 684 685 686 687 688 689 690 691 691 691 692 693 694 698 699 703 704

Songs
List of songs recorded by Frank Sinatra List of songs introduced by Frank Sinatra "Água de Beber" "All the Things You Are" "Always" "Angel Eyes" "As Time Goes By" "At Long Last Love" "Bad, Bad Leroy Brown" "The Best Is Yet to Come" "Blue Hawaii" "Blue Moon" "Blues in the Night" "Body and Soul" "Change Partners" "Ciribiribin" "The Coffee Song" "Come Dance with Me" "Come Fly with Me" "Corcovado" "Day In, Day Out" "Desafinado" "Dindi" "Don't Cry, Joe (Let Her Go, Let Her Go, Let Her Go)" "Don't Make a Beggar of Me" "Drinking Again" "Ebb Tide" "Everything Happens to Me" "Feeling Good" "Five Minutes More" "Fly Me to the Moon" "Get Me to the Church on Time" "The Girl from Ipanema"

"Glad to Be Unhappy" "Goodbye" "Guess I'll Hang My Tears Out to Dry" "Hallelujah I Love Her So" "How Deep Is the Ocean?" "How Do You Keep the Music Playing?" "How Insensitive" "I Concentrate on You" "I Don't Stand a Ghost of a Chance with You" "I Get Along without You Very Well (Except Sometimes)" "I Get a Kick Out of You" "I Hadn't Anyone Till You" "I Wished on the Moon" "I Won't Dance" "I'll Never Smile Again" "I've Got You Under My Skin" "If I Had You" "In the Still of the Night" "In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning" "Inútil Paisagem" "Isle of Capri" "Just One of Those Things" "The Lady Is a Tramp" "Laura" "Like Someone in Love" "Little Green Apples" "Love Is Here to Stay" "Love Me Tender" "Make Believe" "Mama Will Bark" "Meditation" "Mood Indigo" "Moon River" "Moonlight in Vermont" "More Than You Know" "My Funny Valentine" "Now Is the Hour" "Old Devil Moon"

707 708 709 709 712 713 714 716 717 718 720 721 722 723 724 725 727 728 730 731 731 732 733 738 739 740 741 743 746 747 748 748 750 754 756 761 764 765

"On the Sunny Side of the Street" "Once Upon a Time" "One Note Samba" "One for My Baby" "Pennies from Heaven" "Put Your Dreams Away (For Another Day)" "The September of My Years" "The Shadow of Your Smile" "Tenderly" "That Lucky Old Sun" "That Old Black Magic" "That Old Feeling" "That's All" "There's No You" "These Foolish Things (Remind Me of You)" "They All Laughed" "They Can't Take That Away from Me" "The Things We Did Last Summer" "This Town" "Too Marvelous for Words" "Try a Little Tenderness" "Volare" "Wave" "The Way You Look Tonight" "You Brought a New Kind of Love to Me" "You Go to My Head" "You'd Be So Nice to Come Home To" "Zing! Went the Strings of My Heart"

766 768 769 770 772 773 774 775 776 778 780 783 785 786 787 788 789 790 792 793 795 797 811 812 814 815 816 818 819 819 822 824 824 829 831 833

Tribute films
The Rat Pack The Night We Called It a Day

Filmography
Frank Sinatra filmography Higher and Higher Step Lively Anchors Aweigh

The House I Live In Till the Clouds Roll By It Happened in Brooklyn The Miracle of the Bells Take Me Out to the Ball Game On the Town Double Dynamite From Here to Eternity Young at Heart Suddenly The Man with the Golden Arm Guys and Dolls The Tender Trap Not as a Stranger Finian's Rainbow High Society Around the World in 80 Days Carousel Meet Me in Las Vegas Pal Joey The Joker Is Wild The Pride and the Passion Some Came Running Kings Go Forth Never So Few Can-Can Ocean's 11 Pepe The Devil at 4 O'Clock The Manchurian Candidate The Road to Hong Kong 4 for Texas Come Blow Your Horn The List of Adrian Messenger Marriage on the Rocks Von Ryan's Express Assault on a Queen Cast a Giant Shadow

837 839 843 845 847 850 853 855 862 864 868 872 877 879 881 886 890 898 904 906 910 912 915 917 920 924 926 929 932 934 940 943 945 946 948 950 955 957

The Oscar Tony Rome The Naked Runner The Detective Lady in Cement Dirty Dingus Magee Cannonball Run II

960 963 965 967 970 972 974 977 977 979 984 987 990 994 997 997 999 1000 1001 1004 1006 1010 1015 1018 1023 1023 1024 1026 1027 1027 1029 1031 1032 1036

Film productions
A Hole in the Head X-15 Sergeants 3 Robin and the 7 Hoods None But the Brave The First Deadly Sin

Other films
Ship Ahoy Reveille with Beverly Show Business at War A Thousand and One Nights Person to Person Three Coins in the Fountain Advise & Consent Paris When It Sizzles That's Entertainment!

Television films
Our Town Contract on Cherry Street Young at Heart

Television shows
The Frank Sinatra Show (CBS) The Frank Sinatra Show (ABC) The Frank Sinatra Timex Show: Here's to the Ladies (ABC) The Frank Sinatra Timex Show: Welcome Home Elvis (ABC)

Television specials

Frank Sinatra: A Man and His Music A Man and His Music A Man and His Music – Part II A Man and His Music + Ella + Jobim Francis Albert Sinatra Does His Thing Sinatra Sinatra in Concert Ol' Blue Eyes Is Back Sinatra – The Main Event Sinatra and Friends The First 40 Years The Man and His Music

1036 1037 1039 1040 1042 1044 1046 1047 1048 1049 1050 1052 1053 1053 1056 1062 1070 1078 1078 1078 1080 1082 1082 1087 1087 1091 1107 1118 1121 1128 1128 1137 1145

Television cameos
Burke's Law Make Room for Granddaddy Magnum, P.I. Who's the Boss?

Concerts
Concerts of Frank Sinatra Frank Sinatra: Live at Melbourne Festival Hall Concert for the Americas

Awards
List of awards and nominations received by Frank Sinatra

Relationships
Personal relationships of Frank Sinatra Judy Garland Lauren Bacall Juliet Prowse Angie Dickinson

Spouces
Ava Gardner Mia Farrow Barbara Marx

Children
Nancy Sinatra Frank Sinatra, Jr. Christina "Tina" Sinatra

1147 1147 1153 1156 1157 1157 1160 1169 1172 1178 1179 1186 1187 1189 1195 1201 1201 1202 1207 1207 1208 1208 1217 1220 1232 1243 1246 1248 1248 1249 1251 1252 1254

Associated people
Edward Bowes Tommy Dorsey Harry James Antônio Carlos Jobim Bill Miller Nelson Riddle Jilly Rizzo Anthony Martin Sinatra Keely Smith Jimmy Van Heusen

Associated groups
Frank Sinatra and the 3 Flashes Rat Pack

Other associated characters
Johnny Fiama

Record labels
RCA Bluebird Columbia Capitol Reprise Qwest

Related articles
Frank Sinatra Enterprises "Frank Sinatra Has a Cold" Frank Sinatra School of the Arts "My Way" killings Rocky Fortune

"Sinatra Doctrine" Siriusly Sinatra

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References
Article Sources and Contributors Image Sources, Licenses and Contributors 1259 1287

Article Licenses
License 1291

1

Overview
Frank Sinatra
Frank Sinatra

Frank Sinatra at Girl's Town Ball in Florida, March 12, 1960 Background information Birth name Also known as Francis Albert Sinatra [1] Ol' Blue Eyes The Chairman of the Board The Voice December 12, 1915 [2] Hoboken, New Jersey May 14, 1998 (aged 82) Los Angeles, California Traditional pop, jazz, swing, big band, vocal Singer, Vocals 1935-1995 [5] [1] actor, producer, [1] director, [1] [3] [4]

Born

Died

Genres Occupations Instruments Years active Labels Associated acts

conductor

Columbia, Capitol, Reprise, Apple Records Rat Pack, Bing Crosby, Nancy Sinatra, Judy Garland, Quincy Jones, Antonio Carlos Jobim, Frank Sinatra, Jr., Dean Martin, Count Basie, Sammy Davis, Jr., Luis Miguel [sinatra.com sinatra.com]

Website

Francis Albert "Frank" Sinatra, and film actor.

 /sɪˈnɑːtrə/, (December 12, 1915 – May 14, 1998)[6] was an American singer

Frank Sinatra Beginning his musical career in the swing era with Harry James and Tommy Dorsey, Sinatra became an unprecedentedly successful solo artist in the early to mid-1940s, after being signed to Columbia Records in 1943. Being the idol of the "bobby soxers", he released his first album, The Voice of Frank Sinatra in 1946. His professional career had stalled by the 1950s, but it was reborn in 1953 after he won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his performance in From Here to Eternity. He signed with Capitol Records in 1953 and released several critically lauded albums (such as In the Wee Small Hours, Songs for Swingin' Lovers, Come Fly with Me, Only the Lonely and Nice 'n' Easy). Sinatra left Capitol to found his own record label, Reprise Records in 1961 (finding success with albums such as Ring-a-Ding-Ding!, Sinatra at the Sands and Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim), toured internationally, was a founding member of the Rat Pack and fraternized with celebrities and statesmen, including John F. Kennedy. Sinatra turned 50 in 1965, recorded the retrospective September of My Years, starred in the Emmy-winning television special Frank Sinatra: A Man and His Music, and scored hits with "Strangers in the Night" and "My Way". With sales of his music dwindling and after appearing in several poorly received films, Sinatra retired for the first time in 1971. Two years later, however, he came out of retirement and in 1973 recorded several albums, scoring a Top 40 hit with "(Theme From) New York, New York" in 1980. Using his Las Vegas shows as a home base, he toured both within the United States and internationally, until a short time before his death in 1998. Sinatra also forged a successful career as a film actor, winning the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his performance in From Here to Eternity, a nomination for Best Actor for The Man with the Golden Arm, and critical acclaim for his performance in The Manchurian Candidate. He also starred in such musicals as High Society, Pal Joey, Guys and Dolls and On the Town. Sinatra was honored at the Kennedy Center Honors in 1983 and was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by Ronald Reagan in 1985 and the Congressional Gold Medal in 1997. Sinatra was also the recipient of eleven Grammy Awards, including the Grammy Trustees Award, Grammy Legend Award and the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award.

2

Early life
Born December 12, 1915, in Hoboken, New Jersey,[7] Sinatra was the only child of Italian immigrants Natalie Della (Garaventa) and Antonino Martino Sinatra,[8] and was raised Roman Catholic.[9] He left high school without graduating,[10]:38 having attended only 47 days before being expelled because of his rowdy conduct. Sinatra's father, often referred to as Marty, served with the Hoboken Fire Department as a Captain. His mother, known as Dolly, was influential in the neighborhood and in local Democratic Party circles, but also ran an illegal abortion business from her home; she was arrested several times and convicted twice for this offense.[10]:16 During the Great Depression, Dolly nevertheless provided money to her son for outings with friends and expensive clothes.[11] In 1938, Sinatra was arrested for carrying on with a married woman, a criminal offense at the time.[12] For his livelihood, he worked as a delivery boy at the Jersey Observer newspaper,[10]:44 and later as a riveter at the Tietjan and Lang shipyard,[10]:47 but music was Sinatra's main interest, and he listened carefully to big band jazz.[13] He began singing for tips at the age of eight, standing on top of the bar at a local nightclub in Hoboken. Sinatra began singing professionally as a teenager in the 1930s,[10]:48 although he learned music by ear and never learned how to read music.[13]

Frank Sinatra

3

Career
1935–40: Start of career, work with James and Dorsey
Sinatra got his first break in 1935 when his mother persuaded a local singing group, The Three Flashes, to let him join. With Sinatra, the group became known as the Hoboken Four,[5] and they sufficiently impressed Edward Bowes. After appearing on his show, Major Bowes Amateur Hour, they attracted 40,000 votes and won the first prize – a six month contract to perform on stage and radio across the United States. Sinatra left the Hoboken Four and returned home in late 1935. His mother secured him a job as a singing waiter and MC at the Rustic Cabin in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, for which he was paid $15 a week.[14] On March 18, 1939, Sinatra made a demo recording of a song called "Our Love", with the Frank Mane band. The record has "Frank Sinatra" signed on the front. The bandleader kept the original record in a safe for nearly 60 years.[10] In June, Harry James hired Sinatra on a one year contract of $75 a week.[15] It was with the James band that Sinatra released his first commercial record "From the Bottom of My Heart" in July 1939[16]— US Brunswick #8443 and UK Columbia #DB2150.[17] Fewer than 8,000 copies of "From the Bottom of My Heart" (Brunswick #8443) were sold, making the record a very rare find that is sought after by record collectors worldwide. Sinatra released ten commercial tracks with James through 1939, including "All or Nothing At All" which had weak sales on its initial release but then sold millions of copies when re-released by Columbia at the height of Sinatra's popularity a few years later.[18] In November 1939, in a meeting at the Palmer House in Chicago, Sinatra was asked by bandleader Tommy Dorsey to join his band as a replacement for Jack E. Leonard, who had recently left to launch a solo career. This meeting was a turning point in Sinatra's career. By signing with Dorsey's band, one of the hottest at the time, he greatly increased his visibility with the American public. Though Sinatra was still under contract with James, James recognized the opportunity Dorsey offered and graciously released Sinatra from his contract. Sinatra recognized his debt to James throughout his life and upon hearing of James' death in 1983, stated: "he [James] is the one that made it all possible."[19] On January 26, 1940, Sinatra made his first public appearance with the Dorsey band at the Coronado Theater in Rockford, Illinois.[20] In his first year with Dorsey, Sinatra released more than forty songs, with "I'll Never Smile Again" topping the charts for twelve weeks beginning in mid-July.[10]:91 Sinatra's relationship with Tommy Dorsey was troubled, because of their contract, which awarded Dorsey one-third of Sinatra's lifetime earnings in the entertainment industry. In January 1942, Sinatra recorded his first solo sessions without the Dorsey band (but with Dorsey's arranger Axel Stordahl and with Dorsey's approval). These sessions were released commercially on the Bluebird label. Sinatra left the Dorsey band late in 1942 in an incident that started rumors of Sinatra's involvement with the Mafia. A story appeared in the Hearst newspapers that mobster Sam Giancana coerced Dorsey to let Sinatra out of his contract for a few thousand dollars, and was fictionalized in the movie The Godfather.[13] According to Nancy Sinatra's biography, the Hearst rumors were started because of Frank's Democratic politics. In fact, the contract was bought out by MCA founder Jules Stein for $75,000.[19]

Frank Sinatra

4

1940–50: Sinatramania and decline of career
In May 1941, Sinatra was at the top of the male singer polls in the Billboard and Down Beat magazines.[10]:94 His appeal to bobby soxers, as teenage girls of that time were called, revealed a whole new audience for popular music, which had been recorded mainly for adults up to that time.[21] On December 30, 1942, Sinatra made a "legendary opening" at the Paramount Theater in New York. Jack Benny later said, "I thought the goddamned building was going to cave in. I never heard such a commotion... All this for a fellow I never heard of." When Sinatra returned to the Paramount in October 1944, 35,000 fans caused a near riot outside the venue because they were not allowed in.[13] During the musicians' strike of 1942–44, Columbia re-released Harry James and Sinatra's version of "All or Nothing at All" (music by Arthur Altman and lyrics by Jack Lawrence), recorded in August 1939 and released before Sinatra had made a name for himself. The original release did not even mention the vocalist's name. When the recording was re–released in 1943 with Sinatra's name prominently displayed, the record was on the best–selling list for 18 weeks and reached number 2 on June 2, 1943.[22]

Sinatra being interviewed for American Forces Network during World War II.

Sinatra signed with Columbia on June 1, 1943, as a solo artist, and he initially had great success, particularly during the 1942–44 musicians' strike. Although no new records had been issued during the strike, he had been performing on the radio (on Your Hit Parade), and on stage. Columbia wanted to get new recordings of their growing star as fast as possible, so Sinatra convinced them to hire Alec Wilder as arranger and conductor for several sessions with a vocal group called the Bobby Tucker Singers. These first sessions were on June 7, June 22, August 5, and November 10, 1943. Of the nine songs recorded during these sessions, seven charted on the best–selling list.[23] Sinatra did not serve in the military during World War II. On December 11, 1943, he was classified 4-F ("Registrant not acceptable for military service") for a perforated eardrum by his draft board. Additionally, an FBI report on Sinatra, released in 1998, showed that the doctors had also written that he was a "neurotic" and "not acceptable material from a psychiatric standpoint". This was omitted from his record to avoid "undue unpleasantness for both the selectee and the induction service".[24][25] Active-duty servicemen, like journalist William Manchester, said of Sinatra, "I think Frank Sinatra was the most hated man of World War II, much more than Hitler", because Sinatra was back home making all of that money and being shown in photographs surrounded by beautiful women.[11]:91[26] His exemption would resurface throughout his life and cause him grief when he had to defend himself.[24][27] There were accusations, including some from noted columnist Walter Winchell,[28] that Sinatra paid $40,000 to avoid the service – but the FBI found no evidence of this.[25][29] In her book "Over Here, Over There" with Bill Gilbert, Maxene Andrews recalled when Sinatra entertained the troops during an overseas USO tour with comedian Phil Silvers during the war, observing, "I guess they just had a wing-ding, whatever it was. Sinatra demanded his own plane. But Bing [Crosby] said, 'Don't demand anything. Just go over there and sing your hearts out.' So, we did."[30] Sinatra worked frequently with the very popular Andrews Sisters, both on radio in the 1940s, appearing as guests on each other's shows, as well as on many shows broadcast to troops via the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). He appeared as special guest on a rare pilot episode of the sisters' ABC Eight-to-the-Bar Ranch series at the end of 1944, and returned for another much funnier guest stint a few months later, while the trio in turn guested on his Songs By Sinatra series on CBS, to the delight of an audience filled with screaming bobby-soxers. Patty, Maxene, and LaVerne also teamed with Frankie when they appeared three times as guests on Sinatra's CBS television show in the early-1950s. Maxene once told Joe Franklin during a 1979 WWOR-AM Radio interview that Sinatra was "a peculiar man," with the ability to act indifferent towards her at times.[31]

Frank Sinatra In 1945, Sinatra co-starred with Gene Kelly in Anchors Aweigh. That same year, he was loaned out to RKO to star in a short film titled The House I Live In. Directed by Mervyn LeRoy, this film on tolerance and racial equality earned a special Academy Award shared among Sinatra and those who brought the film to the screen, along with a special Golden Globe for "Promoting Good Will". 1946 saw the release of his first album, The Voice of Frank Sinatra, and the debut of his own weekly radio show. By the end of 1948, Sinatra felt that his career was stalling, something that was confirmed when he slipped to No. 4 on Down Beat's annual poll of most popular singers (behind Billy Eckstine, Frankie Laine, and Bing Crosby).[10]:149 The year 1949 saw an upswing, as Frank co-starred with Gene Kelly in Take Me Out to the Ball Game. It was well received critically and became a major commercial success. That same year, Sinatra teamed up with Kelly for a third time in On the Town.

5

1950–60: Rebirth of career, Capitol concept albums
After two years' absence, Sinatra returned to the concert stage on January 12, 1950, in Hartford, Connecticut. His voice suffered and he experienced hemorrhaging of his vocal cords on stage at the Copacabana on April 26, 1950.[11] Sinatra's career and appeal to new teen audiences declined as he moved into his mid-30s. This was a period of serious self-doubt about the trajectory of his career. In February 1951, he was walking through Times Square, past the Paramount theatre, keystone venue of his earlier phenomenal success. The Paramount marquee glowed in announcement of Eddie Fisher in concert. Swarms of teen-age girls had gathered in frenzy, swooning over the current singing idol. For Sinatra this public display of enthusiasm for Fisher validated a fear he had harbored in his own mind for a long time. The Sinatra star had fallen; the shouts of "Frankieee" were echoes of the past. Agitated and disconsolate he rushed home, closed his kitchen door, turned on the gas and laid his head on the top of the stove. A friend returned to the apartment not long after to find Sinatra lying on the floor sobbing out the melodrama of his life, proclaiming his failure was so complete he could not even commit suicide.[32]:458 In September 1951, Sinatra made his Las Vegas debut at the Desert Inn. A month later, a second series of the Frank Sinatra Show aired on CBS. Ultimately, Sinatra did not find the success on television for which he had hoped. The persona he presented to the TV audience was not that of a performer easily welcomed into homes. He projected an arrogance not compatible with the type of cozy congeniality that played well on the small screen.[32]:439 Columbia and MCA dropped him in 1952. The rebirth of Sinatra's career began with the eve-of-Pearl Harbor drama From Here to Eternity (1953), for which he won an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor. This role and performance marked a turnaround in Sinatra's career: after several years of critical and commercial decline, becoming an Oscar-winning actor helped him regain his position as the top recording artist in the world.[33] Also in 1953, Sinatra starred in the NBC radio program Rocky Fortune. His character, Rocko Fortunato (aka Rocky Fortune) was a temp worker for the Gridley Employment Agency who stumbled into crime-solving by way of the odd jobs to which he was dispatched. The series aired on NBC radio Tuesday nights from October 1953 to March 1954, following the network's crime drama hit Dragnet. During the final months of the show, just before the 1954 Oscars, it became a running gag that Sinatra would manage to work the phrase "from here to eternity" into each episode, a reference to his Oscar-nominated performance.[34] In 1953, Sinatra signed with Capitol Records, where he worked with many of the finest musical arrangers of the era, most notably Nelson Riddle,[16] Gordon Jenkins, and Billy May. With a series of albums featuring darker emotional material, Sinatra reinvented himself, including In the Wee Small Hours (1955)—Sinatra's first 12" LP and his second collaboration with Nelson Riddle—Where Are You? (1957) and Frank Sinatra Sings For Only The Lonely (1958). He also incorporated a hipper, "swinging" persona into some of his music, as heard on Swing Easy! (1954), Songs For Swingin' Lovers (1956), and Come Fly With Me (1957).

Frank Sinatra By the end of the year, Billboard had named "Young at Heart" Song of the Year; Swing Easy!, with Nelson Riddle at the helm (his second album for Capitol), was named Album of the Year; and Sinatra was named "Top Male Vocalist" by Billboard, Down Beat and Metronome. A third collaboration with Nelson Riddle, Songs For Swingin' Lovers, was both a critical and financial success, featuring a recording of "I've Got You Under My Skin". Frank Sinatra Sings for Only the Lonely, a stark collection of introspective saloon songs and blues-tinged ballads, was a mammoth commercial success, spending 120 weeks on Billboard's album chart and peaking at #1. Cuts from this LP, such as "Angel Eyes" and "One for My Baby (and One More for the Road)", would remain staples of Sinatra's concerts throughout his life. Through the late fifties, Sinatra frequently criticized rock and roll music, much of it being his reaction to rhythms and attitudes he found alien. In 1958 he lambasted it as "sung, played, and written for the most part by cretinous goons. It manages to be the martial music of every sideburned delinquent on the face of the earth."[35] Sinatra's 1959 hit "High Hopes" lasted on the Hot 100 for 17 weeks, more than any other Sinatra hit did on that chart, and was a recurring favorite for years on "Captain Kangaroo".

6

1960–70: Ring-A-Ding-Ding, Reprise records, Basie, Jobim, "My Way"
Sinatra started the 1960s as he ended the 1950s. His first album of the decade, Nice 'n' Easy, topped Billboard's chart and won critical plaudits. Sinatra grew discontented at Capitol and decided to form his own label, Reprise Records. His first album on the label, Ring-A-Ding-Ding (1961), was a major success, peaking at No.4 on Billboard and No.8 in the UK. His fourth and final Timex TV special was broadcast in March 1960, and earned massive viewing figures. Titled It's Nice to Go Travelling, the show is more commonly known as Welcome Home Elvis. Elvis Presley's appearance after his army discharge was somewhat ironic; Sinatra had been scathing about him in the mid fifties, saying: "His kind of music is deplorable, a rancid smelling aphrodisiac. It fosters almost totally negative and destructive reactions in young people."[36] Presley had responded: "... [Sinatra] is a great success and a fine actor, but I think he shouldn't have said it... [rock and roll] is a trend, just the same as he faced when he started years ago."[37] Later, in efforts to maintain his commercial viability, Sinatra recorded Presley's hit "Love Me Tender" as well as works by Paul Simon ("Mrs. Robinson"), The Beatles ("Something", "Yesterday"), and Joni Mitchell ("Both Sides Now").[38] Following on the heels of the film Can Can was Ocean's 11, the movie that became the definitive on-screen outing for "The Rat Pack," a group of entertainers led by Sinatra who worked together on a loose basis in films and casino shows featuring Dean Martin, Sammy Davis, Jr., Peter Lawford, and Joey Bishop. Subsequent pictures together included Sergeants 3 and Robin and the 7 Hoods, although the movies' rosters of actors varied slightly according to whom Sinatra happened be angry with when casting any given film; he replaced Sammy Davis, Jr. with Steve McQueen in Never So Few and Peter Lawford with Bing Crosby in Robin and the 7 Hoods. From his youth, Sinatra displayed sympathy for African Americans and worked both publicly and privately all his life to help them win equal rights. He played a major role in the desegregation of Nevada hotels and casinos in the 1960s. On January 27, 1961, Sinatra played a benefit show at Carnegie Hall for Martin Luther King, Jr. and led his fellow Rat Pack members and Reprise label mates in boycotting hotels and casinos that refused entry to black patrons and performers. He often spoke from the stage on desegregation and repeatedly played benefits on behalf of Dr. King and his movement. According to his son, Frank Sinatra, Jr., King sat weeping in the audience at a concert in 1963 as Sinatra sang Ol' Man River, a song from the musical Show Boat that is sung by an African-American stevedore. On September 11 and 12, 1961, Sinatra recorded his final songs for Capitol. In 1962, he starred with Janet Leigh and Laurence Harvey in the political thriller, The Manchurian Candidate, playing Bennett Marco. That same year, Sinatra and Count Basie collaborated for the album Sinatra-Basie. This

Frank Sinatra popular and successful release prompted them to rejoin two years later for the follow-up It Might as Well Be Swing, which was arranged by Quincy Jones. One of Sinatra's more ambitious albums from the mid-1960s, The Concert Sinatra, was recorded with a 73-piece symphony orchestra on 35mm tape. Sinatra's first live album, Sinatra at the Sands, was recorded during January and February 1966 at the Sands Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas. In June 1965, Sinatra, Sammy Davis, Jr., and Dean Martin played live in Saint Louis to benefit Dismas House. The Rat Pack concert was broadcast live via satellite to numerous movie theaters across America. Released in August 1965 was the Grammy Award–winning album of the year, September of My Years, containing the single "It Was A Very Good Year", which won the Grammy Award for Best Vocal Performance, Male in 1966. A career anthology, A Man and His Music, followed in November, winning Album of the Year at the Grammys in 1966. The TV special, Frank Sinatra: A Man and His Music, garnered both an Emmy award and a Peabody Award. In the spring, That's Life appeared, with both the single and album becoming Top Ten hits in the US on Billboard's pop charts. Strangers in the Night went on to top the Billboard and UK pop singles charts, winning the award for Record of the Year at the Grammys. The album of the same name also topped the Billboard chart and reached number

7

Dean Martin and Frank Sinatra

4 in the UK. Sinatra started 1967 with a series of important recording sessions with Antônio Carlos Jobim. Later in the year, a duet with daughter Nancy, "Somethin' Stupid", topped the Billboard pop and UK singles charts. In December, Sinatra collaborated with Duke Ellington on the album Francis A. & Edward K.. During the late 1960s, press agent Lee Solters would invite columnists and their spouses into Sinatra's dressing room just before he was about to go on stage. The New Yorker recounted that "the first columnist they tried this on was Larry Fields of the Philadelphia Daily News, whose wife fainted when Sinatra kissed her cheek. 'Take care of it, Lee,' Sinatra said, and he was off." The professional relationship Sinatra shared with Solters focused on projects on the west coast while those focused on the east coast were handled by Solters' partner, Sheldon Roskin of Solters/Roskin/Friedman, a well-known firm at the time.[39] Back on the small-screen, Sinatra once again worked with Jobim and Ella Fitzgerald on the TV special, A Man and His Music + Ella + Jobim. Watertown (1970) was one of Sinatra's most acclaimed concept albums[40] but was all but ignored by the public. Selling a mere 30,000 copies and reaching a peak chart position of 101, its failure put an end to plans for a television special based on the album. With Sinatra in mind, singer-songwriter Paul Anka wrote the song "My Way", inspired from the French "Comme d'habitude" ("As Usual"), composed by Claude François and Jacques Revaux. (The song had been previously commissioned to David Bowie, whose lyrics did not please the involved agents.) "My Way" would, ironically, become more closely identified with him than any other song over his seven decades as a singer even though he reputedly did not care for it.

Frank Sinatra

8

1970–80: Retirement and comeback
On June 13, 1971 – at a concert in Hollywood to raise money for the Motion Picture and TV Relief Fund – at the age of 55, Sinatra announced that he was retiring, bringing to an end his 36-year career in show business. In 1973, Sinatra came out of retirement with a television special and album, both entitled Ol' Blue Eyes Is Back. The album, arranged by Gordon Jenkins and Don Costa, was a great success, reaching number 13 on Billboard and number 12 in the UK. The TV special was highlighted by a dramatic reading of "Send in the Clowns" and a song and dance sequence with former co-star Gene Kelly. In January 1974, Sinatra returned to Las Vegas, performing at Caesars Palace despite vowing in 1970 never to play there again after the manager of the resort, Sanford Waterman, pulled a gun on him during a heated argument.[11]:436 With Waterman recently shot, the door was open for Sinatra to return. In Australia, he caused an uproar by describing journalists there – who were aggressively pursuing his every move and pushing for a press conference – as "fags", "pimps", and "whores". Australian unions representing transport workers, waiters, and journalists went on strike, demanding that Sinatra apologize for his remarks.[11]:464 Sinatra instead insisted that the journalists apologize for "fifteen years of abuse I have taken from the world press".[11]:464 The future Prime Minister of Australia, Bob Hawke, then the Australian Council of Trade Unions (ACTU) leader, also insisted that Sinatra apologize, and a settlement was eventually reached to the apparent satisfaction of both parties,[11]:464 Sinatra's final show of his Australian tour was televised to the nation. In October 1974, Sinatra appeared at New York City's Madison Square Garden in a televised concert that was later released as an album under the title The Main Event – Live. Backing him was bandleader Woody Herman and the Young Thundering Herd, who accompanied Sinatra on a European tour later that month. The TV special garnered mostly positive reviews while the album – actually culled from various shows during his comeback tour – was only a moderate success, peaking at No.37 on Billboard and No.30 in the UK.

Empress Farah Diba of Iran and Frank Sinatra, Tehran, 1975.

Frank Sinatra, with Giulio Andreotti (left) and Richard Nixon at the White House, 1973.

In August 1975, Sinatra held several back-to-back concerts together with the newly-risen singer, John Denver. Soon they became friends with each other. John Denver later appeared as a guest in the Sinatra and friends TV Special, singing "September Song" together with Sinatra. Sinatra covered the John Denver hits "My Sweet Lady" and "Leaving on a Jet Plane". And, according to Denver, his song "A Baby Just Like You" was written at Sinatra's request. In 1979, in front of the Egyptian pyramids, Sinatra performed for Anwar Sadat. Back in Las Vegas, while celebrating 40 years in show business and his 64th birthday, he was awarded the Grammy Trustees Award during a party at Caesars Palace.

Frank Sinatra

9

1980–90: Trilogy, She Shot Me Down, L.A. Is My Lady
In 1980, Sinatra's first album in six years was released, Trilogy: Past Present Future, a highly ambitious triple album that found Sinatra recording songs from the past (pre-rock era) and present (rock era and contemporary) that he had overlooked during his career, while 'The Future' was a free-form suite of new songs linked à la musical theater by a theme, in this case, Sinatra pondering over the future. The album garnered six Grammy nominations – winning for best liner notes – and peaked at number 17 on Billboard's album chart, while spawning yet another song that would become a signature tune, "Theme from New York, New York", as well as Sinatra's much lauded (second) recording of George Harrison's "Something" (the first was not officially released on an album until 1972's Frank Sinatra's Greatest Hits, Vol. 2).

Sinatra sings with then First Lady Nancy Reagan at the White House.

The following year, Sinatra built on the success of Trilogy with She Shot Me Down, an album that revisited the dark tone of his Capitol years, and was praised by critics as a vintage late-period Sinatra. Sinatra would comment that it was "A complete saloon album... tear-jerkers and cry-in-your-beer kind of things".[41] Also in 1981, Sinatra was embroiled in controversy when he worked a ten-day engagement for $2 million in Sun City, South Africa, breaking a cultural boycott against apartheid-era South Africa. See Artists United Against Apartheid He was selected as one of the five recipients of the 1983 Kennedy Center Honors, alongside Katharine Dunham, James Stewart, Elia Kazan, and Virgil Thomson. Quoting Henry James in honoring his old friend, President Ronald Reagan said that "art was the shadow of humanity" and that Sinatra had "spent his life casting a magnificent and powerful shadow".[11]:544 In 1984, Sinatra worked with Quincy Jones for the first time in nearly two decades on the album, L.A. Is My Lady, which was well received critically. The album was a substitute for another Jones project, an album of duets with Lena Horne, which had to be abandoned. (Horne developed vocal problems and Sinatra, committed to other engagements, could not wait to record.)

1990s: Duets, final performances
In 1990, Sinatra did a national tour,[42] and was awarded the second "Ella Award" by the Los Angeles–based Society of Singers. At the award ceremony, he performed for the final time with Ella Fitzgerald.[43] In December, as part of Sinatra's birthday celebrations, Patrick Pasculli, the Mayor of Hoboken, made a proclamation in his honor, declaring that "no other vocalist in history has sung, swung, crooned, and serenaded into the hearts of the young and old... as this consummate artist from Hoboken."[43]:407 The same month Sinatra gave the first show of his Diamond Jubilee Tour at the Brendan Byrne Arena in East Rutherford, New Jersey. In 1993 Sinatra made a surprise return to Capitol and the recording studio for Duets, which was released in November. The other artists who added their vocals to the album worked for free, and a follow-up album (Duets II) was released in 1994 that reached No.9 on the Billboard charts. Still touring despite various health problems, Sinatra remained a top concert attraction on a global scale during the first half of the 1990s. At times during concerts his memory failed him and a fall onstage in Richmond, Virginia, in March 1994, signaled further problems. Sinatra's final public concerts were held in Japan's Fukuoka Dome in December, 1994. The following year, on February 25, 1995, at a private party for 1200 select guests on the closing night of the Frank Sinatra Desert Classic

Frank Sinatra golf tournament, Sinatra sang before a live audience for the very last time. Esquire reported of the show that Sinatra was "clear, tough, on the money" and "in absolute control". His closing song was "The Best is Yet to Come". Sinatra was awarded the Legend Award at the 1994 Grammy Awards, where he was introduced by Bono, who said of him, "Frank's the chairman of the bad attitude... Rock 'n roll plays at being tough, but this guy is the boss—the chairman of boss... I'm not going to mess with him, are you?"[44] Sinatra called it "the best welcome...I ever had", but his acceptance speech ran too long and was abruptly cut off, leaving him looking confused and talking into a dead microphone.[45] Later in the telecast, Billy Joel protested the decision to cut Sinatra off by leaving a long pause in the middle of his song "The River of Dreams" in order to waste "valuable advertising time".[46] In 1995, to mark Sinatra's 80th birthday, the Empire State Building glowed blue. A star-studded birthday tribute, Sinatra: 80 Years My Way, was held at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles. At the end of the program Sinatra graced the stage for the last time to sing the final notes of "New York, New York" with an ensemble. It was Sinatra's last televised appearance. In recognition of his many years of association with Las Vegas, Frank Sinatra was elected to the Gaming Hall of Fame in 1997.[47]

10

Film career
Sinatra enjoyed a huge film career and began making movies almost as soon as his singing career took off. His most important pictures include The Manchurian Candidate with Angela Lansbury, From Here to Eternity with Burt Lancaster, The Man With the Golden Arm with Arnold Stang, Kings Go Forth with Natalie Wood, Guys and Dolls with Marlon Brando, High Society with Bing Crosby, Pal Joey with Rita Hayworth, Some Came Running with Dean Martin, Never So Few with Steve McQueen, A Hole in the Head with Edward G. Robinson, Meet Danny Wilson, On the Town with Gene Kelly, Robin and the 7 Hoods with Bing Crosby, Ocean's 11 and Sergeants 3 with the Rat Pack (Dean Martin, Sammy Davis, Jr., Peter Lawford, and Joey Bishop), Step Lively, None But the Brave (directed by Sinatra), The Detective with Lee Remick, Come Blow Your Horn with Lee J. Cobb and Barbara Rush, and The Pride and the Passion starring Cary Grant, among many others spanning most of his lengthy career.

Personal life
Sinatra had three children, Nancy, Frank Jr., and Tina, all with his first wife, Nancy Barbato (born March 25, 1917, married 1939–51). He was married three more times, to actresses Ava Gardner (1951–57), Mia Farrow (1966–68), and finally to Barbara Marx (1976 until his death). Throughout his life, Sinatra had mood swings and bouts of depression. Solitude and unglamorous surroundings were to be avoided at all cost. He struggled with the conflicting need "to get away from it all, but not too far away."[32]:485 He acknowledged this, telling an interviewer in the 1950s: "Being an 18-karat manic depressive, and having lived a life of violent emotional contradictions, I have an over-acute capacity for sadness as well as elation."[10]:218 In her memoirs My Father's Daughter, his daughter Tina wrote about the "eighteen-karat" remark: "As flippant as Dad could be about his mental state, I believe that a Zoloft a day might have kept his demons away. But that kind of medicine was decades off."[48]

with wife Mia Farrow circa 1967

Although beloved as a hero by his hometown of Hoboken, Frank Sinatra rarely visited it. According to one account, Sinatra returned once in 1948 to celebrate the election of Hoboken's first Italian mayor and was not well received by the crowd. He stated he would never come back, and in fact did not return until 1984, to appear with Ronald

Frank Sinatra Reagan.[49]

11

Alleged organized crime links
Sinatra garnered considerable attention due to his alleged personal and professional links with organized crime,[50] including figures such as Carlo Gambino,[51] Sam Giancana,[51] Lucky Luciano,[51] and Joseph Fischetti.[51] The Federal Bureau of Investigation kept records amounting to 2,403 pages on Sinatra. With his alleged Mafia ties, his ardent New Deal politics and his friendship with John F. Kennedy, he was a natural target for J. Edgar Hoover's FBI.[52] The FBI kept Sinatra under surveillance for almost five decades beginning in the 1940s. The documents include accounts of Sinatra as the target of death threats and extortion schemes. They also portray rampant paranoia and strange obsessions at the FBI and reveal nearly every celebrated Sinatra foible and peccadillo.[53] For a year Hoover investigated Sinatra's alleged Communist affiliations, but found no evidence. The files include his rendezvous with prostitutes, and his extramarital affair with Ava Gardner, which preceded their marriage. Celebrities mentioned in the files are Dean Martin, Marilyn Monroe, Peter Lawford, and Giancana's girlfriend, singer Phyllis McGuire. The FBI's secret dossier on Sinatra was released in 1998 in response to Freedom of Information Act requests. The released FBI files reveal some tantalizing insights into Sinatra’s lifetime consistency in pursuing and embracing seemingly conflicting affiliations. But Sinatra’s alliances had a practical aspect. They were adaptive mechanisms for behavior motivated by self-interest and inner anxieties. In September 1950 Sinatra felt particularly vulnerable. He was in a panic over his moribund career and haunted by the continual speculations and innuendos in circulation regarding his draft status in World War II. Sinatra “was scared, his career had sprung a leak.” In a letter dated September 17, 1950, to Clyde Tolson, Deputy FBI Director. Sinatra offered to be of service to the FBI as an informer. An excerpted passage from a memo in FBI files states that Sinatra “feels he can be of help as a result of going anywhere the Bureau desires and contacting any people from whom he might be able to obtain information. Sinatra feels as a result of his publicity he can operate without suspicion…he is willing to go the whole way.” The FBI declined his assistance.[32]:446–47

Political views
Sinatra held differing political views throughout his life. Sinatra's parents had immigrated to the United States in 1895 and 1897 respectively. His mother, Dolly Sinatra (1896–1977), was a Democratic Party ward leader.[54] Sinatra remained a supporter of the Democratic Party until the early 1970s when he switched his allegiance to the Republican Party.

Political activities 1944–1968
In 1944, after sending a letter to President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Sinatra was invited to meet Roosevelt at the White House, where he agreed to become part of the Democratic party's voter registration drives.[55]:40 He donated $5,000 to the Democrats for the 1944 presidential election and by the end of the campaign was appearing at two or three political events every day.[55]:40
Eleanor Roosevelt and Sinatra in 1947; Sinatra named his son after her husband.

Frank Sinatra

12

After World War II, Sinatra's politics grew steadily more left wing,[55]:41 and he became more publicly associated with the Popular Front. He started reading liberal literature and supported many organizations that were later identified as front organizations of the Communist Party by the House Un-American Activities Committee in the 1950s, though Sinatra was never brought before the committee. Sinatra spoke at a number of New Jersey high schools in 1945, where students had gone on strike in opposition to racial integration. Later that year Sinatra would appear in The House I Live In, a short film that stood against racism. The film was scripted by Albert Maltz, with the title song written by Earl Robinson and Abel Meeropol (under the pseudonym of Lewis Allen).

Sinatra, pictured here with Eleanor Roosevelt in 1960, was an ardent supporter of the Democratic Party until 1970.

In 1948, Sinatra actively campaigned for President Harry S. Truman.[56] In 1952 and 1956, he also campaigned for Adlai Stevenson.[56] In 1956 and 1960, Sinatra sang the National Anthem at the Democratic National Convention.[] Of all the U.S. Presidents he associated with during his career, he was closest to John F. Kennedy.[] In 1960, Sinatra and his friends Peter Lawford, Dean Martin, and Sammy Davis Jr. actively campaigned for Kennedy throughout the United States;[56] On the campaign trail, Sinatra's voice was heard even if he wasn't physically present.[56] The campaign’s theme song, played before every appearance, was a newly recorded version of “High Hopes,” specially recorded by Sinatra with new lyrics saluting JFK.[] In January 1961, Sinatra and Peter Lawford organized the Inaugural Gala in Washington, DC, held on the evening before President John F. Kennedy was sworn into office.[] The event, featuring many big show business stars, was an enormous success, raising a large amount of money for the Democratic Party. Sinatra also organized an Inaugural Gala in California in 1962 to welcome second term Democratic Governor Pat Brown.[11] Sinatra's move toward the Republicans seems to have begun when he was snubbed by President Kennedy in favor of Bing Crosby,[57] a rival singer and a Republican, for Kennedy's visit to Palm Springs, in 1962. Kennedy had planned to stay at Sinatra's home over the Easter holiday weekend, but decided against doing so because of Sinatra's alleged connections to organized crime.[57] Kennedy stayed at Bing Crosby's house instead.[57] Sinatra had invested a lot of his own money in upgrading the facilities at his home in anticipation of the President's visit.[58] At the time, President Kennedy's brother, Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, was intensifying his own investigations into organized crime figures such as Chicago mob boss Sam Giancana, who had earlier stayed at Sinatra's home. Despite his break with Kennedy, however, he still mourned over Kennedy after he learned he was assassinated.[56] According to his daughter Nancy, he learned of Kennedy's assassination while filming a scene of Robin and the Seven Hoods in Burbank.[] After he learned of the assassination, Sinatra quickly finished filming the scene, returned to his Palm Springs home, and sobbed in his bedroom for three days.[] The 1968 election illustrated changes in the once solidly pro-JFK Rat Pack: Peter Lawford, Sammy Davis, Jr., and Shirley MacLaine all endorsed Robert Kennedy in the spring primaries; Sinatra, Dean Martin, and Joey Bishop backed Vice-President Hubert Humphrey. In the fall election, Sinatra appeared for Humphrey in Texas at the Houston Astrodome with President Lyndon Johnson and in a television commercial soliciting campaign contributions.[59] He also re-stated his support for Humphrey on a live election-eve national telethon.

Frank Sinatra

13

Political activities 1970–1984
In 1970, the first sign of Sinatra's break from the Democratic Party came when he endorsed Ronald Reagan for a second term as Governor of California;[43][56] Sinatra, however, remained a registered Democrat and encouraged Reagan to become more moderate.[56] In July 1972, after a lifetime of supporting Democratic presidential candidates, Sinatra announced he would support Republican U.S. President Richard Nixon for re-election in the 1972 presidential election. His switch to the Republican Party was now official;[56] he even told his daughter Tina, who had actively campaigned for Nixon's Democratic opponent George McGovern,[] "the older you get, the more conservative you get."[] Sinatra said he agreed with the Republican Party on most positions, except that of abortion.[55] During Nixon's Presidency, Sinatra visited the White House on several occasions.[] Sinatra also became good friends with Vice President Spiro Agnew. In 1973, Agnew was charged with corruption and resigned as Vice President; Sinatra helped Agnew pay some of his legal bills.[11]:458 In the 1980 presidential election, Sinatra supported Ronald Reagan, and donated $4 million to Reagan's campaign. Sinatra said he supported Reagan as he was "the proper man to be the President of the United States... it's so screwed up now, we need someone to straighten Sinatra is awarded the Presidential Medal of [43]:395 Freedom by President Ronald Reagan. it out." Reagan's victory gave Sinatra his closest relationship [56] with the White House since the early 1960s. Sinatra arranged Reagan's Presidential gala,[11]:503 as he had done for Kennedy 20 years previously. In 1984, Sinatra returned to his birthplace in Hoboken, bringing with him President Reagan, who was in the midst of campaigning for the 1984 presidential election. Reagan had made Sinatra a fund-raising ambassador as part of the Republican National Committee's "Victory '84 Get-Out-The-Vote" (GOTV) drive.[11]:560[60] On January 19, 1985, Sinatra hosted the 50th Presidential Inaugural Gala, the day before the second inauguration of Ronald Reagan.

Death
Sinatra began to show signs of dementia in his last years. After a heart attack in February 1997, he made no further public appearances. After suffering another heart attack,[7] he died at 10:50 p.m. on May 14, 1998, at the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, with his wife, Barbara, by his side.[7] He was 82 years old.[7] Sinatra's final words, spoken after Barbara encouraged him to "fight" as attempts were made to stabilize him, were, "I'm losing."[61] The official cause of death was listed as complications from dementia, heart and kidney disease, and bladder cancer.[62] His death was confirmed by the Sinatra family on their Sinatra's gravestone website with a statement accompanied by a recording of the singer's version of "Softly As I Leave You." The next night the lights on the Las Vegas Strip were dimmed for 10 minutes in his honor and the lights on the Empire State Building in New York were turned blue. President Bill Clinton, an amateur saxophonist and musician, led the world's tributes to Sinatra, saying that after meeting and getting to know the singer as president, he had "come to appreciate on a personal level what millions of people had appreciated from afar".[63] Elton John stated that Sinatra, "was simply the best – no one else even comes close".[63] On May 20, 1998, at the Roman Catholic Church of the Good Shepherd in Beverly Hills, Sinatra's funeral was held, with 400[64] mourners in attendance and hundreds of fans outside.[64] Gregory Peck,[64] Tony Bennett,[64] and Frank,

Frank Sinatra Jr., addressed the mourners, among whom were Jill St. John, Tom Selleck,[64] Joey Bishop, Faye Dunaway,[64] Tony Curtis,[64] Liza Minnelli,[64] Kirk Douglas,[64] Robert Wagner,[64] Bob Dylan, Don Rickles,[64] Nancy Reagan,[64] Angie Dickinson, Sophia Loren,[64] Bob Newhart,[64] Mia Farrow,[64] and Jack Nicholson.[61][64] A private ceremony was held later that day at St. Theresa's Catholic Church in Palm Springs. Sinatra was buried following the ceremony next to his parents in section B-8 of Desert Memorial Park[6] in Cathedral City, a quiet cemetery on Ramon Road where Cathedral City meets Rancho Mirage and near his compound, located on Rancho Mirage's tree-lined Frank Sinatra Drive.[61] His close friends, Jilly Rizzo and Jimmy Van Heusen, are buried nearby in the same cemetery. The words "The Best Is Yet to Come" are imprinted on Sinatra's grave marker.[65]

14

Legacy
"Sinatra was... the first modern pop superstar... Following his idol Bing Crosby, who had pioneered the use of the microphone, Sinatra transformed popular singing by infusing lyrics with a personal, intimate point of view that conveyed a steady current of eroticism... Almost singlehandedly, he helped lead a revival of vocalized swing music that took American pop to a new level of musical sophistication... his 1950s recordings... were instrumental in establishing a canon of American pop song literature." --Stephen Holden
[7]

The U.S. Postal Service issued a 42-cent postage stamp in honor of Sinatra on May 13, 2008.[66] The design of the stamp was unveiled Wednesday, December 12, 2007 – on what would have been his 92nd birthday – in Beverly Hills, California, with Sinatra family members on hand.[67] The design shows a 1950s-vintage image of Sinatra, wearing a hat. The design also includes his signature, with his last name alone.[67] The Hoboken Post Office was renamed in his honor in 2002.[67] The Frank Sinatra School of the Arts in Astoria, Queens and the Frank Sinatra Park in Hoboken were named in his honor. The U.S. Congress passed a resolution on May 20, 2008, designating May 13 as Frank Sinatra Day to honor his contribution to American culture. The resolution was introduced by Representative Mary Bono Mack.[68] To commemorate the anniversary of Sinatra's death, Patsy's Restaurant in New York City, which Sinatra frequented, exhibited in May 2009 fifteen previously unseen photographs of Sinatra taken by Bobby Bank.[69] The photos are of his recording "Everybody Ought to Be in Love" at a nearby recording studio.[69] Stephen Holden wrote for the 1983 Rolling Stone Record Guide: Frank Sinatra's voice is pop music history. [...] Like Presley and Dylan – the only other white male American singers since 1940 whose popularity, influence, and mythic force have been comparable – Sinatra will last indefinitely. He virtually invented modern pop song phrasing. Wynn Resorts dedicated a signature restaurant to Sinatra inside Encore Las Vegas on December 22, 2008.[70] Memorabilia in the restaurant includes his Oscar for "From Here to Eternity", his Emmy for "Frank Sinatra: A Man and His Music", his Grammy for "Strangers in the Night", photographs and a gold album he received for "Classic Sinatra". There is a residence hall at Montclair State University named for him in recognition of his status as an iconic New Jersey native.[71] The Frank Sinatra International Student Center at Israel's Hebrew University, Mt. Scopus campus, was dedicated in 1978 in recognition of Sinatra's charitable and advocacy activities on behalf of the State of Israel.

Frank Sinatra

15

Film portrayals
• In The Godfather, fictional singer Johnny Fontane, whose career was helped by organized crime boss Vito Corleone, was recognized by many, even Sinatra, as being based on his life.[72] • In 1992, CBS aired a TV mini-series about the entertainer's life called Sinatra, directed by James Steven Sadwith and starred Philip Casnoff as Sinatra. Opening with his childhood in Hoboken, New Jersey, the film follows Sinatra's rise to the top in the 1940s, through the dark days of the early 1950s and his triumphant re-emergence in the mid-1950s, to his status as pop culture icon in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. In between, the film hits all of the main events, including his three marriages, his connections with the Mafia and his notorious friendship with the Rat Pack. Tina Sinatra was executive producer. Casnoff received a Golden Globe nomination for his performance. • In 1998, Ray Liotta portrayed Sinatra in the HBO movie The Rat Pack, alongside Joe Mantegna as Dean Martin and Don Cheadle as Sammy Davis, Jr. It depicted their contribution to John F. Kennedy's election as U.S. president in 1960. • In 2003, Sinatra was portrayed by James Russo in "Stealing Sinatra", which revolved around the kidnapping of Frank Sinatra Jr. in 1963 • Also in 2003, he was portrayed by Dennis Hopper in The Night We Called It a Day, based upon events that occurred during a tour of Australia where Frank had called a member of the news media a "two-bit hooker" and all the unions in the country came crashing down on him. • Sinatra was also portrayed by Sebastian Anzaldo in the film Tears of a King, who also impersonated Sinatra in a TV episode of The Next Best Thing. • In the Emmy Award Winning 2011 miniseries, The Kennedys, Sinatra was depicted by Canadian actor Chris Diamantopoulos. • Brett Ratner is currently developing a film adaptation of George Jacobs' memoir Mr. S: My Life With Frank Sinatra.[73] Jacobs, who was Sinatra's valet, will be portrayed by Chris Tucker.[74] • Martin Scorsese is developing a biopic of Sinatra's life to be scripted by Phil Alden Robinson and produced by Scott Rudin.[75] When the film was first announced, three actors were said to be in contention for the part: Leonardo DiCaprio was Scorsese's preference, Johnny Depp was the studio's, and the Sinatra estate preferred George Clooney.[76] Scorsese later mentioned that he wanted Al Pacino for Sinatra and Robert DeNiro as Dean Martin.[77] The film covers his whole life, so three or more actors will be playing him at different ages.[78]

References
[1] "Frank Sinatra" (http:/ / www. hollywood. com/ celebrity/ Frank_Sinatra/ 192093#fullBio). Hollywood.com. . Retrieved May 15, 2008. [2] "Frank Sinatra obituary" (http:/ / news. bbc. co. uk/ 2/ hi/ special_report/ 1998/ 05/ 98/ sinatra/ 67911. stm). BBC News. May 16, 1998. . Retrieved May 15, 2008. [3] Music Genre: Vocal music (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ explore/ genre/ d131). Allmusic. Retrieved October 23, 2008. [4] Gigliotti, Gilbert L. A Storied Singer: Frank Sinatra as Literary Conceit [5] Ruhlmann, William. "Frank Sinatra" (http:/ / www. mtv. com/ music/ artist/ sinatra_frank/ artist. jhtml#bio). MTV. . Retrieved May 15, 2008. [6] Palm Springs Cemetery District "Interment Information (http:/ / www. pscemetery. com/ pdfs/ interments. pdf) [7] Holden, Stephen (May 16, 1998). "Frank Sinatra Dies at 82; Matchless Stylist of Pop" (http:/ / www. nytimes. com/ learning/ general/ onthisday/ bday/ 1212. html). On This Day. . Retrieved March 29, 2011. [8] "Frank Sinatra Biography (1915–1998)" (http:/ / www. filmreference. com/ film/ 39/ Frank-Sinatra. html). Film reference. . Retrieved July 18, 2009. [9] "Frank Sinatra Has a Cold" (http:/ / www. esquire. com/ features/ ESQ1003-OCT_SINATRA_rev_?click=main_sr). Esquire (magazine). October 8, 2007. . Retrieved October 12, 2010. [10] Summers, Anthony; Swan, Robbyn (2005). Sinatra: The Life. New York: Alfred A. Knopf. ISBN 0-375-41400-2. [11] Kelley, Kitty (1986). His Way: Frank Sinatra, the Unauthorized Biography. ISBN 978‐0‐553‐05137‐7. [12] "Sinatra" (http:/ / www. thesmokinggun. com/ mugshots/ sinatramug1. html). Mug Shots of the Week. The Smoking Gun. . [13] O'Brien, Geoffrey (February 10, 2011). "Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man" (http:/ / www. nybooks. com/ articles/ archives/ 2011/ feb/ 10/ portrait-artist-young-man/ ?pagination=false). The New York Review of Books. . Retrieved January 24, 2011. [14] Nelson, Michael (Autumn 1999). Frank Sinatra: the Loneliness of the Long Distance Singer (http:/ / www. vqronline. org/ articles/ 1999/ autumn/ nelson-frank-sinatra/ ). VQR online. . [15] Ingham, Chris. The Rough Guide to Frank Sinatra. Rough Guides. June 30, 2005. ISBN 1-84353-414-2, p. 9.

Frank Sinatra
[16] Gilliland, John (June 8, 1969). "Part 1" (http:/ / digital. library. unt. edu/ ark:/ 67531/ metadc19775/ m1/ ). Pop Chronicles. UNT Digital Library. . [17] Ridgeway, John (1991) [1978]. The SinatraFile. Part 2 (2nd ed.). John Ridgway Books. ISBN 978-0‐905808‐08‐6. [18] "Frank Sinatra" (http:/ / www. rollingstone. com/ music/ artists/ frank-sinatra/ biography). Artists (Rolling Stone). . Retrieved September 19, 2011. [19] Sinatra, Nancy (1986). Frank Sinatra, My Father. Doubleday. ISBN 978-0-385-23356-9. [20] Ridgeway, John (1977). The SinatraFile. Part 1 (1st ed.). John Ridgway Books. ISBN 0-905808-00-2. [21] "Frank Sinatra and the 'bobby-soxers'" (http:/ / century. guardian. co. uk/ 1940-1949/ Story/ 0,,127764,00. html). The Guardian (London). January 10, 1945. Retrieved June 2, 2012. [22] Peters, Richard (1982). Frank Sinatra Scrapbook. New York: St. Martins Press. pp. 123, 157. [23] (CD booklet) Frank Sinatra: The Columbia Years: 1943–1952, The Complete Recordings. 1. 1993. [24] Santopietro, Tom (2008). Sinatra in Hollywood. New York: Macmillan/Thomas Dunne Books. p. 45. ISBN 978-0-312-36226-3. [25] Newton, Michael (2003). The FBI Encyclopedia. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Co. p. 314. ISBN 978-0-7864-1718-6. [26] Erenberg, Lewis A. (1999). Swing-in' the Dream. Chicago, Illinois: University of Chicago Press. p. 197. ISBN 978-0-226-21517-4. [27] Fuchs, Jeanne, and Ruth Prigozy (2007). Frank Sinatra: The Man, the Music, the Legend. Rochester, New York: University of Rochester Press. p. 136. ISBN 978-1-58046-251-8. [28] Holland, Bill (December 19, 1998). Billboard. Volume 110, Number 51. p. 10. [29] "Frank Sinatra" (http:/ / vault. fbi. gov/ Frank Sinatra). Vault. USA: FBI. , 2 403 pp. [30] Andrews, Maxene and Bill Gilbert: "The Andrews Sisters and the USO Stars in World War Two;" New York, Kensington, Zebra Books, 1993, 260 pages. [31] Sforza, John: "Swing It! The Andrews Sisters Story;" University Press of Kentucky, 2000; 289 pages. [32] Kaplan, James (2010). Frank the Voice. Doubleday. [33] Schmidt, M.A. "Best Pictures: From Here to Eternity" (http:/ / www. nytimes. com/ packages/ html/ movies/ bestpictures/ eternity-ar. html). The New York Times. May 9, 1954. [34] Rocky Fortune (http:/ / www. archive. org/ details/ OTRR_Rocky_Fortune_Singles) Old Time Radio Researchers Group, Archive.org. Retrieved April 9, 2009. [35] 5 Enemies of Rock 'n' Roll (http:/ / www. ew. com/ ew/ article/ 0,,318545,00. html) Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved March 31, 2009. [36] Khurana, Simran. "Quotes About Elvis Presley" (http:/ / quotations. about. com/ od/ stillmorefamouspeople/ a/ elvispresley3. htm). about.com. Retrieved on October 14, 2007. [37] Hopkins, J. (2007). Elvis. The Biography, Plexus. p. 126 [38] The TIME 100 (http:/ / www. time. com/ time/ time100/ artists/ profile/ sinatra2. html). Retrieved March 31, 2009. [39] Martin, Douglas. "Lee Solters, Razzle-Dazzle Press Agent, Dies at 89" (http:/ / www. nytimes. com/ 2009/ 05/ 22/ theater/ 22solters. html), The New York Times, May 21, 2009. Accessed May 22, 2009. [40] Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. Watertown (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r187805). allmusic.com. Retrieved December 19, 2006. [41] " She Shot Me Down (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26337). Allmusic.com. Retrieved November 28, 2006. [42] "Frank Sinatra: He held the 'patent' for the popular song" (http:/ / www. cnn. com/ fyi/ school. tools/ profiles/ Frank. Sinatra/ student. storypage. html). Profiles (CNN). . Retrieved November 5, 2011. [43] Freedland, Michael. All the Way: A biography of Frank Sinatra. St Martin's Press, 2000. ISBN 0-7528-1662-4. [44] Bono On Sinatra's Legacy (http:/ / www. mtv. com/ news/ articles/ 1434089/ 19980515/ sinatra_frank. jhtml). MTV.com. May 15, 1998. [45] Bono at Grammy's 1994(Sinatra) (http:/ / www. trilulilu. ro/ beugen2001/ 83ee4ac391fbe8?video_google_com=) – Trilulilu Video TV. Retrieved March 5, 2009. [46] Pareles, Jon (March 2, 1994). "Top Grammy to Houston; 5 for 'Aladdin'" (http:/ / www. nytimes. com/ 1994/ 03/ 02/ movies/ top-grammy-to-houston-5-for-aladdin. html?pagewanted=all). The New York Times. . Retrieved February 15, 2012. [47] "The Gaming Hall of Fame" (http:/ / gaming. unlv. edu/ hof/ index. html). University of Nevada Las Vegas. . Retrieved August 30, 2009. [48] Sinatra, Tina; Coplon, Jeff (2000). My Father's Daughter: A Memoir. New York: Simon & Schuster. p. 47. ISBN 0-684-87076-2. [49] Stahl, Jason (2010-05-12). "Why Sinatra Hated Hobokenites - Hoboken, NJ Patch" (http:/ / hoboken. patch. com/ articles/ remembering-sinatra). Hoboken.patch.com. . Retrieved 2012-04-25. [50] "Frank Sinatra" (http:/ / foia. fbi. gov/ foiaindex/ sinatra. htm). Federal Bureau of Investigation. . Retrieved May 12, 2008. [51] "Mafia reports dogged Sinatra" (http:/ / news. bbc. co. uk/ 2/ hi/ special_report/ 1998/ 05/ 98/ sinatra/ 94360. stm). News (BBC). May 15, 1998. . Retrieved May 15, 2008. [52] "Sinatra: The FBI Files" (http:/ / www. npr. org/ templates/ story/ story. php?storyId=1075739). NPR. . Retrieved June 14, 2008. [53] "AKA Frank Sinatra" (http:/ / www. washingtonpost. com/ wp-srv/ national/ daily/ march99/ sinatra7. htm). The Washington Post Magazine. March 6, 1999. . Retrieved June 14, 2008. [54] Sinatra: The Life, Anthony Summers and Robbyn Swan, p. 16 [55] Smith, Martin (2005). When Ol' Blue Eyes was a Red. Redwords. ISBN 1-905192-02-9. [56] Steve Pond (1991-07-04). "Frank Sinatra and Politics" (http:/ / web. archive. org/ web/ 20110515000915/ http:/ / www. sinatra. com/ legacy/ frank-sinatra-and-politics). Legacy. Sinatra.com. Archived from the original (http:/ / www. sinatra. com/ legacy/ frank-sinatra-and-politics) on 2011-05-15. . Retrieved 2011-07-04.

16

Frank Sinatra
[57] "Peter Lawford's grave" (http:/ / www. hollywoodusa. co. uk/ WestwoodObituaries/ peterlawford. htm). UK: Hollywood, USA. . Retrieved 2011-07-04. [58] "Frank Sinatra Turned Violent After Kennedy Snub" (http:/ / www. contactmusic. com/ new/ xmlfeed. nsf/ story/ sinatra-turned-violent-after-kennedy-snub). Contact Music. . Retrieved 2011-07-04. [59] Humphrey campaign ad (http:/ / www. livingroomcandidate. org/ commercials/ 1968/ frank-sinatra). Livingroom candidate. 1968. [60] "Victory (year)" and "Get-Out-The-Vote" is a specific proper name for a particular campaign/election activity. [61] Hollywood bids Sinatra last farewell (http:/ / www. cnn. com/ SHOWBIZ/ Music/ 9805/ 20/ sinatra. funeral. early/ index. html). CNN.com. Retrieved November 24, 2006. [62] "Frank Sinatra Pictures, Biography, Profile, Facts, Discography, Filmography, more" (http:/ / www. numberonestars. com/ musiclegends/ franksinatra. htm). Numberonestars.com. . Retrieved 2011-07-04. [63] "Clinton leads Sinatra tributes" (http:/ / news. bbc. co. uk/ 2/ hi/ special_report/ 1998/ 05/ 98/ sinatra/ 94559. stm). BBC News. May 16, 1998. . Retrieved November 24, 2006. [64] "Special Report: Final curtain for Sinatra" (http:/ / news. bbc. co. uk/ 2/ hi/ special_report/ 1998/ 05/ 98/ sinatra/ 97196. stm). BBC News. May 20, 1998. . Retrieved May 15, 2008. [65] "Frank Sinatra" (http:/ / www. findagrave. com/ cgi-bin/ fg. cgi?page=gr& GRid=2953). singer, actor, entertainer. Find a Grave. January 01, 2001. . Retrieved June 29, 2011. [66] Fusilli, Jim (May 13, 2008). "Sinatra as Idol – Not Artist" (http:/ / online. wsj. com/ article/ SB121063311685686579. html?mod=googlenews_wsj). Wall Street Journal. . Retrieved May 15, 2008. [67] "Postal Service to immortalize ‘Ol’ Blue Eyes’" (http:/ / www. reuters. com/ article/ 2007/ 12/ 05/ idUS202395+ 05-Dec-2007+ PRN20071205) (Press release). United States Postal Service. December 5, 2007. . Retrieved January 29, 2012. "Frank Sinatra, one of the most iconic entertainers of the 20th century, will be commemorated on a postage stamp next spring, Postmaster General John Potter announced today." [68] Bono Mack, Mary (May 20, 2008). "Frank Sinatra Day" (http:/ / bono. house. gov/ News/ DocumentSingle. aspx?DocumentID=91885). . [69] "Why Sinatra Liked Patsy's Restaurant" (http:/ / cityroom. blogs. nytimes. com/ 2009/ 05/ 11/ why-sinatra-liked-patsys-restaurant/ ). The New York Times. May 11, 2009. . [70] "Opening of Sinatra" (http:/ / www. wynnpressroom. com/ index. php?s=23& cat=27). Wynn Resorts. n.d.. . Retrieved December 1, 2009. [71] "'Montclair State University Campus Map'" (http:/ / www. montclair. edu/ map/ index. php?FontSize=10& w=950& h=494& x=2369. 33333333& y=335& Zoom=0& Building=CLR). Montclair State University. August 18, 2010. . Retrieved August 18, 2010. [72] Santopietro, Tom (2012). The Godfather Effect: Changing Hollywood, America, and Me (http:/ / books. google. com/ books?id=YhdU8thA6eEC& pg=PT148). Macmillan. pp. 148–153. ISBN 1-4299-5262-8. . [73] S.T. VanAirsdale (April 16, 2009). "EXCLUSIVE: Brett Ratner Helps Us Clean Up His IMDB Profile" (http:/ / www. movieline. com/ 2009/ 04/ exclusive-brett-ratner-helps-us-clean-up-his-imdb-profile. php). MovieLine.com. . Retrieved August 19, 2009. [74] "Ratner To Tell Sinatra Valet Story With Tucker" (http:/ / www. imdb. com/ name/ nm2383924/ news#ni0261933). WENN. July 15, 2008. . Retrieved August 19, 2009. [75] Merchan, George (2011-03-08). "Super-producer Scott Rudin to inject new life in Martin Scorsese's Sinatra biopic? - Movie News" (http:/ / www. joblo. com/ movie-news/ super-producer-scott-rudin-to-inject-new-life-in-martin-scorseses-sinatra-biopic). JoBlo.com. . Retrieved 2011-07-04. [76] Gallagher, Paul (October 25, 2009). "George Clooney, Leonardo DiCaprio and Johnny Depp battle to play Frank Sinatra their way" (http:/ / www. guardian. co. uk/ film/ 2009/ oct/ 25/ george-johnny-leo-scorsese-sinatra). The Guardian (London). . [77] "‘Content has taken a backseat'" (http:/ / www. hindu. com/ fr/ 2010/ 05/ 21/ stories/ 2010052150020100. htm). The Hindu (Chennai, India). May 21, 2010. . [78] "Scorsese interview / Entertainment / ShortList Magazine" (http:/ / www. shortlist. com/ entertainment/ scorsese-speaks). Shortlist.com. . Retrieved 2011-07-04.

17

Further reading
Biographies
• • • • • Freedland, Michael (2000) All the Way: A Biography of Frank Sinatra. St Martins Press. ISBN 0-7528-1662-4 Grudens, Richard (2010) Sinatra Singing. Celebrity Profiles Publishing. ISBN 978-0-9763877-8-7 Havers, Richard (2004) Sinatra. Dorling Kindersley. ISBN 1-4053-1461-3 Kaplan, James (2010) Frank: The Voice. Doubleday. ISBN 978-0-385-51804-8 Kelley, Kitty (1986) His Way: The Unauthorized Biography of Frank Sinatra. Bantam Press. ISBN 0-553-26515-6

• Lahr, John (1987) Sinatra. Random House. ISBN 0-7538-0842-0 • Munn, Michael (2002) Sinatra: The Untold Story. Robson Books Ltd. ISBN 1-86105-537-4

Frank Sinatra • • • • • • Rockwell, John (1984) Sinatra: An American Classic. Rolling Stone. ISBN 0-394-53977-X Rojek, Chris (2004) Frank Sinatra. Polity. ISBN 0-7456-3090-1 Santopietro, Tom (2008) Sinatra In Hollywood. Thomas Dunne Books. ISBN 978-0-312-36226-3 Summers, Antony and Swan, Robbyn (2005) Sinatra: The Life. Doubleday. ISBN 0-552-15331-1 Taraborrelli, J. Randall (1998) Sinatra: The Man Behind the Myth. Mainstream Publishing. ISBN 1-84018-119-2 Wilson, Earl (1976) Sinatra.

18

Memoirs
• Ash, Vic. (2006) I Blew it My Way: Bebop, Big Bands and Sinatra. Northway Publications. ISBN 0-9550908-2-2 • Jacobs, George and Stadiem, William. (2003) Mr. S.: The Last Word on Frank Sinatra. HarperCollins. ISBN 0-330-41229-9 • Falcone, Vincent (2005). Frankly – Just Between Us: My Life Conducting Frank Sinatra's Music. Hal Leonard. ISBN 978-0‐634‐09498‐9.

Criticism
• Fuchs, J. & Prigozy, R., ed. (2007) Frank Sinatra: The Man, the Music, the Legend. The Boydell Press. ISBN 1-58046-251-0 • Granata, Charles L. (1999) Sessions with Sinatra: Frank Sinatra and the Art of Recording. Chicago Review Press. ISBN 978-1-55652-509-4 • Hamill, Pete (2003) Why Sinatra Matters. Back Bay Books. ISBN 0-316-73886-7 • Mustazza, Leonard, ed. (1998) Frank Sinatra and Popular Culture. Praeger. ISBN 0-275-96495-7 • Petkov, Steven and Mustazza, Leonard, ed. (1997) The Frank Sinatra Reader. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-511389-6 • Pugliese, S., ed. (2004) Frank Sinatra: "History, Identity, and Italian American Culture ". Palgrave. ISBN 1-4039-6655-9 • Smith, Martin (2005) When Ol' Blue Eyes Was a Red. Redwords. ISBN 1-905192-02-9 • Zehme, Bill (1997) The Way You Wear Your Hat: Frank Sinatra and the Lost Art of Livin'. Harper Collins. ISBN 0-06-093175-2 • "Frank Sinatra – Through the Lens of Jazz" (http://www.jazzsingers.com/FrankSinatra/), Jazz Times Magazine, May 1998 • Friedwald, Will (1999) Sinatra! The Song Is You: A Singer's Art. Da Capo Press. ISBN 0-684-19368-X • Granata, Charles L. (1999) Sessions with Sinatra: Frank Sinatra and the Art of Recording. Chicago Review Press. ISBN 1-55652-509-5 • McNally, Karen (2008) When Frankie Went to Hollywood: Frank Sinatra and American Male Identity University of Illinois Press. ISBN 0-252-03334-5 • Pignone, Charles, with foreword by Sinatra, Frank Jr. and Jones, Quincy (2004) The Sinatra Treasures. Virgin Books. ISBN 1-85227-184-1 • Pignone, Charles, with foreword by Sinatra, Amanda (2007) Frank Sinatra: The Family Album Little Brown and Company. ISBN 0-316-00349-2 • Sinatra, Julie (2007) Under My Skin: My Father, Frank Sinatra The Man Behind the Mystique iuniverse.com, ISBN 0-595-43478-9 • Sinatra, Nancy (1986) Frank Sinatra, My Father. Doubleday. ISBN 978-0-385-23356-9 • Sinatra, Nancy (1998) Frank Sinatra 1915–1998: An American Legend. Readers Digest. ISBN 0-7621-0134-2 • Sinatra, Tina (2000) My Father's Daughter. Simon & Schuster. ISBN 0-684-87076-2

Frank Sinatra

19

Cultural criticism
• • • • • • • Gigliotti, Gilbert L. A Storied Singer: Frank Sinatra as Literary Conceit. Greenwood Press, 2002. Hamill, Pete. Why Sinatra Matters. Back Bay Books, 2003. Mustazza, Leonard, ed. Frank Sinatra and Popular Culture. Praeger, 1998. Petkov, Steven and Mustazza, Leonard, ed. The Frank Sinatra Reader. Oxford University Press, 1997. Pugliese, S., ed. Frank Sinatra: "History, Identity, and Italian American Culture ". Palgrave, 2004. Smith, Martin. When Ol' Blue Eyes was a red. Redwords, 2005. Zehme, Bill. The Way You Wear Your Hat: Frank Sinatra and the Lost Art of Livin'. Harper Collins, 1997.

Other
• • • • • • Gigliotti, Gilbert L., ed. (2008) Sinatra: But Buddy I'm a Kind of Poem. Entasis Press ISBN 978-0-9800999-0-4 Giordmaina, Diane [McCue] (2009) "Sinatra and The Moll". iUniverse. ISBN 978-0-595-53234-6 Havers, Richard (2004) Sinatra. Dorling Kindersley. ISBN 1-4053-1461-3 Ingham, Chris (2005) The Rough Guide to Frank Sinatra. Rough Guides. ISBN 1-84353-414-2 Knight, Timothy (2010) Sinatra – Hollywood His Way. Running Press. ISBN 978-0-7624-3743-6 Kuntz, Tom; Kuntz, Phil (2000) The Sinatra Files: The Secret FBI Dossier. Three Rivers Press ISBN 0-8129-3276-5

• Lloyd, David (2003) The Gospel According to Frank. New American Press. ISBN 1-930907-19-2 • O'Neill, Terry, ed. Morgan, Robert (2007) Sinatra: Frank and Friendly. Evans Mitchell Books. ISBN 1-901268-32-2 • Phasey, Chris (1995) Francis Albert Sinatra: Tracked Down (Discography). Buckland Publications. ISBN 0-7212-0935-1 • The New Rolling Stone Record Guide, Rolling Stone Press, 1983.

External links
• • • • • • • Official website (http://www.sinatra.com) Frank Sinatra (http://www.discogs.com/artist/Frank+Sinatra) discography at Discogs Frank Sinatra (http://www.ibdb.com/person.asp?ID=79640) at the Internet Broadway Database Frank Sinatra (http://www.imdb.com/name/nm69/) at the Internet Movie Database Frank Sinatra (http://www.dmoz.org/Arts/People/S/Sinatra,_Frank/) at the Open Directory Project The House I Live In (1945) (http://www.archive.org/details/TheHouseILiveIn) The Frank Sinatra Show (1950–1952) (http://www.archive.org/details/ Lbines-RetroVisionTheaterPresentsTheFrankSinatraShow870) • Frank Sinatra (http://digital.library.unt.edu/explore/partners/UNTML/browse/?start=21& fq=untl_collection:JGPC) interviewed on the Pop Chronicles (1969). • FBI file on Frank Sinatra (http://vault.fbi.gov/Frank Sinatra)

20

Discography
Frank Sinatra discography
Frank Sinatra discography Releases ↙Studio albums ↙Live albums ↙Compilation albums ↙Singles 59 2 8 297

This article contains a listing of Frank Sinatra's albums (original LPs and collections) and singles from his career. An alphabetical listing of songs recorded by Sinatra with year(s) of recording can be found in the article List of songs recorded by Frank Sinatra.

Albums
Studio albums
Columbia Records introduced the LP album on June 21, 1948; prior to that albums were collections of 78s in a booklet resembling a photo album, rarely more than four records to a set. Sinatra's Capitol studio albums were released on Concepts (1992), and his entire Capitol recordings released on the 1998 album The Capitol Years.
Columbia albums Year Title Peak chart positions US 1946 The Voice of Frank Sinatra • Released: March 4, 1946 2 — 1 UK — Certifications [1] (sales thresholds)

1947 Songs by Sinatra • Released: April, 1947

1948 Christmas Songs by Sinatra • Released: 1948

1949 Frankly Sentimental • Released: June 20, 1949

1950 Dedicated to You • Released: March, 1950

Swing and Dance with Frank Sinatra • Released: October 16, 1950 Capitol albums

Frank Sinatra discography

21
Title Peak chart positions US UK —

Year

Certifications [1] (sales thresholds)

1954 Songs for Young Lovers • Released: January, 1954

3

Swing Easy! • Released: August 2, 1954

3

5

1955 In the Wee Small Hours • Released: April, 1955

2

RIAA: Gold

1956 Songs for Swingin' Lovers! • Released: March, 1956

2

1

RIAA: Gold

1957 Close to You • Released: January, 1957

5

2

A Swingin' Affair! • Released: June, 1957

7

1

Where Are You? • Released: September, 1957

3

A Jolly Christmas from Frank Sinatra • Released: September, 1957

18

RIAA: Platinum

1958 Come Fly with Me • Released: January, 1958

1

2

RIAA: Gold

Frank Sinatra Sings for Only the Lonely • Released: September, 1958

1

5

RIAA: Gold

1959 Come Dance with Me! • Released: January, 1959

2

2

RIAA: Gold

No One Cares • Released: July, 1959

7

1960 Nice 'n' Easy • Released: July, 1960

1

4

RIAA: Gold

1961 Sinatra's Swingin' Session!!! • Released: January, 1961

6

6

Come Swing with Me! • Released: July, 1961

12

13

1962 Point of No Return • Released: March, 1962 Reprise albums Year Title

18

Peak chart positions US UK

Certifications [1] (sales thresholds)

Frank Sinatra discography

22
6 9

1961 Ring-a-Ding-Ding! • Released: March, 1961

Swing Along With Me (retitled Sinatra Swings) • Released: July, 1961

6

8

I Remember Tommy • Released: October, 1961

5

10

1962 Sinatra and Strings • Released: January, 1962

8

6

Sinatra and Swingin' Brass • Released: July, 1962

19

14

All Alone • Released: October, 1962

26

Sinatra Sings Great Songs from Great Britain • Released: November, 1962

12

Sinatra–Basie: An Historic Musical First (with Count Basie) • Released: December 10, 1962

16

2

1963 The Concert Sinatra • Released: May, 1963

11

8

Sinatra's Sinatra • Released: August, 1963

8

7

RIAA: Gold

1964 Sinatra Sings Days of Wine and Roses, Moon River, and Other Academy Award Winners • Released: March, 1964

10

America, I Hear You Singing (with Bing Crosby and Fred Waring) • Released: April, 1964

116

It Might as Well Be Swing (with Quincy Jones) • Released: August, 1964

13

17

12 Songs of Christmas (with Bing Crosby and Fred Waring) • Released: August, 1964

Softly, as I Leave You • Released: November, 1964

19

20

1965 September of My Years • Released: October, 1965

5

RIAA: Gold

My Kind of Broadway • Released: November, 1965

30

A Man and His Music • Released: November, 1965

9

RIAA: Platinum

1966 Moonlight Sinatra • Released: March, 1966

34

Strangers in the Night • Released: May, 1966

1

4

RIAA: Platinum

That's Life • Released: November, 1966

6

22

RIAA: Gold

Frank Sinatra discography

23
19 —

1967 Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim (with Antonio Carlos Jobim) • Released: March, 1967

The World We Knew • Released: August, 1967

24

28

1968 Francis A. & Edward K. (with Duke Ellington) • Released: January, 1968

78

The Sinatra Family Wish You a Merry Christmas (with his children) • Released: September, 1968

Cycles • Released: November, 1968

18

RIAA: Gold

1969 My Way • Released: March, 1969

11

2

RIAA: Gold

A Man Alone • Released: August, 1969

30

18

1970 Watertown • Released: March, 1970

104

14

1971 Sinatra & Company (with Antonio Carlos Jobim) • Released: March, 1971

74

9

1973 Ol’ Blue Eyes Is Back • Released: September, 1973

13

12

RIAA: Gold

1974 Some Nice Things I've Missed • Released: July, 1974

48

35

1980 Trilogy: Past Present Future • Released: March, 1980

17

RIAA: Gold

1981 She Shot Me Down • Released: November, 1981 Qwest albums Year Title

52

Peak chart positions US UK 41

Certifications [1] (sales thresholds)

1984 L.A. Is My Lady • Released: August, 1984 Last Capitol albums Year Title

58

Peak chart positions US UK 5

Certifications [1] (sales thresholds)

1993 Duets • Released: November 2, 1993

2

RIAA: 3× Platinum CRIA: 2× [2] Platinum [2] RIAA: Platinum CRIA: Platinum

1994 Duets II • Released: November 15, 1994

9

29

"—" denotes a title that did not chart or was not released in that territory.

Frank Sinatra discography

24

Compilation albums
Capitol albums Year Title Peak chart positions US 1956 This Is Sinatra! • Released: November, 1956 8 3 8 UK 1 Certifications [1] (sales thresholds) RIAA: Gold

1958 This Is Sinatra Volume 2 • Released: March, 1958

1959 Look to Your Heart • Released: April, 1959

8

5

1959 The Rare Sinatra (Frank Sinatra album) • Released: 1959

1961 All the Way • Released: March, 1961

4

1962 Sinatra Sings of Love and Things • Released: July, 1962

21

Reprise albums Year Title Peak chart positions US 1965 Sinatra '65: The Singer Today • Released: June, 1965 55 — RIAA: 2× Platinum 9 UK — Certifications [1] (sales thresholds)

1968 Frank Sinatra's Greatest Hits • Released: August, 1968

1972 Frank Sinatra's Greatest Hits, Vol. 2 • Released: May, 1972

88

5

RIAA: Platinum

"—" denotes a title that did not chart or was not released in that territory.

Live albums
Reprise albums Year Title Peak chart positions US 1966 Sinatra at the Sands (with Count Basie) • Released: July, 1966 37 30 RIAA: Gold 9 UK 7 Certifications [1] (sales thresholds) RIAA: Gold

1974 The Main Event – Live • Released: October, 1974 Post-career albums Year Title

Peak chart positions US UK —

Certifications [1] (sales thresholds)

1994 Sinatra & Sextet: Live in Paris • Released: March 22, 1994

Frank Sinatra discography

25
— —

1995 Sinatra 80th: Live in Concert • Released: November 14, 1995

1997 Frank Sinatra with the Red Norvo Quintet: Live in Australia, 1959 • Released: April 8, 1997

1999 Sinatra '57 in Concert • Released: April 6, 1999

2005 Live from Las Vegas (Frank Sinatra album) • Released: April 26, 2005

2006 Sinatra: Vegas • Released: November 7, 2006

165

2009 Live at the Meadowlands • Released: May 5, 2009

Sinatra: New York • Released: November 3, 2009

2011 Best of Vegas • Released: February 8, 2011 Ratpack albums Year Title

Peak chart positions US UK —

Certifications [1] (sales thresholds)

1993 Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Sammy Davis Jr. at Villa Venice, Chicago - Live 1962 • Released: 1993

1999 Frank, Sammy & Dean: The Summit in Concert • Released: 1999

2001 The Rat Pack Live at the Sands • Released: 1999

2002 Ratpack: From Vegas to St. Louis • Released: 2002

Christmas with the Rat Pack • Released: October 22, 2002

2003 The Ultimate Rat Pack Collection: Live & Swingin' • Released: 2003

"—" denotes a title that did not chart or was not released in that territory.

Albums conducted by Sinatra

Frank Sinatra discography

26

Year

Title

1946 Frank Sinatra Conducts the Music of Alec Wilder • Released: 1946

1956 Frank Sinatra Conducts Tone Poems of Color • Released: 1956

1957 The Man I Love (sung by Peggy Lee, arranged by Nelson Riddle) • Released: March, 1957

1958 Sleep Warm (sung by Dean Martin, arranged by Pete King) • Released: March 2, 1959

1962 Frank Sinatra Conducts Music from Pictures and Plays (arranged by Harry Sukman) • Released: 2011 on Abbey Rd with the help of Norman Oliver the Third

1982 Syms by Sinatra (sung by Sylvia Syms, arranged by Don Costa) • Released: 1982

1983 Whats New? (with trumpeter Charles Turner) • Released: 1983

Box sets and collections
RCA Records
• • • • • • 1957 Frank and Tommy (Sinatra/Dorsey) 1988 All-Time Greatest Hits Vol.1 (Sinatra/Dorsey) 1994 The Song Is You (Sinatra/Dorsey) [5-Disc] 1996 Frank Sinatra & Tommy Dorsey - Greatest Hits 1998 Frank Sinatra & the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra [3-Disc] 2005 The Essential Frank Sinatra with the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra [2-Disc]

Columbia Records
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 1953 Get Happy! 1955 Frankie 1956 The Voice 1956 That Old Feeling 1957 Adventures of the Heart 1957 Christmas Dreaming 1958 Love Is a Kick 1958 The Broadway Kick 1958 Put Your Dreams Away 1958 The Frank Sinatra Story in Music 1959 Come Back to Sorrento 1966 Greatest Hits: The Early Years 1966 Greatest Hits: The Early Years Volume Two 1968 Someone to Watch Over Me 1968 In Hollywood 1943-1949 1972 In The Beginning: 1943 To 1951 [2-LP] 1986 The Voice: The Columbia Years (1943-1952) [6-LP]

Frank Sinatra discography • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 1987 Hello Young Lovers 1988 Sinatra Rarities: The Columbia Years 1993 The Columbia Years 1943-1952: The Complete Recordings [12-Disc] 1994 The Columbia Years 1943–1952: The V-Discs [2-Disc] 1994 The Essence of Frank Sinatra 1995 16 Most Requested Songs 1995 The Complete Recordings Nineteen Thirty-Nine (Harry James & His Orchestra featuring Frank Sinatra) 1995 I've Got a Crush on You 1996 Sinatra Sings Rodgers and Hammerstein 1997 Frank Sinatra Sings His Greatest Hits 1997 Portrait of Sinatra: Columbia Classics [2-Disc] 1998 The Best of the Columbia Years: 1943-1952 [4-Disc] 2000 Super Hits 2001 Love Songs 2003 The Essential Frank Sinatra: The Columbia Years 2003 The Real Complete Columbia Years V-Discs [3-Disc] 2003 Sinatra Sings Cole Poter

27

• 2003 Sinatra Sings George Gershwin • 2007 A Voice in Time: 1939-1952 [4-Disc] • 2009 From the Heart

Capitol Records
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 1956 This Is Sinatra! 1958 This Is Sinatra Volume 2 1959 Look to Your Heart 1960 Swing Easy 1961 Look Over Your Shoulder 1961 All the Way 1962 The Great Years [3-LP] 1962 Sinatra Sings...of Love and Things 1963 Sinatra Sings the Select Johnny Mercer 1963 Sings Rodgers and Hart 1963 Tell Her You Love Her 1964 The Great Hits of Frank Sinatra 1965 Sings the Select Cole Porter 1966 Forever Frank 1967 Nevertheless I'm in Love With You 1967 Songs for the Young at Heart 1967 The Nearness of You 1967 Try a Little Tenderness 1968 The Best Of Frank Sinatra 1972 The Cole Porter Songbook 1972 The Great Years [3-LP] 1974 One More for the Road 1974 Round # 1

• 1988 Screen Sinatra • 1989 The Capitol Collectors Series

Frank Sinatra discography • • • • • • • • • • • 1990 The Capitol Years [3-Disc] 1992 Concepts [16-Disc] 1992 The Best of the Capitol Years 1995 Sinatra 80th: All the Best [2-Disc] 1996 The Complete Capitol Singles Collection [4-Disc] 1998 The Capitol Years [21-Disc, UK] 2000 Classic Sinatra: His Greatest Performances 1953-1960 2002 Classic Duets 2007 Romance: Songs From the Heart 2008 Sinatra at the Movies 2009 Classic Sinatra II

28

Reprise Records
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 1965 Sinatra '65: The Singer Today 1965 A Man and His Music 1965 My Kind of Broadway 1966 A Man and His Music (Part II): The Frank Sinatra CBS Television Special 1968 Frank Sinatra's Greatest Hits 1972 Frank Sinatra's Greatest Hits, Vol. 2 1977 Portrait of Sinatra - Forty Songs from the Life of a Man 1979 Sinatra-Jobim Sessions 1983 New York New York: His Greatest Hits 1990 The Reprise Collection [4-Disc] 1991 Sinatra Reprise: The Very Good Years 1992 Sinatra: Soundtrack To The CBS Mini-Series [2-Disc] 1994 The Sinatra Christmas Album 1995 The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings 1996 Everything Happens to Me 1997 The Very Best of Frank Sinatra [2-Disc] 1997 My Way: The Best of Frank Sinatra [2-Disc] 1998 Lucky Numbers 2000 Reprise Musical Repertory Theatre [4-Disc] 2002 Frank Sinatra in Hollywood 1940-1964 2002 Greatest Love Songs 2004 Frank Sinatra Christmas Collection 2004 Romance 2008 Nothing But the Best

Frank Sinatra discography

29

Rhino Records
• 2009 Seduction: Sinatra Sings of Love [2-Disc]

Star Mark Compilations
• 2008 Frank Sinatra - Greatest Hits

Shout! Factory
• 2010 Frank Sinatra: Concert Collection (7 DVD box set)

Tribute albums to Sinatra
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • A Jazz Portrait of Frank Sinatra by Oscar Peterson (1959) Very Sinatra by Ruby Braff (1981) Perfectly Frank by Tony Bennett (1992) As I Remember It by Frank Sinatra, Jr. (1996) Manilow Sings Sinatra by Barry Manilow (1998) Blue Eyes Plays Ol' Blue Eyes by Si Zentner & Orchestra (1998) Keely Sings Sinatra by Keely Smith (2001) Plays Sinatra His Way by Joey DeFrancesco (2004) Allow Us to Be Frank by Westlife (2004) Songs of Sinatra by Steve Tyrell (2005) Blue Eyes Meets Bed-Stuy The Notorious B.I.G. & Frank Sinatra by Jon Moskowitz and Dj Cappel & Smitty (2005) L'allieva by Mina (2005) Bolton Swings Sinatra by Michael Bolton (2006) Dear Mr. Sinatra by John Pizzarelli (2006) Ray Stevens Sings Sinatra...Say What?? by Ray Stevens (2008) His Way, Our Way on ITunes (2009) Sinatraland by Patrick Williams and his Big Band (1998) Steve Lawrence Sings Sinatra by Steve Lawrence.(2003) Sin-Atra a heavy metal tribute by various artists. (2011)

Singles
Singles are listed with B-side immediately succeeding. Where a song is listed as (by X), or (instrumental), Sinatra does not feature. Number indicates highest chart position on combined Billboard charts.

With the Harry James Orchestra (Columbia) (1939)
1939 • • • • • "From the Bottom of My Heart" / "Melancholy Mood" (Brunswick Records) "It's Funny to Everyone but Me" (21) (by Jack Lawrence) / "Vol Visto Gailey Star" (by Jack Palmer) "Here Comes the Night" / "Feet Draggin' Blues" (instrumental) "My Buddy" / "Willow Weep For Me" (instrumental) "On a Little Street in Singapore" (27) / "Who Told You I Cared?"

• "Ciribiribin" / "Avalon" (instrumental) 1940

Frank Sinatra discography • "Every Day of My Life" (17) / "Cross Country Jump" (instrumental) • "All or Nothing at All" (1) / "Flash" (instrumental) (re-issued 1943)

30

With the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra (RCA Victor) (1940-1942)
1940 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • "Too Romantic" / "Sweet Potato Piper" (by The Pied Pipers) "The Sky Fell Down" / "What Can I Say After I Say I'm Sorry?" (by The Pied Pipers) "Shake Down The Stars" / "Moments in the Moonlight" "Say It (Over And Over Again)" (12) / "My, My" (by The Pied Pipers) "Polka Dots And Moonbeams" (18) / "I'll Be Seeing You" "The Fable Of The Rose" / "This Is The Beginning Of The End" "Imagination" (8) / "Charming Little Faker" (by The Pied Pipers) "Devil May Care" / "Fools Rush In (Where Angels Fear To Tread)" (12) "It's a Lovely Day Tomorrow" / "You're Lonely And I'm Lonely" (9) "April Played the Fiddle" / "I Haven't Time to be a Millionaire" "Yours Is My Heart Alone" / "Hear My Song Violetta" "I'll Never Smile Again" (with The Pied Pipers) (1) / "Marcheta" (instrumental) "All This And Heaven Too" (12) / "Where Do You Keep Your Heart?" "East of the Sun (and West of the Moon)" / "Head On My Pillow" "And So Do I" (by Connie Haines) / "The One I Love (Belongs to Somebody Else)" (with The Pied Pipers) (11) "Only Forever" (by Allan Storr) / "Trade Winds" (10) "Love Lies" (17) / "The Call Of The Canyon" (14) "Whispering" / "Funny Little Pedro" (by The Pied Pipers) "I Could Make You Care" (17) / "The World Is In My Arms" "Our Love Affair" (5) / "That's For Me" (by Connie Haines) "Looking For Yesterday" / "I Wouldn't Take A Million" (by Connie Haines) "We Three (My Echo, My Shadow And Me)" (3) / "Tell Me At Midnight" "You're Breaking My Heart All Over Again" / "Shadows On The Sand" "Two Dreams Met" (by Connie Haines) / "When You Awake" "I'd Know You Anywhere" / "You've Got Me This Way" (by The Pied Pipers) "Do You Know Why?" / "Isn't That Just Like Love?" (by The Pied Pipers) "Anything" / "Another One of Them Things" "You Say The Sweetest Things" (by Connie Haines and The Pied Pipers) / "Not So Long Ago" "Stardust" (with The Pied Pipers) (7) / "Swanee River" (instrumental)

1941 • "Oh! Look at Me Now" (with Connie Haines and The Pied Pipers) (2) / "You Might Have Belonged To Another" (14) • "Dolores" (with The Pied Pipers) (1) / "I Tried" (21) • "Do I Worry?" (with The Pied Pipers) (4) / "Little Man With A Candy Cigar" (by Jo Stafford) • "Without a Song" / "Deep River" (instrumental) • "It's Always You" / "Birds of a Feather" (by Connie Haines) • "You're Dangerous" (by Connie Haines) / "You Lucky People You" • "Everything Happens To Me" (9) / "Watcha Know Joe" (by Jo Stafford and The Pied Pipers) • "Let's Get Away from It All" (with Jo Stafford, Connie Haines and The Pied Pipers) (7) • "Kiss The Boys Goodbye" (by Connie Haines) / "I'll Never Let a Day Pass By" • "Love Me As I Am" / "Nine Old Men" (by The Pied Pipers)

Frank Sinatra discography • • • • • • • • • • "Neiani" / "This Love Of Mine" (with The Pied Pipers) (3) "I Guess I'll Have To Dream The Rest" (with The Pied Pipers) (12) / "Loose Lid Special" (instrumental) "You And I" (11) / "Free For All" (with The Pied Pipers) "Blue Skies" / "Backstage At The Ballet" (instrumental) "Pale Moon (An Indian Love Song)" / "Hallelujah" "Two In Love" (9) / "A Sinner Kissed An Angel" (15) "Embraceable You" (by Jo Stafford) / "The Sunshine of Your Smile" "Violets For Your Furs" / "Somebody Loves Me" (by The Pied Pipers) "I Think of You" (20) / "Who Can I Turn To?" (by Jo Stafford) "It Isn't a Dream Anymore" / "How Do You Do Without Me?"

31

1942 • "Winter Weather" (by The Pied Pipers) / "How About You?" (8) • "The Last Call for Love" (17) / "Poor You" (by The Pied Pipers) (15) • "I'll Take Tallulah" (with Jo Stafford, Tommy Dorsey and The Pied Pipers) (15) / "Not So Quiet Please" (instrumental) • "(You're a) Snootie Little Cutie" (with Connie Haines and The Pied Pipers) / "Moonlight On The Ganges" (instrumental) • • • • • • "Somewhere a Voice is Calling" / "Well Git It" (instrumental) "Just As Though You Were Here" (6) / "The Street of Dreams" (with The Pied Pipers) (17) "Be Careful, It's My Heart" (13) / "Take Me" (5) "He's My Guy" (by Jo Stafford) / "Light A Candle In The Chapel" (21) "A Boy In Khaki, A Girl In Lace" (by Jo Stafford) / "In The Blue Of Evening" (1) "There Are Such Things" (1) / "Daybreak" (with The Pied Pipers) (17)

First solo singles (Bluebird Records) (1942)
1942 • "Night and Day" (16) / "The Night We Called It a Day" • "The Lamplighter's Serenade" / "The Song Is You" All songs featuring Axel Stordahl and his Orchestra.

Columbia singles (1943-1952)
1943 • "Close to You" (10) / "You'll Never Know" (2) • "Sunday, Monday, or Always" (9) / "If You Please" • "People Will Say We're in Love" (3) / "Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin'" (12) All songs performed A cappella with The Bobby Tucker Singers. 1944 • "I Couldn't Sleep a Wink Last Night" (4) / "A Lovely Way to Spend an Evening" (11) (both songs performed A cappella with The Bobby Tucker Singers) • "White Christmas" (with The Bobby Tucker Singers) (7) / "If You are But a Dream" (19) • "Saturday Night (Is the Loneliest Night of the Week)" (2) / "I Dream of You (More than You Dream I Do)" (7) 1945 • "What Makes the Sunset?" (13) / "I Begged Her" • "Ol' Man River" / "Stormy Weather" (with The Ken Lane Singers) • "I Should Care" (8) / "When Your Lover Has Gone"

Frank Sinatra discography • • • • • • • • • • "Dream" (5) / "There's No You" "Put Your Dreams Away (For Another Day)" / "If You are But a Dream" (reissue) "Homesick - That's All" (23) / "A Friend of Yours" (with The Ken Lane Singers) "If I Loved You" (7) / "You'll Never Walk Alone" (with The Ken Lane Singers) (9) "The Charm of You" / "I Fall in Love Too Easily" "My Shawl" / "Stars In Your Eyes" (with the Xavier Cugat Orchestra) "Lily Belle" / "Don't Forget Tonight Tomorrow" (with The Charioteers) (9) "White Christmas" (reissue) / "Mighty Lak' a Rose" "Nancy (With the Laughing Face)" (10) / "The Cradle Song" "America the Beautiful" (with The Ken Lane Singers) / "The House I Live In" (22)

32

1946 • • • • • • • • • • • • • "Oh! What It Seemed to Be" (1) / "Day by Day" (5) "Full Moon and Empty Arms" (17) / "You are too Beautiful" "All Through the Day" (7) / "Two Hearts are Better Than One" "They Say It's Wonderful" (2) / "The Girl That I Marry" (11) "From This Day Forward" (18) / "Something Old, Something New" (21) "Soliloquy (Part 1 & 2)" "Five Minutes More" (1) / "How Cute Can You Be?" "One Love" / "Somewhere In The Night" "Begin the Beguine" (23) / "Where Is My Bess?" "The Coffee Song" (6) / "The Things We Did Last Summer" (8) "Silent Night" (with The Ken Lane Singers) / "Adeste Fideles" "Jingle Bells" (with The Ken Lane Singers) / "White Christmas" (reissue) "September Song" (8) / "Among My Souvenirs"

1947 • "This Is The Night" (11) / "Hush-A-Bye Island" • "That's How Much I Love You" (with The Page Cavanaugh Trio) (10) / "I Got A Gal I Love (In North And South Dakota)" • "I Want To Thank Your Folks" / "Why Shouldn't It Happen To Us?" • "It's The Same Old Dream" (with Four Hits and a Miss) / "The Brooklyn Bridge" • "Sweet Lorraine" / "Nat Meets June" (by Nat King Cole and June Christy) • "I Believe" (5) / "Time after Time" (16) • "Mam'selle" (1) / "Stella by Starlight" (21) • "Almost Like Being in Love" (20) / "There But For You Go I" • "Tea for Two" / "My Romance" (with Dinah Shore) • "Ain'tcha Ever Comin' Back" (21) / "I Have But One Heart" (13) • "Christmas Dreaming (A Little Early This Year)" (26) / "The Stars Will Remember" • "I've Got a Home In That Rock" / "Jesus Is a Rock (In a Weary Land)" (with The Charioteers) • "So Far" (8) / "A Fellow Needs a Girl" (24) • "The Dum Dot Song" (with The Pied Pipers) (21) / "It All Came True" (with Alvy West and the Little Band) • "You're My Girl " (23) / "Can't You Just See Yourself?" 1948 • "What'll I Do?" (23) / "My Cousin Louella" (With The Tony Mottola Trio) (24) • "But Beautiful" (14) / "If I Only Had a Match" • "For Every Man There's a Woman" / "I'll Make Up for Everything" • "But None Like You" / "We Just Couldn't Say Goodbye" (With The Tony Mottola Trio)

Frank Sinatra discography • • • • • "I've Got a Crush on You" (featuring Bobby Hackett) / "Ever Homeward" "All of Me" (21) / "I Went Down to Virginia" "It Only Happens When I Dance With You" (19) / "A Fella With an Umbrella" "Nature Boy" (A cappella with The Jeff Alexander Choir) (7) / "S'posin'" (With The Tony Mottola Trio) "Just for Now" (21) / "Everybody Loves Somebody" (25)

33

1949 • • • • • • • • • • • "Kiss Me Again" / "My Melancholy Baby" "Autumn in New York" (27) / "(Once Upon) A Moonlight Night" "Señorita" / "If I Steal a Kiss" "A Little Learnin' Is a Dangerous Thing" (Part 1 & 2) (with Pearl Bailey) "Sunflower" (14) / "Once In Love With Amy" "Why Can't You Behave?" (with The Phil Moore Four) / "No Orchids For My Lady" "Comme Ci Comme Ca" / "While the Angelus Was Ringing" "If You Stub Your Toe On The Moon" (with The Phil Moore Four) / "When Is Sometime?" "Bop! Goes My Heart" (with The Phil Moore Four) / "Where Is the One?" "Some Enchanted Evening" (6) / "Bali Ha'i" (18) "The Right Girl For Me" / "Night After Night"

• "The Hucklebuck" (with The Ken Lane Quintet) (10) / "It Happens Every Spring" • "Let's Take an Old Fashioned Walk" (with Doris Day and The Ken Lane Singers) (17) / "Just One Way To Say I Love You" • "It All Depends on You" / "I Only Have Eyes for You" (with The Ken Lane Singers) • "Don't Cry Joe" (with The Pastels (vocal group)) (9) / "The Wedding of Lili Marlene" • "Bye Bye Baby" (with The Pastels (vocal group)) / "Just a Kiss Apart" • "If I Ever Love Again" (with The Double Daters) / "Every Man Should Marry" • "That Lucky Old Sun" (16) / "Could'Ja?" (with The Pied Pipers) • "Mad About You" / "(On the Island of) Stromboli" • "The Old Master Painter" (with The Modernaires) (13) / "Lost in the Stars" 1950 • • • • • • • • • "Sorry" (28) / "Why Remind Me?" (with The Modernaires) "(We've Got A) Sure Thing" (with The Modernaires) / "Sunshine Cake" (with Paula Kelly) "Chattanoogie Shoe Shine Boy" (10) / "God's Country" (with The Jeff Alexander Choir) (25) "Kisses and Tears" (with Jane Russell and The Modernaires) / "When The Sun Goes Down" "American Beauty Rose" (with Mitch Miller's Dixieland Band) (26) / "Just An Old Stone House" "Poinciana (Song of the Tree)" / "There's No Business Like Show Business" "Peachtree Street" (with Rosemary Clooney) / "This is the Night" (reissue) "Goodnight, Irene" (with The Mitch Miller Singers) (5) / "My Blue Heaven" "Life Is So Peculiar" (with Helen Carroll and The Swantones) / "Dear Little Boy of Mine" (with The Mitch Miller Singers) • "One Finger Melody" (9) / "Accidents Will Happen" • "Nevertheless (I'm in Love with You)" (14) / "I Guess I'll Have to Dream the Rest" (with The Whippoorwills) • "Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow!" (with The Swanson Quartet) / "Remember Me In Your Dreams" (with The Whippoorwills) 1951 • "I Am Loved" / "You Don't Remind Me" • "Take My Love" / "Come Back To Sorrento" • "Love Means Love" / "Cherry Pies Ought to Be You" (with Rosemary Clooney)

Frank Sinatra discography • • • • • • • "You're The One (For Me)" (17) / "Faithful" (with The Skylarks) "We Kiss in a Shadow" (22) / "Hello Young Lovers" "Love Me" / "I Whistle a Happy Tune" "Mama Will Bark" (with Dagmar) (21) / "I'm a Fool to Want You" "It's A Long Way From Your House To My House" / "I Fall In Love With You Ev'ry Day" "Castle Rock" (8) / "Deep Night" (with Harry James and his Orchestra) "April in Paris" / "London by Night"

34

1952 • • • • • • • "I Hear A Rhapsody" (24) / "I Could Write a Book" (with The Jeff Alexander Choir) "Feet of Clay" / "Don't Ever Be Afraid To Go Home" "My Girl" / "Walkin' in the Sunshine" "Luna Rossa (Blushing Moon)" (with The Norman Luboff Choir) / "Tennessee Newsboy" "Bim Bam Baby" (20) / "Azure-Te (Paris Blues)" (30) "The Birth of the Blues" (19) / "Why Try To Change Me Now?" "I'm Glad There Is You" / "You Can Take My Word for It Baby" (with The Page Cavanaugh Trio)

1953 • "Shelia" (with The Jeff Alexander Choir) / "Day by Day" (reissue) 1954 • "I'm a Fool to Want You" (reissue) / "If I Forget You" All Orchestras conducted by Axel Stordahl, unless otherwise noted

Capitol singles (1953-1962)
Sinatra's Capitol singles were released on The Complete Capitol Singles Collection (1996) 1953 • • • • "I'm Walking Behind You" (7) / "Lean Baby" (25) "I've Got the World on a String" (14) / "My One and Only Love" (28) "From Here to Eternity" (15) / "Anytime, Anywhere" "South Of The Border (Down Mexico Way)" (18) / "I Love You"

1954 • • • • • • • "Young at Heart" (2) / "Take a Chance" "Don't Worry 'bout Me" (17) / "I Could Have Told You" (21) "Three Coins in the Fountain" (4) / "Rain (Falling From the Skies)" "The Gal That Got Away" (21) / "Half as Lovely (Twice as True)" (23) "It Worries Me" (30) / "When I Stop Loving You" "The Christmas Waltz" / "White Christmas" "You, My Love" / "Someone to Watch Over Me"

1955 • "Melody of Love" / "I'm Gonna Live Till I Die" (with Ray Anthony and his orchestra) • "Why Should I Cry Over You?" / "Don't Change Your Mind About Me" (with June Hutton and the Pied Pipers) • "Two Hearts, Two Kisses (Make One Love)" / "From the Bottom to the Top" (with The Nuggets and Big Dave's Music) • "Learnin' the Blues" (1) / "If I Had Three Wishes" • "Not as a Stranger" / "How Could You Do a Thing Like That to Me?" • "Same Old Saturday Night" (65) / "Fairy Tale"

Frank Sinatra discography • "Love and Marriage" (5) / "The Impatient Years" • "(Love Is) The Tender Trap" (23) / "Weep They Will" 1956 • • • • • • • "Flowers Mean Forgiveness" (35) / "You'll Get Yours" (67) "(How Little It Matters) How Little We Know" (30) / "Five Hundred Guys" (73) "You're Sensational" (52) / "Wait for Me" (theme from Johnny Concho) (75) "True Love" (by Bing Crosby and Grace Kelly) / "Well, Did You Evah!" (with Bing Crosby) "Mind if I Make Love to You?" / "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?" (with Celeste Holm) "Hey! Jealous Lover" (6) / "You Forgot All the Words" "Can I Steal A Little Love?" (20) / "Your Love for Me" (60)

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1957 • • • • • "Crazy Love" (60) / "So Long, My Love" (74) "You're Cheatin' Yourself (If You're Cheatin On Me)" / "Something Wonderful Happens In Summer" "All the Way" (15) / "Chicago (That Toddlin' Town)" (84) "Witchcraft" (20) / "Tell Her You Love Her" "Mistletoe and Holly" / "The Christmas Waltz" (with The Ralph Brewster Singers)

1958 • • • • "Nothing In Common" / "How are Ya Fixed for Love?" (with Keely Smith) (97) "Monique" (from Kings Go Forth) / "Same Old Song and Dance" "Mr Success" (41) / "Sleep Warm" "To Love and Be Loved" / "No One Ever Tells You"

1959 • "French Foreign Legion" (61) / "Time After Time" • "High Hopes" (with 'A Bunch 'o Kids') (30)/ "All My Tomorrows" • "Talk to Me" (38) / "They Came to Cordura" 1960 • "River, Stay 'Way from My Door" (82) / "It's Over, It's Over, It's Over" • "Nice 'N' Easy" (60) / "This Was My Love" • "Old MacDonald" (25) / "You'll Always Be the One I Love" 1961 • "My Blue Heaven" / "Sentimental Baby" • "American Beauty Rose" / "Sentimental Journey" 1962 • "I've Heard That Song Before" / "The Moon Was Yellow" (99) • "I'll Remember April" / "Five Minutes More" • "Five Minutes More" / "I Love Paris"

Frank Sinatra discography

36

Reprise singles (1961-1983)
Sinatra's Reprise singles were released as part of The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings (1995) 1961 • • • • • • • • • • "The Second Time Around" (50) / "Tina" "Granada" (64) / "The Curse of an Aching Heart" "I'll Be Seeing You" (58) / "The One I Love (Belongs to Somebody Else)" "Imagination" / "It's Always You" "I'm Getting Sentimental Over You" / "East of the Sun (and West of the Moon)" "There Are Such Things" / "Polka Dots and Moonbeams" "Without a Song" / "It Started All Over Again" "Take Me" / "Daybreak" "Pocketful of Miracles" (34) / "Name It and It's Yours" "Ring a Ding Ding!"

1962 • "Stardust" (98) / "Come Rain or Come Shine" • "Ev'rybody's Twistin'" (75) / "Nothin' But the Best" • • • • "Goody Goody" / "Love Is Just Around The Corner" "The Look of Love" / "I Left My Heart in San Francisco" "The Look of Love" / "Indiscreet" "Me and My Shadow" (with Sammy Davis, Jr.) / "Sam's Song" (by Sammy Davis, Jr. and Dean Martin)

1963 • • • • • "Call Me Irresponsible" (78) / "Tina" (reissue) "I Have Dreamed" / "Come Blow Your Horn" "A New Kind of Love" / "Love Isn't Just for the Young" "Fugue for Tinhorns" / "The Oldest Established" (with Dean Martin and Bing Crosby) "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas" / "How Shall I Send Thee?" (by Les Baxter's Balladeers)

1964 • • • • • "Stay with Me (Theme From "The Cardinal")" (81) / "Talk to Me Baby" "My Kind of Town" / "I Like to Lead When I Dance" "Softly, as I Leave You" (27) / "Then Suddenly Love" "I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day" / "The Little Drummer Boy" (with Fred Waring & His Pennsylvanians) "We Wish You the Merriest" / "Go Tell It On the Mountain" (with Bing Crosby and Fred Waring & His Pennsylvanians) • "Somewhere in Your Heart" (32) / "Emily" 1965 • • • • • • "Anytime at All" (46) / "Available" "Tell Her (You Love Her Each Day)" (57) / "Here's to the Losers" "Forget Domani" (78)/ "I Can't Believe I'm Losing You" "When Somebody Loves You" / "When I'm Not Near the Girl I Love" "Ev'rybody Has the Right to Be Wrong!" / "I'll Only Miss Her When I Think of Her" "It Was a Very Good Year" (28) / "Moment To Moment"

1966 • "Strangers in the Night" (1) / "Oh, You Crazy Moon" • "Summer Wind" (25) / "You Make Me Feel So Young" (with Count Basie & His Orchestra (live)) • "That's Life" (4) / "September of My Years"

Frank Sinatra discography 1967 • • • • "Somethin' Stupid" (with Nancy Sinatra) / "I Will Wait for You" "Somethin' Stupid" (with Nancy Sinatra) (1) / "Give Her Love" "The World We Knew (Over and Over)" (30) / "You Are There" "This Town" (53') / "This is My Love"

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1968 • "I Can't Believe I'm Losing You" (60) / "How Old Am I?" • "Cycles" (23) / "My Way of Life" (64) • "Whatever Happened to Christmas" / "I Wouldn't Trade Christmas" (with Frank Sinatra, Jr., Nancy Sinatra and Tina Sinatra) 1969 • • • • • "Rain in My Heart" (62) / "Star!" "My Way" (27) / "Blue Lace" "Love's Been Good to Me" (75) / "A Man Alone" "Goin' Out of My Head" (79) / "Forget to Remember" "I Would be in Love (Anyway)" (88) / "Watertown"

• "What's Now is Now" / "The Train" 1970 • "Lady Day" / "Song of the Sabiá" • "Feelin' Kinda Sunday" (with Nancy Sinatra) / "Kids" (by Nancy Sinatra) • "Something" / "Bein' Green" 1971 • "Life's a Trippy Thing" (with Nancy Sinatra) / "I'm Not Afraid" • "I Will Drink The Wine" / "Sunrise In The Morning" 1973 • "Let Me Try Again" (63) / "Send in the Clowns" • "You Will be My Music" / "Winners" 1974 • "Bad, Bad Leroy Brown" (83) / "I'm Gonna Make It All The Way" • "You Turned My World Around" (83) / "Satisfy Me One More Time" 1975 • "Anytime (I'll Be There)" (75) / "The Hurt Doesn't Go Away" • "I Believe I'm Gonna Love You" (47) / "The Only Couple on the Floor" • "A Baby Just Like You" / "Christmas Mem'ries" 1976 • • • • • "The Saddest Thing of All" / "Empty Tables" "I Sing the Songs (I Write the Songs)" / "Empty Tables" "Stargazer" / "The Best I Ever Had" (featuring Sam Butera) "Dry Your Eyes" / "Like a Sad Song" "I Love My Wife" / "Send in the Clowns"

1977 • "Night and Day" (disco version) / "Everybody Ought to Be In Love" 1980

Frank Sinatra discography • "Theme from New York, New York" (32) / "That's What God Looks Like to Me" • "You and Me (We Wanted It All)" / "I've Been There!" 1981 • "Say Hello" / "Good Thing Going (Going Gone)" 1983 • "Here's to the Band" / "It's Sunday" (with Tony Mottola) • "To Love a Child" / "That's What God Looks Like to Me"

38

Qwest singles (1984)
Sinatra's Qwest singles were released as part of The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings (1995), and originally appeared on L. A. Is My Lady (1984). 1984 • "Teach Me Tonight" / "The Best of Everything" • "Mack the Knife" / "It's All Right with Me" • "L. A. Is My Lady" / "Until the Real Thing Comes Along"

References
[1] "Recording Industry Association of America" (http:/ / www. riaa. com/ goldandplatinumdata. php?table=SEARCH_RESULTS). RIAA. . Retrieved 2012-04-07. [2] "Canadian album certifications – Frank Sinatra" (http:/ / www. musiccanada. com/ GPSearchResult. aspx?st=& ica=False& sa=Frank Sinatra& sl=& smt=0& sat=-1& ssb=Artist). Music Canada. . Retrieved 2012-02-23.

External links
• Sinatra.com (http://www.sinatra.com/)

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Studio albums
The Voice of Frank Sinatra
The Voice of Frank Sinatra
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded March 4, 1946 July 30, 1945 Hollywood December 7, 1945 New York City Classic pop 24:01 Columbia C-112 (78rpm) Columbia CL-6001 (33rpm) Legacy CK62100 Frank Sinatra chronology

Genre Length Label

The Voice of Frank Sinatra (1946)

Songs by Sinatra (1947)

Alternative cover The 1948 reissue as a ten-inch long-player.

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

The Voice of Frank Sinatra is the first studio album by American singer Frank Sinatra, released on Columbia Records, catalogue C-112, March 4, 1946. It was first issued as a set of four 78 rpm records totaling eight songs, and went to #1 on the fledgling Billboard chart. It stayed at the top for seven weeks in 1946, spending a total of eighteen weeks on the charts. The album chart consisted of just a Top Five until August of 1948. The cover depicted to the right is that of the original 78 rpm release cover, also used on the compact disc reissue.

The Voice of Frank Sinatra

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Content
The tracks were arranged and conducted by Axel Stordahl and his orchestra, on both dates consisting of a string quartet and four-piece rhythm section, augmented by flutist John Mayhew in July, and, ironically given the part he would play with Sinatra at Columbia in the early 1950s, oboist Mitch Miller in December. Sinatra would record most of these songs again at later stages in his career. Certain critics have claimed The Voice to be the first concept album. Beginning in 1939, however, singer Lee Wiley started releasing albums of 78s dedicated to the songs of a single writer, Cole Porter for example, a precursor to the Songbooks sets formulated by Norman Granz and Ella Fitzgerald in 1956. These may loosely be termed concept albums, although Sinatra with The Voice inaugurated his practice of having a common mood, theme, or instrumentation tying the songs together on a specific release. It also holds the distinction of being the first pop album catalogue item at 33⅓ rpm, when Columbia premiered long-playing vinyl records in 1948, ten-inch and twelve-inch format for classical music, ten-inch only for pop. The Voice was reissued as a 10-inch LP, catalogue number CL 6001 in 1948. It was also later issued as two 45 rpm EPs in 1952 with catalogue number B-112 in 1952, a 12-inch LP with a changed running order including only five of the original tracks in 1955 with catalogue number CL-743, and a compact disc with extra tracks in 2003.[2]

Track listing
Side one
1. 2. 3. 4. "You Go to My Head" (Haven Gillespie, J. Fred Coots) — 3:00 "Someone to Watch Over Me" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) — 3:18 "These Foolish Things (Remind Me of You)" (Holt Marvell, Jack Strachey, Harry Link) — 3:08 "Why Shouldn't I?" (Cole Porter) — 2:53

Side two
1. 2. 3. 4. "I Don't Know Why (I Just Do)" (Roy Turk, Fred E. Ahlert) — 2:46 "Try a Little Tenderness" (Harry M. Woods, James Campbell, Reginald Connelly) — 3:08 "I Don't Stand a Ghost of a Chance with You" (Bing Crosby, Ned Washington, Victor Young) — 3:11 "Paradise" (Nacio Herb Brown, Gordon Clifford) — 2:37

2003 reissue bonus tracks
• "Mam'selle" (Mack Gordon, Edmund Goulding) — 3:26 2. "That Old Feeling" (Lew Brown, Sammy Fain) — 3:19 3. "If I Had You" (Ted Shapiro, Campbell, Connelly) — 3:01 4. "The Nearness of You" (Ned Washington, Hoagy Carmichael) — 2:41 5. "Spring is Here" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) — 2:42 6. "Fools Rush In (Where Angels Fear to Tread)" (Johnny Mercer, Rube Bloom) — 3:01 7. "When You Awake" (Henry Nemo) — 3:07 8. "It Never Entered My Mind" (Rodgers, Hart) — 3:09 9. "Always" (Irving Berlin) — 2:55 10. "(I Don't Stand) A Ghost of A Chance (with You)" (Crosby, Washington, Young) — 3:32 alternate take

The Voice of Frank Sinatra

41

1955 track listing
Side one
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. "I Don't Know Why (I Just Do)" (Turk, Ahlert) — 2:43 "Try a Little Tenderness" (Woods, Campbell, Connelly) — 3:03 "(I Don't Stand) A Ghost of A Chance (with You)" (Crosby, Washington, Young) — 3:16 "Paradise" (Brown, Clifford) — 2:41 "These Foolish Things (Remind Me of You)" (Marvell, Strachey, Link) — 3:15 "Laura" (Johnny Mercer, David Raksin) — 3:17

Side two
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. "She's Funny That Way" (Neil Moret, Richard A. Whiting) — 3:25 "Fools Rush In (Where Angels Fear to Tread)" (Mercer, Bloom) — 3:04 "Over The Rainbow" (Yip Harburg, Harold Arlen) — 3:20 "That Old Black Magic" (Mercer, Arlen) — 2:37 "Spring Is Here" (Rodgers, Hart) — 2:42 "Lover" (Rodgers, Hart) — 2:39

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra — vocal • Axel Stordahl — arranger

New York sessions
• • • • • • • • Leonard Posner. Raoul Polikian — violins Sidney Brecher — viola Anthony Sophos — cello Mitch Miller — oboe Matty Golizio — guitar Bill Clifton — piano Frank Siravo — bass Nat Polen — drums

Hollywood sessions
• • • • • • • • Mischa Russell, David Frisina — violins Sam Freed — viola Fred Goerner — cello Jack Mayhew — flute George Van Eps — guitar Mark McIntyre — piano John Ryan — bass Ray Hagan — drums

The Voice of Frank Sinatra

42

Production personnel
• Bill Richards — producer • Charles L. Granata, Didier C. Deutsch — compact disc reissue producers

References
[1] AllMusic review (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ voice-of-frank-sinatra-r673839) [2] Charles L. Granata, The Voice of Frank Sinatra. 2003, Columbia Legacy CK 62100, liner notes.

Frankly Sentimental

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Frankly Sentimental
Frankly Sentimental
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Label June 20, 1949 July 30, 1946-November 9, 1947 Hollywood New York City Classic pop Columbia Frank Sinatra chronology

Christmas Songs By Sinatra (1948)

Frankly Sentimental (1949)

Dedicated to You (1950)

Frankly Sentimental is the fourth studio album by Frank Sinatra, released on June 20, 1949 as a set of four 78 rpm records and a 10" LP album. The tracks were arranged and conducted by Axel Stordahl and his orchestra. The album is a compilation of eight recordings from eight different sessions between 1946 and 1947.

Track listing
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. "Body and Soul" (E. Heyman, R. Sour, F. Eyton, J. Green) "Laura" (David Raksin, Johnny Mercer) "Fools Rush In" (Mercer, Rube Bloom) "Spring Is Here" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) "One For My Baby (And One More For The Road)" (Harold Arlen, Mercer) "Guess I'll Hang My Tears Out to Dry" (Jule Styne, Sammy Cahn) "When You Awake" (Henry Nemo) "It Never Entered My Mind" (Rodgers, Hart)

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - Vocals • Axel Stordahl - Arranger, Conductor • LOS ANGELES MUSICIANS - 1946 TO 1947: William Bloom, Werner Callies, Walter Edelstein, Sam Freed, David Frisina, Howard Halbert, Sol Kindler, Morris King, Eugene Lamas, Dan Lube, Mischa Russell, Felix Slatkin, Gerald Vinci (violins), Abraham Hochstein, Alexander Neiman, Stanley Spiegelman, Dave Sterkin (violas), Fred Goerner, John Sewell, Julius Tannenbaum (celli), Ann Mason (harp), Heinie Beau (clarinet/alto saxophone), Fred Dornbach (clarinet/tenor saxophone?), Herbert Haymer (clarinet/tenor saxophone), Jules Kinsler (clarinet/alto saxophone/flute/bass clarinet), Harry Klee (clarinet/alto saxophone/flute/piccolo), Clyde Hurley, Manny Klein, Rubin "Zeke" Zarchy (trumpets), Hoyt Bohannon, George Jenkins, Edward Kuczborski (trombones), Richard Perissi (French horn), Mark McIntyre (piano), Dave Barbour, Allan Reuss (guitars), Phil Stephens (bass), Ray Hagan (drums) • NEW YORK MUSICIANS - 1947: Fred Buldrini, Mac Ceppos, Sid Harris, Maurice Hershaft, Harry Katzman, Howard Kay, Sylvan Kirsner, Leo Kruczek, Felix Orlewitz, Merle Pitt, Raoul Polikian, Samuel Rand, Julius

Frankly Sentimental Schachter, Zelly Smirnoff, Harry Urbont, Jack Zyde (violins), Harold Colletta, Solomon Deutsch, Harold Furmansky, Isadore Zir (violas), Maurice Brown, Armand Kaproff, George Ricci (celli), Elaine Vito Ricci (harp), Ernie Caceres (clarinet/alto and baritone saxophones), Harold Feldman (clarinet/tenor saxophone/flute/piccolo/oboe/cor anglais), Bernard Kaufman (clarinet/alto saxophone/flute), Mitch Miller (oboe), Toots Mondello (clarinet/alto saxophone), Hymie Schertzer (clarinet/alto saxophone), Wolfe Taninbaum (clarinet/tenor saxophone), Milt Yaner (clarinet/alto and soprano saxophones), Andy Ferretti, Chris Griffin, Bobby Hackett, John Lausen, Red Solomon (trumpets), George Arus, William Pritchard, William Rausch, Anthony Russo (trombones), Joseph Singer (French horn), Johnny Guarnieri, Bob Kitsis (pianoes), Matty Golizio (guitar), Trigger Alpert (bass), Johnny Blowers, Norris "Bunny" Shawker (drums)

44

References

Songs by Sinatra

45

Songs by Sinatra
Songs by Sinatra, Volume 1
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Label April 1947 (78 rpm release) January 2, 1950 (10" re-issue) December 19, 1944-January 9, 1947 Hollywood Classic pop Columbia Frank Sinatra chronology

The Voice of Frank Sinatra (1946)

Songs by Sinatra (1947)

Christmas Songs By Sinatra (1948)

Songs by Sinatra, Volume 1 is the second studio album by Frank Sinatra. The tracks were arranged and conducted by Axel Stordahl and his orchestra. It is a collection of eight recordings from six different sessions. It was originally released as a set of four 78 rpm records (set number C-124) similar to The Voice of Frank Sinatra and re-issued in 1950 as a 10" record.

Track listing
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. "I'm Sorry I Made You Cry" (N.J. Clesi) "How Deep is the Ocean?" (Irving Berlin) "Over The Rainbow" (with The Ken Lane Singers) (Harold Arlen, E.Y. Harburg) "She's Funny That Way" (N. Moret, R.A. Whiting) "Embraceable You" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) "All The Things You Are" (with The Ken Lane Singers) (Jerome Kern, Oscar Hammerstein II) "That Old Black Magic" (Harold Arlen, Johnny Mercer) "I Concentrate on You" (Cole Porter)

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - Vocals • Axel Stordahl - Arranger, Conductor • MUSICIANS - Victor Arno, Robert Barene, Alex Beller, Eddie Bergman, William Bloom, Harry Blostein, Harry Bluestone, Werner Callies, Sam Cytron, Walter Edelstein, Peter Ellis, Sam Freed, David Frisina, David Jefferson, Gerald Joyce, George Kast, Sol Kindler, Morris King, Samuel Levine, Sam Middleman, Fred Olson, Anthony Perrotti, Nick Pisani, Gene Powers, Ted Rosen, Mischa Russell, Felix Slatkin, Marshall Sosson, Oreste Tomasso, Olcott Vail (violins), Allan Harshman,William Hymanson, Paul Lowenkron, Alexander Neiman, Maurice Perlmutter, Paul Robyn, Leonard Selic, William Spear, Dave Sterkin, Gary White (violas), Cy Bernard, Fred Goerner, Arthur Kafton, Nicholas Ochi-Albi, John Sewell, Julius Tannenbaum (celli), May Cambern, Irma Clow (harps), Heinie Beau (alto saxophone/clarinet), Fred Dornbach (alto saxophone/clarinet), Manny Gershman (alto saxophone/clarinet/baritone saxophone), Leonard Hartman (tenor saxophone/clarinet/flute/bass clarinet), Herbie Haymer (tenor saxophone/clarinet), Jules Kinsler (tenor saxophone/flute/bass clarinet), Harold Lawson (tenor saxophone/clarinet), Don Logiudice (alto saxophone/clarinet), Harry Schuchman (alto

Songs by Sinatra saxophone/clarinet/oboe/baritone saxophone), Arthur Smith (alto saxophone/clarinet), Willie Smith (alto saxophone/clarinet/soprano saxophone), Fred Stulce (alto saxophone/clarinet/flute/baritone saxophone), Don Anderson, Charles Griffard, Max Herman, Ray Linn, Leonard Mach, Billy May, Horace Nelson, Rubin "Zeke" Zarchey (trumpets), Hoyt Bohannon, Dave Hallett, George Jenkins, Carl Loeffler, Pullman "Tommy" Pederson, Jack Schaeffer, Jimmy Skiles, Elmer Smithers, Paul Weigand, Joe Yukl (trombones), Fred Fox, Richard Perissi, James Stagliano (French horns), Mark McIntyre (piano/celeste), Dave Barbour, Allan Reuss (guitars), John Ryan, Artie Shapiro, Phil Stephens (bass), Ray Hagan (drums)

46

Swing and Dance with Frank Sinatra
Swing and Dance with Frank Sinatra
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released October 16, 1950

Recorded April 14 and April 24, 1950, New York City, except tr.4 July 10, 1949 (original) Genre Length Label Vocal Jazz, Classic pop 50:05 (re-issue) Columbia Frank Sinatra chronology

Dedicated to You (1950)

Swing and Dance with Frank Sinatra (1950)

Songs for Young Lovers (1954)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Allmusic [2] Rating [1] (Re-issue)

Swing and Dance with Frank Sinatra is the sixth studio album by Frank Sinatra, later released under the title Swing and Dance with Frank Sinatra. The tracks were arranged and conducted by George Siravo and his orchestra (except for track four, which was conducted by Hugo Winterhalter). Original Columbia 10-inch and 78-rpm set released October 16, 1950; the 7-inch EP and box sets were released in October 1952. It would prove to be the final album that Sinatra released under the Columbia label, another three years before he would start recording for Capitol and another year after that before his next album, entitled Songs For Young Lovers, would be released in 1954. Six of the eight songs on this LP would be remade for one of his contractual obligation albums to Capitol, Sinatra's Swingin' Session!!!. For its compact disc reissue, alternate versions of six songs – including "I've Got A Crush On You" and "All of Me" – are included. The extra songs in this compilation, titled slightly differently as Swing And Dance With Frank Sinatra, were recorded between 1944 and 1951.

Swing and Dance with Frank Sinatra

47

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - Vocals • MUSICIANS - 1949 : Hugo Winterthaler (conductor), Yank Lawson, Carl Poole, Russ Solomon (trumpets), John D'Agostino, Buddy Morrow aka Moe Zydecoff, William Pritchard (trombones), Ernie Caceres (baritone saxophone/clarinet/alto saxophone), Wolf Taninbaum, Henry Ross (tenor saxophone/clarinet), Toots Mondello, Sid Cooper (alto saxophone/clarinet), Johnny Guarnieri (piano), Al Caiola (guitar), Trigger Alpert (bass), Terry Snyder (drums) • MUSICIANS - 1950 : George Siravo (conductor), Billy Butterfield, Steve Lipkins, Carl Poole, Pinky Savitt (trumpets), George Arus, William Rausch (trombones), Ernie Caceres (baritone saxophone/clarinet/alto saxophone), Emmett Callen (alto saxophone), Art Drelinger (alto saxophone/clarinet/oboe/bass clarinet), Leonard Hartman (tenor saxophone/clarinet/bass clarinet), Jimmy Horvath (alto saxophone), Jerry Jerome (tenor saxophone/clarinet), Babe Russin (tenor saxophone), Hymie Schertzer (alto saxophone/clarinet/baritone saxophone), Ken Lane (piano/celeste), Bernie Leighton (piano), Allan Reuss (guitar), Phil Stephens (bass), Johnny Blowers (drums) Expanded CD produced by Charles L. Granata & Didier C. Deutsch

Track listing
Original
Track 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Lover It's Only a Paper Moon My Blue Heaven It All Depends on You Song Title Originally By Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart Billy Rose, E.Y. Harburg and Harold Arlen G. Whiting and Walter Donaldson B.G. DeSylva, Lew Brown and Ray Henderson

You Do Something to Me Cole Porter Should I The Continental When You're Smiling Arthur Freed and Nacio Herb Brown Herb Magidson and C. Conrad Fisher, Goodwin and Shay

Re-issue track listing
Track 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Song Title *Saturday Night (Is the Loneliest Night of the Week) *All of Me I've Got a Crush on You *The Hucklebuck *It All Depends on You **Bye Bye Baby All of Me Should I You Do Something to Me Lover Originally By J. Styne, Sammy Cahn S. Simons and G. Marks George Gershwin and Ira Gershwin R. Alfred and A. Gibson B.G. DeSylva, Lew Brown and Ray Henderson J. Styne and Leo Robin S. Simons and G. Marks Arthur Freed and Nacio Herb Brown Cole Porter Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart

Swing and Dance with Frank Sinatra

48

11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18.

When You're Smiling (The Whole World Smiles With You) Fisher, Goodwin and Shay It's Only a Paper Moon My Blue Heaven The Continental *Meet Me at the Copa *Nevertheless (I'm in Love with You) *There's Something Missing ***Farewell, Farewell to Love Billy Rose, E.Y. Harburg and Harold Arlen G. Whiting and Walter Donaldson Herb Magidson and C. Conrad Axel Stordahl, Sammy Cahn Harry Ruby and Bert Kalmar Rule, O'Brien, Benjamin, Weiss and Downey J. Wolf and George Siravo

All tracks arranged and conducted by George Siravo except for the marked songs: * arranged & conducted by Axel Stordahl ** arranged & conducted by Hugo Winterhalter *** arranged & conducted by Harry James

References
[1] Swing and Dance with Frank Sinatra (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26352) at Allmusic [2] Swing and Dance with Frank Sinatra (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r242513) at Allmusic

Songs for Young Lovers
Songs for Young Lovers
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer 1954 November 5-November 6, 1953 Hollywood Vocal Jazz, Classic pop 21:42 Capitol Voyle Gilmore Frank Sinatra chronology

Swing and Dance with Frank Sinatra (1950)

Songs for Young Lovers (1954)

Swing Easy! (1954)

Songs for Young Lovers

49

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Songs for Young Lovers is the seventh Studio Album by Frank Sinatra, his first released for Capitol Records. It was released as a 10" LP as a set of eight songs. It was also the first Sinatra "album" to not have a 78rpm album set release. The tracks were conducted by Nelson Riddle, the sessions for this album and the preceding singles ("I've Got the World on a String" and "From Here to Eternity") initiating a long-standing collaboration between the arranger and singer that would continue for the next twenty years. All the arrangements, except for Riddle's own "Like Someone in Love", were by Sinatra's uptempo man from his days at Columbia Records, George Siravo, whose charts Sinatra had continued to use in recent club appearances. According to www.jamesdean.com, it was the favorite album of James Dean. Songs For Young Lovers followed a formula similar to Sinatra's previous releases for Columbia - rather than compiling a potentially inconsistent set of former hits, a set of newly recorded songs would be arranged around a specific theme or concept. This time around, the singer had more artistic freedom, and producer Voyle Gilmore was supportive of the album's consistent format. In addition, the state-of-the-art Capitol studios were capable of producing a more detailed sound, which gave Riddle more freedom in his arrangements and orchestrations. The album was re-released in 1960, combined with Swing Easy!, as a 12 inch LP with four extra songs added - "Someone To Watch Over Me", "My One And Only Love", "It Worries Me", and "I Can Read Between the Lines". In 2002, it was one of 50 recordings chosen that year by the Library of Congress to be added to the National Recording Registry. Songs For Young Lovers is currently available on compact disc as a double album with Swing Easy!, also initially released in the ten-inch format and consisting of eight songs. This release, however, does not include the four bonus tracks included on the similar 1960 LP release.

Track listing
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. "My Funny Valentine" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) – 2:31 "The Girl Next Door" (Ralph Blane, Hugh Martin) – 2:38 "A Foggy Day" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) – 2:39 "Like Someone in Love" (Jimmy Van Heusen, Johnny Burke) – 3:10 "I Get a Kick Out of You" (Cole Porter) – 2:55 "Little Girl Blue" (Rodgers, Hart) – 2:54 "They Can't Take That Away from Me" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) – 1:58 "Violets for Your Furs" (Tom Adair, Matt Dennis) – 3:05

Songs for Young Lovers

50

Expanded CD track listing
1. "The Girl Next Door" (Ralph Blane, Hugh Martin) – 2:38 2. "They Can't Take That Away from Me" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) – 1:58 3. "Violets for Your Furs" (Tom Adair, Matt Dennis) – 3:05 4. "Someone to Watch Over Me" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) – 2:56 5. "My One and Only Love" (Guy Wood, Robert Mellin) – 3:11 6. "Little Girl Blue" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) – 2:54 7. "Like Someone in Love" (Jimmy Van Heusen, Johnny Burke) – 3:10 8. "A Foggy Day" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) – 2:39 9. "It Worries Me" (Bix Reichner, Reichel Schulz, Carl Sigman) - 2:52 10. "I Can Read Between The Lines" (David Franklin, Ramon Getzov) - 2:47 11. "I Get a Kick Out of You" (Cole Porter) – 2:55 12. "My Funny Valentine" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) – 2:31

Selected personnel
• Frank Sinatra – vocals • Nelson Riddle – conductor • George Siravo – arranger (for all songs except "Like Someone in Love")

References
[1] Songs for Young Lovers (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26363) at Allmusic

Swing Easy!
Swing Easy!
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer August 2, 1954 April 7, April 19, 1954 Hollywood Vocal Jazz, Classic pop 19:17 Capitol Voyle Gilmore Frank Sinatra chronology

Songs for Young Lovers (1954)

Swing Easy! (1954)

In the Wee Small Hours (1955)

Swing Easy!

51

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Swing Easy! is the eighth studio album by Frank Sinatra. It was released as a 10" LP and consisted of only eight songs, as each side of the record only allowed approximately fourteen minutes of music. The album was Sinatra's second for Capitol and the first to feature arrangements by Nelson Riddle (Riddle had merely conducted on Songs For Young Lovers). As its title implies, the record concentrates on up-tempo swingers done with a light touch. Again, the songs were all standards -- "Just One of Those Things," "Wrap Your Troubles in Dreams," "All of Me" -- which the singer felt benefited from the new thematic setting, new arrangements, and his increasingly playful and textured vocal style. The album was re-released in 1960, combined with Songs For Young Lovers as a single disc 12 inch LP. Four bonus tracks were added - "Lean Baby", "I Love You", "How Could You Do A Thing Like That To Me?", and "Why Should I Cry Over You?". The album is currently available on compact disc as a double album with Songs for Young Lovers, although it lacks the bonus tracks featured on the similar 1960 double release.

Original LP track listing
Side one
1. 2. 3. 4. "Just One of Those Things" (Cole Porter) "I'm Gonna Sit Right Down (And Write Myself a Letter)" (Fred E. Ahlert, Joe Young) "Sunday" (Chester Conn, Benny Krueger, Ned Miller, Jule Styne) "Wrap Your Troubles in Dreams" (Harry Barris, Ted Koehler, Billy Moll)

Side two
1. 2. 3. 4. "Taking a Chance on Love" (Vernon Duke, Ted Fetter, John Latouche) "Jeepers Creepers" (Harry Warren, Johnny Mercer) "Get Happy" (Ted Koehler, Harold Arlen) "All of Me" (Gerald Marks, Seymour Simons)

Expanded CD track listing
1. "Jeepers Creepers" (Harry Warren, Johnny Mercer) 2. "Taking a Chance on Love" (Vernon Duke, Ted Fetter, John Latouche) 3. "Wrap Your Troubles in Dreams" (Harry Barris, Ted Koehler, Billy Moll) 4. "Lean Baby" (Roy Alfred, Billy May) 5. "I Love You" (Harry Archer, Harlan Thompson) 6. "I'm Gonna Sit Right Down (And Write Myself a Letter)" (Fred E. Ahlert, Joe Young) 7. "Get Happy" (Ted Koehler, Harold Arlen) 8. "All of Me" (Seymour Simons, Gerald Marks) 9. "How Could You Do a Thing Like That to Me" (Tyree Glenn, Allan Roberts) 10. "Why Should I Cry Over You?" (Chester Conn, Nathan "Ned" Miller) 11. "Sunday" (Chester Conn, Benny Krueger, Ned Miller, Jule Styne) 12. "Just One of Those Things" (Cole Porter)

Swing Easy!

52

Selected personnel
• Frank Sinatra – vocals • Nelson Riddle – arranger, conductor

References
[1] Swing Easy! (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26366) at Allmusic

In the Wee Small Hours
In the Wee Small Hours
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released April 1955

Recorded February 8, 1955–March 4, 1955, (except Last Night When We Were Young, March 1, 1954) KHJ Studios, Hollywood Genre Length Vocal Jazz, Classic pop 48:41

Language English Label Capitol

Producer Voyle Gilmore Frank Sinatra chronology

Swing Easy! (1954)

In the Wee Small Hours (1955)

Songs for Swingin' Lovers (1956)

In the Wee Small Hours is the ninth studio album by American vocalist Frank Sinatra. It was released in April 1955 on Capitol Records, produced by Voyle Gilmore with arrangements by Nelson Riddle. The songs on the album deal with themes such as loneliness, depression and night-life, and as a result, In the Wee Small Hours is generally regarded as one of the first concept albums.[1][2] Sinatra would successfully continue the "concept" formula with later albums such as Songs for Swingin' Lovers! and Only the Lonely. He had been developing the idea since 1946 with his first album release, The Voice.[3] In the Wee Small Hours was issued as two 10-inch discs, and also as one 12-inch record, making it one of the first of its kind. The album was a commercial success, reaching number 2 on the US charts where it stayed for 18 weeks, being Sinatra's highest charting album since his 1947 release Songs by Sinatra. As of 2002 it has been certified Gold by the RIAA, selling over 500,000 units.[4] The album was also a critical success, and is listed as the third most acclaimed album of the 50s.[5] Rolling Stone called it the 100th greatest album of all time.[6]

In the Wee Small Hours

53

Background
By the early 1950s, the singer saw his career in decline, his teen "bobby soxer" audience having lost interest in him as he entered his late 30s. In 1951, he went so far as to attempt suicide.[7] Later that year, a second season of The Frank Sinatra Show was aired on CBS, but failed to receive the same positive reception the first season had, with its host having lost his previous energy. Later, in 1952, Sinatra was dropped from Columbia Records. Against the wishes of his colleagues, on March 14, 1953 then-Vice President of A&R at Capitol Records, Alan Livingston, signed Sinatra to a seven-year deal on his label.[8] The deal proved to be a success; later that year in August, Sinatra appeared as Private Angelo Maggio in the film From Here to Eternity. The film was highly successful and his performance was highly acclaimed, winning him the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor[9] and the Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor. With this new-found popularity he recorded two albums in 1954, Songs for Young Lovers and Swing Easy!, which both peaked at number 3 on the US charts, and the latter number 5 on the UK Album Charts. Sinatra made another acclaimed performance in February as the lead character, Frankie Machine, in the film The Man with the Golden Arm, which won him nominations for the Academy Award and BAFTA for Best Actor and Actor in Lead Role respectively.

Relationship troubles
Despite his new commercial gain, by the time of the recording of In the Wee Small Hours, Sinatra witnessed the messy end of a chain of relationships. He and his first wife, Nancy Barbato, had separated on Valentine's Day 1950. While still married, Sinatra began a relationship with Ava Gardner, which became very controversial. After he and Nancy finally divorced in October 1951, he married Ava just ten days later. However, they were both jealous of the others' extramarital affairs. Despite having considerable influence in getting him his part in Ava Gardner, Sinatra's second wife, provided From Here to Eternity, Ava broke off from Sinatra two months after inspiration for the album the release of the film, divorcing in 1957. She claimed "We don't have the ability to live together like any normal married couple."[10] Critics presume that these events are the reason behind the melancholy atmosphere of the album.

Recording
The album was recorded in five sessions at KHJ Studios, Hollywood. These sessions took place on February 8, 16 & 17, and April 1 & 4, and would start at 8:00PM, continuing to past midnight. Sinatra was very tense during the recording of the album, reportedly breaking down and crying after the master take of "When Your Lover Has Gone".[10] Rita Kirwan of Music magazine witnessed one of the sessions, and her account goes thus:

Sinatra takes a gulp of the lukewarm coffee remaining in the cup most recently handed to him, and the he lifts the inevitable hat from his head a little, and plops it right back, almost as if he wanted to relieve the pressure from the hat band. The studio empties fast; just music stands and chairs remain. Sinatra flops onto one of the chairs, crosses his legs, and hums a fragment of one of the songs he's been recording. He waves to the night janitor now straightening up the studio, and says: "Jeez, what crazy working hours we got. We both should've been plumbers, [10] huh?"

In the Wee Small Hours

54

Release
The album was released in April 1955. It peaked at number 2 on the Billboard 200, where it remained for 18 weeks, the longest time Sinatra had held a spot in the top-ten at the time, and also his highest charting album since Songs by Sinatra. On September 6, 2002, it was certified Gold by the RIAA, meaning it had shifted over 500,000 units. In the 1980s, the album was reissued with an abridged track listing.[11]

Critical reception Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rolling Stone Rating [12] [13]

Since its release, In the Wee Small Hours has been regarded as one of Sinatra's best, often being ranked alongside Songs for Swingin' Lovers! (1956) and Frank Sinatra Sings for Only the Lonely (1958). It is also considered by many to be one of the best vocal jazz releases of all time. acclaimedmusic.net, a website which aggregates musical accolades, names ...Hours the 3rd most acclaimed album of the 50s (...Swingin' Lovers! being one place behind it), with Kind of Blue by Miles Davis and Elvis Presley's self titled début album in front. It also names the album the 258th most acclaimed album of all time.[5] Stephen Thomas Erlewine commented in Allmusic that the album had an authentic melancholy mood, and is "one of Sinatra's most jazz-oriented performances".[14] Another critic called the album "...perhaps the definitive musical evocation of loneliness".[10]

Accolades
Publication Amazon.com Gear Blender Rolling Stone Accolade 10 Best Albums by Decade (50s) The 100 Greatest Albums of the Century Year Rank

1999 3[5] 1999 [5]

The 100 Greatest American Albums of All Time 2002 54[5] The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time 2003 100[6] 2005 N/A[8] 2006 N/A[15] 2007 11[16]

1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die Time Mojo The All-TIME 100 Albums 100 Records That Changed the World

Legacy
The title track, "In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning", has been recorded by a number of artists following Sinatra's version, including Johnny Hartman, Astrud Gilberto, Lou Rawls, Carly Simon, Art Blakey, Count Basie and His Orchestra, Andy Williams, Wes Montgomery, Ruby Braff, Jamie Cullum, John Mayer, Susan Wong, and many others. A cover version of the title track is also featured as the last track on Curtis Stigers' 2009 album, Lost in Dreams. In his autobiography, B.B. King speaks about how he was, and is, a "Sinatra nut" and how he went to bed

In the Wee Small Hours every night listening to "In the Wee Small Hours." [17] Tom Waits has named it one of his favourite albums.[18] His album The Heart of Saturday Night features cover artwork based on In the Wee Small Hours. Per the biography "Divided Soul," Marvin Gaye cited it as a favorite and an inspiration for his posthumously released "ballad" album Vulnerable along with Billie Holiday's "Lady in Satin."

55

Track listing
Side 1 [19] Writing Length 3:00 3:30 2:35 3:42 2:49 3:24 2:48 3:10

No. Title

1. "In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning" Bob Hilliard, David Mann 2. "Mood Indigo" 3. "Glad to Be Unhappy" 4. "I Get Along Without You Very Well" 5. "Deep in a Dream" 6. "I See Your Face Before Me" 7. "Can't We Be Friends?" 8. "When Your Lover Has Gone" Barney Bigard, Duke Ellington, Irving Mills Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart Rodgers, Hart Eddie DeLange, Jimmy Van Heusen Howard Dietz, Arthur Schwartz Paul James, Kay Swift Einar Aaron Swan

Side 2

[19] Writing Cole Porter Length 2:35 3:17 2:59 3:46 2:42 2:57 3:05 3:33

No. Title 9. "What Is This Thing Called Love?"

10. "Last Night When We Were Young" Harold Arlen, Yip Harburg 11. "I'll Be Around" 12. "Ill Wind" 13. "It Never Entered My Mind" 14. "Dancing on the Ceiling" 15. "I'll Never Be the Same" 16. "This Love of Mine" Alec Wilder Arlen, Ted Koehler Rodgers, Hart Rodgers, Hart Gus Kahn, Matty Malneck, Frank Signorelli Sol Parker, Henry W. Sanicola, Jr., Frank Sinatra

2007 Re-release Bonus Tracks No. Title

[20] Writing Length 3:08 2:55

17. "Three Coins in the Fountain" Jule Styne, Sammy Cahn 18. "Young at Heart" Johnny Richards, Carolyn Leigh

In the Wee Small Hours

56

Selected personnel
• • • • Frank Sinatra – vocals Voyle Gilmore – producer [21] Nelson Riddle – arranger, conductor[21] Musicians include: Victor Bay, Alexander Beller, Harry Bluestone, Nathan Ross, Mischa Russell, Paul Shure, Felix Slatkin, Marshall Sosson (violins), James Arkatov, Cy Bernard, Armand Kaproff, Ray Kramer, Edgar Lustgarten, Kurt Reher, Joseph Saxon, Eleanor Slatkin (celli), Arthur Gleghorn, Luella Howard, Jules Kinsler, George Poole (flutes), John Cave, Vincent DeRosa, Joseph Eger, Richard Perissi (French horns), Bill Miller (piano), George Van Eps (7-string guitar), Phil Stephens (bass), Lou Singer (drums), Kathryn Julye (harp).

References
[1] Annotated liner notes, Pete Welding. In the Wee Small Hours. Capitol Records, 1998 CD release. [2] Jim Cullen (2001-06-01). Restless in the promised land (http:/ / books. google. com/ books?id=5Ny7Z1c-4zEC& pg=PA98#v=onepage& q& f=false). Rowman & Littlefield, 2001. p. 98. ISBN 978-1-58051-093-6. . Retrieved 9 April 2011. [3] Chris Rojek (2004-09-27). Frank Sinatra (http:/ / books. google. com/ ?id=F4DEdXSMYikC& pg=PA43& dq=The+ Voice+ of+ Frank+ Sinatra+ concept+ album#v=onepage& q& f=false). Polity, 2004. p. 43. ISBN 978-0-7456-3091-5. . Retrieved 9 April 2011. [4] http:/ / www. riaa. com/ goldandplatinumdata. php?content_selector=gold-platinum-searchable-database ITWSH riaa certification [5] http:/ / acclaimedmusic. net/ + http:/ / www. acclaimedmusic. net/ Current/ A1785. htm [6] "500 Greatest Albums: In the Wee Small Hours - Frank Sinatra | Rolling Stone Music | Lists" (http:/ / www. rollingstone. com/ music/ lists/ 500-greatest-albums-of-all-time-19691231/ in-the-wee-small-hours-frank-sinatra-19691231). . Retrieved 15 June 2011. [7] Kaplan, James (2010). Frank the Voice. Doubleday. [8] Robert Dimery; Michael Lydon (23 March 2010). 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die: Revised and Updated Edition. Universe. p. 22. ISBN 978-0-7893-2074-2. [9] http:/ / awardsdatabase. oscars. org/ ampas_awards/ DisplayMain. jsp?curTime=1335062190222 [10] Johnny Black; Mark Brend (2008). Classic Track Back to Back: Albums. Thunder Bay Press. pp. 8–12. ISBN 978-1-59223-872-9. [11] "Frank Sinatra: In The Wee Small Hours [Abridged] 1987 Capitol 46571" (http:/ / sinatrafamily. com/ album/ in-the-wee-small-hours-abridged-1453/ ). Sinatrafamily.com. . Retrieved 2012-01-11. [12] In the Wee Small Hours (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r24092) at Allmusic [13] http:/ / www. rocklistmusic. co. uk/ rs5star_ed1. htm Rolling Stone review [14] Stephen Thomas Erlewine. "In the Wee Small Hours - Frank Sinatra | AllMusic" (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ in-the-wee-small-hours-r24092/ review). . Retrieved 15 June 2011. [15] "All-Time 100 Albums" (http:/ / www. time. com/ time/ 2006/ 100albums/ 0,27693,In_the_Wee_Small_Hours,00. html). Time. 2 November 2006. . [16] http:/ / www. acclaimedmusic. net/ Current/ A1785. htm + http:/ / pub37. bravenet. com/ forum/ static/ show. php?usernum=3172289350& frmid=0& msgid=714055 Mojo's 100 records that changed the world list [17] King, B.B. and Daniel Ritz. Blue All Around Me, 1999. [18] Tom Waits (22 March 2005). "Tom Waits on his cherished albums of all time | Music | The Observer" (http:/ / www. guardian. co. uk/ music/ 2005/ mar/ 20/ popandrock1). London: Guardian. . Retrieved 2012-01-11. [19] "Frank Sinatra - In The Wee Small Hours (Vinyl, LP) at Discogs" (http:/ / www. discogs. com/ Frank-Sinatra-In-The-Wee-Small-Hours/ release/ 1376047). . Retrieved 15 June 2011. [20] Sinatra, Frank. Three Original Hit Albums CD, Disc 3. Not Now Music Limited, 2007. [21] "In the Wee Small Hours - Frank Sinatra" (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ in-the-wee-small-hours-r24092/ credits). AllMusic. . Retrieved 2012-01-11.

Songs for Swingin' Lovers!

57

Songs for Swingin' Lovers!
Songs for Swingin' Lovers!
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded March 1956 October 17, 1955, January 9 – 12, 16, 1956 Capitol Records Studios (Melrose Avenue, Hollywood, Los Angeles, California) Vocal jazz, Traditional pop music 43:59 Capitol W653 Voyle Gilmore Frank Sinatra chronology

Genre Length Label

Producer

In the Wee Small Hours (1955)

Songs for Swingin' Lovers (1956) Post 1957 album cover

This Is Sinatra! (1956)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Songs for Swingin' Lovers! is the tenth studio album recorded by the American singer Frank Sinatra for Capitol Records, it was arranged by Nelson Riddle and released in March 1956.[2] It took an alternative tack after In the Wee Small Hours (1954), recording existing pop standards in a hipper, jazzier fashion, revealing an overall exuberance in the vein of Songs for Young Lovers and Swing Easy!. The original cover had Sinatra facing away from the young couple, but in 1957 Capitol altered the cover with a new image of Sinatra facing the couple. All CD releases have retained the new cover. In 2000 the album was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame, and ranked number 306 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 greatest albums of all time in 2003. The album was the first ever number one album in the UK. It was knocked off the top after two weeks by Carousel (the 1956 movie's soundtrack).

Songs for Swingin' Lovers!

58

Track listing
1. "You Make Me Feel So Young" (Josef Myrow, Mack Gordon) – 2:57 2. "It Happened in Monterey" (Mabel Wayne, Billy Rose) – 2:36 3. "You're Getting to be a Habit with Me" (Harry Warren, Al Dubin) – 2:19 4. "You Brought a New Kind of Love to Me" (Sammy Fain, Irving Kahal, Pierre Norman) – 2:48 5. "Too Marvelous for Words" (Richard A. Whiting, Johnny Mercer) – 2:29 6. "Old Devil Moon" (Burton Lane, E.Y. Harburg) – 3:56 7. "Pennies From Heaven" (Arthur Johnston, Johnny Burke) – 2:44 8. "Love is Here to Stay" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) – 2:42 9. "I've Got You Under My Skin" (Cole Porter) – 3:43 10. "I Thought About You" (Jimmy Van Heusen, Mercer) – 2:30 11. "We'll Be Together Again" (Carl T. Fischer, Frankie Laine) – 4:26 12. "Makin' Whoopee" (Walter Donaldson, Gus Kahn) – 3:06 13. "Swingin' Down the Lane" (Isham Jones, Kahn) – 2:54 14. "Anything Goes" (Porter) – 2:43 15. "How About You?" (Burton Lane, Ralph Freed) – 2:45 An additional track, "Memories of You", was recorded during the sessions but ultimately left off the album. (As a slow ballad, it was deemed inappropriate an album of "swingin'" uptempo numbers.) While Sinatra would re-record the tune with Axel Stordahl in 1961 for the Point of No Return album, the 1956 recording with Riddle would remain unreleased until its inclusion on the Capitol Years compilation in 1990.

Selected personnel
• Frank Sinatra – vocals • Nelson Riddle – arranger, conductor

Chart positions
Album
Chart (1956) Peak position [3] 1

UK Albums Chart

References
[1] Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. Songs for Swingin' Lovers! (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r24097) at Allmusic [2] Songs for Swingin' Lovers! (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r24097) at Allmusic [3] "Chart Stats - Frank Sinatra - Songs For Swingin' Lovers" (http:/ / www. chartstats. com/ albuminfo. php?id=1495). chartstats.com. . Retrieved 8 May 2011.

External links
• #306 on the Rolling Stone 500 Greatest Albums of All Time (http://www.rollingstone.com/news/story/_/id/ 6599187)

Close to You

59

Close to You
Close to You
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released 1957

Recorded March 8, April 4 – 5, November 1, 1956 at Capitol Studio A, Hollywood, Los Angeles, California Genre Length Label Vocal Jazz, Classic pop 54:12 Capitol

Producer Voyle Gilmore Frank Sinatra chronology

This Is Sinatra! (1956)

Close to You (1957)

A Swingin' Affair! (1957)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Close to You is the eleventh studio album by Frank Sinatra, accompanied by the Hollywood String Quartet. The album was recorded over a period of eight months and five different sessions, and was arranged by Nelson Riddle. For its CD release, the album was retitled Close to You and More, referencing the bonus tracks.

Track listing
1. "Close to You" (Al Hoffman, Carl G. Lampl, Jerry Livingston) – 3:37 2. "P.S. I Love You" (Gordon Jenkins, Johnny Mercer) – 4:21 3. "Love Locked Out" (Max Kester, Ray Noble) – 2:41 4. "Everything Happens to Me" (Tom Adair, Matt Dennis) – 3:20 5. "It's Easy to Remember (And So Hard to Forget)" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) – 3:34 6. "Don't Like Goodbyes" (Harold Arlen, Truman Capote) – 4:51 7. "With Every Breath I Take" (Ralph Rainger, Leo Robin) – 3:38 8. "Blame It on My Youth" (Edward Heyman, Oscar Levant) – 2:58 9. "It Could Happen to You" (Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen) – 3:13 10. "I've Had My Moments" (Walter Donaldson, Gus Kahn) – 3:47 11. "I Couldn't Sleep a Wink Last Night" (Harold Adamson, Jimmy McHugh) – 3:25 12. "The End of a Love Affair" (Edward Redding) – 4:11 Cd reissue bonus tracks not included on the original 1957 release: 13. "If It's the Last Thing I Do" (Sammy Cahn, Saul Chaplin) – 4:00

Close to You 14. "There's a Flaw in My Flue (Burke, Van Heusen) – 2:41 15. "Wait till You See Her" (Rodgers, Hart) – 3:08

60

Selected personnel
• • • • • • • Frank Sinatra – vocals The Hollywood String Quartet: Felix Slatkin – violin, leader Paul Shure – violin Eleanor Aller – cello Alan Dinkin – viola Nelson Riddle – arranger, conductor

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r24155

A Swingin' Affair!
A Swingin' Affair!
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released 1957

Recorded November 15–28, 1956 at Capitol Studio A, Hollywood, Los Angeles Genre Length Label Vocal Jazz, Classic pop 47:49 Capitol

Producer Voyle Gilmore Frank Sinatra chronology

Close to You (1957)

A Swingin' Affair! (1957)

Where Are You? (1957)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

A Swingin' Affair! is the twelfth studio album by Frank Sinatra. It is claimed to be the sequel to Songs for Swingin' Lovers. "The Lady Is a Tramp" was bumped from the original album and replaced with "No One Ever Tells You", which had been recorded months earlier. Later, "The Lady is a Tramp" appeared on the soundtrack for Pal Joey. It was restored to the album for the compact disc release.

A Swingin' Affair!

61

Track listing
1. "Night and Day" (Cole Porter)  – 3:58 2. "I Wish I Were in Love Again" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart)  – 2:27 3. "I Got Plenty o' Nuttin'" (DuBose Heyward, George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin)  – 3:09 4. "I Guess I'll Have to Change My Plan" (Arthur Schwartz, Howard Dietz)  – 2:23 5. "Nice Work if You Can Get It" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin)  – 2:20 6. "Stars Fell on Alabama" (Frank Perkins, Mitchell Parish)  – 2:37 7. "No One Ever Tells You" (Hub Atwood, Carroll Coates)  – 3:23 8. "I Won't Dance" (Jerome Kern, Jimmy McHugh, Oscar Hammerstein II, Otto Harbach, Dorothy Fields)  – 3:21 9. "The Lonesome Road" (Nat Shilkret, Gene Austin)  – 3:53 10. "At Long Last Love" (Porter)  – 2:23 11. "You'd Be So Nice to Come Home To" (Porter)  – 2:03 12. "I Got It Bad (And That Ain't Good)" (Duke Ellington, Paul Francis Webster)  – 3:21 13. "From This Moment On" (Porter)  – 3:50 14. "If I Had You" (Jimmy Campbell, Reginald Connelly, Ted Shapiro)  – 2:35 15. "Oh! Look at Me Now" (Joe Bushkin, John DeVries)  – 2:48 Cd reissue bonus track not included on the original 1957 release: 16. "The Lady Is a Tramp" (Rodgers, Hart)  – 3:14

Chart positions
Chart Year Peak position

UK Albums Chart

[2] 1957 1

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra – vocals • Nelson Riddle – arranger, conductor

References
[1] A Swingin' Affair! (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r24147) at Allmusic [2] "Chart Stats – Frank Sinatra – A Swingin' Affair" (http:/ / www. chartstats. com/ release. php?release=35828). chartstats.com. . Retrieved 26 May 2011.

Where Are You?

62

Where Are You?
Where Are You?
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer 1957 April 10-May 1, 1957 at Capitol Studio A, Hollywood, Los Angeles Vocal Jazz, Classic pop 53:57 Capitol Voyle Gilmore Frank Sinatra chronology

A Swingin' Affair! (1957)

Where Are You? (1957)

A Jolly Christmas from Frank Sinatra (1957)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Where Are You? is the thirteenth studio album by Frank Sinatra. This is the first album Sinatra recorded at Capitol without Nelson Riddle, as well as the first he recorded in stereo. It would later be re-issued under the name The Night We Called It a Day.

Track listing
1. "Where Are You?" (Harold Adamson, Jimmy McHugh) – 3:30 2. "The Night We Called It a Day" (Matt Dennis, Tom Adair) – 3:28 3. "I Cover the Waterfront" (Johnny Green, Edward Heyman) – 2:58 4. "Maybe You'll Be There" (Rube Bloom, Sammy Gallop) – 3:07 5. "Laura" (Johnny Mercer, David Raksin) – 3:28 6. "Lonely Town" (Leonard Bernstein, Betty Comden, Adolph Green) – 4:12 7. "Autumn Leaves" (Jacques Prévert, Mercer, Joseph Kosma) – 2:52 8. "I'm a Fool to Want You" (Frank Sinatra, Jack Wolf, Joel Herron) – 4:51 9. "I Think of You" (Jack Elliott, Don Marcotte) – 3:04 10. "Where Is the One?" (Alec Wilder, Edwin Finckel) – 3:13 11. "There's No You" (Tom Adair, Hal Hopper) – 3:48 12. "Baby Won't You Please Come Home" (Charles Warfield, Clarence Williams) – 3:00 Cd reissue bonus tracks not included on the original 1957 release: 13. "I Can Read Between the Lines" (David Franklin, Ray Getzov) – 2:43 14. "It Worries Me" (Fritz Schultz-Reichelt, Carl Sigman) – 2:53

Where Are You? 15. "Rain (Falling from the Skies)" (Robert Mellin, Gunther Finlay) – 3:25 16. "Don't Worry 'Bout Me" (Rube Bloom, Ted Koehler) – 3:08 The song "I Think of You" is based on lyrical second theme in E flat major from The Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor, Op. 18, I. Moderato by Sergei Rachmaninoff.

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Personnel
• Frank Sinatra – vocals • Gordon Jenkins – arranger, conductor

Recording dates
• • • • • • April 30, 1953 – "Don't Worry 'Bout Me" December 9, 1953 – "Rain (Falling from the Skies)" April 10, 1957 – "The Night We Called It a Day", "Autumn Leaves", "Where Is the One?", "There's No You" April 29, 1957 – "I Cover the Waterfront", "Laura", "Lonely Town", "Baby Won't You Please Come Home" May 1, 1957 – "Where Are You?", "Maybe You'll Be There", "I'm a Fool to Want You", "I Think of You" May 2, 1953 – "I Can Read Between the Lines"

• May 13, 1954 – "It Worries Me"

References
[1] Where Are You? (Frank Sinatra album) (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r78710) at Allmusic

A Jolly Christmas from Frank Sinatra
A Jolly Christmas from Frank Sinatra
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label September 1957 July 10-May 1, 1957 at Capitol Studio A, Hollywood, Los Angeles Classic pop 38:17 Capitol Frank Sinatra chronology

Where Are You? (1957)

A Jolly Christmas from Frank Sinatra (1957)

Come Fly With Me (1957)

Alternative cover 2001 reissue

A Jolly Christmas from Frank Sinatra

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Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

A Jolly Christmas from Frank Sinatra is a Christmas album by American singer Frank Sinatra, originally released by Capitol Records in 1957. This was Sinatra's first full-length Christmas album. It features the Ralph Brewster Singers along with an orchestra conducted by Gordon Jenkins. Capitol reissued the album in 1963 with different cover art and a new title, The Sinatra Christmas Album, a title which also featured on the album's initial 1987 compact disc pressing. The original title and cover were eventually restored for subsequent CD pressings in 1990 and 1999. In 2001, the album art was altered from its 1957 version. The CD bonus tracks were originally issued on a 1954 Capitol 45 rpm single, arranged and conducted by Nelson Riddle. In 2007 the album was reissued yet again, with a "50th Anniversary" banner placed atop the 2001 cover art and an additional bonus track (a vintage radio PSA that Sinatra did for the American Lung Association's "Christmas Seals" campaign) added. In 2010, the album was reissued on vinyl for the first time in 40 years, exclusively to independent record stores.[2]

Track listing
1. "Jingle Bells" (James Pierpont) – 2:00 2. "The Christmas Song" (Mel Tormé, Robert Wells) – 3:28 3. "Mistletoe and Holly" (Hank Sanicola, Frank Sinatra, Doc Stanford) – 2:18 4. "I'll Be Home for Christmas" (Kim Gannon, Walter Kent, Buck Ram) – 3:11 5. "The Christmas Waltz" (Sammy Cahn, Jule Styne) – 3:03 6. "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas" (Hugh Martin, Ralph Blane) – 3:29 7. "The First Noel" (William B. Sandys) – 2:44 8. "Hark! The Herald Angels Sing" (Felix Mendelssohn, Charles Wesley) – 2:24 9. "O Little Town of Bethlehem" (Lewis H. Redner, Phillip Brooks) – 2:06 10. "Adeste Fideles" ("O, Come All Ye Faithful") (John Francis Wade) – 2:34 11. "It Came Upon the Midnight Clear" (Edmund Sears, Richard Storrs Willis) – 2:51 12. "Silent Night" (Franz Gruber, Josef Mohr) – 2:31 CD reissue bonus tracks 1. "White Christmas" (1954 single version) (Irving Berlin) – 2:37 2. "The Christmas Waltz" (1954 single version) (Sammy Cahn, Jule Styne) – 3:01

A Jolly Christmas from Frank Sinatra

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Personnel
• • • • Frank Sinatra – Vocals The Ralph Brewer Singers – Vocals Gordon Jenkins – Arranger, Conductor Nelson Riddle – Arranger, Conductor (CD bonus tracks)

References
[1] A Jolly Christmas from Frank Sinatra (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r67977) at Allmusic [2] Record Store Day: Black Friday Exclusives 2010 (http:/ / www. recordstoreday. com/ Page/ 958)

Come Fly with Me
Come Fly with Me
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer 1958 October 1, 3, 8, 1957, Capitol Studio A, Hollywood, Los Angeles Vocal jazz, Traditional pop music 46:08 Capitol Voyle Gilmore Frank Sinatra chronology

A Jolly Christmas from Frank Sinatra (1957)

Come Fly with Me (1958)

This Is Sinatra Volume 2 (1958)

Come Fly with Me is an album by American singer Frank Sinatra, released in 1958.[1] Sinatra's first collaboration with arranger/conductor Billy May, Come Fly with Me was designed as a musical trip around the world. Sammy Cahn and Jimmy Van Heusen wrote the title track at Sinatra's request.[2] May would arrange two other Capitol albums for Sinatra, Come Dance with Me! (1958) and Come Swing with Me! (1961). In his autobiography All You Need is Ears, producer George Martin wrote of having visited the Capitol Tower during the recording sessions for the album. According to Martin's book, Sinatra expressed intense dislike for the album cover upon being first shown a mock-up by producer Voyle Gilmore, suggesting it looked like an advertisement for TWA.[3] The album reached #1 on the Billboard album chart in its second week, and remained at the top for five weeks.[4] At the inaugural Grammy Awards Come Fly with Me was nominated for the Grammy Award for Album of the Year. Though recorded in true stereo, "Come Fly with Me" was released to record stores in 1958 in monaural only; a standard practice by Capitol records at the time. The label finally released the stereo version in 1962. [5]

Come Fly with Me

66

Track listing
Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [6]

1. "Come Fly with Me" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) – 3:19 2. "Around the World" (Victor Young, Harold Adamson) – 3:20 3. "Isle of Capri" (Will Grosz, Jimmy Kennedy) – 2:29 4. "Moonlight in Vermont" (Karl Suessdorf, John Blackburn) – 3:32 5. "Autumn in New York" (Vernon Duke) – 4:37 6. "On the Road to Mandalay" (Oley Speaks, Rudyard Kipling) – 3:28 7. "Let's Get Away from It All" (Matt Dennis, Tom Adair) – 2:11 8. "April in Paris" (Duke, Yip Harburg) – 2:50 9. "London By Night" (Carroll Coates) – 3:30 10. "Aquarela do Brasil" (Ary Barroso, Bob Russell) – 2:55 11. "Blue Hawaii" (Leo Robin, Ralph Rainger) – 2:44 12. "It's Nice to go Trav'ling" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 3:52 Cd reissue bonus tracks not included on the original 1958 release: 13. "Chicago" (Fred Fisher) – 2:14 14. "South of the Border" (Jimmy Kennedy, Michael Carr) – 2:50 15. "I Love Paris" (Cole Porter) – 1:49

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - vocals • Billy May - arranger, conductor

On the Road to Mandalay
"On the Road to Mandalay", based on Rudyard Kipling's poem Mandalay was replaced on some versions of the album after the Kipling family objected to Sinatra's interpretation. When the album was initially released in the United Kingdom, the song "French Foreign Legion" replaced "Mandalay", while the song "Chicago" (and "It Happened in Monterey" on some pressings) were used in other parts of the British Commonwealth. Sinatra sang the song in Australia, during a concert tour in 1959, and relayed the story of the Kipling family objection to the song and how the Australian release of Come Fly with Me came to contain "Chicago".

Come Fly with Me

67

References
[1] Songs By Sinatra: Records - Albums Page (http:/ / www. songsbysinatra. com/ records/ albums. html) [2] Songwriters Hall of Fame (http:/ / www. songwritershalloffame. org/ exhibit_bio. asp?exhibitId=5) [3] "All you need is ears - George Martin, Jeremy Hornsby - Google Books" (http:/ / books. google. com/ books?id=4Yoio9MewhcC& pg=PA84& dq="george+ martin"+ + + "frank+ sinatra"& hl=en& ei=dS9TTJbpFsagnQfXsemuDw& sa=X& oi=book_result& ct=result& resnum=1& ved=0CC8Q6AEwAA#v=onepage& q="come fly with me"& f=false). Books.google.com. . Retrieved 2012-01-05. [4] Joel Whitburn, Top Pop Albums 1955-2001 (Menomonee Falls, WI: Record Research, 2001), 797. [5] "SH Forums - View Single Post - Sinatra / Capitol 180g LPs: Wee Small Hours, Come Fly with Me, Come Dance with Me*" (http:/ / www. stevehoffman. tv/ forums/ showpost. php?p=5025828& postcount=167). Stevehoffman.tv. 2009-12-16. . Retrieved 2012-01-05. [6] "Allmusic review" (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r76505). .

Frank Sinatra Sings for Only the Lonely
Frank Sinatra Sings for Only the Lonely
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released September 1958

Recorded May 29, June 24, 26, September 11, 1958 at Capitol Studio A, Hollywood, Los Angeles, California Genre Length Label Vocal jazz, Traditional pop music 59:45 Capitol

Producer Voyle Gilmore Frank Sinatra chronology

This Is Sinatra Volume 2 (1958)

Frank Sinatra Sings for Only the Lonely (1958)

Come Dance with Me! (1959)

Frank Sinatra Sings for Only the Lonely (also known as Sings for Only the Lonely or simply Only the Lonely) is a studio LP by the American singer Frank Sinatra. It was released in the United States by Capitol Records, in September 1958.[1] The album consists of a collection of ballads, following a formula similar to Sinatra's previous albums In the Wee Small Hours (1955) and Where Are You? (1957).[2] At the time of the recording, Sinatra's divorce from Ava Gardner had been finalized, and Nelson Riddle (who wrote the album's arrangements) had recently suffered the deaths of his mother and daughter.[3] Of these events, Riddle remarked: "If I can attach events like that to music... perhaps Only the Lonely was the result."[4] Sinatra had planned to record the album with arranger Gordon Jenkins, with whom he had worked on Where Are You?. Since Jenkins was unavailable at the time, Sinatra chose to work with his frequent collaborator, Riddle. The three tracks conducted by Riddle at the first session were not used, and the subsequent sessions were conducted by Felix Slatkin, after Riddle went on tour with Nat King Cole.[4] On May 25, 1958, Sinatra unsuccessfully attempted to record Billy Strayhorn's ballad "Lush Life". A bootleg recording of Sinatra's attempt at "Lush life" exists; this was the only time Sinatra sang the song in his career.[5] According to John Rockwell's book, Sinatra: An American Classic, when asked at a party in the mid-1970s if he had a favorite album among his recordings, without hesitation, Sinatra chose Only the Lonely.[6] Rockwell writes at length about Sinatra's performance the final track, Harold Arlen and Johnny Mercer's "One for My Baby (and One

Frank Sinatra Sings for Only the Lonely More for the Road)", which also provided the musical accompaniment for Twyla Tharp's Sinatra ballets.[7] The album cover is adorned with a portrait of Sinatra's face as a tragic, Pagliacci-like clown, painted by Nicholas Volpe; on the back of the album is another of Sinatra's recurrent visual motifs: a lamppost.

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Reception
Q Magazine placed Only the Lonely at #1 on the '15 Greatest Stoner Albums of All Time'.[8] The album also peaked at #1 on Billboard's pop album chart during a 120 week chart-run, and was certified Gold on June 21, 1962, nearly four years after its release.[9]

Grammy Awards
Sinatra was nominated for five Grammys at the inaugural Grammy Awards in 1959. Frank Sinatra Sings for Only the Lonely and Sinatra's other album released in 1958, Come Fly with Me, were nominated for the Album of the Year, and Frank Sinatra Sings for Only the Lonely won the Grammy Award for Best Album Cover.

Track listing
Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [10]

1. "Only the Lonely" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) – 4:10 2. "Angel Eyes" (Matt Dennis, Earl Brent) – 3:46 3. "What's New?" (Bob Haggart, Johnny Burke) – 5:13 4. "It's a Lonesome Old Town" (Harry Tobias, Charles Kisco) – 4:18 5. "Willow Weep for Me" (Ann Ronell) – 4:49 6. "Goodbye" (Gordon Jenkins) – 5:45 7. "Blues in the Night" (Harold Arlen, Johnny Mercer) – 4:44 8. "Guess I'll Hang My Tears Out to Dry" (Cahn, Jule Styne) – 4:00 9. "Ebb Tide" (Robert Maxwell, Carl Sigman) – 3:18 10. "Spring is Here" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) – 4:47 11. "Gone with the Wind" (Allie Wrubel, Herb Magidson) – 5:15 12. "One for My Baby (and One More for the Road)" (Arlen, Mercer) – 4:23 Bonus tracks included on the 1987 CD release: 13. "Sleep Warm" (Lew Spence, Marilyn Keith, Alan Bergman) – 2:45 14. "Where or When" (Rodgers, Hart) – 2:25

Frank Sinatra Sings for Only the Lonely

69

Selected personnel
• • • • • Frank Sinatra – vocals Nelson Riddle – arranger Felix Slatkin – conductor Bill Miller – piano Gus Bivona – alto saxophone

Notes
[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] Frank Sinatra Sings for Only the Lonely (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r67980) at Allmusic Summers, Antony and Swan, Robbyn. Sinatra: The Life. Doubleday, 2005. ISBN 0-552-15331-1. p. 271. Ingham, Chris. The Rough Guide to Frank Sinatra. Rough Guides Ltd. June 30, 2005. ISBN 1-84353-414-2. p. 174. Ingham, p. 174 "Frank Sinatra: Lush Life | Randy Wong | Audio" (http:/ / www. redroom. com/ audio/ frank-sinatra-lush-life). Red Room. . Retrieved 2012-01-06. [6] Petkov, Steven and Mustazza, Leonard. The Frank Sinatra Reader. Oxford, 1995. ISBN 978-0-19-511389-1. p. 70. [7] Petkov and Mustazza, p. 71 [8] "Rocklist.net...Q - 150 Rock Lists" (http:/ / www. rocklistmusic. co. uk/ q150lists. htm). Rocklistmusic.co.uk. . Retrieved 2012-01-06. [9] "Gold & Platinum Database –Frank Sinatra" (http:/ / www. riaa. com/ goldandplatinumdata. php?resultpage=1& table=SEARCH_RESULTS& action=& title=& artist=frank sinatra& format=& debutLP=& category=& sex=& releaseDate=& requestNo=& type=& level=& label=& company=& certificationDate=& awardDescription=& catalogNo=& aSex=& rec_id=& charField=& gold=& platinum=& multiPlat=& level2=& certDate=& album=& id=& after=& before=& startMonth=1& endMonth=1& startYear=1958& endYear=2009& sort=Artist& perPage=25). RIAA. 2008-05-01. . Retrieved 2008-05-01. [10] "Allmusic review" (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r67980). .

References
• Ingham, Chris. The Rough Guide to Frank Sinatra. Rough Guides Ltd. June 30, 2005. ISBN 1-84353-414-2 • Summers, Antony and Swan, Robbyn. Sinatra: The Life. Doubleday, 2005. ISBN 0-552-15331-1

Come Dance with Me!

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Come Dance with Me!
Come Dance with Me!
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released January 1959

Recorded December 9, December 22, 23, 1958 at Capitol Studio A, Hollywood, Los Angeles, California Genre Length Label Vocal jazz, Traditional pop music 40:12 Capitol

Producer Dave Cavanaugh Frank Sinatra chronology

Frank Sinatra Sings for Only the Lonely (1958)

Come Dance with Me! (1959)

Look to Your Heart (1959)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Come Dance with Me! is an album by the American singer Frank Sinatra, released in 1959.[2] It was the most successful album of Frank Sinatra's career, spending two and a half years on the Billboard charts. Stereo Review wrote in 1959 that "Sinatra swaggers his way with effortless verve through an appealing collection of bouncy standards, aptly described in the album notes as vocals that dance". At the Grammy Awards of 1960, Come Dance with Me! won the Grammy Award for Album of the Year, as well as Grammy Award for Best Vocal Performance, Male for Sinatra. Billy May won the Grammy Award for Best Arrangement. Come Dance With Me stayed on Billboard's Pop album chart for 140 weeks, peaking at #2.

CD Releases
In 1987, Capitol released Come Dance with Me! on compact disc with four extra songs not found on the original LP. The mastering for this release is somewhat flat compared to other Sinatra albums released on CD at this time. The 1998 remastered "Entertainer of the Century" version vastly improves the 1987 CD release and also includes the four extra songs found on the 1987 version.

Track listing
1. "Come Dance with Me" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) – 2:31 2. "Something's Gotta Give" (Johnny Mercer) – 2:38 3. "Just in Time" (Jule Styne, Betty Comden, Adolph Green) – 2:24 4. "Dancing in the Dark" (Arthur Schwartz, Howard Dietz) – 2:26 5. "Too Close for Comfort" (Jerry Bock, Larry Holofcener, George Weiss) – 2:34

Come Dance with Me! 6. "I Could Have Danced All Night" (Alan Jay Lerner, Frederick Loewe) – 2:40 7. "Saturday Night (Is the Loneliest Night of the Week)" (Cahn, Styne) – 1:54 8. "Day In, Day Out" (Rube Bloom, Mercer) – 3:25 9. "Cheek to Cheek" (Irving Berlin) – 3:06 10. "Baubles, Bangles & Beads" (Robert Wright, George Forrest) – 2:46 11. "The Song Is You" (Jerome Kern, Oscar Hammerstein II) – 2:43 12. "The Last Dance" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:11 13. 14. 15. 16. CD reissue bonus tracks not included on the original 1959 release: "It All Depends on You" (B.G. DeSylva, Lew Brown, Ray Henderson) – 2:06 "Nothing in Common" (duet with Keely Smith) (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:32 "Same Old Song and Dance" (Cahn, Van Heusen, Bobby Worth) – 2:52 "How Are Ya' Fixed for Love?" (with Keely Smith) (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:25

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Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - vocals • Keely Smith - vocals (On "Nothing in Common" and "How Are Ya' Fixed for Love?" CD bonus tracks) • Billy May - arranger, conductor • Heinie Beau - arranger

References
[1] Allmusic review (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r24122) [2] Come Dance with Me! (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r24122) at Allmusic

No One Cares
No One Cares
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released 1959

Recorded March 24, 25, 26, May 14, 1959 at Capitol Studio A, Hollywood, Los Angeles, California Genre Length Label Vocal Jazz, Classic pop 50:38 Capitol

Producer Voyle Gilmore Frank Sinatra chronology

Look to Your Heart (1959)

No One Cares (1959)

Nice 'n' Easy (1960)

No One Cares

72

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

No One Cares is a 1959 album by Frank Sinatra.[2] The album can be seen as a sequel to the Sinatra's earlier album Where Are You?, which was also arranged by Gordon Jenkins. The album was released in 1959 in both stereo and mono versions, each containing 11 songs. A 12th song, "The One I Love (Belongs to Somebody Else)," was recorded at the sessions, but left unreleased until 14 years later. In 1990, that song was released in the 3-disc set, "The Capitol Years," but whereas the 1973 release included two carefully placed intercuts (edits) to correct a gaffe in the lyrics and a less-well-played string passage, the 1990 track was presented raw, without these corrections.[3] The 1991 CD reissue of the album is a new mix from the 3-track tapes. All other issues, including the release in the 1998 UK box set, use the original 1959 stereo mix. Tracks 1 and 10, although arranged by Gordon Jenkins as part of the original concept, were conducted by Nelson Riddle (uncredited) in Mr. Jenkins' absence.[4] On CD, the final three bonus tracks had nothing to do with the original album, and are arranged and conducted by Nelson Riddle.

Track listing
1. "When No One Cares" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) – 2:42 2. "A Cottage for Sale" (Larry Conley, Willard Robison) – 3:16 3. "Stormy Weather" (Harold Arlen, Ted Koehler) – 3:20 4. "Where Do You Go?" (Arnold Sundgaard], Alec Wilder) – 2:34 5. "I Don't Stand a Ghost of a Chance with You" (Bing Crosby, Ned Washington, Victor Young) – 3:16 6. "Here's That Rainy Day" (Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen) – 3:34 7. "I Can't Get Started" (Vernon Duke, Ira Gershwin) – 4:01 8. "Why Try to Change Me Now?" (Cy Coleman, Joseph Allan McCarthy) – 3:41 9. "Just Friends" (John Klenner, Sam M. Lewis) – 3:40 10. "I'll Never Smile Again" (Ruth Lowe) – 3:46 11. "None But the Lonely Heart" (Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky, Bill Westbrook) – 3:41 12. 13. 14. 15. Bonus tracks not included on the original 1959 release: "The One I Love (Belongs to Somebody Else)" (Isham Jones, Gus Kahn) – 3:05 "This Was My Love" (Jim Harbert) – 3:27 "I Could Have Told You" (Carl Sigman, Van Heusen) – 3:18 "You Forgot All the Words (While I Still Remember the Tune)" (E.H Jay, Bernie Wayne) – 3:20

No One Cares

73

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - vocals • Gordon Jenkins - arranger, conductor

References
[1] Allmusic review (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r24110) [2] No One Cares (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r24110) at Allmusic [3] "SH Forums - View Single Post - Sinatra / Capitol Sound Quality - "No One Cares" (1959 LP)" (http:/ / www. stevehoffman. tv/ forums/ showpost. php?p=5551619& postcount=34). Stevehoffman.tv. 2010-06-18. . Retrieved 2012-03-03. [4] "Frank Sinatra - Capitol" (http:/ / www. steve-albin. com/ Artists/ Sinatra/ capitol1. htm). Steve-albin.com. . Retrieved 2012-03-03.

Nice 'n' Easy
Nice 'n' Easy
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released 1960

Recorded March 1 – 3, April 13, at Capitol Studio A, Hollywood, Los Angeles, California Genre Length Label Vocal Jazz, Classic pop 51:30 Capitol

Producer Dave Cavanaugh Frank Sinatra chronology

No One Cares (1959)

Nice 'n' Easy (1960)

All the Way (1961)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Nice 'n' Easy is a 1960 album by Frank Sinatra.[2] All the songs, with the notable exception of the title song, are sung as ballads and were arranged and conducted by Nelson Riddle. The title song was a last-minute substitute for the originally planned "The Nearness of You", that did not appear on the original LP. The album spent nine weeks at number one on the Billboard stereo album chart, and one week at number one on the corresponding mono album chart.[3] At the Grammy Awards of 1961, Nice 'n' Easy was nominated for the Grammy Award as Album of the Year, Best Male Vocal Performance, Best Arrangement.

Nice 'n' Easy

74

Track listing
1. "Nice 'n' Easy" (Alan Bergman, Marilyn Keith, Lew Spence) – 2:45 2. "That Old Feeling" (Lew Brown, Sammy Fain) – 3:33 3. "How Deep Is the Ocean?" (Irving Berlin) – 3:15 4. "I've Got a Crush on You" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) – 2:16 5. "You Go to My Head" (J. Fred Coots, Haven Gillespie) – 4:28 6. "Fools Rush In (Where Angels Fear to Tread)" (Rube Bloom, Johnny Mercer) – 3:22 7. "Nevertheless" (Bert Kalmar, Harry Ruby) – 3:18 8. "She's Funny That Way" (Neil Moret, Richard A. Whiting) – 3:55 9. "Try a Little Tenderness" (Jimmy Campbell, Reginald Connelly, Harry M. Woods) – 3:22 10. "Embraceable You" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) – 3:24 11. "Mam'selle" (Mack Gordon, Edmund Goulding) – 2:48 12. "Dream" (Mercer) – 2:57 Bonus tracks included on the CD reissue: 13. "The Nearness of You" (Hoagy Carmichael, Ned Washington) – 2:43 14. "Someone to Watch Over Me" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) – 2:57 15. "Day In, Day Out" (Bloom, Mercer) – 3:07 16. "My One and Only Love" (Robert Mellin, Guy Wood) – 3:12

Selected personnel
• Frank Sinatra – vocals • Nelson Riddle – arranger, conductor

References
[1] Allmusic review (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26395) [2] Nice 'n' Easy (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26395) at Allmusic [3] Joel Whitburn, Top Pop Albums 1955-2001 (Menomonee Falls, WI: Record Research, 2001), 1177.

Sinatra's Swingin' Session!!!

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Sinatra's Swingin' Session!!!
Sinatra's Swingin' Session
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released 1961

Recorded August 22-September 1, 1960 Capitol Studio A, Hollywood Genre Length Label Vocal Jazz, Classic pop 33:51 Capitol

Producer Dave Cavanaugh Frank Sinatra chronology

All The Way (1961)

Sinatra's Swingin' Session!!! (1961)

Ring-A-Ding-Ding (1961)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Sinatra's Swingin' Session!!! is a 1961 (see 1961 in music) album by Frank Sinatra. Six of the tracks on the album are re-recordings of a batch of songs that Sinatra had previously recorded on the Columbia album, Sing and Dance with Frank Sinatra. It was released on compact disc as Sinatra's Swingin' Session!!! And More

Track listing
1. "When You're Smiling" (Mark Fisher, Joe Goodwin, Larry Shay) – 2:00 2. "Blue Moon" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) – 2:51 3. "S'Posin'" (Paul Denniker, Andy Razaf) – 1:48 4. "It All Depends on You" (B.G. DeSylva, Lew Brown, Ray Henderson) – 2:02 5. "It's Only a Paper Moon" (Harold Arlen, Yip Harburg, Billy Rose) – 2:19 6. "My Blue Heaven" (Walter Donaldson, George A. Whiting) – 2:03 7. "Should I?" (Arthur Freed, Nacio Herb Brown) – 1:30 8. "September in the Rain" (Harry Warren, Al Dubin) – 2:58 9. "Always" (Irving Berlin) – 2:17 10. "I Can't Believe That You're in Love with Me" (Clarence Gaskill, Jimmy McHugh) – 2:25 11. "I Concentrate on You" (Cole Porter) – 2:23 12. "You Do Something to Me" (Porter) – 1:33 CD reissue bonus tracks not included on the original 1961 release: 13. "Sentimental Baby" (Alan Bergman, Marilyn Keith, Lew Spence) – 2:36

Sinatra's Swingin' Session!!! 14. "Hidden Persuasion" (Wainwright Churchill III) – 2:25 15. "Ol' McDonald" (Traditional, Bergman, Keith, Spence) – 2:41

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Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - vocals • Nelson Riddle - arranger, conductor

References
[1] Sinatra's Swingin' Session!!! (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r24146) at Allmusic

Ring-a-Ding-Ding!
Ring-a-Ding-Ding!
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label March 1961 December 19-21, 1960 Los Angeles Vocal Jazz, Classic pop 39:15 Reprise Frank Sinatra chronology

Sinatra's Swingin' Session!!! (1961)

Ring-a-Ding-Ding! (1961)

Come Swing with Me! (1961)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Mojo Rating [1] [2]

Ring-a-Ding-Ding!

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Ring-a-Ding-Ding!
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released June 7, 2011

Recorded December 19-21, 1960 Los Angeles Genre Length Label Vocal Jazz, Classic pop 44:08 Reprise Records

Ring-a-Ding-Ding! is a 1961 album by Frank Sinatra.[3] It was Sinatra's first for Reprise, and, as the initial concept was "an album without ballads", included only uptempo swing numbers.[4] The title track was written specifically for Sinatra by Sammy Cahn and Jimmy Van Heusen. The song "Have You Met Miss Jones?" was recorded for the album, though left off the final track listing. Ring-a-Ding-Ding! reached No. 4; it was given favorable reviews by Stereo Review, and, although a similar album (Sinatra's Swingin' Session!!!) was released by Capitol a mere two months prior, Ring-A-Ding-Ding! managed to maintain a 35 week stay on the charts. In the UK, the album reached No. 8 and stayed for 9 weeks on the chart. The album was reissued by Concord Records on June 7, 2011 to mark its 50th Anniversary.

Track listing From the 1961 Album Release
1. "Ring-a-Ding Ding!" (Jimmy Van Heusen, Sammy Cahn) – 2:44 2. "Let's Fall in Love" (Harold Arlen, Ted Koehler) – 2:11 3. "Be Careful, It's My Heart" (Irving Berlin) – 2:04 4. "A Foggy Day" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) – 2:17 5. "A Fine Romance" (Jerome Kern, Dorothy Fields) – 2:11 6. "In the Still of the Night" (Cole Porter) – 3:25 7. "The Coffee Song" (Bob Hilliard, Dick Miles) – 2:51 8. "When I Take My Sugar to Tea" (Irving Kahal, Sammy Fain, Pierre Norman) – 2:05 9. "Let's Face the Music and Dance" (Berlin) – 2:58 10. "You'd Be So Easy to Love" (Porter) – 2:24 11. "You and the Night and the Music" (Arthur Schwartz, Howard Dietz) – 2:36 12. "I've Got My Love to Keep Me Warm" (Berlin) – 2:52 Bonus tracks included on the 1991 CD release: 13. "Zing! Went the Strings of My Heart" (James F. Hanley) – 2:48 14. "The Last Dance" (Van Heusen, Cahn) – 2:46 15. "The Second Time Around" (Van Heusen, Cahn) – 3:03

Ring-a-Ding-Ding!

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Track listing from the 2011 Reissue Album
1. "Ring-a-Ding Ding!" (Jimmy Van Heusen, Sammy Cahn) – 2:44 2. "Let's Fall in Love" (Harold Arlen, Ted Koehler) – 2:11 3. "Be Careful, It's My Heart" (Irving Berlin) – 2:04 4. "A Foggy Day" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) – 2:17 5. "A Fine Romance" (Jerome Kern, Dorothy Fields) – 2:11 6. "In the Still of the Night" (Cole Porter) – 3:25 7. "The Coffee Song" (Bob Hilliard, Dick Miles) – 2:51 8. "When I Take My Sugar to Tea" (Irving Kahal, Sammy Fain, Pierre Norman) – 2:05 9. "Let's Face the Music and Dance" (Berlin) – 2:58 10. "You'd Be So Easy to Love" (Porter) – 2:24 11. "You and the Night and the Music" (Arthur Schwartz, Howard Dietz) – 2:36 12. "I've Got My Love to Keep Me Warm" (Berlin) – 2:52 Bonus tracks included on the 2011 reissue: 13. "Zing! Went the Strings of My Heart" [Outtake Bonus Track] (James F. Hanley) – 3:00 14. "Have You Met Miss Jones?" [Previously Unreleased Outtake] (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) – 10:18

Selected personnel
• Frank Sinatra - vocals • Johnny Mandel - arranger, conductor • Felix Slatkin - conductor

Popular Culture
Ring-a-Ding-Ding! is the name of a main quest in Fallout: New Vegas.

References
[1] [2] [3] [4] Allmusic review (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26331) Andrew Male Mojo, January 2010, Issue 194. Ring-a-Ding-Ding! (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26331) at Allmusic http:/ / blogcritics. org/ music/ article/ music-review-frank-sinatra-ring-a/

Come Swing with Me!

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Come Swing with Me!
Come Swing with Me!
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released 1961

Recorded March 20-22, 1961 Capitol Studio A, Hollywood, Los Angeles Genre Length Label Vocal jazz 43:50 Capitol

Producer Dave Cavanaugh Frank Sinatra chronology

Ring-a-Ding-Ding! (1961)

Come Swing with Me! (1961)

Sinatra Swings (1961)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Come Swing with Me! is an album by American singer Frank Sinatra, released in 1961. The album is Sinatra's final swing session with Capitol Records, as his next album, Point of No Return, would be composed mainly of torch songs. This album is possibly unique for the orchestral arrangement and stereophonic set-up by Billy May. Due to Capitol's signature "full-spectrum Stereo sound," the audience can distinctly hear the placement of specific orchestral pieces in the studio at the time of the recording, i.e. differences in brass sections from left, to right, to all together in the center. This is most apparent to the apt listener in the album's opening hit, "Day by Day".

Track listing
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. "Day by Day" (Axel Stordahl, Paul Weston, Sammy Cahn) – 2:39 "Sentimental Journey" (Les Brown, Ben Homer, Bud Green) – 3:26 "Almost Like Being in Love" (Frederick Loewe, Alan Jay Lerner) – 2:02 "Five Minutes More" (Cahn, Jule Styne) – 2:36 "American Beauty Rose" (Mack David, Redd Evans, Arthur Altman) – 2:22 "Yes Indeed!" (Sy Oliver) – 2:35 "On the Sunny Side of the Street" (Jimmy McHugh, Dorothy Fields) – 2:42 "Don't Take Your Love from Me" (Henry Nemo) – 1:59 "That Old Black Magic" (Harold Arlen, Johnny Mercer) – 4:05

10. "Lover" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) – 1:53 11. "Paper Doll" (Johnny S. Black) – 2:08 12. "I've Heard That Song Before" (Cahn, Styne) – 2:33

Come Swing with Me! Bonus tracks not included on the original 1961 release: "I Love You" (H. Thompson, H. Archer) – 2:28 "Why Should I Cry Over You" (N. Miller, C. Conn) – 2:42 "How Could You Do a Thing Like That to Me" (T. Glenn, A. Roberts) – 2:44 "River, Stay 'Way From My Door" (Harry M. Woods, Mort Dixon) – 2:38 "I Gotta Right to Sing the Blues" (Arlen, Ted Koehler) – 2:59

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13. 14. 15. 16. 17.

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - Vocals • Billy May - Arranger, Conductor • Heine Beau - Arranger (Tracks 2, 5, 8-10)

References
[1] Come Swing with Me! (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r24156) at Allmusic

I Remember Tommy
I Remember Tommy
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded October 1961 May 1-3, 1961 Los Angeles Vocal Jazz, Classic pop 41:38 Reprise Gregg Geller Frank Sinatra chronology

Genre Length Label Producer

Sinatra Swings (1961)

I Remember Tommy (1961)

Sinatra and Strings (1962)

I Remember Tommy

81

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

I Remember Tommy... is an album by Frank Sinatra, released in 1961. It was recorded as a tribute to bandleader Tommy Dorsey, and consists of re-recorded versions of songs that Sinatra had first performed or recorded with Dorsey earlier in his career. Fellow Dorsey alumnus Sy Oliver arranged and conducted the sessions.

Track listing
1. "I'm Getting Sentimental Over You" (George Bassman, Ned Washington) – 3:42 2. "Imagination" (Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen) – 3:05 3. "There Are Such Things" (George W. Meyer, Stanley Adams, Abel Baer) – 3:13 4. "East of the Sun (And West of the Moon)" (Brooks Bowman) – 3:24 5. "Daybreak" (Ferde Grofe, Harold Adamson) – 2:43 6. "Without a Song" (Vincent Youmans, Billy Rose, Edward Eliscu) – 3:39 7. "I'll Be Seeing You" (Sammy Fain, Irving Kahal) – 2:49 8. "Take Me" (Rube Bloom, Mack David) – 2:19 9. "It's Always You" (Burke, Van Heusen) – 2:49 10. "Polka Dots and Moonbeams" (Burke, Van Heusen) – 3:43 11. "It Started All Over Again" (Carl T. Fischer, Bill Carey) – 2:32 12. "The One I Love (Belongs to Somebody Else)" (Isham Jones, Gus Kahn) – 2:48 13. "In the Blue of Evening" (Tom Montgomery, Tom Adair, Al D’Artega) – 4:03 14. "I'm Getting Sentimental Over You" (Reprise) – 0:49 "In the Blue of the Evening" was added as a bonus track to the 1993 reissue, and is not available on the 1998 Entertainer of the Century remastered reissue.

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - Vocals • Sy Oliver - Arranger, Conductor

References
[1] I Remember Tommy (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r183224) at Allmusic

Sinatra and Strings

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Sinatra and Strings
Sinatra and Strings
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released January 1962

Recorded November 20, 21, 22, 1961, Hollywood, Los Angeles, California Genre Length Label Vocal Jazz, Classic pop 41:47 Reprise Frank Sinatra chronology

I Remember Tommy (1961)

Sinatra and Strings (1962)

Point of No Return (1962)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Sinatra and Strings is a 1962 album by Frank Sinatra.[2] The set of standard ballads is one of the most critically acclaimed works of Sinatra's entire Reprise period. It was Sinatra's first album with arranger Don Costa. Sinatra and Strings marked Sinatra's third recording of "Night and Day," his second recording of "Stardust" (although, on this occasion, Sinatra sang only the introductory verse), as well as his second recording of "All or Nothing At All" (Sinatra recorded his third and final version, the more commonly known swinging rendition, for Strangers in the Night in 1965).

Track listing
1. "I Hadn't Anyone Till You" (Ray Noble) – 3:44 2. "Night and Day" (Cole Porter) – 3:37 3. "Misty" (Erroll Garner, Johnny Burke) – 2:41 4. "Stardust" (Hoagy Carmichael, Mitchell Parish) – 2:48 5. "Come Rain or Come Shine" (Harold Arlen, Johnny Mercer) – 4:06 6. "It Might as Well Be Spring" (Richard Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein II) – 3:15 7. "Prisoner of Love" (Russ Columbo, Leo Robin, Clarence Gaskill) – 3:50 8. "That's All" (Bob Haymes, Alan Brandt) – 3:21 9. "All or Nothing at All" (Jack Lawrence, Arthur Altman) – 3:43 10. "Yesterdays" (Otto Harbach, Jerome Kern) – 3:45 Bonus tracks included on the 1991 CD release: 11. "As You Desire Me" (Allie Wurbel) – 2:53 12. "Don't Take Your Love from Me" (Henry Nemo) – 4:05

Sinatra and Strings

83

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - vocals • Don Costa - arranger, conductor

References
[1] Allmusic review (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r70145) [2] Sinatra and Strings (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r70145) at Allmusic

Point of No Return
Point of No Return
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded March 1962 September 11-12, 1961 Capitol Studio A, Hollywood, Los Angeles, California Vocal Jazz, Classic pop 50:42 Capitol Dave Cavanaugh Frank Sinatra chronology

Genre Length Label Producer

I Remember Tommy (1961)

Point of No Return (1962)

Sinatra and Swingin' Brass (1962)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Point of No Return is an album by American singer Frank Sinatra, released in 1962. As the title reflects, the album contains Sinatra's final recorded songs with Capitol Records before permanently moving to his own Reprise Records label to achieve more artistic freedom with his recordings. Indeed, he had already begun recording with Reprise as early as 1960 and had already recorded Ring-A-Ding-Ding, I Remember Tommy, and Sinatra Swings by the time these sessions occurred. He recorded this album in a hurried two-day session in September 1961 to fulfill his contract. The album was still a special occasion, reuniting Sinatra with Axel Stordahl, the arranger and conductor who helped Sinatra rise to stardom in the 1940s. He also arranged the vocalist's first Capitol session back in 1953, so his presence gave a sense of closure to the Capitol era. In an interesting side note, Sinatra recorded a different version of "I'll Be Seeing You" only months apart during the very same year on I Remember Tommy for Reprise.

Point of No Return

84

Track listing
1. "(Ah, the Apple Trees) When the World Was Young" (Johnny Mercer, M. Philippe-Gerard, Angele Marie T. Vannier) - 3:48 2. "I'll Remember April" (Don Raye, Gene de Paul, Patricia Johnston) - 2:50 3. "September Song" (Kurt Weill, Maxwell Anderson) - 4:21 4. "A Million Dreams Ago" (Lew Quadling, Eddie Howard, Dick Jurgens) - 2:41 5. "I'll See You Again" (Noël Coward) - 2:44 6. "There Will Never Be Another You" (Mack Gordon, Harry Warren) - 3:09 7. "Somewhere along the Way" (Kurt Adams, Sammy Gallop) - 3:01 8. "It's a Blue World" (Bob Wright, Chet Forrest) - 2:49 9. "These Foolish Things (Remind Me of You)" (Jack Strachey, Harry Link, Holt Marvell) - 3:59 10. "As Time Goes By" (Herman Hupfeld) - 3:17 11. "I'll Be Seeing You" (Sammy Fain, Irving Kahal) - 2:47 12. "Memories of You" (Eubie Blake, Andy Razaf) - 3:53 Cd reissue bonus tracks not included on the original 1962 release: 13. "Day In, Day Out" (Rube Bloom, Mercer) - 3:19 14. "Don't Make a Beggar of Me" (Al Sherman) - 3:05 15. "Lean Baby" (Billy May, Roy Alfred) - 2:35 16. "I'm Walking Behind You" (Billy Reid) - 2:57 The bonus tracks represent the rest of Sinatra's work with Axel Stordahl on Capitol Records. These songs were recorded at Sinatra's first Capitol session in April 1953 and were produced by Voyle Gilmore.

Personnel
• • • • Frank Sinatra - Vocals Axel Stordahl - Arranger, Conductor Heine Beau - "Ghost Arranger" Conrad Gozzo - Lead Trumpet

References
[1] Point of No Return (Frank Sinatra album) (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26325) at Allmusic

Sinatra and Swingin' Brass

85

Sinatra and Swingin' Brass
Sinatra and Swingin' Brass
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label 1962 April 10-11, 1962 Hollywood, Los Angeles, California Vocal Jazz, Classic pop 38:15 Reprise Frank Sinatra chronology

Point of No Return (1962)

Sinatra and Swingin' Brass (1962)

Sinatra Sings of Love and Things (1962)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Sinatra And Swingin' Brass is a 1962 studio album by Frank Sinatra. This is the first time Sinatra worked with arranger/composer Neal Hefti. For Sinatra and Swingin' Brass, the singer re-recorded a number of songs he had previously recorded for Capitol: "They Can't Take That Away from Me" and "I Get a Kick Out of You" had been recorded eight years earlier for Songs For Young Lovers, "You Brought a New Kind of Love to Me" had been recorded six years prior for Songs for Swingin' Lovers, and "At Long Last Love" had been recorded five years earlier for A Swingin' Affair!.

Track listing
1. "Goody Goody" (Johnny Mercer, Matty Malneck) – 1:47 2. "They Can't Take That Away from Me" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) – 2:41 3. "At Long Last Love" (Cole Porter) – 2:14 4. "I'm Beginning to See the Light" (Johnny Hodges, Harry James, Duke Ellington, Don George) – 2:34 5. "Don'cha Go 'Way Mad" (Jimmy Mundy, Al Stillman, Illinois Jacquet) – 3:12 6. "I Get a Kick Out of You" (Porter) – 3:14 7. "Tangerine" (Victor Schertzinger, Johnny Mercer) – 2:03 8. "Love Is Just around the Corner" (Lewis E. Gensler, Leo Robin) – 2:27 9. "Ain't She Sweet" (Milton Ager, Jack Yellen) – 2:07 10. "Serenade In Blue" (Harry Warren, Mack Gordon) – 2:58 11. "I Love You" (Porter) – 2:16 12. "Pick Yourself Up" (Jerome Kern, Dorothy Fields) – 2:33 Cd reissue bonus tracks not included on the 1962 release: 13. "Everybody's Twistin'" (Rube Bloom, Ted Koehler) – 2:31

Sinatra and Swingin' Brass 14. "Nothing But the Best" (Johnny Rotella) – 3:00 15. "You Brought a New Kind of Love to Me" (Sammy Fain, Irving Kahal, Pierre Norman Connor) – 2:38 The last three songs are bonus tracks on the 1992 compact disc release, not available on the 1998 Entertainer of the Century remastered series.

86

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - vocals • Neal Hefti - arranger, conductor

References
[1] Sinatra and Swingin' Brass (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26420) at Allmusic

External links
• Article about the recording of this album (http://www.songsbysinatra.com/reprints/rouge_1062.html)

All Alone
All Alone
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label October 1962 January 15–January 17, 1962, Los Angeles Vocal Jazz, Classic pop 40:01 Reprise Frank Sinatra chronology

Sinatra Sings of Love and Things (1962)

All Alone (1962)

Sinatra Sings Great Songs from Great Britain (1962)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

All Alone is an album by Frank Sinatra, released in 1962. Originally, All Alone was going to be called Come Waltz With Me. Although the title and the accompanying specially written title song were dropped before the album's release, the record remained a stately collection of waltzes, arranged and conducted by Gordon Jenkins. The original title track is included as a bonus track on the 1999 compact disc release of the album.

All Alone All of the tracks on the album are torch songs, hence the lonely name of the album. Almost half of the tracks are written by Irving Berlin. The cover is a trimmed portion of painting that hung in Sinatra's Palm Springs home.

87

Track listing
1. "All Alone" (Irving Berlin) – 2:42 2. "The Girl Next Door" (Hugh Martin, Ralph Blane) – 3:18 3. "Are You Lonesome Tonight?" (Roy Turk, Lou Handman) – 3:31 4. "Charmaine", (Erno Rapee, Lew Pollack) – 3:17 5. "What'll I Do?" (Berlin) – 3:15 6. "When I Lost You" (Berlin) – 3:43 7. "Oh, How I Miss You Tonight" (Benny Davis, Joe Burke, Mark Fisher) – 3:21 8. "Indiscreet" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) – 3:52 9. "Remember" (Berlin) – 3:23 10. "Together" (B.G. DeSylva, Lew Brown, Ray Henderson, Stephen Ballantine) – 3:21 11. "The Song is Ended (but the Melody Lingers On)" (Berlin) – 3:25 Cd reissue bonus tracks not included on the original 1962 release: 12. "Come Waltz With Me" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:53

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - vocals • Gordon Jenkins - arranger, conductor

References
[1] All Alone (album) (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26276) at Allmusic

Sinatra Sings Great Songs from Great Britain

88

Sinatra Sings Great Songs from Great Britain
Sinatra Sings Great Songs From Great Britain
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label 1962 June 12–14, 1962, London Vocal Jazz, Classic pop 37:21 Reprise Frank Sinatra chronology

Sinatra and Swingin' Brass (1962)

Sinatra Sings Great Songs From Great Britain (1962)

Sinatra–Basie: An Historic Musical First (1962)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Sinatra Sings Great Songs From Great Britain is an album by Frank Sinatra, arranged by Robert Farnon, recorded in London in 1962. It was released on LP in Great Britain, but not in the United States. It was released in the U.S. on compact disc in the early 1990s. All tracks were available on The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings.

Track listing
1. "The Very Thought of You" (Ray Noble) – 3:34 2. "We'll Gather Lilacs in the Spring" (Ivor Novello) – 3:15 3. "If I Had You" (Jimmy Campbell, Reginald Connelly, Ted Shapiro) – 4:07 4. "Now Is the Hour" (Maewa Kaihan, Clemnet Scott, Dorothy Stewart) – 2:51 5. "The Gypsy" (Billy Reid) – 3:21 6. "Roses of Picardy" (Frederic E. Weatherly, Hayden Wood) – 3:01 7. "A Nightingale Sang in Berkeley Square" (Eric Maschwitz, Manning Sherwin) – 3:54 8. "A Garden in the Rain" (James Dyrenforth, Carroll Gibbons) – 3:24 9. "London by Night" (Carroll Coates) – 3:20 10. "We'll Meet Again" (Hughie Charles, Ross Parker) – 3:44 11. "I'll Follow My Secret Heart" (Noël Coward) – 3:16

Sinatra Sings Great Songs from Great Britain

89

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - Vocals • Robert Farnon - Arranger, Conductor

Notes
Sinatra recorded the album , a collection of all British material, in June 1962, towards the end of a long tour raising money for children's charities that had started back in April and included performances in Tokyo, Hong Kong, Tel Aviv, Rome, Athens, Milan, Madrid. It was the only studio album he recorded outside the United States. It was recorded at CTS recording studio 49-53 Kensington Gardens Square and Sinatra spent three nights in the Bayswater studio. Sinatra had made his first visit to the U.K. in the summer of 1950 when he topped the bill at the London Palladium and enjoyed playing in Britain. When he toured Britain in 1953, at venues that ran from Tooting Granada to Blackpool Opera House, his star had been fading, but by 1962 and the time of this recording, he was a record label owner (Reprise), and recording only reluctantly for Capitol.[2]

References
[1] Sinatra Sings Great Songs from Great Britain (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r169879) at Allmusic [2] Ol' Blue Eyes of Bayswater, Radio Two, January 2011, presented by Paul Sexton (http:/ / www. bbc. co. uk/ programmes/ b019g7nq) (http:/ / www. telegraph. co. uk/ culture/ tvandradio/ 9027609/ Sinatra-in-London-in-1962-The-Voice-records-Well-Meet-Again. html)

Sinatra–Basie: An Historic Musical First
Sinatra-Basie: An Historic Musical First
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label December 10, 1962 October 2–3, 1962, Hollywood, Los Angeles, California Vocal jazz, Traditional pop music 33:05 Reprise Frank Sinatra chronology

Sinatra Sings of Love and Things (1962)

Sinatra-Basie: An Historic Musical First (1962)

The Concert Sinatra (1963)

SinatraBasie: An Historic Musical First

90

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Mojo Rating [1] [2]

Sinatra-Basie: An Historic Musical First (or simply Sinatra-Basie) is a 1962 studio album by Frank Sinatra, arranged by Neal Hefti. As the title indicates, this was the first recording that Sinatra made with the Count Basie Orchestra. In 1964, Sinatra and Basie would make a final studio recording, It Might as Well Be Swing, orchestrated by Quincy Jones, and Sinatra's first live album, Sinatra at the Sands (1966) would feature the Basie band.

Track listing
1. "Pennies from Heaven" (Arthur Johnston, Johnny Burke) – 3:29 2. "Please Be Kind" (Saul Chaplin, Sammy Cahn) – 2:43 3. "(Love Is) The Tender Trap" (Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) – 2:37 4. "Looking at the World Through Rose Colored Glasses" (Jimmy Steiger, Tommy Malie) – 2:32 5. "My Kind of Girl" (Leslie Bricusse) – 4:37 6. "I Only Have Eyes for You" (Harry Warren, Al Dubin) – 3:31 7. "Nice Work If You Can Get It" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) – 2:37 8. "Learnin' the Blues" (Dolores Vicki Silvers) – 4:25 9. "I'm Gonna Sit Right Down and Write Myself a Letter" (Fred Ahlert, Joe Young) – 2:36 10. "I Won't Dance" (Jerome Kern, Jimmy McHugh, Oscar Hammerstein II, Dorothy Fields, Otto Harbach) – 4:07

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - Vocals The Count Basie Orchestra • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Count Basie - Piano Thad Jones - Trumpet F.P. Richard Sonny Cohn Al Aarons Al Porcino Henry Coker - Trombone Rufus Wagner Benny Powell Marshal Royal - alto Saxophone Frank Wess Frank Foster - tenor Saxophone Eric Dixon Charlie Fowlkes - Baritone Saxophone Freddie Green - Guitar Buddy Catlett - double Bass

SinatraBasie: An Historic Musical First • Sonny Payne - Drums • Neal Hefti - Arranger, Conductor

91

References
[1] Allmusic review (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r135150) [2] Andrew Male Mojo, January 2010, Issue 194.

The Concert Sinatra
The Concert Sinatra
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label 1963 February 18–February 21, 1963, Hollywood Vocal Jazz, Classic pop 31:26 Reprise Frank Sinatra chronology

Sinatra-Basie: An Historic Musical First (1962)

The Concert Sinatra (1963)

Sinatra's Sinatra (1963)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Mojo Rating [1] [2]

The Concert Sinatra
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released January 17, 2012

Recorded February 18–February 21, 1963, Hollywood Genre Length Label Vocal Jazz, Classic pop 37:30 Concord

The Concert Sinatra

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Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Mojo Rating [3] [2]

The Concert Sinatra is an album by American singer Frank Sinatra, released in 1963. The title refers to the larger-than-normal orchestra Nelson Riddle gathered for this recording; it is not a documentation of a live performance. This was Frank Sinatra's most fulfilling album of his early Reprise career. It was allegedly Nelson Riddle's favorite Reprise album and was originally recorded on 35mm film. Also, this album has been reissued on January 17, 2012, meticulously remastered from the original 35mm film source,Including 2 bonus tracks, "California" and "America the Beautiful". According to the original liner notes, “The master tracks were recorded on Westrex 35 mm, sprocket-type multi-head magnetic recorders. High output 325-3M recording film was used to achieve the best signal-to-noise ratio,” and so on. And it’s appropriate that the sound is the most remarkable aspect of this new reissue…and also the most controversial. According to Frank Sinatra Jr. in the new liner notes, the original films were located and restored, making Concord’s disc the first time in nearly 50 years since those masters have been used for a reissue. Sinatra and Larry Walsh, co-credited as engineers and mixers, created an entirely new mix for the 2012 edition, with the goal of allowing the listener to “notice the amount of music, originally recorded on the master film, that was never present before [audible]” on any of the previous CD issues. They have succeeded admirably, with the orchestra, remarkably, more fully detailed than in the past. Previously unheard parts have brought to light that will make longtime fans of the album stand up and take notice. But this is also the most drastic remix of any that has been undertaken for the ongoing Sinatra reissue/remix program. The producer, Charles Pignone and the Sinatra/Walsh team, reduced the amount of reverb on the lead vocal, giving the recording a “you are there” feeling that listeners will likely love or hate. The singer, unvarnished, is up front in the mix, though not at the expense of that stunningly full orchestra. This gives the new Concert Sinatra a radical sound signature unlike any previous CD release, and largely unlike any other Sinatra release of any album. As such, it’s hard to consider the new Concert Sinatra as a reissue of an unfortunately deleted title. It’s a completely new take on an old favorite, and the original mix deserves to be heard, especially for comparison to this alternate view. Whether this remix is a valid one is ultimately up to each listener’s taste. But a two-on-one album, preserving both the 1963 mix and the 2012 one, might have made this pill an easier one for some to swallow. The Concord/FSE team is urged to consider the possibility in the future of allowing these remixes to shine alongside the originals; The Concert Sinatra proves beyond a shadow of a doubt that it is possible to hear a classic recording completely anew, even if one’s mileage will, of course, vary. (It’s worth noting that the original mono mix of the album is a valid one worthy of reissue, too.)

The Concert Sinatra

93

Track listing
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. "I Have Dreamed" (Richard Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein II) – 3:01 "My Heart Stood Still" (Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) – 3:06 "Lost in the Stars" (Maxwell Anderson, Kurt Weill) – 4:11 "Ol' Man River" (Hammerstein, Jerome Kern) – 4:29 "You'll Never Walk Alone" (Rodgers, Hammerstein) – 3:11 "Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered" (Rodgers, Hart) – 3:02 "This Nearly Was Mine" (Rodgers, Hammerstein) – 2:49 "Soliloquy" (Rodgers, Hammerstein) – 8:05

Bonus tracks included on the 2012 reissue: 9. "California" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) - 3:36 10. "America the Beautiful" (Katharine Lee Bates, Samuel A. Ward) - 2:21

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - Vocals • Nelson Riddle - Arranger, Conductor

References
[1] Allmusic review (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26416) [2] Andrew Male Mojo, January 2010, Issue 194. [3] Allmusic review (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ 2311358)

Sinatra's Sinatra
Sinatra's Sinatra
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer 1963 April 29–April 30, 1963, Hollywood Vocal Jazz, Classic pop 35:52 Reprise Sonny Burke Frank Sinatra chronology

The Concert Sinatra (1963)

Sinatra's Sinatra (1963)

Sinatra Sings Days of Wine and Roses, Moon River, and Other Academy Award Winners (1964)

Sinatra's Sinatra

94

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Sinatra's Sinatra is an album by American singer Frank Sinatra, released in 1963. The album contained re-recorded versions of 12 songs Sinatra had previously released. Sinatra's two previous record labels, Columbia Records and Capitol Records, had both successfully issued collections of Sinatra's hits; this album was the attempt of his new label, Reprise Records, to duplicate this success. The album was arranged and conducted by frequent Sinatra collaborator Nelson Riddle.

Track listing
1. "I've Got You Under My Skin" (Cole Porter) – 3:26 2. "In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning" (David Mann, Bob Hilliard) – 2:43 3. "The Second Time Around" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) – 3:03 4. "Nancy (With the Laughing Face)" (Phil Silvers, Van Heusen) – 3:37 5. "Witchcraft" (Cy Coleman, Carolyn Leigh) – 2:37 6. "Young at Heart" (Leigh, Johnny Richards) – 2:54 7. "All the Way" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 3:27 8. "(How Little It Matters) How Little We Know" (Leigh, Phil Springer) – 2:19 9. "Pocketful of Miracles" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:37 10. "Oh! What It Seemed to Be" (Bennie Benjamin, George David Weiss, Frankie Carle) – 2:45 11. "Call Me Irresponsible" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 3:12 12. "Put Your Dreams Away (For Another Day)" (Paul Mann, Weiss, Ruth Lowe) – 3:12

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - vocals • Nelson Riddle - arranger, conductor

References
[1] Sinatra's Sinatra (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26340) at Allmusic

Sinatra Sings Days of Wine and Roses, Moon River, and Other Academy Award Winners

95

Sinatra Sings Days of Wine and Roses, Moon River, and Other Academy Award Winners
Sinatra Sings Days of Wine and Roses, Moon River and Other Academy Award Winners
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer 1964 January 27–28, 1964, Hollywood Vocal jazz, traditional pop music 32:29 Reprise Sonny Burke Frank Sinatra chronology

Sinatra's Sinatra (1963)

Sinatra Sings Days of Wine and Roses, Moon River, and Other Academy Award Winners (1964)

America, I Hear You Singing (1964)

Sinatra Sings Days of Wine and Roses, Moon River, and Other Academy Award Winners (or simply Academy Award Winners) is a 1964 album by Frank Sinatra, focusing on songs that won the Academy Award for Best Song.

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating link [1]

Track listing
1. "Days of Wine and Roses" (Henry Mancini, Johnny Mercer) - 2:16 2. "Moon River" (Mancini, Mercer) - 3:20 3. "The Way You Look Tonight" (Jerome Kern, Dorothy Fields) - 3:22 4. "Three Coins in the Fountain" (Sammy Cahn, Jule Styne) - 3:46 5. "In the Cool, Cool, Cool of the Evening" (Mercer, Hoagy Carmichael) - 1:51 6. "Secret Love" (Paul Francis Webster, Sammy Fain) - 3:54 7. "Swinging on a Star" (Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen) - 2:53 8. "It Might As Well Be Spring" (Richard Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein II) - 3:26 9. "The Continental" (Herb Magidson, Con Conrad) - 3:14 10. "Love Is a Many-Splendored Thing" (Webster, Fain) - 3:22 11. "All the Way" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:27

Sinatra Sings Days of Wine and Roses, Moon River, and Other Academy Award Winners

96

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - vocals • Nelson Riddle - arrangements, conductor

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r76517

America, I Hear You Singing
America, I Hear You Singing
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer 1964 January 2–February 4, 1964, Los Angeles Classic pop 32:29 Reprise Sonny Burke Frank Sinatra chronology

Sinatra Sings Days of Wine and Roses, Moon River, and Other Academy Award Winners (1964)

America, I Hear You Singing (1964)

It Might as Well Be Swing (1964)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

America, I Hear You Singing is an album released in 1964 by American singer Frank Sinatra with Bing Crosby and Fred Waring's glee club. The record is a collection of patriotic songs that were recorded as a tribute to the assassinated president John F. Kennedy. The album received its first release on CD in 2010. The tracks featuring Frank Sinatra were also included on the 1995 box set The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings.

America, I Hear You Singing

97

Track listing
All tracks feature Fred Waring and the Pennsylvanians 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. "America, I Hear You Singing (arr Tom Scott)" "This Is A Great Country" (Bing Crosby, arr. Dick Reynolds / Jack Halloran) "The House I Live In" (Frank Sinatra, arr. Nelson Riddle; Lewis Allan, Earl Robinson) – 3:39 "The Hills of Home" (arr. Roy Ringwald) "This Land is Your Land" (Bing Crosby, arr. Dick Reynolds/ Jack Halloran) "Give Me Your Tired, Your Poor (arr. Roy Ringwald)" "You're a Lucky Fellow, Mr. Smith" (Frank Sinatra, arr. Dick Reynolds / Jack Halloran; Francis Burke, Hughie Prince, Don Raye) - 3:46 8. "A Home In the Meadow" (Bing Crosby, arr. Hawley Ades) 9. "Early American" (Frank Sinatra, arr. Nelson Riddle; Burke, Van Heusen) - 3:34 10. "You Never Had It So Good" (Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra, arr. Dick Reynolds / Jack Halloran; Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) – 3:01 11. "Let Us Break Bread Together" (Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra, arr. Roy Ringwald) - 3:39 12. "The Stars And Stripes Forever" (arr. Harry Simeone)

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - Vocals • Bing Crosby - Vocals • Fred Waring and his Singers - Vocals

References
[1] America, I Hear You Singing (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r66453) at Allmusic

It Might as Well Be Swing

98

It Might as Well Be Swing
It Might as Well Be Swing
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer August 1964 June 9–12, 1964, Hollywood, Los Angeles, California Vocal jazz, Traditional pop music 27:22 Reprise Sonny Burke Frank Sinatra chronology

America, I Hear You Singing (1964)

It Might as Well Be Swing (1964)

12 Songs of Christmas (1964)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

It Might as Well Be Swing is a 1964 studio album by Frank Sinatra, accompanied by Count Basie and his orchestra. It was Sinatra's first studio recording with Quincy Jones. This was Sinatra and Basie's second collaboration after 1963's Sinatra-Basie. Sinatra's cover version of "Hello Dolly" on the album features a new second verse improvised by Sinatra, which pays tribute to Louis Armstrong, who had topped the Billboard charts with his own version of the song earlier in 1964. It Might as Well Be Swing is a reference to the title of the well known jazz standard "It Might as Well Be Spring".

Track listing
1. "Fly Me to the Moon" (Bart Howard) – 2:30 2. "I Wish You Love" (Léo Chauliac, Charles Trenet, Albert Beach) – 2:56 3. "I Believe in You" (Frank Loesser) – 2:21 4. "More (Theme from Mondo Cane)" (Riz Ortolani, Nino Oliviero, Marcello Ciorciolini, Norman Newell) – 3:05 5. "I Can't Stop Loving You" (Don Gibson) – 3:00 6. "Hello, Dolly!" (Jerry Herman) – 2:45 7. "I Wanna Be Around" (Johnny Mercer, Sadie Vimmerstedt) – 2:25 8. "The Best is Yet to Come" (Cy Coleman, Carolyn Leigh) – 3:10 9. "The Good Life" (Sacha Distel, Jack Reardon) – 3:10 10. "Wives and Lovers" (Burt Bacharach, Hal David) – 2:50

It Might as Well Be Swing

99

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - vocals • Count Basie - piano • Quincy Jones - arranger, conductor The Count Basie Orchestra • • • • • • • • Al Porcino, Don Rader, Wallace Davenport, Al Aarons, George Cohn and Harry "Sweets" Edison - trumpets Henry Coker, Grover Mitchell, Bill Hughes, Henderson Chambers and Kenny Shroyer - trombones Frank Foster, Charles Fowlkes, Marshall Royal, Frank Wess and Eric Dixon - reeds Emil Richards - vibraphone George Catlett - double bass Freddie Green - guitar Sonny Payne - drums Gerald Vinci, Israel Baker, Jacques Gasselin, Thelma Beach, Bonnie Douglas, Marshall Sosson, Erno Neufeld, Lou Raderman, Paul Shure and James Getzoff - violins • Virginia Majewski, Paul Robyn, Alvin Dinkin and Stan Harris - violas • Edgar Lustgarten and Ann Goodman - cellos Production • • • • • Sonny Burke - producer Lowell Frank - Engineer Ted Allen - Cover photo Gregg Geller - 1998 reissue producer Lee Herschberg - 20-bit digital mastering

References
[1] Allmusic review (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26309)

12 Songs of Christmas

100

12 Songs of Christmas
12 Songs of Christmas
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Label Producer August 1964 June 16-19, 1964, Hollywood, Los Angeles, California Vocal jazz, Traditional pop music Reprise Sonny Burke Frank Sinatra chronology

It Might as Well Be Swing (1964)

12 Songs of Christmas (1964)

Softly, as I Leave You (1964)

12 Songs of Christmas is a 1964 studio album by Frank Sinatra, Bing Crosby and Fred Waring with his orchestra.

Track listing
1. "White Christmas" (Irving Berlin) 2. "It's Christmas Time Again" (Sonny Burke, Jim Harwood, Jack D. Elliot, John M. Elliott, James K. Harwood, Francis Burke) 3. "Go Tell It on the Mountain" (Traditional, John Wesley Work III) 4. "An Old-Fashioned Christmas" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) 5. "Where Angels Sang of Peace" (Traditional) 6. "The Little Drummer Boy" (Katherine K. Bates) 7. "I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day" (Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Johnny Marks) 8. "Do You Hear What I Hear?" (Noël Regney, Gloria Shayne Baker) 9. "The Secret of Christmas" (Cahn, Van Heusen) 10. "The Twelve Days of Christmas" (Traditional) 11. "Christmas Candles" (Dean Kay, Vincent O'Dea, Jay Clinton) 12. "We Wish You the Merriest" (Les Brown)

Personnel
• Fred Waring and his orchestra (Tracks 1-2, 4-8, 10-12) • Bing Crosby (Tracks 2 & 9, 11-12) • Frank Sinatra (Tracks 3-4, 6-7, 12)

Softly, as I Leave You

101

Softly, as I Leave You
Softly, as I Leave You
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer November 1964 August 27, 1962 – October 3, 1964, Los Angeles Classic pop 33:33 Reprise Jimmy Bowen, Sonny Burke Frank Sinatra chronology

12 Songs of Christmas (1964)

Softly, as I Leave You (1964)

Sinatra '65: The Singer Today (1965)

Softly, as I Leave You is a 1964 studio album by American singer Frank Sinatra. This album was Sinatra's first tentative attempt to come to terms with rock and roll music. Arranged by Ernie Freeman, "Softly, as I Leave You", "Then Suddenly Love" and "Available" are definitely stabs at incorporating rock and roll into Sinatra's middle-of-the-road pop sound, featuring drum kits, backing vocals and keyboards. The rest of the album is pieced together from leftovers from various early-'60s sessions, from many different arrangers and conductors, giving the album a rather uneven finish. The title track was the first of at least four attempts to mimic the chart success of Dean Martin's #1 hit "Everybody Loves Somebody", using a driving beat, heavy strings and choral tracks. Sinatra, arranger Ernie Freeman and producer Jimmy Bowen would incorporate the same sound to songs like "When Somebody Loves You", "Tell Her You Love Her (Each Day)" and "Somewhere in Your Heart" with only major chart success.

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating link [1]

Track listing
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. "Emily" (Johnny Mandel, Johnny Mercer) – 2:58 "Here's to the Losers" (Robert Wells, Jack Segal) – 3:05 "Dear Heart" (Jay Livingston, Ray Evans, Henry Mancini) – 2:43 "Come Blow Your Horn" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) – 3:07 "Love Isn't Just for the Young" (Bernard Knee) – 2:57 "I Can't Believe I'm Losing You" (Don Costa, Phil Zeller) – 2:43 "Pass Me By" (Cy Coleman, Carolyn Leigh) – 2:25

8. "Softly, as I Leave You" (Hal Shaper, Antonio DeVito, Giorgio Calabrese) – 2:50 9. "Then Suddenly Love" (Ray Alfred, Paul Vance) – 2:15

Softly, as I Leave You 10. "Available" (Cahn, Ned Wynn, L.B. Marks) – 2:47 11. "Talk to Me Baby" (Robert E. Dolan, Mercer) – 3:00 12. "The Look of Love" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:43

102

Personnel
• • • • • • Frank Sinatra - vocals Neal Hefti - conductor Nelson Riddle - arranger, conductor Marty Paich - arranger Ernie Freeman - arranger Billy May - arranger

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26358

September of My Years
September of My Years
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer October 1965 April 13 – May 27, 1965, Hollywood Traditional pop music, vocal jazz 44:02 Reprise Sonny Burke Frank Sinatra chronology

Sinatra '65: The Singer Today (1965)

September of My Years (1965)

My Kind of Broadway (1965)

September of My Years
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released August 31, 2010

Recorded April 13 - May 27, 1965, Hollywood, Los Angeles June 10, 1984, Carnegie Hall, New York City Genre Length Label Traditional pop music, vocal jazz 50:21 Concord

Producer Sonny Burke

September of My Years

103
Frank Sinatra chronology

-

September of My Years (2010)

-

September of My Years is a 1965 studio album by American singer Frank Sinatra, arranged by Gordon Jenkins. Sinatra was to turn 50 years old in December 1965, and the release of this album along with A Man and His Music and Strangers in the Night marked a surge of popularity in his music. Both September of My Years and A Man and His Music won the Grammy Award for Album of the Year. Sinatra's performance of "It Was a Very Good Year" won the Grammy Award for Best Vocal Performance, Male, at the Grammy Awards of 1966. Arranger Gordon Jenkins was awarded the Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Arrangement Accompanying Vocalist(s) for the same song. This was the first album Sinatra and Jenkins had recorded together since 1962's All Alone. Jenkins and Sinatra would next work together on the 1980 album Trilogy: Past Present Future. CBS television cameras were rolling the night Sinatra recorded "It Was a Very Good Year". The edited result was included in a Walter Cronkite CBS News special about the singer's 50th birthday, broadcast on November 16, 1965. On the 2010 CD reissue of the album, two bonus tracks are included: A live performance of "This Is All I Ask" at Carnegie Hall in June 1984, and the 45 rpm single mix of "How Old Am I?".

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating link [1]

Track listing
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. "The September of My Years" (Jimmy Van Heusen, Sammy Cahn) – 3:12 "How Old Am I?" (Gordon Jenkins) – 3:30 "Don't Wait Too Long" (Sunny Skylar) – 3:04 "It Gets Lonely Early" (Van Heusen, Cahn) – 2:57 "This Is All I Ask" (Jenkins) – 3:03 "Last Night When We Were Young" (Harold Arlen, E.Y. Harburg) – 3:33

7. "The Man in the Looking Glass" (Bart Howard) – 3:25 8. "It Was a Very Good Year" (Ervin Drake) – 4:25 9. "When the Wind Was Green" (Henry Stinson) – 3:22 10. "Hello, Young Lovers" (Richard Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein II) – 3:41 11. "I See It Now" (Alec Wilder, William Engvick) – 2:50 12. "Once Upon a Time" (Charles Strouse, Lee Adams) – 3:30 13. "September Song" (Kurt Weill, Maxwell Anderson) – 3:30 Bonus tracks included on the 2010 reissue: 14. "This Is All I Ask" - 3:49 (Live at Carnegie Hall, New York City, June 12, 1984) 15. "How Old Am I?" - 3:30 (1968 single version)

September of My Years

104

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - vocals • Gordon Jenkins - arranger, conductor

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r24133

My Kind of Broadway
My Kind of Broadway
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer 1965 May 2, 1961 – August 23, 1965, Hollywood Vocal jazz, classic pop 35:09 Reprise Sonny Burke Frank Sinatra chronology

September of My Years (1965)

My Kind of Broadway (1965)

A Man and His Music (1965)

My Kind of Broadway is a 1965 album by Frank Sinatra. It is a collection of songs from various musicals, pieced together from various recording sessions over the previous four years. The album features songs from nine arrangers and composers, the most ever on a single Sinatra album.

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating link [1]

My Kind of Broadway

105

Track listing
1. "Everybody Has the Right to Be Wrong (At Least Once)" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) – 2:05 2. "Golden Moment" (Kenny Jacobson, Rhoda Roberts) – 3:01 3. "Luck Be a Lady" (Frank Loesser) – 5:15 4. "Lost in the Stars" (Maxwell Anderson, Kurt Weill) – 4:08 5. "Hello, Dolly!" (Jerry Herman) – 2:45 6. "I'll Only Miss Her When I Think of Her" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:50 7. "They Can't Take That Away from Me" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) – 2:40 8. "Yesterdays" (Otto Harbach, Jerome Kern) – 3:45 9. "Nice Work If You Can Get It" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) – 2:33 10. "Have You Met Miss Jones?" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) – 2:30 11. "Without a Song" (Vincent Youmans, Billy Rose, Edward Eliscu) – 3:37

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - vocals • Count Basie and his orchestra • • • • • • • • • Don Costa - arranger, conductor Neal Hefti Quincy Jones Billy May Sy Oliver Nelson Riddle Torrie Zito Morris Stoloff - conductor Laurindo Almeida - guitar

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26394

A Man and His Music

106

A Man and His Music
A Man and His Music
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released 1965

Recorded December 19, 1960 – October 21, 1965, Los Angeles and Hollywood Genre Length Label Vocal jazz, classic pop 104:35 Reprise

Producer Sonny Burke Frank Sinatra chronology

My Kind of Broadway (1965)

A Man and His Music (1965)

Moonlight Sinatra (1966)

A Man and His Music is a 1965 double album by Frank Sinatra. It provides a brief retrospective of Sinatra's musical career. The album won the 1967 Grammy Award for Album of the Year. Instead of using the original recordings, which were made for RCA, Columbia and Capitol Records, and therefore not eligible for use by his then-current label, Reprise, Sinatra re-recorded the majority of the album's songs. There is also a narration from Sinatra that runs throughout the album. Approximately 2,000 copies of this album were originally released in a special wooden slipcase containing 3D artwork on the cover in the form of a metal plaque. Each copy was numbered and contained a card signed by Sinatra himself. The packaging also included a booklet highlighting Sinatra's career. A majority of these special "Man and His Music" LP's were given away as door prizes by Sinatra at a party in Palm Springs. The party celebrated the singer's 50th birthday, as well as the airing of Sinatra's 1965 NBC television special of the same name.

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating link [1]

A Man and His Music

107

Track listing
Disc one
1. "Put Your Dreams Away (For Another Day)" (Paul Mann, George David Weiss, Ruth Lowe) - 3:10 2. "All or Nothing at All" (Jack Lawrence, Arthur Altman) - 4:26 3. "I'll Never Smile Again" (Lowe) - 2:49 4. "There Are Such Things" (George W. Meyer, Stanley Adams, Abel Baer) - 2:57 5. "I'll Be Seeing You" (Sammy Fain, Irving Kahal) - 3:06 6. "The One I Love (Belongs to Somebody Else)" (Gus Kahn, Isham Jones) - 3:03 7. "Polka Dots and Moonbeams" (Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen) - 4:46 8. "Night and Day" (Cole Porter) - 4:29 9. "Oh! What It Seemed to Be" (Bennie Benjamin, Weiss, Frankie Carle) - 3:26 10. "Soliloquy" (Richard Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein II) - 8:19 11. "Nancy (With the Laughing Face)" (Phil Silvers, Van Heusen) - 4:21 12. "The House I Live In" (Lewis Allan, Earl Robinson) - 4:40 13. "From Here to Eternity" (Karger, Wells) - 2:44

Disc two
1. "Come Fly with Me" (Sammy Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:13 2. "(How Little It Matters) How Little We Know" (Carolyn Leigh, Phil Springers) - 2:29 3. "Learnin' the Blues" (Dolores Vicki Silvers) - 2:31 4. "In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning" (David Mann, Bob Hilliard) - 2:43 5. "Young at Heart" (Leigh, Johnny Richards) - 3:51 6. "Witchcraft" (Cy Coleman, Leigh) - 2:52 7. "All the Way" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:27 8. "Love and Marriage" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 1:29 9. "I've Got You Under My Skin" (Porter) - 3:26 10. "Ring-a-Ding Ding" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 1:07 11. "The Second Time Around" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:13 12. "The Summit" (Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Sammy Davis, Jr.) - 5:20 13. "The Oldest Established (Permanent Floating Crap Game in New York)" (With Dean Martin and Bing Crosby) (Frank Loesser) - 2:09 14. "Luck Be a Lady" (Loesser) - 2:25 15. "Call Me Irresponsible" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:45 16. "Fly Me to the Moon" (Bart Howard) - 2:30 17. "Softly, as I Leave You" (Hal Shaper, Antonio DeVito, Giorgio Calabrese) - 2:57 18. "My Kind of Town" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:30 19. "The September of My Years" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:22

A Man and His Music

108

Personnel
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • Frank Sinatra - vocals Count Basie and his orchestra Fred Waring and his Pennsylvanians Don Costa - arranger, conductor Ernie Freeman Neal Hefti Gordon Jenkins Johnny Mandel Billy May Sy Oliver Nelson Riddle Freddie Stulce - arranger Sonny Burke - conductor, producer Morris Stoloff

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r67985

Moonlight Sinatra
Moonlight Sinatra
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer 1966 November 29–30, 1965, Hollywood Vocal jazz, classic pop 32:18 Reprise Sonny Burke Frank Sinatra chronology

A Man and His Music (1965)

Moonlight Sinatra (1966)

Strangers in the Night (1966)

Moonlight Sinatra is an album by Frank Sinatra, released in 1966. All of the tracks on the album are centered around the moon, and were arranged and conducted by Nelson Riddle and his orchestra. The title of the album is a reference to Ludwig van Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata.

Moonlight Sinatra

109

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating link [1]

Track listing
1. "Moonlight Becomes You" (Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen) – 2:46 2. "Moon Song" (Sam Coslow, Arthur Johnston) – 3:03 3. "Moonlight Serenade" (Glenn Miller, Mitchell Parish) – 3:26 4. "Reaching for the Moon" (Irving Berlin) – 3:05 5. "I Wished on the Moon" (Dorothy Parker, Ralph Rainger) – 2:53 6. "Oh, You Crazy Moon" (Burke, Van Heusen) – 3:12 7. "The Moon Got in My Eyes" (Burke, Johnston) – 2:52 8. "Moonlight Mood" (Harold Adamson, Peter de Rose) – 3:08 9. "Moon Love" (Mack David, André Kostelanetz) – 4:14 10. "The Moon Was Yellow (And the Night Was Young)" (Fred E. Ahlert, Edgar Leslie) – 3:04

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - vocals • Nelson Riddle - arranger, conductor • The Nelson Riddle Orchestra

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26314

Strangers in the Night

110

Strangers in the Night
Strangers in the Night
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer 1966 April 11 – May 16, 1966, Hollywood Traditional pop music, vocal jazz 27:10 Reprise Jimmy Bowen Frank Sinatra chronology

Moonlight Sinatra (1966)

Strangers in the Night (1966)

Sinatra at the Sands (1966)

Strangers in the Night: Deluxe Edition
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released January 26, 2010

Recorded April 11 - May 16, 1966, Hollywood April 18, 1985, Budokan Hall, Tokyo, Japan Genre Length Label Traditional pop music, vocal jazz 35:21 Concord Records

Producer Nelson Riddle, Sonny Burke Frank Sinatra chronology

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Strangers in the Night: Deluxe Edition (2010)

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Strangers in the Night is a 1966 studio album by Frank Sinatra. It marked Sinatra's return to #1 on the pop album charts in the mid-1960's, and consolidated the comeback he started in 1966. Combining pop hits with show tunes and standards, the album creates a balance between big band and pop instrumentation. The single "Strangers in the Night" also reached #1 on the pop single charts, while "Summer Wind" would slowly become a classic, used for television commercials and mood-setting entrances by the 2000's. At the Grammy Awards of 1967 Sinatra garnered two Grammys for his efforts on this album, including the Record of the Year for the title track, as well as Best Male Vocal Performance for the same song. (He also won a further Grammy that same year, the Album of the Year for A Man and His Music). Ernie Freeman's arrangement of the title track won him the Grammy Award for Best Arrangement Accompanying a Vocalist or Instrumentalist. This is the final album Sinatra performed with long-time arranger/conductor Nelson Riddle and his orchestra.

Strangers in the Night Strangers in the Night has been certified platinum for one million copies sold in the US. It is the only "regular" Sinatra album to achieve this mark (the others to do so have been greatest hits/compilation albums, Christmas albums, or the end-of-career "Duets" albums). Also, this album has been reissued as a "Deluxe Edition" on January 26, 2010. Including three bonus tracks (two recorded tracks of "Strangers in the Night" and "All or Nothing at All" performed at the Budokan Hall from 1985, and an alternate take of "Yes Sir, That's My Baby").

111

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic (1966 original) Rating link [1]

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic (2010 reissue) Rating link [2]

Track listing
1. "Strangers in the Night" (Bert Kaempfert, Charles Singleton, Eddie Snyder) – 2:25 2. "Summer Wind" (Heinz Meier, Hans Bradtke, Johnny Mercer) – 2:53 3. "All or Nothing at All" (Arthur Altman, Jack Lawrence) – 3:57 4. "Call Me" (Tony Hatch) – 3:07 5. "You're Driving Me Crazy!" (Walter Donaldson) – 2:15 6. "On a Clear Day (You Can See Forever)" (Alan Jay Lerner, Burton Lane) – 3:17 7. "My Baby Just Cares for Me" (Donaldson, Gus Kahn) – 2:30 8. "Downtown" (Hatch) – 2:14 9. "Yes Sir, That's My Baby" (Donaldson, Kahn) – 2:08 10. "The Most Beautiful Girl in the World" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) – 2:24 Bonus tracks included on the 2010 reissue: 11. "Strangers in the Night" - 2:14 (Live at the Budokan Hall, Tokyo, Japan, April 18, 1985) 12. "All or Nothing at All" - 3:40 (Live at the Budokan Hall, Tokyo, Japan, April 18, 1985) 13. "Yes Sir, That's My Baby" (Alternate take) - 2:17

Strangers in the Night

112

Chart positions
Year Chart Position

1966 Billboard Pop Albums (Billboard 200) 1

Personnel
• • • • Frank Sinatra - vocals Nelson Riddle - arranger, conductor Ernie Freeman - arranger (track 1) The Nelson Riddle Orchestra

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26364 [2] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r1553266

That's Life
That's Life
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer 1966 October 18 - November 18, 1966 Classic pop 25:36 Reprise Jimmy Bowen Frank Sinatra chronology

Sinatra at the Sands (1966)

That's Life (1966)

Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim (1967)

That's Life is a 1966 album by Frank Sinatra, supported by a studio orchestra arranged and conducted by Ernie Freeman. The album is notable for its title song, "That's Life", a brash R&B tune, which proved to be a top five hit for Sinatra in the age of post-Beatles rock music.

That's Life

113

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating link [1]

Track listing
1. "That's Life" (Kelly Gordon, Dean Kay) – 3:10 2. "I Will Wait for You" (Jacques Demy, Norman Gimbel, Michel Legrand) – 2:19 3. "Somewhere My Love (Lara's Theme)" (From Doctor Zhivago) (Maurice Jarre, Paul Francis Webster) – 2:19 4. "Sand and Sea" (Gilbert Bécaud, Mack David, Maurice Vidalin) – 2:29 5. "What Now My Love" (Bécaud, Pierre Leroyer, Carl Sigman) – 2:32 6. "Winchester Cathedral" (Geoff Stephens) – 2:38 7. "Give Her Love" (Jim Harbert) – 2:14 8. "Tell Her (You Love Her Each Day)" (Samuel Ward, Charles Watkins) – 2:42 9. "The Impossible Dream (The Quest)" (Joe Darion, Mitch Leigh) – 2:34 10. "You're Gonna Hear from Me" (Andre Previn, Dory Previn) – 2:51

Personnel
• • • • Frank Sinatra - vocals Ernie Freeman - arranger, conductor Michel Rubini - organ on "That's Life" Ronnie Barron - organ, keyboards

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26370

Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim

114

Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim
Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim
Studio album by Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer March 1967 January 30, February 1, 1967, Hollywood, Los Angeles Classic pop, Bossa Nova 28:05 Reprise Sonny Burke Frank Sinatra chronology

That's Life (1966)

Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim (1967)

The World We Knew (1967)

Antonio Carlos Jobim chronology

A Certain Mr. Jobim (1967)

Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim (1967)

Stone Flower (1970)

Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim (#4 US JAZZ ALBUMS,#19 US ALBUMS 1967) is a 1967 studio album by Frank Sinatra and Antonio Carlos Jobim. The tracks were arranged and conducted by Claus Ogerman and his orchestra. Along with Jobim's original compositions, the album features three standards from the 'Great American Songbook', ("Change Partners", "I Concentrate on You", and "Baubles, Bangles and Beads") arranged in the bossa nova style. Sinatra and Jobim followed up this album with sessions for a second collaboration, titled Sinatra-Jobim. That album was briefly released on 8-track tape in 1970 before being taken out of print at Sinatra's behest, due to concerns over its sales potential. Several of the Sinatra-Jobim tracks were subsequently incorporated in the Sinatra & Company album (1971) and the Sinatra-Jobim Sessions compilation (1979). In 2010 the Concord Records label issued a new, comprehensive compilation titled Sinatra/Jobim: The Complete Reprise Recordings. At the Grammy Awards of 1968 Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim was nominated for the Grammy Award for Album of the Year.

Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim

115

Track listing
1. "The Girl from Ipanema" (Antonio Carlos Jobim, Norman Gimbel, Vinícius de Moraes) – 3:00 2. "Dindi" (Ray Gilbert, Jobim, Aloysio de Oliveria) – 3:25 3. "Change Partners" (Irving Berlin) – 2:40 4. "Quiet Nights of Quiet Stars (Corcovado)" (Jobim, Gene Lees) – 2:45 5. "Meditation (Meditação)" (Jobim, Gimbel, Newton Mendonça) – 2:51 6. "If You Never Come to Me" (Jobim, Gilbert, de Oliveira) – 2:10 7. "How Insensitive (Insensatez)" (Jobim, Gimbel, de Moraes) – 3:15 8. "I Concentrate on You" (Cole Porter) – 2:32 9. "Baubles, Bangles and Beads" (Robert C. Wright, George Forrest, Alexander Borodin) – 2:32 10. "Once I Loved (O Amor em Paz)" (Jobim, Gilbert, de Moraes) – 2:37

Personnel
Performance
• Frank Sinatra – vocal • Antonio Carlos Jobim – piano, guitar, backing vocals • Claus Ogerman – arranger, conductor

External links
• Allmusic Review link [1]

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r152053

The World We Knew

116

The World We Knew
The World We Knew
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer August, 1967 February 1-July 24, 1967 Hollywood Traditional pop music 26:32 Reprise Jimmy Bowen Frank Sinatra chronology

Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim (1967)

The World We Knew (1967)

Francis A. & Edward K. (1968)

The World We Knew is a 1967 studio album by American singer Frank Sinatra.[1] The title track reached #30 on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart and #1 on the Easy Listening chart in 1967, while the Frank/Nancy Sinatra duet "Somethin' Stupid" reached #1 on both charts.

Reception
Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

The Allmusic review by Stephen Thomas Erlewine awarded the album two and a half stars, and described it as "More of a singles collection than a proper album...Much of this has a rock-oriented pop production, complete with fuzz guitars, reverb, folky acoustic guitars, wailing harmonicas, drum kits, organs, and brass and string charts that punctuate the songs rather than provide the driving force...the songs Sinatra tackles with a variety of arrangers are more ambitious than most middle-of-the-road, adult-oriented soft rock of the late '60s." Erlewine described "Drinking Again" as "exceptional, nuanced" and said that it "ranks among the best songs Sinatra cut during the '60s."
[1]

The World We Knew

117

Track listing
1. "The World We Knew (Over and Over)" (Bert Kaempfert, Herbert Rehbein, Carl Sigman) – 2:50 2. "Somethin' Stupid" (with Nancy Sinatra) (Carson Parks) – 2:45 3. "This Is My Love" (James Harbert) – 3:37 4. "Born Free" (Don Black, John Barry) – 2:05 5. "Don't Sleep in the Subway" (Tony Hatch, Jackie Trent) – 2:22 6. "This Town" (Lee Hazlewood) – 3:05 7. "This Is My Song" (Charlie Chaplin) – 2:30 8. "You Are There" (Harry Sukman, Paul Francis Webster) – 3:31 9. "Drinking Again" (Johnny Mercer, Doris Tauber) – 3:13 10. "Some Enchanted Evening" (Richard Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein II) – 2:34

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - vocals • Nancy Sinatra - vocals (Track 2) • Gordon Jenkins - arranger, conductor • • • • Billy Strange - vocals, guitars H. B. Barnum - piano, producer, arranger Ernie Freeman - piano Claus Ogerman - arrangements, orchestration

References
[1] "The World We Knew" (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ frank-sinatra-reprise-r26294). Allmusic. . Retrieved July 2, 2011.

Francis A. & Edward K.

118

Francis A. & Edward K.
Francis A. & Edward K.
Studio album by Frank Sinatra & Duke Ellington Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer 1968 December 11–12, 1967, Hollywood, Los Angeles, California Vocal jazz 35:14 Reprise Sonny Burke Frank Sinatra chronology

The World We Knew (1967)

Francis A. & Edward K. (1968)

Frank Sinatra's Greatest Hits (1968)

Duke Ellington chronology

...And His Mother Called Him Bill (1967)

Francis A. & Edward K. (1968)

Yale Concert (1968)

Francis A. & Edward K. is a 1968 studio album by Frank Sinatra with Duke Ellington and his big band. This was the first time that Sinatra had worked with Ellington and the sessions were finished on Sinatra's fifty second birthday.

Track listing
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. "Follow Me" (Alan Jay Lerner, Frederick Loewe) – 3:56 "Sunny" (Bobby Hebb) – 4:15 "All I Need Is the Girl" (Stephen Sondheim, Jule Styne) – 5:01 "Indian Summer" (Victor Herbert, Al Dubin) – 4:14 "I Like the Sunrise" (Duke Ellington) – 5:02 "Yellow Days" (Álvaro Carrillo, Alan Bernstein) – 5:00 "Poor Butterfly" (Raymond Hubbell, John Golden) – 4:29 "Come Back to Me" (Burton Lane, Lerner) – 3:22

Francis A. & Edward K.

119

Personnel
• • • • Frank Sinatra - vocals Duke Ellington and His Orchestra Billy May - arranger, conductor Jeff Castleman - Double Bass

External links
• Allmusic review link [1]

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r138201

The Sinatra Family Wish You a Merry Christmas
The Sinatra Family Wish You a Merry Christmas
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer December 1968 July 24-December 12, 1968 Hollywood Classic pop, Christmas 33:31 Reprise Sonny Burke Frank Sinatra chronology

Frank Sinatra's Greatest Hits (1968)

The Sinatra Family Wish You a Merry Christmas (1968)

Cycles (1968)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

The Sinatra Family Wish You a Merry Christmas is a 1968 Christmas album by Frank Sinatra and featuring his children, Frank Sinatra, Jr., Nancy Sinatra, and Tina Sinatra. The album was released on vinyl LP and 8-track, and was out of print for decades before being rereleased on CD in 1999.

The Sinatra Family Wish You a Merry Christmas

120

Track listing
1. "I Wouldn't Trade Christmas" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) – 2:55 2. "It's Such a Lonely Time of Year" (Chip Taylor) – 4:38 3. "Some Children See Him" (Hutson/Burt) – 2:59 4. "O Bambino (One Cold and Blessed Winter)" (Capra, Velona) – 2:59 5. "The Bells of Christmas (Greensleeves)" (Traditional, ad. Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) – 3:41 6. "Whatever Happened to Christmas?" (Jimmy Webb) – 3:05 7. "Santa Claus Is Coming to Town" (Coots, Gillespie) – 2:35 8. "Kids" (Davis) – 3:01 9. "The Christmas Waltz" (Sammy Cahn, Jule Styne) – 3:12 10. "The Twelve Days of Christmas" (Traditional, ad. Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) – 4:26

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - Vocals (Tracks 1, 5, 6, 9, 10) • Frank Sinatra, Jr. - Vocals (Tracks 1, 3, 5, 10) • Nancy Sinatra - Vocals (Tracks 1, 2, 4, 5, 8, 10) • • • • Tina Sinatra - Vocals (Tracks 1, 4, 5, 7, 10) Nelson Riddle - Arranger, Composer Don Costa - Arranger, Composer The Jimmy Joyce Singers

References
[1] The Sinatra Family Wish You a Merry Christmas (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26346) at Allmusic

Cycles

121

Cycles
Cycles
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer 1968 July 24–November 14, 1968, New York City and Hollywood Classic pop, Baroque Pop 32:40 Reprise Don Costa Frank Sinatra chronology

The Sinatra Family Wish You a Merry Christmas (1968)

Cycles (1968)

My Way (1969)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Cycles is a studio album by American singer Frank Sinatra, released in 1968. Released just before Christmas in 1968, there was a ten-month gap between this album and the release of Francis A. & Edward K., which was the longest period in Sinatra's Reprise years in which he did not commercially record music (barring his contributions to The Sinatra Family Wish You a Merry Christmas). Sinatra sang a variety of folk-rock oriented songs, including Joni Mitchell's "Both Sides Now" and the Glen Campbell hits "Gentle on My Mind" and "By the Time I Get to Phoenix". The title song was released as a single, reaching #23 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and #2 on the Easy Listening chart, while the album peaked at #18 on the Billboard 200 chart.

Track listing
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. "Rain in My Heart" (Teddy Randazzo, Victoria Pike) – 3:20 "From Both Sides, Now" (Joni Mitchell) – 2:55 "Little Green Apples" (Bobby Russell) – 5:00 "Pretty Colors" (Al Gorgoni, Chip Taylor) – 2:35 "Cycles" (Gayle Caldwell) – 3:07 "Wandering" (Caldwell) – 2:45 "By the Time I Get to Phoenix" (Jimmy Webb) – 3:55 "Moody River" (Gary D. Bruce) – 2:33

9. "My Way of Life" (Bert Kaempfert, Herb Rehbein, Carl Sigman) – 3:05 10. "Gentle On My Mind" (John Hartford) – 3:25

Cycles

122

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - Vocals • Don Costa - Producer, Arranger, Composer • Bill Miller - Conductor

References
[1] Cycles (Frank Sinatra album) (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26421) at Allmusic

My Way
My Way
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released March 1969

Recorded December 30, 1968, February 18, 20, 24, 1969, Hollywood, Los Angeles Genre Length Label Traditional pop, vocal jazz 32:54 Reprise

Producer Don Costa, Sonny Burke Frank Sinatra chronology

Cycles (1968)

My Way (1969)

A Man Alone (1969)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Mojo Rating [1] [2]

My Way

123

My Way: 40th Anniversary Edition
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released May 5, 2009

Recorded December 30, 1968, February 18, 20, 24, 1969, Hollywood, Los Angeles, August 13, 1969, NBC Studio 2, Burbank, California, October 24, 1987, Reunion Arena, Dallas, Texas Genre Length Label Traditional pop, vocal jazz 40:14 Concord

Producer Don Costa, Sonny Burke

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [3]

My Way is an album by American singer Frank Sinatra, released in 1969.[3] The album is a collection of contemporary pop songs, such as Simon and Garfunkel's "Mrs. Robinson", and The Beatles' "Yesterday", French songs such as "If You Go Away", and of course the anthemic title song "My Way", which effectively became Sinatra's theme song in this latter stage of his career. My Way was reissued by Concord Records in 2009 to mark its 40th Anniversary. Two bonus tracks were included, and new liner notes from Bono. The bonus tracks were a rehearsal of "For Once in My Life" from 1969, for Sinatra's eponymous Emmy Award nominated 1969 television special, Sinatra, and a live 1987 performance of "My Way" at the Reunion Arena, Dallas, Texas. Bono's liner notes had previously appeared as his New York Times Op-ed column on January 9, 2009. The article discussed Bono's personal relationship with Sinatra, and Sinatra's thoughts on Miles Davis. Bono also mused on Sinatra's performances of "My Way", and the new year.[4]

Track listing
1. "Watch What Happens" (Norman Gimbel, Michel Legrand) – 2:17 2. "Didn't We?" (Jimmy Webb) – 2:55 3. "Hallelujah, I Love Her So" (Ray Charles) – 2:47 4. "Yesterday" (John Lennon, Paul McCartney) – 3:56 5. "All My Tomorrows" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) – 4:35 6. "My Way" (Paul Anka, Claude François, Jacques Revaux, Gilles Thibault) – 4:35 7. "A Day in the Life of a Fool" (Luiz Bonfá, Carl Sigman) – 3:00 8. "For Once in My Life" (Ron Miller, Orlando Murden) – 2:50 9. "If You Go Away" (Jacques Brel, Rod McKuen) – 3:30 10. "Mrs. Robinson" (Paul Simon) – 2:55 11. "For Once in My Life" – 4:11 studio rehearsal, NBC Studio 2, Burbank, California, August 13, 1969 12. "My Way" – 3:09 live performance at the Reunion Arena, Dallas, Texas, October 24, 1987

My Way

124

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra – vocals • Don Costa – arranger, conductor

References
[1] [2] [3] [4] Allmusic review (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26316) Andrew Male Mojo, January 2010, Issue 194. My Way (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r1553266) at Allmusic "The New York Times" (http:/ / www. nytimes. com/ 2009/ 01/ 11/ opinion/ 11bono. html). Notes from the Chairman. 2009-01-11. . Retrieved 2009-02-06.

A Man Alone
A Man Alone
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released 1969

Recorded March 19-21 1969, Hollywood Genre Length Label Traditional pop music 32:05 Reprise

Producer Sonny Burke Frank Sinatra chronology

My Way (1968)

A Man Alone (1969)

Watertown (1970)

A Man Alone (fully titled A Man Alone: The Words and Music of McKuen) is a 1969 studio album by American singer Frank Sinatra, arranged by Don Costa. [1] In a tribute to the poet, all songs on this album were written by Rod McKuen. "Love's Been Good to Me" reached No. 8 on the British charts, and was also notably recorded by Johnny Cash.

Reception
The Allmusic review by Stephen Thomas Erlewine awarded the album two stars, stating: "A Man Alone was intended to be a serious statement, but much of it comes off as embarrassing posturing. McKuen's compositions are lyrically slight and musically insubstantial, but what saves A Man Alone from being a total failure is the conviction of Sinatra's performance, as well as Don Costa's skillful arrangements. Sinatra and Costa pull so much out of so little on A Man Alone, it makes the listener wish they had applied their talents and ambitions to a similar, but more substantial set of songs. As it stands, the album is an intriguing listen, but ultimately a failure." [1]

A Man Alone

125

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Track listing
All songs written by Rod McKuen 1. "A Man Alone" – 3:47 2. "Night" (Spoken) – 2:25 3. "I've Been to Town" – 3:13 4. "From Promise to Promise" (Spoken) – 1:31 5. "The Single Man" – 3:01 6. "The Beautiful Strangers" – 2:41 7. "Lonesome Cities" – 3:18 8. "Love's Been Good to Me" – 3:27 9. "Empty Is" (Spoken) – 2:46 10. "Out Beyond the Window" (Spoken) – 2:45 11. "Some Traveling Music" (Spoken) – 2:36 12. "A Man Alone (Reprise)" – 1:30

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra – Vocals • Don Costa – Arranger, Conductor

References
[1] "A Man Alone" (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ a-man-alone-other-songs-of-rod-mckuen-r183061). Allmusic. . Retrieved June 20, 2011.

Watertown

126

Watertown
Watertown
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer 1970 July 14, 17, 1969 Classic pop 36:18 Reprise Bob Gaudio Frank Sinatra chronology

A Man Alone (1969)

Watertown (1970)

Sinatra & Company (1971)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Watertown is a 1970 studio album by the American singer Frank Sinatra. It is Sinatra's most ambitious concept album, an experiment perhaps first started on the 1966 album That's Life. It charts the story of a middle-aged man in Watertown, New York, whose wife has left him with his children. It is similar in tone and nature to Sinatra's earliest concept albums, albums that evoke an air of despair and loneliness, found on such albums as 1958's Frank Sinatra Sings for Only the Lonely and 1955's In the Wee Small Hours. Stephen Thomas Erlewine describes the album's construction as being a 'Series of brief lyrical snapshots that read like letters or soliloquies, the culminating effect of the songs is an atmosphere of loneliness, but it is a loneliness without much hope or romance - it is the sound of a broken man'. It is this introspection that one consistently finds in Sinatra's later albums, culminating in Sinatra's last concept album, Trilogy: Past Present Future from 1980. "Watertown" was produced and co-written by Bob Gaudio, one of four members of the 1960s pop vocal group The Four Seasons. The songs were co-written by Jake Holmes. The album was released to mixed critical reviews and poor sales. Sinatra would release one further album, Sinatra & Company, before announcing his retirement. In 2011, the band CAKE covered "What's Now Is Now" on their album Showroom of Compassion.

Watertown

127

Track listing
1. "Watertown" – 3:36 2. "Goodbye (She Quietly Says)" – 3:06 3. "For a While" – 3:09 4. "Michael & Peter" – 5:10 5. "I Would Be in Love (Anyway)" – 2:31 6. "Elizabeth" – 3:38 7. "What a Funny Girl (You Used to Be)" – 3:00 8. "What's Now Is Now" – 4:04 9. "She Says" – 1:51 10. "The Train" – 3:26 11. "Lady Day" (CD bonus track) – 2:47 All songs written by Bob Gaudio and Jake Holmes

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - vocals • • • • • Bob Gaudio - producer, composer, arranger Jake Holmes - lyricist Charles Calello - arranger, conductor Joe Scott - arranger, conductor Jamie Alexander aka James Rocco and Diane Dell - background vocals

References
[1] Watertown (album) (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r187805) at Allmusic

External links
• A perceptive essay on Watertown by Simpleton (http://www.simpleton.com/20021230.html) • Ed O'Brien interviews Watertown Lyricist Jake Holmes and Composer/Producer Bob Gaudio (http://www. personal.psu.edu/sxh36/watertown.htm) • A more unorthodox take on the album's central concept from Frankosonic (http://www.duckworthsquare.com/ frankosonic/frankosonic/2006/09/frank-sinatra-watertown.html) • A podcast anylysis of Watertown (http://franktruth.noebie.com/2009/04/show-116-frank-sinatras-watertown. html) • In-depth analysis of Watertown by Paul Fuzz (http://www.electricroulette.com/2008/09/frank-sinatra-w. html)

Sinatra & Company

128

Sinatra & Company
Sinatra & Company
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded 1971 February 11, 1969 – October 29, 1970 Hollywood Classic pop 40:03 Reprise Frank Sinatra chronology

Genre Length Label

Watertown (1970)

Sinatra & Company (1971)

Frank Sinatra's Greatest Hits, Vol. 2 (1972)

SinatraJobim The original artwork

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Mojo Rating [1] [2]

Sinatra & Company is an album by American singer Frank Sinatra released in 1971. The first side of this album is in the bossa nova style, and the second side is influenced by soft rock, featuring a couple of standards from John Denver. The bossa nova recordings were originally cut for a follow-up to the widely acclaimed Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim. Arranged by Eumir Deodato, the recordings had been completed, the artwork finalized, and an 8-track tape release of the planned album, titled Sinatra-Jobim, briefly made available when the decision was made to retrench. Some of Sinatra's less mainstream albums hadn't performed well, and anxieties drove the creation of this hybrid. Three songs recorded at the Sinatra-Jobim session – "Bonita", "Sabiá", and "Off Key (Desafinado)" – were omitted from Sinatra & Company. "Sabiá" was released in the USA as the flip side of the 45 rpm single "Lady Day" (Reprise 0970) in 1970, and was issued along with "Bonita" on the 1977 compilation Portrait of Sinatra and the 1979 compilation, Sinatra-Jobim Sessions . "Off Key (Desafinado)" was unreleased until its inclusion on the box set The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings in 1995. In 2010 the Concord Records label issued Sinatra-Jobim: The Complete Reprise Recordings, a comprehensive collection of all the tracks recorded by Sinatra and Jobim. A few 8 track versions of Sinatra-Jobim did survive, and are now eagerly sought after by collectors.[3]

Sinatra & Company

129

Track listing
1. "Drinking Water" (Vinicius de Moraes, Antonio Carlos Jobim, Norman Gimbel) – 2:35 2. "Someone to Light up My Life" (de Moraes, Jobim, Gene Lees) – 2:37 3. "Triste" (Jobim) – 2:40 4. "Don't Ever Go Away" ("Por Causa de Voce") (Ray Gilbert, Dolores Durán, Jobim) – 2:28 5. "This Happy Madness" ("Estrada Branca") (de Moraes, Jobim, Lees) – 2:57 6. "Wave" (Jobim) – 3:25 7. "One Note Samba" (Jobim, Newton Mendonça, Jon Hendricks) – 2:20 8. "I Will Drink the Wine" (Paul Ryan) – 3:30 9. "(They Long to Be) Close to You" (Burt Bacharach, Hal David) – 2:34 10. "Sunrise in the Morning" (Ryan) – 2:50 11. "Bein' Green" (Joe Raposo) – 3:00 12. "My Sweet Lady" (John Denver) – 3:01 13. "Leaving on a Jet Plane" (Denver) – 2:25 14. "Lady Day" (Bob Gaudio, Jake Holmes) – 3:41

Personnel
• • • • • Frank Sinatra - vocals Antonio Carlos Jobim - guitar, scat singing (tracks 1 – 7) Don Costa - arranger, conductor (tracks 8 – 14) Eumir Deodato - arranger (tracks 1 – 7) Morris Stoloff - conductor (tracks 1 – 7)

References
[1] Allmusic review (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26349) [2] Andrew Male Mojo, January 2010, Issue 194. [3] (http:/ / www. 8trackheaven. com/ sinatra. html)

Ol' Blue Eyes Is Back

130

Ol' Blue Eyes Is Back
Ol' Blue Eyes Is Back
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer October 1973 June 4, 1973-August 20, 1973 Hollywood Classic pop 35:54 Reprise Don Costa Frank Sinatra chronology

Frank Sinatra's Greatest Hits, Vol. 2 (1972)

Ol’ Blue Eyes Is Back (1973)

Some Nice Things I've Missed (1974)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Ol' Blue Eyes Is Back is a 1973 album by the American singer Frank Sinatra. Sinatra returned from his brief retirement with the appropriately titled Ol’ Blue Eyes Is Back. Released amidst a whirlwind of publicity, the album was a commercial success, earning gold status and peaking just outside of the top-ten on the UK and Billboard album charts. Additionally, a TV special followed which was nominated for two Emmy awards -- Best Directing a Comedy/Variety Programme and Outstanding Comedy/Variety Special. Directed by Marty Pasetta and produced by Howard W. Koch Ol' Blue Eyes Is Back was a glowing success made all the more memorable by a special appearance from Gene Kelly who had first co-starred with Sinatra 30 years prior in Anchors Aweigh.

Track listing
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. "You Will Be My Music" (Joe Raposo) – 3:52 "You're So Right (For What's Wrong in My Life)" (Victoria Pike, Teddy Randazzo, Roger Joyce) – 4:03 "Winners" (Raposo) – 2:50 "Nobody Wins" (Kris Kristofferson) – 5:10 "Send in the Clowns" (Stephen Sondheim) – 4:10 "Dream Away" (John Williams, Paul Williams) – 4:22 "Let Me Try Again" ("Laisse Moi le Temps") (Paul Anka, Sammy Cahn, Michel Jourdon) – 3:31 "There Used to Be a Ballpark" (Raposo) – 3:34

9. "Noah" (Raposo) – 4:22

Ol' Blue Eyes Is Back

131

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - Vocals • Gordon Jenkins - Arranger, Conductor • Don Costa - Arranger, Conductor

References
[1] Ol' Blue Eyes Is Back (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26321) at Allmusic

Some Nice Things I've Missed
Some Nice Things I’ve Missed
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label July 1974 December 10, 1973 - May 24, 1974 Hollywood Classic pop 28:52 Reprise Frank Sinatra chronology

Ol’ Blue Eyes Is Back (1973)

Some Nice Things I’ve Missed (1974)

The Main Event – Live (1974)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Mojo Rating [1] [2]

Some Nice Things I’ve Missed is a 1974 album by the American singer Frank Sinatra.

Some Nice Things I've Missed

132

Track listing
1. "You Turned My World Around" (Bert Kaempfert, Herbert Rehbein, Kim Carnes, Dave Ellingson) – 2:50 2. "Sweet Caroline" (Neil Diamond) – 2:44 3. "The Summer Knows" (Alan Bergman, Marilyn Bergman, Michel Legrand) – 2:44 4. "I'm Gonna Make It All the Way" (Floyd Huddleston) – 2:54 5. "Tie a Yellow Ribbon 'Round the Ole Oak Tree" (Russell Brown, Irwin Levine) – 3:07 6. "Satisfy Me One More Time" (Huddleston) – 2:22 7. "If" (David Gates) – 3:10 8. "You Are the Sunshine of My Life" (Stevie Wonder) – 2:37 9. "What Are You Doing the Rest of Your Life?" (A. Bergman, M. Bergman, Legrand) – 4:05 10. "Bad, Bad Leroy Brown" (Jim Croce) – 2:49

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - Vocals • Don Costa - Arranger, Conductor • Gordon Jenkins - Arranger, Conductor

References
[1] Allmusic review (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26359) [2] Andrew Male Mojo, January 2010, Issue 194.

Trilogy: Past Present Future
Trilogy: Past Present Future
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded 1980 July 17 - December 18, 1979 New York City, Los Angeles, Hollywood Classic pop, Jazz 106:11 Reprise Frank Sinatra chronology

Genre Length Label

The Main Event Live (1974)

Trilogy: Past Present Future (1980)

She Shot Me Down (1981)

Trilogy: Past Present Future

133

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Trilogy: Past Present Future (or simply Trilogy) is a 1980 album by the American singer Frank Sinatra. This album produced the last of Sinatra's many signature numbers, "Theme from New York, New York." At the Grammy Awards of 1981, Trilogy: Past Present Future was nominated for the Grammy Award for Album of the Year, and Sinatra's recording of "Theme from New York, New York" was nominated for the Grammy Award for Best Male Pop Vocal Performance and the Grammy Award for Song of the Year. On his WNEW-AM show, Jonathan Schwartz described the "Future" suite that forms the final part of this album as "narcissistic" and "a shocking embarrassment" [2]. Sinatra rang to complain, and had Schwartz suspended from his job.[2]

Artistic scheme
Each of the album's three records was conceived as an individual work portraying a different time epoch, and each was arranged by one of Sinatra's major collaborators — Billy May (The Past), Don Costa (The Present), and Gordon Jenkins (The Future). For "The Past", Sinatra made a record of standards ("The Song Is You", "It Had to Be You", "All of You") for the first time since the early 1960s. "The Present" concentrates on pop hits like "Love Me Tender", "Something", "Song Sung Blue", "MacArthur Park", and "Just the Way You Are". For "The Future" (written by Jenkins), "the songs are ambitious, experimental, and self-referential — more of a freeform suite than a set of songs". Trilogy: Past Present Future peaked at No. 17 on the Billboard 200.

Track listing
Disc 1
1. "The Song Is You" (Jerome Kern, Oscar Hammerstein II) – 2:39 2. "But Not for Me" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) – 3:50 3. "I Had the Craziest Dream" (Mack Gordon, Harry Warren) – 3:13 4. "It Had to Be You" (Isham Jones, Gus Kahn) – 3:53 5. "Let's Face the Music and Dance" (Irving Berlin) – 2:50 6. "Street of Dreams" (Sam M. Lewis, Victor Young) – 3:32 7. "My Shining Hour" (Harold Arlen, Johnny Mercer) – 3:21 8. "All of You" (Cole Porter) – 1:42 9. "More Than You Know" (Billy Rose, Edward Eliscu, Vincent Youmans) – 3:22 10. "They All Laughed" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) – 2:49 11. "You and Me (We Wanted It All)" (Carole Bayer Sager, Peter Allen) – 4:07 12. "Just the Way You Are" (Billy Joel) – 3:26 13. "Something" (George Harrison) – 4:42 14. "MacArthur Park" (Jimmy Webb) – 2:45 15. "Theme from New York, New York" (Fred Ebb, John Kander) – 3:26 16. "Summer Me, Winter Me" (Marilyn Bergman, Alan Bergman, Michel Legrand) – 4:02 17. "Song Sung Blue" (Neil Diamond) – 2:47

Trilogy: Past Present Future 18. "For the Good Times" (Kris Kristofferson) – 4:41 19. "Love Me Tender" (Vera Matson, Elvis Presley) – 3:34 20. "That's What God Looks Like to Me" (Lois Irwin, Lan O’Kun) – 2:55

134

Disc 2
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. "What Time Does the Next Miracle Leave?" – 10:44 "World War None!" – 4:27 "The Future" – 4:05 "The Future (Continued): I've Been There" – 3:33 "The Future (Conclusion): Song Without Words" – 6:00 "Before the Music Ends (Finale)" – 9:46

All songs on Future written by Gordon Jenkins.

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - Vocals • Billy May - Arranger, Conductor (Disc 1) • • • • • Don Costa - Arranger, Conductor (Disc 2) Gordon Jenkins - Arranger, Conductor (Disc 3) Diana Lee - Soprano (Disc 3 song 1) Beverly Jenkins - Alto (Disc 3 Song 3 and 5) Loulie Jean Norman - Coloratura soprano (Disc 3 Song 5)

References
[1] Allmusic review (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r70147) [2] Frankie and Jonathan - New York Times (http:/ / query. nytimes. com/ gst/ fullpage. html?res=9806E0D9133CF934A35750C0A9629C8B63& sec=& spon=& pagewanted=all)

She Shot Me Down

135

She Shot Me Down
She Shot Me Down
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released November 1981

Recorded April 8 in Hollywood, Los Angeles, California, and July 20, 21, August 19, September 10, 1981 in New York City, New York Genre Length Label Vocal Jazz, Classic pop 36:40 Reprise

Producer Don Costa Frank Sinatra chronology

Trilogy: Past Present Future (1980)

She Shot Me Down (1981)

L.A. Is My Lady (1984)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

She Shot Me Down is a 1981 album by Frank Sinatra. [2] This was the final album Sinatra recorded for the record label he founded, Reprise Records and generally considered an artistic triumph that evokes the best of Sinatra during this stage of his career. The album, however, was not a commercial success. In essence, She Shot Me Down harks back to the triumphs of Sinatra's Capitol years, a thought-provoking set of torch songs with soaring strings, lyrics fraught with loss and regret, and heart-wrenching, world-weary vocals. Of the recordings chosen for the album, the only remake of a previous recording by Sinatra himself is the medley of Harold Arlen's and Ira Gershwin's "The Gal that Got Away" with Rodgers and Hart's "It Never Entered My Mind". Sinatra would bring this medley to his concert set-list with much success, evident especially during the live concerts filmed in The Dominican Republic for Concert for the Americas. Of the album, Sinatra himself said: "A complete saloon album... tear-jerkers and cry-in-your-beer kind of things."

She Shot Me Down

136

Track listing
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. "Good Thing Going (Going Gone)" (Stephen Sondheim) – 3:53 "Hey Look, No Crying" (Jule Styne, Susan Birkenhead) – 4:27 "Thanks for the Memory" (Leo Robin, Ralph Rainger) – 4:25 "A Long Night" (Alec Wilder, Loonis McGlohon) – 3:44 "Bang Bang (My Baby Shot Me Down)" (Sonny Bono) – 3:24 "Monday Morning Quarterback" (Don Costa, Pamela Phillips-Oland) – 4:38 "South - To a Warmer Place" (Wilder, McGlohon) – 3:45 "I Loved Her" (Gordon Jenkins) – 4:04 Medley: "The Gal that Got Away"/"It Never Entered My Mind" (Harold Arlen, Ira Gershwin)/(Lorenz Hart, Richard Rodgers) – 5:05

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - vocals • Gordon Jenkins - arranger, conductor • Don Costa - arranger, conductor • Nelson Riddle - arranger • Vincent Falcone, Jr - conductor

Recording dates
• • • • • April 8, 1981 - "Bang Bang (My Baby Shot Me Down)", "The Gal that Got Away"/"It Never Entered My Mind" July 20, 1981 - "Thanks for the Memory", "A Long Night", "I Loved Her" July 21, 1981 - "South - To a Warmer Place" August 19, 1981 - "Good Thing Going (Going Gone)" September 10, 1981 - "Hey Look, No Cryin'", "Monday Morning Quarterback"

References
[1] Allmusic review (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26337) [2] She Shot Me Down (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26337) at Allmusic

L.A. Is My Lady

137

L.A. Is My Lady
L.A. Is My Lady
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded August, 1984 April 13, 16–17, May 17, 1984 New York City, New York and Los Angeles, California Classic pop, Vocal Jazz 36:35 Qwest/Warner Bros. Records Quincy Jones Frank Sinatra chronology

Genre Length Label Producer

She Shot Me Down (1981)

L.A. Is My Lady (1984)

All-Time Greatest Dorsey/Sinatra Hits, Vol. 1-4 (1988)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

L.A. Is My Lady is a 1984 studio album by Frank Sinatra, featuring arrangements by Quincy Jones. It was the last solo album that Sinatra recorded, though Sinatra recorded three further songs, which were unreleased until The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings. The album came after an album of duets between Sinatra and Lena Horne, instigated by Jones, was abandoned after Horne developed vocal problems and Sinatra, committed to other engagements, couldn't wait to record. This was the first studio album Sinatra had recorded with Jones since 1964's It Might as Well Be Swing. The sessions were filmed, with a small audience, and released as Frank Sinatra: Portrait of an Album (1985). The documentary shows Sinatra meeting Michael Jackson for the first time, with Jones affectionately calling Jackson "Smelly". Eddie Van Halen, Donna Summer and David Lee Roth make cameo appearances in the video for L.A. Is My Lady, which in turn made moderate rotation on the fledgling MTV Network. Despite its title, the album was recorded in New York City. The album peaked at #58 on the Billboard 200, and #8 on the Top Jazz Albums chart.

L.A. Is My Lady

138

Songs
• This was the first time Sinatra recorded "Mack the Knife". He re-recorded the vocal on October 30, 1986 (combined with the original orchestra track) for the album's 1986 release on compact disc.[2] The musicians that Sinatra name-checks on "Mack the Knife" are; Quincy Jones, Randy Brecker, Michael Brecker, George Benson, Joe Newman, Frank Foster, and Lionel Hampton. The double bassist Major Holley scats over the opening bars of the song. • Sammy Cahn wrote a new verse for "Teach Me Tonight", referencing Sinatra's many love affairs. • Cahn also altered the lyrics of "Until the Real Thing Comes Along", with Sinatra claiming "I'd even punch out Mr. T for you". • In the liner notes, Jones says he had a new arrangement of "Body and Soul" planned for the album, but Sinatra had nothing new to say with the song, and declined to record it. Sinatra's vocal for "Body and Soul" from the L.A. Is My Lady sessions was added to a new arrangement by Torrie Zito and released as a bonus track on Nothing But the Best a 2008 compilation album.

Track listing
1. "L.A. Is My Lady" (Alan Bergman, Marilyn Bergman, Quincy Jones, Peggy Lipton Jones) – 3:12 2. "The Best of Everything" (Fred Ebb, John Kander) – 2:45 3. "How Do You Keep the Music Playing?" (A. Bergman, M. Bergman, Michel Legrand) – 3:49 4. "Teach Me Tonight" (Sammy Cahn, Gene de Paul) – 3:44 5. "It's All Right With Me" (Cole Porter) – 2:39 6. "Mack the Knife" (Marc Blitzstein, Bertolt Brecht, Kurt Weill) – 4:50 7. "Until the Real Thing Comes Along" (Mann Holiner, Alberta Nichols, Cahn, Saul Chaplin, L.E. Freeman) – 3:03 8. "Stormy Weather" (Harold Arlen, Ted Koehler) – 3:38 9. "If I Should Lose You" (Ralph Rainger, Leo Robin) – 2:36 10. "A Hundred Years from Today" (Joe Young, Ned Washington, Victor Young) – 3:04 11. "After You've Gone" (Henry Creamer, Turner Layton) – 3:15 • • • • • Quincy Jones arranged tracks 1, 5, 7-11. Torrie Zito arranged tracks 1 & 4. Dave Matthews & Jerry Hey arranged track 1. Joe Parnello & Sam Nestico arranged tracks 2-3. Frank Foster arranged track 6.

Personnel
• • • • • • • • • Frank Sinatra - vocals Harry Lookofsky - Concert Master Oscar Brashear - trumpet Randy Brecker - trumpet, flugelhorn Jon Faddis - trumpet Gary Grant Joe Newman - trumpet Alan Rubin - trumpet, flugelhorn, piccolo trumpet Lew Soloff - trumpet

• Snooky Young - trumpet • Jerry Hey - trumpet, arranger • Wayne Andre - trombone

L.A. Is My Lady • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • George Bohannon - trombone Urbie Green - trombone Lew McCreary - trombone Benny Powell Bill Reichenbach Jr. - trombone David Taylor - bass trombone Bill Watrous Michael Brecker - saxophone Buddy Collette Ronnie Cuber - baritone saxophone William Green Kim Hutchcroft Jerome Richardson Larry Williams George Young - saxophone Frank Wess - saxophone, alto saxophone Frank Foster - arranger, saxophone John Clark - french horn David Duke Peter Gordon Sidney Muldrow Jerry Peel Henry Sigismonti Toni Price - tuba James (Jim) Self - tuba Margaret Ross - harp Amy Sherman George Benson - guitar Tony Mottola - guitar Lee Ritenour - guitar Lionel Hampton - vibraphone Ray Brown - double bass Gene Cherico Bob Cranshaw - bass Major Holley Marcus Miller - bass Neil Stubenhaus - electric bass Leon "Ndugu" Chancler - drums Irving Cottler - drums Steve Gadd - drums John "J.R." Robinson Ralph MacDonald - percussion Sy Johnson - piano, fender rhodes Joe Parnello piano, arranger, Fender rhodes Craig Huxley - synthesizer

139

• Ed Walsh • Bob James - synthesizer, electric piano, Fender rhodes

L.A. Is My Lady • Hilary James - synthesizer, piano, fender rhodes • Randy Kerber - synthesizer, piano, fender rhodes

140

Production personnel
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Quincy Jones - arranger, conductor, producer Joseph d'Ambrosio - production coordination David Matthews - arranger Sammy Nestico - arranger Torrie Zito - arranger David Smith - engineer Gus Skinas - engineer, digital engineer Phil Ramone - engineer, mixing Jimmy Santis Stanley Wallace Allen Sides - engineer, assistant engineer, mixing assistant Steve Crimmel - engineer, associate engineer Mark Ettel Cliff Jones - engineer, associate remixing engineer Ollie Cotton - associate engineer Bradshaw Leigh Roger Nichols - digital engineer, associate engineer Bernie Grundman - mastering Lee Herschberg - digital mastering Don Hahn - remixing Elliot Scheiner - remixing, assistant engineer, mixing assistant Alan Berliner - photography Bill Ross Ed Thrasher William Warren Stan Cornyn - liner notes

References
[1] Allmusic Review (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26310) [2] http:/ / www. songsbysinatra. com/ songs/ composers/ composers_main. html see under "Weill".

Duets

141

Duets
Duets
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer November 2, 1993 August-September,1993 Vocal jazz, Traditional pop 45:44 Capitol Phil Ramone Hank Cattaneo Frank Sinatra chronology

The Columbia Years 1943-1952: The Complete Recordings (1993)

Duets (1993)

The Columbia Years 1943–1952: The V-Discs (1994)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Duets is an album by American singer Frank Sinatra, released in 1993. Recorded near the end of Sinatra's career, it consists of duets between Sinatra and other guest star singers from various genres; Sinatra personally chose the performers. It was advertised as “The Recording Event of The Decade.” The album was a commercial success, reaching #2 on the Billboard albums chart and #5 in the UK and selling over 3 million copies in the U.S. It is the only Sinatra album to date to achieve triple platinum certification. It received mixed critical notices, with complaints stemming from Phil Ramone's style of production and a lack of personal collaboration, since the guest singers were not physically present with Sinatra but instead were singing along to his pre-recorded vocal parts over a digital audio telecommunications link from EDnet.net [2]. The cover art displays a specially commissioned painting of Frank Sinatra by LeRoy Neiman. Its sequel, Duets II, was released the following year. Both were packaged together in a "90th Birthday Limited Collector's Edition" released in 2005, that included an unreleased duet recording of "My Way" with Luciano Pavarotti.

Duets

142

Track listing
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. "The Lady Is a Tramp" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) (with Luther Vandross) – 3:24 "What Now My Love" (Gilbert Becaud, Carl Sigman, Pierre Leroyer) (with Aretha Franklin) – 3:15 "I've Got a Crush on You" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) (with Barbra Streisand) – 3:23 "Summer Wind" (Heinz Meier, Hans Bradtke, Johnny Mercer) (with Julio Iglesias) – 2:32 "Come Rain or Come Shine" (Harold Arlen, Mercer) (with Gloria Estefan) – 4:04 "New York, New York" (Fred Ebb, John Kander) (with Tony Bennett) – 3:30 "They Can't Take That Away From Me" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) (with Natalie Cole) – 3:11 "You Make Me Feel So Young" (Mack Gordon, Josef Myrow) (with Charles Aznavour) – 3:05 "Guess I'll Hang My Tears Out to Dry"/"In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning" (Sammy Cahn, Jule Styne)/(Bob Hilliard, David Mann) (with Carly Simon) – 3:57 10. "I've Got the World on a String" (Arlen, Ted Koehler) (with Liza Minnelli) – 2:18 11. "Witchcraft" (Carolyn Leigh, Cy Coleman) (with Anita Baker) – 3:22 12. "I've Got You Under My Skin" (Cole Porter) (with Bono) – 3:32 13. "All the Way"/"One For My Baby (And One More For The Road)" (Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen)/(Arlen, Mercer) (with Kenny G) – 6:03

Personnel
• • • • • • • • Frank Sinatra - vocals Phil Ramone - producer Patrick Williams - musical director, conductor Charles Koppelman - executive producer Don Rubin - executive producer Eliot Weisman - executive producer Al Schmitt - engineer John Wheeler - EDnet network engineer

References
[1] Duets (Frank Sinatra album) (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r189202) at Allmusic [2] http:/ / www. ednet. net

External links
• 9.24.93 PR: Frank Sinatra "Duets" Album Set For Release (http://www.sinatraarchive.com/tis/37p.html)

Duets II

143

Duets II
Duets II
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer November 15, 1994 1994 Vocal jazz, Classic pop 52:01 Capitol Phil Ramone Frank Sinatra chronology

Christmas Songs By Sinatra (1994)

Duets II (1994)

Frank Sinatra Sings the Select Johnny Mercer (1995)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Duets II is the 58th and last studio album by American singer Frank Sinatra. It was released in 1994, and was the sequel to the previous year's Duets. Phil Ramone produced the album and guest artists from various genres contributed their duet parts to Sinatra's already recorded vocals. Though not as commercially successful as Duets, it still rose to #9 on the Billboard albums chart and sold over 1 million copies in the U.S. It also peaked at #29 in the UK. Critical notices were again mixed at best, although some viewed it as an improvement over its predecessor. However, the album won Sinatra the 1995 Grammy Award for Best Traditional Pop Vocal Performance, his last competitive Grammy Award.. These would be the last studio recordings made by Sinatra, who had begun his recording career fifty five years earlier. In 2005, both "Duets" albums were packaged together in a "90th Birthday Limited Collector's Edition" that included an unreleased duet recording of "My Way" with Willie Nelson.

Duets II

144

Track listing
1. "For Once in My Life" (Ron Miller, Orlando Murden) (with Gladys Knight and Stevie Wonder) – 3:18 2. "Come Fly with Me" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) (with Luis Miguel) – 4:17 3. "Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) (with Patti Labelle) – 3:31 4. "The Best Is Yet to Come" (Cy Coleman, Carolyn Leigh) (with Jon Secada) – 3:12 5. "Moonlight in Vermont" (John Blackburn, Karl Suessdorf) (with Linda Ronstadt) – 4:07 6. "Fly Me to the Moon" (Bart Howard) (with Antonio Carlos Jobim) – 3:06 7. "Luck Be a Lady" (Frank Loesser) (with Chrissie Hynde) – 5:17 8. "A Foggy Day" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) (with Willie Nelson) – 2:24 9. "Where or When" (Rodgers, Hart) (with Steve Lawrence and Eydie Gorme) – 3:53 10. "Embraceable You" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) (with Lena Horne) – 3:45 11. "Mack the Knife" (Marc Blitzstein, Bertolt Brecht, Kurt Weill) (with Jimmy Buffett) – 4:26 12. "How Do You Keep the Music Playing?"/"My Funny Valentine" (Alan Bergman, Marilyn Bergman, Michel Legrand)/(Rodgers, Hart) (with Lorrie Morgan) – 3:58 13. "My Kind of Town" (Cahn, Van Heusen) (with Frank Sinatra, Jr.) – 2:33 14. "The House I Live In" (Lewis Allan, Earl Robinson) (with Neil Diamond) – 4:14

Personnel
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Dave Allen – technical assistance Marcelo Anez – assistant engineer Ron Anthony – guitar John Aquilino – engineer Bernie Becker – engineer Chuck Berghofer – bass, rhythm bass Craig Brock – assistant engineer Billy Byers – arranger Scott Canto – assistant engineer Bryan Carrigan [2] – assistant engineer Paul Cartledge – engineer Jim Caruana – assistant engineer Hank Cattaneo – producer Bill Cavanaugh – engineer Sean Chambers – assistant engineer, mixing assistant Kiko Cibrian – vocal producer Don Costa – arranger Mike Couzzi – engineer Jill Dell'Abate – production coordination T-Bone Demmar – engineer Peter Doell – assistant engineer Charles Dye – engineer Susanne Edgren – production coordination Andy Engel – illustrations Geraldo Fernandes de Souza, Jr. – engineer Gregg Field – drums

• Frank Foster – arranger • Jim Giddenes – technical assistance

Duets II • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Carl Glanville – engineer, assistant engineer Larry Greenhill – engineer Michael Guerra – technical assistance Don Hahn – engineer Troy Halderson – assistant engineer David Hall – assistant engineer R.R. Harlan – engineer Jay Healy – engineer John Hechtman – technical assistance Tom Hensley – vocal arrangement Ted Jensen – mastering Quincy Jones – arranger Charles Koppelman – executive producer Sebastián Krys – assistant engineer Scott Lechner – technical assistance Alan Lindgren – vocal arrangement Johnny Mandel – arranger George Massenburg – engineer Chie Masumoto – production coordination Billy May – arranger Mike Mazzetti – assistant engineer Paul McKenna – engineer Bucky Meadows – technical assistance Bill Miller – piano Jeff Minnich – technical assistance Francisco Miranda – assistant engineer Jennifer Monnar – assistant engineer Marcelo Moura – assistant engineer LeRoy Neiman – paintings Kim Niemi – coordination Jorge Noriega – backing vocals Clay Ostwald – keyboards Charles Paakkari – engineer John Patterson – engineer Scott Perry – engineer, assistant engineer Csaba Petocz – engineer Jose L. Quintana – vocal producer Rita Quintero – backing vocals Ed Rak – engineer Mark Ralston – assistant engineer Phil Ramone – producer Dave Reitzas – engineer Nelson Riddle – arranger Don Rubin – executive producer Arturo Sandoval – trumpet

145

• Eric Schilling – engineer, mixing • Al Schmitt – engineer

Duets II • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Kevin Scott – assistant engineer Frank Sinatra – vocals Andy Smith – assistant engineer Rick Southern – engineer Tommy Steele – art direction Ted Stein – engineer Ron Taylor – engineer Denny Thomas – technical assistance Terry Trotter – piano Larry Walsh – engineer Eliot Weisman – executive producer Chris Wiggins – assistant engineer Dick Williams – vocal arrangement Patrick Williams – arranger, conductor, director, musical director Frank Wolf – engineer Stevie Wonder – harmonica, piano, vocals Terry Woodson – music preparation

146

• Tom Young – engineer • Bill Zehme – liner notes

References
[1] Duets II (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r207142) at Allmusic [2] http:/ / www. bryancarrigan. com

147

Live albums
Sinatra at the Sands
Sinatra at the Sands
Live album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded July 1966 January 1966 and February 1966 Vocal jazz, Classic pop 76:03 Reprise Sonny Burke Frank Sinatra chronology

Genre Length Label Producer

Strangers In The Night (1966)

Sinatra at the Sands (1966)

That's Life (1966)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Mojo Rating [1] [2]

Sinatra at the Sands is a 1966 live album by Frank Sinatra, accompanied by Count Basie and his orchestra, conducted and arranged by Quincy Jones, recorded live at the Copa Room of the Sands Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas. It was Sinatra's first live album to be commercially released, and contains many definitive readings of the songs that are most readily associated with Sinatra. Sinatra and Basie had previously collaborated on 1963's Sinatra-Basie and 1964's It Might As Well Be Swing, with both albums released on Sinatra's Reprise label. The album was remixed and remastered and released in DVD-Audio in high-resolution stereo and multi-channel surround in 2003. An alternate version of the same show with a slightly different track list was released in November 2006 as part of the box set Sinatra: Vegas.

Sinatra at the Sands

148

Track listing
From the 1998 Warner Bros. Records reissue, 46947 1. "Come Fly with Me" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) – 3:45 2. "I've Got a Crush on You" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) – 2:42 3. "I've Got You Under My Skin" (Cole Porter) – 3:43 4. "The Shadow of Your Smile" (Johnny Mandel, Paul Francis Webster) – 2:31 5. "Street of Dreams" (Victor Young, Sam M. Lewis) – 2:16 6. "One for My Baby (and One More for the Road)" (Harold Arlen, Johnny Mercer) – 4:40 7. "Fly Me to the Moon" (Bart Howard) – 2:50 8. "One O'Clock Jump" (Instrumental) (Count Basie) – 0:53 9. "The Tea Break" (Sinatra Monologue) – 11:48 10. "You Make Me Feel So Young" (Mack Gordon, Josef Myrow) – 3:21 11. "All of Me" (Instrumental) (Gerald Marks, Seymour Simons) – 2:56 12. "The September of My Years" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:57 13. "Luck Be a Lady" (Frank Loesser) – 4:40 (This bonus track was only available on the remastered 1998 CD and 2003 DVD-Audio releases. It was not part of any other edition, including the original LP as well as the current [2010] in-print CD) 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. "Get Me to the Church on Time" (Frederick Loewe, Alan Jay Lerner) – 2:22 "It Was a Very Good Year" (Ervin Drake) – 4:01 "Don't Worry 'Bout Me" (Rube Bloom, Ted Koehler) – 3:18 "Makin' Whoopee" (Walter Donaldson, Gus Kahn) – 4:24 "Where or When" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) – 2:46 "Angel Eyes" (Earl Brent, Matt Dennis) – 3:26 "My Kind of Town" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 3:04 "A Few Last Words" (Sinatra Monologue) – 2:30 "My Kind of Town" (Reprise) – 1:00

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - vocals • Count Basie - piano • Bill Miller - piano The Count Basie Orchestra • • • • • • • • • • • Quincy Jones – arranger, conductor Harry "Sweets" Edison - trumpets Al Aarons Sonny Cohn Wallace Davenport Phil Guilbeau Al Grey - trombones Henderson Chambers Grover Mitchell Bill Hughes Marshall Royal - alto saxophone

• Bobby Plater • Eric Dixon - tenor saxophone • Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis

Sinatra at the Sands • • • • Charlie Fowlkes - baritone saxophone Freddie Green - guitar Norman Keenan - double bass Sonny Payne - drums

149

References
[1] Allmusic review (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r67986) [2] Andrew Male Mojo, January 2010, Issue 194.

The Main Event – Live
The Main Event - Live
Live album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label 1974 October 1974 Classic pop 50:42 Reprise Frank Sinatra chronology

Some Nice Things I've Missed (1974)

The Main Event – Live (1974)

Portrait of Sinatra - Forty Songs from the Life of a Man (1977)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

The Main Event – Live is a 1974 live album and television special by Frank Sinatra.

Track listing
1. Overture: "It Was a Very Good Year"/"All the Way"/"My Kind of Town" (Ervin Drake)/(Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen)/(Cahn, Van Heusen) – 3:12 (introduction by Howard Cosell) 2. "The Lady Is a Tramp" (Lorenz Hart, Richard Rodgers) – 3:02 3. "I Get a Kick Out of You" (Cole Porter) – 4:37 4. "Let Me Try Again (Laisse Moi le Temps)" (Paul Anka, Cahn, Michel Jourdon, Caravelli) – 3:26 5. "Autumn in New York" (Vernon Duke) – 2:45 6. "I've Got You Under My Skin" (Porter) – 4:44 7. "Bad, Bad Leroy Brown" (Jim Croce) – 2:49 8. "Angel Eyes" (Earl Brent, Matt Dennis) – 8:32 9. "You Are the Sunshine of My Life" (Stevie Wonder) – 2:49

The Main Event Live 10. "The House I Live In (That's America to Me)" (Lewis Allan, Earl Robinson) – 6:41 11. "My Kind of Town" – 3:01 12. "My Way" (Anka, Claude François, Jacques Revaux, Gilles Thibault) – 4:57 • • • • Tracks 10 and 12 recorded in Boston Garden, October 2, 1974 Tracks 6 and 8 recorded at War Memorial Auditorium, October 4, 1974 Track 5 recorded in Madison Square Garden, October 12, 1974 Tracks 1-4, 7, 9, and 11 recorded in Madison Square Garden, October 13, 1974

150

Personnel
• • • • Frank Sinatra - Vocals Woody Herman and the Young Thundering Herd Bill Miller - Conductor Jeff Brillinger - Drums

References
[1] The Main Event – Live (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r67991) at Allmusic

Sinatra Saga

151

Sinatra Saga
Sinatra Saga
Live album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label 1994 1953-1987 Vocal Jazz, Traditional Pop, Standards 69 min. Bravura Music Frank Sinatra chronology

The Columbia Years 1943–1952: The V-Discs (1994)

Sinatra Saga (1994)

Sinatra Saga, Vol. 2 (1994)

Sinatra Saga is a live album by Frank Sinatra, containing 2 discs of him performing live on stage from the 1950s to the 1980s.

Track listing
Disc one
1. "When You're Smiling" (Mark Fisher, Joe Goodwin, Larry Shay) 2. "Don't Worry 'bout Me" (Rube Bloom, Ted Koehler) 3. "The Birth of the Blues" (Buddy G. DeSylva, Lew Brown)
Recorded at the Opera House Theater, Blackpool, England, July 26, 1953

4. "Three Coins in the Fountain" (Jule Styne, Sammy Cahn)
Recorded at the Melbourne Town Hall, Melbourne, Australia, January 19, 1955

5. "You Make Me Feel So Young" (Josef Myrow, Mack Gordon) 6. "I Won't Dance" (Jerome Kern, Oscar Hammerstein, Otto Harbach) 7. "The Lady is a Tramp" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart)
Recorded at the Seattle Civic Auditorium, Seattle, Washington, June 9, 1957

8. "Just One of Those Things" (Cole Porter) 9. "Dancing in the Dark" (Arthur Schwartz, Howard Dietz) 10. "Night and Day" (Porter)
Recorded at the Melbourne Stadium, Melbourne, Australia, March 31, 1959

11. 12. 13. 14.

"My Funny Valentine" (Rodgers, Hart) "In the Still of the Night" (Porter) "April in Paris" (Vernon Duke, E.Y. Harburg) "Too Marvelous for Words" (Richard A. Whiting, Johnny Mercer)
Recorded at the Hibya Park, Tokyo, Japan, April 20, 1962

15. "Ol' Man River" (Kern, Hammerstein II)
Recorded at the Theatre Manzoni, Milan, Italy, May 25, 1962

16. "I've Got You Under My Skin" (Porter)

Sinatra Saga 17. "I Only Have Eyes for You" (Harry Warren, Al Dubin) 18. "Luck Be a Lady" (Frank Loesser)
Recorded at the Kiel Opera House, St. Louis, Missouri, June 20, 1965

152

19. "I've Got You Under My Skin" (Ballad Version)
Recorded at the Friends of the Liberty, February 12, 1967

20. "That's Life" (Kelly Gordon, Dean Thompson) 21. "Moonlight in Vermont" (Karl Suessdorf, John Blackburn)
Recorded at the Oakland Coliseum, Oakland, California, May 22, 1968

Disc two
1. "All I Need is the Girl" (Stephen Sondheim, Styne) 2. "I Have Dreamed" (Rodgers, Hammerstein II)
Recorded at the Oakland Coliseum, Oakland, California, May 22, 1968

3. "You Will Be My Music" (Joe Raposo) 4. "My Kind of Town" (Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) 5. "There Used to Be a Ballpark" (Raposo)
Recorded at the Carnegie Hall, New York City, New York, April 8, 1974

6. "All By Myself" (Eric Carman)
Recorded at the Sabre Room, Chicago, Illinois, May 13, 1976

7. "Maybe This Time" (Fred Ebb, John Kander)
Recorded at the Caesar's Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada, May 5, 1978

8. "Lover, Come Back to Me" (Sigmund Romberg, Hammerstein II)
Recorded at the Caesar's Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada, January 12, 1978

9. "It Had to Be You" (Isham Jones, Gus Kahn) 10. "Street of Dreams" (Victor Young, Sam M. Lewis) 11. Medley: "The Gal That Got Away"/"It Never Entered My Mind" (Harold Arlen, Ira Gershwin)/(Rodgers, Hart)
Recorded at the Resorts International, Atlantic City, New Jersey, November 20, 1979

12. "When Joanna Loved Me" (Robert Wells, Jack Segal)
Recorded at the Maksoud Plaza Hotel, São Paulo, Brazil, August 15, 1981

13. "Summer Wind" (Heinz Meyer, Hans Bradtke, Mercer)
Recorded at the Golden Nugget, Las Vegas, Nevada, October 25, 1986

14. "Only One to a Customor" (Carolyn Leigh, Styne)
Recorded at the Golden Nugget, Las Vegas, Nevada, December 27, 1986

15. 16. 17. 18.

"More Than You Know" (Billy Rose, Edward Eliscu, Vincent Youmans) "Where or When" (Rodgers, Hart) "Mack the Knife" (Marc Blitzstein, Bertold Brecht, Kurt Weill) "Theme from New York, New York" (Ebb, Kander)
Recorded at the Golden Nugget, Las Vegas, Nevada, October 25, 1986

Sinatra Saga

153

Personnel
• • • • • Frank Sinatra - vocals Bill Miller - pianist and conductor Vincent Falcone, Jr. - conductor Al Viola - guitarist Irv Cottler - drums

Sinatra Saga, Vol. 2

154

Sinatra Saga, Vol. 2
Sinatra Saga, Vol. 2
Live album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Label 1994 May 29, 1975 - January 23, 1986 Vocal Jazz, Traditional Pop, Standards Bravura Music Frank Sinatra chronology

Sinatra Saga (1994)

Sinatra Saga, Vol. 2 (1994)

Sinatra & Sextet: Live in Paris (1994)

Sinatra Saga, Vol. 2 is a 1994 live album by American singer Frank Sinatra.

Track listing
1. "I Sing the Songs (I Write the Songs)" (Bruce Johnston) - 3:20
Recorded at the Westchester Premiere Theater, Tarrytown, New York, September 27, 1976

2. "The Best Is Yet To Come" (Cy Coleman, Carolyn Leigh) - 3:35 3. "Come Rain or Come Shine" (Harold Arlen, Johnny Mercer) - 3:25
Recorded at the Metropolitan Center, Boston, Massachusetts, June 7, 1981

4. "Change Partners" (Irving Berlin) - 3:04
Recorded at the Lloyd Norble Center, Norman, Oklahoma, January 23, 1986

5. "I Can't Get Started" (Vernon Duke, Ira Gershwin) - 4:11
Recorded at the Resorts International, Atlantic City, New Jersey, November 24, 1979

6. "For Once in My Life" (Ron Miller, Orlando Murden) - 2:56
Recorded at the Westchester Premiere Theater, Tarrytown, New York, September 26, 1976

7. "I See Your Face Before Me" (Howard Dietz, Arthur Schwartz) - 2:30
Recorded at the Royal Albert Hall, London, England, May 29, 1975

8. "Just the Way You Are" (Billy Joel) - 3:21
Recorded at the Resorts International, Atlantic City, New Jersey, November 21, 1979

9. "See the Show Again" (Barry Manilow) - 3:35
Recorded at the Tonight Show, Burbank, California, November 14, 1977

10. "It's All Right with Me" (Cole Porter) - 2:58
Recorded at the Lloyd Norble Center, Norman, Oklahoma, January 23, 1986

11. "For the Good Times" (Kris Kristofferson) - 5:09
Recorded at the Resorts International, Atlantic City, New Jersey, November 25, 1979

12. "Pennies from Heaven" (Johnny Burke, Arthur Johnston) - 4:15
Recorded at the Century Plaza Hotel, Los Angeles, California, May 19, 1981

13. "Empty Tables" (Mercer, Jimmy Van Heusen) - 4:38 14. "Never Gonna Fall in Love Again" (Eric Carmen) - 3:23

Sinatra Saga, Vol. 2
Recorded at the Westchester Premiere Theater, Tarrytown, New York, September 26, 1976

155

15. "The Song Is You" (Jerome Kern, Oscar Hammerstein II) - 3:14
Recorded at the Resorts International, Atlantic City, New Jersey, November 21, 1979

16. "Angel Eyes" (Matt Dennis, Earl Brent) - 3:28
Recorded at the Metropolitan Center, Boston, Massachusetts, June 7, 1981

17. "They All Laughed" (George Gershwin, I. Gershwin) - 2:19
Recorded at the Resorts International, Atlantic City, New Jersey, November 19, 1979

18. "You and Me (We Wanted It All)" (Peter Allen, Carole Bayer Sager) - 3:49
Recorded at the Metropolitan Center, Boston, Massachusetts, June 7, 1981

19. "Here's to the Band" (Artie Schroeck, Sharman Howe, Alfred Nittoli) - 4:27
Recorded at the Lloyd Norble Center, Norman, Oklahoma, January 23, 1986

20. "My Way" (Paul Anka, Claude Francois, Jacques Revaux, Gilles Thibaut) - 5:24
Recorded at the Resorts International, Atlantic City, New Jersey, November 19, 1979

Sinatra & Sextet: Live in Paris
Sinatra & Sextet: Live in Paris
Live album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label March 22, 1994 June 5, 1962 Vocal jazz, Classic pop 71:18 Reprise Frank Sinatra chronology

Sinatra Saga (1994)

Sinatra & Sextet: Live in Paris (1994)

The Song Is You (1994)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Sinatra & Sextet: Live in Paris is a live album by American singer Frank Sinatra, recorded in 1962 but not released until 1994. The album was released by Reprise Records. An earlier, non-commercial edition of this concert was released in late 1992, albeit with two fewer songs than the twenty five in this set. It was only the third live album ever officially released of Sinatra, after 1966's Sinatra at the Sands and 1974's The Main Event – Live. It was his first concert he ever performed in Paris, France. The album is unique in that it is an entire unedited concert of Sinatra.

Sinatra & Sextet: Live in Paris

156

Concert Background
After being snubbed by President Kennedy earlier in the year, the Sinatra brain trust decided to take a tour of international capitals to benefit children's charities, in order to polish the singer's apparently tarnished image. The tour eventually extended to thirty dates in two months, starting on April 15th in Mexico City and ending June 17th in Monte Carlo. The concert which makes up the album was recorded on June 5th, towards the end of the tour. Guitarist Al Viola stated in the liner notes of the album that, since the band was gathered on such short notice, they never rehearsed with Sinatra for the tour. Much of the band had already performed with him on previous albums with the same arrangements, so he never felt rehearsals were necessary.

Commentary
During the concert, the singer makes some risque remarks. His spoken introduction to "One for My Baby" is an example. Of the song's protagonist, Sinatra had this to say: "It's obvious what his trouble is: Girls. Cherche la femme (Look for the girl). Which means in French Why don't you share the broad with me?" Following his performance of "Ol' Man River", the singer states: "That song is about Sammy Davis's people. And 'dis is a song about my people," moving into "The Lady Is A Tramp". Sinatra jokes through some of his vocal difficulties, commenting at one point that he should "avoid the pre-show onion soup", and that he's "gotta stop sleepin' in the park."

Track listing
1. Introduction by Charles Aznavour – 1:04 2. "Goody Goody" (Matty Malneck, Johnny Mercer) – 1:11 3. "Imagination" (Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen) – 2:25 4. "At Long Last Love" (Cole Porter) – 2:12 5. "Moonlight in Vermont" (John Blackburn, Karl Suessdorf) – 3:33 6. "Without a Song" (Vincent Youmans, Billy Rose, Edward Eliscu) – 2:36 7. "Day In, Day Out" (Rube Bloom, Mercer) – 2:35 8. "I've Got You Under My Skin" (Porter) – 2:49 9. "I Get a Kick Out of You" (Porter) – 2:58 10. "The Second Time Around" (Sammy Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:41 11. "Too Marvelous for Words" (Mercer, Richard A. Whiting) – 1:37 12. "My Funny Valentine" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) – 2:49 13. "In the Still of the Night" (Porter) – 3:18 14. "April in Paris" (Vernon Duke, E.Y. Harburg) – 2:30 15. "You're Nobody 'Til Somebody Loves You" (Page Cavanaugh, Russ Morgan, Larry Stock) – 3:53 16. "They Can't Take That Away from Me" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) – 1:48 17. "Chicago (That Toddlin' Town)" (Fred Fisher) – 2:07 18. "Night and Day" (Porter) – 4:19 19. "I Could Have Danced All Night" (Alan Jay Lerner, Frederick Loewe) – 2:43 20. "One for My Baby (and One More for the Road)" (Harold Arlen, Mercer) – 5:45 21. "A Foggy Day" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) – 2:15 22. "Ol' Man River" (Oscar Hammerstein II, Jerome Kern) – 3:33 23. "The Lady Is a Tramp" (Rodgers, Hart) – 3:44 24. "I Love Paris" (Porter) – 1:39 25. "Nancy (With the Laughing Face)" (Phil Silvers, Van Heusen) – 2:14

Sinatra & Sextet: Live in Paris 26. "Come Fly with Me" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 3:00

157

Personnel
• • • • • • • Frank Sinatra - Vocals Bill Miller - Piano Al Viola - Guitar Ralph Peña - Bass Irv Cottler - Drums Emil Richards - Vibraphone Harry Klee - Alto Saxophone, Flute

References
[1] Sinatra & Sextet: Live in Paris (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r197646) at Allmusic

Sinatra 80th: Live in Concert
Sinatra 80th: Live In Concert
Live album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label November 14, 1995 1987 - 1988 Traditional pop music, Vocal jazz 52:32 Capitol Frank Sinatra chronology

The Complete Recordings Nineteen Thirty-Nine (1995)

Sinatra 80th: Live In Concert (1995)

Sinatra 80th: All the Best (1995)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Sinatra 80th: Live in Concert is a live album by American singer Frank Sinatra, released in 1995. The album is a compilation of previously-unreleased live recordings from his concerts between 1987 and 1988. (The title is a reference to Sinatra's age at the time of the album's release, not at the time of the performances.) The final track, "My Way", is an outtake from the Duets album. The album was certified gold by the RIAA.[2]

Sinatra 80th: Live in Concert

158

Track listing
1. "You Are the Sunshine of My Life" (Stevie Wonder) – 2:37 2. "What Now My Love" (Gilbert Becaud, Carl Sigman, Pierre Delanoë) – 2:41 3. "My Heart Stood Still" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) – 3:28 4. "What's New?" (Bob Haggart, Johnny Burke) – 2:38 5. "For Once in My Life" (Ronald Miller, Orlando Murden) – 2:56 6. "If" (David Gates) – 3:22 7. "In the Still of the Night" (Cole Porter) – 3:38 8. "Soliloquy" (Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein II) – 11:14 9. "Maybe This Time" (Fred Ebb, John Kander) - 2:52 10. "Where or When" (Rodgers, Hart) – 4:08 11. "You Will Be My Music" (Joe Raposo) – 4:25 12. "Strangers in the Night" (Bert Kaempfert, Charles Singleton, Eddie Snyder) – 2:09 13. "Angel Eyes" (Earl Brent, Matt Dennis) - 4:26 14. "New York, New York" (Ebb, Kander) - 4:29 15. "My Way" [with Luciano Pavarotti] (Paul Anka, Claude Francois, Jacques Revaux, Gilles Thibault) - 3:33 • Tracks 1-6, 9-11, 13,14 recorded in Dallas, October 24, 1987. • Tracks 7-8,12 recorded in Detroit, December, 1988.[3]

References
[1] Allmusic review (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r228931) [2] Hawtin, Steve. "Album artist 5 - Frank Sinatra" (http:/ / tsort. info/ music/ gpf7q8. htm#93). Tsort.info. Tsort.info. . Retrieved 28 May 2012. [3] "Sinatra 80th Live in Concert Information" (http:/ / web. archive. org/ web/ 20020818090723/ http:/ / www. sinatraarchive. com/ tis/ live-in-concert. html) (in English). The Sinatra Archive. The Sinatra Archive. Archived from the original (http:/ / www. sinatraarchive. com/ tis/ live-in-concert. html) on 18 Aug 2002. . Retrieved 28 May 2012.

Frank Sinatra with Red Norvo Quintet: Live in Australia, 1959

159

Frank Sinatra with Red Norvo Quintet: Live in Australia, 1959
With the Red Norvo Quintet: Live in Australia, 1959
Live album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded April 8, 1997 March 31 & April 1, 1959 Melbourne, Australia Vocal jazz, Classic pop 57:53 Blue Note Frank Sinatra chronology

Genre Length Label

Greatest Hits: Early Years (1996)

With the Red Norvo Quintet: Live in Australia, 1959 (1997)

The Very Best of Frank Sinatra (1997)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

With the Red Norvo Quintet: Live in Australia, 1959 is a live album by American singer Frank Sinatra, recorded in 1959 but released in 1997. These tapes were recorded during two stops on Sinatra's brief Australian tour of 1959, during which he was backed by the quintet of jazz vibraphonist Red Norvo. It is considered one of the wildest performances he has ever recorded, as he exhibits great freedom in his lyric choice, often switching and twisting entire phrases. For example, just as Sinatra begins "I've Got You Under My Skin", a woman in the audience screams. He responds between lyrics with "Get your hand off that broad!"

Track listing
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. "Perdido" (Instrumental) (Ervin Drake, Hans Jan Lengsfelder, Juan Tizol) – 5:22 "Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea" (Instrumental) (Harold Arlen, Ted Koehler) – 5:08 "I Could Have Danced All Night" (Alan Jay Lerner, Frederick Loewe) – 2:45 "Just One of Those Things" (Cole Porter) – 2:30 "I Get a Kick Out of You" (Porter) – 3:05 "At Long Last Love" (Porter) – 2:26 "Willow Weep for Me" (Ann Ronell) – 3:49 "I've Got You Under My Skin" (Porter) – 3:15

9. "Moonlight in Vermont" (John Blackburn, Karl Suessdorf) – 3:43 10. "The Lady is a Tramp" (Lorenz Hart, Richard Rodgers) – 4:41

Frank Sinatra with Red Norvo Quintet: Live in Australia, 1959 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. "Sinatra Speaks" – 1:34 "Angel Eyes" (Earl Brent, Matt Dennis) – 2:53 "Come Fly with Me" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) – 2:53 "All the Way" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:40 "Dancing in the Dark" (Howard Dietz, Arthur Schwartz) – 2:17 "One for My Baby (And One More for the Road)" (Arlen, Johnny Mercer) – 5:14 "All of Me" (Gerald Marks, Seymour Simons) – 3:02 "On the Road to Mandalay" (Oley Speaks, Rudyard Kipling) – 4:15 "Night and Day" (Porter) – 4:16

160

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - Vocals • Red Norvo - Orchestra

References
[1] Frank Sinatra with the Red Norvo Quintet: Live in Australia, 1959 (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r259426) at Allmusic

Sinatra '57 in Concert
Sinatra ’57 in Concert
Live album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label April 6, 1999 June 9, 1957 Vocal Jazz, Classic pop 56:07 Artanis Records Frank Sinatra chronology

Lucky Numbers (1998)

Sinatra ’57 in Concert (1999)

Classic Sinatra: His Greatest Performances 1953-1960 (2000)

Sinatra '57 in Concert

161

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Sinatra ’57 in Concert is a 1999 live album by the American singer Frank Sinatra. It is a complete recording of a concert performed at the Seattle Civic Auditorium on June 9, 1957. It was digitally remastered and officially released from a recording made by Wally Heider and first released as a bootleg. Nelson Riddle, the arranger, conducted the orchestra at this concert.

Track listing
1. Introduction - "You Make Me Feel So Young" (Mack Gordon, Josef Myrow) - 3:46 2. "It Happened in Monterey" (Billy Rose, Mabel Wayne) - 2:23 3. "At Long Last Love" (Cole Porter) - 2:15 4. "I Get a Kick Out of You" (Porter) - 2:49 5. "Just One of Those Things" (Porter) - 3:02 6. "A Foggy Day" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) - 3:31 7. "The Lady is a Tramp" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) - 3:18 8. "They Can't Take That Away from Me" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) - 1:40 9. "I Won't Dance" (Dorothy Fields, Oscar Hammerstein II, Otto Harbach, Jimmy McHugh) - 3:26 10. Sinatra Dialogue - 4:52 11. "When Your Lover Has Gone" (Enir A. Swan) - 2:53 12. "Violets for Your Furs" (Tom Adair, Matt Dennis) - 3:34 13. "My Funny Valentine" (Rodgers, Hart) - 2:44 14. "Glad to Be Unhappy" (Rodgers, Hart) - 1:37 15. "One for My Baby (and One More for the Road)" (Harold Arlen, Johnny Mercer) - 4:01 16. "(Love Is) The Tender Trap" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) - 4:12 17. "Hey! Jealous Lover" (Cahn, Kay Twomey, Bee Walker) - 2:21 18. "I've Got You Under My Skin" (Porter) - 3:15 19. "Oh! Look at Me Now" (Joe Bushkin, John DeVries) - 3:12

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - Vocals

References
[1] Sinatra '57 in Concert (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r401908) at Allmusic

Live from Las Vegas

162

Live from Las Vegas
Live from Las Vegas
Live album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label April 26, 2005 December 1986 Traditional pop music, Vocal jazz 72:57 Capitol Frank Sinatra chronology

Fly Me to the Moon (Opus Collection) (2005)

Live from Las Vegas (2005)

Duets/Duets II: 90th Birthday Limited Collector's Edition (2005)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Live from Las Vegas is a 2005 live album by the American singer Frank Sinatra. This album forms part of Capitol Records 'Las Vegas Centennial Collection', and showcases a December 1986 concert by Sinatra. This was Sinatra's first live Las Vegas album released since 1966s Sinatra at the Sands. It was recorded at the Golden Nugget Las Vegas.

Track listing
1. Intro ("A Lovely Way to Spend an Evening") [instrumental] (Harold Adamson, Jimmy McHugh) – 0:38 2. "I've Got the World On a String" (Harold Arlen, Ted Koehler) – 2:25 3. "What Now My Love" (Gilbert Bécaud, Pierre Delanoë, Carl Sigman) – 2:43 4. "I Get a Kick Out of You" (Cole Porter) – 4:58 5. "My Heart Stood Still" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) – 3:27 6. "Luck Be a Lady" (Frank Loesser) – 5:04 7. "I've Got a Crush on You" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) – 2:32 8. "Mack the Knife" (Marc Blitzstein, Bertolt Brecht, Kurt Weill) – 4:30 9. Monologue – 1:59 10. "The Girls I Never Kissed" (Leiber and Stoller) – 4:03 11. "For Once in My Life" (Ron Miller, Orlando Murden) – 2:53 12. "Someone to Watch Over Me" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) – 3:46 13. "Maybe This Time" (Fred Ebb, John Kander) – 2:51 14. "I've Got You Under My Skin" (Porter) – 4:22 15. "Only One to a Customer" (Carolyn Leigh, Jule Styne) – 3:45 16. "I Have Dreamed" (Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein II) – 3:22

Live from Las Vegas 17. "My Way" (Paul Anka, Claude François, Jacques Revaux, Gilles Thibault) – 4:01 18. "New York, New York" (Kander, Ebb) – 3:55 19. Bows ("You Are There") (instrumental) (Harry Sukman, Paul Francis Webster) – 0:44

163

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra – vocals • Bill Miller - pianist, conductor

References
[1] link (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r735376)

Sinatra: Vegas
Sinatra: Vegas
Live album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label November 7, 2006 1961-1987 Vocal jazz, Classic pop 272:57 Reprise Frank Sinatra chronology

Duets/Duets II: 90th Birthday Limited Collector's Edition (2005)

Sinatra: Vegas (2006)

Romance: Songs From the Heart (2007)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Pitchfork Media (8.7/10.0) Rating [1] [2]

Sinatra: Vegas is a 2006 box set of live performances by the American singer Frank Sinatra, recorded in Las Vegas. This box set covers some twenty years of Sinatra's performances in Las Vegas, both at the Sands Casino, and at Caesars Palace. The first disc captures a live performance from 1961, disc two is from 1966, an alternative performance to that found on Sinatra at the Sands. The final two discs are from the 1980s, with disc five a previously unreleased DVD of a May 5, 1978 performance at Caesars Palace. This set peaked at #165 on the Billboard 200.

Sinatra: Vegas

164

Track listing
Disc one (recorded at the Sands Hotel, November 2, 1961)
• With the Antonio Morelli Orchestra 1. Introductions and Announcement - 0:26 2. "The One I Love (Belongs to Somebody Else)" (Isham Jones, Gus Kahn) - 2:39 3. "Don't Cry, Joe (Let Her Go, Let Her Go, Let Her Go)" (Joe Marsala) - 2:33 4. "Imagination" (Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen) - 2:42 5. "Moonlight in Vermont" (John Blackburn, Karl Suessdorf) - 3:07 6. "Without a Song" (Edward Eliscu, Billy Rose, Vincent Youmans) - 2:46 7. "In the Still of the Night" (Cole Porter) - 3:27 8. "Here's That Rainy Day" (Burke, Van Heusen) - 2:38 9. "The Moon Was Yellow (And the Night Was Young)" (Fred E. Ahlert, Edgar Leslie) - 2:34 10. Monologue by Frank Sinatra - 2:40 11. "You Make Me Feel So Young" (Mack Gordon, Josef Myrow) - 2:45 12. "The Second Time Around" (Sammy Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:51 13. "River, Stay 'Way from My Door" (Parody) (Mort Dixon, Harry M. Woods) - 3:49 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. "The Lady is a Tramp" (Lorenz Hart, Richard Rodgers) - 3:40 "Just One of Those Things" (Porter) - 4:10 "You're Nobody 'Til Somebody Loves You" (James Cavanaugh, Russ Morgan, Larry Stock) - 4:08 Bows by Frank Sinatra - 0:40 "Young at Heart" (Carolyn Leigh, Jimmy Richards) - 2:00 "Witchcraft" (Cy Coleman, Leigh) - 1:29 "On the Road to Mandalay" (Rudyard Kipling, Oley Speaks) - 2:50 "Bows by Frank Sinatra - 0:43 Frank Sinatra Speaks on Segregation in Nevada - 1:38

Disc two (recorded at the Sands Hotel, January-February 1966)
• With the Count Basie Orchestra 1. Introductions - 1:23 2. "Come Fly with Me" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:03 3. "I've Got a Crush on You" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) - 2:59 4. "I've Got You Under My Skin" (Porter) - 3:27 5. "The September of My Years" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:03 6. "Street of Dreams" (Sam M. Lewis, Victor Young) - 2:13 7. "Fly Me to the Moon (In Other Words" (Bart Howard) - 2:49 8. Monologue by Frank Sinatra - 8:33 9. "You Make Me Feel So Young" - 3:16 10. "The Shadow of Your Smile" (Johnny Mandel, Paul Francis Webster) - 2:40 11. "Get Me to the Church on Time" (Alan Jay Lerner, Frederick Loewe) - 2:26 12. "Luck Be a Lady" (Frank Loesser) - 4:34 13. "It Was a Very Good Year" (Ervin Drake) - 3:51 14. "Don't Worry 'Bout Me" (Rube Bloom, Ted Koehler) - 3:15 15. "My Kind of Town" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:54 16. Introductions by Frank Sinatra - 4:39 17. "My Kind of Town" (Reprise) - 1:44

Sinatra: Vegas 18. Frank Sinatra Speaks on Working with Count Basie - 1:12

165

Disc three (recorded at Caesar's Palace, March 1982)
1. "Get Me to the Church on Time" - 2:28 2. "I Get a Kick Out of You" (Porter) - 5:35 3. "I Can't Get Started" (Vernon Duke, I. Gershwin) - 3:05 4. "Without a Song" - 3:48 5. "Hey Look, No Crying" (Susan Birkenhead, Jule Styne) - 3:49 6. "The Lady is a Tramp" - 3:49 7. Monologue by Frank Sinatra - 2:59 8. "Night and Day" (Porter) - 2:32 9. "All or Nothing at All" (Arthur Altman, Jack Lawrence) - 3:21 10. "The One I Love (Belongs to Somebody Else)" - 3:14 11. "These Foolish Things (Remind Me Of You)" (Harry Link, Holt Marvell, Jack Strachey) - 2:25 12. "Somethin' Stupid" (Carson Parks) - 6:10 13. "Theme from New York, New York" (Fred Ebb, John Kander) - 4:40 14. Bows by Frank Sinatra - 0:55

Disc four (recorded at the Golden Nugget, April 1987)
1. "I've Got the World on a String" (Harold Arlen, Koehler) - 2:39 2. "At Long Last Love" (Porter) - 2:31 3. "Witchcraft" - 2:43 4. Medley: "The Gal That Got Away"/"It Never Entered My Mind" (Arlen, I. Gershwin)/(Rodgers, Hart) - 6:52 5. "For Once in My Life" (Ron Miller, Orlando Murden) - 3:05 6. "My Heart Stood Still" (Rodgers, Hart) - 3:22 7. "You Are the Sunshine of My Life" (Stevie Wonder) - 2:46 8. Monologue by Frank Sinatra - 1:45 9. "Spring is Here" (Rodgers, Hart) - 3:26 10. "What Now My Love?" (Gilbert Bécaud, Pierre Leroyer, Carl Sigman) - 2:37 11. "I Get Along Without You Very Well (Except Sometimes)" (Hoagy Carmichael) - 4:08 12. "Pennies from Heaven" (Johnny Burke, Arthur Johnston) - 3:41 13. "Angel Eyes" (Earl Brent, Matt Dennis) - 7:45 14. "Mack the Knife" (Marc Blitzstein, Bertolt Brecht, Kurt Weill) - 4:22 15. Bows by Frank Sinatra - 1:16

Disc five (DVD) (recorded at Caesar's Palace, May 5, 1978)
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Backstage (Before the Show) Welcome to Caesars "All of Me" (Gerald Marks, Seymour Simons) "Maybe This Time" (Kander, Ebb) "The Lady Is a Tramp" "Didn't We?" (Jimmy Webb) "Someone to Watch Over Me" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) "Something" (George Harrison)

9. "Baubles, Bangles and Beads" (Alexander Borodine, George Forrest, Robert C. Wright) 10. Medley: "The Gal That Got Away"/"It Never Entered My Mind"

Sinatra: Vegas 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. Monologue "My Kind of Town" "Send in the Clowns" (Stephen Sondheim) Monologue "Don't Worry 'Bout Me" Introductions "My Way" (Paul Anka, Claude François, Jacques Revaux, Gilles Thibault) "America the Beautiful" (Katharine Lee Bates) Backstage (After The Show) "Freedom to Live" "Freedom to Live"

166

Personnel
• • • • Frank Sinatra - Vocals Nancy Sinatra Bill Miller Arrangements, Pianist Quincy Jones - Arranger, Conductor

• Count Basie and His Orchestra • Antonio Morelli and His Orchestra

References
[1] Allmusic review (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r860404) [2] Pitchfork Media review (http:/ / pitchfork. com/ reviews/ albums/ 9827-vegas-live/ )

Frank Sinatra: The Greatest Concerts

167

Frank Sinatra: The Greatest Concerts
Frank Sinatra: The Greatest Concerts
Live album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Label November 10, 2008 1955–1981 Traditional pop music, Vocal jazz, Swing music Entertain Me Ltd. Frank Sinatra chronology

Nothing But the Best (2008)

Frank Sinatra: The Greatest Concerts (2008)

Seduction: Sinatra Sings of Love (2009)

This CD contains five rare, live concerts by Frank Sinatra from 1955 to 1981, and a few bonus tracks on each disc.

Track listing
Disc one (Tokyo, June 1962)
1. "Too Marvelous for Words" (Johnny Mercer, Richard A. Whiting) 2. "Imagination" (Jimmy Van Heusen, Johnny Burke) 3. "Moonlight in Vermont" (John Blackburn, Karl Suessdorf) 4. "Day In, Day Out" (Rube Bloom, Mercer) 5. "Without a Song" (Edward Eliscu, Billy Rose, Vincent Youmans) 6. "The Moon Was Yellow (And the Night Is Young)" (Fred E. Ahlert, Edgar Leslie) 7. "I've Got You Under My Skin" (Cole Porter) 8. "At Long Last Love" (Porter) 9. "My Funny Valentine" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) 10. "In the Still of the Night" (Porter) 11. "Embraceable You" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) 12. "Night and Day" (Porter) 13. "April in Paris" (Vernon Duke, E.Y. Harburg) 14. "The Lady Is a Tramp" (Rodgers, Hart) 15. Tokyo Monologue 16. "All the Way" (Sammy Cahn, Van Heusen) 17. "Chicago" (Fred Fisher) 18. "I Could Have Danced All Night" (Alan Jay Lerner, Frederick Loewe) 19. "New York, New York" (Fred Ebb, John Kander) 20. "Come Fly with Me" (Cahn, Van Heusen)

Frank Sinatra: The Greatest Concerts

168

Disc two (Melbourne, January 19, 1955)
1. "I've Got the World on a String" (Harold Arlen, Ted Koehler) 2. "I Get a Kick Out of You" (Porter) 3. "My Funny Valentine" 4. "Taking a Chance on Love" (Duke, Ted Fetter, John Latouche) 5. "Three Coins in the Fountain" (Jule Styne, Cahn) 6. "(I Got A Woman Crazy For Me) She's Funny That Way" (Neil Moret, Whiting) 7. "Just One of Those Things" (Porter) 8. "A Foggy Day" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) 9. "All of Me" (Gerald Marks, Seymour Simons) 10. "Young at Heart" (Carolyn Leigh, Johnny Richards) 11. "Nancy (With the Laughing Face)" (Phil Silvers, Van Heusen) 12. "They Can't Take That Away from Me" (G. Gerhswin, I. Gershwin) 13. "Ol' Man River"/National Anthem (Jerome Kern, Oscar Hammerstein II) 14. "Our Town" [Bonus Track] (Cahn, Van Heusen) 15. "Grovers Corners" [Bonus Track] (Cahn, Van Heusen) 16. "The Impatient Years" [Bonus Track] (Cahn, Van Heusen) 17. 18. 19. 20. "Our Town" (Reprise) [Bonus Track] "Love and Marriage" [Bonus Track] (Cahn, Van Heusen) "Look to Your Heart" [Bonus Track] (Cahn, Van Heusen) Finale [Bonus Track]

Disc three (The White House, April 17, 1973)
1. Introduction by Richard Nixon 2. "You Make Me Feel So Young" (Josef Myrow, Mack Gordon) 3. "Moonlight in Vermont" 4. "One for My Baby (and One More for the Road)" (Arlen, Mercer) 5. "I've Got You Under My Skin" 6. "I Have Dreamed" (Rodgers, Hammerstein II) 7. "Fly Me to the Moon" (Bart Howard) 8. "Try a Little Tenderness" (Jimmy Campbell, Reginald Connelly, Harry M. Woods) 9. "Ol' Man River" 10. "I've Got the World on a String" 11. "The House I Live In (That's America to Me)" (Lewis Allan, Earl Robinson) 12. Thanks from President Nixon

Disc four (Caesars Palace, Lake Tahoe, February 12, 1981)
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. "I've Got the World on a String" "You and Me (We Wanted It All)" (Carole Bayer Sager, Peter Allen) "The Best is Yet to Come" (Cy Coleman, Leigh) "Here's That Rainy Day" (Van Heusen, Burke) "Fly Me to the Moon" "Angel Eyes" (Matt Dennis, Tom Adair) A Toast to the Audience

8. Teaching Brando to Sing 9. "Luck Be a Lady" (Frank Loesser)

Frank Sinatra: The Greatest Concerts 10. "Send in the Clowns" (Stephen Sondheim) 11. "I Get a Kick Out of You" 12. "Where or When" (Rodgers, Hart) 13. "I've Got You Under My Skin" 14. "As Time Goes By" (Herman Hupfeld) 15. "High Time" (Instrumental) 16. A Brief Singing Lesson 17. "Summer Me, Winter Me" (Marilyn Bergman, Alan Bergman, Michel Legrand) 18. "New York, New York" 19. "Lonely Town (Leonard Bernstein, Betty Comden, Adolph Green) (Live at the Reunion Arena, Dallas, Texas, October 24, 1987) 20. "Moonlight in Veromont" (Live at the Reunion Arena, Dallas, Texas, October 24, 1987)

169

Disc five (Westchester Premiere Theater, April 1976)
1. "Night and Day" 2. "Where or When" 3. "For Once in My Life" (Ron Miller, Orlando Murden) 4. "The Lady Is a Tramp" 5. "Imagination" 6. "What's New?" (Bob Haggart, Burke) 7. "Didn't We?" (Jimmy Webb) 8. "Witchcraft" (Coleman, Leigh) 9. "All By Myself" (Eric Carmen) 10. Political Monologue 11. "If" (David Gates) 12. "The Hungry Years" (Neil Sedaka) 13. "I've Got You Under My Skin" 14. "Empty Tables" (Mercer, Van Heusen) 15. "Send in the Clowns" 16. "I Sing the Songs (I Write the Songs)" (Bruce Johnston) 17. "My Kind of Town" (Cahn, Van Heusen) 18. "My Way" (Paul Anka, Claude Francois, Jacques Revaux, Gilles Thibaut) 19. Closing Theme

Personnel
• • • • • Frank Sinatra - vocals Bill Miller - Piano arrangements Vincent Falcone, Jr. - conductor, piano Al Viola - Guitar Tony Motolla - Guitar

Live at the Meadowlands

170

Live at the Meadowlands
Live at the Meadowlands
Live album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer May 5, 2009 March 14, 1986 Jazz 50:15 Concord Charles Pignone Frank Sinatra chronology

Seduction: Sinatra Sings of Love (2009)

Live at the Meadowlands (2009)

Classic Sinatra II (2009)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Live at the Meadowlands is a 2009 live album by the American singer Frank Sinatra, of a 1986 concert at the Meadowlands Arena in East Rutherford, New Jersey. [2] Housed in a striking package and presented with a 24 page collectors' book of rare photos and extensive notes by long-time Sinatra associate Hank Cattaneo, this previously unreleased recording features 21 digitally remastered songs on one compact disc.

Track listing
1. Overture: "My Way"/"I Get a Kick out of You"/"Young at Heart"/"Nancy (With the Laughing Face)"/"There Are Such Things"/"High Hopes"/"I've Got You Under My Skin"/"My Kind of Town"/"All the Way"/"Strangers in the Night" (Paul Anka, Claude François, Jacques Revaux, Gilles Thibault)/(Cole Porter)/(Johnny Richards, Carolyn Leigh)/(Jimmy Van Heusen, Phil Silvers)/(Stanley Adams, Abel Baer, George W. Meyer)/(Van Heusen, Cahn)/(Porter)/(Van Heusen, Cahn)/(Van Heusen, Cahn)/(Bert Kaempfert, Charles Singleton, Eddie Snyder) – 3:40 2. "Without a Song" (Edward Eliscu, Billy Rose, Vincent Youmans) – 4:12 3. "Where or When" (Lorenz Hart, Richard Rodgers) – 3:40 4. "For Once in My Life" (Ron Miller, Orlando Murden) – 2:48 5. "Nice 'n' Easy" (Alan Bergman, Marilyn Bergman, Lew Spence) – 3:00 6. "My Heart Stood Still" (Hart, Rodgers) – 3:14 7. "Change Partners" (Irving Berlin) – 3:44 8. "It Was a Very Good Year" (Ervin Drake) – 4:51 9. "You Make Me Feel So Young" (Mack Gordon, Josef Myrow) – 3:06

Live at the Meadowlands 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. "The Gal That Got Away" (Harold Arlen, Ira Gershwin) – 4:23 "Theme from New York, New York" (Fred Ebb, John Kander) – 4:11 Monologue – 3:02 "Come Rain or Come Shine" (Arlen, Johnny Mercer) – 3:43 "Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered" (Hart, Rodgers) – 3:36 "Moonlight in Vermont" (Karl Suessdorf, John Blackburn) – 3:53 "L.A. Is My Lady" (A. Bergman, M. Bergman, Quincy Jones, Peggy Lipton Jones) – 3:06 "I've Got You Under My Skin" – 4:42 "Someone to Watch Over Me" (George Gershwin, I. Gershwin) – 3:09 "One for My Baby (and One More for the Road)" (Arlen, Mercer) – 5:48 "Mack the Knife" (Marc Blitzstein, Bertolt Brecht, Kurt Weill) – 4:20 "New York Bows (Theme from New York, New York)" – 1:18

171

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - vocals • Bill Miller - piano, conductor • Tony Mottola - guitar • Don Baldini - double bass • Irving Cottler - drums

References
[1] Allmusic review (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r1497952) [2] Live at the Meadowlands (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r1497952) at Allmusic

Sinatra: New York

172

Sinatra: New York
Sinatra: New York
Live album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label November 3, 2009 1955-1990 Vocal jazz, Classic pop 208:06 Reprise Frank Sinatra chronology

Christmas with Sinatra & Friends (2009)

Sinatra: New York (2009)

36 Greatest Hits! (2010)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Pitchfork Media (6.1/10.0) Rating [1] [2]

Sinatra: New York is a 2009 box set album of live performances by the American singer Frank Sinatra, recorded in New York City. [3] New York, both at the Carnegie Hall, and at Madison Square Garden. The first disc captures two live performances from 1955 and 1963, disc two and three are from the Carnegie Hall and from Madison Square Garden in 1974. The final two discs are from the 1980s, with disc five a previously unreleased DVD of a June 25, 1980 performance at the Carnegie Hall.

Track listing
Disc One (Recorded at the Manhattan Center, February 3, 1955 & at the United Nations, September 13, 1963)
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Introductions: Martin Block and Tommy Dorsey – 3:51 "I'll Never Smile Again" (Ruth Lowe) – 3:28 "Oh! Look at Me Now" (Joe Bushkin, John DeVries) – 2:07 "This Love of Mine" (Sol Parker, Hank Sanicola, Frank Sinatra) – 4:40 "Too Marvelous for Words" (Johnny Mercer, Richard A. Whiting) – 2:34 "They Can't Take That Away from Me" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) – 2:40 "I Have Dreamed" (Oscar Hammerstein II, Richard Rodgers) – 3:16 Monologue by Frank Sinatra – 2:12 "A Foggy Day" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) – 3:15

10. "My Heart Stood Still" (Lorenz Hart, Rodgers) – 2:57 11. "I Get a Kick Out of You" (Cole Porter) – 3:47

Sinatra: New York

173

Disc Two (Recorded at the Carnegie Hall, April 8, 1974)
1. Overture: "All the Way"/"My Kind of Town"/"You Will Be My Music" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen)/(Cahn, Van Heusen)/(Joe Raposo) – 2:37 2. "Come Fly with Me" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:06 3. "I Get a Kick Out of You" – 4:15 4. "Don't Worry 'bout Me" (Rube Bloom, Ted Koehler) – 4:34 5. "If" (David Gates) – 4:03 6. "Bad, Bad Leroy Brown" (Jim Croce) – 3:01 7. Saloon Trilogy: "Last Night When We Were Young"/"Violets for Your Furs"/"Here's That Rainy Day" (Harold Arlen, Yip Harburg)/(Matt Dennis, Tom Adair)/(Van Heusen, Burke) – 11:05 8. Bows: "You Will Be My Music" – 1:01 9. Monologue by Frank Sinatra – 7:20 10. "My Way" (Paul Anka, Claude François, Gilles Thibaut, Jacques Revaux) – 4:24 11. "You Will Be My Music" – 4:09 12. "I've Got You Under My Skin" (Porter) – 4:35 13. "Send in the Clowns" (Stephen Sondheim) – 5:10 14. "That's Life" (Kelly Gordon, Dean Kay) – 2:38 15. 16. 17. 18. Bows: "My Way" – 1:11 "There Used to Be a Ballpark" (Raposo) – 4:04 "My Kind of Town" – 3:13 Bows: "My Way" – 1:54

Disc Three (Recorded at Madison Square Garden, October 12, 1974)
• With Woody Herman and his orchestra. 1. Overture: "It Was a Very Good Year"/"All the Way"/"My Kind of Town" (Ervin Drake)/(Cahn, Van Heusen)/(Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:58 2. "The Lady Is a Tramp" (Hart, Rodgers) – 4:07 3. "I Get a Kick Out of You" – 4:13 4. "What Are You Doing the Rest of Your Life?" (Alan Bergman, Marilyn Bergman, Michel Legrand) – 4:21 5. "Bad, Bad Leroy Brown" – 3:19 6. "Let Me Try Again (Laisse Moi le Temps)" (Anka, Cahn, Michel Jourdon) – 4:51 7. "Send in the Clowns" – 5:34 8. "My Kind of Town" – 2:48 9. Monologue by Frank Sinatra – 3:16 10. "Autumn in New York" (Vernon Duke) – 3:30 11. "If" – 3:30 12. "I've Got You Under My Skin" – 4:38 13. "Angel Eyes" (Earl Brent, Dennis) – 6:11 14. "The House I Live In (That's America to Me)" (Lewis Allan, Earl Robinson) – 6:15 15. "You Are the Sunshine of My Life" (Stevie Wonder) – 4:15 16. "My Way" – 4:00 17. Bows: "My Way" – 1:57 • See also: "The Main Event – Live".

Sinatra: New York

174

Disc Four (Recorded at the Carnegie Hall, June 1984 & at Radio City Music Hall, June 1990)
1. "Fly Me to the Moon (In Other Words)" (Bart Howard) – 2:35 2. "Luck Be a Lady" (Frank Loesser) – 6:10 3. "This Is All I Ask" (Gordon Jenkins) – 3:49 4. "Come Rain or Come Shine" (Arlen, Mercer) – 3:49 5. Monologue by Frank Sinatra – 1:54 6. "My Way" – 3:34 7. "Teach Me Tonight" (Cahn, Gene de Paul) – 4:31 8. "Pennies from Heaven" (Burke, Arthur Johnston) – 4:12 9. "For Once in My Life" (Ron Miller, Orlando Murden) – 3:00 10. "Strangers in the Night" (Bert Kaempfert, Charles Singleton, Eddie Snyder) – 2:39 11. Monologue by Frank Sinatra – 4:04 12. "Mack the Knife" (Marc Blitzstein, Bertolt Brecht, Kurt Weill) – 4:49 13. "Summer Wind" (Hans Bradtke, Heinz Meier, Mercer) – 3:09 14. "Theme from New York, New York" (Fred Ebb, John Kander) – 3:39 15. Bows: "Goodbye" (Jenkins) – 2:01

Disc Five (DVD) (Recorded at the Carnegie Hall, June 25, 1980)
1. "I've Got the World on a String" (Arlen, Koehler) 2. "The Best Is Yet to Come" (Cy Coleman, Carolyn Leigh) 3. "The Lady Is a Tramp" 4. "When Your Lover Has Gone" (Einar Aaron Swan) 5. "This Is All I Ask" 6. "I've Got You Under My Skin" 7. "Summer Me, Winter Me" (A. Bergman, M. Bergman, Legrand) 8. "Street of Dreams" (Sam M. Lewis, Victor Young) 9. Medley: "The Gal That Got Away"/"It Never Entered My Mind" (Arlen, I. Gershwin)/(Rodgers, Hart) 10. "I Can't Get Started" (Duke, I. Gershwin) 11. "Send in the Clowns" 12. "Come Fly with Me" 13. "Guess I'll Hang My Tears Out to Dry" (Cahn, Jule Styne) 14. "You and Me (We Wanted It All)" (Peter Allen, Carole Bayer Sager) 15. "The Song Is You" (Hammerstein, Jerome Kern) 16. "Theme from New York, New York"

Personnel
• • • • • Frank Sinatra - vocals Bill Miller Piano Arrangements Al Viola - guitarist Vincent Falcone, Jr. - conductor Woody Herman and his orchesetra

Sinatra: New York

175

References
[1] Allmusic review (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r1643203) [2] Pitchfork Media review (http:/ / pitchfork. com/ reviews/ albums/ 13733-new-york/ ) [3] Sinatra: New York (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r1643203) at Allmusic

Best of Vegas
Best of Vegas

Live album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer February 8, 2011 1961-1987 Vocal jazz, Classic pop 58:42 Concord Records Charles Pignone Frank Sinatra chronology

The Reprise Years (2010)

Best of Vegas (2011)

Sinatra/Basie: The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings (2011)

Best of Vegas

176

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Best of Vegas is a 2011 live album by an American singer, Frank Sinatra that contains 17 live tracks from the 2006 box set, "Sinatra: Vegas". In the span of a few years, Las Vegas refueled Frank Sinatra's career and Sinatra in turn became the lead figure in the city's ascendance. It was a synergistic relationship that has since become legendary in the annals of 20th century entertainment. All the Sinatra classics are here, performed live before adoring crowds at some of the most prestigious venues in the history of Vegas. "The Lady Is a Tramp", "I've Got You Under My Skin", "All or Nothing at All", "Pennies from Heaven" and of course, the "Theme From New York, New York" are just some of the gems in the Best of Vegas collection.

Track listing
1. Introduction - 0:26 2. "The One I Love (Belongs to Somebody Else)" (Isham Jones, Gus Kahn) – 2:39 3. "Moonlight in Vermont" (John Blackburn, Karl Suessdorf) – 3:07 4. "The Lady Is a Tramp" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) – 3:40 5. "I've Got You Under My Skin" (Cole Porter) – 3:27 6. "Street of Dreams" (Sam M. Lewis, Victor Young) – 2:13 7. "Fly Me to the Moon (In Other Words)" (Bart Howard) – 2:49 8. Monologue – 8:33 9. "Luck Be a Lady" (Frank Loesser) – 4:34 10. "I Can't Get Started" (Vernon Duke, Ira Gershwin) – 3:05 11. "Without a Song" (Edward Eliscu, Billy Rose, Vincent Youmans) – 3:48 12. "All or Nothing at All" (Arthur Altman, Jack Lawrence) – 3:21 13. "Witchcraft" (Cy Coleman, Carolyn Leigh) – 2:43 14. "Pennies from Heaven" (Johnny Burke, Arthur Johnston) – 3:41 15. "Angel Eyes" (Earl Brent, Matt Dennis) – 7:45 16. "Theme from New York, New York" (Fred Ebb, John Kander) – 4:40 17. Bows – 0:55 • • • • Tracks 1-4 from the Sands Hotel, November 2, 1961 Tracks 5-9 from the Sands Hotel, January-February 1966 Tracks 10-12, 16-17 from Caesar's Palace, March 1982 Tracks 13-15 from the Golden Nugget, April 1987

Best of Vegas

177

References
[1] Best of Vegas (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r2106287) at Allmusic

178

Compilation albums
This Is Sinatra!
This Is Sinatra!
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released 1956

Recorded April 30, 1953-September 13, 1955 KHJ Studios, Hollywood Genre Length Label Vocal Jazz, Classic pop 35:52 Capitol Frank Sinatra chronology

Songs for Swingin' Lovers (1956)

This Is Sinatra! (1956)

Close to You (1957)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

This Is Sinatra! is an album by Frank Sinatra, released in 1956. This is the first collection of Sinatra's singles and B-sides with Nelson Riddle. This album is now available on CD (Bluemoon CD 803) All of the tracks also appear on the box set The Complete Capitol Singles Collection and various Capitol reissues. A second collection, entitled This Is Sinatra Volume 2, was released in 1958. Both albums were part of Capitol's "This Is" series. The albums highlighted past hits by artists like Sinatra, June Christy, Dean Martin and Nat "King" Cole as well as newly released (and hopefully hit-making) singles.

Track listing
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. "I've Got the World on a String" (Harold Arlen, Ted Koehler) - 2:14 "Three Coins in the Fountain" (Jule Styne, Sammy Cahn) - 3:07 "Love and Marriage" (Jimmy Van Heusen, Cahn) - 2:41 "From Here to Eternity" (Freddy Karger, Robert Wells) - 3:01 "South of the Border" (Jimmy Kennedy, Michael Carr) - 2:52 "Rain (Falling From The Skies)" (Robert Mellin, Gerald Finlay) - 3:27 "The Gal That Got Away" (Arlen, Ira Gershwin) - 3:12

8. "Young at Heart" (Johnny Richards, Carolyn Leigh) - 2:53 9. "Learnin' the Blues" (Dolores Silvers) - 3:04

This Is Sinatra! 10. "My One and Only Love" (Guy Wood, Mellin) - 3:14 11. "(Love Is) The Tender Trap" (Van Heusen, Cahn) - 3:00 12. "Don't Worry 'Bout Me" (Rube Bloom, Koehler) - 3:07

179

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - Vocals • Nelson Riddle - Arranger, Conductor

Chart positions
Chart Year Peak position

UK Albums Chart

[2] 1957 1

References
[1] Allmusic review (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26372) [2] "Chart Stats - Frank Sinatra - This Is Sinatra" (http:/ / www. chartstats. com/ albuminfo. php?id=1510). chartstats.com. . Retrieved 8 May 2011.

This Is Sinatra Vol. 2
This Is Sinatra Volume Two
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label 1958 May 13, 1954-December 11, 1957 Hollywood Vocal Jazz, Classic pop 40:55 Capitol Frank Sinatra chronology

Come Fly With Me (1958)

This Is Sinatra Volume Two (1958)

Frank Sinatra Sings for Only the Lonely (1958)

This Is Sinatra Vol. 2

180

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

This Is Sinatra Volume Two is an album by American singer Frank Sinatra, released in 1958. Another collection of Sinatra singles and B-sides with backings courtesy of Nelson Riddle, following 1956's This Is Sinatra!. It also included seven new tracks, all recorded in late 1957: "I Believe," "Everybody Loves Somebody," "It's the Same Old Dream," "Time After Time," "You'll Always Be the One I Love," "If You Are But a Dream," and "Put Your Dreams Away." Since Sinatra first recorded these songs in the 1940s, and since most deal with dreams, they might have been meant for a concept album that never came to completion. This collection is long out of print, and only appears on compact disc in its entirety and original running order on 1994's British release, "This is Sinatra, 1953-1957," (on EMI's "Music for Pleasure" [MFP] subsidiary) and within 1998's The Capitol Years 21 disc box set, also a British release. Most of the tracks appear on the box set The Complete Capitol Singles Collection. Others appear on the three-disc compilation The Capitol Years.

Track listing
1. "Hey! Jealous Lover" (Sammy Cahn, Kay Twomey, Bee Walker) – 2:24 2. "Everybody Loves Somebody" (Irving Taylor, Ken Lane) - 3:46 3. "Something Wonderful Happens In Summer" (Joe Bushkin, John DeVries) - 3:16 4. "Half as Lovely (Twice as True)" (Lew Spence, Sammy Gallop) - 3:09 5. "You're Cheatin' Yourself (If You're Cheatin' on Me)" (Al Hoffman, Dick Manning) – 2:38 6. "You'll Always Be The One I Love" (Ticker Freeman, Sonny Skylar) - 2:59 7. "You Forgot All the Words" (Bernie Wayne, E.H. Jay) - 3:24 8. "How Little We Know" (Phillip Springer, Carolyn Leigh) - 2:39 9. "Time After Time" (Jule Styne, Cahn) - 3:31 10. "Crazy Love" (Cahn, Phil Tuminello) - 2:54 11. "Wait for Me" (Nelson Riddle, Dick Stanford) - 2:54 12. "If You Are But a Dream" (Moe Jaffe, Jack Fulton, Nat Bonx) - 3:50 13. "So Long, My Love" (Cahn, Lew Spence) - 2:50 14. "It's the Same Old Dream" (Styne, Cahn) - 3:06 15. "I Believe" (Styne, Cahn) - 2:33 16. "Put Your Dreams Away" (Paul Mann, Stephen Weiss, Ruth Lowe) - 3:12

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - Vocals • Nelson Riddle - Arranger, Conductor

References
[1] This Is Sinatra Volume 2 (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26371) at Allmusic

Look to Your Heart

181

Look to Your Heart
Look to Your Heart

Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Label 1959 May 2, 1953-August 15, 1955 Hollywood Vocal Jazz, Classic pop Capitol Frank Sinatra chronology

Come Dance with Me! (1959)

Look to Your Heart (1959)

No One Cares (1959)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Look to Your Heart is an album by American singer Frank Sinatra, released in 1959 but recorded between 1953 and 1955. This is the third Capitol collection of Sinatra singles and B-sides with Nelson Riddle, following 1956's This Is Sinatra! and 1958's This Is Sinatra Volume 2. It includes a couple of songs from the 1955 musical version of Our Town. There is a compact disc release of this album on the Hallmark label [2], released in 2010 and it can also be found within The Capitol Years 21 disc box set. All of the tracks also appear on the box set The Complete Capitol Singles Collection.

Look to Your Heart

182

Track listing
1. "Look to Your Heart" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) – 3:10 2. "Anytime, Anywhere" (Imogen Carpenter, Lenny Adelson) – 2:45 3. "Not as a Stranger" (Van Heusen, Buddy Kaye) – 2:47 4. "Our Town" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 3:16 5. "You, My Love" (Van Heusen, Mack Gordon) – 2:56 6. "Same Old Saturday Night" (Frank Reardon, Cahn) – 2:31 7. "Fairy Tale" (Jay Livingston, Dick Stanford) – 2:59 8. "The Impatient Years" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 3:14 9. "I Could Have Told You" (Carl Sigman, Van Heusen) – 3:18 10. "When I Stop Loving You" (George Cates, Alan Copeland, Mort Greene) – 2:56 11. "If I Had Three Wishes" (C. Baum, Lew Spence) – 2:56 12. "I'm Gonna Live Till I Die" (Al Hoffman, Walter Kent, Mann Curtis) – 1:54

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - Vocals • Nelson Riddle - Arranger, Conductor

References
[1] Look to Your Heart (Frank Sinatra album) (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26411) at Allmusic [2] http:/ / www. amazon. co. uk/ Look-Your-Heart-Transfer-Vinyl/ dp/ B0042AFCW0/ ref=sr_1_1?s=music& ie=UTF8& qid=1326796728& sr=1-1

All the Way
All the Way
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released 1961

Recorded September 11, 1958-September 1, 1960, Capitol Studio A, Hollywood Genre Length Label Vocal Jazz, Classic pop 30:02 Capitol

Producer Dave Cavanaugh Frank Sinatra chronology

Nice 'n' Easy (1960)

All the Way (1961)

Sinatra's Swingin' Session!!! (1961)

All the Way

183

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

All the Way is an album by American singer Frank Sinatra, released in 1961. The fourth Capitol compilation album of singles and B-sides from 1957 to 1960. Capitol released All the Way on Compact Disc briefly in 1988, before discontinuing it in the early 1990s. All tracks are available on The Complete Capitol Singles Collection box set.

Track listing
1. "All the Way" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) – 2:55 2. "High Hopes" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:43 3. "Talk to Me" (Eddie Snyder, Stanley Kahan, Rudy Vallee) – 3:04 4. "French Foreign Legion" (Aaron Schroeder, Guy Wood) – 2:03 5. "To Love and Be Loved" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 3:53 6. "River, Stay 'Way from My Door" (Harry M. Woods, Mort Dixon) – 2:39 7. "Witchcraft" (Cy Coleman, Carolyn Leigh) – 2:54 8. "It's Over, It's Over, It's Over" (Matt Dennis, Dick Stanford) – 2:42 9. "Old MacDonald Had a Farm" (Traditional, Alan Bergman, Marilyn Keith, Lew Spence) – 2:42 10. "This Was My Love" (Jim Harbert) – 3:28 11. "All My Tomorrows" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 3:15 12. "Sleep Warm" (Bergman, Keith, Spence) – 2:43

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - vocals • Nelson Riddle - arranger, conductor

References
[1] All the Way (Frank Sinatra album) (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26275) at Allmusic

Sinatra Sings of Love and Things

184

Sinatra Sings of Love and Things
Sinatra Sings of Love and Things
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label July 1962 August 13, 1957–March 6, 1962, Hollywood Vocal Jazz, Classic pop 32:59 Capitol Frank Sinatra chronology

Sinatra and Swingin' Brass (1962)

Sinatra Sings of Love and Things (1962)

All Alone (1962)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Sinatra Sings of Love and Things is an album by Frank Sinatra, released in 1962. This is the fifth compilation of Capitol singles and B-sides. All songs are available in the box set The Complete Capitol Singles Collection, except "I Gotta Right To Sing The Blues," the final song Sinatra recorded for Capitol (which appears as a bonus track on the CD reissue of Come Swing With Me) and "The Nearness of You," which appears as a bonus track on the CD reissue of Nice 'n' Easy (It was recorded at those sessions.) It has also been issued in the U.K. as part of the 21 CD box set "The Capitol Years". There is an error on the back cover of the original 1962 LP. The very top line states "Twelve great performances never before available in an album!", when actually, the closing tune "Something Wonderful Happens In Summer" appears on the 1958 compilation LP "This Is Sinatra! Volume Two".

Track listing
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. "The Nearness of You" (Hoagy Carmichael, Ned Washington) - 2:44 "Hidden Persuasion" (Wainwright Churchill III) - 2:26 "The Moon Was Yellow" (Fred E. Ahlert, Edgar Leslie) - 3:02 "I Love Paris" (Cole Porter) - 1:52 "Monique" (Sammy Cahn, Elmer Bernstein) - 3:18 "Chicago" (Fred Fisher) - 2:12 "Love Looks So Well On You" (Lew Spence, Marilyn Keith, Alan Bergman) - 2:41 "Sentimental Baby" (Spence, Keith, Bergman) - 2:38

9. "Mr. Success" (Edwin Grienes, Frank Sinatra, Hank Sanicola) - 2:42 10. "They Came To Cordura" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) - 3:02 11. "I Gotta Right To Sing The Blues" (Harold Arlen, Ted Koehler) - 3:00

Sinatra Sings of Love and Things 12. "Something Wonderful Happens In Summer" (Joe Bushkin, John DeVries) - 3:12

185

Personnel
• • • • Frank Sinatra - vocals Nelson Riddle - arranger, conductor Felix Slatkin - arranger, conductor Skip Martin - arranger

References
[1] Sinatra Sings of Love and Things (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26426) at Allmusic

Sinatra '65: The Singer Today

186

Sinatra '65: The Singer Today
Sinatra '65: The Singer Today
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label June, 1965 February 21, 1963–April 14, 1965, Los Angeles Vocal Jazz, Classic pop 29:05 Reprise Professional reviews • Allmusic link [1]

Frank Sinatra chronology

Sofly, as I Leave You (1964)

Sinatra '65: The Singer Today (1965)

September of My Years (1965)

Sinatra '65: The Singer Today is a 1965 compilation album by Frank Sinatra. The album is a collection of various singles and sessions, highlighted by the hits "Luck Be a Lady", "Anytime At All", "Somewhere In Your Heart", "Stay With Me", and "Tell Her (You Love Her Each Day)." The version of "My Kind of Town" featured here is not the edited single version. This soundtrack recording contains a verse before the chorus that was edited out of the single version. The title may or may not have been a parody of "Beatles '65", which was released months earlier on Capitol Records. This album is available on compact disc, and all the songs are available on The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings.

Track listing
1. "Tell Her (You Love Her Each Day)" (Gil Ward, Charles Watkins) - 2:42 2. "Any Time at All" (Baker Knight) - 2:22 3. "Stay With Me" (Jerome Moross, Carolyn Leigh) - 3:04 4. "I Like to Lead When I Dance" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) - 4:07 5. "You Brought a New Kind of Love to Me" (Sammy Fain, Irving Kahal, Pierre Norman Connor) - 2:38 6. "My Kind of Town" (unedited version) (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:09 7. "When Somebody Loves You" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 1:54 8. "Somewhere in Your Heart" (Russell Faith, Clarence Keltner) - 2:29 9. "I've Never Been In Love Before" (Frank Loesser) - 2:57 10. "When I'm Not Near The Girl I Love" (E.Y. Harburg, Burton Lane) - 3:25 11. "Luck Be a Lady" (Loesser) - 5:18

Sinatra '65: The Singer Today

187

Personnel
• • • • • • • Frank Sinatra - vocals Ernie Freeman - arranger, conductor Nelson Riddle Don Costa Billy May - arranger Gordon Jenkins - conductor Morris Stoloff

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26341

Frank Sinatra's Greatest Hits
Frank Sinatra's Greatest Hits!
Greatest hits album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer August 1968 July 17, 1964 - July 24, 1967 Vocal jazz, Easy Listening 33:40 Reprise Jimmy Bowen; Sonny Burke Frank Sinatra chronology

Francis A. & Edward K. (1968)

Frank Sinatra's Greatest Hits! (1968)

The Sinatra Family Wish You a Merry Christmas (1968)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Frank Sinatra's Greatest Hits! is Frank Sinatra's first compilation released on his own Reprise Records. It concentrates on mostly single releases from the mid to late 60's, which fluctuates between adult contemporary pop and jazzy swing. The album opens up with Sinatra's recent number one hit "Strangers in the Night" and continues through the varies styles of music Sinatra recorded in the 60's, from easy listening ballads like "It Was a Very Good Year" and "Softly, as I Leave You" to contemporary pop like "When Somebody Loves You" and "That's Life". Greatest Hits was a modest hit, peaking at #55 on the album charts in late 1968. A second volume was issued in 1972, Frank Sinatra's Greatest Hits, Vol. 2. Both albums have since been supplanted with newer and more cohesive compilations.

Frank Sinatra's Greatest Hits

188

Track listing
1. "Strangers in the Night" (Bert Kaempfert, Charles Singleton, Eddie Snyder) - 2:25 2. "Summer Wind" (Heinz Meier, Hans Bradtke, Johnny Mercer) - 2:53 3. "It Was a Very Good Year" (Ervin Drake) - 4:25 4. "Somewhere in Your Heart" (Russell Faith, Clarence Keltner) - 2:26 5. "Forget Domani" (Norman Newell, Riz Ortolani) - 2:36 6. "Somethin' Stupid" (with Nancy Sinatra) (Carson Parks) - 2:35 7. "That's Life" (Kelly Gordon, Dean Kay Thompson) - 3:07 8. "Tell Her (You Love Her Each Day)" (Gil Ward, Charles Watkins) - 2:40 9. "The World We Knew (Over and Over)" (Kaempfert, Herb Rehbein, Carl Sigman) - 2:47 10. "When Somebody Loves You" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) - 1:54 11. "This Town" (Lee Hazlewood) - 3:06 12. "Softly, as I Leave You" (Hal Shaper, Antonio DeVito, Giorgio Calabrese) - 2:50

References
[1] Frank Sinatra's Greatest Hits (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26356) at Allmusic

Frank Sinatra's Greatest Hits, Vol. 2
Greatest Hits, Vol. 2
Greatest hits album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer May 1972 May 27, 1965-October 26, 1970 Easy Listening, Vocal jazz 37:38 Reprise Don Costa, Sonny Burke, Frank Sinatra Frank Sinatra chronology

Sinatra & Company (1971)

Frank Sinatra's Greatest Hits, Vol. 2 (1972)

Ol' Blue Eyes Is Back (1973)

Frank Sinatra's Greatest Hits, Vol. 2

189

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Frank Sinatra's Greatest Hits, Vol. 2 was Sinatra's second compilation of material released by Reprise Records, which like its predecessor, consisted of singles and songs from movie soundtracks. Vol. 2 picks up where Frank Sinatra's Greatest Hits leaves off, so all of the tracks date from 1968 to 1971, except for "The September of My Years", which dates back to 1965. Though the song "My Way" became Sinatra's signature song, it was not a big hit in the U.S. In the U.K. it went to #5 and spent 75 weeks in the Top 40. The highest charting U.S. single in this collection is "Cycles" which peaked at #23. The remaining tracks represent the sound of Sinatra's music in the late 60's, which was more laid back than his early 60's swinging tunes, with the B-side "Star!" being a notable exception. Vol. 2 peaked at #88 on the album charts in the summer of 1972 during Sinatra's brief retirement from show business.

Track listing
1. "My Way" (Paul Anka, Claude François, Jacques Revaux, Gilles Thibault) - 4:34 2. "A Man Alone" (Rod McKuen) - 3:46 3. "Cycles" (Judith Caldwell) - 3:13 4. "Bein' Green" (Joe Raposo) - 3:00 5. "Love's Been Good To Me" (McKuen) - 3:26 6. "I'm Not Afraid" (Jacques Brel, Gérard Jouannest, McKuen)- 3:42 7. "Goin' Out of My Head" (Teddy Randazzo, Bobby Weinstein) - 2:47 8. "Something" (George Harrison) - 3:34 9. "What's Now is Now" (Bob Gaudio, Jake Holmes) - 4:04 10. "Star!" (Jimmy Van Heusen, Sammy Cahn) - 2:36 11. "The September of My Years" (Van Heusen, Cahn) - 3:15

Personnel
• • • • • • Frank Sinatra - vocals Nelson Riddle - arranger, conductor Don Costa Gordon Jenkins Joseph Scott Lennie Hayton

References
[1] Frank Sinatra's Greatest Hits, Vol. 2 (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26292) at Allmusic

Portrait of Sinatra Forty Songs from the Life of a Man

190

Portrait of Sinatra – Forty Songs from the Life of a Man
Portrait of Sinatra - Forty Songs from the Life of a Man
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Label 1977 1961-1977 Jazz Reprise Frank Sinatra chronology

The Main Event Live (1974)

Portrait of Sinatra - Forty Songs from the Life of a Man (1977)

Sinatra-Jobim Sessions (1979)

Portrait of Sinatra - Forty Songs from the Life of a Man is a 1977 compilation album by Frank Sinatra that consists 40 songs that were recorded from Reprise Records.

Track listing
Disc one
1. "Let's Face the Music and Dance" 2. "Nancy (With the Laughing Face)" 3. "I've Got You Under My Skin" 4. "Let Me Try Again (Laisse Moi Le Temps)" 5. "Fly Me to the Moon" 6. "All or Nothing at All" 7. "For Once in My Life" 8. "Bonita" 9. "My Kind of Town" 10. "Call Me Irresponsible"

Disc two
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. "All the Way" "Strangers in the Night" "Didn't We?" "Come Fly with Me" "The Second Time Around" "In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning" "Bad, Bad Leroy Brown" "Softly, as I Leave You"

9. "Cycles" 10. "Send in the Clowns"

Portrait of Sinatra Forty Songs from the Life of a Man

191

Disc three
1. "That's Life" 2. "Little Green Apples" 3. "The Song of the Sabiá" 4. "Goody Goody" 5. "Empty Tables" 6. "I Believe I'm Gonna Love You" 7. "Stargazer" 8. "I Sing the Songs (I Write the Songs)" 9. "You Are the Sunshine of My Life" 10. "It Was a Very Good Year"

Disc four
1. 2. 3. 4. "Somethin' Stupid" (w/Nancy Sinatra) "Young at Heart" "You Make Me Feel So Young" "Yesterday"

5. "Pennies from Heaven" 6. "If" 7. "Something" 8. "Star!" 9. "Love's Been Good to Me" 10. "My Way"

SinatraJobim Sessions

192

Sinatra–Jobim Sessions
Sinatra-Jobim Sessions
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim Released Recorded Genre 1979 1967, 1969 Jazz Bossa Nova 50:27 WEA Brasil Frank Sinatra chronology

Length Label

Portrait of Sinatra - Forty Songs from the Life of a Man (1977)

Sinatra-Jobim Sessions (1979)

Trilogy: Past Present Future (1980)

Antonio Carlos Jobim chronology

Urubu (1976)

Sinatra-Jobim Sessions (1979)

Terra Brasilis (1980)

The Sinatra-Jobim Sessions is a 1979 double LP compilation album of Frank Sinatra's work with Antonio Carlos Jobim. The album was published only in Brazil by producer Roberto Quartin, and has never been re-released on vinyl or CD until 2010 when it was re-mastered and released under The Frank Sinatra Collection and became available world wide. All but three songs recorded by Sinatra and Jobim in 1967 and 1969 were released on Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim (1967) and Sinatra & Company (1971). The tracks "Bonita", "Sabiá", and "Off Key (Desafinado)", however, were previously only available on the 8-track Sinatra-Jobim (1970), which was quickly pulled from release [1]. The first two of these tracks are included on Sinatra-Jobim Sessions, making it eagerly sought by collectors. "Off Key (Desafinado)" was not included here and remained largely unavailable until Sinatra's The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings was released in 1998. This collection also included two recordings which do not actually feature Jobim, "Drinking Again" [2] and "Manhã De Carnaval". In 2010 the Concord Records label issued a new, comprehensive compilation entitled Sinatra-Jobim: The Complete Reprise Recordings. Sinatra and Jobim worked together for a final time in 1994 on Duets II, recording a cover of "Fly Me to the Moon".

SinatraJobim Sessions

193

Track listing
1. "Baubles, Bangles and Beads" (Robert C. Wright, George Forrest, Alexander Borodin) – 2:32 2. "I Concentrate on You" (Cole Porter) – 2:32 3. "Dindi" (Ray Gilbert, Antonio Carlos Jobim, Aloysio de Oliveria) – 3:25 4. "Change Partners" (Irving Berlin) – 2:40 5. "Corcovado" (Jobim, Gene Lees) – 2:45 6. "If You Never Come to Me (Inútil Paisagem)" (Jobim, Gilbert, de Oliveira) – 2:10 7. "The Girl from Ipanema" (Jobim, Norman Gimbel, Vinícius de Moraes) – 3:00 8. "Meditation" (Jobim, Gimbel, Newton Mendonça) – 2:51 9. "Once I Loved (O Amor em Paz)" (Jobim, Gilbert, de Moraes) – 2:37 10. "How Insensitive" (Jobim, Gimbel, de Moraes) – 3:15 11. "Drinking Again" (Johnny Mercer, Doris Tauber) - 3:13 12. "One Note Samba" (Jobim, Mendonça) – 2:20 13. "Don't Ever Go Away (Por Causa de Voce)" (Gilbert, Dolores Duran, Jobim) – 2:28 14. "Wave" (Jobim) – 3:25 15. "Bonita" (Jobim) - 3:39 16. "Someone to Light Up My Life" (de Moraes, Jobim, Lees) – 2:37 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. "Water to Drink (Agua de Beber)" (de Moraes, Jobim, Gimbel) – 2:35 "The Song of the Sabiá (Sabiá)" (Jobim, Chico Buarque) - 3:38 "This Happy Madness (Estrada Branca)" (de Moraes, Jobim, Lees) – 2:57 "Triste" (Jobim) – 2:40 "Manhã De Carnaval (A Day in the Life of a Fool)" (Sigman, Bonfá) – 2:59

Personnel
• • • • • Frank Sinatra - Vocals Antonio Carlos Jobim - Piano, Guitar, Vocals Claus Ogerman - Arranger, Conductor Eumir Deodato - Arranger Don Costa - Arranger, Conductor

References
[1] http:/ / www. 8trackheaven. com/ sinatra. html [2] http:/ / sinatrafamily. com/ forum/ showthread. php?p=120041#post120041

All-Time Greatest Dorsey/Sinatra Hits, Vol. 1-4

194

All-Time Greatest Dorsey/Sinatra Hits, Vol. 1-4
All-Time Greatest Dorsey/Sinatra Hits, Vol. 1-4
Compilation album by Tommy Dorsey and Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label 1988 1940-1942 Jazz Swing 49:05 RCA Tommy Dorsey and Frank Sinatra chronology

L.A. Is My Lady (1984)

All-Time Greatest Dorsey/Sinatra Hits, Vol. 1-4 (1988)

The Reprise Collection (1990)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

All-Time Greatest Dorsey/Sinatra Hits, Vol. 1-4 is a compilation album, issued by RCA of early 1940s Tommy Dorsey tracks featuring Frank Sinatra. This album contained hits such as "I'll Never Smile Again" and "I'll Be Seeing You".

Track listing
1. "The Sky Fell Down" (Louis Alter, Edward Heyman) - 3:24 2. "I'll Be Seeing You" (Sammy Fain, Irving Kahal) - 3:05 3. "Fools Rush In (Where Angels Fear to Tread)" (Bobby Bloom, Johnny Mercer) - 3:14 4. "Imagination" (Johnny Burke, James Van Heusen) - 3:12 5. "I'll Never Smile Again" (Ruth Lowe) - 3:09 6. "Our Love Affair (Roger Edens, Arthur Freed) - 3:01 7. "Oh! Look at Me Now" (Joe Bushkin, John DeVries) - 3:14 8. "Without a Song" (Edward Eliscu, Billy Rose, Vincent Youmans) - 4:28 9. "Let's Get Away from It All" (Tom Adair, Matt Dennis) - 5:00 10. "Blue Skies" (Irving Berlin) - 3:18 11. "Street of Dreams" (Sam M. Lewis, Victor Young) - 2:41 12. "Take Me" (Rube Bloom, Mack David) - 2:59 13. "Be Careful, It's My Heart" (Berlin) - 2:48 14. "There Are Such Things" (Stanley Adams, Abel Baer, George W. Meyer) - 2:41 15. "Light a Candle in the Chapel" (Duke Leonard, Nelson, E.G., Harry Pease) - 3:03[1]

All-Time Greatest Dorsey/Sinatra Hits, Vol. 1-4

195

Credits
• • • • • Executive Producer: Don Wardell Liner Notes: Patrick Snyder Digital Engineer: Dick Baxter Digital Producer: Chick Crumpacker Performers: Tommy Dorsey & His Orchestra, Frank Sinatra, Connie Haines, The Pied Pipers [2]

References
[1] William Ruhlmann. "All-Time Greatest Dorsey/Sinatra Hits, Vol. 1-4" (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r137850). Allmusic. . Retrieved January 13, 2012. [2] "All Time Greatest Dorsey Sinatra Hits Vol 1 4 by Tommy Dorsey @ ARTISTdirect.com - Shop, Listen, Download" (http:/ / www. artistdirect. com/ nad/ store/ artist/ album/ 0,,78323,00. html). Artistdirect.com. . Retrieved January 13, 2012.

Capitol Collectors Series
Capitol Collectors Series
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label July 26, 1989 April 30, 1953 - March 1960 Vocal, Traditional Pop, Vocal Jazz 56:10 Capitol Frank Sinatra chronology

All-Time Greatest Dorsey/Sinatra Hits, Vol. 1-4 (1988)

Capitol Collectors Series (1989)

The Reprise Collection (1990)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic link [1] Rating

Capitol Collectors Series is a 1989 compilation album by American singer Frank Sinatra.

Capitol Collectors Series

196

Track listing
1. "I'm Walking Behind You" (Billy Reid) - 2:57 2. "I've Got the World on a String" (Harold Arlen, Ted Koehler) - 2:10 3. "From Here to Eternity" (Freddy Karger, Robert Wells) - 2:59 4. "South of the Border" (Jimmy Kennedy, Michael Carr) - 2:47 5. "Young at Heart" (Johnny Richards, Carolyn Leigh) - 2:50 6. "Don't Worry 'bout Me" (Rube Bloom, Koehler) - 3:08 7. "Three Coins in the Fountain" (Jule Styne, Sammy Cahn) - 3:03 8. "Melody of Love" [with Ray Anthony] (Hans Engelmann, Tom Glazer) - 3:05 9. "Learnin' the Blues" (Dolores Vicki Silvers) – 3:00 10. "Same Old Saturday Night" (Frank Reardon, Cahn) – 2:28 11. "Love and Marriage" (Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) – 2:37 12. "(Love Is) The Tender Trap" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:57 13. "(How Little It Matters) How Little We Know" (Phillip Springer, Carolyn Leigh) – 3:22 14. "Hey Jealous Lover" (Cahn, Kay Twomey, Bee Walker) – 2:41 15. "Can I Steal a Little Love?" (Phil Tuminello) - 2:31 16. "All the Way" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:54 17. 18. 19. 20. "Chicago (That Toddlin' Town)" (Fred Fisher) - 2:10 "Witchcraft" (Cy Coleman, Leigh) – 2:53 "High Hopes" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:50 "Nice 'n' Easy" (Alan Bergman, Marilyn Keith, Lew Spence) – 2:47

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r24154

The Capitol Years

197

The Capitol Years
The Capitol Years
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label December 13, 1990 1953-1961 Classic pop 224:06 Capitol Frank Sinatra chronology

The Reprise Collection (1990)

The Capitol Years (1990)

Sinatra Reprise: The Very Good Years (1991)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

The Capitol Years is a 1990 compilation album of the U.S. singer Frank Sinatra. Released to coincide with Sinatra's 75th birthday, this three-disc set has an abundance of classic Sinatra performances from his career with Capitol Records, which spanned the years 1953 to 1961.

Track listing
Disc One
1. "I've Got the World on a String" (Harold Arlen, Ted Koehler) - 2:10 2. "Lean Baby" (Roy Alfred, Billy May) - 2:33 3. "I Love You" (Harry Archer, Harlan Thompson) - 2:27 4. "South of the Border" (Jimmy Kennedy, Michael Carr) – 2:50 5. "From Here to Eternity" (Freddie Karger, Robert Wells) - 2:59 6. "They Can't Take That Away From Me" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) - 1:57 7. "I Get a Kick Out of You" (Cole Porter) - 2:53 8. "Young at Heart" (Carolyn Leigh, Johnny Richards) - 2:59 9. "Three Coins In The Fountain" (Jule Styne, Sammy Cahn) - 3:04 10. "All of Me" (Gerald Marks, Seymour Simons) - 2:07 11. "Taking a Chance on Love" (Vernon Duke, Ted Fetter, John Latouche) - 2:19 12. "Someone to Watch Over Me" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) - 2:56 13. "What Is This Thing Called Love?" (Porter) - 2:35 14. "In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning" (Bob Hilliard, David Mann) - 2:59 15. "Learnin' The Blues" (Delores Vicki Silvers) - 3:00

The Capitol Years 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. "Our Town" (Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) - 3:15 "Love and Marriage" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:38 "(Love Is) The Tender Trap" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:57 "Weep They Will" (Bill Carey, Carey Fischer) - 3:16 "I Thought About You" (Van Heusen, Johnny Mercer) – 2:30 "You Make Me Feel So Young" (Josef Myrow, Mack Gordon) – 2:57 "Memories Of You" (Andy Razaf, Eubie Blake) - 2:53 "I've Got You Under My Skin" (Porter) - 3:43 "Too Marvelous For Words" (Mercer, Richard A. Whiting) - 2:27 "Don't Like Goodbyes" (Harold Arlen, Truman Capote) - 4:50 "(How Little It Matters) How Little We Know" (Leigh, Philip Springer) - 2:39

198

Disc two
1. 2. 3. 4. "Hey! Jealous Lover" (Cahn, Kay Twomey, Bee Walker) - 2:21 "You're Sensational" (Porter) - 2:16 "Close to You" (Al Hoffman, Carl G. Lampl, Jerry Livingston) - 3:56 "Stars Fell on Alabama" (Mitchell Parish, Frank Perkins) - 2:35

5. "I Got Plenty Of Nothing" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin, Dubose Heyward) - 3:14 6. "I Wish I Were in Love Again" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) - 2:28 7. "The Lady Is a Tramp" (Rodgers, Hart) - 3:14 8. "Night and Day" (Porter) - 3:59 9. "The Lonesome Road" (Gene Austin, Nat Shilkret) - 3:53 10. "If I Had You" (Jimmy Campbell, Reginald Connelly, Ted Shapiro) - 2:35 11. "Where Are You?" (Harold Adamson, Jimmy McHugh) – 3:30 12. "I'm a Fool to Want You" (Frank Sinatra, Jack Wolf, Joel Herron) – 4:51 13. "Witchcraft" (Cy Coleman, Carolyn Leigh) - 2:52 14. "Something Wonderful Happens In Summer" (Joe Bushkin, John DeVries) - 3:12 15. "All the Way" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:52 16. "Chicago (That Toddlin' Town)" (Fred Fisher) - 2:12 17. "Let's Get Away from It All" (Matt Dennis, Tom Adair) – 2:11 18. "Autumn in New York" (Vernon Duke) – 4:37 19. "Come Fly With Me" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 3:19 20. "Everybody Loves Somebody" (Sam Coslow, Ken Lane, Irving Taylor) - 3:42 21. "It's The Same Old Dream" (Cahn, Styne) - 3:02 22. "Put Your Dreams Away (For Another Day)" (Ruth Lowe, Paul Mann, George David Weiss) - 3:12 23. "Here Goes" - 2:42 24. "Angel Eyes" (Earl Brent, Matt Dennis) - 3:44

The Capitol Years

199

Disc three
1. "Ebb Tide" (Robert Maxwell, Carl Sigman) - 3:18 2. "Guess I'll Hang My Tears Out to Dry" (Cahn, Styne) - 3:59 3. "Only the Lonely" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 4:31 4. "One For My Baby (And One More For The Road)" (Arlen, Mercer) - 4:04 5. "To Love and Be Loved" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:56 6. "I Couldn't Care Less" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:58 7. "The Song Is You" (Oscar Hammerstein II, Jerome Kern) - 2:42 8. "Just In Time" (Betty Comden, Adolph Green, Styne) - 2:23 9. "Saturday Night (Is the Loneliest Night of the Week)" (Cahn, Styne) - 1:54 10. "Come Dance With Me" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:59 11. "French Foreign Legion" (Aaron Schroeder, Guy Wood) - 2:01 12. "The One I Love (Belongs to Somebody Else)" (Isham Jones, Gus Kahn) - 3:03 13. "Here's That Rainy Day" (Johnny Burke, Van Heusen) - 4:19 14. "High Hopes" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:42 15. "When No One Cares" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:42 16. "I'll Never Smile Again" (Ruth Lowe) - 3:43 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. "I've Got a Crush on You" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) - 2:16 "Embraceable You" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) - 3:23 "Nice 'N' Easy" (Alan Bergman, Marilyn Keith, Lew Spence) - 2:45 "I Can't Believe That You're In Love With Me" (Clarence Gaskill, McHugh) - 2:25 "On the Sunny Side of the Street" (Dorothy Fields, McHugh) - 2:41 "I've Heard That Song Before" (Cahn, Styne) - 2:30 "Almost Like Being In Love" (Alan Jay Lerner, Frederick Loewe) - 2:02 "I'll Be Seeing You" (Sammy Fain, Irving Kahal) - 2:46 "I Gotta Right to Sing the Blues" (Arlen, Koehler) - 2:58

Personnel
• • • • • • • • • Frank Sinatra - vocals Gordon Jenkins - arranger, conductor Skip Martin - arranger Billy May - arranger, conductor Nelson Riddle - arranger, conductor Felix Slatkin - conductor Axel Stordahl - conductor Heinie Beau - arranger Ron Furmanek - Box Set Compiled & Produced by

References
[1] Allmusic (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r24255)

Sinatra Reprise: The Very Good Years

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Sinatra Reprise: The Very Good Years
Sinatra Reprise: The Very Good Years
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label March 26, 1991 1960-1979 Classic pop 66:54 Reprise Frank Sinatra chronology

The Capitol Years (1990)

Sinatra Reprise: The Very Good Years (1991)

Sinatra Sings the Songs of Van Heusen & Cahn (1991)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Sinatra Reprise: The Very Good Years is a single disc compilation taken from the four disc box set The Reprise Collection. For many years, this was the only collection of Sinatra's Reprise work on one disc until 2008's collection Nothing But The Best. The Very Good Years reached #98 on the Billboard Top 200 album charts in 1991.

Track listing
1. "The Last Dance" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) - 2:46 2. "Night and Day" (Cole Porter) – 3:37 3. "I Get a Kick Out of You" (Porter) – 3:14 4. "Luck Be a Lady" (Frank Loesser) - 5:14 5. "The Way You Look Tonight" (Jerome Kern, Dorothy Fields) - 3:22 6. "My Kind of Town" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:08 7. "The Best Is Yet to Come" (Cy Coleman, Carolyn Leigh) - 2:54 8. "Fly Me To The Moon" (Bart Howard) - 2:49 9. "It Was a Very Good Year" (Ervin Drake) - 4:27 10. "Love and Marriage" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:12 11. "I've Got You Under My Skin" (Porter) – 3:43 live performance at the Sands Hotel, 1966 12. "Strangers in the Night" (Bert Kaempfert, Charles Singleton, Eddie Snyder) – 2:25 13. "Summer Wind" (Heinz Meyer, Hans Bradtke, Johnny Mercer) – 2:53 14. "All or Nothing at All" (Arthur Altman, Jack Lawrence) – 3:57 15. "That's Life" (Kelly Gordon, Dean Kay) – 3:10 16. "My Way" (Paul Anka, Claude François, Jacques Revaux, Gilles Thibault) – 4:35

Sinatra Reprise: The Very Good Years 17. "The Lady Is a Tramp" (Rodgers, Hart) - 2:56 live performance at Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, October
13, 1974

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18. "Send in the Clowns" (Stephen Sondheim) - 3:36 19. "Nancy (With the Laughing Face)" (Phil Silvers, Van Heusen) - 2:28 20. "Theme from New York, New York" (Fred Ebb, John Kander) - 3:26

Personnel
• • • • • • • • • • Frank Sinatra - vocals Nelson Riddle - arranger, conductor Don Costa Gordon Jenkins Billy May Ernie Freeman Quincy Jones Neal Hefti Bill Miller - pianist, conductor Count Basie and his Orchestra

• Woody Herman and his Orchestra

References
[1] Sinatra Reprise: The Very Good Years (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r24268) at Allmusic

Sinatra Sings the Songs of Van Heusen & Cahn
Sinatra Sings the Songs of Van Heusen & Cahn
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label November 12, 1991 December 19, 1960 - November 11, 1968 Classic pop 53:29 Reprise Frank Sinatra chronology

Sinatra Reprise: The Very Good Years (1991)

Sinatra Sings the Songs of Van Heusen & Cahn (1991)

Sinatra: Soundtrack To The CBS Mini-Series (1992)

Sinatra Sings the Songs of Van Heusen & Cahn

202

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Sinatra Sings the Songs of Van Heusen & Cahn is a 1991 compilation album by Frank Sinatra. It comprises his renditions of Jimmy Van Heusen and Sammy Cahn. In this remarkable album, Sinatra sings the songs of an exceptional songwriting pair of Sammy Cahn and Jimmy Van Heusen, who have written some of the most beautiful songs from the Great American Songbook. Sammy Cahn was one of my all-time favorite lyricists. His works are exceptionally charming and he really had a way with words. Five out of twenty-two songs are from the creative pens of Jim Van Heusen and Johnny Burke. All these are the songs made popular by the Chairman of the Board and were recorded between 1960 and 1968 with seven creative and the best arrangers/conductors of all-time: Nelson Riddle, Gordon Jenkins, Johnny Mandel, Sy Oliver, Quincy Jones, Neal Hefti and Torrie Zito. He left his indelible mark of excellence into these songs and made them his very own. One of the most influential and humanitarian people in the world, Bono, once said, "Sinatra's songs are his home, and he lets you in." It's very true, one can just imagine the beauty that he injected into each song even the most ordinary and obscure songs. They become magically wonderful to the ears of the listeners when he interpreted them.

Track listing
1. "Ring-a-Ding Ding!" (Jimmy Van Heusen, Sammy Cahn) 2. "The Last Dance" (Van Heusen, Cahn) 3. "Imagination" (Van Heusen, Johnny Burke) 4. "Polka Dots and Moonbeams" (Van Heusen, Burke) 5. "It's Always You" (Van Heusen, Burke) 6. "Indiscreet" (Van Heusen, Cahn) 7. "Come Waltz with Me" (Van Heusen, Cahn) 8. "The Look of Love" (Van Heusen, Cahn) 9. "(Love Is) The Tender Trap" (Van Heusen, Cahn) 10. "Come Blow Your Horn" (Van Heusen, Cahn) 11. "Call Me Irresponsible" (Van Heusen, Cahn) 12. "All the Way" (Van Heusen, Cahn) 13. "Swinging on a Star" (Van Heusen, Burke) 14. "My Kind of Town" (Van Heusen, Cahn) 15. "I Like to Lead When I Dance" (Van Heusen, Cahn) 16. "The September of My Years" (Van Heusen, Cahn) 17. "I'll Only Miss Her When I Think of Her" (Van Heusen, Cahn) 18. "Come Fly with Me" (Van Heusen, Cahn) 19. "Love and Marriage" (Van Heusen, Cahn) 20. "Moonlight Becomes You" (Van Heusen, Burke) 21. "Oh, You Crazy Moon" (Van Heusen, Burke) 22. "Star!" (Van Heusen, Cahn)

Sinatra Sings the Songs of Van Heusen & Cahn

203

References
[1] Sinatra Sings the Songs of Van Heusen & Cahn (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26350) at Allmusic

Sinatra: Soundtrack to the CBS Mini-Series
Sinatra: Soundtrack to the CBS Mini-Series
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label October 20, 1992 November 23, 1931 - September 19, 1979 Vocal, Traditional Pop, Vocal Jazz 105:51 Reprise Frank Sinatra chronology

Sinatra Sings the Songs of Van Heusen & Cahn (1991)

Sinatra: Soundtrack To The CBS Mini-Series (1992)

The Best of the Capitol Years (1992)

Sinatra: Soundtrack To The CBS Mini-Series is a 1992 double disc compilation album by American singer, Frank Sinatra.

Track listing
Disc one
1. "Where the Blue of the Night (Meets the Gold of the Day)" (Bing Crosby, Roy Turk, Fred E. Ahlert) 2. "Temptation" (Nacio Herb Brown, Arthur Freed) 3. "All or Nothing at All" (Jack Lawrence, 4. "Shake Down the Stars" (Ed DeLange, Jimmy Van Heusen) 5. "Without a Song" (Billy Rose, Vincent Youmans, Edward Eliscu) 6. "Street of Dreams" (Victor Young, Sam M. Lewis) 7. "I'll Be Seeing You" (Sammy Fain, Irving Kahal) 8. "I'll Never Smile Again" (Ruth Lowe) 9. "Sing, Sing, Sing (With a Swing)" (Louis Prima) 10. "Where or When" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) 11. "Stormy Weather" (Harold Arlen, Ted Koehler) 12. "Our Love Affair" (Roger Edens, Arthur Freed) 13. "I Fall In Love Too Easily" (Sammy Cahn, Jule Styne) 14. "The Hucklebuck" (Roy Alfred, Andy Gibson, Charlie Parker) 15. "Fairy Tale" (Jay Livingston, Jo Stafford)

Sinatra: Soundtrack to the CBS Mini-Series

204

Disc two
1. "Lover Man (Oh, Where Can You Be?)" (Jimmy Davis, Ram Ramirez) 2. "You Go to My Head" (J. Fred Coots, Haven Gillespie) 3. "I'm a Fool to Want You" (Frank Sinatra, Jack Wolf, Joel Herron) 4. "It Was a Very Good Year" (Ervin Drake) 5. "Autumn in New York" (Vernon Duke) 6. "It All Depends On You" (B.G. DeSylva, Lew Brown, Ray Henderson) 7. "They Can't Take That Away from Me" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) 8. "Come Fly with Me" (Cahn, Van Heusen) 9. "High Hopes" (Cahn, Van Heusen) 10. "One for My Baby (And One More for the Road)" (Arlen, Johnny Mercer) 11. "You Make Me Feel So Young" (Josef Myrow, Mack Gordon) 12. "That's Life" (Dean Kay Thompson, Kelly Gordon) 13. "All the Way" (Cahn, Van Heusen) 14. "New York, New York" (Fred Ebb, John Kander) 15. "My Way" (Paul Anka, Claude Francois, Jacques Revaux, Gillies Thibaut)

The Best of the Capitol Years

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The Best of the Capitol Years
The Best of the Capitol Years
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label November 3, 1992 April 30, 1953 - April 13, 1960 Vocal, Traditional Pop, Vocal Jazz 58:51 Capitol Frank Sinatra chronology

Sinatra: Soundtrack To The CBS Mini-Series (1992)

The Best of the Capitol Years (1992)

Concepts (1992)

The Best of the Capitol Years is a 1992 compilation album by American singer Frank Sinatra. A flawless single-disc condensation of the three-CD Capitol Years box featuring many of Sinatra's most famous songs of the '50s and early-'60s period he spent making masterpieces for the label. Sinatra displays at least as many emotional shadings here as there are songs on the disc; not only is there the unfettered ebullience of "I've Got the World on a String" or the desolation of "What Is This Thing Called Love?" but a riotously insouciant reading of the ostensibly heartbroken "South of the Border" and a wise interpretation by the middle-aged Sinatra of "You Make Me Feel So Young."

Track listing
1. "I've Got the World on a String" (Harold Arlen, Ted Koehler) - 2:13 2. "South of the Border" (Jimmy Kennedy, Michael Carr) - 2:52 3. "I Get a Kick Out of You" (Cole Porter) - 2:52 4. "Young at Heart" (Carolyn Leigh, Johnny Richards) - 2:50 5. "Three Coins in the Fountain" (Sammy Cahn, Jule Styne) - 3:07 6. "What Is This Thing Called Love?" (Porter) - 2:34 7. "In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning" (Bob Hilliard, David Mann) - 3:00 8. "Learnin' the Blues" (Dolores Silvers) - 3:04 9. "Love and Marriage" (Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) - 2:38 10. "(Love Is) The Tender Trap" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:00 11. "You Make Me Feel So Young" (Josef Myrow, Mack Gordon) - 2:58 12. "I've Got You Under My Skin" (Porter) - 3:46 13. "(How Little It Matters) How Little We Know" (Leigh, Phillip Springer) - 2:40 14. "The Lady Is a Tramp" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) - 3:15 15. "Night and Day" (Porter) - 4:02 16. "Witchcraft" (Leigh, Cy Coleman) - 2:55 17. "All the Way" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:55 18. "Come Fly with Me" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:20 19. "High Hopes" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:45 20. "Nice 'n' Easy" (Alan Bergman, Marilyn Keith, Lew Spence) - 2:44

Christmas Songs by Sinatra

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Christmas Songs by Sinatra
Christmas Songs By Sinatra
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released 1948 (78 rpm and 10" Record release)

Recorded = November 14, 1944-November 5, 1950 (Compilation) New York City Genre Classic pop Christmas 44:27 Columbia Frank Sinatra chronology

Length Label

Songs by Sinatra (1947)

Christmas Songs By Sinatra (1948)

Frankly Sentimental (1949)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Christmas Songs By Sinatra is the name of the third studio album by the American singer Frank Sinatra. It was originally released in 1948 as a 78 rpm album set (C-167) and a 10" LP record featuring a collection of holiday songs. A compilation album was released in 1994 including the songs originally released on the 1948 album along with Christmas songs from his years recording at Columbia records.

1948 78rpm studio album Track listing
Disc 1: 1. Silent Night 2. Adeste Fideles Disc 2: 1. White Christmas 2. Jingle Bells Disc 3: 1. O Little Town Of Bethlehem 2.It Came Upon A Midnight Clear Disc 4: 1. Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas 2. Santa Claus Is Comin' To Town

1948 10" record LP studio album Track listing
1. White Christmas 2. Jingle Bells 3. Silent Night 4. Adeste Fideles 5. O Little Town Of Bethlehem 6. It Came Upon A Midnight Clear 7. Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas 8. Santa Claus Is Comin' To Town

Christmas Songs by Sinatra

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1994 Compilation album Track listing
1. "White Christmas" (Irving Berlin) - 3:25 2. "Silent Night" (Josef Mohr, Franz X. Gruber) - 3:19 3. "Adeste Fideles (O, Come All Ye Faithful)" (Frederick Oakeley, John Francis Wade) - 2:38 4. "Jingle Bells" (James Pierpont) - 2:37 5. "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas" (Ralph Blane, Hugh Martin) - 2:36 6. "Christmas Dreaming (A Little Early This Year)" (Irving Gordon, Lester Lee) - 3:01 7. "It Came Upon A Midnight Clear" (Edmund Sears, Richard Storrs Willis) - 3:34 8. "O Little Town of Bethlehem" (Phillips Brooks, Lewis Redner) - 3:07 9. "Santa Claus Is Coming to Town" (J. Fred Coots, Haven Gillespie) - 2:36 10. "Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow!" (Sammy Cahn, Jule Styne) - 2:38 11. Introduction by General Reynolds, Chief of Special Services – 0:57 12. Medley: "O, Little Town of Bethlehem"/"Joy to the World"/"White Christmas" (Brooks, Redner)/(Isaac Watts, Lowell Mason)/(Berlin) – 5:18 13. "Ave Maria" (Franz Schubert) - 3:31 14. "Winter Wonderland" (Felix Bernard, Richard B. Smith) - 2:06 15. "The Lord's Prayer" (Albert Hay Malotte) - 3:36

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra – Vocals • Axel Stordahl – Arranger, Conductor • NEW YORK MUSICIANS - 1944: Julius Brand, Fred Buldrini, Sid Harris, L. Kanter, Murray Kellner, Bernard Kundell, William Lockwood, Arthur Loesserman, Harold Micklin, Seymour Miroff, Gene Orloff, Raoul Polikian (violins), Morris Kahn, Sol Paeff, Sol Rumberg (violas), E. Gara, George Polikian, Avron Twerdowsky (celli), Ruth Hill (harp), Arthur Baker, Henry Ross (alto saxophones/clarinets), Harold Feldman (tenor saxophone/flute/clarinet/piccolo/oboe/cor anglais), Bernard Kaufman (tenor saxophone/flute/clarinet/bass clarinet), Peter Pumiglio (clarinet/alto and baritone saxophones), Carl Poole, Sammy Shapiro, Red Solomon (trumpets), John D'Agostino, Anthony Russo, Charles Small (trombones), Karl Chlupse (French horn), Billy Rowland (piano), Matty Golizio (guitar), Ward Lay (bass), Johnny Blowers (drums) • LOS ANGELES MUSICIANS - 1945 TO 1947: Victor Arno, Alex Beller, Harry Bluestone, Werner Callies, Walter Edelstein, Peter Ellis, Sam Freed, David Frisina, Gerald Joyce, George Kast, Sol Kindler, Morris King, Samuel Levine, Dan Lube, Sam Middleman, Anthony Perrotti, Nick Pisani, Mischa Russell, Felix Slatkin, Marshall Sosson, Olcott Vail, Gerald Vinci (violins), Allan Harshman, William Hymanson, Maurice Perlmutter, Paul Robyn, Stanley Spiegelman, Dave Sterkin, Gary White (violas), Cy Bernard, Fred Goerner, Nicholas Ochi-Albi, John Sewell (celli), May Cambern, Lauretta McFarland (harps), Heinie Beau (alto saxophone/clarinet), Fred Dornbach (alto saxophone/clarinet), Jack Dumont (tenor saxophone/clarinet), Manny Gershman (alto and baritone saxophones/clarinet), Leonard Hartman (tenor saxophone/clarinet/flute/bass clarinet), Herbert Haymer (tenor saxophone/clarinet), Jules Kinsler (alto saxophone/clarinet/flute/bass clarinet), Harold Lawson (tenor saxophone/clarinet), Don Logiudice (alto saxophone/clarinet), Babe Russin (tenor saxophone/clarinet), Fred Stulce (alto and baritone saxophones/flute/clarinet), Charles Griffard, Bruce Hudson, Manny Klein, Ray Linn, Leonard Mach, George Seaberg, Zeke Zarchy (trumpets), Hoyt Bohannon, Dave Hallett, George Jenkins, Edward Kuczborski, Carl Loeffler, Pullman Pederson, Bill Schaefer, Jimmy Skiles, Elmer Smithers (trombones), Jack Cave, Vincent DeRosa, James McGee (French horns), Mark McIntyre (piano), Dave Barbour, Allan Reuss (guitars), John Ryan, Artie Shapiro, Phil Stephens (bass), Ray Hagan (drums) • NEW YORK MUSICIANS - 1950: Julius Brand, Arnold Eidus, Julius Held, Maurice Hershaft, Harry Hoffman, Zelly Smirnoff (violins), Solomon Deutsch, Harold Furmansky (violas), George Polikian (cello), Elaine Vito

Christmas Songs by Sinatra Ricci (harp), Harold Feldman (tenor saxophone/clarinet/flute/piccolo/oboe/cor anglais), Manny Gershman (alto and baritone saxophones/clarinet), Bernard Kaufman (tenor saxophone/clarinet/flute/bass clarinet), Al Richman (alto saxophone/clarinet), Hymie Schertzer (alto saxophone/clarinet), Yank Lawson, Dale McMickle, Johnny Owens (trumpets), George Arus, Roland Dupont, Bill Rank (trombones), John Barrows (French horn), George Forbes (piano), Matty Golizio (guitar), Frank Carroll (bass), Johnny Blowers (drums) Jeff Alexander Orchestra The Bobby Tucker Singers The Ken Lane Singers The B. Swanson Quartet The Mitchell Boys Choir

208

• • • • •

References
[1] Christmas Songs by Sinatra (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r229290) at Allmusic

Gold Collection

209

Gold Collection
Gold Collection

Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded October 18, 1994 1940s, June 14, 1958, Sporting Club, Monte Carlo, March 31-April 1, 1959, Melbourne, Australia, November 16, 1970, Royal Festival Hall, London, England Vocal Deja Vu Frank Sinatra chronology

Genre Label

Christmas Songs by Sinatra (1994)

Gold Collection (1994)

Duets II (1994)

Gold Collection is a 1994 double disc compilation album by American singer, Frank Sinatra. A budget-priced collection featuring a haphazard song selection and poor fidelity, The Frank Sinatra Gold Collection provides neither an effective introduction to the Voice, nor a representative selection of performances, making it a disc to avoid.

Track listing
Disc one
1. "Stardust" 2. "Whispering" 3. "Fools Rush In (Where Angels Fear to Tread)" 4. "Polka Dots and Moonbeams" 5. "I'll Be Seeing You" 6. "East of the Sun (and West of the Moon)" 7. "Daybreak" 8. "This Love of Mine" 9. "I'll Never Smile Again" 10. "Kisses and Tears"

Gold Collection 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. "Tea for Two" "Getting to Know You" "Some Enchanted Evening" "The Moon Was Yellow (And the Night Is Young)" "Imagination" "My Blue Heaven" "Begin the Beguine" "Blue Skies" "I've Got My Love to Keep Me Warm" "Somebody Loves Me"

210

Disc two
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. "Come Fly with Me" "I Get a Kick Out of You" "I've Got You Under My Skin" "Where or When" "Moonlight in Vermont"

6. "On the Road to Mandalay" 7. "When Your Lover Has Gone" 8. "April in Paris" 9. "All the Way" 10. "Monique" 11. "Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered" 12. "The Lady Is a Tramp" 13. "You Make Me Feel So Young" 14. "Night and Day" 15. "Dancing in the Dark" 16. "My Funny Valentine" 17. "Embraceable You" 18. "At Long Last Love" 19. "I Could Have Danced All Night" 20. "My Way"

Frank Sinatra Sings the Select Johnny Mercer

211

Frank Sinatra Sings the Select Johnny Mercer
Frank Sinatra Sings the Select Johnny Mercer
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Label April 4, 1995 1953-1961 Traditional pop music, Vocal jazz Big Band, Jazz Frank Sinatra chronology

Duets II (1994)

Frank Sinatra Sings the Select Johnny Mercer (1995)

Frank Sinatra Sings the Select Rodgers & Hart (1995)

Frank Sinatra Sings the Select Johnny Mercer is a 1995 compilation album by Frank Sinatra, that has him singing the songs written by Johnny Mercer.

Track listing
• All songs written by Johnny Mercer. 1. "Too Marvelous for Words" (Johnny Mercer, Richard A. Whiting) - 2:27 2. "Day In - Day Out" [Ballad Version] (Mercer, Rube Bloom) - 3:17 3. "Laura" (Mercer, David Raksin) - 3:27 4. "Jeepers Creepers" (Mercer, Harry Warren) 5. "Blues in the Night" (Mercer, Harold Arlen) 6. "Something's Gotta Give" (Mercer) 7. "Fools Rush In (Where Angels Fear to Tread)" (Mercer, Bloom) 8. "P.S. I Love You" (Mercer, Gordon Jenkins) 9. "(Ah, the Apple Trees) When the World Was Young" (Mercer, M. Philippe-Gerard, Angele Marie T. Vannier) 10. "That Old Black Magic" (Merer, Arlen) 11. "Autumn Leaves" (Mercer, Jacques Prévert, Joseph Kosma) 12. "I Thought About You" (Mercer, Jimmy Van Heusen) 13. "Day In - Day Out" [Swingin' Version] 14. "One for My Baby (and One More for the Road)" (Mercer, Arlen)

Frank Sinatra Sings the Select Rodgers & Hart

212

Frank Sinatra Sings the Select Rodgers & Hart
Frank Sinatra Sings the Select Rodgers & Hart

Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Label April 4, 1995 1953-1961 Traditional pop music, Vocal jazz Big Band, Jazz Frank Sinatra chronology

Frank Sinatra Sings the Select Johnny Mercer (1995)

Frank Sinatra Sings the Select Rodgers & Hart (1995)

Sinatra 80th: Live in Concert (1995)

Frank Sinatra Sings the Select Rodgers & Hart is a 1995 compilation album by Frank Sinatra. In this album, Sinatra sings his renditions of Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart.

Track listing
• All songs written by Rodgers and Hart. 1. "Lover" 2. "Glad to Be Unhappy" 3. "I Didn't Know What Time It Was" 4. "Where or When" 5. "It's Easy to Remember (And So Hard to Forget)" 6. "There's a Small Hotel" 7. "Wait till You See Her" 8. "Little Girl Blue" 9. "Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered" 10. "I Wish I Were in Love Again" 11. "Spring Is Here" 12. "The Lady Is a Tramp"

Frank Sinatra Sings the Select Rodgers & Hart 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. "Dancing on the Ceiling" "I Could Write a Book" "Blue Moon" "It Never Entered My Mind" "My Funny Valentine"

213

The Complete Recordings Nineteen Thirty-Nine

214

The Complete Recordings Nineteen Thirty-Nine
The Complete Recordings Nineteen Thirty-Nine
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Label August 29, 1995 1939 Jazz, Big Band Sony Records Frank Sinatra chronology

Frank Sinatra Sings the Select Rodgers & Hart (1995)

The Complete Records Nineteen Thirty-Nine (1995)

Sinatra 80th: Live in Concert (1995)

The Complete Recordings Nineteen Thirty-Nine is a 1995 compilation album by Frank Sinatra, containing 21 songs he's recorded when he started his singing career in 1939 with Harry James.

Track listing
1. "From the Bottom of My Heart" (Roy Ingraham, Jack Murray) - 3:13 2. "Melancholy Mood" (William Schumann, V. Knight) - 3:03 3. "My Buddy" (Gus Kahn, Walter Donaldson) - 2:53 4. "It's Funny to Everyone But Me" (Dave Franklin, Isham Jones) - 2:54 5. "Here Comes the Night" (Frank Loesser, H. Edelstein, C. Hohengarten) - 2:47 6. "All or Nothing at All" (Jack Lawrence, Arthur Altman) - 2:56 7. "On a Little Street in Singapore" (Peter de Rose, Billy Hill) - 2:48 8. "Who Told You I Cared?" (George Whiting, Bert Reisfeld) - 2:37 9. "Ciribiribin (They're So in Love)" (R. Thaler, Alberto Pestalozza) - 2:25 10. "Every Day of My Life" (Harry James, B. Hays, M. Beck) - 2:55 11. "From the Bottom of My Heart" - 3:21 12. "Melancholy Mood" - 3:10 13. "It's Funny to Everyone But Me" - 2:50 14. "All or Nothing at All" - 2:57 15. "Stardust" (Hoagy Carmichael, Mitchell Parish) - 3:59 16. "Wishing (Will Make It So)" (Buddy DeSylva) - 3:47 17. "If I Didn't Care" (Lawrence) - 3:27 18. "The Lamp Is Low" (Parish, Rose, Maurice Ravel) - 2:00 19. "My Love for You" (Abner Silver, Sid Wayne) - 2:31 20. "Moon Love" [Adapted From Tchaikovsky's 5th Symphony, 2nd Movement] (Mack David, André Kostelanetz) - 2:57 21. "This Is No Dream" (Benny Davis, Ted Shapiro, Tommy Dorsey) - 3:18

Sinatra 80th: All the Best

215

Sinatra 80th: All the Best
Sinatra 80th: All the Best
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Label November 14, 1995 1953-1960 Traditional pop music, Vocal jazz Capitol Frank Sinatra chronology

Sinatra 80th: Live in Concert (1995)

Sinatra 80th: All the Best (1995)

The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings (1995)

Sinatra 80th: All the Best is a double compilation disc album by Frank Sinatra. On the final track, "The Christmas Song" is recorded both by Sinatra and Nat King Cole.

Track listing
Disc one
1. "Lean Baby" (Roy Alfred, Billy May) - 2:34 2. "I'm Walking Behind You" (Billy Reid) - 2:57 3. "I've Got the World on a String" (Harold Arlen, Ted Koehler) - 2:11 4. "From Here to Eternity" (Freddy Karger, Robert Wells) - 2:59 5. "South of the Border" (Jimmy Kennedy, Michael Carr) - 2:48 6. "Young at Heart" (Carolyn Leigh, Johnny Richards) - 2:51 7. "Three Coins in the Fountain" (Jule Styne, Sammy Cahn) - 3:05 8. "Come Fly with Me (Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) - 3:18 9. "Someone to Watch Over Me" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) - 2:56 10. "Melody of Love" (Hans Engelmann, Tom Glazer) - 3:05 11. "Night and Day" (Cole Porter) - 3:59 12. "Learnin' the Blues" (Dolores Silvers) - 3:01 13. "Same Old Saturday Night" (Frank Reardon, Cahn) - 2:29 14. "Love and Marriage" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:38 15. "The Impatient Years" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:16 16. "(Love Is) The Tender Trap" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:57 17. "(How Little It Matters) How Little We Know" (Philip Springer, Leigh) - 2:39 18. "Wait for Me (Theme from Johnny Concho)" (Nelson Riddle, Jo Stafford) - 2:51 19. "The Lady is a Tramp" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) - 3:15 20. "Well, Did You Evah!" (with Bing Crosby) - (Porter) - 3:49

Sinatra 80th: All the Best

216

Disc two
1. "Hey! Jealous Lover" (Cahn, Kay Twomey, Bee Walker) - 2:22 2. "I've Got You Under My Skin" (Porter) - 3:42 3. "All the Way" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:51 4. "Chicago" (Fred Fisher) - 2:12 5. "Witchcraft" (Cy Coleman, Leigh) - 2:53 6. "How Are Ya' Fixed for Love?" (with Keely Smith) (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:25 7. "No One Ever Tells You" (Hub Atwood, Carroll Coates) - 3:24 8. "Time After Time" (Styne, Cahn) - 3:27 9. "In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning" (Bob Hilliard, David Mann) - 2:59 10. "You Make Me Feel So Young" (Josef Myrow, Mack Gordon) - 2:55 11. "I Get a Kick Out of You" (Porter) - 2:54 12. "All My Tomorrows" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:15 13. "High Hopes" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:42 14. "What Is This Thing Called Love?" (Porter) - 2:32 15. "The Moon Was Yellow (And the Night Was Young)" (Fred E. Ahlert, Edgar Leslie) - 3:00 16. "I Love Paris" (Porter) - 1:51 17. 18. 19. 20. "Blues in the Night" (Arlen, Johnny Mercer) - 4:43 "Guess I'll Hang My Tears Out to Dry" (Styne, Cahn) - 3:58 "Nice 'N' Easy" (Alan Bergman, Marilyn Bergman, Lew Spence) - 2:45 "The Christmas Song" (with Nat King Cole) (Mel Tormé, Wells) - 3:13

Personnel
• • • • • • • Frank Sinatra - vocals Keely Smith Bing Crosby Nat King Cole Nelson Riddle - arranger, conductor Gordon Jenkins Billy May

Everything Happens to Me

217

Everything Happens to Me
Everything Happens to Me
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer February 6, 1996 1962 - 1981 Traditional pop music, Vocal jazz 69:01 Reprise Al Cooper Frank Sinatra chronology

The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings (1995)

Everything Happens to Me (1996)

Frank Sinatra Sings the Select Cole Porter (1996)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Everything Happens to Me is a 1996 compilation album by Frank Sinatra.

Track listing
1. Medley: "The Gal That Got Away"/"It Never Entered My Mind" (Harold Arlen, Ira Gershwin)/(Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) - 5:05 2. "Everything Happens to Me" (Matt Dennis, Tom Adair) - 4:11 3. "Once Upon a Time" (Charles Strouse, Lee Adams) - 3:30 4. "Summer Wind" (Heinz Meyer, Hans Bradtke, Johnny Mercer) - 2:53 5. "Once I Loved (O Amor en Paz)" (Antonio Carlos Jobim, Ray Gilbert, Vinícius de Moraes) - 2:37 6. "If I Had You" (Jimmy Campbell, Reginald Connelly, Ted Shapiro) - 4:07 7. "What Are You Doing the Rest of Your Life?" (Alan Bergman, Marilyn Bergman, Michel Legrand) - 4:05 8. "The Second Time Around" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) - 3:03 9. "I Hadn't Anyone Till You" (Ray Noble) - 3:44 10. "Come Rain or Come Shine" (Arlen, Mercer) - 4:05 11. "More Than You Know" (Billy Rose, Edward Eliscu, Vincent Youmans) - 3:22 12. "If You Go Away" (Jacques Brel, Rod McKuen) - 3:30 13. "Yesterday" (John Lennon, Paul McCartney) - 3:56 14. "Drinking Again" (Mercer, Doris Tauber) - 3:13 15. "I'll Only Miss Her When I Think Of Her" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:50 16. "How Insensitive" (Jobim, Norman Gimbel, de Moraes) - 3:15 17. "Didn't We?" (Jimmy Webb) - 2:55

Everything Happens to Me 18. "All My Tomorrows" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 4:35 19. "Put Your Dreams Away (For Another Day)" (Paul Mann, George David Weiss, Ruth Lowe) - 3:12

218

Personnel
• • • • • • • • • Frank Sinatra - vocals Antonio Carlos Jobim - vocals, guitar Laurindo Almeida - guitar Nelson Riddle - arranger, conductor Don Costa Gordon Jenkins Robert Farnon Clause Ogerman Torrie Zito

References
[1] Everything Happens to Me (album) (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r237338) at Allmusic

Frank Sinatra Sings the Select Cole Porter

219

Frank Sinatra Sings the Select Cole Porter
Frank Sinatra Sings the Select Cole Porter
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label July 23, 1996 1953-1960 Traditional pop music, Vocal jazz 39:57 Capitol Frank Sinatra chronology

Everything Happens to Me (1996)

Frank Sinatra Sings the Select Cole Porter (1996)

Screen Sinatra (1996)

Frank Sinatra Sings the Select Cole Porter is an album released in 1996 by American singer Frank Sinatra. It comprises his renditions of Cole Porter songs.

Track listing
All songs written by Cole Porter. 1. "I've Got You Under My Skin" - 3:43 2. "I Concentrate on You" - 2:23 3. "What Is This Thing Called Love?" - 2:35 4. "You Do Something to Me" - 1:33 5. "At Long Last Love" - 2:23 6. "Anything Goes" - 2:43 7. "Night and Day" - 3:58 8. "Just One of Those Things" - 3:14 9. "I Get a Kick Out of You" - 2:56 10. "You'd Be So Nice to Come Home To" - 2:07 11. "I Love Paris" - 1:49 12. "From This Moment On" - 3:50 13. "C'est Magnifique" - 2:01 14. "It's All Right With Me" - 4:16 15. "Mind if I Make Love to You?" - 2:17 16. "You're Sensational" - 3:09

Frank Sinatra Sings the Select Cole Porter

220

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - vocals • Nelson Riddle - arranger, conductor

Frank Sinatra Sings the Select Sammy Cahn
Frank Sinatra Sings the Select Sammy Cahn
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Label August 20, 1996 1953-1961 Traditional pop music, Vocal jazz Big Band, Jazz Frank Sinatra chronology

Screen Sinatra (1996)

Frank Sinatra Sings the Select Sammy Cahn (1996)

The Complete Capitol Singles Collection (1996)

Frank Sinatra Sings the Select Sammy Cahn is a 1996 compilation album by Frank Sinatra, that has him singing the songs written by Sammy Cahn.

Track listing
• All songs written by Sammy Cahn. 1. "Come Fly with Me" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) 2. "Time After Time" (Cahn, Jule Styne) 3. "(Love Is) The Tender Trap" (Cahn, Van Heusen) 4. "Guess I'll Hang My Tears Out to Dry" (Cahn, Styne) 5. "Love and Marriage" (Cahn, Van Heusen) 6. "Saturday Night (Is the Loneliest Night of the Week)" (Cahn, Styne) 7. "All the Way" (Cahn, Van Heusen) 8. "I've Heard That Song Before" (Cahn, Styne) 9. "All My Tomorrows" (Cahn, Van Heusen) 10. "It's the Same Old Dream" (Cahn, Styne) 11. "Come Dance With Me" (Cahn, Van Heusen) 12. "Three Coins in the Fountain" (Cahn, Styne) 13. "Day by Day" (Cahn, Styne) 14. "To Love and Be Loved" (Cahn, Van Heusen) 15. "High Hopes" (Cahn, Van Heusen) 16. "If It's the Last Thing I'll Do" (Cahn, Styne) 17. "Five Minutes More" (Cahn, Styne) 18. "The Last Dance" (Cahn, Van Heusen)

Greatest Hits: Early Years

221

Greatest Hits: Early Years
Greatest Hits: Early Years
Greatest hits album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Label October 3, 1996 1940's Traditional pop music, Vocal jazz Big Band, Jazz Frank Sinatra chronology

The Complete Capitol Singles Collection (1996)

Greatest Hits: Early Years (1996)

With the Red Norvo Quintet: Live in Australia, 1959 (1997)

Track listing
1. "I've Got a Crush on You" 2. "If You Are But a Dream" 3. "Nancy (With the Laughing Face)" 4. "The Girl That I Marry" 5. "The House I Live In (That's America To Me)" 6. "Dream (When You're Feeling Blue)" 7. "Saturday Night (Is the Loneliest Night of the Week)" 8. "Five Minutes More" 9. "The Coffee Song (They've Got a Lot of Coffee in Brazil)" 10. "Sunday, Monday or Always" 11. "Put Your Dreams Away (For Another Day)"

The Very Best of Frank Sinatra

222

The Very Best of Frank Sinatra
The Very Best of Frank Sinatra
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer June 10, 1997 December 19, 1960 - September 19, 1979 Classic pop 125:17 Reprise Gregg Geller Frank Sinatra chronology

With the Red Norvo Quintet: Live in Australia, 1959 (1997)

The Very Best of Frank Sinatra (1997)

Portrait of Sinatra: Columbia Classics (1997)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

The Very Best of Frank Sinatra is a double disc compilation album by Frank Sinatra that consists 40 hits he made from Reprise Records.

Track listing
Disc one
1. "Stardust" (Hoagy Carmichael, Mitchell Parish) - 2:48 2. "A Foggy Day" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) - 2:17 3. "Let's Fall in Love" (Harold Arlen, Ted Koehler) - 2:11 4. "The Girl Next Door" (Hugh Martin, Ralph Blane) - 3:18 5. "Old Devil Moon" (Burton Lane, E.Y. Harburg) - 2:59 6. "The Way You Look Tonight" (Dorothy Fields, Jerome Kern) - 3:22 7. "Fly Me to the Moon (In Other Words)" (Bart Howard) - 2:30 8. "Nice Work If You Can Get It" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) - 2:37 9. "I Get a Kick Out of You" (Cole Porter) - 3:14 10. "Come Rain or Come Shine" (Arlen, Johnny Mercer) - 4:05 11. "Please Be Kind" (Saul Chaplin, Sammy Cahn) - 2:43 12. "Don'cha Go 'Way Mad" (Jimmy Mundy, Al Stillman, Illinois Jacquet) - 3:12 13. "They Can't Take That Away from Me" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) - 2:41 14. "In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning" (David Mann, Bob Hilliard) - 2:43 15. "I've Got You Under My Skin" (Porter) - 3:26

The Very Best of Frank Sinatra 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. "Let's Face the Music and Dance" (Irving Berlin) - 2:58 "Come Fly with Me" (Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) - 3:11 "My Kind of Town" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:09 "Luck Be a Lady" (Frank Loesser) - 5:17 "The Best Is Yet to Come" (Cy Coleman, Carolyn Leigh) - 3:10

223

Disc two
1. "It Was a Very Good Year" (Ervin Drake) - 4:25 2. "All or Nothing at All" (Jack Lawrence, Arthur Altman) - 3:43 3. "Night and Day" (Porter) - 3:37 4. "Nancy (With the Laughing Face)" (Phil Silvers, Van Heusen) - 3:37 5. "Young at Heart" (Leigh, Johnny Richards) - 2:54 6. "Love and Marriage" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:12 7. "All the Way" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:27 8. "Witchcraft" (Coleman, Leigh) - 2:37 9. "(Love Is) The Tender Trap" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:37 10. "The Second Time Around" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:03 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. "Pocketful of Miracles" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:39 "Softly, as I Leave You" (Hal Sharper, Antonio DeVito, Giorgio Calabrese) - 2:50 "Strangers in the Night" (Bert Kaempfert, Charles Singleton, Eddie Snyder) - 2:25 "Summer Wind" (Heinz Meyer, Hans Bradtke, Mercer) - 2:53 "That's Life" (Kelly Gordon, Dean Kay Thompson) - 3:10 "Somethin' Stupid" [with Nancy Sinatra] (Carson Parks) - 2:45 "Wave" (Antonio Carlos Jobim) - 3:25 "My Way" (Paul Anka, Claude Francois, Jacques Revaux, Gilles Thibaut) - 4:36 "Theme from New York, New York" (Fred Ebb, John Kander) - 3:26 "Put Your Dreams Away (For Another Day)" (Paul Mann, George David Weiss, Ruth Lowe) - 3:12

Personnel
• • • • • • • • • • • • • Frank Sinatra - vocals Nancy Sinatra - vocals Antonio Carlos Jobim - guitar Nelson Riddle - arranger, conductor Don Costa Gordon Jenkins Billy May Johnny Mandell Ernie Freeman Billy Strange Eumir Deodato Neal Hefti Count Basie and his orchestra

The Very Best of Frank Sinatra

224

References
[1] The Very Best of Frank Sinatra (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r277384) at Allmusic

Portrait of Sinatra: Columbia Classics
Portrait of Sinatra: Columbia Classics

Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Label June 25, 1997 August 31, 1939 - March 27, 1951 Classic pop Sony Records Frank Sinatra chronology

The Very Best of Frank Sinatra (1997)

Portrait of Sinatra: Columbia Classics (1997)

The Best of the Columbia Years: 1943-1952 (1998)

While some prefer the Sinatra of the Capitol era, citing that work as more elegant and artful, the recordings Frank made for Columbia in the 1940s and early '50s are just as important. They represent a different phase in Sinatra's evolution, but are no less striking in their emotional impact. While Axel Stordahl, Sinatra's chief arranger at Columbia, may not have been the modernist/minimalist that Nelson Riddle would become in the latter's Capitol work, Stordahl was as sympathetic a collaborator as Sinatra had encountered to that point.

Portrait of Sinatra: Columbia Classics

225

Track listing
Disc one
1. "All or Nothing at All" 2. "If You Are But a Dream" 3. "Night and Day" 4. "Sweet Lorraine" 5. "Guess I'll Hang My Tears Out to Dry" 6. "Nancy (With the Laughing Face)" 7. "The House I Live In" 8. "Blue Skies" 9. "There's No You" 10. "When Your Lover Has Gone" 11. "Stormy Weather" 12. "The Nearness of You" 13. "These Foolish Things (Remind Me of You)" 14. "Saturday Night (Is the Loneliest Night of the Week)" 15. 16. 17. 18. "Where or When" "Someone to Watch Over Me" "Put Your Dreams Away (For Another Day)" "All of Me"

Disc two
1. "There's No Business Like Show Business" 2. "Falling in Love with Love" 3. "You Go to My Head" 4. "Everybody Loves Somebody" 5. "I Believe" 6. "Why Was I Born?" 7. "I've Got a Crush on You" 8. "Body and Soul" 9. "That Old Feeling" 10. "Almost Like Being in Love" 11. "September Song" 12. "It Never Entered My Mind" 13. "I Only Have Eyes for You" 14. "The Song Is You" 15. "Don't Cry, Joe (Let Her Go, Let Her Go, Let Her Go)" 16. "It All Depends On You" 17. "The Continental" 18. "I'm a Fool to Want You"

The Columbia Years 19431952: The V-Discs

226

The Columbia Years 1943–1952: The V-Discs
The Columbia Years 1943-1952: The V-Discs
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released 1994 (box) June 16, 1998 (jewel) 1943-1945 Classic pop 145:12 Columbia Frank Sinatra chronology

Recorded Genre Length Label

Duets (1993)

The Columbia Years 1943-1952: The V-Discs (1994)

Sinatra Saga (1994)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

The Columbia Years 1943–1952: The V-Discs is a 1994 compilation album by the American singer Frank Sinatra. It was released as a "long box" box set in 1994 and re-released in a jewel box size in 1998. The two-CD set contains recordings from V-Discs that were sent to troops during World War II. The V-Discs were the only recordings that the musician's union allowed Sinatra to record during the session musicians strike between 1942 and 1944 and he took full advantage, knowing that although the records would not be sold, it would keep him in the public ear, and allow him to perfect his technique. Although a heavy set, it does not contain every V-disc Sinatra recorded. A more complete set would not become available until 2003 with the release of The Real Complete Columbia Years V-Discs.

Track listing
Disc One

The Columbia Years 19431952: The V-Discs

227

No. Title 1. "I Only Have Eyes for You" 2. "Kiss Me Again" 3. "(There'll Be A) Hot Time in the Town of Berlin" 4. "The Music Stopped" 5. "I Couldn't Sleep a Wink Last Night" 6. "The Way You Look Tonight" 7. "I'll Be Around" 8. "You've Got a Hold On Me" 9. "A Lovely Way to Spend an Evening"

Writer(s) Harry Warren, Al Dubin Victor Herbert, Henry Blossom Joe Bushkin, John DeVries Jimmy McHugh, Harold Adamson McHugh, Adamson Jerome Kern, Dorothy Fields Alec Wilder Frederick Loewe, Alan Jay Lerner McHugh, Adamson

Length 3:43 2:39 2:26 2:56 2:58 2:38 1:38 2:30 3:07 2:11 2:18 3:11 2:23 2:43 2:34 2:00 1:27 3:03 2:50 1:39 3:37 3:42 2:37 2:45 2:36 2:41 2:08 71:00

10. "(I Got a Woman Crazy For Me) She's Funny That Way" Neil Moret, Richard A. Whiting 11. "Speak Low" 12. "Close to You" 13. "My Shining Hour" 14. "Long Ago and Far Away" 15. "Some Other Time" 16. "Come Out, Come Out, Wherever You Are" 17. "Put Your Dreams Away (For Another Day)" 18. "And Then You Kissed Me" 19. "All the Things You Are" 20. "All of Me" 21. "Nancy (With the Laughing Face)" 22. "Mighty Lak' a Rose" 23. "Falling in Love with Love" 24. "Cradle Song (Brahms' Lullaby)" 25. "I'll Follow My Secret Heart" 26. "There's No You" 27. "Someone to Watch Over Me" Total length: Kurt Weill, Ogden Nash Al Hoffman, Jerry Livingston, Carl Lampl Harold Arlen, Johnny Mercer Jerome Kern, Ira Gershwin Jule Styne, Sammy Cahn Styne, Cahn Ruth Lowe, Paul Mann, Stephen Weiss Styne, Cahn Kern, Oscar Hammerstein II Gerald Marks, Seymour Simons Jimmy Van Heusen, Phil Silvers Ethelbert Nevin, Frank Lebby Stanton Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart Johannes Brahms Noël Coward Hal Hopper, Tom Adair George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin

Disc Two

The Columbia Years 19431952: The V-Discs

228

No. Title 1. "Let Me Love You Tonight" 2. "Just Close Your Eyes" 3. "If You Are But a Dream" (previously unreleased) 4. "Strange Music" (previously unreleased) 5. "Cradle Song (Brahms' Lullaby)" (previously unreleased) 6. "Dick Haymes, Dick Todd and Como" (previously unreleased) 7. "None But the Lonely Heart" 8. "Ol' Man River" 9. "Homesick, That's All" 10. "The Night is Young and You're So Beautiful" 11. "Aren't You Glad You're You" 12. "You Brought a New Kind of Love to Me" 13. "I'll Never Smile Again" 14. "Without a Song"

Writer(s) Mitchell Parish, Rene Touzet Jack Elliott, Sam Mineo, Lewis Rodgers Moe Jaffe, Jack Fulton, Nat Bonx Edvard Grieg, adapted by Robert Wright, George Forrest Brahms Van Heusen, Johnny Burke, Cahn Tchaikovsky, Bill Westbrook Kern, Hammerstein Gordon Jenkins Dana Suesse, Irving Kahal, Billy Rose Van Heusen, Burke Sammy Fain, Kahal, Pierre Norman Connor Ruth Lowe Vincent Youmans, Rose, Edward Eliscu

Length 2:40 1:36 3:43 3:25 2:35 2:38 3:26 4:10 3:12 2:09 2:05 1:35 3:24 2:19 3:00 2:27 2:55 3:15 3:06 3:13 3:34 1:45 2:36 2:52 2:26 4:06 74:12

15. "Was the Last Time I Saw You (The Last Time)" (previously unreleased) Edna Osser, Marjorie Goetschius 16. "Don't Forget Tonight, Tomorrow" (previously unreleased) 17. "Oh! What it Seemed to Be" 18. "Over the Rainbow" 19. "Where is My Bess" 20. "My Romance" 21. "The Song is You" 22. "I Fall in Love With You Ev'ry Day" 23. "They Say It's Wonderful" 24. "You are Too Beautiful" 25. "Come Rain or Come Shine" 26. "Stormy Weather" Total length: Leo "Ukie" Sherin, Jay Milton Bennie Benjamin, George David Weiss, Frank Carle Harold Arlen, E.Y. Harburg G. Gershwin, DuBose Heyward, I. Gershwin Kern, Hammerstein Rodgers, Hart Sam H. Stept Irving Berlin Rodgers, Hart Arlen, Mercer Arlen, Ted Koehler

Personnel
• • • • • • • Frank Sinatra – Vocals, all tracks The Bobby Tucker Singers – vocals, Disc 1 tracks 1, 6, & 12 Raymond Paige and his orchestra – music, Disc 2 tracks 3-6 The Pied Pipers (June Hutton, Hal Hopper, Chuck Lowry, Clark Yocum) – vocals, Disc 2 tracks 13 & 16 Tommy Dorsey – trombone, "I'll Never Smile Again" Dinah Shore – vocal duet, Disc 2 tracks 10 & 20 Axel Stordahl

• Disc 1: arranger, all tracks except tracks 5 & 7; conductor, all tracks • Disc 2: arranger & conductor, tracks 1, 2, 7-12, 14-27 • Alec Wilder – arranger, Disc 1 tracks 5 & 7

The Columbia Years 19431952: The V-Discs

229

References
[1] The Columbia Years 1943–1952: The V-Discs (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r204178) at Allmusic

• Liner Notes, The V-Discs: The Columbia Years 1943-1952, Columbia Records, 1994.

Frank Sinatra & the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra
Frank Sinatra & the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label September 29, 1998 February 26, 1940 – July 2, 1942 Classic pop 190:25 RCA Records Frank Sinatra chronology

The Best of the Columbia Years: 1943–1952 (1998)

Frank Sinatra & the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra (1998)

The Capitol Years (1998)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Frank Sinatra & the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra is a 1998 compilation album by the American singer Frank Sinatra. The three-CD set contains recordings from Sinatra's performances with Tommy Dorsey and his orchestra at the beginning of his five-decade singing career. Many of the songs had never been available prior to the set, as Sinatra did not record them for his studio albums when he was alive. They had, however, been available as transfers from 78rpm on vinyl in the six-LP box set The Dorsey/Sinatra Sessions, compiled by Alan Dell for RCA/Victor records, set SD 1000, issued in 1982, accompanied by a leaflet including full discography. The track listing of that set differs from below, being in numerical order by original matrix number, and is more extensive, comprising 83 tracks.

Frank Sinatra & the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra

230

Track listing
Disc one
1. "Polka Dots and Moonbeams" (Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen) - 3:18 2. "Say It" (Frank Loesser, Jimmy McHugh) - 3:22 3. "Imagination" (Burke, Van Heusen) - 3:13 4. "I'll Never Smile Again" (Ruth Lowe) - 3:09 5. "All This and Heaven Too" (Eddie DeLange, Van Heusen) - 3:36 6. "Fools Rush In" (Rube Bloom, Johnny Mercer) - 3:10 7. "The One I Love (Belongs to Somebody Else)" (Jones, Kahn) - 3:30 8. "The Call of the Canyon" (Billy Hill) - 3:08 9. "Love Lies" (Ralph Freed, Joseph Meyer, Carl Sigman) - 3:20 10. "Trade Winds" (Cliff Friend, Charlie Tobias) - 2:59 11. "I Could Make You Care" (Sammy Cahn, Saul Chaplin) - 3:06 12. "Our Love Affair" (Roger Edens, Arthur Freed) - 2:59 13. "We Three (My Echo, My Shadow and Me)" (Nelson Cogane, Sammy Mysels, Dick Robertson) - 3:01 14. "Stardust" (Hoagy Carmichael, Mitchell Parish) - 3:10 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. "Oh! Look at Me Now" (Joe Bushkin, John DeVries) - 3:13 "You Might Have Belonged to Another" (Lucille Harmon, Pat West) - 2:45 "Dolores" (Louis Alter, Frank Loesser) - 2:55 "I Tried" (Carl Nutter, Paul Hand, Clark Dennis) - 3:15 "Do I Worry?" (Stanley Cowan, Bobby Worth) - 3:14 "Everything Happens to Me" (Tom Adair, Matt Dennis) - 3:10

Disc two
1. "This Love of Mine" (Sol Parker, Hank Sanicola, Frank Sinatra) - 3:39 2. "You and I" (Meredith Willson) - 2:44 3. "I Guess I'll Have to Dream the Rest (Martin Block, Bud Green, Mickey Stoner) - 3:30 4. "Two in Love" (Willson) - 2:53 5. "A Sinner Kissed an Angel" (Mack David, Larry Shayne) - 2:52 6. "How About You?" (Ralph Freed, Burton Lane) - 2:52 7. "I Think of You" (Jack Elliott, Don Marcotte) - 2:53 8. "The Last Call for Love" (Marcus Cummings, E.Y. Harburg, Burton Lane) - 2:29 9. "Just as Though You Were Here" (John Benson Brooks, Eddie DeLange) - 3:12 10. "Street of Dreams" (Sam M. Lewis, Victor Young) - 2:39 11. "Take Me" (Rube Bloom, David) - 2:59 12. "Be Careful, It's My Heart" (Irving Berlin) - 2:41 13. "I'll Take Tallulah" (Harburg, Lane) - 3:12 14. "Light a Candle in the Chapel" (Harry Pease, Ed G. Nelson, Duke Leonard) - 3:02 15. "Daybreak" (Harold Adamson, Ferde Grofe) - 3:10 16. "There Are Such Things" (Stanley Adams, George W. Meyer, Abel Baer) - 2:42 17. "It Started All over Again" (Bill Carey, Carl T. Fischer) - 2:25 18. "Let's Get Away from It All" (Adair, Matt Dennis) - 4:57 19. "In the Blue of Evening" (Adair, Alfred D'Artega) - 2:54 20. "It's Always You" (Burke, Van Heusen) - 3:14 21. "I'll Be Seeing You" (Sammy Fain, Irving Kahal) - 3:00

Frank Sinatra & the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra

231

Disc three
1. "The Sky Fell Down" (Alter, Heyman) - 3:13 2. "Too Romantic" (Burke, James V. Monaco) - 3:09 3. "This Is the Beginning of the End" (Gordon) - 3:12 4. "Devil May Care" (Burke, Warren) - 3:05 5. "April Played the Fiddle" (Burke, Monaco) - 3:05 6. "East of the Sun (And West of the Moon)" (Brooks Bowman) - 3:19 7. "Whispering" (Richard Coburn, Vincent Rose, John Schoenberger) - 2:57 8. "Looking for Yesterday" (DeLange, Van Heusen) - 3:10 9. "Tell Me at Midnight" (Clay A. Boland, Bickley Reichner) - 2:50 10. "Shadows on the Sand" (Adams, Will Grosz) - 2:57 11. "You're Breaking My Heart All Over Again" (James Cavanaugh, John Redmond, Arthur Altman) - 3:03 12. "You Lucky People, You" (Burke, Van Heusen) - 2:37 13. "Without a Song" (Vincent Youmans, Edward Eliscu, Billy Rose) - 4:26 14. "Blue Skies" (Berlin) - 3:17 15. "Violets for Your Furs" (Adair, Dennis) - 3:05 16. "Poor You" (Harburg, Lane) - 2:47 17. 18. 19. 20. "The Night We Called It a Day" (Adair, Dennis) - 3:22 "The Lamplighter's Serenade" (Hoagy Carmichael, Paul Francis Webster) - 2:54 "The Song Is You" (Oscar Hammerstein II, Jerome Kern) - 3:23 "Night and Day" (Cole Porter) - 3:02

Additional titles in the RCA LP (vinyl) set
Most of the above titles are included in the LP set, with the following additions: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. "Shake Down The Stars" (February 26, 1940) "Moments In The Moonlight" (February 26, 1940) "The Fable Of The Rose" (March 12, 1940) "Hear My Song Violetta" (March 29, 1940) (unpublished take - variant from issued version) "I Haven't Time To Be A Millionaire" (April 10, 1940) "Yours Is My Heart Alone" (April 10, 1940) (remake of title first recorded under same number on March 21, 1940) 7. "You're Lonely And I'm Lonely" (April 23, 1940) 8. "Head On My Pillow" (April 23, 1940) 9. "It's A Lovely Day Tomorrow" (April 23, 1940) 10. "Where Do You Keep Your Heart?" (April 23, 1940) 11. "The World Is In My Arms" (July 17, 1940) 12. "When You Awake" (September 9, 1940) 13. "Anything" (September 9, 1940) 14. "I'd Know You Anywhere" (September 17, 1940) 15. "Do You Know Why?" (October 16, 1940) 16. "Not So Long Ago" (November 11, 1940) 17. "I'll Never Let A Day Pass By" (May 28, 1941) 18. "Love Me As I Am" (May 28, 1941) 19. "Neiani" (June 27, 1941) (unreleased first take) 20. "Free For All" (remake of May 28 version which was not released) (June 27, 1941) 21. "Pale Moon" (August 19, 1941)

Frank Sinatra & the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. "How Do You Do Without Me?" (September 18, 1941) "The Sunshine Of Your Smile" (Take 3, September 26, 1941) "Snootie Little Cutie" (February 19, 1942) "Somewhere A Voice Is Calling" (March 9, 1942) "Dig Down Deep" (June 17, 1942)

232

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - Vocals • Tommy Dorsey and His Orchestra

References
[1] Frank Sinatra & the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r376394) at Allmusic

Lucky Numbers
Lucky Numbers
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label December 8, 1998 April 11, 1962 - September 19, 1979 Classic pop 32:18 Reprise Frank Sinatra chronology

The Capitol Years (1998)

Lucky Numbers (1998)

Sinatra '57 in Concert (1999)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Lucky Numbers is a 1998 compilation album by Frank Sinatra.

Lucky Numbers

233

Track listing
1. "Theme from New York, New York" (Fred Ebb, John Kander) - 3:26 2. "The Boys' Night Out" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) - 2:48 3. "Come Blow Your Horn" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:08 4. "Pocketful of Miracles" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:39 5. "Luck Be a Lady" (Frank Loesser) - 5:17 6. "That's Life" (Dean Kay Thompson, Kelly Gordon) - 3:10 7. "Pick Yourself Up" (Jerome Kern, Dorothy Fields) - 2:33 8. "Pennies from Heaven" (Arthur Johnston, Johnny Burke) - 3:29 9. "Here's to the Losers" (Jack Segal, Robert Wells) - 3:04 10. "Winners" (Joe Raposo) - 2:53

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - vocals • Nelson Riddle - arranger, conductor • Don Costa • • • • Billy May Neal Hefti Ernie Freeman Gordon Jenkins

References
[1] Lucky Numbers (album) (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r382815) at Allmusic

Classic Sinatra: His Greatest Performances 19531960

234

Classic Sinatra: His Greatest Performances 1953–1960
Classic Sinatra: His Great Performances 1953-1960

Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre March 28, 2000 1953-1960 Classic pop Jazz 59:40 Capitol Frank Sinatra chronology

Length Label

Sinatra '57 in Concert (1999)

Classic Sinatra: His Great Performances 1953-1960 (2000)

Super Hits (2000)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Classic Sinatra: His Great Performances 1953–1960 is a 2000 compilation album by Frank Sinatra, containing twenty tracks he recorded for Capitol Records.

Classic Sinatra: His Greatest Performances 19531960

235

Track listing
1. "I've Got the World on a String" (Harold Arlen, Ted Koehler) - 2:10 2. "I Get a Kick Out of You" (Cole Porter) - 2:54 3. "They Can't Take That Away from Me" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) - 1:58 4. "My Funny Valentine" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) - 2:31 5. "Young at Heart" (Carolyn Leigh, Johnny Richards) - 2:51 6. "Someone to Watch Over Me" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) - 2:56 7. "In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning" (David Mann, Bob Hilliard) - 3:01 8. "I've Got You Under My Skin" (Porter) - 3:43 9. "You Make Me Feel So Young" (Josef Myrow, Mack Gordon) - 2:56 10. "It Happened in Monterey" (Mabel Wayne, Billy Rose) - 2:36 11. "Oh! Look at Me Now" (Joe Bushkin, John DeVries) - 2:49 12. "Night and Day" (Porter) - 4:00 13. "Witchcraft" (Cy Coleman, Leigh) - 2:53 14. "The Lady Is a Tramp" (Rodgers, Hart) - 3:16 15. "All the Way" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) - 2:53 16. "Come Fly with Me" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:18 17. 18. 19. 20. "Put Your Dreams Away (For Another Day)" (Paul Mann, Stephen Weiss, Ruth Lowe) - 3:13 "One for My Baby (and One More for the Road)" (Arlen, Johnny Mercer) - 4:26 "Come Dance with Me" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:31 "Nice 'N' Easy" (Alan Bergman, Marilyn Bergman, Lew Spence) - 2:44

Personnel
• • • • Frank Sinatra - vocals Nelson Riddle - arranger, conductor Billy May Bill Miller - pianist

References
[1] Classic Sinatra: His Greatest Performances 1953–1960 (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r471929) at Allmusic

Super Hits

236

Super Hits
Super Hits
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre August 22, 2000 1944-1951 Classic pop Jazz 30:03 Sony Records Frank Sinatra chronology

Length Label

Classic Sinatra: His Greatest Performances 1953-1960 (2000)

Super Hits (2000)

Robin and the 7 Hoods (2000)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Super Hits is a 2000 compilation album by American singer Frank Sinatra.

Track listing
1. "Begin the Beguine" (Cole Porter) 2. "Nancy (With the Laughing Face)" (Phil Silvers, Jimmy Van Heusen) 3. "The Coffee Song (They've Got An Awful Lot of Coffee In Brazil)" (Bob Hilliard, Dick Miles) 4. "One for My Baby (and One More for the Road)" (Harold Arlen, Johnny Mercer) 5. "Dream (When You're Feeling Blue)" (Mercer) 6. "Saturday Night (Is the Loneliest Night of the Week)" (Sammy Cahn, Jule Styne) 7. "Home on the Range" (Brewster M. Higley, Daniel E. Kelley) 8. "Nature Boy" (Eden Ahbez) 9. "Sunshine Cake" (Johnny Burke, Van Heusen) 10. "Castle Rock" [Single Version] (Ervin Drake, Al Sears, J. Shirl)

Super Hits

237

Personnel
• • • • Frank Sinatra - vocals Paula Kelly Harry James - trumpetier Axel Stordahl - arranger, conductor

References
[1] Super Hits (Frank Sinatra album) (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r495939) at Allmusic

My Way: The Best of Frank Sinatra

238

My Way: The Best of Frank Sinatra
My Way: The Best of Frank Sinatra

Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre 2000 December 20, 1960 - October 30, 1986 Classic pop Jazz 124:34 Reprise Professional reviews • Allmusic link [1]

Length Label

Frank Sinatra chronology

Robin and the 7 Hoods (1997)

My Way: The Best of Frank Sinatra (1997)

Love Songs (2001)

My Way: The Best of Frank Sinatra is a compilation double album of singer Frank Sinatra's greatest hits.

Track listing
Disc one
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. "My Way" (Paul Anka, Claude Francois, Jacques Revaux, Gilles Thibaut) - 4:36 "Strangers in the Night" (Bert Kaempfert, Charles Singleton, Eddie Snyder) - 2:25 "Theme from New York, New York" (Fred Ebb, John Kander) - 3:26 "I Get a Kick Out of You" (Cole Porter) - 3:11 "Somethin' Stupid" with Nancy Sinatra (Carson Parks) - 2:45 "Moon River" (Henry Mancini, Johnny Mercer) "What Now My Love" (Gilbert Bécaud, Pierre Leroyer, Carl Sigman) – 2:32 "Summer Wind" (Heinz Meyer, Hans Bradtke, Mercer) - 2:53

My Way: The Best of Frank Sinatra 9. "For Once in My Life" (Ron Miller, Orlando Murden) 10. "Love and Marriage" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) 11. "They Can't Take That Away from Me" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) 12. "My Kind of Town" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:10 13. "Fly Me to the Moon" (Bart Howard) - 2:30 14. "I've Got You Under My Skin" (Porter) - 3:26 15. "The Best Is Yet to Come" (Cy Coleman, Carolyn Leigh) - 3:10 16. "It Was a Very Good Year" (Ervin Drake) - 4:25 17. "Come Fly with Me" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:11 18. "That's Life" (Kelly Gordon, Dean Kay Thompson) - 3:11 19. "The Girl from Ipanema" (Antonio Carlos Jobim, Norman Gimbel, Vinícius de Moraes) - 3:00 20. "The Lady Is a Tramp" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) - 2:56 live performance at Madison Square Garden, New York City,
New York, October 13, 1974

239

21. 22. 23. 24.

"Bad, Bad Leroy Brown" (Jim Croce) - 2:49 "Mack the Knife" (Marc Blitzstein, Bertolt Brecht, Kurt Weill) - 4:53 "Love's Been Good to Me" (Rod McKuen) - 3:27 "L.A. Is My Lady" (Alan Bergman, Marilyn Bergman, Quincy Jones, Peggy Lipton Jones) - 3:12

Disc two
1. "Let's Face the Music and Dance" (Irving Berlin) - 2:58 2. "Come Rain or Come Shine" (Harold Arlen, Mercer) - 4:05 3. "Night and Day" (Porter) - 3:37 4. "The Very Thought of You" (Ray Noble) - 3:34 5. "Pennies from Heaven" (Arthur Johnston, Johnny Burke) - 3:27 6. "Bewitched, Bothered, and Bewildered" (Rodgers, Hart) - 3:02 7. "America, the Beautiful" (Katharine Lee Bates, Samuel Ward) - 2:21 8. "All the Way" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:27 9. "In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning" (David Mann, Bob Hilliard) - 2:41 10. "The Way You Look Tonight" (Dorothy Fields, Jerome Kern) - 3:22 11. "Three Coins in the Fountain" (Cahn, Jule Styne) - 3:46 12. "Softly, as I Leave You" (Hal Shaper, Antonio DeVito, Giorgio Calabrese) - 2:50 13. "All or Nothing at All" (Jack Lawrence, Arthur Altman) - 3:56 14. "Yesterday" (John Lennon, Paul McCartney) - 3:56 15. "Moonlight Serenade" (Glenn Miller, Mitchell Parish) - 3:26 16. "Somewhere My Love (Lara's Theme) (From Doctor Zhivago)" (Maurice Jarre, Paul Francis Webster) - 2:12 17. "Mrs. Robinson" (Paul Simon) - 2:55 18. "Something" (George Harrison) - 3:34 19. "You Are the Sunshine of My Life" (Stevie Wonder) - 2:37 20. "Send in the Clowns" (Stephen Sondheim) - 4:10 21. "It Had to Be You" (Isham Jones, Gus Kahn) - 3:53 22. "The Best of Everything" (Ebb, Kander) - 2:45

My Way: The Best of Frank Sinatra

240

Personnel
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Frank Sinatra - vocals Nancy Sinatra - vocals Antonio Carlos Jobim - vocals, guitar Nelson Riddle - arranger, conductor Don Costa Gordon Jenkins Ernie Freeman Billy Strange Johnny Mandel Clause Ogerman Billy May Quincy Jones Neal Hefti Count Basie and his Orchestra Woody Herman and his Orchestra

References
http://www.allmusic.com/album/r523096

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r523096

Love Songs

241

Love Songs
Love Songs
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Genre January 9, 2001 Classic pop Jazz Sony Frank Sinatra chronology

Label

My Way: The Best of Frank Sinatra (2000)

Love Songs (2001)

Greatest Love Songs (2002)

Love Songs is a 2001 compilation album by Frank Sinatra, that contains 15 love songs he recorded from Columbia Records.

Track listing
1. "Falling in Love with Love" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) 2. "(Just One Way to Say) I Love You" (Irving Berlin) 3. "I Fall In Love Too Easily" (Sammy Cahn, Jule Styne) 4. "Embraceable You" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) 5. "They Say It's Wonderful" (Berlin) 6. "Fools Rush In (Where Angels Fear to Tread)" (Johnny Mercer, Rube Bloom) 7. "Everybody Loves Somebody" (Irving Taylor, Ken Lane) 8. "Take My Love" (Jack Wolf, Joel. S. Herron, Frank Sinatra) 9. "I Am Loved" (Cole Porter) 10. "Every Man Should Marry" (Abner Silver, Benny Davis) 11. "The Right Girl for Me" (Betty Comden, Adolph Green, Roger Edens) 12. "My Girl" (Charles Freed) 13. "We Kiss in a Shadow" (Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein II) 14. "Love Me" (Ned Washington, Victor Young) 15. "I Hear a Rhapsody" (George Fragos, Jack Baker, Dick Gasparre)

Greatest Love Songs

242

Greatest Love Songs
Greatest Love Songs
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre January 15, 2002 November 5, 1953-April 11, 1966, 1999 Classic pop Jazz 60:19 Reprise Sonny Burke Frank Sinatra chronology

Length Label Producer

Love Songs (2001)

Greatest Love Songs (2002)

Frank Sinatra in Hollywood 1940-1964 (2002)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Greatest Love Songs is a 2002 compilation album by American singer Frank Sinatra, containing 22 love songs.

Track listing
1. "My Funny Valentine" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) - 2:31 2. "What Is This Thing Called Love?" (Cole Porter) - 2:35 3. "Like Someone in Love" (Jimmy Van Heusen, Johnny Burke) - 3:10 4. "I've Got a Crush on You" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) - 2:16 5. "Let's Fall in Love" (Harold Arlen, Ted Koehler) - 2:11 6. "You'd Be So Easy to Love" (Porter) - 2:24 7. "Fly Me to the Moon" (Bart Howard) - 2:30 8. "In the Blue of Evening" (Tom Montgomery, Tom Adair, Al D'Artega) - 4:03 9. "Moonlight Serenade" (Glenn Miller, Mitchell Parish) - 3:26 10. "I'm Getting Sentimental Over You" (George Bassman, Ned Washington) - 3:42 11. "In the Still of the Night" (Porter) - 3:25 12. "You and the Night and the Music" (Arthur Schwartz, Howard Dietz) - 2:36 13. "Don't Take Your Love from Me" (Henry Nemo) - 4:05 14. "I Hadn't Anyone Till You" (Ray Noble) - 3:44 15. "My Heart Stood Still" (Rodgers, Hart) - 3:06 16. "The Very Thought of You" (Noble) - 3:34 17. "The Way You Look Tonight" (Dorothy Fields, Jerome Kern) - 3:22

Greatest Love Songs 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. "You Brought a New Kind of Love to Me" (Sammy Fain, Irving Kahal, Pierre Norman Connor) - 2:38 "Night and Day" (Porter) - 3:37 "Come Rain or Come Shine" (Arlen, Johnny Mercer) - 4:06 "All the Way" [with Celine Dion] (Heusen, Sammy Cahn) - 3:53 "Strangers in the Night" (Bert Kaempfert, Charles Singleton, Eddie Snyder) - 2:25

243

Personnel
• • • • • • • • Frank Sinatra - vocals Celine Dion - vocals Count Basie and his Orchestra Nelson Riddle - arranger, conductor Don Costa Robert Farnon Sy Oliver Johnny Mandel

References
[1] link (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r569006) |

Christmas with the Rat Pack

244

Christmas with the Rat Pack
Christmas with the Rat Pack
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Sammy Davis, Jr. Released Recorded Genre Length October 22, 2002 Various Dates Christmas, Pop 55:16

Christmas with the Rat Pack is a 2002 album compiling Christmas songs by Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, and Sammy Davis, Jr.

Track listing
1. "I've Got My Love to Keep Me Warm," Dean Martin 2. "Mistletoe and Holly," Frank Sinatra 3. "Christmas Time All Over the World" (previously unreleased), Sammy Davis, Jr. 4. "The First Noel," Frank Sinatra 5. "Baby, It's Cold Outside," Dean Martin 6. "I Believe," Frank Sinatra 7. "Silver Bells," Dean Martin 8. "The Christmas Song," Sammy Davis, Jr. 9. "Hark! The Herald Angels Sing," Frank Sinatra 10. "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer," - Dean Martin 11. "The Christmas Waltz," Frank Sinatra 12. "Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow!," Dean Martin 13. "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas," Frank Sinatra 14. Medley: "Peace on Earth/Silent Night," Dean Martin 15. "Jingle Bells," Sammy Davis, Jr. 16. "White Christmas," Dean Martin 17. "It Came Upon a Midnight Clear," Frank Sinatra 18. "Winter Wonderland," Dean Martin 19. "I'll Be Home for Christmas (If Only in My Dreams)," Frank Sinatra 20. "A Marshmallow World" (from The Dean Martin Christmas Show), Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin 21. "Auld Lang Syne" (live), Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin The album was originally issued with an "Ocean's Eleven" themed cover in 2002 but after Capitol Records received heavy opposition from conservative religious groups, the album cover was changed to a two-tone red and green theme with a large hat and holly leaves.

The Real Complete Columbia Years V-Discs

245

The Real Complete Columbia Years V-Discs
The Real Complete Columbia Years V-Discs
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded November 25, 2003 October 17, 1943December 6, 1948 Classic pop ~~:~~ Jazz Factory Frank Sinatra chronology

Genre Length Label

Classic Duets (2002)

The Real Complete Columbia Years V-Discs (2003)

The Platinum Collection (2004)

The Real Complete Columbia Years V-Discs is a 2003 compilation album by the American singer Frank Sinatra. The 3-CD compilation includes four transcription discs pressed for Armed Forces Radio Service but not released on The Columbia Years 1943-1952: The V-Discs. The first album is also included in this collection.

Track listing
Disc one
1. "I Only Have Eyes for You" (Al Dubin, Harry Warren) - 3:58 2. "Kiss Me Again" (Henry Martyn Blossom, Vctor Herbert) - 2:41 3. "(There'll Be A) Hot Time in the Town of Berlin" (Joe Bushkin, John DeVries) - 2:28 4. "The Music Stopped" (Harold Adamson, Jimmy McHugh) - 2:58 5. "I Couldn't Sleep a Wink Last Night" (Adamson, McHugh) - 3:00 6. "The Way You Look Tonight" (Dorothy Fields, Jerome Kern) - 2:41 7. "I'll Be Around" (Alec Wilder) - 1:40 8. "You've Got a Hold on Me" (Alan Jay Lerner, Frederick Loewe) - 2:32 9. "A Lovely Way to Spend an Evening" (Adamson, McHugh) - 3:10 10. "(I Got A Woman Crazy For Me) She's Funny That Way" (Richard A. Whiting, Neil Moret) - 2:14 11. "Speak Low" (Ogden Nash, Kurt Weill) - 2:21 12. "Close to You" (Jerry Livingston, Carl Lampl, Al Hoffman) - 3:13 13. "My Shining Hour" (Harold Arlen, Johnny Mercer) - 2:26 14. "Long Ago (And Far Away)" (George Gershwin, Kern) - 2:37 15. "Some Other Time" (Sammy Cahn, Jule Styne) - 2:37 16. "Come Out, Come Out, Wherever You Are" (Cahn, Styne) - 2:02 17. "Put Your Dreams Away (For Another Day)" (Ruth Lowe, Paul Mann, Stephen Weiss) - 1:30 18. "And Then You Kissed Me" (Cahn, Styne) - 3:05 19. "All the Things You Are" (Oscar Hammerstein II, Kern) - 2:52 20. "All of Me" (Marks, Simons) - 1:42 21. "Nancy (With the Laughing Face)" (Phil Silvers, Jimmy Van Heusen) - 3:38

The Real Complete Columbia Years V-Discs 22. 23. 24. 25. "Mighty Lak' a Rose" (Frank Lebby Stanton, Ethelbert Nevin) - 3:43 "Falling in Love With Love" (Lorenz Hart, Richard Rodgers) - 2:39 "Cradle Song (Brahms' Lullaby)" (Johannes Brahms) - 2:48 "I'll Follow My Secret Heart" (Noël Coward) - 2:35

246

Disc two
1. "Someone to Watch Over Me" (G. Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) - 2:10 2. "There's No You" (Tom Adair, Hal Hopper) - 2:43 3. "Let Me Love You Tonight" (Mitchell Parish, René Touzet) - 2:43 4. "Just Close Your Eyes" (John M. Elliot, Sam Mineo, Lewis Rodgers) - 1:39 5. "If You Are but a Dream" (Moe Jaffe, Jack Fulton, Nat Bonx) - 3:06 6. "Saturday Night (Is the Loneliest Night in the Week)" (Cahn, Styne) - 2:46 7. "I Begged Her" (Cahn, Styne) - 3:02 8. "What Makes the Sunset?" (Cahn, Styne) - 2:57 9. "The Charm of You" (Cahn, Styne) - 3:02 10. "When Your Lover Has Gone" (Einar Aaron Swan) - 2:55 11. "None But the Lonely Heart" (Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, Arthur Westbrook) - 3:28 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. "Ol' Man River" (Hammerstein, Kern) - 4:11 "Over the Rainbow" (Arlen, Yip Harburg) - 3:17 "You'll Never Walk Alone" (Hammerstein, Rodgers) - 3:27 "Stars in Your Eyes" (Mort Greene, Ricardo López Méndez, Gabriel Ruiz (composer)) - 2:47 "My Shawl" (Xavier Cugat, Pedro Berrios, Stanley Adams) - 3:17 "Someone to Watch Over Me" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) - 3:22 "You Go to My Head" (J. Fred Coots, Haven Gillespie) - 3:02 "These Foolish Things" (Harry Link, Holt Marvell, Jack Strachey) - 3:10 "I Don't Know Why (I Just Do)" (Fred E. Ahlert, Roy Turk) - 2:47 "Homesick, That's All" (Gordon Jenkins) - 3:14 "The Night Is Young and You're So Beautiful" (Dana Suesse, Irving Kahal, Billy Rose) - 2:12 "Aren't You Glad You're You (Johnny Burke, Van Heusen) - 2:08 "You Brought a New Kind of Love to Me" (Sammy Fain, Kahal, Pierre Norman) - 1:34

Disc three
1. "I'll Never Smile Again" (Lowe) - 3:26 2. "Without a Song" (Edward Eliscu, Rose, Vincent Youmans) - 2:20 3. "Oh! What It Seemed to Be" (Bennie Benjamin, Frankie Carle, George David Weiss) - 2:56 4. "Old School Teacher" (Willard Robison) - 3:24 5. "White Christmas" (Irving Berlin) - 3:14 6. "My Romance" (Hart, Rodgers) - 3:14 7. "The Song Is You" (Hammerstein, Kern) - 3:35 8. "Should I? (Reveal)" (Nacio Herb Brown, Arthur Freed) - 2:26 9. "Oh Bess, Oh Where's My Bess?" (G. Gershwin, DuBose Heyward) - 3:09 10. "Soliloquy" (Hammerstein, Rodgers) - 8:09 11. "I Fall in Love With You Ev'ry Day" (Sam H. Stept) - 1:47 12. "They Say It's Wonderful" (Berlin) - 2:38 13. "You Are Too Beautiful" (Hart, Rodgers) - 2:54 14. "Come Rain or Come Shine" (Arlen, Mercer) - 2:28 15. "One for My Baby (and One More for the Road)" (Arlen, Mercer) - 3:07

The Real Complete Columbia Years V-Discs 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. "Stormy Weather" (Arlen, Ted Koehler) - 3:55 "Sunflower" (Mack David) - 3:04 "If You Are But a Dream" (Bonx, Fulton, Jaffe) - 3:46 "Strange Music" (Robert B. Wright, George Forrest, Edvard Grieg) - 3:27 "Cradle Song (Brahms' Lullaby)" - 2:37 "Dick Haymes, Dick Todd and Como" (Burke, Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:40 "Don't Forget Tonight, Tomorrow" (Jay Milton, Ukie Sherin) - 2:28 "Was the Last Time I Saw You (The Last Time)" (Marjorie Goetschius, Edna Osser) - 2:59

247

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - Vocals • Axel Stordahl - Conductor • Tommy Dorsey - Conductor

Frank Sinatra Christmas Collection

248

Frank Sinatra Christmas Collection
Frank Sinatra Christmas Collection
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Label October 26, 2004 1957 - August 27, 1991 Traditional pop music, Classic pop Reprise Frank Sinatra chronology

The Platinum Collection (2004)

Frank Sinatra Christmas Collection (2004)

Romance (2004)

Frank Sinatra Christmas Collection is a 2004 Christmas album from Frank Sinatra.

Track listing
1. "I've Got My Love to Keep Me Warm" (Irving Berlin) 2. "The Christmas Waltz" (Jule Styne, Sammy Cahn) 3. "Santa Claus Is Coming to Town" (J. Fred Coots, Haven Gillespie) 4. "The Little Drummer Boy" (Katherine K. Davis) 5. "We Wish You the Merriest" (Les Brown) 6. "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas" (Hugh Martin, Ralph Blane) 7. "Go Tell It on the Mountain" (Traditional, John Wesley Work III) 8. "The Christmas Song" (Mel Torme, Robert Wells) 9. "I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day" (Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Johnny Marks) 10. "I Wouldn't Trade Christmas" (Jimmy Van Heusen, Cahn) 11. "Christmas Memories" (Alan Bergman, Marilyn Bergman, Don Costa) 12. "The Twelve Days of Christmas" (Traditional, Van Heusen, Cahn) 13. "The Bells of Christmas (Greensleeves)" (Traditional, Van Heusen, Cahn) 14. "An Old-Fashioned Christmas" (Van Heusen, Cahn) 15. "A Baby Just Like You" (John Denver, Joe Henry) 16. "Whatever Happened to Christmas?" (Jimmy Webb) 17. "White Christmas" (Berlin) 18. Bonus Track: "Silent Night" (Josef Mohr, Franz X. Gruber)

Frank Sinatra Christmas Collection

249

Personnel
• Vocals: Frank Sinatra, Nancy Sinatra, Frank Sinatra, Jr., Tina Sinatra, Bing Crosby, Fred Waring and his Pennsylvanians, Jimmy Joyce Singers • Arrangers: Nelson Riddle, Don Costa, Dick Reynolds, Harry Betts, Jack Holloran

Romance

250

Romance
Romance
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded December 28, 2004 November 5, 1953July 18, 1979, 1999 Traditional pop music, Classic pop 126:55 Reprise Frank Sinatra chronology

Genre Length Label

Frank Sinatra Christmas Collection (2004)

Romance (2004)

Live from Las Vegas (2005)

Romance is a 2004 compilation album by American singer Frank Sinatra, that consists of 50 romantic tunes.

Track listing
Disc one
1. "Strangers in the Night" (Bert Kaempfert, Charles Singleton, Eddie Snyder) - 2:25 2. "Somethin' Stupid" (with Nancy Sinatra) (Carson Parks) - 2:45 3. "Let's Fall in Love" (Harold Arlen, Ted Koehler) - 2:11 4. "I've Got a Crush on You" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) - 2:16 5. "Something" (George Harrison) - 3:34 6. "Night and Day" (Cole Porter) - 3:37 7. "The Way You Look Tonight" (Dorothy Fields, Jerome Kern) - 3:22 8. "I Get a Kick Out of You" (Porter) - 3:14 9. "Moon River" (Henry Mancini, Johnny Mercer) - 3:20 10. "Come Fly with Me" (live) (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) - 3:45 11. "Come Rain or Come Shine" (Arlen, Mercer) - 4:06 12. "Love's Been Good to Me" (Rod McKuen) - 3:27 13. "Misty" (Erroll Garner, Johnny Burke) - 2:41 14. "More (Theme from Mondo Cane)" (Riz Ortolani, Nino Oliviero, Marcello Ciorciolini, Norman Newell) - 3:05 15. "You and the Night and the Music" (Arthur Schwartz, Howard Dietz) - 2:36 16. "September Song" (Kurt Weill, Maxwell Anderson) - 3:30 17. "Cycles" (Gayle Caldwell) - 3:07 18. "The Best is Yet to Come" (Cy Coleman, Carolyn Leigh) - 3:10 19. "East of the Sun (And West of the Moon)" (Brooks Bowman) - 3:26 20. "You'd Be So Easy to Love" (Porter) - 2:24 21. "When Somebody Loves You" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 1:54 22. "I Love You" (Porter) - 2:16 23. "Gentle On My Mind" (John Hartford) - 3:25

Romance 24. "It Had to Be You" (Isham Jones, Gus Kahn) - 3:53 25. "Let's Face the Music and Dance" (Irving Berlin) - 2:58

251

Disc two
1. "A Fine Romance" (Fields, Kern) - 2:11 2. "I've Got You Under My Skin" (Porter) - 3:26 3. "Have You Met Miss Jones?" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) - 2:30 4. "Fly Me to the Moon (In Other Words)" (Bart Howard) - 2:30 5. "My Funny Valentine" (Rodgers, Hart) - 2:31 6. "What Is This Thing Called Love?" (Porter) - 2:35 7. "Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered" (Rodgers, Hart) - 3:02 8. "Call Me Irresponsible" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:12 9. "I'm Beginning to See the Light" (Johnny Hodges, Harry James, Duke Ellington, Don George) - 2:34 10. "The Very Thought of You" (Ray Noble) - 3:34 11. "Summer Wind" (Heinz Meier, Hans Bradtke, Mercer) - 2:53 12. "Like Someone in Love" (Van Heusen, Burke) - 3:10 13. "Quiet Nights of Quiet Stars" (Antonio Carlos Jobim, Gene Lees) - 2:45 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. "Desafinado" (Jon Hendricks, Jobim, Newton Mendonça) - 3:00 "Wave" (Jobim) - 3:25 "Watch What Happens" (Norman Gimbel, Michel Lengrand) - 2:17 "I Have Dreamed" (Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein II) - 3:01 "I Only Have Eyes for You" (Harry Warren, Al Dubin) - 3:31 "Love Walked In" (G. Gershswin, I. Gershwin) - 2:19 "It's Always You" (Van Heusen, Burke) - 2:49 "They Can't Take That Away from Me" (G. Gerswhin, I. Gershwin) - 2:41 "The Look of Love" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:43 "Call Me" (Tony Hatch) - 3:07 "It Was a Very Good Year" (Ervin Drake) - 4:25 "All the Way" (Cahn, Van Heusen) (w/Celine Dion) - 3:53

Personnel
• • • • Frank Sinatra - vocals Nancy Sinatra - vocals Celine Dion - vocals Antonio Carlos Jobim - vocals, guitar

Duets/Duets II: 90th Birthday Limited Collector's Edition

252

Duets/Duets II: 90th Birthday Limited Collector's Edition
Duets/Duets II: 90th Birthday Limited Collector's Edition
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer November 28, 2005 1993-1994 Jazz Vocal 105:07 Capitol David Foster Phil Ramone Albert Hammond Andre Fischer Tommy LiPuma Al Schmitt Ptrick Williams Frank Sinatra chronology

Live from Las Vegas (2005)

Duets/Duets II: 90th Birthday Limited Collector's Edition (2005)

Sinatra: Vegas (2006)

Duets/Duets II: 90th Birthday Limited Celebration Edition is a two-disc compilation album set by Frank Sinatra. This was released to celebrate his 90th birthday. The album includes a duet with Willie Nelson on "My Way" (disc 2, track 15).

Track listing
Disc one
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. "The Lady Is a Tramp" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) (with Luther Vandross) - 3:24 "What Now My Love" (Gilbert Becaud, Carl Sigman, Pierre Leroyer) (with Aretha Franklin) - 3:15 "I've Got a Crush on You" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) (with Barbra Streisand) - 3:23 "Summer Wind" (Heinz Meier, Hans Bradtke, Johnny Mercer) (with Julio Iglesias) - 2:32 "Come Rain or Come Shine" (Harold Arlen, Mercer) (with Gloria Estefan) - 4:04 "New York, New York" (Fred Ebb, John Kander) (with Tony Bennett) - 3:30 "They Can't Take That Away from Me" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) (with Natalie Cole) - 3:11 "You Make Me Feel So Young" (Mack Gordon, Josef Myrow) (with Charles Aznavour) - 3:05 "Guess I'll Hang My Tears Out to Dry"/"In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning" (Sammy Cahn, Jule Styne)/(Bob Hilliard, David Mann) (with Carly Simon) - 3:57 10. "I've Got the World on a String" (Arlen, Ted Koehler) (with Liza Minnelli) - 2:18 11. "Witchcraft" (Cy Coleman, Carolyn Leigh) (with Anita Baker) - 3:22 12. "I've Got You Under My Skin" (Cole Porter) (with Bono) - 3:32

Duets/Duets II: 90th Birthday Limited Collector's Edition 13. "All the Way"/"One for My Baby (and One More for the Road)" (Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen)/(Arlen, Mercer) (with Kenny G) - 6:03

253

Disc two
1. "For Once in My Life" (Ron Miller, Orlando Murden) (with Gladys Knight and Stevie Wonder) - 3:18 2. "Come Fly with Me" (Cahn, Van Heusen) (with Luis Miguel) - 4:17 3. "Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered" (Rodgers, Hart) (with Patti Labelle) - 3:31 4. "The Best is Yet to Come" (Coleman, Leigh) (with Jon Secada) - 3:12 5. "Moonlight in Vermont" (John Blackburn, Karl Suessdorf) (with Linda Ronstadt) - 4:07 6. "Fly Me to the Moon" (Bart Howard) (with Antonio Carlos Jobim) - 3:06 7. "Luck Be a Lady" (Frank Loesser) (with Chrissie Hynde) - 5:17 8. "A Foggy Day" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) (with Willie Nelson) - 2:24 9. "Where or When" (Rodgers, Hart) (with Steve Lawrence and Eydie Gorme) - 3:53 10. "Embraceable You" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) (with Lena Horne) - 3:45 11. "Mack the Knife" (Marc Blitzstein, Bertolt Brecht, Kurt Weill) (with Jimmy Buffett) - 4:26 12. "How Do You Keep the Music Playing?"/"My Funny Valentine" (Alan Bergman, Marilyn Bergman, Michel Legrand)/(Rodgers, Hart) (with Lorrie Morgan) - 3:58 13. "My Kind of Town" (Cahn, Van Heusen) (with Frank Sinatra, Jr.) - 2:33 14. "The House I Live In" (Lewis Allan, Earl Robinson) (with Neil Diamond) - 4:14 15. "My Way" [Previously Unreleased] (Paul Anka, Claude François, Jacques Revaux, Gilles Thibaut) (with Willie Nelson) - 4:22

Romance: Songs from the Heart

254

Romance: Songs from the Heart
Romance: Songs from the Heart

Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label January 2007 November 5, 1953-March 22, 1961 Classic pop, Jazz 50:28 Capitol Professional reviews • Allmusic link [1]

Frank Sinatra chronology

Sinatra: Vegas (2006)

Romance: Songs from the Heart (2007)

A Voice in Time: 1939-1952 (2007)

Romance: Songs from the Heart is a 2007 album by Frank Sinatra, released posthumously, that consists of 21 tracks he recorded for Capitol Records. An alternate version of "Nice 'n' Easy" is included on the disc.

Track listing
1. "I've Got You Under My Skin" (Cole Porter) - 3:43 2. "Time After Time" (Jule Styne, Sammy Cahn) - 3:28 3. "Day by Day" (Axel Stordahl, Paul Weston, Cahn) - 2:37 4. "All the Way" (Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) - 2:52 5. "Too Marvelous for Words" (Johnny Mercer, Richard A. Whiting) - 2:28 6. "My Funny Valentine" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) - 2:32 7. "Love Is Here to Stay" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) - 2:40 8. "I've Got a Crush on You" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) - 2:17 9. "Cheek to Cheek" (Irving Berlin) - 3:06 10. "Try a Little Tenderness" (Jimmy Campbell, Reginald Connelly, Harry M. Woods) - 3:21

Romance: Songs from the Heart 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. "I Wish I Were in Love Again" (Rodgers, Hart) - 2:27 "Angel Eyes" (Matt Dennis, Earl Brent) - 3:44 "In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning" (Bob Hilliard, David Mann) - 3:00 "As Time Goes By" (Herman Hupfeld) - 3:19 "At Long Last Love" (Porter) - 2:24 "I'll Be Seeing You" (Sammy Fain, Irving Kahal) - 2:47 "Almost Like Being in Love" (Frederick Loewe, Alan Jay Lerner) - 2:01 "Embraceable You" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) - 3:23 "Nice 'n' Easy" [Alternate Take Previously Unreleased] (Alan Bergman, Marilyn Bergman, Lew Spence) - 2:43 "Where or When" - (Rodgers, Hart) - 2:32 "If You Are But a Dream" (Moe Jaffe, Jack Fulton, Nat Bonx) - 3:54

255

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - vocals • Nelson Riddle - arranger, conductor

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r70147

Sinatra at the Movies

256

Sinatra at the Movies
Sinatra at the Movies
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Label April 15, 2008 1955-1959 Traditional pop music, Vocal jazz, Swing music Capitol Frank Sinatra chronology

Sinatra Sings Cole Porter (2008)

Sinatra at the Movies (2008)

Nothing But the Best (2008)

Sinatra at the Movies is a 2008 compilation album by Frank Sinatra. After Bing Crosby, no jazz vocalist had more success in the movies, or was better at intertwining his performances with his films, than Frank Sinatra. From 1940 to 1970, he was never far from Hollywood, and his film successes often went hand in hand with his popular fortune. (Even his movie personals aligned with his musical themes and ambitions, from his breakthrough starring role, in Higher and Higher, to the ambitious On the Town, the scrappy From Here to Eternity, the quintessentially swinging Pal Joey, and the self-satisfied Ocean's Eleven.) Sinatra at the Movies isn't the career-spanning movie retrospective that it should be—instead, it concentrates on his Capitol period of the '50s. (Even his big film hit from 1943's Higher and Higher, "I Couldn't Sleep a Wink Last Night," is present here only in its 1957 version.) The '50s are virtually defined by Sinatra's great music, but the quality of his movie titles was scatter shot. Yes, there were some big hits from the film world -- "Three Coins in the Fountain," "All the Way," "(Love Is) The Tender Trap," "All of Me" -- and virtually all of them were great performances. Sinatra was also making sure he recorded plenty of great material, classics like "I Could Write a Book" (from Pal Joey), "The Lady Is a Tramp" (Pal Joey again), and "Just One of Those Things" (Young at Heart). Yet he was occasionally becoming lighter and more pithy by the end of his Capitol era, never more so than when a children's choir began "High Hopes." Overall, it's not a great choice for beginners, although note that it provides a great complement to his studio albums of the '50s. An added bonus here is the inclusion of several songs that are comparatively rare on Sinatra retrospectives: "Not as a Stranger," "Monique," and "C'est Magnifique."

Track listing
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. "(Love Is) The Tender Trap" [From "The Tender Trap"] (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) - 2:58 "From Here to Eternity" [From "From Here to Eternity"] (Freddy Karger, Robert Wells) - 2:59 "I Love Paris" [From "Can-Can"] (Cole Porter) - 1:50 "How Deep Is the Ocean?" [From "Meet Danny Wilson"] (Irving Berlin) - 3:14 "I Could Write a Book" [From "Pal Joey"] (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) - 3:53 "All the Way" [From "The Joker is Wild"] (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:52 "Young at Heart" [From "Young at Heart"] (Carolyn Leigh, Johnny Richards) - 2:50 "Not as a Stranger" [From "Not as a Stranger"] (Van Heusen, Buddy Kaye) - 2:46

9. "All of Me" [From "Meet Danny Wilson"] (Gerald Marks, Seymour Simons) - 2:08 10. "High Hopes" [From "A Hole in the Head"] (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:41 11. "The Lady Is a Tramp" [From "Pal Joey"] (Rodgers, Hart) - 3:15

Sinatra at the Movies 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. "Monique" [From "Kings Go Forth"] (Cahn, Elmer Bernstein) - 3:17 "Chicago (That Toddlin' Town)" [From "The Joker Is Wild"] (Fred Fisher) - 2:12 "Three Coins in the Fountain" [From "Three Coins in the Fountain"] (Jule Styne, Cahn) - 3:06 "I Believe" [From "It Happened in Brooklyn"] (Ervin Drake, Irvin Graham, Jimmy Shirl, Al Stillman) - 2:31 "Johnny Concho Theme (Wait For Me)" [From "Johnny Concho"] (Nelson Riddle, Jo Stafford) - 2:51 "C'est Magnifique" [From "Can-Can"] (Porter) - 2:01 "I Couldn't Sleep a Wink Last Night" [From "Higher and Higher"] (Harold Adamson, Jimmy McHugh) - 3:25 "Just One of Those Things" [From "Young at Heart"] (Porter) - 3:15 "To Love and Be Loved" [From "Some Came Running"] (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:55

257

Nothing But the Best
Nothing But The Best
Greatest hits album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label May 13, 2008 1962–1984 Traditional pop music, Vocal jazz, Swing music 74:36 Warner Bros. Frank Sinatra chronology

Sinatra at the Movies (2008)

Nothing But the Best (2008)

Frank Sinatra: The Greatest Concerts (2008)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Nothing But the Best is a 2008 compilation album by American singer Frank Sinatra. All the tracks on this album are recordings made when Sinatra was on his own Reprise label, thus the first track, "Come Fly with Me" is not the 1957 Capitol version. Other notable differences are "Strangers in the Night" has an extended fade out and the first two cymbal notes are cut from the beginning of the "Theme from New York, New York". The album was certified Gold by the RIAA on December 9, 2008. [2] As of June 4, 2009, the album has sold 525,478 copies in the US. It has been present on the Billboard Top 200 for 87 weeks as of May 29, 2010 [3] The producer of this album is Charles Pignone and the executive producer is Robert Finkelstein & Jimmy Edwards. This album is presented in 3 versions:standard edition (22 tracks with 1 bonus track and another one but in not all releases), Christmas edition (22 tracks with 1 bonus track + 12 Christmas songs) and a DVD edition (22 tracks with 1 bonus track + 1 DVD concert of the artist, in addition this album is packaged in Digipack format).

Nothing But the Best

258

Track listings
1. "Come Fly with Me" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) - 3:14 2. "The Best is Yet to Come" (Cy Coleman, Carolyn Leigh) - 2:56 3. "The Way You Look Tonight" (Jerome Kern, Dorothy Fields) - 3:22 4. "Luck Be a Lady" (Frank Loesser) - 5:15 5. "Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) - 3:00 6. "The Good Life" (Sacha Distel, Jack Reardon) - 2:27 7. "The Girl from Ipanema" (Antonio Carlos Jobim, Norman Gimbel, Vinícius de Moraes) - 3:14 8. "Fly Me to the Moon (In Other Words)" (Bart Howard) - 2:28 9. "Summer Wind" (Heinz Meier, Hans Bradtke, Johnny Mercer) - 2:55 10. "Strangers in the Night" (Bert Kaempfert, Charles Singleton, Eddie Snyder) - 2:45 11. "Call Me Irresponsible" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:56 12. "Somethin' Stupid" [With Nancy Sinatra] (Carson Parks) - 2:40 13. "My Kind of Town" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:11 14. "It Was a Very Good Year" (Ervin Drake) - 4:27 15. "That's Life" (Kelly Gordon, Dean Kay) - 3:07 16. "Moonlight Serenade" (Glenn Miller, Mitchell Parish) - 3:28 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. "Nothing But the Best" (Johnny Rotella) - 3:00 "Drinking Again" (Johnny Mercer, Doris Tauber) - 3:15 "All My Tomorrows" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 4:35 "My Way" (Paul Anka, Claude François, Jacques Revaux, Gilles Thibault) - 4:36 "Theme from New York, New York" (Fred Ebb, John Kander) - 3:25 "Body and Soul" [Previously unissued] (Frank Eyton, Johnny Green, Edward Heyman, Robert Sour) - 4:20

Christmas Edition This is a limited re-edition of the original 1964 album 12 Songs of Christmas, by Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra and Fred Waring and The Pennsylvanians.
Disc Two No. Title 1. "White Christmas" 2. "It's Christmas Time Again" Writer(s) Irving Berlin Sonny Burke, Jim Harwood, Jack D. Elliot, John M. Elliott, James K. Harwood, Francis Burke Traditional, John Wesley Work III Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen Traditional Katherine K. Bates Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Johnny Marks Length

3. "Go Tell it on the Mountain" 4. "An Old-Fashioned Christmas" 5. "When Angels Sang of Peace" 6. "The Little Drummer Boy" 7. "I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day" 8. "Do You Hear What I Hear?" 9. "The Secret of Christmas" 10. "The Twelve Days of Christmas" 11. "Christmas Candles" 12. "We Wish You the Merriest"

Noël Regney, Gloria Shayne Baker Cahn, Van Heusen Traditional Dean Kay, Vincent O'Dea, Jay Clinton Les Brown

Nothing But the Best

259

DVD edition
1. "Introduction by Princess Grace of Monaco" 2. "You Make Me Feel So Young" 3. "Pennies from Heaven" 4. "I've Got You Under My Skin" 5. "Something" 6. "The Lady Is a Tramp" 7. "I Get Along Without You Very Well" 8. "Didn't We" 9. "One for My Baby" 10. "I Will Drink the Wine" 11. "I Have Dreamed" 12. "My Kind of Town" 13. "My Way"

References
[1] Allmusic review (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r1368835/ review) [2] RIAA Website (http:/ / www. riaa. com/ goldandplatinumdata. php?table=SEARCH) [3] http:/ / www. billboard. com/ #/ charts/ billboard-200?begin=181& order=position

Seduction: Sinatra Sings of Love
Seduction: Sinatra Sings of Love

Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label January 27, 2009 1960–1984 Traditional pop music, Vocal jazz, Swing music 82:03 Warner Bros. Frank Sinatra chronology

Seduction: Sinatra Sings of Love

260

From the Heart (2009)

Seduction: Sinatra Sings of Love (2009)

Live at the Meadowlands (2009)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Seduction: Sinatra Sings of Love is a 2009 double disc compilation album by American singer, Frank Sinatra. Released by Rhino just in time for Valentine's Day 2009, Seduction: Sinatra Sings of Love is a good collection of 22 highlights—with an additional ten cuts on the two-disc "deluxe" edition—from Sinatra's Reprise recordings. While there are surely some hits here -- "Some Enchanted Evening," "They Can't Take That Away from Me," "I Get A Kick Out of You," "I've Got You Under My Skin" -- what's noteworthy about this collection is that it isn't just a recycling of familiar songs, it digs a little deeper into his catalog (even finding a previously unissued "My Funny Valentine") to create a compilation that isn't necessarily for aficionados, but rather Sinatra fans who already know the big tunes and want to dig a little deeper. In this regard, it's a worthy compilation, delivering plenty of good music that is both good and fits the seductive mood of the title. This album is dedicated to Sinatra's arranger and conductor, Neal Hefti.

Track listing
Disc one
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. "Prisoner of Love" (Russ Columbo, Leo Robin, Clarance Gaskill) - 3:50 "I've Got You Under My Skin" (Cole Porter) - 3:26 "My Funny Valentine" [Alternate Version] (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) - 2:31 "Witchcraft" (Cy Coleman, Carolyn Leigh) - 2:37 "All the Way" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) - 3:32 "It Had to Be You" (Isham Jones, Gus Kahn) - 3:53 "Young at Heart" (Leigh, Johnny Richards) - 2:56 "Love Is a Many-Splendored Thing" (Paul Francis Webster, Sammy Fain) - 3:54

9. "Some Enchanted Evening" (Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein II) - 3:29 10. "(How Little It Matters) How Little We Know" (Leigh, Phil Springer) - 2:23 11. "I Get a Kick Out of You" (Porter) - 3:13 12. "The Second Time Around" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:09 13. "At Long Last Love" (Porter) - 2:41 14. "I Concentrate on You" (Porter) - 2:39 15. "Then Suddenly Love" (Ray Alfred, Paul Vance) - 2:23 16. "They Can't Take That Away from Me" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) - 2:42 17. "A Fine Romance" (Dorothy Fields, Jerome Kern) - 2:13 18. "More (Theme from Mondo Cane)" (Riz Ortolani, Nino Oliviero, Marcello Ciorciolini, Norman Newell) - 3:01 19. "This Happy Madness (Estrada Branca)" (Aloysio de Oliveira, Antonio Carlos Jobim, Gene Lees) - 3:02 20. "Teach Me Tonight" (Cahn, Gene DePaul) - 3:48 21. "All the Way Home" (Teddy Randazzo) - 3:54

Seduction: Sinatra Sings of Love 22. "That's All" (Bob Haymes, Alan Brandt) - 3:21

261

Disc two
1. "The Look of Love" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:44 2. "Secret Love" (Webster, Fain) - 3:54 3. "I Wish You Love" (Léo Chauliac, Charles Trenet, Albert Beach) - 2:56 4. "I Like to Lead When I Dance" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:09 5. "Misty" (Erroll Garner, Johnny Burke) - 2:41 6. "Stay With Me (Main Theme from The Cardinal)" (Leigh, Jerome Moross) - 3:04 7. "Talk To Me Baby" (Robert E. Dolan, Johnny Mercer) - 2:58 8. "For Once in My Life" (Ron Miller, Orlando Murden) - 2:50 9. "All of You" (Porter) - 1:42 10. "I Had the Craziest Dream" (Mack Gordon, Harry Warren) - 3:13

References
[1] Seduction: Sinatra Sings of Love (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r1466392) at Allmusic

Classic Sinatra II
Classic Sinatra II
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label June 2, 2009 1953-1959 Vocal Jazz, Classic pop 55:37 Capitol Frank Sinatra chronology

Live at the Meadowlands (2009)

Classic Sinatra II (2009)

Sinatra: Collector's Edition (2009)

Classic Sinatra II

262

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Classic Sinatra II is a 2009 compilation album by Frank Sinatra, that consists 21 tracks he recorded from Capitol Records.

Track listing
1. "Something's Gotta Give" (Johnny Mercer) - 2:39 2. "Too Marvelous for Words" (Mercer, Richard Whiting) - 2:28 3. "Love and Marriage" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) - 2:38 4. "From This Moment On" (Cole Porter) - 3:53 5. "(Love Is) The Tender Trap" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:57 6. "I Get Along Without You Very Well (Except Sometimes)" (Hoagy Carmichael, Jane Brown Thompson) - 3:42 7. "All of Me" (Gerald Marks, Seymour Simons) - 2:07 8. "I Thought About You" (Van Heusen, Mercer) - 2:29 9. "Moonlight in Vermont" (Jack Blackburn, Karl Suessdorf) - 3:33 10. "High Hopes" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:42 11. "Learnin' The Blues" (Dolores Silvers) - 3:02 12. "Here's That Rainy Day" (Van Heusen, Johnny Burke) - 3:34 13. "Pennies from Heaven" (Arthur Johnston, Burke) - 2:43 14. "I've Got a Crush on You" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) - 2:17 15. "Guess I'll Hang My Tears Out to Dry" (Jule Styne, Cahn) - 4:00 16. "Memories of You" (Andy Razaf, Eubie Blake) - 2:54 17. "Love is Here to Stay" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) - 2:40 18. "(Ah, the Apple Trees) When the World Was Young" (Mercer, M. Philippe-Gerard, Angele Marie T. Vannier) 3:47 19. "Just One of Those Things" (Porter) - 3:14 20. "Angel Eyes" (Matt Dennis, Tom Adair) - 3:48 21. "This Can't Be Love" (Previously unreleased) (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) - 1:40

References
[1] Classic Sinatra II (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ classic-sinatra-ii-r1561372) at Allmusic

Sinatra: Collector's Edition

263

Sinatra: Collector's Edition
Sinatra: Collector's Edition
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label September 22, 2009 December 20, 1960-February 24, 1969 Vocal Jazz, Classic pop 64:50 Madacy Frank Sinatra chronology

Classic Sinatra II (2009)

Sinatra: Collector's Edition (2009)

Christmas with Sinatra & Friends (2009)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Rating Allmusic Please specify a rating. [1]

Sinatra: Collector's Edition is a 2009 double compilation album by Frank Sinatra, that consists 20 tracks he recorded from Reprise Records.

Track listing
Disc one
1. "Night and Day" (Cole Porter) - 3:40 2. "Without a Song" (Vincent Youmans, Billy Rose, Edward Eliscu) - 3:42 3. "The Very Thought of You" (Ray Noble) - 3:34 4. "Summer Wind" (Heinz Meier, Hans Bradtke, Johnny Mercer) - 2:57 5. "All or Nothing at All" (Arthur Altman, Jack Lawrence) - 3:46 6. "Let's Face the Music and Dance" (Irving Berlin) - 2:53 7. "I Get a Kick Out of You" (Porter) - 3:17 8. "For Once in My Life" (Ron Miller), Orlando Murden) - 2:53 9. "Strangers in the Night" (Bert Kaempfert, Charles Singleton, Eddie Snyder) - 2:38 10. "Young at Heart" (Carolyn Leigh, Johnny Richards) - 2:57

Sinatra: Collector's Edition

264

Disc two
1. "That's Life" (Kelly Gordon, Dean Thompson) - 3:09 2. "Something" (George Harrison) - 3:34 3. "Then Suddenly Love" (Ray Alfred, Paul Vance) - 2:18 4. "Little Green Apples" (Bobby Russell) – 5:00 5. "It's a Wonderful World" (Harold Adamson, Jan Savitt, Johnny Watson) - 2:14 6. "Witchcraft" (Cy Coleman, Leigh) - 2:40 7. "Pocketful of Miracles" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) - 2:44 8. "Nancy (With the Laughing Face)" (Van Heusen, Phil Silvers) - 3:40 9. "Star!" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:38 10. "My Way" (Paul Anka, Claude Francois, Jacques Revaux, Gilles Thibaut) - 4:36

References
[1] Sinatra: Collector's Edition (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ classic-sinatra-ii-r1671889) at Allmusic

Christmas with Sinatra & Friends
Christmas with Sinatra & Friends
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Label October 6, 2009 1950s-1960s, 1975 Vocal Jazz, Classic pop Concord Records Frank Sinatra chronology

Sinatra: Collector's Edition (2009)

Christmas with Sinatra & Friends (2009)

Sinatra: New York (2009)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Christmas with Sinatra & Friends is a 2009 compilation album by Frank Sinatra. Eight Sinatra songs are taken from A Jolly Christmas from Frank Sinatra and 12 Songs of Christmas. The remaining four tracks feature Rosemary Clooney ("White Christmas"), Mel Tormé ("The Christmas Song [Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire]"), Tony Bennett and Bill Evans ("A Child Is Born"), and Ray Charles and Betty Carter ("Baby, It's Cold Outside"). Even though this compilation is relatively short, Christmas with Sinatra and Friends is a fairly solid collection of holiday music.

Christmas with Sinatra & Friends

265

Track listing
1. "The Christmas Waltz" (Sammy Cahn, Jule Styne) 2. "Santa Claus Is Coming to Town" (John Frederick Coots Haven Gillespie) 3. "The Christmas Song (Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire)" (Bob Wells, Mel Tormé) 4. "I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day" (Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Johnny Marks) 5. "The Little Drummer Boy" (Katherine K. Davis) 6. "A Child Is Born" (Thad Jones, Mel Lewis) 7. "Mistletoe and Holly" (Hank Sanicola, Frank Sinatra, Doc Stanford) 8. "An Old-Fashioned Christmas" (Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) 9. "White Christmas" (Irving Berlin) 10. "Whatever Happened to Christmas?" (Jimmy Webb) 11. "Baby, It's Cold Outside" (Frank Loesser) 12. "Christmas Memories" (Alan Bergman, Marilyn Bergman, Don Costa)

Personnel
• Tony Bennett - Track 6 • • • • • • Betty Carter - Track 11 Ray Charles - Track 11 Rosemary Clooney - Track 9 Bill Evans - Track 6 Frank Sinatra - Tracks 1-2, 4-5, 7-8, 10, 12 Mel Torme - Track 3

References
[1] Christmas with Sinatra & Friends (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r1658387) at Allmusic

36 Greatest Hits!

266

36 Greatest Hits!
36 Greatest Hits
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Label January 25, 2010 1960-1979 Vocal Jazz, Classic pop Reprise Frank Sinatra chronology

Sinatra: New York (2009)

36 Greatest Hits! (2010)

Sinatra/Jobim: The Complete Reprise Recordings (2010)

36 Greatest Hits! is a 2010 box set by American singer Frank Sinatra. This box set consists 36 songs he recorded for his own label, Reprise.

Track listing
Disc one
1. "I've Got You Under My Skin" (Cole Porter) 2. "All or Nothing at All" (Jack Lawrence, Arthur Altman) 3. "For Once in My Life" (Ron Miller, Orlando Murden) 4. "I Never Knew" (Ted Fio Rito, Gus Kahn) 5. "Moon River" (Henry Mancini, Johnny Mercer) 6. "The Lady Is a Tramp" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) 7. "Night and Day" (Porter) 8. "I Get a Kick Out of You" (Porter) 9. "Born Free" (Don Black, John Barry) 10. "Hello, Dolly!" (Jerry Herman) 11. "Something" (George Harrison) 12. "My Way" (Paul Anka, Claude Francois, Jacques Revaux, Gilles Thibaut)

Disc two
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. "Ring-A-Ding-Ding" (Jimmy Van Heusen, Sammy Cahn) "Summer Wind" (Mercer, Hanz Bradtke, Heinz Meyer) "Swinging on a Star" (Van Heusen, Johnny Burke) "I Wished on the Moon" (Dorothy Parker, Ralph Rainger) "Then Suddenly Love" (Ray Alfred, Paul Vance) "Love Me Tender" (Vera Matson, Elvis Presley) "The Continental" (Herb Magidson, Con Conrad)

8. "I'll Never Smile Again" (Ruth Lowe) 9. "It's a Wonderful World" (Adamson, Jan Savitt, Johnny Watson) 10. "Send in the Clowns" (Stephen Sondheim)

36 Greatest Hits! 11. "Pocketful of Miracles" (Cahn, Van Heusen) 12. "Softly, as I Leave You" (Hal Shaper, Antonio DeVito, Giorgio Calabrese)

267

Disc three
1. "Strangers in the Night" (Bert Kaempfert, Charles Singleton, Eddie Snyder) 2. "Witchcraft" (Cy Coleman, Carolyn Leigh) 3. "Nancy (With the Laughing Face)" (Phil Silvers, Van Heusen) 4. "Star!" (Cahn, Van Heusen) 5. "Gentle On My Mind" (John Hartford) 6. "That's Life" (Kelly Gordon, Dean Thompson) 7. "Are You Lonesome Tonight?" (Roy Turk, Lou Handman) 8. "The Look of Love" (Cahn, Van Heusen) 9. "The Very Thought of You" (Ray Noble) 10. "Without a Song" (Vincent Youmans, Billy Rose, Edward Eliscu) 11. "Young at Heart" (Leigh, Johnny Richards) 12. "Put Your Dreams Away (For Another Day)" (Paul Mann, Stephen Weiss, Lowe)

Come Fly Away

268

Come Fly Away
Come Fly Away
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Label March 6, 2010 1950s-1984 Vocal Jazz, Classic pop, Classical Reprise Records Frank Sinatra chronology

36 Greatest Hits! (2010)

Come Fly Away (2010)

Sinatra/Jobim: The Complete Reprise Recordings (2010)

Come Fly Away is a 2010 compilation album by Frank Sinatra. These 16 songs have been chosen to be in the album that were taken from the Broadway musical, "Come Fly Away".

Track listing
1. "Moonlight Becomes You" (Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen) 2. "I've Got the World on a String" (Harold Arlen, Ted Koehler) 3. "Let's Fall in Love" (Arlen, Koehler) 4. "Yes Sir, That's My Baby" (Walter Donaldson, Gus Kahn) 5. "Witchcraft" (Cy Coleman, Carolyn Leigh) 6. "Lean Baby" (Roy Alfred, Billy May) 7. "Nice 'n' Easy" (Lew Spence, Alan Bergman, Marilyn Keith) 8. "Just Friends" (John Klenner, Sam M. Lewis) 9. "Pick Yourself Up" (Jerome Kern, Dorothy Fields) 10. "Wave" (Antonio Carlos Jobim) 11. "Let's Face the Music and Dance" (Irving Berlin) 12. "Summer Wind" (Heinz Meier, Hans Bradtke, Johnny Mercer) 13. "Body and Soul" (Frank Eyton, Johnny Green, Edward Heyman, Robert Sour) 14. "The September of My Years" (Sammy Cahn, Van Heusen) 15. "My Way" (Paul Anka, Claude Francois, Jacques Revaux, Gilles Thibaut) 16. "Theme from New York, New York" (Fred Ebb, John Kander)

Sinatra/Jobim: The Complete Reprise Recordings

269

Sinatra/Jobim: The Complete Reprise Recordings
Sinatra/Jobim: The Complete Reprise Recordings
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label May 4, 2010 January 30, February 1, 1967 – February 1969 Vocal Jazz, Classic pop, Bossa Nova 58:14 Concord Records Frank Sinatra chronology

Come Fly Away (2010)

Sinatra/Jobim: The Complete Reprise Recordings (2010)

The Reprise Years (2010)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Sinatra/Jobim: The Complete Reprise Recordings is a 2010 compilation album by Frank Sinatra, consisted of 20 tracks he recorded with the Brazilian musician Antonio Carlos Jobim.

Track Listing
1. "The Girl from Ipanema" (Antonio Carlos Jobim, Norman Gimbel, Vinícius de Moraes) – 3:00 2. "Dindi" (Ray Gilbert, Jobim, Aloysio de Oliveria) – 3:25 3. "Change Partners" (Irving Berlin) – 2:40 4. "Quiet Nights of Quiet Stars" (Jobim, Gene Lees) – 2:45 5. "Meditation" (Jobim, Gimbel, Newton Mendonça) – 2:51 6. "If You Never Come to Me" (Jobim, Gilbert, de Oliveira) – 2:10 7. "How Insensitive" (Jobim, Gimbel, de Moraes) – 3:15 8. "I Concentrate on You" (Cole Porter) – 2:32 9. "Baubles, Bangles and Beads" (Robert Wright, George Forrest, Alexander Borodin) – 2:32 10. "Once I Loved (O Amor em Paz)" (Jobim, Gilbert, de Moraes) – 2:37 11. "The Song of the Sabia (Sabiá)" – (Jobim, Chico Buarque, Gimbel) – 3:38 12. "Water to Drink (Agua de Beber)" (de Moraes, Jobim, Gimbel) – 2:35 13. "Someone to Light Up My Life" (de Moraes, Jobim, Lees) – 2:37 14. "Triste" (Jobim) – 2:40 15. "This Happy Madness (Estrada Branca)" (de Moraes, Jobim, Lees) – 2:57 16. "One Note Samba (Samba de Uma Nota So)" (Jobim, Mendonça) – 2:20 17. "Don't Ever Go Away (Por Causa de Voce)" (Gilbert, Delores Duran, Jobim) – 2:28 18. "Wave" (Jobim) – 3:25

Sinatra/Jobim: The Complete Reprise Recordings 19. "Desafinado" (Hendricks, Jobim, Mendonça) – 3:00 20. "Bonita" (Gilbert, Jobim, Lees) – 3:39

270

Personnel
• • • • Frank Sinatra – vocals Antonio Carlos Jobim – vocals, guitar Claus Ogerman – arranger, conductor Eumir Deodato

References
[1] Sinatra/Jobim: The Complete Reprise Recordings (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r1778586) at Allmusic

Sinatra/Basie: The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings

271

Sinatra/Basie: The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings
Sinatra/Basie: The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings

Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label September 6, 2011 October 2-3, 1962-June 1964 Vocal jazz, Big Band 59:53 Concord Records Frank Sinatra chronology

Best of Vegas (2011)

Sinatra/Basie: The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings (2011)

Sinatra: Best of the Best (2011)

Sinatra/Basie: The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings is a 2011 compilation album by American singer, Frank Sinatra that consists 20 songs he recorded with jazz pianist, Count Basie. 10 tracks from "Sinatra–Basie: An Historic Musical First" (1962), and 10 more from "It Might as Well Be Swing" (1964). It's virtually impossible to imagine a more swinging combination than Frank Sinatra---the premier pop vocalist of an adoring generation, and the mighty orchestra of Count Basie. Such a scintillating summit meeting actually unfolded not once but twice in the studio. This collection brings together both of those historic album-length collaborations, originally on the label Sinatra founded, Reprise Records. It's a thoroughly satisfying soiree.

Sinatra/Basie: The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings

272

Track listing
1. "Pennies from Heaven" (Arthur Johnston, Johnny Burke) – 3:29 2. "Please Be Kind" (Saul Chaplin, Sammy Cahn) – 2:43 3. "(Love Is) The Tender Trap" (Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) – 2:37 4. "Looking at the World Through Rose Colored Glasses" (Jimmy Steiger, Tommy Malie) – 2:32 5. "My Kind of Girl" (Leslie Bricusse) – 4:37 6. "I Only Have Eyes for You" (Harry Warren, Al Dubin) – 3:31 7. "Nice Work If You Can Get It" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) – 2:37 8. "Learnin' the Blues" (Dolores Vicki Silvers) – 4:25 9. "I'm Gonna Sit Right Down and Write Myself a Letter" (Fred Ahlert, Joe Young) – 2:36 10. "I Won't Dance" (Jerome Kern, Jimmy McHugh, Oscar Hammerstein II, Dorothy Fields, Otto Harbach) – 4:07 11. "Fly Me to the Moon (In Other Words)" (Bart Howard) – 2:30 12. "I Wish You Love" (Léo Chauliac, Charles Trenet, Albert Beach) – 2:56 13. "I Believe in You" (Frank Loesser) – 2:21 14. "More (Theme from Mondo Cane)" (Riz Ortolani, Nino Oliviero, Marcello Ciorciolini, Norman Newell) – 3:05 15. "I Can't Stop Loving You" (Don Gibson) – 3:00 16. "Hello, Dolly!" (Jerry Herman) – 2:45 17. 18. 19. 20. "I Wanna Be Around" (Johnny Mercer, Sadie Vimmerstedt) – 2:25 "The Best Is Yet to Come" (Cy Coleman, Carolyn Leigh) – 3:10 "The Good Life" (Sacha Distel, Jack Reardon) – 3:10 "Wives and Lovers" (Burt Bacharach, Hal David) – 2:50

Sinatra: Best of the Best

273

Sinatra: Best of the Best
Sinatra: Best of the Best

Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label November 15, 2011 April 30, 1953 - September 19, 1979 Vocal jazz, Big Band 128:46 Capitol Records Frank Sinatra chronology

Sinatra/Basie: The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings (2011)

Sinatra: Best of the Best (2011)

Sinatra: Best of the Best is a 2011 double compilation album by American singer, Frank Sinatra. The album was promoted as having his classic hits from Capitol Records and Reprise Records together on one record for the first time ever. This 2 disc set is packaged in a lift top box and contains 5 collectible postcards of classic Sinatra images. The first disc contains the biggest hits from Frank Sinatra's career. And the second disc contains the long out of print Live In '57 performance recorded in Seattle, Washington. Though this album was compiled and released by Capitol Records, the song "Night and Day" presented here is not the Captiol version, but the 1962 Reprise version from the album Sinatra and Strings. Best of the Best is also available as a single disc with just the hits from disc one.

Sinatra: Best of the Best

274

Track listing
Disc one
1. "I've Got the World on a String" (Harold Arlen, Ted Koehler) - 2:14 2. "My Funny Valentine" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) - 2:31 3. "Young at Heart" (Carolyn Leigh, Johnny Richards) - 2:53 4. "In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning" (Bob Hilliard, David Mann) - 3:00 5. "Love and Marriage" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) - 2:41 6. "You Make Me Feel So Young" (Josef Myrow, Mack Gordon) - 2:57 7. "I've Got You Under My Skin" (Cole Porter) - 3:43 8. "The Lady Is a Tramp" (Rodgers, Hart) - 3:14 9. "Witchcraft" (Cy Coleman, Leigh) - 2:54 10. "All the Way" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:55 11. "Come Fly with Me" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:19 12. "Angel Eyes" (Matt Dennis, Earl Brent) - 3:46 13. "Nice 'n' Easy" (Alan Bergman, Marilyn Keith, Lew Spence) - 2:45 14. "Night and Day" (Porter) - 3:47 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. "The Way You Look Tonight" (Jerome Kern, Dorothy Fields) - 3:22 "My Kind of Town" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:08 "Fly Me to the Moon (In Other Words)" (Bart Howard) - 2:49 "It Was a Very Good Year" (Ervin Drake) - 4:27 "Strangers in the Night" (Bert Kaempfert, Charles Singleton, Eddie Snyder) - 2:25 "Summer Wind" (Heinz Meyer, Hans Bradtke, Johnny Mercer) - 2:53 "That's Life" (Kelly Gordon, Dean Kay) - 3:10 "My Way" (Paul Anka, Claude Francois, Jacques Revaux, Gilles Thibaut) - 4:36 "Theme from New York, New York" (Fred Ebb, John Kander) - 3:26

Disc two
1. Introduction - "You Make Me Feel So Young" - 3:46 2. "It Happened in Monterey" (Billy Rose, Mabel Wayne) - 2:23 3. "At Long Last Love" (Porter) - 2:15 4. "I Get a Kick Out of You" (Porter) - 2:49 5. "Just One of Those Things" (Porter) - 3:02 6. "A Foggy Day" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) - 3:31 7. "The Lady is a Tramp" - 3:18 8. "They Can't Take That Away from Me" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) - 1:40 9. "I Won't Dance" (Fields, Oscar Hammerstein II, Otto Harbach, Jimmy McHugh) - 3:26 10. Sinatra Dialogue - 4:52 11. "When Your Lover Has Gone" (Enir A. Swan) - 2:53 12. "Violets for Your Furs" (Tom Adair, Dennis) - 3:34 13. "My Funny Valentine" - 2:44 14. "Glad to Be Unhappy" (Rodgers, Hart) - 1:37 15. "One for My Baby (and One More for the Road)" (Arlen, Mercer) - 4:01 16. "(Love Is) The Tender Trap" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 4:12 17. "Hey! Jealous Lover" (Cahn, Kay Twomey, Bee Walker) - 2:21 18. "I've Got You Under My Skin" - 3:15 19. "Oh! Look at Me Now" (Joe Bushkin, John DeVries) - 3:12

275

Soundtrack albums
High Society
High Society
Soundtrack album by Bing Crosby Released Recorded Genre Label 1956 January 1956 Traditional pop Capitol Bing Crosby chronology

Bing: A Musical Autobiography (1954)

High Society (1956)

Songs I Wish I Had Sung the First Time Around (1956)

High Society is a 1956 soundtrack album, featuring Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra, Louis Armstrong and Grace Kelly. This was Crosby's fourth LP album, and his first recorded with Capitol Records. It was the soundtrack for the MGM feature film High Society, also released in 1956. Crosby's exclusive recording contract with Decca Records expired at the end of 1955 and he chose to go freelance. After his recording of "True Love" with Grace Kelly went gold, Crosby joked that it was the only gold record to feature a real-life princess.

Track listing
1. "High Society" (Overture) - Johnny Green, conducting the MGM Studio Orchestra 2. "High Society Calypso" - Louis Armstrong and His Band 3. "Little One" - Bing Crosby 4. "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?" - Celeste Holm, Frank Sinatra 5. "True Love" - Bing Crosby, Grace Kelly 6. "You're Sensational" - Frank Sinatra 7. "I Love You, Samantha" - Bing Crosby 8. "Now You Has Jazz" - Louis Armstrong and His Band, Bing Crosby 9. "Well, Did You Evah!" - Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra 10. "Mind if I Make Love to You?" - Frank Sinatra All songs written by Cole Porter.

High Society

276

Chart positions
Chart Year Peak position

UK Albums Chart

[1] 1957 1

References
[1] "Chart Stats - Original Soundtrack - High Society" (http:/ / www. chartstats. com/ albuminfo. php?id=1509). chartstats.com. . Retrieved 8 May 2011.

Young at Heart

277

Young at Heart
Young at Heart
Soundtrack album by Doris Day and Frank Sinatra Released Genre Label November 1, 1954 Traditional pop Columbia Doris Day chronology

Calamity Jane (1953)

Young at Heart (1954)

Love Me or Leave Me (1955)

Frank Sinatra chronology

Swing Easy (1954)

Young at Heart (1954)

In the Wee Small Hours (1955)

Young at Heart was a 10" LP album [1] released by Columbia Records as catalog number CL-6331, on November 1, 1954, containing songs sung by Doris Day and Frank Sinatra from the soundtrack of the movie Young at Heart. On May 31, 2004 the album was reissued, combined with You're My Thrill, as a compact disk by Sony BMG Music Entertainment. (In fact, though the CD was entitled "You're My Thrill/Young at Heart," the four added tracks that were added to "You're My Thrill" when it was retitled "Day Dreams" were included, as well as four extra tracks not included in either album originally.)

Track listing
(see [2] and [1]) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. "Till My Love Comes to Me" (Paul Francis Webster, based on Mendelssohn's "On Wings of Song") (Doris Day) "Ready, Willing and Able" (Floyd Huddleston, Al Rinker, Dick Gleason) (Doris Day) "Hold Me in Your Arms" (Ray Heindorf, Charles Henderson, Don Pippin) (Doris Day) "Someone to Watch Over Me" (George Gershwin/Ira Gershwin) (Frank Sinatra) "Just One of Those Things" (Cole Porter) (Doris Day) "There's A Rising Moon" (Sammy Fain/Paul Francis Webster) (Doris Day) "One For My Baby (And One More For The Road)" (Harold Arlen/Johnny Mercer) (Frank Sinatra) "You My Love" (Mack Gordon/Jimmy Van Heusen) (Doris Day)

References
[1] Album details on Doris Day tribute site (http:/ / www. dorisdaytribute. com/ albums-youngatheart. htm) [2] Listing on IMDb database (http:/ / www. imdb. com/ title/ tt0047688/ soundtrack)

Robin and the 7 Hoods

278

Robin and the 7 Hoods
Robin and the 7 Hoods
Soundtrack album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre October 24, 2000 April 8, 1964 Classic pop Jazz Artanis Records Frank Sinatra chronology

Label

Classic Sinatra: His Greatest Performances 1953-1960 (2000)

Robin and the 7 Hoods (2000)

My Way: The Best of Frank Sinatra (2000)

Robin and the 7 Hoods is a 2000 soundtrack album by Frank Sinatra and his Rat Pack that have them singing the songs that were written by Jimmy Van Heusen and Sammy Cahn from their 1964 film, Robin and the 7 Hoods.

Track listing
• All songs written by Jimmy Van Heusen and Sammy Cahn. 1. "Overture" 2. "My Kind of Town" - Frank Sinatra 3. "All for One and One for All" - Peter Falk, Frank Sinatra and Chorus 4. "Don't Be a Do-Badder" - Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra and Kids 5. "Any Man Who Loves His Mother" - Dean Martin 6. "Style" - Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and Bing Crosby 7. "Mister Booze" - Bing Crosby, Sammy Davis, Jr., Dean Martin, Frank Sinatra and Chorus 8. "I Like to Lead When I Dance" - Frank Sinatra 9. "Bang! Bang!" - Sammy Davis, Jr. 10. "Charlotte Couldn't Charleston" - Chorus 11. "Give Praise! Give Praise! Give Praise!" - Chorus 12. "Don't Be a Do-Badder" (Finale) - Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Sammy Davis, Jr. and Bing Crosby 13. "My Kind of Town" (Previously Unreleased Alternate Version) - Frank Sinatra

279

Other albums
Frank Sinatra Conducts the Music of Alec Wilder
Frank Sinatra Conducts the Music of Alec Wilder
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label 1946 March 31, 1939 – December 10, 1945, Los Angeles Jazz 44:14 CBS Records Frank Sinatra chronology

Frank Sinatra Conducts the Music of Alec Wilder (1946)

Frank Sinatra Conducts Tone Poems of Color (1956)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Frank Sinatra Conducts the Music of Alec Wilder is an album of compositions by Alec Wilder, conducted by Frank Sinatra, released in 1946.[2]

Track listing
The original COLUMBIA (78, M-637) 1946 album contained tracks 1-6. Tracks 7-13 are older recordings (From 1939 to 1940), added in 1950 on The COLUMBIA (10", ML-4271). 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. "Air for Oboe" (Soloist, Mitch Miller) – 3:35 "Air for Bassoon" (Soloist, Harold Goltzer) – 4:34 "Air for Flute" (Soloist, Julius Baker) – 4:33 "Air for English Horn" (Soloist, Mitch Miller) – 3:57 "Slow Dance" – 4:06 "Theme and Variations" – 4:11 "Such a Tender Night" – 3:05 "She'll Be Seven in May" – 2:59 "It's Silk, Feel It!" – 2:31

10. "Seldon the Sun" – 3:16 11. "Her Old Man Was Suspicious" – 2:24

Frank Sinatra Conducts the Music of Alec Wilder 12. "His First Long Pants" – 2:37 13. "Pieces of Eight" – 2:26 All pieces composed by Alec Wilder.

280

Recording Dates
• • • • • • Track 1, 2 & 3 were recorded December 5, 1945. Track 4, 5 & 6 were recorded December 10, 1945. Track 7 was recorded March 31, 1939. Track 8 & 9 were recorded June 13, 1939. Track 10, 11 & 13 were recorded July 17, 1940. Track 12 was recorded August 7, 1940.

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - conductor (tracks 1-6) / With Woodwind Octet, The Columbia String Orchestra & Harpsichord • The Alec Wilder Octet (tracks 7-13) • Alec Wilder Octet includes : Jimmy Carroll, Eddie Powell, Mitch Miller, Harold Goltzer, Reggie Merrill, Walter Gross, Gerry Gillis, Frank Carroll & Toots Mondello

References
[1] Allmusic review (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26417) [2] "Singer-Saints: Frank Sinatra Conducts The Music Of Alec Wilder (In Memoriam Mitch Miller)" (http:/ / singersaintsrecords. blogspot. com/ 2010/ 08/ frank-sinatra-conducts-music-of-alec. html). . Retrieved 16-Sep-2010.

Frank Sinatra Conducts Tone Poems of Color
Frank Sinatra Conducts Tone Poems of Color
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer 1956 February 22 - March 15, 1956 Easy Listening/Light Classical 43:59 Capitol Voyle Gilmore Frank Sinatra chronology

Frank Sinatra Conducts the Music of Alec Wilder (1946)

Frank Sinatra Conducts Tone Poems of Color (1956)

The Man I Love (1957)

Frank Sinatra Conducts Tone Poems of Color

281

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Frank Sinatra Conducts Tone Poems of Color is a 1956 album of tone poems composed by eight notable mid-20th century Hollywood arrangers, with each composition inspired by the poetry of Norman Sickel. As well as being conducted by Sinatra this album marked the first musical collaboration between Sinatra and Gordon Jenkins. A chapter discussing the album, "The Colors of Ava: Tone Poems of Color and the Painful Measure of Sinatra's Passions," appears in A Storied Singer: Frank Sinatra as Literary Conceit (Greenwood Press, 2002) by Gilbert L. Gigliotti.

Track listing
1. "White" (Victor Young) – 4:14 2. "Green" (Gordon Jenkins) – 4:05 3. "Purple" (Billy May) – 4:21 4. "Yellow" (Jeff Alexander) – 2:38 5. "Gray" (Alec Wilder) – 4:29 6. "Gold" (Nelson Riddle) – 3:36 7. "Orange" (Nelson Riddle) – 4:57 8. "Black" (Victor Young) – 3:58 9. "Silver" (Elmer Bernstein) – 4:38 10. "Blue" (Alec Wilder) – 4:38 11. "Brown" (Jeff Alexander) – 4:01 12. "Red" (André Previn) – 3:57

Recording Dates
• • • • • Tracks 1, 7, 8 & 11 were recorded February 22, 1956. Tracks 9 & 12 were recorded February 28, 1956. Tracks 2, 4, 5 & 10 were recorded March 07, 1956. Tracks 3 & 6 were recorded March 15, 1956. All Tracks were Recorded at The Capitol Tower & Engineered by John Palladino.

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - Conductor

References
[1] Frank Sinatra Conducts Tone Poems of Color (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26296) at Allmusic

The Man I Love

282

The Man I Love
The Man I Love
Studio album by Peggy Lee Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer 1957 April 2-30, 1957 Vocal jazz 38:27 Capitol Milt Gabler Peggy Lee chronology

Songs from Walt Disney's "Lady and the Tramp" (1957)

The Man I Love (1957)

Sea Shells (1958)

Frank Sinatra chronology

Frank Sinatra Conducts Tone Poems of Color (1956)

The Man I Love (1957)

Sleep Warm (1958)

The Man I Love is a 1957 album by Peggy Lee, with an orchestra arranged by Nelson Riddle, and conducted by Frank Sinatra. This was Lee's first 12 inch LP record after re-signing for Capitol Records in 1957.

Reception
Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Allmusic awarded the album three and a half stars with reviewer William Ruhlmann commenting that Lee "(lays) back in understated vocal performances to reinforce the near-victimhood of the woman depicted in the songs. Riddle supports these interpretations with lush string charts that hint of dark feelings. The result is a superb pairing of singer, conductor, and arranger on an album that re-conceives Lee as a Capitol recording artist in the Sinatra concept album mold."[1]

The Man I Love

283

Track listing
1. "The Man I Love" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) - 3:45 2. "Please Be Kind" (Sammy Cahn, Saul Chaplin) - 4:14 3. "Happiness is a Thing Called Joe" (Harold Arlen, Yip Harburg) - 4:05 4. "(Just One Way to Say) I Love You" (Irving Berlin) - 2:53 5. "That's All" (Alan Brandt, Bob Haymes) - 2:55 6. "Something Wonderful" (Oscar Hammerstein II, Richard Rodgers) - 3:15 7. "He's My Guy" (Gene de Paul, Don Raye) - 4:13 8. "Then I'll Be Tired of You" (Harburg, Arthur Schwartz) - 2:28 9. "My Heart Stood Still" (Lorenz Hart, Rodgers) - 2:45 10. "If I Should Lose You" (Ralph Rainger, Leo Robin) - 2:23 11. "There Is No Greater Love" (Isham Jones, Marty Symes) - 3:38 12. "The Folks Who Live On the Hill" (Hammerstein, Jerome Kern) - 3:37

Personnel
• Peggy Lee - vocals • Frank Sinatra - conductor • Nelson Riddle - arranger

References
[1] Ruhlmann, William. "The Man I Love" (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ the-man-i-love-r25626). Allmusic. . Retrieved March 18, 2011.

Sleep Warm
Sleep Warm
Studio album by Dean Martin Released March 2, 1959

Recorded October 13–15, 1958, 1750 N. Vine Street, Hollywood, California, United States of America Genre Length Label Vocal 37:04 Capitol

Producer Lee Gillette Dean Martin chronology

Pretty Baby (1957)

Sleep Warm (1959)

A Winter Romance (1959)

Frank Sinatra chronology

Sleep Warm

284

The Man I Love (1957)

Sleep Warm (1958)

Frank Sinatra Conducts Music From Pictures And Plays (1962)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Sleep Warm is an album recorded by Dean Martin for Capitol Records in three sessions between October 13, 1958 and October 15, 1958 with arrangements by Pete King and orchestra conducted by Frank Sinatra. Described in the liner notes as a "beguiling set of lullabies for moderns", the selections follow a "bedtime" concept with several of the song titles containing the words "dream" and/or "sleep". The completed album was released March 2, 1959. In 1963, Capitol Records re-released Sleep Warm under the title Dean Martin Sings/Sinatra Conducts.

Track listing
LP
Capitol Records Catalog Number (S)[2] T-1150 Side A • 1. "Sleep Warm" (Lew Spence/Marilyn Keith/Alan Bergman) – 3:51
Session 7333; Master 30400. Recorded October 14, 1958.

• 2. "Hit the Road to Dreamland" (Harold Arlen, Johnny Mercer) – 2:51
Session 7266; Master 30150. Recorded October 15, 1958.

• 3. "Dream" (Johnny Mercer) – 3:20
Session 7322; Master 30354. Recorded October 13, 1958.

• 4. "Cuddle Up A Little Closer" (Karl Hoschna, Otto Harbach) – 3:12
Session 7322; Master 30357. Recorded October 13, 1958.

• 5. "Sleepy Time Gal" (Ange Lorenzo, Richard A. Whiting, Joseph R. Alden, Raymond B. Egan) – 2:51
Session 7266; Master 30147. Recorded October 15, 1958.

• 6. "Good Night Sweetheart" (Ray Noble, Jimmy Campbell, Reg Connelly) – 3:10.
Session 7322; Master 30356. Recorded October 13, 1958.

Sleep Warm Side B • 1."All I Do Is Dream of You" (Nacio Herb Brown / Arthur Freed) – 2:46
Session 7266; Master 30149. Recorded October 15, 1958.

285

• 2."Let's Put Out the Lights (And Go To Sleep)" (Herman Hupfeld) – 2:45
Session 7333; Master 30401. Recorded October 14, 1958.

• 3."Dream a Little Dream of Me" (Wilbur Schwandt / Fabian Andre / Gus Kahn) – 3:16
Session 7322; Master 30355. Recorded October 13, 1958.

• 4."Wrap Your Trouble in Dreams (And Dream Your Troubles Away)" (Ted Koehler / Harry Barris / Billy Moll) – 2:59
Session 7266; Master 30148. Recorded October 15, 1958.

• 5."Goodnight, My Love" (Mack Gordon / Harry Revel) – 3:03
Session 7333; Master 30403. Recorded October 14, 1958.

• 6."Brahms' Lullaby" (Public Domain) – 3:00
Session 7333; Master 30402. Recorded October 14, 1958.

Compact Disc
Ed. 1996 Capitol Compact Disc Catalog Number 7243 8 37500 2 3 Ed. 2005 Collectors' Choice Music reissue added four more tracks to the twelve tracks on the original Capitol LP. Catalog Number WWCCM06022. • 1. "The Sailor's Polka" (Jerry Livingston / Mack David)
Session 2309; Master 9020-6. Recorded September 15, 1951.

• 2. "Humdinger" (Edna Lewis / Irving Fields)
Session 7757; Master 31691-11. Recorded May 15, 1959.

• 3. "Baby Obey Me" (Jay Livingston / Ray Evans)
Session 1726; Master 5923-3. Recorded April 28, 1950.

• 4. "Zing-A Zing-A-Boom" (Black-Out e Ze Maria / Glen Moore)
Session 1646; Master 5605-4. Recorded March 3, 1950.

Complete Musical Credits
• • • • • • • • Dean Martin: Vocals. Frank Sinatra: Leader. Benjamin Barrett: Contractor. Alfred Viola: Guitar. Joseph G. 'Joe' Comfort: Bass. Alvin A Stoller: Drums (Sessions 7322 and 7333). William Richmond: Drums (Session 7266). Ken Lane: Piano.

• William Miller: Piano. • Elizabeth Greensporn: Cello. • Edgar 'Ed' Lustgarten: Cello (Session 7322).

Sleep Warm • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Kurt Reher: Cello (Session 7333). Eleanor Aller Slatkin (Session 7266). Kathryn Julye: Harp (Sessions 7322 and 7266). Stella Castellucci: Harp (Session 7333). Alvin Dinkin: Viola (Sessions 7322 and 7266). Louis Kievman: Viola (Session 7322). Alexander Neiman: Viola (Session 7333). Paul Robyn: Viola (Session 7333 and 7266). Victor Arno: Violin. Harry Bluestone: Violin (Session 7322). Jacques Gasselin: Violin (Session 7322). James Getzoff: Violin (Session 7333). Seymour Kramer: Violin (Session 7322). Carl LaMagna: Violin (Session 7322). Daniel 'Dan' Lube: Violin. Amerigo Marino: Violin. Alexander 'Alex' Murray: Violin (Session 7333). Erno Neufeld: Violin (Session 7333). Louis Raderman: Violin (Session 7266). Paul C. Shure: Violin. Felix Slatkin: Violin (Session 7266). Marshall Sosson: Violin (Session 7266). Gerald Vinci: Violin (Sessions 7333 and 7266). Jack Cave: French Horn (Sessions 7322 and 7333). Gus Bivona: Saxophone (Session 7266). Herman C. Gunkler: Saxophone (Sessions 7322 and 7333). Dale Issenhuth: Saxophone. Jules Jacob: Saxophone. Abraham E. Most: Saxophone. Theodore M. 'Ted' Nash: Saxophone (Sessions 7322 and 7333). Wilbur Schwartz: Saxophone (Session 7266). Frances L. 'Joe' Howard: Trombone (Session 7266). Murray McEachern: Trombone (Session 7266). George M. Roberts: Trombone (Session 7266). Frank F. Beach: Trumpet (Session 7266). Conrad Gozzo: Trumpet (Session 7266). Dale McMickle: Trumpet (Session 7266). Edwin L 'Buddy' Cole: Piano. Julian C. 'Matty' Matlock: Clarinet. Charles T. 'Chuck' Gentry: Saxophone. Edward R. Miller: Saxophone. Elmer R. 'Moe' Schneider: Trombone. Charles Richard 'Dick' Cathcart: Trumpet.

286

Sleep Warm

287

Notes
[1] Allmusic review (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r62733) [2] The optional 'S' indicates a stereo recording)

Frank Sinatra Conducts Music from Pictures and Plays
Frank Sinatra Conducts Music from Pictures and Plays
Studio album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer 1962 July 1962, KHJ Studios, Hollywood Jazz 43:59 Reprise Voyle Gilmore Frank Sinatra chronology

Sleep Warm (1958)

Frank Sinatra Conducts Music from Pictures and Plays (1962)

Syms by Sinatra (1982)

Frank Sinatra Conducts Music from Pictures and Plays is a 1962 studio album conducted by Frank Sinatra, and arranged by Harry Sukman. This was the first album that Sinatra conducted for his new record label, Reprise Records.

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating link [1]

Track listing
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. "All the Way" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) – 4:14 "An Affair to Remember" (Harry Warren, Leo McCarey, Harold Adamson) – 4:05 "Laura" (David Raksin, Johnny Mercer) – 4:21 "Tammy" (Jay Livingston, Ray Evans) – 2:38 "Moon River" (Henry Mancini, Mercer) – 4:29 "Exodus" – 3:36 "Little Girl Blue" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) – 4:57 "Maria" (Leonard Bernstein, Stephen Sondheim) – 3:58

9. "Something Wonderful" (Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein II) – 4:38 10. "I've Grown Accustomed to Her Face" (Alan Jay Lerner, Frederick Loewe) – 4:38

Frank Sinatra Conducts Music from Pictures and Plays 11. "The Girl That I Marry" (Irving Berlin) – 4:01 12. "If Ever I Would Leave You" (Lerner, Loewe) – 3:57

288

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra – conductor

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r26296

Syms by Sinatra

289

Syms by Sinatra
Syms by Sinatra
Studio album by Sylvia Syms Released Genre Length Label Producer 1982 Jazz 38:27 Reprise Frank Sinatra, Don Costa Sylvia Syms chronology

She Loves to Hear the Music (1978)

Syms by Sinatra (1982)

Then Along Came Bill: A Tribute to Bill Evans (1989)

Frank Sinatra chronology

Frank Sinatra Conducts Music from Pictures and Plays (1962)

Syms by Sinatra (1982)

Whats New? (1983)

Syms by Sinatra is a 1982 album by Sylvia Syms, arranged by Don Costa, and conducted by Frank Sinatra .

Track listing
1. "Hooray for Love" (Harold Arlen, Leo Robin) 2. "All My Tomorrows" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) 3. "By Myself" (Arthur Schwartz, Howard Dietz) 4. "You Go to My Head" (J. Fred Coots, Haven Gillespie) 5. "Close Enough for Love" (Johnny Mandel, Paul Williams) 6. "Them There Eyes" (Maceo Pinkard, William Tracy, Doris Tauber) 7. "Someone to Light Up My Life" (Antonio Carlos Jobim, Gene Lees, Vinicius de Moraes) 8. "I Thought About You" (Johnny Mercer, Van Heusen) 9. "You Must Believe in Spring" (Alan Bergman, Marilyn Bergman, Michel Legrand, Jacques Demy) 10. "Old Devil Moon" (E.Y. Harburg, Burton Lane)

Syms by Sinatra

290

Personnel
• • • • Sylvia Syms - vocals Frank Sinatra - conductor Don Costa - arranger Vincent Falcone, Jr.

291

Box sets
The Voice: Frank Sinatra, the Columbia Years (1943–1952)
The Voice: Frank Sinatra, the Columbia Years (1943-1952)
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Label 1986 1943-1952 Classic pop Columbia

The Voice: Frank Sinatra, the Columbia Years is a 1986 four-disc compilation album of the U.S. singer Frank Sinatra.

Track listing
disc 1: 1. The Nearness of You 2. If I Had You 3. Nevertheless 4. You Go to My Head 5. My Melancholy Baby 6. How Deep Is the Ocean? 7. Embraceable You 8. She's Funny That Way (I Got a Woman Crazy for Me) 9. For Every Man There's a Woman 10. I Don't Know Why (I Just Do) 11. Someone to Watch Over Me 12. Love Me 13. There's No Business Like Show-Business 14. The Song Is You 15. September Song 16. Oh, What a Beautiful Morning! 17. They Say It's Wonderful 18. Bess, Oh Where Is My Bess? disc 2: 1. 2. 3. 4. Saturday Night (Is the Loneliest Night in the Week) Poinciana Try a Little Tenderness Autumn in New York

The Voice: Frank Sinatra, the Columbia Years (19431952) 5. April in Paris 6. Dream 7. Nancy (With the Laughing Face) 8. Put Your Dreams Away 9. I'm Glad There Is You 10. Day by Day 11. Close to You 12. I'm A Fool to Want You 13. Where or When 14. I Could Write a Book 15. Why Was I Born? 16. Lost in the Stars 17. All the Things You Are 18. Ol' Man River disc 3: 1. Should I? 2. Birth of the Blues 3. Mean to Me 4. It All Depends on You 5. Deep Night 6. Sweet Lorraine 7. Castle Rock 8. Why Can't You Behave? 9. My Blue Heaven 10. S'posin' 11. You Can Take My Word for It, Baby 12. Blue Skies 13. The Continental 14. It's the Same Old Dream 15. Laura 16. Stormy Weather 17. I've Got a Crush on You 18. The House I Live In disc 4: 1. One for My Baby 2. I Should Care 3. These Foolish Things 4. I Guess I'll Have to Dream the Rest 5. It Never Entered My Mind 6. When Your Lover Has Gone 7. Body and Soul 8. That Old Feeling 9. (I Don't Stand A) Ghost Of a Chance With You 10. There's No You 11. Guess I'll Hang My Tears Out to Dry 12. Why Try to Change Me Now?

292

The Voice: Frank Sinatra, the Columbia Years (19431952) 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. All Through the Day I Couldn't Sleep a Wink Last Night Time After Time But Beautiful I Fall in Love Too Easily The Brooklyn Bridge

293

The Reprise Collection
The Reprise Collection
Box set by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label November 23, 1990 December 19, 1960-October 30, 1986 Classic pop 272:57 Reprise Frank Sinatra chronology

Capitol Collector's Series (1989)

The Reprise Collection (1990)

The Capitol Years (1990)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

The Reprise Collection is a 1990 box set by the American singer Frank Sinatra. Released to coincide with Sinatra's 75th birthday, this four-disc set has an abundance of classic Sinatra performances from his career with Reprise Records. A single disc version called Sinatra Reprise: The Very Good Years was released in 1991, which highlighted Sinatra's best known songs.

The Reprise Collection

294

Track listing
Disc one
1. "Let's Fall in Love" (Harold Arlen, Ted Koehler) - 2:11 2. "You'd Be So Easy to Love" (Cole Porter) - 2:24 3. "The Coffee Song (They've Got An Awful Lot of Coffee in Brazil)" (Bob Hilliard, Dick Miles) - 2:51 4. "Zing! Went the Strings of My Heart" (James F. Hanley) - 2:48 5. "The Last Dance" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) - 2:46 6. "The Second Time Around" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 3:03 7. "Tina" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:54 8. "Without a Song" (Vincent Youmans, Billy Rose, Edward Eliscu) – 3:39 9. "It Started All Over Again" (Carl T. Fischer, Bill Carey) – 2:32 10. "Love Walked In" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) – 2:19 11. "You're Nobody 'Til Somebody Loves You" (James Cavanaugh, Russ Morgan, Larry Stock) – 4:09 12. "Don't Take Your Love from Me" (Henry Nemo) - 4:05 13. "Come Rain or Come Shine" (Arlen, Johnny Mercer) – 4:06 14. "Night and Day" (Porter) – 3:37 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. "All Alone" (Irving Berlin) – 2:42 "What'll I Do?" (Berlin) – 3:15 "I Get a Kick Out of You" (Porter) – 3:14 "Don'cha Go 'Way Mad" (Jimmy Mundy, Al Stillman, Illinois Jacquet) – 3:12 "A Garden in the Rain" (James Dyrenforth, Carroll Gibbons) – 3:24 "A Nightingale Sang in Berkeley Square" (Eric Maschwitz, Manning Sherwin) – 3:54 "Please Be Kind" (Saul Chaplin, Cahn) – 2:43

Disc two
1. "Pennies from Heaven" (Johnny Burke, Arthur Johnston) - 3:27 2. "Me And My Shadow" [with Sammy Davis, Jr.] (Dave Dreyer, Al Jolson, Billy Rose) - 3:06 3. "I Have Dreamed" (Oscar Hammerstein II, Richard Rodgers) - 2:57 4. "America the Beautiful" (Katherine Lee Bates, Samuel Ward) - 2:21 5. "California" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 3:37 6. "Soliloquy" (Hammerstein, Rodgers) - 8:06 7. "Luck Be a Lady" (Frank Loesser) - 5:14 8. "Here's to the Losers" (Jack Segal, Robert Wells) - 3:04 9. "The Way You Look Tonight" (Jerome Kern, Dorothy Fields) - 3:22 10. "My Kind of Town" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:08 11. "The Best Is Yet to Come" (Cy Coleman, Carolyn Leigh) - 2:54 12. "Fly Me To The Moon" (Bart Howard) - 2:49 13. "September Song" (Maxwell Anderson, Kurt Weill) - 3:30 14. "It Was a Very Good Year" (Ervin Drake) - 4:27 15. "This Is All I Ask" (Gordon Jenkins) - 3:03 16. "I'll Only Miss Her When I Think of Her" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:51 17. "Love and Marriage" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:12 18. "Moonlight Serenade" (Glenn Miller, Mitchell Parish) – 3:26 19. "I Wished on the Moon" (Dorothy Parker, Ralph Rainger)- 2:53 20. "Oh, You Crazy Moon" (Burke, Van Heusen) - 3:13

The Reprise Collection

295

Disc three
1. 2. 3. 4. "I've Got You Under My Skin" (Porter) – 3:43 "The Shadow of Your Smile" (Johnny Mandel, Paul Francis Webster) – 2:31 "Street of Dreams" (Victor Young, Samuel Lewis) – 2:16 "You Make Me Feel So Young" (Mack Gordon, Joe Myrow) – 3:21 live performances from the Sands Hotel,
January–February, 1966

5. "Strangers in the Night" (Bert Kaempfert, Charles Singleton, Eddie Snyder) – 2:25 6. "Summer Wind" (Heinz Meier, Hans Bradtke, Mercer) – 2:53 7. "All or Nothing at All" (Arthur Altman, Jack Lawrence) – 3:57 8. "That's Life" (Kelly Gordon, Dean Kay) – 3:10 9. "I Concentrate on You" (Porter) – 2:32 10. "Dindi" (Ray Gilbert, Antonio Carlos Jobim, Aloysio de Oliveria) – 3:25 11. "Once I Loved (O Amor em Paz)" (Jobim, Gilbert, Vinícius de Moraes) – 2:37 12. "How Insensitive (Insensatez)" (Jobim, Norman Gimbel, de Moraes) – 3:15 13. "Drinking Again" (Mercer, Doris Tauber) – 3:13 14. "Somethin' Stupid" [with Nancy Sinatra] (Carson Parks) – 2:45 15. "All I Need Is the Girl" (Stephen Sondheim, Jule Styne) – 5:01 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. "Indian Summer" (Victor Herbert, Al Dubin) – 4:14 "My Way" (Paul Anka, Claude François, Jacques Revaux, Gilles Thibault) – 4:35 "Wave" (Jobim) – 3:25 "A Man Alone" (Rod McKuen) - 3:47 "Forget to Remember" (Victoria Pike, Teddy Randazzo) - 2:58

Disc four
1. "There Used to Be a Ballpark" (Joe Raposo) – 3:34 2. "What Are You Doing the Rest of Your Life?" (Alan Bergman, Marilyn Bergman, Michel Legrand) – 4:05 3. "Just As Though You Were Here" (John Benson Brooks, Eddie DeLange) - 4:22 4. "The Lady Is a Tramp" (Rodgers, Hart) - 2:56 live performance from Madison Square Garden, October 13, 1974 5. "Empty Tables" (Van Heusen, Mercer) - 2:48 6. "Send in the Clowns" (Sondheim) - 3:36 7. "I Love My Wife" (Coleman, Michael Stewart) - 3:10 8. "Nancy (With the Laughing Face)" (Phil Silvers, Van Heusen) - 2:28 9. "Emily" (Johnny Mandel, Mercer) - 3:00 10. "Sweet Lorraine" (Cliff Burwell, Mitchell Parish) - 2:22 11. "My Shining Hour" (Arlen, Mercer) - 3:23 12. "More Than You Know" (Eliscu, Rose, Youmans) - 3:25 13. "The Song Is You" (Hammerstein, Kern) - 2:40 14. "Theme from New York, New York" (Fred Ebb, John Kander) - 3:26 15. "Something" (George Harrison) - 4:43 16. Medley: "The Gal That Got Away"/"It Never Entered My Mind" (Arlen, I. Gershwin)/(Rodgers, Hart) - 5:50 17. "A Long Night" (Alec Wilder, Loonis McGlohon) - 3:44 18. "Here's to the Band" (Steve Howe, Alfred Nittoli, Artie Schroeck) - 4:09 19. "It's Sunday" (Susan Birkenhead, Styne) - 3:26 20. "Mack the Knife" (Marc Blitzstein, Bertolt Brecht, Kurt Weill) - 4:52

The Reprise Collection

296

Personnel
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Frank Sinatra - vocals Nancy Sinatra Sammy Davis, Jr. Antonio Carlos Jobim - vocals, guitar Don Costa - arranger, conductor Ernie Freeman Neal Hefti Gordon Jenkins Quincy Jones Skip Martin Billy May Sy Oliver Marty Paich Nelson Riddle Felix Slatkin Torrie Zito

• Morris Stoloff • Count Basie and his orchestra • Woody Herman and his orchestra

References
[1] The Reprise Collection (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r24256) at Allmusic

Concepts

297

Concepts
Concepts
Box set by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label November 16, 1992 1953-1960 Classic pop, Vocal jazz 14:07:45 Capitol Frank Sinatra chronology

Sinatra Sings the Songs of Van Heusen & Cahn (1991)

Concepts (1992)

The Columbia Years 1943-1952: The Complete Recordings (1993)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Concepts is a 1992 sixteen-disc box set compilation of the U.S. singer Frank Sinatra. This sixteen CD set is the first major compilation from an entire era of Sinatra's career. This particular set contains every studio album from years with Capitol Records. It also includes the instrumental album Frank Sinatra Conducts Tone Poems of Color, which was new to compact disc with this set. However, it does not include any singles compilations or soundtracks Sinatra released on the label.

Track listing
Disc one
1. "My Funny Valentine" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) – 2:31 2. "The Girl Next Door" (Ralph Blane, Hugh Martin) – 2:39 3. "A Foggy Day" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) – 2:41 4. "Like Someone in Love" (Jimmy Van Heusen, Johnny Burke) – 3:13 5. "I Get a Kick Out of You" (Cole Porter) – 2:56 6. "Little Girl Blue" (Rodgers, Hart) – 2:54 7. "They Can't Take That Away from Me" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) – 1:59 8. "Violets for Your Furs" (Tom Adair, Matt Dennis) – 3:07 9. "Just One of Those Things" (Porter) – 3:14 10. "I'm Gonna Sit Right Down and Write Myself a Letter" (Fred E. Ahlert, Joe Young) – 2:29 11. "Sunday" (Chester Conn, Benny Krueger, Ned Miller, Jule Styne) – 2:31 12. "Wrap Your Troubles in Dreams" (Harry Barris, Ted Koehler, Billy Moll) – 2:17 13. "Taking a Chance on Love" (Vernon Duke, Ted Fetter, John La Touche) – 2:14

Concepts 14. "Jeepers Creepers" (Harry Warren, Johnny Mercer) – 2:24 15. "Get Happy" (Koehler, Harold Arlen)– 2:27 16. "All of Me" (Seymour Simons, Gerald Marks) – 2:08

298

Disc two
1. "In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning" (Bob Hilliard, David Mann) – 3:02 2. "Mood Indigo" (Barney Bigard, Duke Ellington, Irving Mills) – 3:32 3. "Glad to Be Unhappy" (Rodgers, Hart) – 2:39 4. "I Get Along Without You Very Well (Except Sometimes)" (Hoagy Carmichael, Jane Brown Thompson) – 3:45 5. "Deep in a Dream" (Eddie DeLange, Van Heusen) – 2:51 6. "I See Your Face Before Me" (Howard Dietz, Arthur Schwartz) – 3:27 7. "Can't We Be Friends?" (Paul James, Kay Swift) – 2:50 8. "When Your Lover Has Gone" (Einar Aaron Swan) – 3:12 9. "What Is This Thing Called Love?" (Porter) – 2:36 10. "Last Night When We Were Young" (Arlen, Yip Harburg) – 3:18 11. "I'll Be Around" (Alec Wilder) – 3:01 12. "Ill Wind" (Arlen, Koehler) – 3:48 13. 14. 15. 16. "It Never Entered My Mind" (Rodgers, Hart) – 2:43 "Dancing on the Ceiling" (Rodgers, Hart) – 3:00 "I'll Never Be the Same" (Gus Kahn, Matty Malneck, Frank Signorelli) – 3:07 "This Love of Mine" (Sol Parker, Henry W. Sanicola, Jr., Frank Sinatra) – 3:35

Disc three
1. "You Make Me Feel So Young" (Josef Myrow, Mack Gordon) – 2:57 2. "It Happened in Monterey" (Mabel Wayne, Billy Rose) – 2:37 3. "You're Getting to Be a Habit with Me" (Warren, Al Dubin) – 2:19 4. "You Brought a New Kind of Love to Me" (Sammy Fain, Irving Kahal, Pierre Norman) – 2:49 5. "Too Marvelous for Words" (Richard A. Whiting, Mercer) – 2:32 6. "Old Devil Moon" (Burton Lane, Harburg) – 3:57 7. "Pennies from Heaven" (Arthur Johnston, Burke)– 2:45 8. "Our Love Is Here to Stay" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) – 2:42 9. "I've Got You Under My Skin" (Porter) – 3:45 10. "I Thought About You" (Van Heusen, Mercer) – 2:31 11. "We'll Be Together Again" (Carl T. Fischer, Frankie Laine) – 4:27 12. "Makin' Whoopee" (Walter Donaldson, Kahn) – 3:08 13. "Swingin' Down the Lane" (Isham Jones, Kahn) – 2:54 14. "Anything Goes" (Porter) – 2:44 15. "How About You?" (Burton Lane, Ralph Freed) – 2:45

Concepts

299

Disc four
1. "White" (Victor Young) – 4:14 2. "Green" (Gordon Jenkins) – 4:05 3. "Purple" (Billy May) – 4:21 4. "Yellow" (Jeff Alexander) – 2:38 5. "Gray" (Alec Wilder) – 4:29 6. "Gold" (Nelson Riddle) – 3:36 7. "Orange" (Riddle) – 4:57 8. "Black" (Young) – 3:58 9. "Silver" (Elmer Bernstein) – 4:38 10. "Blue" (Wilder) – 4:38 11. "Brown" (Alexander) – 4:01 12. "Red" (André Previn) – 3:57

Disc five
1. "Close to You" (Al Hoffman, Carl G. Lampl, Jerry Livingston) – 3:40 2. "P.S. I Love You" (Gordon Jenkins, Mercer) – 4:24 3. "Love Locked Out" (Max Kester, Ray Noble) – 2:45 4. "Everything Happens to Me" (Adair, Dennis) – 3:22 5. "It's Easy to Remember" (Rodgers, Hart) – 3:37 6. "Don't Like Goodbyes" (Arlen, Truman Capote) – 4:52 7. "With Every Breath I Take" (Ralph Rainger, Leo Robin) – 3:41 8. "Blame It on My Youth" (Edward Heyman, Oscar Levant) – 3:00 9. "It Could Happen to You" (Burke, Van Heusen) – 3:16 10. "I've Had My Moments" (Donaldson, Kahn) – 3:50 11. "I Couldn't Sleep a Wink Last Night" (Harold Adamson, Jimmy McHugh) – 3:28 12. "The End of a Love Affair" (Edward Redding) – 4:09 13. "If It's the Last Thing I Do" (Sammy Cahn, Saul Chaplin) – 4:00 14. "There's a Flaw in My Flue" (Burke, Van Heusen) – 2:41 15. "Wait Till You See Her" (Rodgers, Hart) – 3:10

Disc six
1. "Night and Day" (Porter) – 4:02 2. "I Wish I Were in Love Again" (Rodgers, Hart) – 2:31 3. "I Got Plenty O' Nuttin'" (DuBose Heyward, G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) – 3:13 4. "I Guess I'll Have to Change My Plan" (Schwartz, Dietz) – 2:26 5. "Nice Work if You Can Get It" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) – 2:24 6. "Stars Fell on Alabama" (Frank Perkins, Mitchell Parish) – 2:41 7. "No One Ever Tells You" (Hub Atwood, Carroll Coates) – 3:28 8. "I Won't Dance" (Jerome Kern, McHugh, Oscar Hammerstein II, Otto Harbach, Dorothy Fields) – 3:27 9. "The Lonesome Road" (Nathaniel Shilket, Gene Austin) – 3:57 10. "At Long Last Love" (Porter) – 2:27 11. "You'd Be So Nice to Come Home To" (Porter) – 2:07 12. "I Got It Bad (and That Ain't Good)" (Ellington, Paul Francis Webster) – 3:25 13. "From This Moment On" (Porter) – 3:56 14. "If I Had You" (Jimmy Campbell, Reginald Connelly, Ted Shapiro) – 2:39

Concepts 15. "Oh! Look at Me Now" (Joe Bushkin, John DeVries) – 2:50 16. "The Lady Is a Tramp" (Rodgers, Hart) - 3:16

300

Disc seven
1. "Jingle Bells" (James Pierpont) – 2:00 2. "The Christmas Song" (Mel Tormé, Robert Wells) – 3:28 3. "Mistletoe and Holly" (Hank Sanicola, Sinatra, Doc Stanford) – 2:18 4. "I'll Be Home for Christmas" (Kim Gannon, Walter Kent, Buck Ram) – 3:11 5. "The Christmas Waltz" (Cahn, Styne) – 3:03 6. "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas" (Blane, Martin) – 3:29 7. "The First Nowell" (William B. Sandys) – 2:44 8. "Hark! The Herald Angels Sing" (Felix Mendelssohn, Charles Wesley) – 2:24 9. "O Little Town of Bethlehem" (Lewis H. Redner, Phillips Brooks) – 2:06 10. "Adeste Fideles" ("O, Come All Ye Faithful") (John Francis Wade) – 2:34 11. "It Came Upon the Midnight Clear" (Edmund Sears, Richard Storrs Willis) – 2:51 12. "Silent Night" (Franz Gruber, Josef Mohr) – 2:31 13. "White Christmas" (Irving Berlin) – 2:37 14. "The Christmas Waltz" (alternate) – 3:01

Disc eight
1. "Where Are You?" (Adamson, McHugh) – 3:30 2. "The Night We Called It a Day (Dennis, Adair) – 3:27 3. "I Cover the Waterfront" (Johnny Green, Edward Heyman) – 2:59 4. "Maybe You'll Be There" (Rube Bloom, Sammy Gallop) – 3:06 5. "Laura" (Mercer, David Raksin) – 3:27 6. "Lonely Town" (Leonard Bernstein, Betty Comden, Adolph Green) – 4:11 7. "Autumn Leaves" (Jacques Prévert, Mercer, Joseph Kosma) – 2:51 8. "I'm a Fool to Want You" (Sinatra, Jack Wolf, Joel Herron) – 4:50 9. "I Think of You" (Jack Elliott, Don Marcotte) – 3:03 10. "Where Is the One?" (Wilder, Edwin Finckel)- 3:12 11. "There's No You" (Adair, Hal Hopper) - 3:45 12. "Baby Won't You Please Come Home" (Charles Warfield, Clarence Williams) - 2:57 13. "I Can Read Between the Lines" (David Franklin, Ray Getzov) – 2:43 14. "It Worries Me" (Fritz Schultz-Reichelt, Carl Sigman) – 2:53 15. "Rain (Falling from the Skies)" (Robert Mellin, Gunther Finlay) – 3:25 16. "Don't Worry 'Bout Me" (Bloom, Koehler) – 3:08

Concepts

301

Disc nine
1. "Come Fly With Me" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 3:18 2. "Around the World" (Victor Young, Adamson) – 3:20 3. "Isle of Capri" (Will Grosz, Jimmy Kennedy) – 2:29 4. "Moonlight in Vermont" (Karl Suessdorf, John Blackburn) – 3:31 5. "Autumn in New York" (Duke) – 4:36 6. On the Road to Mandalay" (Oley Speaks, Rudyard Kipling) – 3:29 7. "Let's Get Away from It All" (Dennis, Adair) – 2:10 8. "April in Paris" (Duke, Harburg) – 2:50 9. "London By Night" (Carroll Coates) – 3:30 10. "Brazil" (Ary Barroso, Bob Russell) – 2:55 11. "Blue Hawaii" (Rainger, Robin) – 2:43 12. "It's Nice to go Trav'ling" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 3:49 13. "Chicago" (Fred Fisher) – 2:14 14. "South of the Border" (Kennedy, Michael Carr) – 2:50 15. "I Love Paris" (Porter) – 1:49

Disc ten
1. "Only the Lonely" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 4:10 2. "Angel Eyes" (Dennis, Earl Brent) - 3:46 3. "What's New?" (Bob Haggart, Burke) - 5:13 4. "It's a Lonesome Old Town" (Harry Tobias, Charles Kisco) - 4:18 5. "Willow Weep for Me" (Ann Ronell) - 4:19 6. "Goodbye" (Jenkins) - 5:45 7. "Blues in the Night" (Arlen, Mercer) - 4:44 8. "Guess I'll Hang My Tears Out to Dry" (Cahn, Styne) - 4:00 9. "Ebb Tide" (Robert Maxwell, Carl Sigman) - 3:18 10. "Spring is Here" (Rodgers, Hart) - 4:47 11. "Gone with the Wind" (Allie Wrubel, Herb Magidson) - 5:15 12. "One for My Baby (and One More for the Road)" (Arlen, Mercer) - 4:23 13. "Sleep Warm" (Lew Spence, Marilyn Keith, Alan Bergman) 14. "Where or When" (Rodgers, Hart)

Disc eleven
1. "Come Dance with Me" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:31 2. "Something's Gotta Give" (Mercer) – 2:38 3. "Just in Time" (Styne, Comden, Green ) – 2:24 4. "Dancing in the Dark" (Schwartz, Dietz) – 2:26 5. "Too Close for Comfort" (Jerry Bock, Larry Holofcener, George David Weiss) – 2:34 6. "I Could Have Danced All Night" (Alan Jay Lerner, Frederick Loewe) – 2:40 7. "Saturday Night (Is the Loneliest Night of the Week)" (Cahn, Styne) – 1:54 8. "Day In, Day Out" (Bloom, Mercer) – 3:25 9. "Cheek to Cheek" (Berlin) – 3:06 10. "Baubles, Bangles and Beads" (Robert Wright, George Forrest) – 2:46 11. "The Song Is You" (Jerome Kern, Hammerstein) – 2:43 12. "The Last Dance" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:11

Concepts 13. 14. 15. 16. "It All Depends on You" (Buddy DeSylva, Lew Brown, Ray Henderson) – 2:06 "Nothing in Common" (duet with Keely Smith) (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:32 "Same Old Song and Dance" (Cahn, Van Heusen, Bobby Worth) – 2:52 "How Are Ya' Fixed for Love?" (with Keely Smith) (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:25

302

Disc twelve
1. "When No One Cares" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:42 2. "A Cottage for Sale" (Larry Conley, Willard Robison) – 3:16 3. "Stormy Weather" (Arlen, Koehler) – 3:20 4. "Where Do You Go?" (Arnold Sundgaard, Wilder) – 2:34 5. "I Don't Stand a Ghost of a Chance with You" (Bing Crosby, Ned Washington, Young) – 3:16 6. "Here's That Rainy Day" (Burke, Van Heusen) – 3:34 7. "I Can't Get Started" (Duke, I. Gershwin) – 4:01 8. "Why Try to Change Me Now?" (Cy Coleman, Joseph Allan McCarthy) – 3:41 9. "Just Friends" (John Klenner, Sam M. Lewis) – 3:40 10. "I'll Never Smile Again" (Lowe) – 3:46 11. "None But the Lonely Heart" (Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky, Bill Westbrook) – 3:41 12. 13. 14. 15. "The One I Love (Belongs to Somebody Else)" (Jones, Kahn) – 3:05 "This Was My Love" (Jim Harbert) – 3:28 "I Could Have Told You" (Carl Sigman, Van Heusen) – 3:18 "You Forgot All the Words (While I Still Remember the Tune)" (Bernie Wayne, E.H. Jay) – 3:24

Disc thirteen
1. "Nice 'n' Easy" (Spence, Keith, Bergman) – 2:45 2. "That Old Feeling" (Lew Brown, Fain) – 3:33 3. "How Deep Is The Ocean?" (Berlin) – 3:15 4. "I've Got a Crush on You" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) – 2:16 5. "You Go To My Head" (J. Fred Coots, Haven Gillespie) – 4:28 6. "Fools Rush In (Where Angels Fear to Tread)" (Bloom, Mercer) – 3:22 7. "Nevertheless" (Bert Kalmar, Harry Ruby) – 3:18 8. "She's Funny That Way" (Neil Moret, Richard A. Whiting) – 3:55 9. "Try a Little Tenderness" (Jimmy Campbell, Reginald Connelly, Harry M. Woods) – 3:22 10. "Embraceable You" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) – 3:24 11. "Mam'selle" (Gordon, Edmund Goulding) – 2:48 12. "Dream" (Mercer) – 2:57 13. "The Nearness of You" (Hoagy Carmichael, Washington) - 2:44 14. "Someone to Watch over Me" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) - 2:57 15. "Day In, Day Out" - 3:07 16. "My One and Only Love" (Mellin, Wood) - 3:12

Concepts

303

Disc fourteen
1. "When You're Smiling" (Mark Fisher, Joe Goodwin, Larry Shay) – 2:00 2. "Blue Moon" (Rodgers, Hart) – 2:51 3. "S'Posin" (Paul Denniker, Andy Razaf) – 1:48 4. "It All Depends on You" – 2:02 5. "It's Only a Paper Moon" (Arlen, Harburg, Rose) – 2:19 6. "My Blue Heaven" (Donaldson, George A. Whiting) – 2:03 7. "Should I?" (Arthur Freed, Nacio Herb Brown) – 1:30 8. "September in the Rain" (Warren, Dubin) – 2:58 9. "Always" (Berlin) – 2:17 10. "I Can't Believe That You're in Love with Me" (Clarence Gaskill, McHugh) – 2:25 11. "I Concentrate on You" (Porter) – 2:23 12. "You Do Something to Me" (Porter) – 1:33 13. "Sentimental Baby" (Spence, Keith, Bergman) – 2:36 14. "Hidden Persuasion" (Wainwright Churchill III) – 2:25 15. "Ol' McDonald" (Traditional, Bergman, Keith, Spence) – 2:41

Disc fifteen
1. "Day by Day" (Axel Stordahl, Paul Weston, Cahn) – 2:39 2. "Sentimental Journey" (Brown, Ben Homer, Bud Green) – 3:26 3. "Almost Like Being in Love" (Loewe, Lerner) – 2:02 4. "Five Minutes More" (Cahn, Styne) – 2:36 5. "American Beauty Rose" (Mack David, Redd Evans, Arthur Altman) – 2:22 6. "Yes Indeed!" (Sy Oliver) – 2:35 7. "On the Sunny Side of the Street" (McHugh, Fields) – 2:42 8. "Don't Take Your Love From Me" (Henry Nemo) – 1:59 9. "That Old Black Magic" (Arlen, Mercer) – 4:05 10. "Lover" (Rodgers, Hart) – 1:53 11. "Paper Doll" (Johnny S. Black) – 2:08 12. "I've Heard That Song Before" (Cahn, Styne) – 2:33 13. "I Love You" (Harry Archer, Harlan Thompson) – 2:28 14. "Why Should I Cry over You?" (Chester Conn, Ned Miller) – 2:41 15. "How Could You Do a Thing Like That to Me" (Tyree Glenn, Allan Roberts) – 2:44 16. "River, Stay 'Way from My Door" (Matt Dixon, Harry M. Woods) – 2:39 17. "I Gotta Right to Sing the Blues" (Arlen, Koehler) - 3:00

Disc sixteen
1. "(Ah, the Apple Trees) When the World Was Young" (Mercer, M. Philippe-Gerard, Angele Marie T. Vannier) 3:48 2. "I'll Remember April" (Don Raye, Gene de Paul, Patricia Johnston) - 2:50 3. "September Song" (Kurt Weill, Maxwell Anderson) - 4:21 4. "A Million Dreams Ago" (Lew Quadling, Eddie Howard, Dick Jurgens) - 2:41 5. "I'll See You Again" (Noël Coward) - 2:44 6. "There Will Never Be Another You" (Gordon, Warren) - 3:09 7. "Somewhere Along the Way" (Kurt Adams, Gallop) - 3:01 8. "It's a Blue World" (Bob Wright, Chet Forrest) - 2:49

Concepts 9. "These Foolish Things (Remind Me of You)" (Jack Strachey, Harry Link, Holt Marvell) - 3:59 10. "As Time Goes By" (Herman Hupfeld) - 3:17 11. "I'll Be Seeing You" (Fain, Irving Kahal) - 2:47 12. "Memories of You" (Eubie Blake, Razaf) - 3:53 13. "Day In, Day Out" – 3:19 14. "Don't Make a Beggar of Me" (Al Sherman) – 3:04 15. "Lean Baby" (Roy Alfred, Billy May) – 2:34 16. "I'm Walking Behind You" (Billy Reid) – 2:58

304

Personnel
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Frank Sinatra - vocals Gordon Jenkins - arranger, conductor Heinie Beau - arranger Ted Allan - Photography Paul Atkinson - Reissue Producer Sid Avery - Photography Brad Benedict - Photo Research Sammy Cahn - Liner Notes Dave Cavanaugh - Producer William Claxton - Photography Will Friedwald - Liner Notes Voyle Gilmore - Producer Concetta Halstead - Design Gene Howard - Photography Skip Martin - Arranger, Conductor Billy May - Arranger, Conductor Bill Miller - Producer Nelson Riddle - Arranger, Conductor Norman Sickel - Poetry Keely Smith - Performer Tommy Steele - Art Direction Axel Stordahl - Arranger, Conductor James Van Heusen - Liner Notes Ken Veeder - Photography Larry Walsh - Remastering, Digital Remastering Pete Welding - Liner Notes, Compilation, Reissue Compilation Tim Weston - Design Bob Willoughby - Photography

References
[1] Concepts (album) (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r58581) at Allmusic

The Columbia Years 19431952: The Complete Recordings

305

The Columbia Years 1943–1952: The Complete Recordings
The Columbia Years 1943-1952: The Complete Recordings
Box set by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label October 5, 1993 1943-1952 Classic pop 860:25 Columbia Frank Sinatra chronology

Concepts (1992)

The Columbia Years 1943-1952: The Complete Recordings (1993)

Duets (1993)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

The Columbia Years 1943–1952: The Complete Recordings is a 1993 box set album by the American singer Frank Sinatra. This twelve-disc set contains 285 songs Sinatra recorded during his nine-year career with Columbia Records.

Track listing
Disc one
1. "Close To You" 2. "You'll Never Know" 3. "Sunday, Monday or Always" 4. "If You Please" 5. "People Will Say We're In Love" 6. "Oh, What A Beautiful Mornin'" 7. "I Couldn't Sleep a Wink Last Night" 8. "A Lovely Way To Spend An Evening" 9. "The Music Stopped" 10. "If You Are But a Dream 11. "Saturday Night (Is the Loneliest Night of the Week)" 12. "There's No You"

The Columbia Years 19431952: The Complete Recordings 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. "White Christmas" "I Dream of You (More Than You Dream of Me)" "I Begged Her" "What Makes the Sunset?" "I Fall In Love Too Easily" "Nancy (With the Laughing Face)" "Cradle Song" "Ol' Man River" "Stormy Weather" "The Charm of You"

306

Disc two
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. "Embraceable You" "When Your Lover Has Gone" "Kiss Me Again" "(I Got A Woman Crazy For Me) She's Funny That Way" "My Melancholy Baby"

6. "Where Or When" 7. "All The Things You Are" 8. "Mighty Lak' a Rose" 9. "I Should Care" 10. "Homesick-That's All" 11. "Dream (When You're Feeling Blue)" 12. "A Friend of Yours" 13. "Put Your Dreams Away (For Another Day)" 14. "Over The Rainbow" 15. "You'll Never Walk Alone" 16. "If I Loved You" 17. "Lily Belle" 18. "Don't Forget Tonight Tomorrow" 19. "I've Got a Home In That Rock" 20. "Jesus Is a Rock In That Weary Land" 21. "Stars in Your Eyes" 22. "My Shawl"

Disc three
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. "Someone to Watch Over Me" "You Go to My Head" "These Foolish Things (Remind Me of You)" "I Don't Know Why (I Just Do)" "The House I Live In (That's America To Me)" "Day By Day" "Nancy (With The Laughing Face)" "You Are Too Beautiful"

9. "America The Beautiful" 10. "Silent Night, Holy Night" 11. "The Moon Was Yellow (And the Night Was Young)"

The Columbia Years 19431952: The Complete Recordings 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. "I Only Have Eyes For You" "The Old School Teacher" "Just An Old Stone House" "Full Moon And Empty Arms" "Oh, What It Seemed To Be" "I Have But One Heart" "I Don't Stand a Ghost of a Chance with You" "Why Shouldn't I?" "Try a Little Tenderness" "Paradise" "All Through the Day" "One Love" "Two Hearts Are Better Than One" "How Cute Can You Be?"

307

Disc four
1. "From This Day Forward" 2. "Where Is My Bess?" 3. "Begin The Beguine" 4. "Something Old, Something New" 5. "They Say It's Wonderful" 6. "That Old Black Magic" 7. "The Girl That I Marry" 8. "I Fall In Love with You Ev'ry Day" 9. "How Deep Is the Ocean (How Blue Is the Sky)" 10. "Home on the Range" 11. "The Song Is You" 12. "Soliloquy (Parts 1 & 2)" 13. "Somewhere In The Night" 14. "Could'ja?" 15. "Five Minutes More" 16. "The Things We Did Last Summer" 17. "You'll Know When It Happens" 18. "This Is The Night" 19. "The Coffee Song (They've Got An Awful Lot Of Coffee In Brazil)" 20. "Among My Souvenirs" 21. "I Love You" 22. "September Song" 23. "Blue Skies" 24. "Guess I'll Hang My Tears Out to Dry"

The Columbia Years 19431952: The Complete Recordings

308

Disc five
1. "Adeste Fideles (O, Come All Ye Faithful)" 2. "Lost in the Stars" 3. "Jingle Bells" 4. "Falling In Love With Love" 5. "Hush-A-Bye Island" 6. "So They Tell Me" 7. "There's No Business Like Show Business" 8. "(Once Upon) A Moonlight Night" 9. "Strange Music" 10. "Poinciana (Song Of The Tree)" 11. "The Music Stopped" 12. "Why Shouldn't It Happen to Us?" 13. "Time After Time" 14. "It's the Same Old Dream" 15. "I'm Sorry I Made You Cry" 16. "None But the Lonely Heart" 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. "The Brooklyn Bridge" "I Believe" "I Got A Gal I Love (In North & South Dakota)" "The Dum-Dot Song (I Put a Penny In the Gum Slot)" "All of Me" "It's Up to You" "My Romance"

Disc six
1. "Always" 2. "I Want To Thank Your Folks" 3. "That's How Much I Love You" 4. "You Can Take My Word For It Baby" 5. "Sweet Lorraine" 6. "Always" 7. "I Concentrate On You" 8. "My Love For You" 9. "Mam'selle" 10. "Ain'tcha Ever Comin' Back" 11. "Stella By Starlight" 12. "There But For You Go I" 13. "Almost Like Being In Love" 14. "Tea For Two" 15. "My Romance" 16. "Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas" 17. "Christmas Dreaming (A Little Early This Year)" 18. "The Stars Will Remember (So Will I)" 19. "It All Came True" 20. "That Old Feeling" 21. "If I Had You"

The Columbia Years 19431952: The Complete Recordings 22. "The Nearness Of You" 23. "One For My Baby (And One More For The Road)"

309

Disc seven
1. "But Beautiful" 2. "A Fellow Needs A Girl" 3. "So Far" 4. "It All Came True" 5. "Can't You Just See Yourself" 6. "You're My Girl" 7. "All Of Me" 8. "I'll Make Up For Ev'rything" 9. "Strange Music" 10. "Laura" 11. "Night And Day" 12. "My Cousin Louella" 13. "We Just Couldn't Say Goodbye" 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. "S'posin'" "Just For Now" "None But The Lonely Heart" "The Night We Called It A Day" "The Song Is You" "What'll I Do?" "Poinciana (Song Of The Tree)" "(I Offer You The Moon) Senorita" "The Music Stopped"

Disc eight
1. "Mean To Me" 2. "Spring Is Here" 3. "Fools Rush In (Where Angels Fear To Tread)" 4. "When You Wake" 5. "It Never Entered My Mind" 6. "I've Got a Crush on You" 7. "Body And Soul" 8. "I'm Glad There Is You" 9. "I Went Down To Virginia" 10. "If I Only Had A Match" 11. "If I Steal A Kiss" 12. "Autumn In New York" 13. "Everybody Loves Somebody" 14. "A Little Learnin' Is A Dangerous Thing, Part 1" 15. "A Little Learnin' Is A Dangerous Thing, Part 2" 16. "Ever Homeward" 17. "But None Like You" 18. "Catana" 19. "Why Was I Born?"

The Columbia Years 19431952: The Complete Recordings 20. 21. 22. 23. "It Came Upon A Midnight Clear" "O Little Town Of Bethlehem" "White Christmas" "For Every Man There's A Woman"

310

Disc nine
1. "Help Yourself To My Heart" 2. "Santa Claus Is Coming to Town" 3. "If I Forget You" 4. "Where Is The One?" 5. "When Is Sometime?" 6. "It Only Happens When I Dance With You" 7. "A Fella With An Umbrella" 8. "Nature Boy" 9. "Sunflower" 10. "Once In Love With Amy" 11. "Once In Love With Amy" 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. "Why Can't You Behave?" "Bop! Goes My Heart" "Comme Ci Comme Ca" "No Orchids For My Lady" "While The Angelus Was Ringing (Les Trois Cloches)" "If You Stub Your Toe On The Moon" "Kisses And Tears" "Some Enchanted Evening" "Bali Ha'i" "The Right Girl For Me" "Night After Night" "The Huckle-Buck" "It Happens Every Spring"

Disc ten
1. "Let's Take An Old-Fashioned Walk" 2. "(Just One Way To Say) I Love You" 3. "It All Depends On You" 4. "Bye Bye Baby" 5. "Don't Cry Joe (Let Her Go, Let Her Go, Let Her Go)" 6. "Every Man Should Marry" 7. "If I Ever Love Again" 8. "We're Just A Kiss Apart" 9. "Every Man Should Marry" 10. "The Wedding Of Lili Marlene" 11. "That Lucky Old Sun (Just Rolls Around Heaven All Day)" 12. "Mad About You" 13. "(On The Island Of) Stromboli" 14. "The Old Master Painter" 15. "Why Remind Me"

The Columbia Years 19431952: The Complete Recordings 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. "Sorry" "Sunshine Cake" "(We've Got A) Sure Thing" "God's Country" "Sheila" "Chattanoogie Shoe Shine Boy" "Kisses And Tears" "When the Sun Goes Down" "American Beauty Rose"

311

Disc eleven
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. "Peachtree Street" "Should I (Reveal)" "You Do Something To Me" "Lover" "When You're Smiling (The Whole World Smiles With You)" "It's Only A Paper Moon"

7. "My Blue Heaven" 8. "The Continental" 9. "Goodnight Irene" 10. "Dear Little Boy Of Mine" 11. "Life Is So Peculiar" 12. "Accidents Will Happen" 13. "One Finger Melody" 14. "Remember Me In Your Dreams" 15. "If Only She'd Look My Way" 16. "London By Night" 17. "Meet Me At The Copa" 18. "Come Back To Sorrento (Torna A Surriento)" 19. "April In Paris" 20. "I Guess I'll Have To Dream The Rest" 21. "Nevertheless (I'm In Love With You)" 22. "Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow!" 23. "Take My Love" 24. "I Am Loved" 25. "You Don't Remind Me" 26. "Love Means Love" 27. "Cherry Pies Ought To Be You"

The Columbia Years 19431952: The Complete Recordings

312

Disc twelve
1. "Faithful" 2. "You're The One" 3. "There's Something Missing" 4. "Hello, Young Lovers" 5. "We Kiss In A Shadow" 6. "I Whistle A Happy Tune" 7. "I'm A Fool To Want You" 8. "Love Me" 9. "Mama Will Bark" 10. "It's A Long Way (From Your House To My House)" 11. "Castle Rock" 12. "Farewell, Farewell To Love" 13. "Deep Night" 14. "A Good Man Is Hard To Find" 15. "I Could Write A Book" 16. "I Hear A Rhapsody" 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. "Walking In The Sunshine" "My Girl" "Feet Of Clay" "Don't Ever Be Afraid To Go Home" "Luna Rossa (Blushing Moon)" "The Birth Of The Blues" "Azure-Te (Paris Blues)" "Tennessee Newsboy (The Newsboy Blues)" "Bim Bam Baby" "Why Try To Change Me Now"

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - Vocals

References
[1] The Columbia Years 1943–1952: The Complete Recordings (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r190565) at Allmusic

The Song Is You

313

The Song Is You
The Song Is You
Box set by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded August 30, 1994 February 1, 1940July 2, 1942 Classic pop 382:55 RCA Records Frank Sinatra chronology

Genre Length Label

Sinatra & Sextet: Live in Paris (1994)

The Song Is You (1994)

Christmas Songs By Sinatra (1994)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

The Song Is You is a 1994 box set by the American singer Frank Sinatra. This five disc box set contains every studio recording Frank Sinatra performed with Tommy Dorsey and his orchestra, a few tracks of alternate recording takes, and a full disc of mostly-unreleased radio broadcasts. It is considered a definitive look at the first years of what would become a half-a-century long career.

Track listing
Disc one
1. "The Sky Fell Down" (Edward Heyman, Louis Alter) 2. "Too Romantic" (Johnny Burke, James Monaco) 3. "Shake Down the Stars" (Ed DeLange, Jimmy Van Heusen) 4. "Moments in the Moonlight" (Richard Himber, Irving Gordon, Alvin Kaufman) 5. "I'll Be Seeing You" (Sammy Fain, Irving Kahal) 6. "Say It" (Frank Loesser, Jimmy McHugh) 7. "Polka Dots and Moonbeams" (Burke, Van Heusen) 8. "The Fable of the Rose" (Bickley Reichner, Josef Myrow) 9. "This Is the Beginning of the End" (Mack Gordon) 10. "Hear My Song Violetta" (Buddy Bernier, Robert Emmerich, Othmar Klase, Rudolph Inkesch) 11. "Fools Rush In (Where Angels Fear to Tread)" (Rube Bloom, Johnny Mercer) 12. "Devil May Care" (Burke, Harry Warren) 13. "April Played the Fiddle" (Burke, Monaco)

The Song Is You 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. "I Haven't the Time to Be a Millionaire" (Burke, Monaco) "Imagination" (Burke, Van Heusen) "Yours Is My Heart Alone" (Franz Lehar, Ludwig Herzer, Fritz Lohner) "You're Lonely and I'm Lonely" (Irving Berlin) "East of the Sun (and West of the Moon)" (Brooks Bowman) "Head On My Pillow" (Bissel Palmer, Pierre Connor) "It's a Lovely Day Tomorrow" (Berlin) "I'll Never Smile Again" (Ruth Lowe) "All This and Heaven Too" (DeLange, Van Heusen) "Where Do You Keep Your Heart?" (Al Stillman, Fred Ahlert)

314

Disc two
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. "Whispering" (Vincent Rose, Richard Coburn, John Schonberger) "Trade Winds" (Cliff Friend, Charles Tobias) "The One I Love (Belongs to Somebody Else)" (Isham Jones, Gus Kahn) "The Call of the Canyon" (Billy Hill) "Love Lies" (Carl Sigman, Ralph Freed, Joseph Meyer)

6. "I Could Make You Care" (Sammy Cahn, Saul Chaplin) 7. "The World Is in My Arms" (Yip Harburg, Burton Lane) 8. "Our Love Affair" (Freed, Roger Edens) 9. "Looking for Yesterday" (DeLange, Van Heusen) 10. "Tell Me at Midnight" (Clay A. Boland, Bickley Reichner) 11. "We Three (My Echo, My Shadow & Me)" (Dick Robertson, Nelson Cogane, Sammy Mysels) 12. "When You Awake" (Henry Nemo) 13. "Anything" (DeLange, Frank Signorelli, P. Napoleon) 14. "Shadows on the Sand" (Stanley Adams, Will Grosz) 15. "You're Breaking My Heart All Over Again" (James Cavanaugh, John Redmond, Arthur Altman) 16. "I'd Know You Anywhere" (Mercer, Jimmy McHugh) 17. "Do You Know Why?" (Burke, Van Heusen) 18. "Not So Long Ago" (Reichner, Boland) 19. "Stardust" (Hoagy Carmichael, Mitchell Parish) 20. "Oh! Look at Me Now" (Joe Bushkin, John DeVries) 21. "You Might Have Belonged to Another" (P. West, L. Harmon) 22. "You Lucky People, You" (Burke, Van Heusen) 23. "It's Always You" (Burke, Van Heusen) 24. "I Tried" (Carl Nutter, Paul Hand, Clark Dennis)

Disc three
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. "Dolores" (Loesser, Alter) "Without a Song" (Vincent Youmans, Edward Eliscu, Billy Rose) "Do I Worry?" (Bobby Worth, Stanley Cowan) "Everything Happens to Me" (Matt Dennis, Tom Adair) "Let's Get Away from It All" (Dennis, Adair) "I'll Never Let a Day Pass By" (Loesser, Victor Schertzinger)

7. "Love Me As I Am" (Loesser, Alter) 8. "This Love of Mine" (Sol Parker, Hank Sanicola, Frank Sinatra) 9. "I Guess I'll Have to Dream the Rest" (Mickey Stoner, Bud Green, Martin Block)

The Song Is You 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. "You & I" (Leslie Bricusse) "Neiani" (Axel Stordahl, Sy Oliver) "Free For All" (Unknown) "Blue Skies" (Berlin) "Two In Love" (Meredith Willson) "Pale Moon (An Indian Love Song)" (Jesse Glick, Frederick Logan) "I Think of You" (J. Elliot, Don Marcotte) "How Do You Do Without Me?" (Bushkin, DeVries) "A Sinner Kissed An Angel" (Mack David, Larry Shayne) "Violets for Your Furs" (Dennis, Adair) "The Sunshine of Your Smile" (Leonard Cooke, Lillian Ray) "How About You" (Lane, Ralph Freed) "Snootie Little Cutie" (Bobby Troup)

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Disc four
1. "Poor You" (Harburg, Lane) 2. "I'll Take Tallulah" (Harburg, Lane) 3. "The Last Call for Love" (Harburg, Lane, M. Cummings) 4. "Somewhere A Voice Is Calling" (Eileen Newton, Arthur Tate) 5. "Just As Though You Were Here" (DeLange, John Benson Brooks) 6. "Street of Dreams" (Victor Young, Sam M. Lewis) 7. "Take Me" (Bloom, David) 8. "Be Careful, It's My Heart" (Berlin) 9. "In the Blue of Evening" (Adair, Alfred D'Artega) 10. "Dig Down Deep" (Walter Hirsch, Gerald Marks, S. Marco) 11. "There Are Such Things" (Stanley Adams, George W. Meyer, Abel Baer) 12. "Daybreak" (Harold Adamson, Ferde Grofe) 13. "It Started All Over Again" (Bill Carey, Carl T. Fischer) 14. "Light a Candle In the Chapel" (Harry Pease, Ed G. Nelson, Duke Leonard) 15. "Too Romantic" [Take 2] 16. "Shake Down the Stars" [Take 2] 17. "Hear My Song Violetta" (Take 2) 18. "You're Lonely and I'm Lonely" [Take 3] 19. "Our Love Affair" [Take 2] 20. "Violets for Your Furs" [Take 2] 21. "The Night We Called It a Day" (Dennis, Adair) 22. "The Lamplighter's Serenade" (Carmichael, Paul Francis Webster) 23. "The Song Is You" (Jerome Kern, Oscar Hammerstein II) 24. "Night and Day" (Cole Porter)

The Song Is You

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Disc Five (Radio Broadcasts)
1. Theme: "I'm Getting Sentimental Over You" (George Bassman, Ned Washington) 2. "Who?" (Kern, Otto Harbach, Hammerstein II) 3. "I Hear a Rhapsody" (George Fragos, Jack Baker, Dick Gasparre) 4. "I'll Never Smile Again" 5. "Half-Way Down The Street" (Unknown) 6. "Some Of Your Sweetness (Got Into My Heart)" (J. Clayborn, G. Clayborn) 7. "Once In A While" 8. "A Little In Love" 9. "It Came to Me" 10. "Only Forever" 11. "Marie" 12. "Yearning" 13. "How Am I to Know" 14. "You're Part of My Heart" 15. Announcements 16. "You're Stepping On My Toes" 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. "You Got the Best of Me" "That's How It Goes" "When Daylight Dawns" "When Sleepy Stars Begin to Fall" "Goodbye Lover, Goodbye" "One Red Rose" "The Things I Love" "In the Blue of Evening" "Just As Though You Were Here" Frank Sinatra's Farewell To The Tommy Dorsey Orchestra "The Song Is You"

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - Vocals • Tommy Dorsey and his Orchestra

References
[1] The Song Is You (album) (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r204345) at Allmusic

The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings

317

The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings
The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings
Box set by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded November 21, 1995 December 19, 1960June 6, 1988 Traditional pop music, Vocal jazz 1436:49 Reprise Frank Sinatra chronology

Genre Length Label

Sinatra 80th: All the Best (1995)

The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings (1995)

Everything Happens to Me (1996)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings is a 1995 box set album by the American singer Frank Sinatra. The release coincided with Sinatra's 80th birthday celebration. The original 1995 packaging had the 20 discs encased in a small, leather-bound trunk. When it was re-released in 1998, it was repackaged in a more-standard (and cheaper) cardboard format.

Features
As the title implies, the set claims to contain every song ever recorded in the studio during Sinatra's career with Reprise Records,but strangely misses the 49-second "I'm Getting Sentimental Over You (Reprise)" included as the closing track from the 1961 album I Remember Tommy and also leaves off a remake of "Body and Soul" and "Leave It All To Me" (a song written by Paul Anka), in addition to several alternate versions of songs included in the set. The set is the largest ever released for Sinatra to-date, containing 452 tracks on twenty compact discs. The albums represented are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Ring-a-Ding-Ding!" "Swing Along With Me I Remember Tommy Sinatra and Strings Sinatra and Swingin' Brass Sinatra Sings Great Songs from Great Britain

7. All Alone 8. Sinatra-Basie: An Historic Musical First (with Count Basie) 9. The Concert Sinatra

The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. Sinatra's Sinatra Sinatra Sings Days of Wine and Roses, Moon River, and Other Academy Award Winners America, I Hear You Singing It Might as Well Be Swing (with Count Basie) 12 Songs of Christmas (Frank Sinatra, Bing Crosby and Fred Waring album) Softly, as I Leave You Sinatra '65: The Singer Today September of My Years My Kind of Broadway A Man and His Music Moonlight Sinatra Strangers in the Night That’s Life Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim (with Antonio Carlos Jobim) The World We Knew Francis A. & Edward K. (with Duke Ellington) The Sinatra Family Wish You a Merry Christmas Cycles My Way A Man Alone Watertown Sinatra & Company Ol' Blue Eyes Is Back Some Nice Things I've Missed Trilogy: Past Present Future She Shot Me Down L.A. Is My Lady

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The set also contained tracks that were never released prior, as well as songs new to compact disc, including those originally recorded for the album America, I Hear You Singing. They are generally presented in order of when they were recorded, although there are exceptions to that rule, including the concept albums September of My Years and the "Future" section of the triple album Trilogy: Past Present Future. Also, the song cycle Watertown (a story told with its songs) is presented out of order.

Track listing
Disc one
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. "Ring-A-Ding-Ding" (Jimmy Van Heusen, Sammy Cahn) - 2:44 "Let's Fall in Love" (Harold Arlen, Ted Koehler) - 2:11 "In the Still of the Night" (Cole Porter) - 3:25 "A Foggy Day" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) - 2:17 "Let's Face the Music and Dance" (Irving Berlin) - 2:58 "You'd Be So Easy to Love" (Porter) - 2:24 "A Fine Romance" (Jerome Kern, Dorothy Fields) - 2:11 "The Coffee Song (They've Got An Awful Lot of Coffee in Brazil)" (Bob Hilliard, Dick Miles) - 2:51

9. "Be Careful, It's My Heart" (Berlin) - 2:04 10. "I've Got My Love to Keep Me Warm" (Berlin) - 2:52

The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. "Zing! Went the Strings of My Heart" (James F. Hanley) - 2:48 "You and the Night and the Music" (Arthur Schwartz, Howard Dietz) - 2:36 "When I Take My Sugar to Tea" (Irving Kahal, Sammy Fain, Pierre Norman) - 2:05 "The Last Dance" (Van Heusen, Cahn) - 2:46 "The Second Time Around" (Van Heusen, Cahn) - 3:03 "Tina" (Van Heusen, Cahn) - 2:56 "In the Blue of Evening" (Tom Montgomery, Tom Adair, Al D'Artega) – 4:03 "I'll Be Seeing You" (Fain, Kahal) – 2:49 "I'm Getting Sentimental Over You" (George Bassman, Ned Washington) – 3:42 "Imagination" (Johnny Burke, Van Heusen) – 3:05 "Take Me" (Rube Bloom, David) – 2:19 "Without a Song" (Vincent Youmans, Billy Rose, Edward Eliscu) – 3:39 "Polka Dots and Moonbeams" (Burke, Van Heusen) – 3:43 "Daybreak" (Ferde Grofe, Harold Adamson) – 2:43 "The One I Love (Belongs to Somebody Else)" (Isham Jones, Gus Kahn) - 2:49

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Disc two
1. "There Are Such Things" (George W. Meyer, Stanley Adams, Abel Baer) – 3:13 2. "It's Always You" (Burke, Van Heusen) - 2:48 3. "It Started All Over Again" (Bill Carey, Carl T. Fischer) - 2:31 4. "East of the Sun (And West of the Moon)" (Brooks Bowman) 5. "The Curse of an Aching Heart" (Henry Fink, Al Piantadosi) – 2:06 6. "Love Walked In" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) – 2:19 7. "Please Don't Talk About Me When I'm Gone" (Sidney Clare, Sam H. Stept) – 2:56 8. "Have You Met Miss Jones?" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) – 2:30 9. "Don't Be That Way" (Benny Goodman, Mitchell Parish, Edgar Sampson) – 2:41 10. "I Never Knew" (Ted Fio Rito, Kahn) – 2:14 11. "Falling in Love with Love" (Rodgers, Hart) – 1:49 12. "It's a Wonderful World" (Adamson, Jan Savitt, Johnny Watson) – 2:17 13. "Don't Cry, Joe (Let Her Go, Let Her Go, Let Her Go)" (Joe Marsala) – 3:05 14. "You're Nobody 'Til Somebody Loves You" (James Cavanaugh, Russ Morgan, Larry Stock) – 4:09 15. "Moonlight on the Ganges" (Sherman Myers, Chester Wallace) – 3:18 16. "Granada" (Dorothy Dodd, Agustín Lara) – 3:38 17. "As You Desire Me" (Allie Wurbel) - 2:52 18. "Stardust" (Hoagy Carmichael, Parish) – 2:48 19. "Yesterdays" (Otto Harbach, Kern) – 3:45 20. "I Hadn't Anyone Till You" (Ray Noble) – 3:44 21. "It Might as Well Be Spring" (Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein II) – 3:15 22. "Prisoner of Love" (Russ Columbo, Leo Robin, Clarence Gaskill) – 3:50 23. "That's All" (Bob Haymes, Alan Brandt) – 3:21 24. "Don't Take Your Love From Me" (Henry Nemo) - 4:05

The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings

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Disc three
1. "Misty" (Erroll Garner, Burke) – 2:41 2. "Come Rain or Come Shine" (Arlen, Johnny Mercer) – 4:06 3. "Night and Day" (Porter) – 3:37 4. "All or Nothing at All" (Jack Lawrence, Arthur Altman) – 3:43 5. "Pocketful of Miracles" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:39 6. "Name It and It's Yours" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 3:14 7. "The Song is Ended (but the Melody Lingers On)" (Berlin) – 3:25 8. "All Alone" (Berlin) – 2:42 9. "Charmaine" (Ernö Rapeé, Lew Pollack) – 3:17 10. "When I Lost You" (Berlin) – 3:43 11. "Remember" (Berlin) – 3:23 12. "Together" (B.G. DeSylva, Lew Brown, Ray Henderson, Stephen Ballantine) – 3:21 13. "The Girl Next Door" (Hugh Martin, Ralph Blane) – 3:18 14. "Indiscreet" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 3:52 15. "What'll I Do?" (Berlin) – 3:15 16. "Oh, How I Miss You Tonight" (Benny Davis, Joe Burke, Mark Fisher) – 3:21 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. "Are You Lonesome Tonight?" (Roy Turk, Lou Handman) – 3:31 "Come Waltz with Me" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:53 "Everybody's Twistin'" (Bloom, Koehler) – 2:31 "Nothing but the Best" (Johny Rotella) - 3:02 "The Boys' Night Out" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:48

Disc four
1. "I'm Beginning to See the Light" (Johnny Hodges, Harry James, Duke Ellington, Don George) – 2:34 2. "I Get a Kick Out of You" (Porter) – 3:14 3. "Ain't She Sweet" (Milton Ager, Jack Yellen) – 2:07 4. "I Love You" (Porter) – 2:16 5. "They Can't Take That Away from Me" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) – 2:41 6. "Love Is Just around the Corner" (Lewis E. Gensler, Robin) – 2:27 7. "At Long Last Love" (Porter) – 2:14 8. "Serenade In Blue" (Harry Warren, Mack Gordon) – 2:58 9. "Goody Goody" (Mercer, Matty Malneck) – 1:47 10. "Don'cha Go 'Way Mad" (Jimmy Mundy, Al Stillman, Illinois Jacquet) – 3:12 11. "Tangerine" (Victor Schertzinger, Mercer) – 2:03 12. "Pick Yourself Up" (Kern, Fields) – 2:33 13. "If I Had You" (Jimmy Campbell, Reginald Connelly, Ted Shapiro) – 4:07 14. "The Very Thought of You" (Noble) – 3:34 15. "I'll Follow My Secret Heart" (Noël Coward) – 3:16 16. "A Garden in the Rain" (James Dyrenforth, Carroll Gibbons) – 3:24 17. "London by Night" (Carroll Coates) – 3:20 18. "The Gypsy" (Billy Reid) – 3:21 19. "Roses of Picardy" (Frederic E. Weatherly, Hayden Wood) – 3:01 20. "A Nightingale Sang in Berkeley Square" (Eric Maschwitz, Manning Sherwin) – 3:54 21. "We'll Meet Again" (Hughie Charles, Ross Parker) – 3:44 22. "Now Is the Hour" (Maewa Kaihan, Clemnet Scott, Dorothy Stewart) – 2:51 23. "We'll Gather Lilacs in the Spring" (Ivor Novello) – 3:15

The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings 24. "The Look of Love" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:44 25. "I Left My Heart in San Francisco" (George Cory, Douglass Cross) - 2:54

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Disc five
1. "Nice Work If You Can Get It" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) – 2:37 2. "Please Be Kind" (Saul Chaplin, Cahn) – 2:43 3. "I Won't Dance" (Kern, Jimmy McHugh, Hammerstein, Fields, Harbach) – 4:07 4. "Learnin' the Blues" (Dolores Vicki Silvers) – 4:25 5. "I'm Gonna Sit Right Down (And Write Myself a Letter)" (Fred Ahlert, Joe Young) – 2:36 6. "I Only Have Eyes for You" (Warren, Al Dubin) – 3:31 7. "My Kind of Girl" (Leslie Bricusse) – 4:37 8. "Pennies from Heaven" (Arthur Johnston, Burke) – 3:29 9. "(Love Is) The Tender Trap" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:37 10. "Looking at the World Through Rose Colored Glasses" (Jimmy Steiger, Tommy Malie) – 2:32 11. "Me and My Shadow" (Dave Dreyer, Al Jolson, Billy Rose) - 3:06 (with Sammy Davis, Jr.) 12. "Come Blow Your Horn" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:08 13. "Call Me Irresponsible" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:56 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. "Lost in the Stars" (Maxwell Anderson, Kurt Weill) – 4:11 "My Heart Stood Still" (Rodgers, Hart) – 3:06 "Ol' Man River" (Hammerstein, Kern) – 4:29 "This Nearly Was Mine" (Rodgers, Hammerstein) – 2:49 "You'll Never Walk Alone" (Rodgers, Hammerstein) – 3:11 "I Have Dreamed" (Rodgers, Hammerstein) – 3:01 "Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered" (Rodgers, Hart) – 3:02 "California" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:36 "America the Beautiful" (Katharine Lee Bates, Samuel A. Ward) - 2:21

Disc six
1. "Soliloquy" (Rodgers, Hammerstein) – 8:05 2. "You Brought a New Kind of Love to Me" (Sammy Fain, Irving Kahal, Pierre Norman Connor) - 2:38 3. "In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning" (David Mann, Bob Hilliard) – 2:43 4. "Nancy (With the Laughing Face)" (Phil Silvers, Van Heusen) – 3:37 5. "Young at Heart" (Leigh, Johnny Richards) – 2:54 6. "The Second Time Around" – 3:03 7. "All the Way" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 3:27 8. "Witchcraft" (Cy Coleman, Carolyn Leigh) – 2:37 9. "(How Little It Matters) How Little We Know" (Leigh, Phil Springer) – 2:19 10. "Put Your Dreams Away (For Another Day)" (Paul Mann, Weiss, Ruth Lowe) – 3:12 11. "I've Got You Under My Skin" (Porter) – 3:26 12. "Oh! What It Seemed to Be" (Bennie Benjamin, George David Weiss, Frankie Carle) – 2:45 13. "We Open in Venice" (Porter) - 2:13 (with Dean Martin and Sammy Davis, Jr.) 14. "Old Devil Moon" (Yip Harburg, Burton Lane) - 2:59 15. "When I'm Not Near the Girl I Love" (Harburg, Lane) - 3:25 16. "Guys and Dolls" (Frank Loesser) - 2:50 (with Dean Martin) 17. "I've Never Been in Love Before" (Loesser) - 2:57 18. "So in Love" (Reprise) (Porter) - 2:53 (with Keely Smith) 19. "Twin Soliloquies (Wonder How It Feels)" (Rodgers, Hammerstein) - 1:38 (with Keely Smith)

The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings 20. "Some Enchanted Evening" (Rodgers, Hammerstein) - 3:29 21. "Some Enchanted Evening" (Reprise) - 3:21 (with Rosemary Clooney)

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Disc seven
1. "Luck Be a Lady" (Loesser) - 5:18 2. "Fugue for Tinhorns" (Loesser) - 1:31 (with Bing Crosby and Dean Martin) 3. "The Oldest Established (Permanent Floating Crap Game in New York)" (Loesser) - 2:33 (with B.Crosby and Martin) 4. "Here's to the Losers" (Jack Segal, Robert Wells) - 3:04 5. "Love Isn't Just for the Young" (Bernie Knee) - 2:57 6. "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas" (Hugh Martin, Ralph Blane) - 3:54 7. "Talk to Me Baby" (Robert E. Dolan, Mercer) - 2:58 8. "Stay With Me (Main Theme from The Cardinal)" (Carolyn Leigh, Jerome Moross) - 3:04 9. "Early American" (Burke, Van Heusen) - 3:34 10. "The House I Live In" (Lewis Allan, Earl Robinson) – 3:39 11. "You're a Lucky Fellow, Mr. Smith" (Francis Burke, Hughie Prince, Don Raye) - 3:46 12. "The Way You Look Tonight" (Kern, Fields)- 3:22 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. "Three Coins in the Fountain" (Cahn, Jule Styne) - 3:46 "Swinging on a Star" (Burke, Van Heusen) - 2:53 "The Continental" (Herb Magidson, Con Conrad) - 3:14 "In the Cool, Cool, Cool of the Evening" (Mercer, Carmichael) - 1:51 "It Might as Well Be Spring" (Rodgers, Hammerstein) - 3:26 "Secret Love" (Paul Francis Webster, Fain) - 3:54 "Moon River" (Henry Mancini, Mercer) - 3:20 "Days of Wine and Roses" (Mancini, Mercer) - 2:16 "Love Is A Many-Splendored Thing" (Webster, Fain) - 3:22 "Let Us Break Bread Together" (Roy Ringwald) - 3:39 "You Never Had It So Good" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 3:01

Disc eight
1. "I Can't Believe I'm Losing You" (Don Costa, Phil Zeller) – 2:43 2. "My Kind of Town" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:09 3. "I Like to Lead When I Dance" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 4:07 4. "Style" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 4:28 5. "Mister Booze" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 5:01 6. "Don't Be a Do-Badder (Finale)" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 1:16 7. "The Best is Yet to Come" (Coleman, Leigh) – 3:10 8. "I Wanna Be Around" (Mercer, Sadie Vimmerstedt) – 2:25 9. "I Believe in You" (Loesser) – 2:21 10. "Fly Me to the Moon" (Bart Howard) – 2:30 11. "Hello, Dolly!" (Jerry Herman) – 2:45 12. "The Good Life" (Sacha Distel, Jack Reardon) – 3:10 13. "I Wish You Love" (Léo Chauliac, Charles Trenet, Albert Beach) – 2:56 14. "I Can't Stop Loving You" (Don Gibson) – 3:00 15. "More (Theme From Mondo Cane)" (Riz Ortolani, Nino Oliviero, Marcello Ciorciolini, Norman Newell) – 3:05 16. "Wives and Lovers" (Burt Bacharach, Hal David) – 2:50 17. "An Old-Fashioned Christmas" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:45

The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. "I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day" (Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Johnny Marks) - 2:36 "Little Drummer Boy" Katherine K. Davis - 3:03 "Go Tell It on the Mountain" (Traditional, John Wesley Work III) - 3:23 "We Wish You the Merriest" (Les Brown) - 2:14 "Softly, as I Leave You" (Hal Shaper, Antonio DeVito, Giorgio Calabrese) – 2:50 "Then Suddenly Love" (Ray Alfred, Paul Vance) – 2:15 "Since Marie Has Left Paree" (Hy Glaser, Jerry Solomon) - 1:57 "Available" (Cahn, Ned Wynn, L.B. Marks) – 2:47

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Disc nine
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. "Pass Me By" (Coleman, Leigh) – 2:25 "Emily" (Johnny Mandel, Mercer) – 2:58 "Dear Heart" (Jay Livingston, Ray Evans, Mancini) – 2:43 "Somewhere in Your Heart" (Russell Faith, Clarence Keltner) - 2:29 "Any Time at All" (Baker Knight) - 2:22 "Don't Wait Too Long" (Sunny Skylar) – 3:04 "September Song" (Weill, Anderson) – 3:30

8. "Last Night When We Were Young" (Arlen, Harburg) – 3:33 9. "Hello, Young Lovers" (Rodgers, Hammerstein) – 3:41 10. "I See It Now" (Alec Wilder, William Engvick) – 2:50 11. "When the Wind Was Green" (Henry Stinson) – 3:22 12. "Once Upon a Time" (Charles Strouse, Lee Adams) – 3:30 13. "How Old Am I?" (Gordon Jenkins) – 3:30 14. "It Was a Very Good Year" (Ervin Drake) – 4:25 15. "The Man in the Looking Glass" (Howard) – 3:25 16. "This Is All I Ask" (Jenkins) – 3:03 17. "It Gets Lonely Early" (Van Heusen, Cahn) – 2:57 18. "The September of My Years" (Van Heusen, Cahn) – 3:12 19. "Tell Her (You Love Her Each Day)" (Gil Ward, Charles Watkins) 2:42 20. "When Somebody Loves You" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 1:54 21. "Forget Domani" (Newell, Ortolani) - 2:36 22. "Ev'rybody Has the Right to Be Wrong! (At Least Once)" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:07 23. "I'll Only Miss Her When I Think of Her" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:52 24. "Golden Moment" (Kenny Jacobson, Rhoda Roberts) - 2:57

Disc ten
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. "Come Fly with Me" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:11 "I'll Never Smile Again" (Ruth Lowe) - 2:14 "Moment to Moment" (Mancini, Mercer) - 2:57 "Love and Marriage" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:12 "Moon Song" (Sam Coslow, Johnston) – 3:03 "Moon Love" (M. David, André Kostelanetz) – 4:14 "The Moon Got In My Eyes" (Burke, Johnston) – 2:52 "Moonlight Serenade" (Glenn Miller, Parish) – 3:26

9. "Reaching for the Moon" (Berlin) – 3:05 10. "I Wished on the Moon" (Dorothy Parker, Ralph Rainger) – 2:53 11. "Moonlight Becomes You" (Burke, Van Heusen) – 2:46

The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. "Moonlight Mood" (Adamson, Peter DeRose) – 3:08 "Oh, You Crazy Moon" (Burke, Van Heusen) – 3:12 "The Moon Was Yellow (And The Night Was Young)" (Ahlert, Edgar Leslie) – 3:04 "Strangers in the Night" (Bert Kaempfert, Charles Singleton, Eddie Snyder) – 2:25 "My Baby Just Cares for Me" (Walter Donaldson, Gus Kahn) – 2:30 "Yes Sir, That's My Baby" (Donaldson, Kahn) – 2:08 "You're Driving Me Crazy!" (Donaldson) – 2:15 "The Most Beautiful Girl in the World" (Rodgers, Hart) – 2:24 "Summer Wind" (Heinz Meier, Hans Bradtke, Mercer) – 2:53 "All or Nothing at All" – 3:57 "Call Me" (Tony Hatch) – 3:07 "On a Clear Day (You Can See Forever)" (Alan Jay Lerner, Frederick Loewe) – 3:17 "Downtown" (Hatch) – 2:14

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Disc eleven
1. "That's Life" (Kelly Gordon, Dean Thompson) – 3:10 2. "Give Her Love" (Jim Harbert) - 2:14 3. "What Now My Love" (Gilbert Bécaud, Pierre Leroyer, Carl Sigman) – 2:32 4. "Somewhere My Love (Lara's Theme)" (From Doctor Zhivago) (Maurice Jarre, Webster) – 2:19 5. "Winchester Cathedral" (Geoff Stephens) – 2:38 6. "I Will Wait for You" (Jacques Demy, Norman Gimbel, Michel Legrand) – 2:19 7. "You're Gonna Hear from Me" (Andre Previn, Dory Previn) – 2:51 8. "Sand and Sea" (Gilbert Bécaud, M. David, Maurice Vidalin) – 2:29 9. "The Impossible Dream (The Quest)" (Joe Darion, Mitch Leigh) – 2:34 10. "Baubles, Bangles and Beads" (Robert Wright, George Forrest, Alexander Borodin) – 2:32 11. "I Concentrate on You" (Porter) – 2:32 12. "Dindi" (Ray Gilbert, Antonio Carlos Jobim, Aloysio de Oliveria) – 3:25 13. "Change Partners" (Berlin) – 2:40 14. "Quiet Nights of Quiet Stars" (Jobim, Gene Lees) – 2:45 15. "If You Never Come to Me" (Jobim, Gilbert, de Oliveira) – 2:10 16. "The Girl from Ipanema" (Jobim, Gimbel, de Moraes) – 3:00 17. "Meditation (Meditação)" (Jobim, Gimbel, Newton Mendonça) – 2:51 18. "Once I Loved (O Amor em Paz)" (Jobim, Gilbert, de Moraes) – 2:37 19. "How Insensitive (Insensatez)" (Jobim, Gimbel, de Moraes) – 3:15 20. "Drinking Again" (Mercer, Doris Tauber) – 3:13 21. "Somethin' Stupid" (Carson Parks) – 2:45 (with Nancy Sinatra) 22. "You Are There" (Harry Sukman, Webster) – 3:31 23. "The World We Knew (Over and Over)" (Kaempfert, Herb Rehbein, Sigman) – 2:50 24. "Born Free" (Don Black, John Barry) – 2:05 25. "This Is My Love" (James Harbert) – 3:37

The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings

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Disc twelve
1. "This Is My Song" (Charles Chaplin) – 2:30 2. "Don't Sleep in the Subway" (Hatch, Jackie Trent) – 2:22 3. "Some Enchanted Evening" – 2:34 4. "This Town" (Lee Hazlewood) – 3:05 5. "Younger Than Springtime" (Rodgers, Hammerstein) - 2:42 6. "All I Need Is the Girl" (Stephen Sondheim, Styne) – 5:01 7. "Yellow Days" (Alarcon Carrillo, Alan Bernstein) – 5:00 8. "Indian Summer" (Victor Herbert, Dubin) – 4:14 9. "Come Back to Me" (Lane, Lerner) – 3:22 10. "Poor Butterfly" (Raymond Hubbell, John Golden) – 4:29 11. "Sunny" (Bobby Hebb) – 4:15 12. "I Like the Sunrise" (Ellington) – 5:02 13. "Follow Me" (Lerner, Loewe) – 3:56 14. "My Way of Life" (Kaempfert, Rehbein, Sigman) – 3:05 15. "Cycles" (Judith Caldwell) – 3:07 16. "Whatever Happened to Christmas?" (Jimmy Webb) – 3:05 17. 18. 19. 20. "The Twelve Days of Christmas" (Traditional, Cahn, Van Heusen) – 4:26 "The Bells of Christmas (Greensleeves)" (Traditional, Cahn, Van Heusen) – 3:41 "I Wouldn't Trade Christmas" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:55 "The Christmas Waltz" (Cahn, Styne) – 3:12

Disc thirteen
1. "Blue Lace" (Bill Jacob, Patty Jacob, Ortolani) – 2:43 2. "Star!" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:34 3. "Gentle On My Mind" (John Hartford) – 3:25 4. "By the Time I Get to Phoenix" (Webb) – 3:55 5. "Little Green Apples" (Bobby Russell) – 5:00 6. "Moody River" (Gary D. Bruce) – 2:33 7. "Pretty Colors" (Al Gorgoni, Chip Taylor) – 2:35 8. "Rain in My Heart" (Teddy Randazzo, Victoria Pike) – 3:20 9. "Wandering" (Caldwell) – 2:45 10. "Both Sides Now" (Joni Mitchell) – 2:55 11. "My Way" (Paul Anka, Claude François, Jacques Revaux, Gilles Thibault) – 4:35 12. "One Note Samba (Samba de Uma Nota Só)" (Jobim, Mendonça) – 2:20 13. "Don't Ever Go Away (Por Causa de Voce)" (Gilbert, Delores Duran, Jobim) – 2:28 14. "Wave" (Jobim) – 3:25 15. "Bonita" (Gilbert, Jobim, Lees) - 3:39 16. "Someone to Light Up My Life" (de Moraes, Jobim, Lees) – 2:37 17. "Desafinado" (Hendricks, Jobim, Mendonça) – 3:00 18. "Water to Drink (Agua de Beber)" (de Moraes, Jobim, Gimbel) – 2:35 19. "The Song of the Sabiá" (Jobim, Chico Buarque, Gimbel) - 3:38 20. "This Happy Madness (Estrada Branca)" (de Moraes, Jobim, Lees) – 2:57 21. "Triste" (Jobim) – 2:40

The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings

326

Disc fourteen
1. "All My Tomorrows" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 4:35 2. "Didn't We?" (Webb) – 2:55 3. "Manhã De Carnaval (A Day in the Life of a Fool)" (Luiz Bonfá, Sigman) – 3:00 4. "Yesterday" (John Lennon, Paul McCartney) – 3:30 5. "If You Go Away" (Jacques Brel, Rod McKuen) – 3:30 6. "Watch What Happens" (Gimbel, Legrand) – 2:17 7. "For Once in My Life" (Ron Miller, Orlando Murden) – 2:50 8. "Mrs. Robinson" (Paul Simon) – 2:55 9. "Hallelujah, I Love Her So" (Ray Charles) – 2:47 10. "I've Been to Town" (McKuen) – 3:13 11. "Empty Is" (McKuen) – 2:46 12. "The Single Man" (McKuen) – 3:01 13. "Lonesome Cities" (McKuen) – 3:18 14. "The Beautiful Strangers" (McKuen) – 2:41 15. "A Man Alone" (McKuen) – 3:47 16. "Love's Been Good to Me" (McKuen) – 3:27 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. "Out Beyond the Window" (McKuen) – 2:45 "Night" (McKuen) – 2:25 "Some Traveling Music" (McKuen) – 2:36 "From Promise to Promise" (McKuen) – 1:31 "A Man Alone (Reprise)" – 1:30 "In the Shadow of the Moon" (Earl Brown, Heinz Keissling) - 2:55 "Forget to Remember" (Pike, Randazzo) - 2:58 "Goin' Out of My Head" (Randazzo, Bobby Weinstein) - 2:45

Disc fifteen
1. "I Would Be in Love (Anyway)" (Bob Gaudio, Jake Holmes) – 2:31 2. "The Train" (Gaudio, Holmes) – 3:26 3. "She Says" (Gaudio, Holmes) – 1:51 4. "Lady Day" (Gaudio, Holmes) – 2:47 5. "Watertown" (Gaudio, Holmes) – 3:36 6. "What's Now Is Now" (Gaudio, Holmes) – 4:04 7. "Goodbye (She Quietly Says)" (Gaudio, Holmes) – 3:06 8. "What a Funny Girl (You Used to Be)" (Gaudio, Holmes) – 3:00 9. "Elizabeth" (Gaudio, Holmes) – 3:38 10. "Michael and Peter" (Gaudio, Holmes) – 5:10 11. "For a While" (Gaudio, Holmes) – 3:09 12. "Lady Day" – 3:41 13. "I Will Drink the Wine" (Paul Ryan) – 3:30 14. "Bein' Green" (Joe Raposo) – 3:00 15. "My Sweet Lady" (John Denver) – 3:01 16. "Sunrise in the Morning" (Ryan) – 2:50 17. "I'm Not Afraid" (Jacques Brel, Gérard Jouannest, McKuen) - 3:39 18. "Something" (George Harrison) - 3:32 19. "Leaving on a Jet Plane" (Denver) – 2:25 20. "(They Long to Be) Close to You" (Bacharach, H. David) – 2:34

The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings 21. "Feelin' Kinda Sunday" (Nino Tempo, Annette Tucker, Kathy Wakefield) - 2:52 22. "Life's a Trippy Thing" (Howard Greenfield, Linda Laurie) - 2:42 23. "The Game Is Over" (Denver)

327

Disc sixteen
1. "Bang Bang (My Baby Shot Me Down)" (Sonny Bono) - 3:37 2. "You Will Be My Music" (Raposo) – 3:52 3. "Noah" (Raposo) – 4:22 4. "Nobody Wins" (Kris Kristofferson) – 5:10 5. "The Hurt Doesn't Go Away" (Raposo) – 2:51 6. "Winners" (Raposo) – 2:53 7. "Let Me Try Again" ("Laisse Moi le Temps") (Anka, Cahn, Michel Jourdon) – 3:31 8. "Walk Away" (Elmer Bernstein, Leigh) - 2:57 9. "Send in the Clowns" (Sondheim) – 4:10 10. "There Used to Be a Ballpark" (Raposo) – 3:34 11. "You're So Right (For What's Wrong In My Life)" (Pike, Randazzo, Roger Joyce) – 4:03 12. "Dream Away" (John Williams, Paul Williams) – 4:22 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. "Bad, Bad Leroy Brown" (Jim Croce) – 2:49 "I'm Gonna Make It All the Way" (Floyd Huddleston) – 2:54 "Empty Tables" (Mercer, Van Heusen) - 3:03 "If" (David Gates) – 3:10 "The Summer Knows" (A. Bergman, M. Bergman, Legrand) – 2:44 "Sweet Caroline" (Neil Diamond) – 2:44 "You Turned My World Around" (Kaempfert, Rehbein, Kim Carnes, Dave Ellingson) – 2:50 "What Are You Doing the Rest of Your Life?" (A. Bergman, M. Bergman, Legrand) – 4:05 "Tie a Yellow Ribbon 'Round the Ole Oak Tree" (Russell Brown, Irwin Levine) – 3:07 "Satisfy Me One More Time" (Huddleston) – 2:22

Disc seventeen
1. "You Are the Sunshine of My Life" (Stevie Wonder) – 2:37 2. "Just As Though You Were Here" (John Benson Brooks, Eddie DeLange) - 4:23 3. "Everything Happens to Me" (Adair, Matt Dennis) - 3:43 4. "Anytime (I'll Be There)" (Anka) - 3:21 5. "The Only Couple on the Floor"(Irving Daine, Johnny Durrill) - 3:11 6. "I Believe I'm Gonna Love You" (Harry Lloyd, Gloria Sklerov) - 2:48 7. "The Saddest Thing of All" (M. Legrand, Pierre Leroyer, Edward Ruault, Sigman) - 3:29 8. "A Baby Just Like You" (Denver, Joe Henry) - 2:47 9. "Christmas Memories" (A. Bergman, M. Bergman, Costa) - 2:09 10. "I Sing the Songs (I Write the Songs)" (Bruce Johnston) - 3:51 11. "Empty Tables" (Mercer, Van Heusen) - 2:48 12. "Send in the Clowns" - 3:39 13. "The Best I Ever Had" (Danny Hice, Ruby Hice) - 1:57 14. "Stargazer" (Diamond) - 2:58 15. "Dry Your Eyes" (Diamond, Robbie Robertson) - 3:02 16. "Like a Sad Song" (Denver) - 4:12 17. "I Love My Wife" (Coleman, Michael Stewart) - 3:10 18. "Night and Day" - 2:11

The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. "All or Nothing at All" - 2:36 "Everybody Ought to Be in Love" (Anka) - 3:19 "Nancy (With the Laughing Face)" - 2:29 "Emily" - 2:59 "Linda" (Lawrence) - 2:44 "Sweet Lorraine" (Carter Burwell, Parish) - 2:22

328

Disc eighteen
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. "Barbara" (David, Van Heusen) - 3:14 "I Had the Craziest Dream" (Gordon, Warren) – 3:13 "It Had to Be You" (Jones, Kahn) – 3:53 "You and Me (We Wanted It All)" (Carole Bayer Sager, Peter Allen) – 4:07 "MacArthur Park" (Webb) – 2:45 "Summer Me, Winter Me" (M. Bergman, A. Bergman, Legrand) – 4:02 "That's What God Looks Like to Me" (Lois Irwin, Lan O'Kun) – 2:55 "For the Good Times" (Kristofferson) – 4:41 "Love Me Tender" (Vera Matson, Elvis Presley) – 3:34 "Just the Way You Are" (Billy Joel) – 3:26 "Song Sung Blue" (Diamond) – 2:47 "Isn't She Lovely?" (Wonder) - 2:04 "My Shining Hour" (Arlen, Mercer) – 3:21 "All of You" (Porter) – 1:42 "More Than You Know" (Rose, Eliscu, Youmans) – 3:22 "The Song Is You" (Kern, Hammerstein) – 2:39 "But Not for Me" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) – 3:50 "Street of Dreams" (Sam M. Lewis, Victor Young) – 3:32 "They All Laughed" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) – 2:49 "Let's Face the Music and Dance" – 2:50 "Theme from New York, New York" (Fred Ebb, John Kander) – 3:26 "Something" – 4:42

Disc nineteen
1. "What Time Does the Next Miracle Leave?" (Jenkins) – 10:44 2. "World War None!" (Jenkins) – 4:27 3. "The Future" (Jenkins) – 4:05 4. "The Future (Continued): I've Been There" (Jenkins) – 3:33 5. "The Future (Conclusion): Song Without Words" (Jenkins) – 6:00 6. "Finale: Before the Music Ends" (Jenkins) – 9:46 7. "Bang Bang (My Baby Shot Me Down)" - 3:24 8. "Everything Happens to Me" - 4:11 9. Medley: "The Gal That Got Away"/"It Never Entered My Mind" (Arlen, I. Gershwin)/(Hart, Rodgers) - 5:05 10. "Thanks for the Memory" (Robin, Rainger) - 4:25 11. "I Loved Her" (Jenkins) - 4:04 12. "A Long Night" (Wilder, Loonis McGlohon) - 3:44 13. "South - To a Warmer Place" (Wilder, McGlohon) - 3:45 14. "Say Hello!" (Richard Behrke, Cahn) - 2:25 15. "Good Thing Going (Going Gone)" (Sondheim) - 3:53

The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings

329

Disc twenty
1. "Monday Morning Quarterback" (Costa, Pamela Phillips-Oland) - 4:38 2. "Hey Look, No Cryin'" (Styne, Susan Birkenhead) - 4:27 3. "To Love a Child" (H. David, Raposo) - 3:21 4. "Love Makes Us Whatever We Want to Be" (Cahn, Styne) - 2:39 5. "Searching" (Cahn, Styne) - 3:47 6. "Here's to the Band" (Sharman Howe, Alfred Nittoli, Artie Schroeck) - 4:11 7. "All The Way Home" (Randazzo) - 3:54 8. "It's Sunday" (Birkenhead, Styne) - 3:36 9. "L.A. Is My Lady" (A. Bergman, M. Bergman, Quincy Jones, Peggy Lipton) – 3:12 10. "Until the Real Thing Comes Along" (Mann Holiner, Alberta Nichols, Cahn, S. Chaplin, L.E. Freeman) – 3:03 11. "After You've Gone" (Henry Creamer, Turner Layton) – 3:15 12. "The Best of Everything" (Ebb, Kander) – 2:45 13. "It's All Right With Me" (Porter) – 2:39 14. "A Hundred Years from Today" (J. Young, Washington, V. Young) – 3:04 15. "How Do You Keep the Music Playing?" (A. Bergman, M. Bergman, Legrand) – 3:49 16. "Teach Me Tonight" (Cahn, Gene de Paul) – 3:44 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. "If I Should Lose You" (Rainger, Robin) – 2:36 "Stormy Weather" (Arlen, Koehler) – 3:38 "Mack the Knife" (Marc Blitzstein, Bertolt Brecht, Weill) – 4:50 "The Girls I Never Kissed" (Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller) - 3:31 "Only One to a Customer" (Leigh, Styne) - 2:48 "My Foolish Heart" (Washington, V. Young) - 2:47

References
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Frank Sinatra - vocals Dean Martin Sammy Davis, Jr. Bing Crosby Keely Smith Rosemary Clooney Nancy Sinatra Frank Sinatra, Jr. Tina Sinatra Antonio Carlos Jobim - vocals, guitar Eileen Farrell Bill Miller - piano Count Basie and His Orchestra Duke Ellington and His Orchestra Johnny Mandel - arranger Skip Martin Dick Reynolds Nelson Riddle Sy Oliver - arranger, vocals

• Billy May • Don Costa

The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Gordon Jenkins Neal Hefti Robert Farnon Bill Loose Marty Paich Gil Grau Jack Halloran Roy Ringwald Quincy Jones Harry Betts Ernie Freeman Torrie Zito Laurindo Almeida Fred Stulce Claus Ogerman Billy Strange H. B. Barnum Eumir Deodato Charles Calello Joseph Scott Lennie Hayton Al Capps Joe Beck Tony Mottola Joe Parnello Sam Nestico Frank Foster Bob Florence

330

References
[1] The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r228577) at Allmusic

Screen Sinatra

331

Screen Sinatra
Screen Sinatra
Box set by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Label July 26, 1996 1953-1971 Classic pop EMI, Capitol Records Frank Sinatra chronology

Frank Sinatra Sings the Select Cole Porter (1996

Screen Sinatra (1996)

Frank Sinatra Sings the Select Sammy Cahn (1996)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Rating Allmusic (Not rated)[1]

Screen Sinatra is an album featuring songs by Frank Sinatra from various movies to which he has contributed. The tracks were mostly recorded between 1953 and 1960, though the final track—“Dream”—comes from the 1971 film Carnal Knowledge. The compilation was released in 1989 in a box set by EMI and was released in the United States by Capitol Records in 1996.

Track listing
1. "From Here to Eternity" (Freddie Karger, Robert Wells) (from From Here to Eternity) 2. "Three Coins in the Fountain" (Jule Styne, Sammy Cahn) (from Three Coins in the Fountain) 3. "Young at Heart" (Johnny Richards, Carolyn Leigh) (from Young at Heart) 4. "Just One of Those Things" (Cole Porter) (from Young at Heart) 5. "Someone to Watch Over Me" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) (from Young at Heart) 6. "Not as a Stranger" (Jimmy Van Heusen, Buddy Kaye) (from Not as a Stranger) 7. "(Love Is) The Tender Trap" (Cahn, Van Heusen) (from The Tender Trap) 8. "Johnny Concho Theme (Wait For Me)" (Nelson Riddle, Dick Stanford) (from Johnny Concho) 9. "All the Way" (Van Heusen, Cahn) (from The Joker Is Wild) 10. "Chicago (That Toddlin' Town)" (Fred Fisher) (from The Joker Is Wild) 11. "Monique" (Cahn, Elmer Bernstein) (from Kings Go Forth) 12. "They Came To Cordura" (Cahn, Van Heusen) (from They Came To Cordura) 13. "To Love and Be Loved" (Van Heusen, Cahn) (from Some Came Running) 14. "High Hopes" (Van Heusen, Cahn) (from A Hole in the Head) 15. "All My Tomorrows" (Van Heusen, Cahn) (from A Hole in the Head) 16. "It's All Right with Me" (Porter) (from Can Can) 17. "C'est Magnifique" (Porter) (from Can Can)

Screen Sinatra 18. "Dream" (Johnny Mercer) (from Daddy Long Legs)

332

References
[1] Screen Sinatra (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r624235) at Allmusic

The Complete Capitol Singles Collection
The Complete Capitol Singles Collection
Box set by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded September 3, 1996 April 2, 1953September 12, 1961 Classic pop ~~:~~ Capitol Frank Sinatra chronology

Genre Length Label

Frank Sinatra Sings the Select Sammy Cahn (1996)

The Complete Capitol Singles Collection (1996)

Greatest Hits: Early Years (1996)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

The Complete Capitol Singles Collection is a 1996 box set by the American singer Frank Sinatra. This four-disc set contains all the singles -- A-sides and B-sides—that Sinatra recorded for Capitol Records between 1953 and 1960 with the notable exception of "If You Are But A Dream" which was inexplicably omitted. It is available on an Australian double CD only. Among them are duets with Bing Crosby, Keely Smith, June Hutton, and the Nuggets, who provided vocal backing at a 1955 session where Sinatra made two forays into rock 'n' roll. Those songs, along with about 20 others, make their first appearance on compact disc with this set. The packaging includes many photographs, detailed session notes, and a long essay by Will Friedwald, who explains that Sinatra followed a "singles aesthetic" that set these songs quite apart from the "concept" albums he was recording simultaneously for Capitol.

The Complete Capitol Singles Collection

333

Track listing
Disc one
1. "Lean Baby" (Roy Alfred, Billy May) - 2:33 2. "I'm Walking Behind You" (Billy Reid) – 2:58 3. "I've Got the World on a String" (Harold Arlen, Ted Koehler) – 2:14 4. "My One and Only Love" (Guy Wood, Robert Mellin) – 3:14 5. "Anytime, Anywhere" (Imogen Carpenter, Lenny Adelson) – 2:45 6. "From Here to Eternity" (Freddie Karger, Robert Wells) – 3:01 7. "I Love You" (Harry Archer, Harlan Thompson) – 2:28 8. "South of the Border" (Jimmy Kennedy, Michael Carr) – 2:52 9. "Take a Chance" (David Raksin, Don Stanford) – 2:40 10. "Young at Heart" (Johnny Richards, Carolyn Leigh) – 2:53 11. "Don't Worry 'bout Me" (Rube Bloom, Koehler) - 3:07 12. "I Could Have Told You" (Carl Sigman, Jimmy Van Heusen) – 3:18 13. "Rain (Falling from the Skies)" (Mellin, Gunther Finlay) – 3:27 14. "Three Coins in the Fountain" (Jule Styne, Sammy Cahn) – 3:07 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. "The Gal That Got Away" (Arlen, Ira Gershwin) – 3:12 "Half as Lovely (Twice as True)" (Lew Spence, Sammy Gallop) – 3:09 "It Worries Me" (Fritz Schultz-Reichelt, Sigman) – 2:55 "When I Stop Loving You" (George Cates, Alan Copeland, Mort Greene) – 2:56 "White Christmas" (Irving Berlin) - 2:37 "The Christmas Waltz" (Cahn, Styne) – 3:03 "Someone to Watch Over Me" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) – 2:59 "You, My Love" (Van Heusen, Mack Gordon) – 2:56

Disc two
1. "Melody of Love" (Hans Engelmann, Tom Glazer) - 3:02 2. "I'm Gonna Live Till I Die" (with Ray Anthony and his orchestra) (Mann Curtis, Al Hoffman, Walter Kent) 1:54 3. "Why Should I Cry over You?" (Chester Conn, Ned Miller) – 2:41 4. "Don't Change Your Mind About Me" (with June Hutton and the Pied Pipers) (Leonard Adelson, Imogen Carpenter) - 2:44 5. "Two Hearts, Two Kisses (Make One Love)" (Harry Stone, Otis Williams) - 2:23 6. "From the Bottom to the Top" (with The Nuggets and Big Dave's Music) (Gee Wilson) - 2:22 7. "If I Had Three Wishes" (Claude Baum, Spence) – 2:56 8. "Learnin' the Blues" (Dolores Vicki Silvers) – 3:04 9. "Not as a Stranger" (Van Heusen, Buddy Kaye) – 2:47 10. "How Could You Do a Thing Like That to Me" (Tyree Glenn, Allan Roberts) – 2:44 11. "Same Old Saturday Night" (Frank Reardon, Cahn) – 2:31 12. "Fairy Tale" (Jay Livingston, Stanford) – 2:59 13. "Love and Marriage" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:41 14. "The Impatient Years" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 3:14 15. "(Love Is) The Tender Trap" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 3:00 16. "Weep They Will" (Bill Carey, Carl T. Fischer) - 3:19 17. "You'll Get Yours" (Stanford, Van Heusen) - 2:28 18. "Flowers Mean Forgiveness" (Al Frisch, Edward R. White, Mack Wolfson) - 3:07

The Complete Capitol Singles Collection 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. "(How Little It Matters) How Little We Know" (Phillip Springer, Leigh) – 2:44 "Five Hundred Guys" (David Cantor, Irving Kosloff) - 2:50 "Wait for Me" (theme from Johnny Concho) (Nelson Riddle, Stanford) - 2:54 "You're Sensational" (Cole Porter) - 3:54 "Well, Did You Evah!" (with Bing Crosby) (Porter) - 3:46

334

Disc three
1. "Mind if I Make Love to You?" (Porter) - 2:24 2. "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?" (with Celeste Holm) (Porter) - 2:07 3. "You Forgot All the Words (While I Still Remember the Tune)" - 3:20 4. "Hey! Jealous Lover" (Cahn, Kay Twomey, Bee Walker) – 2:24 5. "Your Love for Me" (Barry Parker) - 2:59 6. "Can I Steal a Little Love?" (Phil Tuminello) - 2:32 7. "So Long, My Love" (Cahn, Spence) – 2:50 8. "Crazy Love" (Cahn, Tuminello) - 2:54 9. "Something Wonderful Happens in Summer" (Joe Bushkin, John DeVries) – 3:16 10. "You're Cheatin' Yourself (If You're Cheatin' on Me)" (Hoffman, Dick Manning) – 2:38 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. "All the Way" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:55 "Chicago" (Fred Fisher) - 2:12 "Witchcraft" (Cy Coleman, Leigh) – 2:54 "Tell Her You Love Her" (Hugh Halliday, Homer Denison, Parker) - 3:01 "The Christmas Waltz" (with The Ralph Brewster Singers) (Cahn, Styne) - 3:04 "Mistletoe & Holly" (Hank Sanicola, Frank Sinatra, Stanford) - 2:18 "Nothing In Common" (with Keely Smith) (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:31 "How Are Ya' Fixed for Love?" (with Keely Smith) (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:26 "Same Old Song and Dance" (Van Heusen, Cahn, Bobby Worth) – 2:54 "Monique" (Cahn, Elmer Bernstein) - 3:18 "Mr. Success" (Edwin Grienes, Sinatra, Sanicola) - 2:42 "Sleep Warm" (Spence, Alan Bergman, Marilyn Keith) – 2:43 "No One Ever Tells You" (Hub Atwood, Carroll Coates) – 3:28 "To Love and Be Loved" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:58

Disc four
1. "Time After Time" (Styne, Cahn) - 3:31 2. "French Foreign Legion" (Aaron Schroeder, Guy Wood) – 2:03 3. "All My Tomorrows" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 3:15 4. "High Hopes" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:43 5. "They Came to Cordura" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:02 6. "Talk to Me" (Eddie Snyder, Stanley Kahan, Rudy Vallee) – 3:04 7. "River, Stay 'Way from My Door" (Matt Dixon, Harry M. Woods) – 2:39 8. "It's Over, It's Over, It's Over" (Dennis, Stanford) – 2:42 9. "This Was My Love" (Jim Harbert) – 3:28 10. "Nice 'n' Easy" (Spence, Bergman, Keith) – 2:45 11. "You'll Always Be the One I Love" (Ticker Freeman, Sunny Skylar) – 2:59 12. "Old McDonald Had a Farm" (Traditional, Spence, Bergman, Keith) – 2:42 13. "My Blue Heaven" (Donaldson, George A. Whiting) – 2:03 14. "Sentimental Baby" (Spence, Bergman, Keith) - 2:38

The Complete Capitol Singles Collection 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. "Sentimental Journey" (Les Brown, Ben Homer, Bud Green) – 3:26 "American Beauty Rose" (Mack David, Redd Evans, Arthur Altman) – 2:22 "The Moon Was Yellow" (Fred E. Ahlert, Edgar Leslie) - 3:02 "I've Heard That Song Before" (Cahn, Styne) – 2:33 "Five Minutes More" (Cahn, Styne) – 2:36 "I'll Remember April" (Don Raye, Gene DePaul, Patricia Johnston) - 2:50 "I Love Paris" (Porter) - 1:52 "Hidden Persuasion" (Wainwright Churchill III) - 2:26 "Ya Better Stop" (Cliff Ferre, Mark McIntyre) – 2:36 "The Sea Song" (Dorothy Fields, Arthur Schwartz) - 2:55 "Look to Your Heart" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 3:10 "I Believe" (Styne, Cahn) – 2:33 "Love Looks So Well On You" (Spence, Keith, Bergman) - 2:41

335

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - vocals • The Ralph Brewster singers • • • • • Bing Crosby June Hutton The Nuggets Keely Smith Nelson Riddle - arranger

References
[1] The Complete Capitol Singles Collection (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r239261) at Allmusic

The Best of the Columbia Years: 19431952

336

The Best of the Columbia Years: 1943–1952
The Best Of The Columbia Years: 1943-1952
Box set by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label June 16, 1998 1943-1952 Classic pop 297:29 Legacy Records Frank Sinatra chronology

The Very Best of Frank Sinatra (1997)

The Best Of The Columbia Years: 1943-1952 (1998)

Frank Sinatra & the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra (1998)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

The Best Of The Columbia Years: 1943-1952 is a four-disc box set by the American singer Frank Sinatra, released on Legacy Records in 1998, catalogue C4K 64681. All but nine tracks were originally released on 78 rpm records, and as an overview of Sinatra's recordings on Columbia this set replaces the previous catalogue item The Voice: The Columbia Years (1943-1952), released in 1986 on vinyl and later also on compact disc. The box set contains the highlights of his career with Columbia Records; the complete recordings from these years were released in 1993 on The Columbia Years 1943-1952: The Complete Recordings.

Content
These recordings comprise the first phase of Sinatra's solo career, after his apprenticeship in the swing bands of Harry James and Tommy Dorsey, Sinatra having signed with Columbia on June 1, 1943. At that time, the Petrillo recording ban was on, and the first two tracks of the box reflect this situation, a cappella recordings of Frank with a backing vocal group. A second recording ban took place in 1948, and Sinatra again recorded with vocals only on the track "Nature Boy." The rest of the recordings featured instrumental backing with few exceptions arranged by Axel Stordahl, Sinatra's mainstay during the Columbia period. The bulk of the selections on this package date from the 1940s, with only the disc four covering the declining years of his career while on the label in the 1950s. Beginning with disc four track five, Columbia simultaneously released these records as 45 rpm singles, the new format having been introduced by its rival RCA Records in 1949. Disc one tracks 19 through 21, and disc two tracks four through six, were issued as part of Sinatra's very first album, a package of four records entitled The Voice of Frank Sinatra, which peaked at #1 on the fledgling album chart. Disc four tracks six through nine were also included on the Columbia ten-inch album Sing and Dance with Frank Sinatra, catalogue CL-6143. Disc two track 22, "Sweet Lorraine," features Sinatra with the 1946 Metronome All-Stars: Charlie Shavers, Lawrence Brown, Johnny Hodges, Coleman Hawkins, Harry Carney, Nat King Cole, Bob Ahern, Eddie Safranski,

The Best of the Columbia Years: 19431952 and Buddy Rich. Disc three track 2, "My Romance," is a duet with Dinah Shore, and disc three track 23, "Let's Take An Old-Fashioned Walk," is a duet with Doris Day.

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Select personnel
• • • • • • • • • • • Frank Sinatra - vocal Axel Stordahl - instrumental arrangements Felix Slatkin - violin John Guarnieri - piano Bill Miller - piano Dave Barbour - guitar Barney Kessel - guitar Allan Reuss - guitar George Van Eps - guitar Nick Fatool - drums Alvin Stoller - drums

Track listing
Disc One
1. "Close To You" (Al Hoffman, Carl G. Lampl, Jerry Livingston) - 3:18 2. "People Will Say We're In Love" (Oscar Hammerstein II, Richard Rodgers) - 3:20 3. "If You Are But A Dream" (Moe Jaffe, Jack Fulton, Nat Bonx) - 3:04 4. "Saturday Night (Is the Loneliest Night of the Week)" (Jule Styne, Sammy Cahn) - 2:43 5. "White Christmas" (Irving Berlin) - 3:22 6. "I Fall In Love Too Easily" (Styne, Cahn) - 3:13 7. "Ol' Man River" (Hammerstein II, Jerome Kern) - 4:00 8. "Stormy Weather" (Ted Koehler, Harold Arlen) - 4:13 9. "Embraceable You (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) - 3:16 10. "(I Got A Woman Crazy For Me) She's Funny That Way" (Richard Whiting, Neil Moret) - 3:20 11. "My Melancholy Baby" (Ernie Burnett, Maybelle Watson, George A. Norton) - 3:08 12. "Where or When (Lorenz Hart, Rodgers) - 3:13 13. "All The Things You Are" (Hammerstein II, Kern) - 3:00 14. "I Should Care" (Cahn, Paul Weston, Axel Stordahl) - 3:00 15. "Dream" (Johnny Mercer) - 3:02 16. "Put Your Dreams Away (For Another Day) (Ruth Lowe, Paul Mann, Stephen Weiss) - 3:06 17. "Over The Rainbow" (Yip Harburg, Arlen) - 3:16 18. "If I Loved You" (Hammerstein II, Rodgers) - 3:04 19. "Someone To Watch Over Me" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) - 3:19 20. "You Go to My Head" (J. Fred Coots, Haven Gillespie) - 2:59 21. "These Foolish Things (Remind Me Of You)" (Holt Marvell, Jack Strachey) - 3:07 22. "The House I Live In" (Lewis Allan, Earl Robinson) - 3:18 23. "Day By Day" (Cahn, Paul Weston, Stordahl) - 3:08

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Disc Two
1. "Nancy (With the Laughing Face)" (Phil Silvers, Jimmy Van Heusen) - 3:19 2. "Full Moon And Empty Arms" (Buddy Kaye, Ted Mossman, Sergei Rachmaninoff) - 3:12 3. "Oh, What It Seemed To Be" (Bennie Benjamin, George Weiss, Frankie Carle) - 2:59 4. "I Don't Stand a Ghost of a Chance with You" (Bing Crosby, Ned Washington, Victor Young) - 3:11 5. "Why Shouldn't I?" (Cole Porter) - 2:52 6. "Try A Little Tenderness" (James Campbell, Reginald Connelly, Harry M. Woods) - 3:08 7. "Begin the Beguine" (Porter) - 2:55 8. "They Say It's Wonderful" (Berlin) - 3:04 9. "That Old Black Magic" (Mercer, Arlen) - 2:32 10. "How Deep Is the Ocean?" (Berlin) - 2:56 11. "Home On The Range" (Brewster M. Higley, Daniel E. Kelley) - 3:11 12. "Five Minutes More" (Styne, Cahn) - 2:35 13. "The Things We Did Last Summer" (Styne, Cahn) - 3:15 14. "Among My Souvenirs" (Edgar Leslie, Horatio Nicholls) - 3:15 15. "September Song" (Maxwell Anderson, Kurt Weill) - 3:05 16. "Blue Skies" (Berlin) - 2:28 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. "Guess I'll Hang My Tears Out to Dry" (Styne, Cahn) - 3:23 "Lost In The Stars" (Anderson, Weill) - 3:15 "There's No Business Like Show Business" (Berlin) - 3:18 "Time After Time" (Styne, Cahn) - 3:09 "The Brooklyn Bridge" (Styne, Cahn) - 2:35 "Sweet Lorraine" (Mitchell Parish, Cliff Burwell) - 3:08 "Always" (Berlin) - 2:55 "Mam'selle" (Mack Gordon, Edmund Goulding) - 3:19

Disc Three
1. "Stella by Starlight" (Washington, Young) - 3:19 2. "My Romance" (Hart, Rodgers) - 3:15 3. "If I Had You" (Ted Shapiro, James Campbell, Reginald Connelly) - 3:06 4. "One For My Baby (And One More For The Road)" (Mercer, Arlen) - 3:04 5. "But Beautiful" (Johnny Burke, Van Heusen) - 3:12 6. "You're My Girl" (Styne, Cahn) - 3:09 7. "All Of Me" (Gerald Marks, Seymour Simons) - 2:44 8. "Night And Day" (Cole Porter) - 3:38 9. "S'Posin" (Andy Razaf, Paul Denniker) - 2:45 10. "The Night We Called It A Day" (Tom Adair, Matt Dennis) - 3:21 11. "The Song Is You" (Hammerstein II, Kern) - 3:15 12. "What'll I Do?" (Irving Berlin) - 3:05 13. "The Music Stopped" (Jimmy McHugh, Harold Adamson) - 2:57 14. "Fools Rush In (Where Angels Fear To Tread)" (Mercer, Rube Bloom) - 2:59 15. "I've Got a Crush on You" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) - 3:15 16. "Body and Soul" (Johnny Green, Edward Heyman, Robert Sour, Frank Eyton) - 3:18 17. "I'm Glad There Is You (Paul Madeira, Jimmy Dorsey) - 3:06 18. "Autumn in New York" (Vernon Duke) - 3:15 19. "Nature Boy" (Eden Ahbez) - 3:18 20. "Once In Love With Amy" (Frank Loesser) - 3:00

The Best of the Columbia Years: 19431952 21. 22. 23. 24. "Some Enchanted Evening" (Hammerstein II, Rodgers) - 3:07 "The Hucklebuck" (Roy Alfred, Andy Gibson, Charlie Parker) - 3:00 "Let's Take An Old-Fashioned Walk" (Berlin) - 2:59 "It All Depends On You" (Buddy G. DeSylva, Lew Brown, Ray Henderson) - 2:43

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Disc Four
1. "Bye Bye Baby" (Styne, Leo Robin) - 2:38 2. "Don't Cry, Joe (Let Her Go, Let Her Go, Let Her Go)" (Joe Marsala) - 3:18 3. "That Lucky Old Sun" (Haven Gillespie, Beasley Smith) - 3:16 4. "Chattanooga Shoe Shine Boy" (Harry Stone, Jack Stapp) - 2:37 5. "American Beauty Rose" (Hal David, Arthur Altman, Redd Evans) - 2:34 6. "Should I?" (Arthur Freed, Nacio Herb Brown) - 2:24 7. "You Do Something To Me" (Porter) - 2:33 8. "Lover" (Rodgers, Hart) - 2:39 9. "When You're Smiling" (Mark Fisher, Joe Goodwin, Larry Shay) - 2:28 10. "London By Night" (Carroll Coates) - 3:09 11. "Meet Me at The Copa" (Cahn, Stordahl) - 3:11 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. "April In Paris" (Yip Harburg, Duke) - 2:43 "I Guess I'll Have To Dream The Rest" (Martin Block, Bud Green, Mickey Stoner) - 2:42 "Nevertheless (I'm In Love With You)" (Bert Kalmar, Harry Ruby) - 3:08 "I Am Loved" (Porter) - 2:25 "Hello, Young Lovers" (Rodgers, Hammerstein II) - 3:32 "We Kiss In A Shadow" (Rodgers, Hammerstein II) - 3:35 "I'm A Fool To Want You" (Joel Herron, Frank Sinatra, Jack Wolf) - 2:55 "Love Me" (Washington, Victor Young) - 3:09 "Deep Night" (Rudy Vallee, Charlie Henderson) - 3:16 "I Could Write A Book" (Rodgers, Hart) - 2:42 "I Hear A Rhapsody" (George Fragos, Jack Baker, Dick Gasparre, Richard Bard) - 3:04 "My Girl" (Charles Freed) - 2:24 "The Birth of the Blues" (Buddy G. DeSylva, Lew Brown, Henderson) - 3:28 "Azure-Te (Paris Blues)" William Davis, Donald Wolf) - 2:33 "Why Try To Change Me Now" (Cy Coleman, Joseph A. McCarthy) - 2:47

References
[1] The Best of the Columbia Years: 1943–1952 (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r228763) at Allmusic

The Capitol Years

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The Capitol Years
The Capitol Years
Box set by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label November 10, 1998 1953-1961 Classic pop ~~:~~ EMI Capitol Records Frank Sinatra chronology

Frank Sinatra & the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra (1998)

The Capitol Years (1998)

Lucky Numbers (1998)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

For the 1990 Frank Sinatra compilation album, see The Capitol Years (1990 Frank Sinatra album). The Capitol Years is a 1998 box set by the American singer Frank Sinatra. This set was originally assembled by EMI, Capitol's sister company in the United Kingdom. The set contains 21 CDs featuring every album that Sinatra authorized for release between 1953 and 1961 (save for Frank Sinatra Conducts Tone Poems of Color and A Jolly Christmas from Frank Sinatra), remastered in state-of-the-art 20-bit digital audio. Each CD contains an individual Sinatra Capitol LP (including singles compilations), but the bonus tracks from the American versions appear on a separate CD here as The Rare Sinatra. The sound quality on this box is arguably superior to American remasters, also produced in 1998 for eight of Sinatra's key albums in the United States.

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Track listing
Disc one - Songs for Young Lovers (1954)
1. "The Girl Next Door" (Hugh Martin, Ralph Blane) – 2:39 2. "They Can't Take That Away from Me" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) – 1:59 3. "Violets for Your Furs" (Tom Adair, Matt Dennis) – 3:07 4. "Someone to Watch over Me" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) – 2:59 5. "My One and Only Love" (Guy Wood, Robert Mellin) – 3:14 6. "Little Girl Blue" (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) – 2:54 7. "Like Someone in Love" (Jimmy Van Heusen, Johnny Burke) – 3:13 8. "A Foggy Day" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) – 2:41 9. "It Worries Me" (Fritz Schultz-Reichelt, Carl Sigman) – 2:55 10. "I Can Read Between the Lines" (Ramon Getzov, Sid Frank) – 2:50 11. "I Get a Kick Out of You" (Cole Porter) – 2:56 12. "My Funny Valentine" (Rodgers, Hart) – 2:31

Disc two - Swing Easy! (1954)
1. "Jeepers Creepers" (Harry Warren, Johnny Mercer) – 2:24 2. "Taking a Chance on Love" (Vernon Duke, Ted Fetter, John Latouche) – 2:14 3. "Wrap Your Troubles in Dreams" (Harry Barris, Ted Koehler, Billy Moll) – 2:17 4. "Lean Baby" (Roy Alfred, Billy May) – 2:34 5. "I Love You" (Harry Archer, Harlan Thompson) – 2:28 6. "I'm Gonna Sit Right Down (And Write Myself a Letter)" (Fred E. Ahlert, Joe Young) – 2:29 7. "Get Happy" (Koehler, Harold Arlen)– 2:27 8. "All of Me" (Seymour Simons, Gerald Marks) – 2:08 9. "How Could You Do a Thing Like That to Me" (Tyree Glenn, Allan Roberts) – 2:44 10. "Why Should I Cry over You?" (Chester Conn, Ned Miller) – 2:41 11. "Sunday" (Chester Conn, Benny Krueger, Ned Miller, Jule Styne) – 2:31 12. "Just One of Those Things" (Porter) – 3:14

Disc three - In the Wee Small Hours (1955)
1. "In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning" (Bob Hilliard, David Mann) – 3:02 2. "Mood Indigo" (Barney Bigard, Duke Ellington, Irving Mills) – 3:32 3. "Glad to Be Unhappy" (Rodgers, Hart) – 2:39 4. "I Get Along Without You Very Well (Except Sometimes)" (Hoagy Carmichael, Jane Brown Thompson) – 3:45 5. "Deep in a Dream" (Eddie DeLange, Van Heusen) – 2:51 6. "I See Your Face Before Me" (Howard Dietz, Arthur Schwartz) – 3:27 7. "Can't We Be Friends?" (Paul James, Kay Swift) – 2:50 8. "When Your Lover Has Gone" (Einar Aaron Swan) – 3:12 9. "What Is This Thing Called Love?" (Porter) – 2:36 10. "Last Night When We Were Young" (Arlen, Yip Harburg) – 3:18 11. "I'll Be Around" (Alec Wilder) – 3:01 12. "Ill Wind" (Arlen, Koehler) – 3:48 13. "It Never Entered My Mind" (Rodgers, Hart) – 2:43 14. "Dancing on the Ceiling" (Rodgers, Hart) – 3:00 15. "I'll Never Be the Same" (Gus Kahn, Matty Malneck, Frank Signorelli) – 3:07

The Capitol Years 16. "This Love of Mine" (Sol Parker, Henry W. Sanicola, Jr., Frank Sinatra) – 3:35

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Disc four - This Is Sinatra! (1956)
1. "I've Got the World on a String" (Arlen, Koehler) – 2:14 2. "Three Coins in the Fountain" (Styne, Sammy Cahn) – 3:07 3. "Love and Marriage" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:41 4. "From Here to Eternity" (Freddie Karger, Robert Wells) – 3:01 5. "South of the Border" (Jimmy Kennedy, Michael Carr) – 2:52 6. "Rain (Falling from the Skies)" (Mellin, Gunther Finlay) – 3:27 7. "The Gal That Got Away" (Arlen, I. Gershwin) – 3:12 8. "Young at Heart" (Johnny Richards, Carolyn Leigh) – 2:53 9. "Learnin' the Blues" (Dolores Silvers) – 3:04 10. "My One and Only Love" – 3:15 11. "(Love Is) The Tender Trap" (Van Heusen, Cahn) – 3:00 12. "Don't Worry 'bout Me" (Rube Bloom, Koehler) - 3:07

Disc five - Songs for Swingin' Lovers (1956)
1. "You Make Me Feel So Young" (Josef Myrow, Mack Gordon) – 2:57 2. "It Happened in Monterey" (Mabel Wayne, Billy Rose) – 2:37 3. "You're Getting to Be a Habit with Me" (Warren, Al Dubin) – 2:19 4. "You Brought a New Kind of Love to Me" (Sammy Fain, Irving Kahal, Pierre Norman) – 2:49 5. "Too Marvelous for Words" (Richard A. Whiting, Mercer) – 2:32 6. "Old Devil Moon" (Burton Lane, Harburg) – 3:57 7. "Pennies from Heaven" (Arthur Johnston, Burke)– 2:45 8. "Our Love Is Here to Stay" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) – 2:42 9. "I've Got You Under My Skin" (Porter) – 3:45 10. "I Thought About You" (Van Heusen, Mercer) – 2:31 11. "We'll Be Together Again" (Carl T. Fischer, Frankie Laine) – 4:27 12. "Makin' Whoopee" (Walter Donaldson, Kahn) – 3:08 13. "Swingin' Down the Lane" (Isham Jones, Kahn) – 2:54 14. "Anything Goes" (Porter) – 2:44 15. "How About You?" (Burton Lane, Ralph Freed) – 2:45

Disc six - Close to You (1957)
1. "Close to You" (Al Hoffman, Carl G. Lampl, Jerry Livingston) – 3:40 2. "P.S. I Love You" (Gordon Jenkins, Mercer) – 4:24 3. "Love Locked Out" (Max Kester, Ray Noble) – 2:45 4. "Everything Happens to Me" (Adair, Dennis) – 3:22 5. "It's Easy to Remember (And So Hard to Forget)" (Rodgers, Hart) – 3:37 6. "Don't Like Goodbyes" (Arlen, Truman Capote) – 4:52 7. "With Every Breath I Take" (Ralph Rainger, Leo Robin) – 3:41 8. "Blame It on My Youth" (Edward Heyman, Oscar Levant) – 3:00 9. "It Could Happen to You" (Burke, Van Heusen) – 3:16 10. "I've Had My Moments" (Donaldson, Kahn) – 3:50 11. "I Couldn't Sleep a Wink Last Night" (Harold Adamson, Jimmy McHugh) – 3:28 12. "The End of a Love Affair" (Edward Redding) – 4:09

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Disc seven - A Swingin' Affair! (1957)
1. "Night and Day" (Porter) – 4:02 2. "I Wish I Were in Love Again" (Rodgers, Hart) – 2:31 3. "I Got Plenty O' Nuttin'" (DuBose Heyward, G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) – 3:13 4. "I Guess I'll Have to Change My Plan" (Schwartz, Dietz) – 2:26 5. "Nice Work if You Can Get It" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) – 2:24 6. "Stars Fell on Alabama" (Frank Perkins, Mitchell Parish) – 2:41 7. "No One Ever Tells You" (Hub Atwood, Carroll Coates) – 3:28 8. "I Won't Dance" (Jerome Kern, McHugh, Oscar Hammerstein II, Otto Harbach, Dorothy Fields) – 3:27 9. "The Lonesome Road" (Nathaniel Shilket, Gene Austin) – 3:57 10. "At Long Last Love" (Porter) – 2:27 11. "You'd Be So Nice to Come Home To" (Porter) – 2:07 12. "I Got It Bad (And That Ain't Good)" (Ellington, Paul Francis Webster) – 3:25 13. "From This Moment On" (Porter) – 3:56 14. "If I Had You" (Jimmy Campbell, Reginald Connelly, Ted Shapiro) – 2:39 15. "Oh! Look at Me Now" (Joe Bushkin, John DeVries) – 2:50

Disc eight - Where Are You? (1957)
1. "Where Are You?" (Harold Adamson, Jimmy McHugh) – 3:30 2. "The Night We Called It a Day (Dennis, Adair) – 3:27 3. "I Cover the Waterfront" (Johnny Green, Edward Heyman) – 2:59 4. "Maybe You'll Be There" (Bloom, Sammy Gallop) – 3:06 5. "Laura" (Mercer, David Raksin) – 3:27 6. "Lonely Town" (Leonard Bernstein, Betty Comden, Adolph Green) – 4:11 7. "Autumn Leaves" (Jacques Prévert, Mercer, Joseph Kosma) – 2:51 8. "I'm a Fool to Want You" (Sinatra, Jack Wolf, Joel Herron) – 4:50 9. "I Think of You" (Jack Elliott, Don Marcotte) – 3:03 10. "Where Is the One?" (Wilder, Edwin Finckel)- 3:12 11. "There's No You" (Adair, Hal Hopper) - 3:45 12. "Baby Won't You Please Come Home" (Charles Warfield, Clarence Williams) - 2:57

Disc nine - Come Fly with Me (1958)
1. "Come Fly With Me" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 3:18 2. "Around the World" (Victor Young, Adamson) – 3:20 3. "Isle of Capri" (Will Grosz, Jimmy Kennedy) – 2:29 4. "Moonlight in Vermont" (Karl Suessdorf, John Blackburn) – 3:31 5. "Autumn in New York" (Duke) – 4:36 6. "On the Road to Mandalay" (Oley Speaks, Rudyard Kipling) – 3:29 7. "Let's Get Away from It All" (Dennis, Adair) – 2:10 8. "April in Paris" (Duke, Harburg) – 2:50 9. "London By Night" (Carroll Coates) – 3:30 10. "Brazil" (Ary Barroso, Bob Russell) – 2:55 11. "Blue Hawaii" (Rainger, Robin) – 2:43 12. "It's Nice to go Trav'ling" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 3:49

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Disc ten - This Is Sinatra Volume 2 (1958)
1. "Hey! Jealous Lover" (Cahn, Kay Twomey, Bee Walker) – 2:24 2. "Everybody Loves Somebody" (Irving Taylor, Ken Lane) – 3:46 3. "Something Wonderful Happens in Summer" (Bushkin, Devries) – 3:16 4. "Half as Lovely (Twice as True)" (Lew Spence, Gallop) – 3:09 5. "You're Cheatin' Yourself (If You're Cheatin' on Me)" (Hoffman, Dick Manning) – 2:38 6. "You'll Always Be the One I Love" (Ticker Freeman, Sunny Skylar) – 2:59 7. "You Forgot All the Words (While I Still Remember the Tune)" (Bernie Wayne, E.H. Jay) – 3:24 8. "(How Little It Matters) How Little We Know" (Phillip Springer, Leigh) – 2:44 9. "Time After Time" (Styne, Cahn) - 3:31 10. "Crazy Love" (Cahn, Phil Tuminello) - 2:54 11. "Wait for Me" (Nelson Riddle, Stanford) - 2:54 12. "If You Are But a Dream" (Moe Jaffe, Jack Fulton, Nat Bonx) – 3:58 13. "So Long, My Love" (Cahn, Spence) – 2:50 14. "It's the Same Old Dream" (Styne, Cahn) – 3:06 15. "I Believe" (Styne, Cahn) – 2:33 16. "Put Your Dreams Away (For Another Day)" (Paul Mann, George David Weiss, Ruth Lowe) – 3:12

Disc eleven - Only the Lonely (1958)
1. "Only the Lonely" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 4:10 2. "Angel Eyes" (Dennis, Earl Brent) - 3:46 3. "What's New?" (Bob Haggart, Burke) - 5:13 4. "It's a Lonesome Old Town" (Harry Tobias, Charles Kisco) - 4:18 5. "Willow Weep for Me" (Ann Ronell) - 4:19 6. "Goodbye" (Gordon Jenkins) - 5:45 7. "Blues in the Night" (Arlen, Mercer) - 4:44 8. "Guess I'll Hang My Tears Out to Dry" (Cahn, Styne) - 4:00 9. "Ebb Tide" (Robert Maxwell, Carl Sigman) - 3:18 10. "Spring is Here" (Rodgers, Hart) - 4:47 11. "Gone with the Wind" (Allie Wrubel, Herb Magidson) - 5:15 12. "One for My Baby (and One More for the Road)" (Arlen, Mercer) - 4:23

Disc twelve - Come Dance with Me! (1959)
1. "Come Dance with Me" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:31 2. "Something's Gotta Give" (Mercer) – 2:38 3. "Just in Time" (Styne, Comden, Green) – 2:24 4. "Dancing in the Dark" (Schwartz, Dietz) – 2:26 5. "Too Close for Comfort" (Jerry Bock, Larry Holofcener, Weiss) – 2:34 6. "I Could Have Danced All Night" (Alan Jay Lerner, Frederick Loewe) – 2:40 7. "Saturday Night (Is the Loneliest Night of the Week)" (Cahn, Styne) – 1:54 8. "Day In, Day Out" (Bloom, Mercer) – 3:25 9. "Cheek to Cheek" (Irving Berlin) – 3:06 10. "Baubles, Bangles and Beads" (Robert Wright, George Forrest) – 2:46 11. "The Song Is You" (Kern, Hammerstein) – 2:43 12. "The Last Dance" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:11

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Disc thirteen - No One Cares (1959)
1. "When No One Cares" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:42 2. "A Cottage for Sale" (Larry Conley, Willard Robison) – 3:16 3. "Stormy Weather" (Arlen, Ted Koehler) – 3:20 4. "Where Do You Go?" (Arnold Sundgaard, Wilder) – 2:34 5. "I Don't Stand a Ghost of a Chance with You" (Bing Crosby, Ned Washington, Young) – 3:16 6. "Here's That Rainy Day" (Burke, Van Heusen) – 3:34 7. "I Can't Get Started" (Duke, I. Gershwin) – 4:01 8. "Why Try to Change Me Now?" (Cy Coleman, Joseph Allan McCarthy) – 3:41 9. "Just Friends" (John Klenner, Sam M. Lewis) – 3:40 10. "I'll Never Smile Again" (Lowe) – 3:46 11. "None But the Lonely Heart" (Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky, Bill Westbrook) – 3:41 12. "The One I Love (Belongs to Somebody Else)" (Jones, Kahn) – 3:05

Disc fourteen - Look to Your Heart (recorded 1953-5, released 1959)
1. "Look to Your Heart" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 3:10 2. "Anytime, Anywhere" (Imogen Carpenter, Lenny Adelson) – 2:45 3. "Not as a Stranger" (Van Heusen, Buddy Kaye) – 2:47 4. "Our Town" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 3:16 5. "You, My Love" (Van Heusen, Gordon) – 2:56 6. "Same Old Saturday Night" (Frank Reardon, Cahn) – 2:31 7. "Fairy Tale" (Jay Livingston, Stanford) – 2:59 8. "The Impatient Years" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 3:14 9. "I Could Have Told You" (Carl Sigman, Van Heusen) – 3:18 10. "When I Stop Loving You" (George Cates, Alan Copeland, Mort Greene) – 2:56 11. "If I Had Three Wishes" (Claude Baum, Spence) – 2:56 12. "I'm Gonna Live Till I Die" (Hoffman, Walter Kent, Mann Curtis) – 1:54

Disc fifteen - Nice 'n' Easy (1960)
1. "Nice 'n' Easy" (Alan Bergman, Marilyn Keith, Spence) – 2:45 2. "That Old Feeling" (Lew Brown, Fain) – 3:33 3. "How Deep Is The Ocean?" (Berlin) – 3:15 4. "I've Got a Crush on You" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) – 2:16 5. "You Go To My Head" (J. Fred Coots, Haven Gillespie) – 4:28 6. "Fools Rush In (Where Angels Fear to Tread)" (Bloom, Mercer) – 3:22 7. "Nevertheless (I'm in Love with You)" (Bert Kalmar, Harry Ruby) – 3:18 8. "(I Got A Woman Crazy For Me) She's Funny That Way" (Neil Moret, Richard A. Whiting) – 3:55 9. "Try a Little Tenderness" (Jimmy Campbell, Reginald Connelly, Harry M. Woods) – 3:22 10. "Embraceable You" (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) – 3:24 11. "Mam'selle" (Gordon, Edmund Goulding) – 2:48 12. "Dream" (Mercer) – 2:57

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Disc sixteen - Come Swing with Me (1961)
1. "Day by Day" (Axel Stordahl, Paul Weston, Cahn) – 2:39 2. "Sentimental Journey" (Brown, Ben Homer, Bud Green) – 3:26 3. "Almost Like Being in Love" (Loewe, Lerner) – 2:02 4. "Five Minutes More" (Cahn, Styne) – 2:36 5. "American Beauty Rose" (Mack David, Redd Evans, Arthur Altman) – 2:22 6. "Yes Indeed!" (Sy Oliver) – 2:35 7. "On the Sunny Side of the Street" (McHugh, Fields) – 2:42 8. "Don't Take Your Love From Me" (Henry Nemo) – 1:59 9. "That Old Black Magic" (Arlen, Mercer) – 4:05 10. "Lover" (Rodgers, Hart) – 1:53 11. "Paper Doll" (Johnny S. Black) – 2:08 12. "I've Heard That Song Before" (Cahn, Styne) – 2:33

Disc seventeen - All the Way (1961)
1. "All the Way" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:55 2. "High Hopes" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:43 3. "Talk to Me" (Eddie Snyder, Stanley Kahan, Rudy Vallee) – 3:04 4. "French Foreign Legion" (Aaron Schroeder, Guy Wood) – 2:03 5. "To Love and Be Loved" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 3:53 6. "River, Stay 'Way from My Door" (Matt Dixon, Harry M. Woods) – 2:39 7. "Witchcraft" (Coleman, Leigh) – 2:54 8. "It's Over, It's Over, It's Over" (Dennis, Stanford) – 2:42 9. "Old McDonald Had a Farm" (Traditional, Bergman, Keith, Spence) – 2:42 10. "This Was My Love" (Jim Harbert) – 3:28 11. "All My Tomorrows" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 3:15 12. "Sleep Warm" (Bergman, Keith, Spence) – 2:43

Disc eighteen - Sinatra's Swingin' Session!!! (1961)
1. "When You're Smiling" (Mark Fisher, Joe Goodwin, Larry Shay) – 2:00 2. "Blue Moon" (Rodgers, Hart) – 2:51 3. "S'Posin" (Paul Denniker, Andy Razaf) – 1:48 4. "It All Depends on You" (B.G. DeSylva, Brown, Ray Henderson) – 2:02 5. "It's Only a Paper Moon" (Arlen, Harburg, Rose) – 2:19 6. "My Blue Heaven" (Donaldson, George A. Whiting) – 2:03 7. "Should I?" (Arthur Freed, Nacio Herb Brown) – 1:30 8. "September in the Rain" (Warren, Dubin) – 2:58 9. "Always" (Berlin) – 2:17 10. "I Can't Believe That You're in Love with Me" (Clarence Gaskill, McHugh) – 2:25 11. "I Concentrate on You" (Porter) – 2:23 12. "You Do Something to Me" (Porter) – 1:33

The Capitol Years

347

Disc nineteen - Point of No Return (1962)
1. "(Ah, the Apple Trees) When the World Was Young" (Mercer, M. Philippe-Gerard, Angele Marie T. Vannier) 3:48 2. "I'll Remember April" (Don Raye, Gene de Paul, Patricia Johnston) - 2:50 3. "September Song" (Kurt Weill, Maxwell Anderson) - 4:21 4. "A Million Dreams Ago" (Lou Quadling, Eddie Howard, Dick Jurgens) - 2:41 5. "I'll See You Again" (Noël Coward) - 2:44 6. "There Will Never Be Another You" (Gordon, Warren) - 3:09 7. "Somewhere along the Way" (Kurt Adams, Gallop) - 3:01 8. "It's a Blue World" (Bob Wright, Chet Forrest) - 2:49 9. "These Foolish Things (Remind Me of You)" (Jack Strachey, Harry Link, Holt Marvell) - 3:59 10. "As Time Goes By" (Herman Hupfeld) - 3:17 11. "I'll Be Seeing You" (Fain, Irving Kahal) - 2:47 12. "Memories of You" (Eubie Blake, Razaf) - 3:53

Disc twenty - Sinatra Sings of Love and Things (1962)
1. "The Nearness of You" (Hoagy Carmichael, Washington) - 2:44 2. "Hidden Persuasion" (Wainwright Churchill III) - 2:26 3. "The Moon Was Yellow" (Fred E. Ahlert, Edgar Leslie) - 3:02 4. "I Love Paris" (Porter) - 1:52 5. "Monique" (Cahn, Elmer Bernstein) - 3:18 6. "Chicago" (Fred Fisher) - 2:12 7. "Love Looks So Well On You" (Spence, Keith, Bergman) - 2:41 8. "Sentimental Baby" (Spence, Keith, Bergman) - 2:38 9. "Mr. Success" (Edwin Grienes, Sinatra, Sanicola) - 2:42 10. "They Came to Cordura" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:02 11. "I Gotta Right to Sing the Blues" (Arlen, Koehler) - 3:00 12. "Something Wonderful Happens In Summer" - 3:12

Disc twenty-one - The Rare Sinatra
1. "Day In, Day Out" – 3:20 2. "I'm Walking Behind You" (Billy Reid) – 2:58 3. "Don't Make a Beggar of Me" (Al Sherman) – 3:04 4. "Ya Better Stop" (Cliff Ferre, Mark McIntyre) – 2:36 5. "Take a Chance" (David Raksin, Don Stanford) – 2:40 6. "Day In, Day Out" – 3:08 7. "Memories of You" (E. Blake, A. Razaf) – 2:54 8. "If It's the Last Thing I Do" (Cahn, Saul Chaplin) – 4:00 9. "There's a Flaw in My Flue" (Burke, Van Heusen) – 2:41 10. "Wait Till You See Her" (Rodgers, Hart) – 3:10 11. "Nothing in Common" (Van Heusen, Cahn) – 2:33 12. "Same Old Song and Dance" (Van Heusen, Cahn, Bobby Worth) – 2:54 13. "How Are Ya' Fixed for Love?" (Van Heusen, Cahn) – 2:28 14. "Where or When" (Rodgers, Hart) – 2:29 15. "It All Depends on You" – 2:04 16. "I Couldn't Care Less" (Van Heusen, Cahn) – 3:02

The Capitol Years 17. "The Song Is You" – 2:57 18. "The One I Love (Belongs to Somebody Else)" – 3:06

348

Personnel
• Frank Sinatra - Vocals

References
[1] The Capitol Years (1998 Frank Sinatra album) (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r381866) at Allmusic

Reprise Musical Repertory Theatre

349

Reprise Musical Repertory Theatre
Reprise Musical Repertory Theatre
Compilation album by Various Artists Released September 26, 2000

Recorded 1963, Los Angeles Genre Label Jazz vocal, Traditional pop music Reprise

Producer Sonny Burke Professional reviews • link [1] Allmusic

Reprise Musical Repertory Theatre is a series of albums released in 1963 (see 1963 in music), and released in this box set in 2000. The four discs feature the scores of four popular Broadway musicals of the time, namely Finian's Rainbow (1947), Kiss Me, Kate (1948), South Pacific (1949) and Guys and Dolls (1950).

Track listing
Disc One - Finian's Rainbow 1. Overture - 4:00 2. "This Time of the Year" (The Hi-Lo's) - 2:28 3. "How Are Things in Glocca Morra?" (Rosemary Clooney) - 3:06 4. "If This Isn't Love" (Dean Martin, Hi Lo's) - 2:32 5. "Look to the Rainbow" (Clooney) - 2:54 6. "Something Sort of Grandish" (Bing Crosby) - 2:26 7. "Old Devil Moon" (Frank Sinatra) - 2:59 8. "Necessity" (Sammy Davis, Jr.) - 3:24 9. "When I'm Not Near the Girl I Love" (Sinatra) - 3:25 10. "When the Idle Poor Become the Idle Rich" (Lou Monte, Mary Kaye Trio) - 2:37 11. "The Begat" (The McGuire Sisters) - 3:40 12. "How Are Things in Glocca Morra?" (Reprise) (Clark Dennis) - 2:24 13. "The Great Come-And-Get It Day" (Davis) - 2:41 Disc Two - Kiss Me, Kate 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Overture - 3:40 "Another Op'nin', Another Show" (Hi Lo's) - 1:55 "Why Can't You Behave?" (Jo Stafford) - 3:01 "We Open in Venice" (Sinatra, Martin, Davis) - 2:13 "So in Love" (Johnny Prophet) - 2:52 "I Hate Men" (Phyllis McGuire) - 3:06 "Too Darn Hot" (Davis) - 2:29 "Were Thine That Special Face" (Prophet) - 3:35

Reprise Musical Repertory Theatre 9. "Where Is the Life That Late I Led?" (Monte) - 2:56 10. "Wunderbar" (Dinah Shore, Prophet) - 2:58 11. "Always True to You in My Fashion" (Keely Smith) - 3:38 12. "Bianca" (Martin) - 2:47 13. "So in Love" (Reprise) (Sinatra, Smith) - 2:53 Disc Three - South Pacific 1. Overture - 3:57 2. "Dites-Moi" (McGuire Sisters) - 1:55 3. "A Cockeyed Optimist" (Stafford) - 3:12 4. "Twin Soliloquies" (Sinatra, Smith) - 1:38 5. "Some Enchanted Evening" (Sinatra) - 3:29 6. "(I'm in Love with) a Wonderful Guy" (Smith) - 3:29 7. "Younger Than Springtime" (Crosby) - 2:38 8. "Bali Ha'i" (Stafford) - 3:43 9. "There Is Nothing Like a Dame" (Davis) - 2:37 10. "I'm Gonna Wash That Man Right Outa My Hair" (Shore) - 2:38 11. "Bloody Mary" (Hi-Lo's) - 1:56 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. "Happy Talk" (Debbie Reynolds) - 3:05 "Younger Than Springtime" (Reprise) (Hi-Lo's) - 3:14 "This Nearly Was Mine" (Sinatra) - 2:47 "Honey Bun" (Shore) - 2:55 "You've Got to Be Carefully Taught" (Davis) - 1:45 "Some Enchanted Evening" (Reprise) (Sinatra, Clooney) - 3:21

350

Disc Four - Guys and Dolls 1. Overture - 3:34 2. "Fugue for Tinhorns" (Sinatra, Crosby, Martin) - 1:31 3. "I'll Know" (Stafford) - 3:31 4. "The Oldest Established (Permanent Floating Crap Game in New York)" (Sinatra, Crosby, Martin) - 2:33 5. "A Bushel and a Peck" (McGuire Sisters) - 2:31 6. "Guys and Dolls" (Sinatra, Martin) - 2:50 7. "If I Were a Bell" (Shore) - 2:40 8. "I've Never Been in Love Before" (Sinatra) - 2:57 9. "Take Back Your Mink" (Reynolds) - 2:58 10. "More I Cannot Wish You" (Clark Dennis) - 3:18 11. "Adelaide's Lament" (Reynolds) - 3:52 12. "Luck Be a Lady" (Sinatra) - 5:18 13. "Sue Me" (Reynolds, Allan Sherman) - 2:32 14. "Sit Down, You're Rockin' the Boat" (Davis) - 3:33 15. "Guys and Dolls" (Reprise) (Sinatra, Martin) - 1:51 • • • • All songs on disc one composed by Burton Lane, with lyrics by Yip Harburg All songs on disc two written by Cole Porter All songs on disc three composed by Richard Rodgers, with lyrics written by Oscar Hammerstein II All songs on disc four written by Frank Loesser

Reprise Musical Repertory Theatre

351

Personnel
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Frank Sinatra - vocals Dean Martin Sammy Davis, Jr. Dinah Shore Debbie Reynolds The Hi-Lo's Rosemary Clooney Bing Crosby The McGuire Sisters Jo Stafford Nelson Riddle - arranger Marty Paich Skip Martin - arranger Billy May - arranger Morris Stoloff - conductor

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r498999

Frank Sinatra in Hollywood 1940–1964
Frank Sinatra in Hollywood 1940-1964
Compilation album by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label May 21, 2002 1940–1964 Classic pop 363:39 Rhino / Reprise Frank Sinatra chronology

Greatest Love Songs (2002)

Frank Sinatra in Hollywood 1940-1964 (2002)

Classic Duets (2002)

Frank Sinatra in Hollywood 19401964

352

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Frank Sinatra in Hollywood 1940–1964 is a 2002 compilation album by the American singer Frank Sinatra. This boxed set collates songs that Sinatra recorded for films made by Paramount, MGM, Columbia, RKO, Universal, Warner Bros., United Artists, and 20th Century Fox, between 1940 and 1964.

Track listing
Disc one
From "Las Vegas Nights" (PARAMOUNT, 03/28/1941) : • 1. "Delores" (outtake) - (Louis Alter, Frank Loesser) - 3:25
(rec. 11/24/1940, Frank Sinatra, The Pied Pipers, Tommy Dorsey And His Orchestra)

• 2. "I'll Never Smile Again" - (Ruth Lowe) - 3:14
(rec. 11/24/1940, Frank Sinatra, Jo Stafford, The Pied Pipers, Tommy Dorsey And His Orchestra)

From "Ship Ahoy" (MGM, 05/15/1942) • 3. Radio Spot for "Ship Ahoy" (Excerpt) - 2:09
(Aired circa 1942, Frank Sinatra)

• 4. "Moonlight Bay" - (Edward Madden, Percy Wenrich) - 2:43
(rec. 12/29/1941, Frank Sinatra, The Pied Pipers, Mixed Chorus, Tommy Dorsey And His Orchestra)

• 5. "Poor You" - (Yip Harburg, Burton Lane) - 5:47
(rec. 12/16/1941, Frank Sinatra, Red Skelton, Virginia O'Brien, Eleanor Powell, Tommy Dorsey And His Orchestra)

• 6. "The Last Call for Love" - (Marcus Cummings, Harburg, Lane) - 2:27
(rec. 12/16/1941, Frank Sinatra, Jo Stafford, The Pied Pipers, Tommy Dorsey And His Orchestra)

• 7. "Blue Skies" (outtake) - (Irving Berlin) - 2:57
(rec. 12/15/1941, Frank Sinatra, Ziggy Elman (Trumpet), Band Chorus, Tommy Dorsey And His Orchestra)

• 8. Finale : "The Last Call for Love" - 1:18
(rec. 01/30/1942, Frank Sinatra, The Pied Pipers, Mixed Chorus, Tommy Dorsey And His Orchestra)

From "Reveille with Beverly" (COLUMBIA, 02/04/1943)' • 9. "Night and Day" - (Cole Porter) - 3:13
(rec. 09/17/1942, Frank Sinatra, The Columbia Pictures Orchestra, Morris Stoloff)

From "Higher and Higher" (RKO, 12/11/1943) • 10. "I Couldn't Sleep a Wink Last Night" - (Harold Adamson, Jimmy McHugh) - 2:13
(rec. 09/08/1943, Frank Sinatra, Stanley Wrightsman (Piano), The RKO Radio Studio Orchestra, Constantin Bakaleinikoff)

• 11. "The Music Stopped" - (Adamson, McHugh) - 3:01
(rec. 09/01/1943, Frank Sinatra, The RKO Radio Studio Orchestra, Constantin Bakaleinikoff)

• 12. "I Saw You First" - (Adamson, McHugh) - 1:43

Frank Sinatra in Hollywood 19401964
(rec. 08/24/1943, Frank Sinatra, Marcy McGuire, The RKO Radio Studio Orchestra, Constantin Bakaleinikoff)

353

• 13. "A Lovely Way to Spend an Evening" (w/ Orch.) - (Adamson, McHugh) - 3:12
(rec. 09/08/1943, Frank Sinatra, The RKO Radio Studio Orchestra, Constantin Bakaleinikoff)

• 14. "A Lovely Way to Spend an Evening" (w/ Piano) - (Adamson, McHugh) - 1:48
(rec. 09/08/1943, Frank Sinatra, Stanley Wrightsman (Piano))

• 15. "You're on Your Own" - (Adamson, McHugh) - 2:31
(rec. 08/24/1943, Frank Sinatra, Dooley Wilson, Mel Tormé, Marcy McGuire, Michèle Morgan, Victor Borge, The RKO Radio Studio Orchestra, Constantin Bakaleinikoff)

• 16. "You're on Your Own" (Reprise) - (Adamson, McHugh) - 0:57
(rec. 08/24/1943, Frank Sinatra, The RKO Radio Studio Orchestra, Constantin Bakaleinikoff)

• 17. Finale: "I Saw You First"/"A Lovely Way to Spend an Evening"/"The Music Stopped" - (Adamson, McHugh) - 1:30
(rec. 09/01/1943 & 09/08/1943, Frank Sinatra, Marcy McGuire, Barbara Hale, Chorus, The RKO Radio Studio Orchestra, Constantin Bakaleinikoff)

From "Your Hit Parade Extra" (Presented by Lucky Strike, 1943) • 18. "Stardust" - (Hoagy Carmichael, Mitchell Parish) - 2:33
(rec. circa 1943, Frank Sinatra, The Hit Paraders, The Hit Parade Orchestra, Mark Warnow)

From "The Road To Victory" (aka "The Shining Future") (WARNER BROS., 05/18/1944) • 19. "(There'll Be A) Hot Time in the Town of Berlin (When the Yanks Go ...)" - (Joe Bushkin, John DeVries) 1:53
(rec. 03/04/1944, Frank Sinatra, The Warner Bros. Studio Orchestra, Leo Forbstein)

From "The All-Star Bond Rally" (20th CENTURY-FOX, 04/25/1945) • 20. "Saturday Night (Is the Loneliest Night of the Week)" - (Sammy Cahn, Jule Styne) - 2:05
(rec. 11/08/1943, Frank Sinatra, Harry James And His Orchestra)

From "Step Lively" (RKO, 06/24/1944) • 21. "Come Out, Come Out, Wherever You Are" - (Sammy Cahn, Jule Styne) - 2:02
(rec. 01/31/1944, Frank Sinatra, Gloria DeHaven, Chorus, The RKO Radio Studio Orchestra, Constantin Bakaleinikoff)

• 22. "As Long as There's Music" - (Cahn, Styne) - 2:02
(rec. 01/31/1944, Frank Sinatra, The RKO Radio Studio Orchestra, Constantin Bakaleinikoff)

• 23. "Where Does Love Begin?" - (Cahn, Styne) - 2:15
(rec. 02/21/1944, Frank Sinatra, Anne Jeffreys, The RKO Radio Studio Orchestra, Constantin Bakaleinikoff)

• 24. "Some Other Time" - (Cahn, Styne) - 1:34
(rec. 02/24/1944, Frank Sinatra, The RKO Radio Studio Orchestra, Constantin Bakaleinikoff)

• 25. "Some Other Time" (Ft. Gloria DeHaven) - (Cahn, Styne) - 3:14
(rec. 02/24/1944, Frank Sinatra, Gloria DeHaven, The RKO Radio Studio Orchestra, Constantin Bakaleinikoff)

• 26. "And Then You Kissed Me" (Outtake) - (Cahn, Styne) - 2:07 • 27. Finale: "As Long as There's Music"/"Some Other Time"/"As Long as There's Music" - (Cahn, Styne) - 4:37
(rec. 02/25/1944, Frank Sinatra, Gloria DeHaven, George Murphy, Chorus, RKO Radio Studio Orchestrra, C. Bakaleinikoff)

Frank Sinatra in Hollywood 19401964

354

Disc two
From "Anchors Aweigh" (MGM, 07/19/1945) • 1. "We Hate to Leave" (Cahn, Styne) - 1:49
(rec. 06/13/44, Frank Sinatra, Gene Kelly, The M-G-M Studio Chorus, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, George Stoll)

• 2. "The Cradle Song" - (Brahms' Lullaby) (Johannes Brahms) - 1:35
(rec. 06/4/44, Frank Sinatra, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, George Stoll)

• 3. "I Begged Her" - (Cahn, Styne) - 3:26
(rec. 06/14/44, Frank Sinatra, Gene Kelly, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, George Stoll)

• 4. "If You Knew Susie Like I Know Susie" - (Buddy DeSylva, Joseph Meyer) - 2:00
(rec. 06/13/44, Frank Sinatra, Gene Kelly, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, George Stoll)

• 5. "What Makes the Sunset?" - (Cahn, Styne) - 3:33
(rec. 06/30/44, Frank Sinatra, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, George Stoll)

• 6. "The Charm of You" - (Cahn, Styne) - 2:18
(rec. 08/18/44, Frank Sinatra, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, George Stoll)

• 7. "I Fall in Love Too Easily" - (Cahn, Styne) - 1:38
(rec. 09/05/44, Frank Sinatra, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, George Stoll)

From "The House I Live In" (RKO, 1945) • 8. Acceptance Speech for Receiving an Honorary Academy Award - 2:54
(rec. 03/07/46, Frank Sinatra)

• 9. "The House I Live In" - (Lewis, Robinson) - 3:22
(rec. 05/08/45, Frank Sinatra, The RKO Radio Studio Orchestra, Axel Stordahl)

• 10. "If You Are But a Dream" - (Nat Bonx, Jack Fulton, Moe Jaffe) - 2:12
(rec. 05/08/45, Frank Sinatra, The RKO Radio Studio Orchestra, Axel Stordahl)

From "A Thousand and One Nights" (COLUMBIA, 07/20/1945) • 11. "All or Nothing at All" - (Arthur Altman, Jack Lawrence) - 1:36
(rec. 04/26/45, Frank Sinatra, The Columbia Pictures Orchestra, Morris Stoloff)

From "Till the Clouds Roll By" (MGM, 12/04/1946) • 12. "Ol' Man River" - (Oscar Hammerstein II, Jerome Kern) - 3:00
(rec. 03/18/46, Frank Sinatra, The M-G-M Studio Chorus, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, Lennie Hayton)

From "It Happened in Brooklyn" (MGM 04/04/1947) • 13. "Whose Baby Are You?" - (Cahn, Styne) - 0:57
(rec. 07/18/46, Frank Sinatra, André Previn (Piano))

• 14. "The Brooklyn Bridge" - (Cahn, Styne) - 2:42
(rec. 06/06/46, Frank Sinatra, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, Johnny W. Green)

• 15. "The Brookyln Bridge" (alternate ending/outtake) - (Cahn, Styne) - 1:05 • 16. "Invention #1" - (Johann Sebastian Bach) 2:15
(rec. 06/04/46, Frank Sinatra, Kathryn Grayson, School Children, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, Johnny W. Green)

• 17. "I Believe" - (Cahn, Styne) - 3:50
(rec. 10/21/46, Frank Sinatra, Jimmy Durante, Bobby Long, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, Johnny W. Green)

Frank Sinatra in Hollywood 19401964 • 18. "Time After Time" - (Cahn, Styne) - 1:50
(rec. 09/17/46, Frank Sinatra, André Previn (Piano), The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, Johnny W. Green)

355

• 19. "The Song's Gotta Come from the Heart" - (Cahn, Styne) - 4:17
(rec. 09/26/46, Frank Sinatra, Jimmy Durante (Vocal, Piano), The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, Johnny W. Green)

• 20. "Otchi-Tchor-Ni-Ya" (Outtake) - (Traditional) - 0:43
(rec. 09/26/46, Frank Sinatra, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, Johnny W. Green)

• 21. "La Ci Darem la Mano" - (from Don Giovanni) (Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart) - 3:20
(rec. 07/18/46, Frank Sinatra, Kathryn Grayson, André Previn (Piano), The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, Johnny W. Green)

• 22. "It's the Same Old Dream" - (Cahn, Styne) - 1:52
(rec. 09/23/46, Frank Sinatra, André Previn (Piano), The Starlighters, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, Johnny W. Green)

• 23. "It's the Same Old Dream" (Reprise) - (Cahn, Styne) - 2:36 • 24. Finale : "The Brooklyn Bridge" - (Cahn, Styne) - 0:51
(rec. 10/09/46, Frank Sinatra, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, Johnny W. Green)

• 25. Presentation of Modern Screen Magazine's Award for "Most Popular Film Star Of 1946" - 2:04
(rec. 10/09/46, Frank Sinatra, Louis B. Mayer)

From "The Miracle of the Bells" (RKO, 03/16/1948) • 26. "Ever Homeward" (A Capella) - (Cahn, Styne) - 1:32
(rec. 08/19/47 & 08/20/47, Frank Sinatra)

• 27. Promotional Spot for "The Chapel of Four Chaplains" and "The Miracle Of The Bells" - 1:45
(rec. 03/18/48, Frank Sinatra)

From "The Kissing Bandit" (MGM, 01/28/1949) • 28. "If I Steal a Kiss" - (Nacio Herb Brown, Edward Heyman) - 3:06
(rec. 05/08/47, Frank Sinatra, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, George Stoll)

• 29. "Senorita" - (Brown, Heyman) - 2:15
(rec. 06/28/47, Frank Sinatra, Kathryn Grayson, The M-G-M Studio Chorus, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, George Stoll)

• 30. "Siesta" - (Brown, Earl Brent) - 2:06
(rec. 05/27/47, Frank Sinatra, The M-G-M Studio Chorus, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, George Stoll)

• 31. "What's Wrong With Me?" - (Brown, Heyman) - 1:29
(rec. 02/26/48, Frank Sinatra, Kathryn Grayson, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, George Stoll)

• 32. "We're on Our Way" (Outtake) - (Brown, Brent) - 2:59
(rec. 05/08/47, Frank Sinatra, J. Carrol Naish, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, George Stoll)

• 33. Finale : "If I Steal a Kiss" - (Brown, Heyman) - 1:24
(rec. 06/28/47, Frank Sinatra, Kathryn Grayson, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, George Stoll)

Frank Sinatra in Hollywood 19401964

356

Disc three
• 1. Promotional interview discussing The Kissing Bandit and Take Me Out to the Ball Game - 3:16
(rec. 1949, Frank Sinatra, Dick Simmons)

From "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" (MGM, 03/09/1949) • 2. "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" - (Jack Norworth, Albert Von Tilzer) - 2:02
(rec. 07/22/48, Frank Sinatra, Gene Kelly, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, Adolph Deutsch)

• 3. "Yes, Indeedy" - (Betty Comden, Roger Edens, Adolph Green) - 3:16
(rec. 07/22/48, Frank Sinatra, Gene Kelly, Jules Munshin, The M-G-M Studio Chorus, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, Adolph Deutsch )

• 4. "O'Brien to Ryan to Goldberg" - (Comden, Edens, Green) - 4:02
(rec. 07/23/48, Frank Sinatra, Gene Kelly, Jules Munshin, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, Adolph Deutsch)

• 5. "The Right Girl for Me" - (Comden, Edens, Green) - 2:56
(rec. 08/12/48, Frank Sinatra, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, Adolph Deutsch)

• 6. "Boys and Girls Like You and Me" (Outtake) - (Oscar Hammerstein II, Richard Rodgers) - 3:26 • 7. "It's Fate, Baby It's Fate" - (Comden, Edens, Green) - 3:13
(rec. 08/12/48, Frank Sinatra, Betty Garrett, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, Adolph Deutsch)

• 8. "Strictly U.S.A." - (Edens) - 3:21
(rec. 10/15/48, Frank Sinatra, Gene Kelly, Jules Munshin, Betty Garrett, Esther Williams, Dick Lane, Tommy Dugan, The M-G-M Studio Chorus, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, Adolph Deutsch)

• 9. Finale : "Strictly U.S.A." - (Edens) - 2:19
(rec. 10/15/48, Frank Sinatra, Gene Kelly, Jules Munshin, Betty Garrett, Esther Williams, Judy Matson, The M-G-M Studio Chorus, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, Adolph Deutsch)

From "On the Town" (MGM, 12/08/1949) • 10. "New York, New York" (full length version) - (Comden, Green) - 4:07
(rec. 05/03/49, Frank Sinatra, Gene Kelly, Jules Munshin Ralph Brewster, Charles Pavalato, Marvin Bailey, Bill Lee, Harry Stanton, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, Lennie Hayton)

• 11. "Come Up to My Place" - (Leonard Bernstein, Comden, Green) - 2:53
(rec. 03/03/49, Frank Sinatra, Betty Garrett, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, Lennie Hayton)

• 12. "You're Awful" - (Comden, Edens, Green) - 3:18
(rec. 03/24/49, Frank Sinatra, Betty Garrett, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, Lennie Hayton)

• 13. "Count on Me" - (Comden, Edens, Green) - 3:33
(rec. 03/24/49, Frank Sinatra, Jules Munshin, Ann Miller, Betty Garrett, Alice Pearce, The M-G-M Studio Chorus, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, Lennie Hayton)

• 14. "Pearl of the Persian Sea" - (Comden, Edens, Green) - 2:07
(rec. 03/24/49, Frank Sinatra, Gene Kelly, Jules Munshin, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, Lennie Hayton)

• 15. "On the Town" - (Comden, Edens, Green) - 5:43
(rec. 03/23/49, Frank Sinatra, Gene Kelly, Jules Munshin, Ann Miller, Vera-Ellen, Betty Garrett, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, Lennie Hayton)

From "Double Dynamite" (RKO, 12/25/1951) • 16. "It's Only Money" (Ft. Groucho Marx) - (Cahn, Styne) - 1:31
(rec. 01/28/49, Frank Sinatra, Groucho Marx, The RKO Radio Studio Orchestra, Constantin Bakaleinikoff)

Frank Sinatra in Hollywood 19401964 • 17. "Kisses and Tears" (Ft. Jane Russel) - (Cahn, Styne) - 3:29
(rec. 12/2/48, Frank Sinatra, Jane Russell, The RKO Radio Studio Orchestra, Constantin Bakaleinikoff)

357

• 18. Finale : "It's Only Money" (Ft. Groucho Marx & Jane Russel) - (Cahn, Styne) - 1:08
(rec. 01/31/49, Frank Sinatra, Groucho Marx, Jane Russell, The RKO Radio Studio Orchestra, Constantin Bakaleinikoff)

From "Meet Danny Wilson" (UNIVERSAL, 04/01/1952) • 19. Promotional Spot for Meet Danny Wilson - 0:24
(rec. 1951, Frank Sinatra)

• 20. "All of Me" - (Gerald Marks, Seymour Simons) - 1:31
(rec. 06/13/51, Frank Sinatra, Ken Lane (Piano), The Universal Studio Orchestra, Joseph Gershenson)

• 21. "How Deep Is the Ocean?" - (Berlin) - 1:55 • 22. "You're a Sweetheart" - (Adamson, McHugh) - 2:21 • 23. "She's Funny That Way" (Edited version) - (Neil Moret, Richard A. Whiting) - 1:32
(rec. 06/13/51, Frank Sinatra, Ken Lane (Piano), Manny Klein (Trumpet), The Universal Studio Orchestra, Joseph Gershenson)

• 24. "A Good Man Is Hard to Find" - (Eddie Green) - 2:58
(rec. 06/13/51, Frank Sinatra, Shelley Winters, Ken Lane (Piano), The Universal Studio Orchestra, Joseph Gershenson)

• 25. "Lonesome Man Blues" (Edited version) - (Sy Oliver) - 1:29
(rec. 06/21/51, Frank Sinatra, Danny Welton (Harmonica), The Universal Studio Orchestra, Joseph Gershenson)

• 26. "That Old Black Magic" - (Harold Arlen, Johnny Mercer) - 2:39 • 27. "I've Got a Crush on You" - (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) - 1:53
(rec. 07/11/51, Frank Sinatra, Ken Lane (Piano), The Ebonaires, The Universal Studio Orchestra, Joseph Gershenson)

• 28. "When You're Smiling (The Whole World Smiles With You)" - (Mark Fisher, Joe Goodwin, Larry Shay) 1:52

Disc four
From "From Here to Eternity" (COLUMBIA, 08/05/1953) • 1. "From Here to Eternity"/"Re-Enlistment Blues" (Instrumental) - (Fred Karger, Robert Wells) - 2:54
(rec. 1953, The Columbia Pictures Orchestra, Morris Stoloff)

• 2. Acceptance Speech for Receiving the "Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor" - 1:17
(rec. 03/25/54, Frank Sinatra)

• 3. "From Here to Eternity" - (Karger, Wells) - 3:01
(rec. 05/02/53, Frank Sinatra, Orchestra, Nelson Riddle)

From "Three Coins in the Fountain" (20th CENTURY-FOX, 05/12/1954) • 4. Interview Discussing "Three Coins in The Foutain" & "Young At Heart" - 3:08
(rec. 05/06/54, Frank Sinatra, Louella Parsons)

• 5. "Three Coins in the Fountain" (Capitol Records master) - (Cahn, Styne) - 3:04
(rec. 03/01/54, Frank Sinatra, Orchestra, Nelson Riddle)

From "Young at Heart" (WARNER BROS. 12/16/1954) • 6. "Young at Heart" (Capitol Records master) - (Carolyn Leigh, Johnny Richards) - 2:51
(rec. 12/09/53, Frank Sinatra, Orchestra, Nelson Riddle)

• 7. "Someone to Watch Over Me" (Alternate Mix, w/orchestra) - (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) - 2:21

Frank Sinatra in Hollywood 19401964
(rec. 07/12/54, Frank Sinatra, Bill Miller (Piano), The Warner Bros. Studio Orchestra, Ray Heindorf)

358

• 8. "Just One of Those Things" (w/Jazz Quartet) - (Porter) - 2:08
(rec. 07/13/54 & 07/14/54, Frank Sinatra, Bill Miller (Piano), Jazz Quartet)

• 9. "One for My Baby (and One More for the Road)" (Piano, Vocal) - (Arlen, Mercer) - 3:40
(rec. 08/11/54, Frank Sinatra, Bill Miller (Piano))

• 10. "You, My Love" (Alternate Mix) - (Mack Gordon, Jimmy Van Heusen) - 2:13
(rec. 08/25/54, Frank Sinatra, Doris Day, The Warner Bros. Studio Orchestra, Ray Heindorf)

From "Finian’s Rainbow" (Unreleased) (Distributors Corp. Of America, 1954) • 11. "Necessity" - (Harburg, Lane) - 2:42
(rec. 12/10/54, Frank Sinatra, Orchestra, Lynn Murray)

• 12. "Ad Lib Blues" (Ft. Louis Armstrong) - (Traditional) - 1:56
(rec. 11/20/54, Frank Sinatra, Louis Armstrong, Jazz Trio, Orchestra, Lynn Murray)

• 13. "That Great Come-And-Get-It Day" - (Harburg, Lane) - 2:11
(rec. 11/20/54, Frank Sinatra, Children's Chorus, Orchestra, Lynn Murray)

• 14. "Necessity" (Scat Version) - (Harburg, Lane) - 0:26 • 15. "If This Isn't Love" - (Harburg, Lane) - 2:20
(rec. 12/09/54, Frank Sinatra, Children's Chorus, Orchestra, Lynn Murray)

• 16. "Old Devil Moon" - (Harburg, Lane) - 8:00
(rec. 12/02/54, Frank Sinatra, Ella Logan, The Jazz All Stars (Red Norvo, Ray Brown, Herb Ellis, Oscar Peterson, Frank Flynn), Orchestra, Lynn Murray)

• 17. "Old Devil Moon" (Reprise) (Piano, Vocal) - (Harburg, Lane) - 0:24
(rec. 11/20/54, Frank Sinatra, Oscar Peterson (Piano))

• 18. "Necessity" (Ft. Ella Fitzgerald) - (Harburg, Lane) - 3:01
(rec. 11/20/54, Frank Sinatra, Ella Fitzgerald, The Oscar Peterson Trio, Orchestra, Lynn Murray)

• 19. Finale:"How Are Things in Glocca Morra?" (Ft. Ella Logan) - (Harburg, Lane) - 1:00
(rec. 11/20/54, Frank Sinatra, Ella Logan, Chorus, Orchestra, Lynn Murray)

From "Not as a Stranger" (UNITED ARTISTS, 06/28/1955) • 20. "Not as a Stranger" - (Buddy Kaye, Van Heusen) - 2:46
(rec. 03/04/55, Frank Sinatra, Orchestra, Nelson Riddle)

From "Guys and Dolls" (Samuel Goldwyn, 11/03/1955) • 21. "The Oldest Established (Permanent Floating Crap Game in New York)" - (Loesser) - 3:01
(rec. 03/01/55, Frank Sinatra, Stubby Kaye, Johnny Silver, Chorus, Orchestra, Jay Blackton)

• 22. "Guys and Dolls" - (Loesser) - 3:28
(rec. 03/01/55, Frank Sinatra, Stubby Kaye, Johnny Silver, Orchestra, Jay Blackton)

• 23. "Adelaide" - (Loesser) - 3:19
(rec. 03/11/55, Frank Sinatra, Orchestra, Jay Blackton)

• 24. "Sue Me" - (Loesser) - 2:56
(rec. 03/09/55, Frank Sinatra, Vivian Blaine, Orchestra, Jay Blackton)

From "The Tender Trap" (MGM, 11/04/1955) • 25. "(Love Is) The Tender Trap" (Main Title) - (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:09

Frank Sinatra in Hollywood 19401964
(rec. 07/27/55, Frank Sinatra, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, Jeff Alexander)

359

• 26. "(Love Is) The Tender Trap" (Piano, Vocal) - (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:10
(rec. 07/15/55, Frank Sinatra, Bill Miller (Piano))

• 27. "(Love Is) The Tender Trap" (End Title) - (Cahn, Van Heusen) -0:48
(rec. 07/27/55, Frank Sinatra, David Wayne, Celsete Holm, Debbie Reynolds, Betty Noyes, Barbara Allen, Dorothy McCarty, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, Jeff Alexander)

Disc five
From "Carousel" (20th CENTURY-FOX, 02/16/1956) • 1. "Soliloquy" (Outtake) - (Hammerstein, Rodgers) - 8:25
(rec. 02/23/55, Frank Sinatra, Orchestra, Richard Jones)

From "The Man with the Golden Arm" (UNITED ARTISTS, 01/1956) • 2. "The Man With the Golden Arm" - (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:23
(rec. 10/31/55, Frank Sinatra, Orchestra, Nelson Riddle)

From "Johnny Concho" (UNITED ARTISTS, 07/1956) • 3. Johnny Concho Theme : "Wait For Me" - (Nelson Riddle, Dok Stanford) - 2:52
(rec. 04/05/56, Frank Sinatra, Loulie Jean Norman, Orchestra, Nelson Riddle)

From "High Society" (MGM, 07/17/1956) • 4. Promotional Spots for "High Society" - 1:16
(rec. 1956, Frank Sinatra, Bing Crosby)

• 5. "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?" (Alt. Mix) - (Porter) - 2:01
(rec. 01/20/56, Frank Sinatra, Celeste Holm, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, Johnny W. Green)

• 6. "You're Sensational" - (Porter) - 3:09
(rec. 01/20/56, Frank Sinatra, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, Johnny W. Green)

• 7. "Well, Did You Evah!" (Ft. Bing Crosby) (Alt. Mix) - (Porter) - 3:39
(rec. 01/17/56, Frank Sinatra, Bing Crosby, The M-G-M Studio Orchestra, Johnny W. Green)

• 8. "Mind if I Make Love to You?" (Alt. Mix) - (Porter) - 2:17 From "The Joker is Wild" (PARAMOUNT, 10/1957) • 9. "All the Way" (Version 1) - (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:05
(rec. 10/03/56, Frank Sinatra, The Paramount Studio Orchestra, Walter Scharf)

• 10. "I Cried for You (Now It's Your Turn to Cry Over Me)" - (Gus Arnheim, Arthur Freed, Abe Lyman) - 1:35 • 11. "If I Could Be With You (One Hour Tonight)" - (Henry Creamer, Turner Layton) - 1:17 • 12. "At Sundown" - (Walter Donaldson) - 1:44 • 13. "All the Way" (Version 2) - (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:09 • 14. Medley: "Out of Nowhere"/"Swingin' on a Star" - (Johnny Green, Heyman)/(Johnny Burke, Van Heusen) 1:45
(rec. 11/19/56 & 11/20/56, Frank Sinatra, The Paramount Studio Orchestra, Walter Scharf)

• 15. Medley: "Naturally"/"Ah, So Pure"/"Naturally" - (Harry Barris, Joseph McCarthy, Friedrich Van Flotow) 1:56 • 16. "All the Way" (Parody) - (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 1:09

Frank Sinatra in Hollywood 19401964 • 17. "Chicago (That Toddlin' Town)" (Capitol Records master) - (Fred Fisher) - 2:13
(rec. 08/13/57, Frank Sinatra, Orchestra, Nelson Riddle)

360

From "Pal Joey" (COLUMBIA, 10/25/1957) • 18. Promotional Spots for "Pal Joey" (Kim Novak, Frank Sinatra) - 0:49
(rec. 1957, Frank Sinatra, Kim Novak)

• 19. "I Didn't Know What Time It Was" - (Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) - 2:47
(rec. 05/23/57, Frank Sinatra, The Columbia Pictures Orchestra, Morris Stoloff)

• 20. "There's a Small Hotel" - (Rodgers, Hart) - 2:16
(rec. 06/14/57, Frank Sinatra, The Columbia Pictures Orchestra, Morris Stoloff)

• 21. "I Could Write a Book" - (Rodgers, Hart) - 2:17
(rec. 06/14/57, Frank Sinatra, Trudy Erwin, The Columbia Pictures Orchestra, Morris Stoloff)

• 22. "The Lady is a Tramp" - (Rodgers, Hart) - 3:14 • 23. "Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered" (Capitol Records master) - (Rodgers, Hart) - 3:39
(rec. 08/13/57, Frank Sinatra, Orchestra, Nelson Riddle)

• 24. Finale: "Dream Sequence"/"What Do I Care for a Dame?"/"I Could Write a Book" - (George Duning) (Rodgers, Hart) - 5:57
(rec. 09/25/57, Frank Sinatra, The Columbia Pictures Orchestra, Morris Stoloff)

Disc six
From "Kings Go Forth" (UNITED ARTISTS, 07/1958) • 1. "Monique" (Capitol Records master) - (Bernstein, Cahn) - 3:17
(rec. 05/29/58, Frank Sinatra, Orchestra, Felix Slatkin)

From "Some Came Running" (MGM 12/18/1958) • 2. "To Love and Be Loved" (Capitol Records master) - (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:58
(rec. 10/15/58, Frank Sinatra, Orchestra, Nelson Riddle)

From "A Hole in the Head" (UNITED ARTISTS, 07/15/1959) • 3. Promotional Spots for "A Hole in the Head" - 1:47
(rec. 1959, Frank Sinatra)

• 4. "All My Tomorrows" (Capitol Records master) - (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:14
(rec. 12/29/58, Frank Sinatra, Orchestra, Nelson Riddle)

• 5. "High Hopes" (Ft. Eddie Hodges) - (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:11
(rec. 02/12/59, Frank Sinatra, Eddie Hodges, Orchestra, Nelson Riddle)

From "Can-Can" (20th CENTURY-FOX, 03/09/1960) • 6. Main Title: "Can-Can/Montmart’" - (Porter) 3:02
(rec. 09/01/59, Frank Sinatra, Maurice Chevalier, 20TH Century Fox Chorus, 20TH Century Fox Studio Orchestra, Nelson Riddle)

• 7. "I Love Paris" (full length version/outtake) - (Porter) 3:40
(rec. 10/13/59, Frank Sinatra, Maurice Chevalier, 20TH Century Fox Studio Orchestra, Nelson Riddle)

• 8. "C'est Magnifique" - (Porter) - 2:01
(rec. 08/27/59, Frank Sinatra, 20TH Century Fox Studio Orchestra, Nelson Riddle)

• 9. "Let's Do It (Let's Fall in Love)" (Ft. Shirley MacLaine) - (Porter) - 2:48

Frank Sinatra in Hollywood 19401964
(rec. 09/22/59, Frank Sinatra, Shirley MacLaine, 20TH Century Fox Studio Orchestra, Nelson Riddle)

361

• 10. "It's All Right With Me" - (Porter) - 4:16 From "Advise and Consent" (COLUMBIA, 06/06/1962) • 11. "Heart of Mine" (Alt. Mix, w/Orchestra) - (Jerry Fielding, Ned Washington) - 2:18
(rec. 09/18/61, Frank Sinatra, The Columbia Pictures Orchestra, Jerry Fielding)

From "Come Blow Your Horn" (PARAMOUNT, 06/05/1963) • 12. Promotional Spot for "Come Blow Your Horn" 0:58
(rec. 1963, Frank Sinatra)

• 13. "Come Blow Your Horn" (Cahn, Van Heusen) 4:51
(rec. 10/25/62, Frank Sinatra, The Paramount Studio Orchestra, Nelson Riddle)

From "The Victors" (COLUMBIA 12/1963) • 14. "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas" - (Ralph Blane, Hugh Martin) - 3:32
(rec. 07/16/63, Frank Sinatra, The Wally Stott Chorus, The Wally Stott Orchestra, The Columbia Pictures Orchestra, Gus Levene)

From "Paris When It Sizzles" (PARAMOUNT, 04/1964) • 15. "The Girl Who Stole the Eiffel Tower" - (Richard Quine, Riddle) - 1:38
(rec. 03/13/63, Frank Sinatra, William Holden (Narration), The Paramount Studio Orchestra, Nelson Riddle)

From "Robin and the 7 Hoods" (WARNER BROS., 06/24/1964) • 16. "My Kind of Town (Chicago Is)" - (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:58
(rec. 11/13/63, Frank Sinatra, The Warner Bros. Studio Orchestra, Nelson Riddle)

• 17. "I Like to Lead When I Dance" (Reprise Records master) - (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 4:08
(rec. 04/08/64, Frank Sinatra, The Warner Bros. Studio Orchestra, Nelson Riddle)

• 18. "Mister Booze" (Reprise Records master) - (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 5:17
(rec. 04/10/64, Frank Sinatra, Bing Crosby, Dean Martin, Sammy Davis Jr., The Warner Bros. Studio Chorus, The Warner Bros. Studio Orchestra, Nelson Riddle)

• 19. "Style" (Alt. Mix) - (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 4:29
(rec. 12/03/63, Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Bing Crosby, The Warner Bros. Studio Orchestra, Nelson Riddle)

• 20. Finale : "Don't Be a Do-Badder" - (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 1:11
(rec. 10/18/63, Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Sammy Davis Jr., The Warner Bros. Studio Orchestra, Nelson Riddle)

• 21. Bonus : "Don't Be a Do-Badder" (Vocal Tracking Session) - (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 5:28

Credits
Produced by Charles L. Granata & Didier C. Deutsch

References
[1] Allmusic review (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r591362/ review)

Frank Sinatra: The Reprise Years

362

Frank Sinatra: The Reprise Years
The Reprise Years

Box set by Frank Sinatra Released Recorded Genre Length Label November 29, 2010 1960-1984 Vocal Jazz, Classic pop 1315:24 Universal Music Group Frank Sinatra chronology

Sinatra/Jobim: The Complete Reprise Recordings (2010)

The Reprise Years (2010)

Best of Vegas (2011)

Frank Sinatra: The Reprise Years is a 36 disc boxed set by an American singer, Frank Sinatra. This set contains 35 CDs featuring every studio album that Sinatra released between 1960 and 1984. Each CD contains an individual Sinatra Reprise LP (including singles compilations and a bonus DVD). Missing from the set are 1966's Greatest Hits! and 1972's Greatest Hits, Vol.2, which contain songs not available on any other album. Also not included are any single-only releases from the 70's and 80's which are not available on any studio album. The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings contains all of the missing songs from this collection. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Disc one - Ring-A-Ding-Ding (1961) Disc two - Sinatra Swings (1961) Disc three - I Remember Tommy (1961) Disc four - Sinatra and Strings (1961) Disc five - Sinatra and Swingin' Brass (1962) Disc six - Sinatra Sings Great Songs from Great Britain (1962) Disc seven - All Alone (1962) Disc eight - Sinatra-Basie: An Historic Musical First (1962) Disc nine - The Concert Sinatra (1963) Disc ten - Sinatra's Sinatra (1963) Disc eleven - Sinatra Sings Days of Wine and Roses, Moon River, and Other Academy Award Winners (1964) Disc twelve - America, I Hear You Singing (1964) Disc thirteen - It Might as Well Be Swing (1964) Disc fourteen - Softly, as I Leave You (1964)

Frank Sinatra: The Reprise Years • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Disc fifteen - Sinatra '65: The Singer Today (1965) Disc sixteen - September of My Years (1965) Disc seventeen - My Kind of Broadway (1965) Disc eighteen - A Man and His Music (1965) Disc nineteen - Strangers in the Night (1966) Disc twenty - Moonlight Sinatra (1966) Disc twenty-one - That's Life (1966) Disc twenty-two - Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim (1967) Disc twenty-three - The World We Knew (1967) Disc twenty-four - Francis A. & Edward K. (1968) Disc twenty-five - The Sinatra Family Wish You a Merry Christmas (1968) Disc twenty-six - Cycles (1968) Disc twenty-seven - My Way (1969) Disc twenty-eight - A Man Alone (1969) Disc twenty-nine - Watertown (1970) Disc thirty - Sinatra & Company (1971) Disc thirty-one - Ol' Blue Eyes Is Back (1973) Disc thirty-two - Some Nice Things I've Missed (1974) Disc thirty-three - Trilogy: Past Present Future (1980) Disc thirty-four - She Shot Me Down (1981) Disc thirty-five - L.A. Is My Lady (1984) Disc thirty-six - A Man and His Music - Trilogy (DVD) • A Man and His Music (1965) • A Man and His Music Part II (1966) • A Man and His Music + Ella + Jobim (1967)

363

Personnel
• • • • • • • • • Frank Sinatra - vocals Nancy Sinatra Frank Sinatra, Jr. Tina Sinatra Dean Martin Sammy Davis, Jr. Bing Crosby Antonio Carlos Jobim - vocals, guitar Count Basie and his Orchestra

References

364

Tribute albums
A Jazz Portrait of Frank Sinatra
A Jazz Portrait of Frank Sinatra
Studio album by Oscar Peterson Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer 1959 May 18, 1959 Jazz 25:25 Verve Norman Granz Oscar Peterson chronology

Sonny Stitt Sits In with the Oscar Peterson Trio (1958)

A Jazz Portrait of Frank Sinatra (1959)

The Jazz Soul of Oscar Peterson (1959)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source All About Jazz Allmusic Rating (favorable) link [1] [2]

link

A Jazz Portrait of Frank Sinatra is a 1959 album by The Oscar Peterson trio, recorded in tribute to Frank Sinatra. [3]

Track listing
1. "You Make Me Feel So Young" (Mack Gordon, Josef Myrow) – 2:40 2. "Come Dance with Me" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) – 2:22 3. "Learnin' the Blues" (Dolores Vicki Silvers) – 3:41 4. "Witchcraft" (Cy Coleman, Carolyn Leigh) – 3:12 5. "(Love Is) The Tender Trap" (Cahn, Van Heusen) – 2:44 6. "Saturday Night (Is the Loneliest Night of the Week)" (Cahn, Jule Styne) – 2:57 7. "Just in Time" (Betty Comden, Adolph Green, Styne) – 1:53 8. "It Happened in Monterey" (Billy Rose, Mabel Wayne) – 2:57 9. "I Get a Kick Out of You" (Cole Porter) – 3:03 10. "All of Me" (Seymour Simons, Gerald Marks) – 3:25 11. "The Birth of the Blues" (Ray Henderson, Buddy DeSylva, Lew Brown) – 2:38 12. "How About You?" (Ralph Freed, Burton Lane) – 3:11

A Jazz Portrait of Frank Sinatra

365

Personnel
The Oscar Peterson trio • Oscar Peterson – piano • Ray Brown – double bass • Ed Thigpen – drums

References
[1] http:/ / www. allaboutjazz. com/ php/ article. php?id=15949 [2] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r145472 [3] A Jazz Portrait of Frank Sinatra (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r145472) at Allmusic

Perfectly Frank

366

Perfectly Frank
Perfectly Frank
Studio album by Tony Bennett Released Recorded September 15, 1992 Clinton Sound Studio, New York City Westlake Studios, Los Angeles Jazz 73:45 Columbia CK 52965 Andre Fischer Professional reviews • Allmusic link [1]

Genre Length Label

Producer

Tony Bennett chronology

Forty Years: The Artistry of Tony Bennett (1991)

Perfectly Frank (1992)

Steppin' Out (1993)

Perfectly Frank is an album by Tony Bennett, released in 1992, recorded as a tribute to Frank Sinatra. Part of Bennett's late-in-life comeback to commercial success, it achieved gold record status in the United States and in 1993 won the Grammy Award for Best Traditional Pop Vocal Performance. In 2006 it was reissued with the same contents as Perfectly Frank: An American Classic Celebrates 80, in conjunction with Bennett's 80th birthday.

Track listing
1. "Time After Time" (Sammy Cahn, Jule Styne) - 3:32 2. "I Fall in Love Too Easily" (Cahn, Styne) - 2:01 3. "East of the Sun (and West of the Moon)" (Brooks Bowman) - 4:11 4. "Nancy (With the Laughing Face)" (Phil Silvers, Jimmy Van Heusen) - 3:14 5. "I Thought About You" (Johnny Mercer, Van Heusen) - 2:55 6. "Night and Day" (Cole Porter) - 3:35 7. "I've Got the World on a String" (Harold Arlen, Ted Koehler) - 2:52 8. "I'm Glad There Is You" (Jimmy Dorsey, Paul Medeira) - 3:14 9. "Nightingale Sang in Berkeley Square" (Eric Maschwitz, Manning Sherwin) - 2:55 10. "I Wished on the Moon" (Dorothy Parker, Ralph Rainger) - 3:08 11. "You Go to My Head" (J. Fred Coots, Haven Gillespie) - 3:46 12. "The Lady Is a Tramp" (Lorenz Hart, Richard Rodgers) - 2:25 13. "I See Your Face Before Me" (Howard Dietz, Arthur Schwartz) - 2:58 14. "Day In, Day Out" (Rube Bloom, Mercer) - 2:07 15. "Indian Summer" (Al Dubin, Victor Herbert) - 2:59 16. "Call Me Irresponsible" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:24

Perfectly Frank 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. "Here's That Rainy Day" (Sonny Burke, Van Heusen) - 3:31 "Last Night When We Were Young" (Arlen, Yip Harburg) - 2:25 "I Wish I Were in Love Again" (Hart, Rodgers) - 2:14 "A Foggy Day" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) - 2:12 "Don't Worry 'Bout Me" (Rube Bloom, Koehler) - 4:53 "One for My Baby (and One More for the Road)" (Arlen, Mercer) - 3:24 "Angel Eyes" (Earl Brent, Matt Dennis) - 2:42 "I'll Be Seeing You" (Irving Kahal) - 2:56

367

Personnel
• • • • Tony Bennett - vocals Ralph Sharon - piano Joe La Barbera - drums Paul Langosch - double bass

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r859315

Manilow Sings Sinatra
Manilow Sings Sinatra
Studio album by Barry Manilow Released Genre November 10, 1998 Pop Easy listening 38:55 Arista Barry Manilow chronology

Length Label

Summer of '78 (1996)

Manilow Sings Sinatra (1998)

Here at the Mayflower (2001)

Manilow Sings Sinatra

368

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating [1]

Manilow Sings Sinatra is an album by singer-songwriter Barry Manilow, released in 1998. The album was a compilation of himself singing songs originally made notable by Frank Sinatra, who had recently died. The album also featured two new compositions, intended as tributes to Sinatra.

Track listing
1. "One Man in a Spotlight" (Barry Manilow, Bruce Sussman) - 0:57 2. "I've Got the World on a String" (Harold Arlen, Ted Koehler) - 2:13 3. "The Second Time Around" (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) - 3:34 4. "Come Dance with Me"/"Come Fly With Me" (Cahn, Van Heusen)/(Cahn, Van Heusen) - 2:59 5. "All the Way" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:43 6. "You Make Me Feel So Young" (Mack Gordon, Josef Myrow) - 2:59 7. "Strangers in the Night" (Bert Kaempfert, Charlie Singleton, Eddie Snyder) - 3:08 8. "In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning" (Bob Hilliard, David Mann) - 3:34 9. "Summer Wind" (Hans Bradtke, Heinz Meyer, Johnny Mercer) - 2:46 10. "Saturday Night (Is the Loneliest Night of the Week)" (Cahn, Jule Styne) - 2:12 11. "Angel Eyes" (Earl Brent, Matt Dennis) - 4:09 12. "My Kind of Town" (Cahn, Van Heusen) - 3:00 13. "Put Your Dreams Away (For Another Day)" (Ruth Lowe, Paul Mann, George David Weiss) - 1:41 14. "Here's to the Man" (Manilow, Sussman) - 2:01

References
[1] Allmusic review (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r381732/ review)

Allow Us to Be Frank

369

Allow Us to Be Frank
...Allow Us to Be Frank
Studio album by Westlife Released 8 November 2004 (see Release history) 2004; Rokstone Studios (London), Big band 39:21 English Sony BMG, RCA Steve Mac Westlife chronology

Recorded

Genre Length Language Label Producer

Turnaround (2003)

...Allow Us to Be Frank (2004)

Face To Face (2005)

Singles from ...Allow Us to Be Frank 1. 2. 3.

"Smile"
Released: 4 November 2004

"Fly Me to the Moon"
Released: 20 December 2004

"Ain't That a Kick in the Head"
Released: 6 January 2005

...Allow Us To Be Frank, a Rat Pack tribute album, was the fifth studio album by Irish boyband Westlife and the first album since the departure of Bryan McFadden. It was released on 8 November 2004, and peaked at number two in Ireland and number three in the United Kingdom. ...Allow Us To Be Frank was number twenty-four on the 2004 year-end album charts. The album features songs made popular by Frank Sinatra such as "The Way You Look Tonight", "Come Fly With Me", "Moon River", "Summer Wind" and "That's Life". It also includes the Nat "King" Cole song, "When I Fall in Love". It was recorded with a 60-piece orchestra at Phoenix Studios in Wembley, Middlesex.

Allow Us to Be Frank

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Professional ratings Review scores
Source Entertainment.ie MTV Asia RTE.ie Rovi Stylus Magazine F [5] [3] [4] Rating [1] [2]

Singles
"Smile" was released as the album's first single on 4 November 2004. The physical single features the video, and B-sides "White Christmas" and "When I Fall In Love".[6] "Fly Me To The Moon" was released as the album's second single on 20 December 2004. The single was only released digitally, featuring the video, as well as an exclusive B-side, "Beyond The Sea", which does not feature on the album. "Ain't That A Kick In The Head" was released as the album's third and final single on 6 January 2005. The physical single features the video, as well B-side "Moon River".[7]

Track listing
No. Title 1. "Ain't That a Kick in the Head" 2. "Fly Me to the Moon" 3. "Smile" 4. "Let There Be Love" Writer(s) Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen Bart Howard Charles Chaplin, Geoffrey Parsons, John Turner Ian Grant, Lionel Rand Length 2:27 2:31 2:50 2:45 4:07 3:15 3:10 2:59 2:58 3:19 3:09 2:40 3:13

5. "The Way You Look Tonight" (with Joanne Hindley) Jerome Kern, Dorothy Fields 6. "Come Fly with Me" 7. "Mack the Knife" 8. "I Left My Heart in San Francisco" 9. "Summer Wind" 10. "Clementine" 11. "When I Fall in Love" 12. "Moon River" 13. "That's Life" Cahn, Van Heusen Marc Blitzstein, Bertolt Brecht, Kurt Weill George Cory, Douglas Cross Hans Bradtke, Henry Mayer, Johnny Mercer Woody Harris, Percy Montrose Edward Heyman, Victor Young Mercer, Henry Mancini Kelly Gordon, Dean Kay

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Japanese Bonus Tracks No. Title Writer(s) Length 3:45 2:30

14. "The Way You Look Tonight" (Westlife-only version) Kern, Fields 15. "Ain't That A Kick In The Head" (video) Cahn, Van Heusen

Release history
Region Europe Date 8 November 2004

Philippines 13 November 2004 Taiwan Japan 3 December 2004 24 November 2004

Chart performance
Chart (2004) Peak position [8] 30 2 [10] 32 5 75 3

Germany Top 100 Albums Ireland Top 100 [9]

Netherlands Album Top 100 Sweden Top 60 Albums

[11] [12]

Switzerland Albums Top 100 United Kingdom Top 100

[13]

Chart (2005)

Peak position [14] 25 15

Belgium (Flanders) Ultratop 50 albums Denmark Album Top 40 [15]

Certifications
Region Certification

United Kingdom 2× Platinum[16]

References
[1] Lynch, Andrew. "Westlife - Allow Us To Be Frank" (http:/ / entertainment. ie/ album-review/ Westlife---Allow-Us-To-Be-Frank/ 3568. htm). Entertainment.ie. . Retrieved 15 October 2011. [2] MTV Asia review (http:/ / www. mtvasia. com/ Review/ CD/ C20050222001191. html)

Allow Us to Be Frank
[3] "Westlife - Allow Us To Be Frank" (http:/ / www. rte. ie/ arts/ 2004/ 1122/ westlife. html). RTÉ Ten. 22 November 2004. . Retrieved 15 October 2011. [4] O'Brien, Jon. "Listen to Allow Us to Be Frank by Westlife" (http:/ / www. allrovi. com/ music/ album/ allow-us-to-be-frank-mw0000471089). AllRovi. . Retrieved 15 October 2011. [5] Stylus Magazine review (http:/ / www. stylusmagazine. com/ reviews/ westlife/ allow-us-to-be-frank. htm) [6] "㈜한터정보시스템 ▒" (http:/ / www. hanteo. com/ search/ album_info. asp?mcode=801208523). Hanteo.com. . Retrieved 2012-01-09. [7] "Westlife Ain't That A Kick In The Head Sweden 5" CD SINGLE (334605)" (http:/ / eil. com/ shop/ moreinfo. asp?catalogid=334605). Eil.com. 2005-08-22. . Retrieved 2012-01-09. [8] "Chartverfolgung / Westlife / Longplay" (http:/ / www. musicline. de/ de/ chartverfolgung_summary/ artist/ Westlife/ 26719/ ?type=longplay) (in German). Media Control GfK International. . Retrieved 15 October 2011. [9] "Irish Music Charts Archive: Top 75 Artist Album, Week Ending 11 November 2004" (http:/ / www. chart-track. co. uk/ index. jsp?c=p/ musicvideo/ music/ archive/ index_test. jsp& ct=240002& arch=t& lyr=2004& year=2004& week=46). GFK Chart-Track. . Retrieved 15 October 2011. [10] "dutchcharts.nl – Westlife – Allow Us To Be Frank" (http:/ / dutchcharts. nl/ showitem. asp?interpret=Westlife& titel=Allow+ Us+ To+ Be+ Frank& cat=a) (in Dutch). dutchcharts.nl. Hung Medien / hitparade.ch. . Retrieved 15 October 2011. [11] "swedishcharts.com – Westlife – Allow Us To Be Frank" (http:/ / swedishcharts. com/ showitem. asp?interpret=Westlife& titel=Allow+ Us+ To+ Be+ Frank& cat=a). swedishcharts.com. Hung Medien. . Retrieved 15 October 2011. [12] "Westlife – Allow Us To Be Frank – swisscharts.com |" (http:/ / swisscharts. com/ showitem. asp?interpret=Westlife& titel=Allow+ Us+ To+ Be+ Frank& cat=a). swisscharts.com. Hung Medien. . Retrieved 15 October 2011. [13] "Chart Stats – Westlife – Allow Us To Be Frank" (http:/ / www. chartstats. com/ release. php?release=34561). ChartStats.com. . Retrieved 15 October 2011. [14] "ultratop.be – Westlife – Allow Us To Be Frank" (http:/ / www. ultratop. be/ nl/ showitem. asp?interpret=Westlife& titel=Allow+ Us+ To+ Be+ Frank& cat=a) (in Dutch). www.ultratop.be. ULTRATOP & Hung Medien / hitparade.ch. . Retrieved 15 October 2011. [15] "danishcharts.com – Westlife – Allow Us To Be Frank" (http:/ / danishcharts. com/ showitem. asp?interpret=Westlife& titel=Allow+ Us+ To+ Be+ Frank& cat=a). danishcharts.com. Hung Medien. . Retrieved 15 October 2011. [16] "BPI – Certified Awards Search" (http:/ / www. bpi. co. uk/ certifiedawards/ search. aspx). British Phonographic Industry. . Retrieved 15 October 2011.

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External links
• Official Westlife Website (http://www.westlife.com)

Bolton Swings Sinatra

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Bolton Swings Sinatra
Bolton Swings Sinatra
Studio album by Michael Bolton Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer May 23, 2006 March, 2006 Pop 41:38 The Second Time Around / Concord Michael Bolton, Alex Christensen Michael Bolton chronology

'Til the End of Forever (2005)

Bolton Swings Sinatra (2006)

One World One Love (2009)

Professional ratings Review scores
Source Allmusic Rating link [1]

Bolton Swings Sinatra is an album by Michael Bolton. Bolton records songs originally made notable by Frank Sinatra. The album debuted at #51 and constitutes another minor and brief comeback for Bolton, with about 200,000 copies in the US and less than 300,000 copies worldwide.

Track listing
1. "You Go to My Head" (J. Fred Coots, Haven Gillespie) – 4:03 2. "Fly Me to the Moon" (Bart Howard) – 2:58 3. "For Once in My Life" (Ron Miller, Orlando Burden) – 3:20 4. "Summer Wind" (Hans Bradtke, Henry Mayer, Johnny Mercer) – 2:34 5. "My Funny Valentine" (Lorenz Hart, Richard Rodgers) – 3:52 6. "I've Got You Under My Skin" (Cole Porter) – 3:31 7. "That's Life" (Kelly Gordon, Dean Kay) – 3:17 8. "The Second Time Around" - duet with Nicollette Sheridan (Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen) – 4:03 9. "The Girl from Ipanema" (Vinicius de Moraes, Norman Gimbel, Antonio Carlos Jobim) – 3:12 10. "Night and Day" (Porter) – 4:01 11. "They Can't Take That Away From Me" (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin) – 3:10 12. "Theme from New York, New York" (Leonard Bernstein, Betty Comden) – 2:28

Bolton Swings Sinatra

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References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r834868

375

Singles
"All or Nothing at All"
"All or Nothing at All"
Music by Lyrics by Published Language Arthur Altman Jack Lawrence 1939 English

Recorded by Frank Sinatra (several times) Chet Baker and Johnny Pace John Coltrane Freddie Hubbard Diana Krall Barry Manilow Jimmy Scott Ian Shaw Sarah Vaughan many other artists

"All or Nothing at All" is a song composed in 1939 by Arthur Altman, with lyrics by Jack Lawrence. Frank Sinatra's 1939 recording of the song became a huge hit in 1943, when it was reissued by Columbia Records during the 1942-43 musicians' strike. The record peaked in the Billboard top two. In a 1944 interview, Sinatra said of the delayed success of the song, "That was the song, a few days after Harry James and myself recorded it, that gave us our walking papers out of the old Victor Hugo Cafe (a major entertainment venue of the 1930s) on the Sunset Strip in Hollywood. The manager came up and waved his hands for us to stop. He said Harry's trumpet playing was too loud for the joint and my singing was just plain lousy and fired Harry, me and the entire band on the spot. He said the two of us couldn't draw flies as an attraction, and I guess he was right - the room was as empty as a barn. It's a funny thing about that song. The recording we made of it 5 years ago is now one of the top spots among the best sellers. But it's the same old recording. It's also the song I auditioned with for Tommy Dorsey, who signed me on the strength of it. And now it's my first big record."

References in Popular Culture
• The song was used in the 1947 MGM cartoon, "Little 'Tinker", directed by Tex Avery. In the cartoon, a skunk tries to attract a mate by dressing like Frank Sinatra and singing this song. The skunk's singing voice was actually provided by Bill Roberts (uncredited).

Notable recordings
• Frank Sinatra - with Harry James (1939), Sinatra and Strings (1962, once again in a ballad arrangement), Strangers in the Night (1966, in an uptempo, swinging arrangement), a disco version in 1977 with Joe Beck, live 1982 performance on Sinatra: Vegas (2006).

"All or Nothing at All" • • • • • • • • • • • • Jimmy Scott - If You Only Knew (1955) Billie Holiday - All or Nothing at All (1958) Chet Baker and Johnny Pace - Chet Baker Introduces Johnny Pace (1958) Freddie Hubbard - Open Sesame (1960) John Coltrane - Ballads (1962) Sarah Vaughan - Sarah + 2 (1962) Jack Jones - The Impossible Dream (1966) and New Jack Swing (1997) Betty Carter, with Dave Holland - Feed the Fire (1993) Barry Manilow - Singin' with the Big Bands (1994) Diana Krall - Love Scenes (1997) Ian Shaw - In a New York Minute (1999) Kurt Elling- Dedicated to You: Kurt Elling Sings the Music of Coltrane and Hartman (2009)

376

References External links
• Entry on songfacts.com (http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=3238)

"Imagination"
"Imagination"
Music by Lyrics by Published Language Jimmy Van Heusen Johnny Burke 1940 English

Recorded by Glenn Miller orchestra Tommy Dorsey orchestra many other artists; see #Recorded versions

"Imagination" is a popular song with music written by Jimmy Van Heusen and the lyrics by Johnny Burke.[1] The song was first published in 1940. The two best-selling versions were recorded by the orchestras of Glenn Miller and Tommy Dorsey in 1940. The recording by Glenn Miller was released by Bluebird Records as catalog number 10622. It first reached the Billboard magazine Best Seller chart on July 20, 1940 and lasted 3 weeks on the chart, peaking at #3.[2] The recording by Tommy Dorsey was released by Victor Records as catalog number 26581. It reached the Billboard magazine Best Seller chart at #8 on July 20, 1940, its only week on the chart.[2]

"Imagination"

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"Imagination"
Single by Miki Howard from the album Come Share My Love B-side Released Format "You Better Be Ready to Love Me" January 1987 Cassette single 7" single 1986 Jazz 4:16 Atlantic Johnny Burke Jimmy Van Heusen LeMel Humes Miki Howard singles chronology

Recorded Genre Length Label Writer(s)

Producer

Come Share My Love (1986)

"Imagination" (1987)

"Come Back to Me Lover" (1987)

Miki Howard version
The song re-recorded by American R&B singer Miki Howard. Released as the second single from Howard's debut album, Come Share My Love. The song was R&B hit, peaking to no. 13 on the Hot R&B Singles chart.[3]

Charts
Chart (1987) Peak position 13

U.S. Billboard Hot 100 U.S. Billboard Hot R&B Singles

Other Recorded versions
The song has been recorded by, among others: Steve Allen (released by Columbia Records as catalog number 39589)[4] Georgie Auld and his orchestra (recorded February 1940, released by Varsity Records as catalog number 8199)[5] Chet Baker Shirley Bassey Chick Bullock and his orchestra (recorded February 21, 1940, released by Vocalion Records as catalog number 5434)[6] • June Christy - Fair and Warmer! (1957) • • • • • • Petula Clark (recorded 1963, released by Pye Records as catalog number 7N15517)[7] • Rosemary Clooney - Love (1963)

"Imagination" • Harry Connick, Jr. on 20 • Bing Crosby and John Scott Trotter's orchestra (recorded December 24, 1947, released by Decca Records as catalog number 24696)[8] • Doris Day (recorded November, 1947, released by Columbia Records as catalog number 38423,[9] also as catalog number 38698)[10] • Al Donahue and his orchestra (recorded March 18, 1940, released by Vocalion Records as catalog number 5434,[6] also by Conqueror Records as catalog number 9453)[11] • Jimmy Dorsey • Billy Eckstine with Pete Rugolo arr, cond) and his All Stars, including Pete Candoli (tp), Don Fagerquist (tp), Bud Shank (as, fl), Gerald Wiggins (p), Red Callender (b), Larry Bunker (ds). Recorded in Los Angeles, CA on January 2, 1958. • Ella Fitzgerald (recorded February 15, 1940, released by Decca Records as catalog number 3078B)[12] and recorded live in 1961 at the Crescendo Club in Los Angeles (released in 2009 in the album Twelve Nights In Hollywood). • The Fleetwoods • Miki Howard - Come Share My Love (1986) • Lionel Hampton • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Dick Haymes - The Complete Capitol Collection (2006) Keith Jarrett - on disc 4 of Keith Jarrett at the Blue Note (1994) Dean Martin (released October 1960 on his album This Time I'm Swingin'!) Art Pepper on his 1957 album Art Pepper Meets the Rhythm Section The Quotations recorded a doo-wop version in 1961 on Verve Records(VK10245) Andy Russell (released by Capitol Records as catalog number 20034)[13] Jan Savitt and his orchestra (recorded January 24, 1940, released by Decca Records as catalog number 2990B)[14] Little Jimmy Scott (released by Savoy Records as catalog number 1174)[15] Dinah Shore (recorded February 21, 1940, released by Bluebird Records as catalog number 10668) Frank Sinatra and Tommy Dorsey - Legendary Sides (1997) Kate Smith (recorded May 1, 1940, released by Columbia Records as catalog number 35486)[16] Keely Smith - The Keely Smith Collection (HMV Jazz Series, 1999) Jeri Southern - Bygone Days (2009) Jess Stacy (released by Capitol Records as catalog number 1136)[17] Jo Stafford on her album Jo + Jazz (1960) Sonny Stitt Ted Straeter and his orchestra (recorded February 21, 1940, released by Columbia Records as catalog number 35402)[16] Fred Waring and his orchestra (recorded June 28, 1944, released by Decca Records as catalog number 29219)[18] Fran Warren on her album Hey There! Here's Fran Warren released in 1957 By Pickwick Joe Williams Florence Wright (recorded February 11, 1950, released by National Records as catalog number 9105)[19] Victor Young and orchestra (released by Decca Records as catalog number 28570)[20]

378

"Imagination"

379

References
[1] ASCAP entry for Imagination (http:/ / www. ascap. com/ ace/ search. cfm?requesttimeout=300& mode=results& searchstr=390115758& search_in=i& search_type=exact& search_det=t,s,w,p,b,v& results_pp=20& start=1) [2] Whitburn, Joel (1973). Top Pop Records 1940-1955. Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin: Record Research. [3] Top 100 Music Hits, Top 100 Music Charts, Top 100 Songs & The Hot 100 | Billboard.com (http:/ / www. billboard. com/ charts/ hot-100#/ song/ miki-howard/ imagination/ 427145) [4] Columbia Records in the 39500 to 39999 series (http:/ / 78discography. com/ COL39500. htm) [5] Varsity Records in the 8000 to 8419 series (http:/ / 78discography. com/ Vars8000. htm) [6] Vocalion Records in the 5000 to 5499 series (http:/ / 78discography. com/ VOC5000. htm) [7] Petula Clark discography (http:/ / www. 45-rpm. org. uk/ dirp/ petulac. htm) [8] Decca Records in the 24500 to 24999 series (http:/ / 78discography. com/ Dec24500. htm) [9] Columbia Records in the 38000 to 38499 series (http:/ / 78discography. com/ COL38000. htm) [10] Columbia Records in the 38500 to 38999 series (http:/ / 78discography. com/ COL38500. htm) [11] Conqueror Records in the 9000 to 9499 series (http:/ / 78discography. com/ Conq9000. htm) [12] Decca Records in the 3000 to 3499 series (http:/ / 78discography. com/ Dec3000. htm) [13] Capitol Records in the 20000 to 20156 series (http:/ / 78discography. com/ Capitol20000. htm) [14] Decca Records in the 2500 to 2999 series (http:/ / 78discography. com/ Dec2500. htm) [15] Savoy Records in the 1100 to 1199 series (http:/ / 78discography. com/ sav1100. htm) [16] Columbia Records in the 35200 to 35499 series (http:/ / 78discography. com/ COL35200. htm) [17] Capitol Records in the 1000 to 1499 series (http:/ / 78discography. com/ Capitol1000. htm) [18] Decca Records in the 29000 to 29255 series (http:/ / 78discography. com/ Dec2900F. htm) [19] National Records in the 3001 to 25000 series (http:/ / 78discography. com/ NationalLate. htm) [20] Decca Records in the 28500 to 28999 series (http:/ / 78discography. com/ Dec28500. htm)

External links
• Jimmy Van Heusen Website (http://www.jimmyvanheusen.com)

"East of the Sun (and West of the Moon"
"East of the Sun (and West of the Moon)" is a popular song written by Brooks Bowman, an undergraduate member of Princeton University's Class of 1936, for the 1934 production of the Princeton Triangle Club's production of Stags at Bay.[1] It was published in 1934 and soon became a signature song of the Princeton Nassoons, Princeton University's oldest a cappella group. "East of the Sun" was first recorded by Hal Kemp for Brunswick Records on Dec. 1, 1934. Soon after their founding in the late 1930s, the Princeton Nassoons adopted an arrangement as one of their signature pieces, and have recorded it on many albums including one as recently as 2010. Since the 1950s the song has become a popular staple of many jazz musicians. Lyrics East of the sun and west of the moon, We'll build a dream house of love, dear. Near to the sun in the day near to the moon at night, We'll live in a lovely way, dear Living on love and pale moonlight. Just you and I, forever and a day, Love will not die, we'll keep it that way, Up among the stars we'll find

"East of the Sun (and West of the Moon" A harmony of life to a lovely tune, East of the sun and west of the moon, dear, East of the sun and west of the moon.

380

Recorded Versions
One of the first recordings was by Arthur Tracy on September 22, 1935 according to CD jacket of ASV Living Era Hits of '35, CD AJA 5185. Sarah Vaughan recorded it in a 1949 Columbia session for the album Sarah Vaughan in Hi-Fi.[2] Charlie Parker recorded it as early as 1952; it is featured on numerous albums, including two renditions on The Complete Legendary Rockland Palace Date 1952.[3] Stan Getz recorded it in 1955, and it was featured as the first track on his seminal double album The West Coast Jazz.[4] One of the most popular recordings was by Louis Armstrong, featured in his 1957 double-album I've Got the World on a String.[5] Keely Smith recorded it in 1958 for her Capital album, Politely [6] with Billy May & His Orchestra. Lee Wiley recorded it for "West of the Moon" (1958). Ella Fitzgerald included this on her 1959 Verve release Ella Fitzgerald Sings Sweet Songs for Swingers with the Frank DeVol Orchestra and Harry "Sweets" Edison on trumpet. Frank Sinatra recorded it on I Remember Tommy (1961). Ellis Marsalis Recorded the song in the Wynton Marsalis album of 1991, Standard Time Vol. 2. Tony Bennett recorded the song on his 1992 tribute to Sinatra Perfectly Frank. Betty Carter recorded the song on her 1996 album I'm Yours, You're Mine. Diana Krall recorded the song on her album When I Look in Your Eyes (1999) and again on Live in Paris (2002). Other versions recorded include: Guy Mitchell, Billie Holiday,[7] Tommy Dorsey,[8] George Shearing, Dakota Staton,[9] Lester Young,[10] Scott Hamilton (1993),[11] Stacey Kent (1998), Sonny and Perley (1999),[12] Alexis Cole (2005),[13] Rebecca Parris (2007),[14] and Joshua Redman (2007).[15]

References
[1] History of the Princeton Triangle Club (http:/ / www. princeton. edu/ ~triangle/ content_page/ history. html) Retrieved 09-11-19 [2] Sarah Vaughan, Hi-Fi (http:/ / www. amazon. com/ dp/ B000002AGJ) Retrieved 09-19-11 [3] Charlie Parker, Complete Legendary Rockland Palace Dance Date 1952 (http:/ / www. amazon. com/ dp/ samples/ B000001LZ4) Retrieved 09-19-11 [4] Stan Getz, West Coast Jazz (http:/ / www. amazon. com/ dp/ B00000HYIH) Retrieved 09-19-11 [5] Louis Armstrong, I've Got the World on a String/Under the Stars (http:/ / www. amazon. com/ dp/ B00002DDQI) Retrieved 09-19-11 [6] Keely Smith, Politely! (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ politely-r68015) Retrieved 09-19-11 [7] Billie Holiday, Verve Jazz Masters 47: Billie Holiday Sings Standards (http:/ / www. amazon. com/ dp/ B0000046Z9) Retrieved 09-19-11 [8] Tommy Dorsey, A Portrait of Tommy Dorsey (http:/ / www. amazon. com/ dp/ B000024SGP) Retrieved 09-19-11 [9] Dakota Staton, Spotlight on Dakota Staton (Great Ladies of Song) (http:/ / www. amazon. com/ dp/ B000008QGF) Retrieved 09-19-11 [10] Lester Young, Movin' With Lester (http:/ / www. amazon. com/ dp/ B0002BHDTS) Retrieved 09-19-11 [11] Scott Hamilton, East of the Sun (http:/ / www. amazon. com/ dp/ B0000006MN) Retrieved 09-19-11 [12] Sonny and Perley, East of the Sun (http:/ / www. amazon. com/ dp/ B000050GF5) Retrieved 09-11-09 [13] Alexis Cole, Nearer the Sun (http:/ / www. cdbaby. com/ cd/ alexiscole2) Retrieved 09-19-11 [14] Rebecca Parris, You Don't Know Me (http:/ / www. amazon. com/ dp/ B000MTDLQE) Retrieved 09-11-09 [15] Joshua Redman, Back East (http:/ / www. amazon. com/ dp/ B000N4S95Q) Retrieved 09-11-19

"The One I Love (Belongs to Somebody Else)"

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"The One I Love (Belongs to Somebody Else)"
"The One I Love (Belongs to Somebody Else)" is a popular song. The music was written by Isham Jones, the lyrics by Gus Kahn. The song was published in 1924. It was first introduced by Al Jolson. The song was performed in the 1951 film I'll See You in My Dreams, starring Doris Day and Danny Thomas. The film was based loosely upon the lives of Gus Kahn and his wife Grace LeBoy Kahn. Frank Sinatra covered the song on his 1961 I Remember Tommy album and the 1991 re-issue of his 1959 No One Cares album.

"Stardust"

382

"Stardust"
"Stardust"

A sign erected in front of the Gables in Bloomington, IN to commemorate Hoagy Carmichael, composer of "Stardust".
Music by Lyrics by Published Original artist Recorded by Hoagy Carmichael Mitchell Parish 1927 Hoagy Carmichael's orchestra Many artists

"Stardust" is an American popular song composed in 1927 by Hoagy Carmichael with lyrics added in 1929 by Mitchell Parish. Originally titled "Star Dust", Carmichael first recorded the song at the Gennett Records studio in Richmond, Indiana. The song, "a song about a song about love",[1] played in an idiosyncratic melody in medium tempo, became an American standard, and is considered one of the most recorded songs of the 20th century, with over 1,500 total recordings.[2] In 2004, Carmichael's original 1927 recording of the song was one of 50 recordings chosen by the Library of Congress to be added to the National Recording Registry.

Composition
"Stardust" (the song's original title was "Star Dust", which has long been compounded into "Stardust")[3] was written at the Keuka Hotel on Keuka Lake, a Finger Lake in Western New York, on an old upright piano, and first recorded in Richmond, Indiana, for Gennett Records (Gennett 6311) by Carmichael, with Emil Seidel and his Orchestra and the Dorsey brothers as "Hoagy Carmichael and His Pals," on October 31, 1927, as a peppy (but mid-tempo) jazz instrumental. Carmichael said he was inspired by the types of improvisations made by Bix Beiderbecke.[4] The tune at first attracted only moderate attention, mostly from fellow musicians, a few of whom (including Don Redman) recorded their own versions of Carmichael's tune. Mitchell Parish wrote lyrics for the song, based on his own and Carmichael's ideas, which were published in 1929. A slower version had been recorded in October 1928, but the real transformation came on May 16, 1930, when bandleader Isham Jones recorded it as a sentimental ballad.[5]

Covers
Jones' recording became the first of many hit versions of the tune. Young baritone sensation Bing Crosby released a version in 1931, and by the following year, over two dozen bands had recorded "Stardust." It was then covered by almost every prominent band of that era. Versions have been recorded by Louis Armstrong, Dave Brubeck, Tommy Dorsey, Tex Beneke with The Glenn Miller Orchestra (Recorded in New York City on February 1, 1947 and released by RCA Victor Records as catalogue number 20-2016B[6] and by EMI on the His Master's Voice label as catalogue number BD 5968), Frank Sinatra, Billie Holiday, Doris Day, Jan Garber, Fumio Nanri, Dizzy Gillespie, Nat King Cole, Mel Tormé, Connie Francis, Jean Sablon, Keely Smith, Terumasa Hino, Harry Connick Jr, Ella

"Stardust" Fitzgerald, Olavi Virta, The Peanuts, Django Reinhardt, Barry Manilow, John Coltrane, Earl Grant, Willie Nelson, Billy Ward and His Dominoes, George Benson, Mina, Ken Hirai, Los Hombres Calientes and many others. Glenn Miller also released a recording of the song on V-Disc, No. 65A, with a spoken introduction recorded with the AAFTC Orchestra which was released in December, 1943. Billy Ward and His Dominoes had a #13 hit with the song on the Billboard Pop chart. However, it has been the Artie Shaw version of 1941, with memorable solos by Billy Butterfield (trumpet) and Jack Jenney (trombone) that remains the favorite orchestral version of the Big Band era. Ringo Starr recorded a version for his first solo album, Sentimental Journey, in 1970, after the break-up of The Beatles. Sergio Franchi covered the song on his 1964 RCA Victor album The Exciting Voice of Fergio Franchi. Rod Stewart recorded the song for his album "Stardust: The Great American Songbook Volume III" (2004). Katie Melua recorded a cover on her EP Nine Million Bicycles in 2005. Michael Bublé recorded it for his album "Crazy Love" released in 2009. Certain recorded variations on the song have become notable. Armstrong recorded "Stardust" on November 4, 1931, and on an alternate take inserted the lyric 'oh, memory' just before an instrumental break. This version became prized over the issued take among jazz collectors, including Carmichael.[7] Thirty years later, Sinatra recorded just the verse on his November 20, 1961 recording for his album Sinatra and Strings - much to Carmichael's initial chagrin, although Hoagy is said to have changed his mind upon hearing the recording. In 1993, guitarist Larry Coryell covered the song from his album "Fallen Angel."[8][9] Les Deux Love Orchestra included their version of Stardust on the 2001 album, "Music From Les Deux Cafés." In 2006, David Benoit covered the song from his Standards album "Standards."[10] While the song has been traditionally performed as a ballad, vocalist Kalil Wilson recorded an uptempo version of the song for his 2009 album, "Easy to Love." Willie Nelson's cover of the song was used to wake up the crew of Space Shuttle mission STS-97 on their second flight day.[11]

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Legacy
In 1999, "Stardust" was included in the "NPR 100", a list compiled by National Public Radio of the 100 most important American musical works of the 20th century.[12] In 2000, Swedish music reviewers voted it as "the tune of the century", with Kurt Weill's "Mack the Knife" as second. In 2004, Carmichael's original 1927 recording of the song was one of 50 recordings chosen that year by the Library of Congress to be added to the National Recording Registry.

Notes
[1] Sudhalter 2003, p.XI. See also p.123: "..."Star Dust" is obviously a song about a song—a genre relatively rare in American popular music. There had been such songs before: Irving Berlin's 1909 "That Mesmerizing Mendelssohn Tune" (about the great German composer's famed Spring Song) is one example among many. But none had been a major song about a song—particularly a song that didn't actually exist. This was new." [2] National Public Radio. "Hoagy Carmichael: 'Stardust Melodies'" (http:/ / www. npr. org/ templates/ story/ story. php?storyId=88122354). Jazz Profiles. NPR Music. . [3] "Hoagy Carmichael Collection" (http:/ / www. letrs. indiana. edu/ cgi-bin/ hoagy-idx. pl?type=itemlist& idno=ATM-MC2-1-13& size=First+ 30). Archives of Traditional Music at Indiana University. . Retrieved 2007-06-17. [4] "Brief Biography of Hoagy Carmichael" (http:/ / www. dlib. indiana. edu/ collections/ hoagy/ research/ bio/ ). Dlib.indiana.edu. . Retrieved 2011-01-18. [5] Sudhalter 2002, p.139 [6] "RCA Victor Records in the 20-2000 to 20-2999 series" (http:/ / www. 78discography. com/ RCA202000. htm). 78discography.com. . Retrieved 2011-01-18. [7] Armstrong, Louis. Portrait of the Artist As A Young Man 1923-1934. Columbia/Legacy 57176, 1994. Insert booklet, p. 26 [8] "Fallen Angel overview" (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r193718). Allmusic.com. . [9] "Email Jazz News" (http:/ / www. allaboutjazz. com/ php/ news_email. php?id=13423). All About Jazz. .

"Stardust"
[10] "Standards overview" (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r840559). Allmusic.com. . [11] NASA (May 11, 2009). "STS-97 Wakeup Calls" (http:/ / spaceflight. nasa. gov/ gallery/ audio/ shuttle/ sts-97/ html/ ndxpage1. html). NASA. . Retrieved July 31, 2009. [12] "The 100 most important American musical works of the 20th century" (http:/ / www. npr. org/ programs/ specials/ vote/ list100. html). National Public Radio. . Retrieved 2008-08-09.

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References
• Forte, Allen (1995). "Ballads of Hoagy Carmichael, Arthur Schwartz, Vernon Duke, John Green, Burton Lane, and Jimmy Van Heusen". The American Popular Ballad of the Golden Era, 1924-1950. Princeton University Press. ISBN 0-691-04399-X. • Sudhalter, Richard M. (2003). Stardust Melody: The Life and Music of Hoagy Carmichael. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-516898-4.

External links
• Stardust (http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio2/soldonsong/songlibrary/indepth/stardust.shtml) on Sold on Song (BBC) • "Stardust" (http://www.redhotjazz.com/songs/hoagy/stardust2.ram) (played by Hoagy Carmichael, 1933) The Red Hot Jazz Archive (http://www.redhotjazz.com) • "Stardust" (http://www.redhotjazz.com/Songs/Louie/lao/stardust.ram) (played by Louis Armstrong and his Orchestra, 1931) The Red Hot Jazz Archive (http://www.redhotjazz.com) • "Stardust" (http://www.redhotjazz.com/songs/waller/stardust.ram) (played by Fats Waller, 1937) The Red Hot Jazz Archive (http://www.redhotjazz.com)

"Oh! Look at Me Now"
"Oh! Look at Me Now" is a 1941 song composed by Joe Bushkin, with lyrics by John DeVries. It is strongly associated with Frank Sinatra, who first recorded it with Tommy Dorsey and his orchestra, in an arrangement by Sy Oliver. Sinatra re-recorded the song for his 1957 A Swingin' Affair!, this time arranged and conducted by Nelson Riddle.

Notable recordings
• George Shearing and Nancy Wilson - The Swingin's Mutual! (1961) • Frank Sinatra - with Tommy Dorsey, October 24, 1940, with Tommy Dorsey, Connie Haines and The Pied Pipers, January 6, 1941, A Swingin' Affair! (1957), Sinatra '57 in Concert (1999) • Ella Fitzgerald - All That Jazz (1989) • Gareth Gates and Zoe Birkett - Pop Idol: The Big Band Album (2002) • Bobby Darin

"Without a Song"

385

"Without a Song"
"Without a Song" is a popular song with music by Vincent Youmans and lyrics by Billy Rose and Edward Eliscu, published in 1929. It was included in the musical play, Great Day. "Without a Song" was recorded twice by Perry Como: the first time on January 11, 1951 and the second time in June 1970 at a live performance at the International Hotel, Las Vegas, Nevada. The 1951 recording was issued as a 78 rpm single in the United States by RCA Victor Records (catalog number 20-4033) and in the United Kingdom by HMV (catalog number B-10093). It was also included in a 1957 album, Dream Along With Me (RCA Camden catalog number CAL-403). The 1970 recording was issued on albums by RCA and its United Kingdom, Netherlands, and Japan subsidiaries, but not as a single. Lawrence Tibbett, Nelson Eddy and Frank Sinatra recorded versions of the song with what appears to be the original lyrics, including the line, "A darkie's born, but he's no good no how, without a song." In subsequent recordings, Sinatra didn't use the term "darkie", and later recorded versions included the altered text "a man is born, but he's no good no how, without a song."[1] In addition to popular artists like Perry Como, Frank Sinatra, and Tony Bennett and opera singers like Jan Peerce and Mario Lanza, many African-American artists of varying styles also successfully recorded the song. These included a version in "gospel style" of Mahalia Jackson in concert in Berlin, 1967. Others include Oscar Peterson, Louis Armstrong, Art Blakey, Art Tatum, Billy Eckstine (album No Cover, No Minimum), The Ravens, Joe Henderson, Freddie Hubbard, Art Pepper, Adam Rogers, The Isley Brothers, Stevie Wonder, and The Supremes (for their album I Hear A Symphony). Sonny Rollins recorded an instrumental version, on his 1961 "comeback" album, The Bridge. A version was recorded by Stanley Turrentine on his album Never Let Me Go (Blue Note 90838). A version appears on the Rhino reissue of Bill Evans's album You Must Believe in Spring. The jazz singer Jimmy Scott recorded the song on his 2006 album Milestone Profiles - Jimmy Scott on Milestone Records. "Without a Song" was released as a single in the UK by Gary Shearston in 1974 and by Noah Stewart in 2011.

References
[1] Richard Cohen. "A Face On the Past" (http:/ / blacksuperhero. com/ articles/ art2-Cohen. html). .

"Let's Get Away from It All"

386

"Let's Get Away from It All"
"Let's Get Away from It All" is a popular song with music by Matt Dennis and lyrics by Tom Adair, published in 1941. The song is best known in a version by Frank Sinatra while he was a part of Tommy Dorsey's orchestra, but many others have recorded it and it is considered a pop standard.

"Blue Skies"
"Blue Skies" is a popular song written by Irving Berlin in 1926.

History
The song was composed in 1926 as a last-minute addition to the Rodgers and Hart musical Betsy. Although the show only ran for 39 performances, "Blue Skies" was an instant success, with audiences on opening night demanding 24 encores of the piece from star Belle Baker.[1] During the final repetition, Ms. Baker forgot her lyrics, prompting Berlin to sing them from his seat in the front row.[2] In 1927, the music was published and Ben Selvin's recorded version was a #1 hit. That same year, it became one of the first songs to be featured in a talkie, when Al Jolson performed it in The Jazz Singer. Another version of the song was recorded by Benny Goodman and his Orchestra in 1935 [Victor Scroll 25136]. 1946 was also a notable year for the song, with a Bing Crosby/Fred Astaire film taking its title, and two recorded versions by Count Basie and Benny Goodman reaching #8 and #9 on the pop charts, respectively. Crossing genres, Willie Nelson's recording of "Blue Skies" was a #1 country music hit in 1978. It was a major western swing and country standard already in 1939, by Moon Mullican, and in 1962 by Jim Reeves. "Blue Skies" is one of many popular songs whose lyrics use a "Bluebird of happiness" as a symbol of cheer: "Bluebirds singing a song -- Nothing but bluebirds all day long."

Chart performance
Willie Nelson version
Chart (1978) Peak position 1 32 53 1 4 26

U.S. Billboard Hot Country Singles U.S. Billboard Adult Contemporary Australian Kent Music Report Canadian RPM Country Tracks Canadian RPM Adult Contemporary Tracks New Zealand Singles Chart

"Blue Skies"

387

Recorded versions
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Judy Garland Oscar Aleman Don Shirley Trio (Water Boy) Irving Kaufman (singer) (1927) Ben Selvin (1927) Josephine Baker (1927) Fritz Kreisler (1927) Maxine Sullivan (1937) Moon Mullican (1939) Slim Gaillard (1940–1942) Tommy Dorsey and his orchestra (with vocal by Frank Sinatra) (1941) Betty Hutton (1944) Count Basie and his orchestra (with vocal by Jimmy Rushing) (1946) Bing Crosby (1946) Benny Goodman and his orchestra (instrumental, with Bunny Berigan trumpet solo) (1935) Benny Goodman and his orchestra (with vocal by Art Lund) (1946)

• Frank Sinatra (1946) • Donald Peers with two pianos. Recorded at Royal Albert Hall, London, on June 13, 1949 as the first song of a medley along with "There's a Rainbow 'Round My Shoulder" and "If You Were the Only Girl in the World". The medley was released by EMI on the His Master's Voice label as catalog number B 9792. • Art Tatum (1949) • Dinah Washington (1954) • Mel Torme (1954) • Doris Day • "Verden Rundt's" All Star Band (A. Skjold (trombone) - K. Bergheim (tenor) - Knut Hyrum (baritone) - I. Børsum (bass), Carsten Klouman (piano) - K. O. Hoff (drums). Recorded in Oslo on March 28, 1955. It was released by A/S Nera on the Musica label as catalog number RA-9009. The B side was "Jumpin' at the Woodside". • The McGuire Sisters (1957) • Ella Fitzgerald (1958) • Della Reese (1960) • Freddy Cannon (1960) • Jim Reeves (1962) • Bobby Darin (1962) • Johnny Rivers (1962) • Frank Ifield (1964) • Willie Nelson (1978), from his album of standards, Stardust • Rosemary Clooney • Kiri Te Kanawa (1986) • Cassandra Wilson (1988) • Nancy LaMott (1991) • Lyle Lovett (1994) • Marina Lima (1995) • Eva Cassidy (1996) • Lavay Smith & Her Red Hot Skillet Lickers (1996) • The Swingle Singers (1996)

"Blue Skies" • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Lea Delaria (1998) Groove Armada (1999), under the title "Inside My Mind (Blue Skies)" Mercury Rev (2001) Fiona Apple and Brad Mehldau (2002) – unreleased, but performed at Club Largo. Brent Spiner (2002), performing as Lt. Cmdr. Data in the movie Star Trek Nemesis. Steve March Tormé "The Essence of Love" Curtis Stigers (2003) Caetano Veloso (2004) Robert Glasper (2004) Debby Boone (2005) Rod Stewart (2005) Lori Cullen (2006) Deborah Cox (2007) Erich Von Kneip (2007) Gloria Gibson (2008) Sarah Davies (2008) Diane Schuur (2008) mote (2009) Blue October (2009) Phillip Kangari (2008) Hoboken Charter School (2010)

388

Selected appearances in film
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • The Jazz Singer (1927) Alexander's Ragtime Band (1938) Blue Skies (1946) White Christmas (1954) Glengarry Glen Ross (1994) With Honors (1994) Edge of Seventeen (1998) Patch Adams (1998) Star Trek Nemesis (2002) The Aviator (2004) Hollywoodland (2006) The Good Shepherd (2006) Harold & Kumar Escape from Guantanamo Bay (2008) Kommissar LaBréa - Tod an der Bastille (2009)

"Blue Skies"

389

Notes
[1] Blue Skies (http:/ / www. jazzstandards. com/ compositions-1/ blueskies. htm) at jazzstandards.com (http:/ / www. jazzstandards. com/ ) retrieved on March 19, 2009 [2] Laurence Bergreen, As Thousands Cheer: The Life of Irving Berlin, 1996, p. 277.

External links
• • • • Betsy 1926 (http://www.lorenzhart.org/betsy.htm) Irving Berlin’s Music in Films (http://www.hollywood.com/celebs/detail/id/199620) Time article on Irving Berlin (http://www.time.com/time/sampler/article/0,8599,189846,00.html) An early electronic performance of "Blue Skies" realized on the RCA Mark II Electronic Sound Synthesizer (http://120years.net/machines/rca/rca_blue.aiff)

"Pale Moon (An Indian Love Song)"

390

"Pale Moon (An Indian Love Song)"
"Pale Moon" (An Indian Love Song)

Sheet music cover (1920)
Music by Frederic Knight Logan Lyrics by Jesse G. M. Glick Written 1920

Language English

"Pale Moon" (An Indian Love Song) is a popular song composed by Frederic Knight Logan with lyrics by Jesse G. M. Glick. The song was written in 1920. Frank Sinatra recorded a version with the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra in 1941. Jimmy Wakely and Tex Williams also recorded popular Western and Western Swing versions.

Lyrics
The lyrics as published:[1] Out of my lodge at eventide, 'Mong the sobbing pine, Footsteps echo by my side, A spirit face, a sign. Twilight skies are all alight Across the deep lagoon. A face is breaking through the night, My Indian {maid} {brave}, Pale Moon. Speak to thy love forsaken, Thy spirit mantle throw. Ere thou the great white dawn awaken' And to the sea thou swingest low, Then to the west, I'll follow across the deep lagoon, Swift as a flying arrow, To thy abode, Pale Moon.

"Pale Moon (An Indian Love Song)"

391

References
[1] Glick, "Pale Moon" (Sheet music).

Bibliography
• Glick, Jesse G.M. (w.); Logan, Frederic Knight (m.). "Pale Moon (An Indian Love Song)." Chicago: Forster Music Publisher, Inc. (1920).

"Embraceable You"

392

"Embraceable You"
"Embraceable You"
Music by Lyrics by Published Written Language George Gershwin Ira Gershwin 1930 1928 English

Original artist Ginger Rogers Recorded by Various artists

"Embraceable You" is a popular song, with music by George Gershwin and lyrics by Ira Gershwin. The song was originally written in 1928 for an unpublished operetta named East is West. It was eventually published in 1930 and included in the Broadway musical Girl Crazy. where it was performed by Ginger Rogers in a song and dance routine choreographed by Fred Astaire. Billie Holiday's 1944 recording was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 2005.[1]

Notable Recordings
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Oleta Adams, on the album The Glory of Gershwin (1994) Chet Baker Nat King Cole Ornette Coleman - This Is Our Music (1959) Johnny Dankworth - Too Cool For The Blues (2010) Doris Day Jimmy Dorsey - May 1941 (Decca 3928) Bill Evans - Bill Evans at the Montreux Jazz Festival (1968) Ella Fitzgerald, on the album Ella Fitzgerald Sings the George and Ira Gershwin Songbook (1959) and Nice Work If You Can Get It, Pablo, 1983. Med Flory and Supersax - Live in '75: Japanese Tour (1999) Judy Garland - Girl Crazy, film (1943)[2] Herbie Hancock, on his (1998) album Gershwin's World Nicole Henry Billie Holiday (1944) Etta James on her 1994 cover album Mystery Lady: Songs of Billie Holiday Liberace Maureen McGovern Idina Menzel Liza Minnelli, on her 1996 album Gently Charlie Parker - Cool Bird (1947) Louis Prima Duncan Sheik, on Red Hot + Rhapsody Frank Sinatra (1941) Brent Spiner, on the album Ol' Yellow Eyes Is Back Rod Stewart

"Embraceable You" • • • • • Art Tatum Chucho Valdés Sarah Vaughan - Sarah Vaughan with Clifford Brown (1954) Ben Webster and Harry "Sweets" Edison, on the EP album Ben and "Sweets" Andy Williams - Warm and Willing (1962)

393

Footnotes
[1] Grammy Hall of Fame (http:/ / www. grammy. org/ recording-academy/ awards/ hall-of-fame#e) [2] Dir. Norman Taurog, Busby Berkeley (1943). Video: "Judy Garland - Embraceable You on Lost Vocals" (http:/ / lostvocals. ning. com/ video/ judy-garland-embraceable-you). Girl Crazy. MGM. Video:. Retrieved 2009-01-31.

"How About You?"
"How About You?" is a popular song composed by Burton Lane, with lyrics by Ralph Freed. It was introduced in the 1941 film Babes on Broadway by Judy Garland and Mickey Rooney and has also featured in The Fisher King with Robin Williams. The music of the song appears in the film All About Eve (1950). The lyrics of the song are often changed depending on the recording artist, in its original form, it is a duet though rarely has it been recorded that way. Certain lyrics have also been changed based on the time of the song's release; the line "Franklin Roosevelt's looks give me a thrill" had been changed to "James Durante's looks" in a fifties recording by Sinatra, though he did sing it in its original form with Dorsey back in the forties.

Notable recordings
• Shirley Bassey - Bewitching Miss Bassey (1959) • Rosemary Clooney - At Long Last (1998) (with the Count Basie Orchestra) • Frank Sinatra - Songs for Swingin' Lovers (1956); The Legendary Sides (1997) (with Tommy Dorsey)

"There Are Such Things"

394

"There Are Such Things"
"There Are Such Things"
Written by Stanley Adams Abel Baer George W. Meyer 1942 English

Published Language

Original artist Frank Sinatra (with Tommy Dorsey and his orchestra) Recorded by Count Basie Billy Eckstine Al Hibbler Ahmad Jamal Etta Jones Al Martino The Modernaires The Pied Pipers Sonny Rollins Anne Shelton Norman Simmons Jo Stafford Sonny Stitt Jerry Vale Sarah Vaughan

"There Are Such Things" is a popular song by Stanley Adams, Abel Baer, and George W. Meyer, published in 1942. The most popular version of the song, by Tommy Dorsey's orchestra, reached #1 on the charts, but many other versions have been recorded since.

Recorded versions
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Count Basie Billy Eckstine Al Hibbler Ahmad Jamal Etta Jones Al Martino The Modernaires The Pied Pipers Sonny Rollins Anne Shelton Norman Simmons Frank Sinatra and Tommy Dorsey - Legendary Sides (1997) Jo Stafford Sonny Stitt Jerry Vale Sarah Vaughan

"Night and Day"

395

"Night and Day"
"Night and Day" is a popular song by Cole Porter. It was written for the 1932 musical play Gay Divorce. It is perhaps Porter's most popular contribution to the Great American Songbook and has been recorded by dozens of artists. Fred Astaire introduced "Night and Day" on stage, and his recording of the song was a #1 hit. He performed it again in the 1934 film version of the show, renamed The Gay Divorcee, and it became one of his signature pieces. Porter was known to claim that the Islamic call to worship he heard on a trip to Morocco inspired the song.[1] Another popular legend has it he was inspired by the Moorish architecture of the Alcazar Hotel in Cleveland Heights, Ohio.[2] The song was so associated with Porter that when Hollywood first filmed his life story in 1946, the movie was entitled Night and Day.

Notable recordings
"Night and Day" has been recorded many times, notably by Fred Astaire, Bill Evans, Art Tatum, Billie Holiday, Frank Sinatra, Dionne Warwick, Ella Fitzgerald, Shirley Bassey, Ringo Starr, Sondre Lerche, Doris Day, Deanna Durbin, Jamie Cullum, Etta James, and U2. Sinatra recorded the song at least five times including with Axel Stordahl in his first solo session in 1942 and again with him in 1947, with Nelson Riddle in 1956 for A Swingin' Affair!, with Don Costa in 1961 for Sinatra and Strings, and even a disco version with Joe Beck in 1977. Dionne Warwick recorded it for her 1990 album Dionne Warwick Sings Cole Porter. Shirley Bassey recorded it for her 1959 album The Bewitching Miss Bassey. Doris Day recorded it for her 1958 album Hooray for Hollywood. Fitzgerald's most celebrated recording of the song occurred on her 1956 album Ella Fitzgerald Sings the Cole Porter Songbook. Everything But the Girl chose this song for their first single in 1983. It made #92 in August 1982[3]. The song was recorded by Ringo Starr in 1970 for his first solo album Sentimental Journey. The rock/jam band Phish has played the song live only once in their more than 20-year career: at a private wedding on August 12, 1989. The song was recorded by U2 in 1990 and appeared on the Red Hot + Blue compilation album. Thomas Anders (of Modern Talking fame) recorded his version in 1997 on the album Live Concert. Chicago added a version in 1995 on their return-to-their-roots-disc, Night & Day: Big Band; Rod Stewart recorded a version for his 2004 album Stardust: the Great American Songbook 3. A rendition was also recorded by The Temptations, which was featured on the soundtrack of the 2000 movie What Women Want. "Night and Day" also reappeared on the American pop charts in 1967, done by Sérgio Mendes and Brasil '66. In 2004 a version of "Night and Day" was included in the biographical film about Cole Porter, De-Lovely, sung by John Barrowman and Kevin Kline. The song was also recorded in 2005 by Sondre Lerche on his album Duper Sessions. In 2007 it was recorded by Bebel Gilberto with a bossa nova approach on her album Momento. Allan Sherman's 1965 album Allan in Wonderland included a version, with Porter's music and words unchanged, but with punctuation marks included, so it starts like this: Night and Day; You are the one; Only you, beneath the moon, and under the sun ;

"Night and Day" Victor Borge was better known for verbal punctuation than was Sherman, but in the case of this song, Borge would start playing Beethoven's "Moonlight Sonata" op. 27, with its opening left-hand octave, and then would begin playing the three right-hand notes, seguéing into the beginning of "Night and Day". Little River Band references the song in their song "Reminiscing". One line of the song states "And the Porter tune/Made us dance across the room", while in the background the backup singers sing the words "Night and Day".

396

Song structure
The construction of "Night And Day" is unusual for a hit song of the 1930s. Most popular tunes then featured 32-bar choruses, divided into four 8-bar sections, usually with an AABA musical structure, the B section representing the bridge. Porter's song, on the other hand, has a chorus of 48 bars, divided into 6 sections of 8 bars — ABABCB — with section C representing the bridge.

Harmonic structure
"Night And Day" has unusual chord changes (the underlying harmony). The tune begins with a pedal (repeated) dominant with a major seventh chord built on the flattened sixth of the key, which then resolves to the dominant seventh in the next bar. If performed in the key of B♭, the first chord is therefore G♭ major seventh, with an F (the major seventh above the harmonic root) in the melody, before resolving to F7 and eventually B♭ maj7. This section repeats and is followed by a descending harmonic sequence starting with a -7♭5 (half diminished seventh chord or Ø) built on the augmented fourth of the key, and descending by semitones — with changes in the chord quality— to the supertonic minor seventh which forms the beginning of a more standard II-V-I progression. In B♭, this sequence begins with an EØ, followed by an E♭-7, D-7 and D♭ dim, before resolving onto C-7 (the supertonic minor seventh) and cadencing onto B♭. The bridge is also unusual, with an immediate, fleeting and often (depending on the version) unprepared key change up a minor third, before an equally transient and unexpected return to the key centre. In B♭, the bridge begins with a D♭ major seventh, then moves back to B♭ with a B♭ major seventh chord. This repeats, and is followed by a recapitulation of the second section outlined above. The vocal verse is also unusual in that most of the melody consists entirely of a single note — the same dominant pedal that begins the body of the song — with rather inconclusive and unusual harmonies underneath. Some have seen the use of repeated notes in the verse as an indication of the singer's obsession.

In popular culture
In film: • • • • • • • • The Gay Divorcee (1934, sung by Fred Astaire; danced by Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers) The Singing Marine (1937) Now, Voyager (1942) Action in the North Atlantic (1943, Julie Bishop dubbed by Martha Mears) Destination Tokyo (1943) The Hard Way (1943, instrumental) Reveille with Beverly (1943, Frank Sinatra) Lady on a Train (1945, Deanna Durbin)

• Night and Day (1946) • Desk Set (1957, Katharine Hepburn)

"Night and Day" • • • • • • • • • • • • Evil under the Sun (1982) Once Upon a Time in America (1984) Radio Days (1987) September (1987, Art Tatum, Ben Webster, Red Callender, Bill Douglass) The Rocketeer (1991) Jumanji (1995) Le Jour et la nuit aka Day and Night (1997, Ella Fitzgerald) Dream for an Insomniac (1998, Frank Sinatra) The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg (1998, Fred Astaire) What Women Want (2000, The Temptations) De-Lovely (2004, John Barrowman, Kevin Kline) The instrumental version appears on the soundtrack of Wes Anderson's Fantastic Mr. Fox (2009).

397

On stage: • Gay Divorce (1932, Fred Astaire) *Gay Divorce (1933, Fred Astaire, Claire Luce) London revival • Cole (1974, 1: instrumental, 2: Kenneth Nelson) London • Happy New Year (1980, John McMartin, Michael Scott) • A Swell Party (1991, Angela Richards) London revue On television: • • • • • • Ford Star Jubilee: You’re the Top (1956, George Chakiris, Sally Forrest) CBS. The Muppet Show (1981, The Mummies) Episode 112. Highlander (1995, Tamara Gorski) Canadian TV, Season 3, Episode 11: "Vendetta". Friends (1997, Frank Sinatra) NBC sitcom Season 4, Episode 4 "The One with the Ballroom Dancing". Chocolate com Pimenta (2003, Ella Fitzgerald, Buddy Bregman Orchestra) Brazilian TV. The Cosby Show, season 2, episode 3.

In other media: • This song was mentioned in Stephen King's short story "1408". • This song is also featured in the video game Bioshock.

References
[1] NPR 100 (http:/ / www. npr. org/ programs/ specials/ vote/ list100. html) [2] "Cleveland Heights' Alcazar exudes exotic style and grace in any age" (http:/ / www. cleveland. com/ arts/ index. ssf/ 2008/ 10/ cleveland_heights_alcazar_exud. html). Cleveland Plan Dealer. . Retrieved 2010-11-15. [3] http:/ / www. chartstats. com/ release. php?release=10728

External links
• "Night and Day" (http://www.almacogan.com/videos.html) performed on British TV by British singer Alma Cogan.

"The Night We Called It a Day"

398

"The Night We Called It a Day"
"The Night We Called It a Day" is a popular song and jazz standard. The music was written by Matt Dennis, the lyrics by Tom Adair. The song was published in 1941. The song was first recorded by the Tommy Dorsey orchestra; later recordings include Frank Sinatra (at least three times), Doris Day, Chet Baker, Chris Connor, June Christy and Diana Krall.

"The Song Is You"
"The Song Is You" is a popular song composed by Jerome Kern with lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II. It was written for their musical Music in the Air (1932)[1] and sung in that show by Tullio Carminati.[2] In later years the song became often associated with Frank Sinatra.[3] "The Song Is You" is the recurring musical theme of the 2003 Guy Maddin film The Saddest Music in the World. Nine different versions of the song were arranged for the film by composer Christopher Dedrick, whose work received a Genie Award.

Notable recordings
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Dave Brubeck - Jazz Goes to College (1954) Anita O'Day - Pick Yourself Up with Anita O'Day (1956) Bing Crosby - Bing Sings Whilst Bregman Swings (1956) Doris Day - Day by Day Vic Damone - That Towering Feeling! (1956) Frank Sinatra - Come Dance with Me! (1958) Terry Gibbs - Terry Gibbs Dream Band vol. 2 (1959) June Christy - The Song Is June! (1959) Shirley Bassey - EP "In Other Words..." (1963) Art Blakey - A Jazz Message (1963) Jay and the Americans - At the Cafe Wha? Nancy Wilson - Yesterday's Love Songs/Today's Blues (1963) Sergio Franchi - RCA Victor album The Song is You (1967)[4] Scott Walker - Scott: Scott Walker Sings Songs from his TV Series (1969) Joe Pass - Virtuoso (1973) Supersax - Supersax & L.A. Voices, Volume 1 (1983) Keith Jarrett Trio - Still Live (1986) Marni Nixon - Marni Nixon sings Classic Kern (1988) Franck Amsallem - Amsallem Sings (2009) Barbara Cook - Mostly Sondheim - in a medley with "Let's Face the Music and Dance" (Irving Berlin), as a duet with Malcolm Gets (2001) • The SuperJazz Big Band of Birmingham, Alabama recorded the song on the album UAB SuperJazz, Featuring Ellis Marsalis. (2001) • Diane Tell - recorded a French version called "Lui, toi et moi" by Boris Vian on the album Docteur Boris & Mister Vian (2009) • Johnny Dankworth - Too Cool For The Blues (2010)

"The Song Is You"

399

References
[1] [2] [3] [4] http:/ / www. songwritershalloffame. org/ index. php/ exhibits/ bio/ C67 http:/ / www. ibdb. com/ production. php?id=16668 http:/ / sinatraguide. com/ collections1. htm http:/ / www. discogs. com/ sergio-franchi

"Close to You"
"Close to You" is a popular song written by Jerry Livingston, Carl Lampl and Al Hoffman. It has been recorded three times by Frank Sinatra; on June 7, 1943, again on December 26, 1943 for Columbia Records and on November 1, 1956 for Capitol Records. The 1956 version was issued as the title track of an album, Close to You and More, in 1957 for Capitol. This song should not be confused with the Burt Bacharach-Hal David song, "(They Long to Be) Close to You", a major 1970s hit for The Carpenters, which was also recorded by Sinatra on October 29, 1970 for his album Sinatra And Company.

"You'll Never Know"
"You'll Never Know" is a popular song. The music was written by Harry Warren and the lyrics by Mack Gordon,[1] based on a poem written by a young Oklahoma war bride named Dorothy Fern Norris.[2] The song was introduced in the 1943 movie Hello, Frisco, Hello where it is sung by Alice Faye.[1] It was also performed by Faye in the 1944 film Four Jills in a Jeep. The song is often credited as Faye's signature song. However, Faye never made a recording of the ballad and, in later years, frequent covers of the song diminished her association with it. It was recorded in 1943 by, among others, Frank Sinatra and Dick Haymes. Haymes’ version was a number one hit for four weeks on the R&B charts that year.[3] Sinatra recorded his version at his first recording session at Columbia as a solo artist. (He had recorded at Columbia in 1939 as a member of Harry James’s band.) It was arranged and conducted by Alec Wilder with the Bobby Tucker Singers providing accompaniment. Sinatra’s version charted for 16 weeks starting July 24 and spent two weeks at number 2.[4] In Britain, the recording by Vera Lynn was popular due to the ongoing Second World War. The Sinatra and Haymes records were made during the 1942–1944 musicians' strike, an American Federation of Musicians strike against the recording companies. As a result, the recordings were made without musicians, with vocal groups replacing the usual instrumental backup. The group backing Haymes, The Song Spinners, was actually given credit on the Haymes record. (The Song Spinners #1 hit, "Comin' In on a Wing and a Prayer" held the #1 spot on the charts for three weeks preceding Haymes' "You'll Never Know." Vocalist Margaret Johnson of The Song Spinners did the vocal arrangements for both songs.) The song won the 1943 Academy Award for Best Original Song, one of nine nominated songs that year.[1] A 1952 recording by Rosemary Clooney with Harry James is also well known, as well as a version recorded in 1954 by Big Maybelle. Bette Midler performed the song for the Bette Midler Sings the Rosemary Clooney Songbook. The song was the first song that Barbra Streisand ever recorded in 1955. It was the opening song on her 4-CD box-set Just for the Record (1991). The collection closed with another version of the song, sung as a duet by Streisand at age 45 (recorded April 21, 1988) and herself as a girl at age 13.[5] Shirley Bassey reached #6 on the UK charts with her 1961 version.[1]

"You'll Never Know" Alice Faye's recording is the opening song in Martin Scorsese's 1974 film Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore. Trini Lopez included "You'll Never Know" on his Reprise Records album The Sing Along World of Trini Lopez (Reprise 6183). The Mamas & the Papas vocalist Denny Doherty included the song on his 1974 solo album "Waiting for a Song" (Ember-Paramount EMA 0286 - 1974). The single was released with 'Goodnight and Good Morning', from the same album, as the B-side. This version reached the top 15 of Billboard's Easy Listening survey. Elkie Brooks recorded it for her 1984 album, Screen Gems. Lew DeWitt, formerly of The Statler Brothers, released a version in 1985 on the Compleat label. Doris Day recorded a version in her two-album set Hooray for Hollywood in 1958. Vocalist Michael Bublé performs a live recording of the song on his 2004 album, Come Fly With Me.

400

References
[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] Roberts, David (2006). British Hit Singles & Albums (19th ed.). London: Guinness World Records Limited. p. 134. ISBN 1-904994-10-5. The lyrics can be found at thepeaches.com (http:/ / www. thepeaches. com/ music/ frank/ YoullNeverKnow. htm) Whitburn, Joel (2004). Top R&B/Hip-Hop Singles: 1942-2004. Record Research. p. 249. (CD booklet), "Frank Sinatra: The Columbia Years: 1943–1952, The Complete Recordings Vol. 1, 1993 (CD booklet), "Barbra Streisand: Just for the Record...", 1991 Columbia Records C4K 44111, p. 88

"Sunday, Monday, or Always"
"Sunday, Monday, or Always" is a 1943 popular song with music by Jimmy Van Heusen and lyrics by Johnny Burke. The biggest hit version, recorded by Bing Crosby in 1943 and appearing in his film Dixie, was made during a musician's strike, and recorded with a vocal group background instead of an orchestra. This recording was released by Decca Records as catalog number 18561. It first reached the Billboard magazine Best Seller chart on August 19, 1943 and lasted 18 weeks on the chart, peaking at #1. [1] The song is featured in an Amos and Andy radio show with the same title in 1943. Andy Brown had apparently heard the tune and later thought he came up with it himself. Somebody who knew the songs true origin played a trick on Andy by helping him write lyrics that go “Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday.” Later the real writers put in a brief appearance in the show when the truth comes to light. The song was also recorded by Frank Sinatra about the same time, with a similar vocal background because of the strike. This version was released by Columbia Records as catalog number 36679. It first reached the Billboard magazine Best Seller chart on September 9, 1943 and lasted 4 weeks on the chart, peaking at #9.[1] A subsequent parody version by Sinatra, titled "Dick Haymes, Dick Todd and Como", was recorded October 23, 1944 for the V-Disc program.[2]

References
[1] Whitburn, Joel (1973). Top Pop Records 1940-1955. Record Research. [2] Liner Notes, The V-Discs: The Columbia Years 1943-1952, Columbia Records, 1994.

"People Will Say We're in Love"

401

"People Will Say We're in Love"
"People Will Say We're in Love"
Song from Oklahoma! Published Writer Composer 1943 Oscar Hammerstein II Richard Rodgers

"People Will Say We're In Love" is a show tune from the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical Oklahoma! (1943). In the original Broadway production, the song was introduced by Alfred Drake and Joan Roberts.

Plot context
The other characters think, correctly, that Laurey (Joan Roberts) and Curly (Alfred Drake) are in love. In this song they warn each other not to behave indiscreetly, lest people misinterpret their intentions. Neither wants to admit to the other - or themselves - his or her true feelings. At the end of the musical the characters reprise the number after becoming engaged, saying "Let people say we're in love."

Covers
This song has been covered by many people, including instrumental versions. Three versions made the Top 40 charts: Bing Crosby (#2), Frank Sinatra (#3) and The Ink Spots (#11). The list of covers includes: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 101 Strings Orchestra The Cannonball Adderley Quintet Thomas Allen & Valerie Masterson Eric Alexander Chet Baker & Gerry Mulligan Chris Bennett Emmett Berry Les Brown and His Band of Renown Kenny Burrell Donald Byrd & Doug Watkins Eugene Chadbourne Rosemary Clooney George Coleman Bing Crosby Carmen Cavallaro Ray Charles Nat King Cole Dorothy Collins Perry Como Ray Conniff Doris Day Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis Sammy Davis Jr. & Carmen McRae

"People Will Say We're in Love" • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Trudy Desmond Lou Donaldson Herb Ellis & Jimmy Giuffre Ella Fitzgerald Helen Forrest Sergio Franchi - The Songs of Richard Rodgers (1965)[1] Erroll Garner Tom Grant Bennie Green Dick Haymes Ted Heath Fred Hersch Lena Horne & Lennie Hayton Leslie Hutchinson The Ink Spots Joni James Jack Jones Spike Jones Roger Kellaway Stacey Kent - The Boy Next Door (2008) James Last Peggy Lee Marcia Lewis Monica Lewis Joe Loss Orchestra. Recorded in London on August 19, 1947. Released by EMI on the His Master's Voice label as catalogue numnber BD 5974 Gordon Macrae and Shirley Jones (film version) Helen Merrill Glenn Miller & The Army Air Force Band Sophie Milman - Make Someone Happy (2007) Marion Montgomery Gerry Mulligan Nigel Ogden Johnny Otis Robert Palmer Ken Peplowski The Platters Paul Quinichette Rita Reys Nelson Riddle Spike Robinson Frank Sinatra - The Best Of The Columbia Years 1943 - 1952 Johnny Smith Kate Smith The Spaniels

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• Sonny Stitt & Hank Jones • Dick Sudhalter

"People Will Say We're in Love" • • • • • • Tierney Sutton The Treniers Lawrence Welk Andy Williams Mary Lou Williams Nancy Wilson

403

References
[1] http:/ / www. discogs. com/ sergio-franchi

"Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin'"

404

"Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin'"
"Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin'"
Song from Oklahoma! Published Writer Composer 1943 Oscar Hammerstein II Richard Rodgers

"Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin'" is the opening song from the musical Oklahoma! written by composer Richard Rodgers and lyricist/librettist Oscar Hammerstein II. It is sung by Curly McLain at the beginning of the first scene and was the first a cappella opening to a musical. • Joe Loss Orchestra recorded it in London on May 19, 1947. It was released by EMI on the His Master's Voice label as catalogue number BD 5974.

"A Lovely Way to Spend an Evening"
"A Lovely Way to Spend an Evening" is a popular song with music by Jimmy McHugh and lyrics by Harold Adamson, published in 1943.[1] The song is considered a pop standard, recorded by many artists.

Recorded versions
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • The Angels Ernestine Anderson Shirley Bassey Shocky Stanley Black Ann Burton Dick Cary Frank Chacksfield June Christy Freddy Cole Chris Connor Johnny Desmond Sonny Dunham Ray Eberle Four Graduates The Four Lads Curtis Fuller Ho'okena • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Engelbert Humperdinck Gregg James Jack Jones June Katz Stan Kenton Kay Kyser Gary LeMel Magnolia Jazz Band Richard Maltby, Sr. Mantovani Johnny Mathis Glenn Miller Audrey Morris Oscar Peterson • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Louis Prima Lou Rawls The Savoys Raymond Scott Frank Sinatra Denzal Sinclaire Keely Smith The Spaniels Dorothy Squires Bob Stewart Carla Thomas Mel Tormé Neil Della Torre Jr. Johnny Varro Patrick Wilson Timi Yuro The Ink Spots feat. Bill Kenny •

Little Anthony & the Imperials •

Bob Crosby and his orchestra •

"A Lovely Way to Spend an Evening"

405

References
[1] ASCAP (http:/ / www. ascap. com/ ace/ )

"White Christmas"
"White Christmas"
Picture sleeve of 1959 reissue by Decca Records (9-23778) Single by Bing Crosby from the album Merry Christmas B-side "Let's Start the New Year Right" "God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen" 1942, 1946, 1947, 1950, 1955, 1983 7-inch, 10-inch May 29, 1942 March 19, 1947 Christmas, Pop 3:02 (1942 recording) 3:04 (1947 recording) Decca (1942-1973 issues) MCA (1983-1985 issues) Irving Berlin Bing Crosby singles chronology

Released Format Recorded

Genre Length

Label

Writer(s)

"Be Careful, It's My Heart" (1942)

"White Christmas" (1942)

"Moonlight Becomes You" (1942)

"White Christmas" is an Irving Berlin song reminiscing about an old-fashioned Christmas setting. According to the Guinness Book of World Records, the version sung by Bing Crosby is the best-selling single of all time, with estimated sales in excess of 50 million copies worldwide.[1][2][3][4] Accounts vary as to when and where Berlin wrote the song.[4] One story is that he wrote it in 1940, in warm La Quinta, California, while staying at the La Quinta Hotel, a frequent Hollywood retreat also favored by writer-producer Frank Capra. He often stayed up all night writing — he told his secretary, "Grab your pen and take down this song. I just wrote the best song I've ever written — heck, I just wrote the best song that anybody's ever written!"[5]

Bing Crosby version
The first public performance of the song was by Bing Crosby, on his NBC radio show The Kraft Music Hall on Christmas Day, 1941; a copy of the recording from the radio program is owned by the estate of Bing Crosby and was loaned to CBS Sunday Morning for their December 25, 2011, program. [4][] He subsequently recorded the song with the John Scott Trotter Orchestra and the Ken Darby Singers for Decca Records in just 18 minutes on May 29, 1942, and it was released on July 30 as part of an album of six 78-rpm songs from the film Holiday Inn.[4][6] At first, Crosby did not see anything special about the song. He just said "I don't think we have any problems with that one,

"White Christmas" Irving." The song initially performed poorly and was overshadowed by the film's first hit song: "Be Careful, It's my Heart".[6] By the end of October 1942, however, "White Christmas" topped the "Your Hit Parade" chart. It remained in that position until well into the new year.[6] (It has often been noted that the mix of melancholy — "just like the ones I used to know" — with comforting images of home — "where the treetops glisten" — resonated especially strongly with listeners during World War II. The Armed Forces Network was flooded with requests for the song.[6]) In 1942 alone, Crosby's recording spent eleven weeks on top of the Billboard charts. The original version also hit number one on the Harlem Hit Parade for three weeks,[7] Crosby's first-ever appearance on the black-oriented chart. Re-released by Decca, the single returned to the #1 spot during the holiday seasons of 1945 and 1946 (on the chart dated January 4, 1947), thus becoming the only single with three separate runs at the top of the U.S. charts. The recording became a chart perennial, reappearing annually on the pop chart twenty separate times before Billboard magazine created a distinct Christmas chart for seasonal releases. Following its prominence in the musical Holiday Inn, the composition won the Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1942.[8] In the film, Bing Crosby sings "White Christmas" as a duet with actress Marjorie Reynolds, though her voice was dubbed by Martha Mears. This now-familiar scene was not the moviemakers' initial plan; in the script as originally conceived, Reynolds, not Crosby, was to sing the song.[6] The version of "White Christmas" most often heard today is not the original 1942 Crosby recording, as the master had become damaged due to frequent use. Crosby re-recorded the track on March 18, 1947, accompanied again by the Trotter Orchestra and the Darby Singers, with every effort made to reproduce the original recording session.[5] There are subtle differences in the orchestration, most notably the addition of a celesta and flutes to brighten up the introduction. Crosby was dismissive of his role in the song's success, saying later that "a jackdaw with a cleft palate could have sung it successfully." But Crosby was associated with it for the rest of his career. Another Crosby vehicle — the 1954 musical White Christmas — was the highest-grossing film of 1954.

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Sales figures
Crosby's "White Christmas" single has been credited with selling 50 million copies, the most by any release and therefore it is the biggest-selling single worldwide of all time. The Guinness Book of World Records 2009 Edition lists the song as a 100-million seller, encompassing all versions of the song, including albums.[3][4] Crosby's holiday collection Merry Christmas was first released as an LP in 1949, and has never been out-of-print since. There has been some confusion and considerable debate on whether Crosby's record is or is not the best-selling single in the world, due to a lack of information on sales of "White Christmas," because Crosby's recording was released before the advent of the modern-day US and UK singles charts.[9] However, after careful research, Guinness World Records in 2007 concluded that, worldwide, Crosby's recording of "White Christmas" has, in their estimation, sold at least 50 million copies, and that Elton John's recording of "Candle in the Wind 1997" has sold 33 million, making Crosby's recording the best-selling single of all time.[1] However, an update in the 2009 edition of the book decided to further help settle the controversy amicably by naming both John's and Crosby's songs to be "winners" by stating that John's recording is the "best-selling single since UK and US singles charts began in the 1950s," while maintaining that "the best-selling single of all time was released before the first pop charts," and that this distinction belongs to "White Christmas," which it says "was listed as the world's best-selling single in the first-ever Guinness Book of Records (published in 1955) and - remarkably - still retains the title more than 50 years later."[10]

"White Christmas"

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Historic influence
"ItsRanked" ranked Crosby's "White Christmas" as the number one Christmas song on its Top 40 Christmas Songs of all time.[11] In 1999, National Public Radio included it in the "NPR 100", which sought to compile the one hundred most important American musical works of the 20th century. Crosby's version of the song also holds the distinction of being ranked #2 on the "Songs of the Century" list, behind only Judy Garland's "Over the Rainbow," as voted by members of the RIAA.[12] In 2002, the original 1942 version was one of 50 historically significant recordings chosen that year by the Library of Congress to be added to the National Recording Registry. The recording was broadcast on the radio on April 30, 1975, as a secret, pre-arranged signal precipitating the U.S. evacuation of Saigon (see Fall of Saigon).

Original introduction
Irving Berlin's opening bars are often dropped in recordings, but are included on A Christmas Gift for You from Philles Records, sung by Darlene Love, on Barbra Streisand's A Christmas Album, on The Carpenters Christmas Portrait, on Bette Midler's Cool Yule, on Libera's Christmas Album, and on Crash Test Dummies' Jingle All the Way.[5] The sun is shining, the grass is green, The orange and palm trees sway. There's never been such a day in Beverly Hills, L.A. But it's December the twenty-fourth,— And I am longing to be up North— —Verse dropped from original version[13] This opening verse was also included on country singer Collin Raye's version of the song, as featured on his 2004 album, Christmas: The Gift. British band Keane's version of the song also included this introduction, but with changed lyrics to give the song a melancholic feeling: The sun's been hiding, the streets are gray, The rain has been falling down. Seems everyone wears a frown for Christmas in London town It reminds me each time I roamed. I'm longing to be back home —Keane version of the introduction

Other versions
"White Christmas" is the most-recorded Christmas song; there have been more than 500 recorded versions of the song, in several different languages.[14] • 1942: Gordon Jenkins and his Orchestra (with Bob Carroll on lead vocal) released a version of the song that reached number 16 on Billboard magazine's pop singles chart.[15] • 1942: Charlie Spivak and his Orchestra (with Garry Stevens on lead vocal) released a version of the song that reached number 18 on Billboard magazine's pop singles chart.[16] • 1942: Freddy Martin and his Orchestra (with Clyde Rogers on lead vocal) released a version of the song that reached number 20 on Billboard magazine's pop singles chart (this same version charted on the Billboard pop singles chart again in December 1945, reaching number 16).[17]

"White Christmas" • 1944: Frank Sinatra released a version of the song (with backing orchestration by Axel Stordahl) that reached number 7 on Billboard magazine's pop singles chart (this same version charted on the Billboard pop singles chart two more times: in December 1945, reaching number 5, and in December 1946, reaching number 6).[18] • 1945: On December 23rd, Kay Thompson performed her version of the song on the CBS radio program Request Performance backed by the Kay Thompson Rhythm Singers and a orchestra conducted by Leith Stevens. A recording of this radio performance has survived and can be heard on Sepia Records' 2009 3-CD compilation Think Pink! A Kay Thompson Party produced and annotated by Sam Irvin, author of Kay Thompson: From Funny Face to Eloise published by Simon & Schuster in 2010. • 1946: Jo Stafford (with backing vocals by the Lyn Murray Singers and backing orchestration by Paul Weston) released a version of the song that reached number 9 on Billboard magazine's pop singles chart.[16] • 1947: Eddy Howard and his Orchestra released a version of the song that reached number 21 on Billboard magazine's pop singles chart.[19] • 1947: Perry Como (with backing orchestration by Lloyd Shaffer) released a version of the song that reached number 23 on Billboard magazine's pop singles chart.[20] • 1948: R&B vocal group The Ravens released a version of the song that reached number 9 on Billboard magazine's Rhythm & Blues Records chart in January 1949. Their version was released as the flip-side of a single that included their version of "Silent Night".[21] • 1949: Country singer Ernest Tubb (with female backing vocals by The Troubadettes) released a version of the song that reached number 7 on Billboard magazine's Country & Western Records chart.[22] • 1952: On July 15th, singer Eddie Fisher with Hugo Winterhalter's orchestra & chorus recorded a version of the song at Manhattan Center, New York City, New York. The song was released by RCA Victor Records as catalog number 20-4910 (in USA)[23] and by EMI on the His Master's Voice label as catalog number B 10779 and JO 420. • 1952: Mantovani and His Orchestra released a version of the song that reached number 23 on Billboard magazine's pop singles chart.[17] • 1954: The Drifters released a cover version of the song that showcased the talents of lead singer Clyde McPhatter and the bass of Bill Pinkney. Their recording of the song peaked at number 2 on Billboard's Rhythm & Blues Records chart in December 1954 (it also returned to the same chart in the next two years). In December 1955, "White Christmas" became the Drifters' first of 34 singles to register on the mainstream Billboard Top 100 singles chart, reaching number 80.[24] For decades, the Drifters' version of the song was primarily heard on R&B radio stations, getting little exposure elsewhere. The song received a boost in the early 1990s, when it was prominently featured in the film Home Alone during a scene in which the lead character Kevin (Macaulay Culkin) is applying his father's aftershave while mouthing the lyrics. Radio stations formats as diverse as oldies, adult contemporary, Top 40, and country began playing the Drifters' version of the song, which was also featured in the 1994 film The Santa Clause. • 1957: Elvis Presley recorded the song for his first holiday album, Elvis' Christmas Album. • 1961: Mitch Miller included the song on his album Holiday Sing Along with Mitch. Instead of the lyrics, Miller printed a disclaimer on the album cover stating "The publisher assumes everyone knows the lyrics to this song!" • 1961: David Seville covered the song for the first holiday album by Alvin and the Chipmunks, Christmas with The Chipmunks. • 1961: Haunani Kahalewai sang the song, including some lyrics in Hawaiian language, on the holiday album A Merry Hawaiian Christmas by the Hawaii Calls Orchestra and Chorus. • 196?: Before he emigrated to the USA, Italo-American tenor Sergio Franchi recorded an Italian language version of the song titled "Bianco Natale." It was recorded in Italy and produced in Canada (Durium DC 26099).

408

"White Christmas" • 1963: Andy Williams recorded a version of the song that was included on his first holiday album, The Andy Williams Christmas Album. This version of "White Christmas" was also released as a single, and reached number 1 on Billboard's special, year-end, weekly Christmas Singles chart (the B-side of the single contained Williams's version of "The Christmas Song"). This same version of "White Christmas" charted again on Billboard's Christmas Singles chart again in 1967, reaching number 22. • 1963: Darlene Love recorded the song for the Phil Spector-produced holiday album, A Christmas Gift for You from Philles Records. • 1963: Smokey Robinson & The Miracles recorded the song for their holiday album, Christmas with The Miracles. • 1963: Jimmy McGriff recorded the song for his holiday album, Christmas with McGriff. • 1963: Jim Reeves recorded the song for his holiday album, Twelve Songs of Christmas. • 1964: Doris Day recorded the song for her holiday album, The Doris Day Christmas Album. • 1965: The Supremes recorded the song for their holiday album, Merry Christmas. • 1965: Bob Marley recorded the song with The Wailers and released it as a single. This version later appeared on his compilation album, Destiny: Rare Ska Sides from Studio 1. • 1966: Dean Martin recorded the song for his holiday album, The Dean Martin Christmas Album. • 1967: Barbra Streisand's version of the song, recorded for her first holiday album A Christmas Album, contains the seldom-heard verse. • 1968: Otis Redding's version of the song was released as a single (posthumously), and reached number 12 on Billboard magazine's special, year-end, weekly Christmas Singles chart in December of '68.[21] • 1968: Lana Cantrell released a version of the song on the various artists holiday album, Christmas Day with Colonel Sanders. This version was later included on other various artist Christmas albums. • 1971: The Partridge Family recorded a version of the song for their holiday album, A Partridge Family Christmas Card. • 1979: Stiff Little Fingers covered the song and released it as part of the "Silly Encores" B-side to their UK 7" single, "At the Edge". This version also appeared as a bonus track on the American 2005 CD reissue of the band's 1980 live album, Hanx! • 1984: Kenny Rogers and Dolly Parton recorded a version of the song for their holiday album, Once Upon a Christmas. • 1985: The Canadian Brass recorded an instrumental version for their holiday album, A Canadian Brass Christmas. • 1989: New Kids on the Block recorded a version of the song for their holiday album, Merry, Merry Christmas. • 1991: Marco T. La Voz del Rock and Roll in Colombia recorded the song for his album Pequeño Pueblo de Belen is an Elvis cover in Spanish. • 1992: Michael Bolton covered the song for his non-holiday album, Timeless: The Classics. This version of the song reached number 73 on Billboard's Hot 100 Airplay chart in January 1993.[25] • 1992: Garth Brooks covered the song for his first holiday album, Beyond the Season. This version of the song reached number 70 on Billboard's Hot Country Singles & Tracks chart in January 1995.[26] • 1994: Kenny G recorded an instrumental version of the song for his holiday album, Miracles: The Holiday Album. • 1996: Michie Tomizawa (as Sailor Mars) covered the song on the holiday album, Sailor Stars Merry Christmas! • 1998: Martina McBride covered the song for her holiday album, White Christmas. This version of the song charted twice: reaching number 75 on Billboard's Hot Country Singles & Tracks chart in December 1999, and number 62 on the same chart in December 2000.[27]

409

"White Christmas" • 1998: Chicago recorded the song for their first Christmas album, Chicago XXV: The Christmas Album. • 1999: A1 released an a cappella version of the song that was included on their "Ready or Not/Everytime" CD single. • 2000: Rockapella recorded the song for their holiday album, Christmas. • 2000: Linda Ronstadt recorded the song for her holiday album, A Merry Little Christmas. • 2001: Mannheim Steamroller included the song on their holiday album, Christmas Extraordinaire. • 2002: Crash Test Dummies included the song on their holiday album, Jingle All The Way. • 2003: Bette Midler covered the song for her non-holiday album, Bette Midler Sings the Rosemary Clooney Songbook. This version of the song reached number 15 on Billboard's Hot Adult Contemporary Tracks chart in December 2003.[28] • 2003: Michael Bublé covered the song for his five-track holiday EP, Let It Snow! • 2004: LeAnn Rimes recorded the song for her first holiday album, What a Wonderful World. • 2004: Dionne Warwick recorded the song for her holiday album, My Favorite Time of the Year. • 2004: Tina Sugandh recorded the song for the Columbia/Sony film Christmas With the Kranks with Indian/Bollywood elements added to the song. • 2005: Westlife covered the song and included it as a B-side on their single, "When You Tell Me That You Love Me." • 2005: Dutch singer René Froger covered the song on his first holiday album, Pure Christmas (re-released as Happy Christmas in 2009). • 2006: The song was covered by Twisted Sister featuring Doro Pesch and was released on their holiday album, A Twisted Christmas, with German/English lyrics.[29] • 2007: Taylor Swift recorded the song for her holiday EP, Sounds of the Season: The Taylor Swift Holiday Collection • 2007: Frank Rendo recorded the song as part of a medley with "Count Your Blessings Instead of Sheep" for his holiday album, Remembering Christmas. • 2008: Rascal Flatts included a version of the song as a bonus track on a limited edition version of their compilation album, Greatest Hits Volume 1. • 2008: Neil Sedaka recorded the song for his first-ever holiday album, The Miracle of Christmas. • 2008: Al Jarreau recorded the song for his holiday album, Christmas. • 2008: Edyta Górniak recorded the song for her holiday album, Zakochaj się na Święta w kolędach (Fall in love for Christmas in carols), with Polish/English lyrics. • 2008: Italian singer Irene Grandi recorded an Italian version of the song, titled "Bianco Natale", for her Christmas album, Canzoni per Natale. • 2008: Rick Astley sang the song at the DR Christmas Show. • 2009: Andrea Bocelli recorded the song for his first holiday album, My Christmas. The song debuted at No. 30 on the Portuguese Singles Chart; it spent the following two weeks at No. 19, then rose to No. 18 in its fourth week, before reaching No. 16 in its fifth week.[30] The song also debuted at No. 7 on the Hungarian Singles Chart.[31] • 2009: Boy George recorded a cover of the song that was released as a single in digital download format. • 2010: In October, Argos released an advert appearing to show Crosby beatboxing to the tune of the song. • 2010: Panic! at the Disco released their version of the song to their fanclub "Northern Downpour". • 2011: Michael Bublé recorded the song again in a duet featuring Shania Twain, this time for his full-length holiday album, Christmas. This version is based on the 1954 arrangement by The Drifters.

410

"White Christmas" • 2011: Jackie Evancho recorded the song for her holiday album, Heavenly Christmas. • 2011: Lady Gaga recorded a version of the song for her holiday television special, A Very Gaga Thanksgiving, which was also included as one of four tracks on her holiday EP, A Very Gaga Holiday. • 2011: Joe McElderry recorded the song for his third studio album, Classic Christmas. • 2011: Asker recorded and released a version for their holiday EP, A Yuletide Yell.

411

Notes and references
[1] [2] [3] [4] Guinness Book of Records, 2007 Edition, page 187 (http:/ / img299. imageshack. us/ img299/ 3315/ guinness2007. pdf) Guinness Book of Records, 2008 Edition, page 181 (http:/ / img38. imageshack. us/ img38/ 8412/ guinness2008. pdf) Guinness Book of Records, 2009 Edition, pages 14, 15 & 169 (http:/ / img827. imageshack. us/ img827/ 4387/ guinness2009. pdf) Roy J. Harris, Jr. (December 5, 2009). "The Best-Selling Record of All. 'White Christmas' and the reasons it endures" (http:/ / online. wsj. com/ article/ SB10001424052748703499404574561734246276554. html). Wall Street Journal. . Retrieved 2009-12-06. "It was a peaceful song that became a wartime classic. Its unorthodox, melancholy melody—and mere 54 words, expressing the simple yearning for a return to happier times—sounded instantly familiar when sung by America's favorite crooner. But 67 years after its introduction, some still are surprised to learn that Bing Crosby's recording of the Irving Berlin ballad "White Christmas" became not only the runaway smash-hit for the World War II holidays, but the best-selling record of all time." [5] White Christmas (http:/ / www. hymnsandcarolsofchristmas. com/ Hymns_and_Carols/ white_christmas. htm) [6] John Mueller (1986). Astaire Dancing - The Musical Films. London: Hamish Hamilton. pp. 204, 425. ISBN 0-241-11749-6. [7] Whitburn, Joel (2004). Top R&B/Hip-Hop Singles: 1942-2004. Record Research. p. 139. [8] Roberts, David (2006). British Hit Singles & Albums (19th ed.). London: Guinness World Records Limited. p. 134. ISBN 1-904994-10-5. [9] "RIAA News Room - The American Recording Industry Announces its Artists of the Century - Nov 10, 1999" (http:/ / www. riaa. com/ newsitem. php?resultpage=2& id=3abf3ec8-ef5b-58f9-e949-3b57f5e313df). Recording Industry Association of America website. RIAA. 1999-11-10. . Retrieved 2010-02-08.. [10] Guinness Book of Records 2009 states that "Candle in the Wind 1997" is the "best-selling single since charts began"; however, not of all time. Bing Crosby's "White Christmas" is still recognized as the best selling single of all time, but since it was released prior to the start of many charts, its sales prior to the 1950s are estimated. John's 1997 song has sold the most copies when looking at copies sold since charts began, as verified in Guinness World Records. ISBN 1-904994-37-7. See also: Guinness Book of Records, 2009 Edition, pages 14, 15 & 169 (http:/ / img827. imageshack. us/ img827/ 4387/ guinness2009. pdf) [11] Top 40 Christmas Songs (Lyrical) - ItsRanked! (http:/ / itsranked. com/ rankings/ 2007/ 11/ christmas-songs-top-40. html) [12] "New song list puts 'Rainbow' way up high" (http:/ / archives. cnn. com/ 2001/ SHOWBIZ/ Music/ 03/ 07/ 365. songs/ ). CNN. March 7, 2001. . [13] White Christmas piano solo, Hal Leonard [14] "ASCAP Announces Top 25 Holiday Songs of the Decade" (http:/ / www. ascap. com/ press/ 2009/ 1123_holidays_songs. aspx). ASCAP. November 23, 2009. . Retrieved December 9, 2011. [15] Whitburn, Joel (2004). Christmas in the Charts (1920-2004). Wisconsin: Record Research Inc.. p. 42. ISBN 0-89820-161-6. [16] Whitburn, Joel (2004). Christmas in the Charts (1920-2004). Wisconsin: Record Research Inc.. p. 59. ISBN 0-89820-161-6. [17] Whitburn, Joel (2004). Christmas in the Charts (1920-2004). Wisconsin: Record Research Inc.. p. 47. ISBN 0-89820-161-6. [18] Whitburn, Joel (2004). Christmas in the Charts (1920-2004). Wisconsin: Record Research Inc.. p. 58. ISBN 0-89820-161-6. [19] Whitburn, Joel (2004). Christmas in the Charts (1920-2004). Wisconsin: Record Research Inc.. p. 41. ISBN 0-89820-161-6. [20] Whitburn, Joel (2004). Christmas in the Charts (1920-2004). Wisconsin: Record Research Inc.. p. 29. ISBN 0-89820-161-6. [21] Whitburn, Joel (2004). Christmas in the Charts (1920-2004). Wisconsin: Record Research Inc.. p. 55. ISBN 0-89820-161-6. [22] Whitburn, Joel (2004). Christmas in the Charts (1920-2004). Wisconsin: Record Research Inc.. p. 62. ISBN 0-89820-161-6. [23] RCA Victor Records in the 20-4500 to 20-4999 series (http:/ / www. 78discography. com/ RCA204500. htm) [24] CD sleeve: Billboard Greatest Christmas Hits (1955 - Present), 1989 Rhino Records Inc. [25] Whitburn, Joel (2004). Christmas in the Charts (1920-2004). Wisconsin: Record Research Inc.. p. 22. ISBN 0-89820-161-6. [26] Whitburn, Joel (2004). Christmas in the Charts (1920-2004). Wisconsin: Record Research Inc.. p. 23. ISBN 0-89820-161-6. [27] Whitburn, Joel (2004). Christmas in the Charts (1920-2004). Wisconsin: Record Research Inc.. p. 48. ISBN 0-89820-161-6. [28] Whitburn, Joel (2004). Christmas in the Charts (1920-2004). Wisconsin: Record Research Inc.. p. 49. ISBN 0-89820-161-6. [29] laut.de | Twisted Sister - "A Twisted Christmas" (CD-Kritik) (http:/ / www. laut. de/ lautstark/ cd-reviews/ t/ twisted_sister/ a_twisted_christmas/ index. htm) [30] "White Christmas-bianco Natale" on acharts.com (http:/ / acharts. us/ song/ 52351) [31] "White Christmas-bianco Natale" Hungary Top 10 (http:/ / mahasz. hu/ m/ ?menu=slagerlistak& menu2=single_track_top_10), Week 51/2009

"White Christmas"

412

External links
• Lyrics to White Christmas (http://www.christmassongswords.com/white-christmas-songs.htm)

"Saturday Night (Is the Loneliest Night of the Week)"
"Saturday Night (Is the Loneliest Night of the Week)" is a popular song. The music was written by Jule Styne, the lyrics by Sammy Cahn. The song was published in 1944. The song is best known in a version by Frank Sinatra (recorded November 14, 1944, released by Columbia Records as catalog number 36762[1], with the flip side "I Dream of You (More than You Dream I Do)"), but has been recorded by a number of other artists, including Barry Manilow.

References
[1] Columbia Records in the 36500 to 36999 series (http:/ / 78discography. com/ COL36500. htm)

"I Dream of You (More than You Dream I Do)"
"I Dream of You (More Than You Dream I Do)" is a popular song. It was written by Marjorie Goetschius and Edna Osser and published in 1944. Charted versions were recorded by Tommy Dorsey and his orchestra, by Andy Russell, by Frank Sinatra, and by Perry Como. The recording by Tommy Dorsey was made on November 14, 1944 and released by RCA Victor Records as catalog number 20-1608.[1] It first reached the Billboard magazine charts on December 28, 1944 and lasted 8 weeks on the chart, peaking at #4.[2] The flip side of this recording was also a big hit, "Opus No. 1." The recording by Andy Russell was released by Capitol Records as catalog number 175.[3] It first reached the Billboard magazine charts on December 21, 1944 and lasted 3 weeks on the chart, peaking at #5.[2] The flip side of this recording was "Magic Is the Moonlight." The recording by Frank Sinatra was made on December 1, 1944, released by Columbia Records as catalog number 36762[4]). It first reached the Billboard magazine charts on January 18, 1945 and lasted 4 weeks on the chart, peaking at #7.[2] This recording was a two-sided hit; the flip side of this recording was "Saturday Night (Is the Loneliest Night of the Week)." The recording by Perry Como was made on December 8, 1944 and released by RCA Victor Records as catalog number 20-1629.[1] It reached the Billboard magazine charts on January 18, 1945 and lasted 1 week on the chart, at #10.[2] The flip side of this recording was "I'm Confessin' (that I Love You)." This recording was also released in the United Kingdom by HMV with the catalog number BD-1165. The flip side of this recording was "If You Were the Only Girl (in the World)"

"I Dream of You (More than You Dream I Do)"

413

Other recorded versions
• Gene Bua (released 1960 by Warwick Records as catalog number 602, with the flip side "Willie"[5] • Georgia Carr (released by Capitol Records as catalog number 2277, with the flip side "I Let a Song Go Out of My Heart"[6]) • Jimmy Dorsey and his orchestra (recorded November 21, 1944, released by Decca Records as catalog number 18637, with the flip side "Magic Is the Moonlight"[7]) • Al Golden and his Golden Notes (released by Keystone Transcription Service as catalog numbers KBS102 and KBS231N[8]) • Art Kassell and his Kita (vocal: J. Featherstone; recorded 1944, released by Hit Records as catalog number 7110, with the flip side "Magic Is the Moonlight"[9]) • The Senders (released 1959 by Kent Records as catalog number 320, with the flip side "The Ballad of Stagger Lee"[10] • Terry Soggs (released 1961 by Fortune Records as catalog number 539, with the flip side "Route 16"[11] Other versions of the song have been recorded by Alma Cogan, by Doris Day and Les Brown's orchestra, by Archie Lewis and The Geraldo Strings, Jerry Lewis, and by Johnny Mathis.

References
[1] RCA Victor Records in the 20-1500 to 20-1999 series (http:/ / 78discography. com/ RCA201500. htm) [2] Whitburn, Joel (1973). Top Pop Records 1940-1955. Record Research. [3] Capitol Records in the 100 to 499 series (http:/ / 78discography. com/ Capitol100. htm) [4] Columbia Records in the 36500 to 36999 series (http:/ / 78discography. com/ COL36500. htm) [5] Warwick Records in the 500 to 699 series (http:/ / www. globaldogproductions. info/ w/ warwick. html. html) [6] Capitol Records in the 2000 to 2499 series (http:/ / 78discography. com/ Capitol2000. htm) [7] Decca Records in the 18500 to 18999 series (http:/ / 78discography. com/ Dec18500. htm) [8] Keystone transcription records in the 1 to 298 series (http:/ / 78discography. com/ Keyst1. htm) [9] Hit Records in the 7000 to 7159 series (http:/ / 78discography. com/ Hit7000. htm) [10] Kent Records listing (http:/ / www. globaldogproductions. info/ k/ kent. html) [11] Fortune Records listing (http:/ / www. globaldogproductions. info/ fortune. html)

"Ol' Man River"

414

"Ol' Man River"
"Ol' Man River"
Music by Lyrics by Written Recorded by Jerome Kern Oscar Hammerstein II 1927 Paul Whiteman and His Orchestra, others

Performed by Paul Robeson, Jules Bledsoe, others

"Ol' Man River" (music by Jerome Kern, lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II) is a song in the 1927[1] musical Show Boat that expresses the African American hardship and struggles of the time with the endless, uncaring flow of the Mississippi River; it is sung from the point-of-view of a black dock worker on a showboat,[2][3] and is the most famous song from the show. Meant to be performed in a slow tempo, it is sung completely once by the dock worker "Joe" who travels with the boat, and, in the stage version, is heard four more times in brief reprises. Joe serves as a sort of musical one-man Greek chorus, and the song, when reprised, comments on the action, as if saying, "This has happened, but the river keeps rolling on anyway." The song is notable for several aspects: the lyrical pentatonic-scale melody, the subjects of toil and social class, metaphor to the Mississippi, and as a bass solo (rare in musicals, solos for baritones or tenors being more common). Paul Whiteman and His Orchestra had a no. 1 hit recording of the song in 1928 sung in a much faster tempo than Kern and Hammerstein intended, and featuring Bing Crosby on vocals and Bix Beiderbecke on cornet. A second version, by Paul Whiteman with Paul Robeson on vocals and sung in a dance tempo, was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 2006.

Various versions
The song was first performed in the original stage production of Show Boat on December 27, 1927, by Jules Bledsoe, who also sang it in the part-talkie 1929 film, although that film version had little to do with the stage musical. Bledsoe also recorded the song years later. However, the most famous rendition of it, one that is still noted today, was sung by Paul Robeson in James Whale's classic 1936 film version of Show Boat. (Robeson had performed the song before in the 1928 London production of the show and in the 1932 Broadway revival.) The song became an American classic, and was performed by many musicians and musical groups, including Paul Whiteman and His Orchestra, Bix Beiderbecke, Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra, Gordon MacRae, Robert Merrill, Sam Cooke, Al Jolson, Screaming Jay Hawkins, Cilla Black, Django Reinhardt, Ray Charles, Jim Croce, Jimmy Ricks and the Ravens, The Beach Boys, The Jeff Beck Group, Muslim Magomayev[4] and Aretha Franklin. William Warfield sang it in the 1951 Technicolor film version of Show Boat in another rendition that became very famous. (It became his signature song, and he performed it several times on television and in several stage revivals of Show Boat.) Melvin Franklin, the famous bass singer of The Temptations, performed it at most concerts, eventually making it his signature song. Judy Garland, one of the few female singers to attempt the song, sang a powerful rendition on her television show in 1963, followed by a studio recording. Among less well-known singers who have performed the song on television, bass-baritone Dan Travis, Jr. sang it in the made-for-television biopic Ziegfeld: The Man and His Women (1978),[5] and P.L. Brown sang it in the 1989 Paper Mill Playhouse version of Show Boat, which was televised by PBS.[6] The song also has versions in the Indian languages Assamese,[7] Hindi[8] and Bengali, sung by Indian musician Bhupen Hazarika,[9] who met Robeson while studying at Columbia University. The Assamese song is called "Bistirno Parore"; the Bengali version is Bistirno Dupare. The Hindi composition is known as "Ganga Behti Ho

"Ol' Man River" Kyon." Instead of the Mississippi, the song is dedicated to the Brahmaputra river in the Assamese version and the Ganges river in the Bengali and Hindi versions..

415

Turning an upbeat-sounding melody into a tragic one
From the show's opening number "Cotton Blossom", the notes in the phrase "Cotton Blossom, Cotton Blossom" are the same notes as those in the phrase "Ol' Man River, dat Ol' Man River," but inverted. However, "Cotton Blossom" was written first, and "Ol' Man River" was written only after Kern and Hammerstein realized they needed a song to end the first scene in the show. Hammerstein decided to use the idea of the Mississippi River as a basis for the song, and told Kern to use the melody that the stevedores sang in "Cotton Blossom" but invert some of it, and slow down the tempo. This inversion gave "Ol' Man River" a tragic quality. The year was 1927, and few predicted the second-generation song would become so popular in the Roaring Twenties, which had lighter upbeat songs, such as "Yes, We Have No Bananas" (1923).

Paul Robeson's alterations to the song lyrics
Beginning about 1938, and continuing on to the end of his career, Paul Robeson changed a few of the lyrics of "Ol' Man River" when singing it at recitals, though never in actual stage performances of Show Boat, and not in the 1936 film version.[2] (In addition to the 1928 and 1932 stage productions as well as the 1936 film version, he appeared in a Los Angeles stage revival in 1940). Except for the change of the word "niggers" to "darkies," the lyrics of the song as Robeson performed it in the 1936 film version of the show remain exactly as Oscar Hammerstein II originally wrote them in 1927. However, after 1938, Robeson would record the song only with the lyrics that he used in his post-1936 concert recitals. In the 1978 one-man play Paul Robeson, by Phillip Hayes Dean, there is a (perhaps fictitious) reference to the change in the lyrics - an unseen interviewer asks Robeson (played by James Earl Jones) about the original lyrics, and he responds "No, I don't sing it that way anymore".[10] In the 1951 film version of Show Boat, as well as the 1962 studio recording and the 1966 Lincoln Center revival of the show, William Warfield sang only the introductory verse and the lyrics to the main section of the song, and omitted what could be considered a controversial section, in contrast to both Jules Bledsoe (who sang it in the prologue to the 1929 film version) and Robeson (who sang the whole song in the 1936 film). The section that Warfield omitted begins: Niggers all work on de Mississippi, Niggers all work while de white folks play... In the 1936 film, the word "niggers" was changed to "darkies". Ever since the 1946 revival, the term has been changed to "colored folks", although there have been revivals that change the line to Here we all work on de Mississippi. Al Jolson sang a version starting with "lots of folks work on the Mississippi." Also, the phrase "feared of dyin' " (rather than "skeered" of dying) has been sung in some recordings,[3] notably Lawrence Tibbett's 1930s version, Gordon MacRae's 1950s version (first heard on The Railroad Hour), and Frank Sinatra's 1946 performance, first heard in the film Till the Clouds Roll By. Robeson's own 1938 changes in the lyrics of the song are as follows: • Instead of "Dere's an ol' man called de Mississippi, / Dat's de ol' man that I'd like to be...", Robeson sang "There's an ol' man called the Mississippi, / That's the ol' man I don't like to be"..." • Instead of "Tote that barge! / Lift that bale! / Git a little drunk, / An' you land in jail...", Robeson sang "Tote that barge and lift dat bale!/ You show a little grit / And you lands in jail.." • Instead of "Ah gits weary / An' sick of tryin'; / Ah'm tired of livin' / An skeered of dyin', / But Ol' Man River, / He jes' keeps rolling along!", Robeson sang "But I keeps laffin'/ Instead of cryin' / I must keep fightin'; / Until I'm

"Ol' Man River" dyin', / And Ol' Man River, / He'll just keep rollin' along!"[11] Late in Scene 7 of Act II, Joe does sing this verse, but rather than singing "I must keep fightin' until I'm dyin", sings "I must keep livin' until I'm dyin". According to the 1988 EMI album of Show Boat, these are Hammerstein's authentic lyrics for this reprise. In recitals and in several of his many recordings of the song, Robeson also omitted the controversial section "Niggers all work on de Mississippi...", etc., with its middle portion "Don't look up/ An' don't look down/ You don't dast make / De white boss frown", etc., as well as its concluding "Lemme go ' way from de Mississippi/ Lemme go ' way from de white man boss, etc." . However, Robeson did include a portion of these lyrics in the 1932 4-record 78 RPM album of selections from Show Boat. Robeson's own changes to the lyrics were sung by him, and by no other singer, although a clip exists of William Warfield, singing voice nearly gone, in one of his last appearances before his death, singing the song with the changes that Robeson incorporated into it.[12] The changes in Robeson's concert renditions of the song shift the portrayal of Joe away from a resigned and sad character who is susceptible to the forces of his world, to one who is timelessly empowered and able to persevere through even the most trying circumstances. Lawrence Tibbett, in his performances of the song, did use the word "niggers". Frank Sinatra famously changed "Niggers all work on de Mississippi..." to "Here we all work on the Mississippi..." in a version of the song that he recorded post-1946. His 1946 performance of it omitted this section altogether. The Temptations changed any references to the "white man boss" to "rich man boss", as well as "Here we all work while the white boys play" to "Here we all work while the rich boys play". In 1988, EMI/Angel Records issued a 3-CD set of the complete score of Show Boat, starring Frederica Von Stade, Jerry Hadley, Teresa Stratas, and Bruce Hubbard, conducted by John McGlinn. On this album, the original 1927 lyrics of Ol' Man River were heard for the first time on a hi-fi stereo recording. Gordon MacRae's version of the song, as performed on The Railroad Hour, changed the phrase white man boss to big man boss.[13]

416

Parodies and References
• A parody version was performed on CBS Radio by Stan Freberg and Daws Butler in 1957, entitled "Elderly Man River." The parody lampooned what would today be termed "political correctness" by featuring a prudish censor from the "Citizen's Radio Board" who repeatedly interrupts Freberg's performance of the song to criticize (and insist on changes to) the grammar and appropriateness of the song's lyrics. • In an episode of the TV situation comedy Maude, the housekeeper Florida (played by Esther Rolle) sings "Darkies all work while de white folks play" as she does housework. Her politically correct and liberal employer Maude (Bea Arthur) scolds her and says that the words have changed, to which Florida sings "Coloured folks work on the Mississippi". Maude explains that the proper new lyrics to the song are "Here we all work on the Mississippi, here we all work while the straw boss plays." Florida replies that those may be the new lyrics, but the only problem is that "y'all still playing and we're still working". • In The Simpsons episode "Simpsons Tall Tales", Doctor Julius Hibbert is featured as a steamboat captain singing "Ol' Man River". • In The Jackson Five cartoon episode "Rasho-Jackson", all five brothers depict Jackie Jackson as a whip-wielding tyrant yelling "Tote that barge, lift that bale!". Jackie sees himself saying the same thing, but in a genteel, British accent. • In an episode of Everybody Loves Raymond, Robert mentions that he sang this song in his high school chorus days.

"Ol' Man River" • The Australian oddball pop group TISM produced in 1996 a hit single about River Phoenix and his death, entitled "(He'll Never Be An) Ol' Man River". • Jimmy Velvit recorded a version titled "Old Man River Boogie" for his 1995 CD Jimmy Velvit - The Original (Collectables Records COL-5530). • A popular, up-tempo British ballad of 1933, "Old Father Thames," mirrored some of the strains of "Ol' Man River" but celebrated stoicism over despair and resignation: Old Father Thames keeps rolling along, / Down to the mighty sea. / What does he know? What does he care? / Nothing for you or me.... (Words and music by Raymond Wallace & "Betsy O'Hogan" [Lawrence Wright]). • In the animated short Mississippi Hare, some of which takes place on a Mississippi riverboat, a riverboat gambler named Colonel Shuffle threatens to throw Bugs Bunny into "Ol' Man River". • In the 1947 film version of James Thurber's The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, Danny Kaye, during one of Mitty's fantasies, performs a number called "Fashions by Anatol", which contains the parodistic (and somewhat irrelevant) line "Tote dat barge! Lift dat veil!", referring of course, to a woman's veil. The film also contains a reference to Show Boat's Gaylord Ravenal, by including a Mississippi riverboat sequence in which Mitty (Kaye) imagines himself as riverboat gambler Gaylord Mitty. • In a Daffy Duck cartoon, Daffy suddenly appears as an old black slave, and in dialect, speaks the line "Tote dat barge! Lift dat bale!". • In a Snagglepuss cartoon, Snagglepuss also says the line for no real reason (but not in dialect). • In the Family Guy episode "Brian Goes Back to College", Ashlee Simpson is about to start miming a song when the song changes to "Ol' Man River". • Singer Patti LuPone sang this song in her concert Coulda, Woulda, Shoulda stating "There were only two things standing between me and this role". • In the Futurama episode "Fear of a Bot Planet", Bender complains about the amount of work he has to do, saying "Yes Miss Leela, no Miss Leela, tote that space barge, lift that space pail." • In an episode of The Golden Girls, it is revealed that Dorothy (Bea Arthur) sang this song in high school. When prompted, she delivers the famous half-octave drop on the line, "Get a little drunk, and you land in jail". • Tunis born and usually German language Singer Roberto Blanco sang it on the 70th anniversary of his birthday live on TV. • On an episode of Martin entitled "Dead Men Don't Flush", the cast sings Ol' Man River around the supposedly dead plumber's body as he sits on the couch. • In the first episode of Boys from the Blackstuff, Loggo (Alan Igbon) is seen walking down the street wearing fishing gear singing a few lines from the song. • Mad Magazine published a parody about Hollywood movie stars and MGM studio boss Louis B. Mayer who went to great lengths to "collect more stars than the heavens". • On an episode on the second season of the BBC sitcom Grace & Favour, Miss Brahms (Wendy Richard) and Mr. Humphries (John Inman) sing a version of the song while planting potatoes, featuring the lyrics "Planting taters/Bake my bottom/And poor old Rumbold/Is soon forgotten/He just keeps plantin'/He just keeps plantin' along". • Heath Ledger had the song title tattooed on his arm.[14] • In the 76th Academy Awards, Billy Crystal sang a parody of "Ol' Man River" about Mystic River and its director, Clint Eastwood. • During Michael Jordan's brief return to professional basketball playing for the Washington Wizards, the political satire group The Capitol Steps released a parody called "Old Man Wizard".

417

"Ol' Man River" • In 1998, the political satire group The Capitol Steps released a parody about Bill Clinton called "Old Man Zipper". • In the movie Joe Versus The Volcano an edited version of Ray Charles's version of "Ol' Man River" plays while he hugs a Great Dane. • In Olaf Stapledon's 1932 novel Last Men in London, the narrator, a human descendant from two billion years in the future, and his mate, sing a rough duet of "Ol' Man River" to better understand the minds of 20th Century humans. • In Leonard Bernstein's musical West Side Story, the character of Anybodys remarks "Whatta bunch of ol' man rivers; they don't know nothin', and they don't say nothin'." • In The Honeymooners lost episode "Christmas Party", which first aired December 19, 1953, Frances Langford asks Ed Norton if there is a song that he would like her to sing to which he replies "How about that number that was always good for you, Ol' Man River." • In Wolf Whistle by Lewis Nordan, reporters ask locals in Arrow Catcher, Mississippi if they would be willing to play "Old Man River," and they reply that "they couldn't recollect ever having heard that song." • In episode 43 of the Australian TV drama series Prisoner (aka Prisoner:Cell Block H), when Officer Jim Fletcher orders the women to work in the prison laundry, top dog "Queen" Bea Smith sings the lines; "tote that barge, lift that bail" to the tune of Ol' Man River • On the live CD A Night in San Francisco, Van Morrison sings "Lif' dat bale! Tote dat barge!" during "See Me Through." • The movie Joe Versus the Volcano released in 1990 features the Ray Charles version. The song is introduced after the lead character, Joe Banks (played by Tom Hanks), hears from his doctor that he is terminally ill. • In Mad Men episode "A Little Kiss", Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce receives an African figurine with a resume attached as a prank. The resume reads, "1960-1965: Toted 'dat barge, lifted 'dat bale."

418

References
[1] Show Boat | IBDB: The official source for Broadway Information (http:/ / www. ibdb. com/ production. php?id=10538) [2] Amazon.com: Broadway: The American Musical: Books: Michael Kantor and Laurence Maslon (http:/ / www. amazon. com/ dp/ 0821229052) [3] "Lesson: Ol’ Man River" (school lesson for Mississippi River), Michael E. Marrapodi, New Covenant Christian School, Ashland, Massachusetts, 2006, webpage: MassGeo-River (http:/ / www. massgeo. org/ river. htm): shows phrase "feared of dyin' " (rather than "skeered" of dying) as sung in earlier recordings. [4] MUSLIM MAGOMAEV "Old Man River" from the musical "Show Boat" - YouTube (http:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?v=ZgIL0auB5xA/ ) [5] Ziegfeld: The Man and His Women (TV 1978) - IMDb (http:/ / www. imdb. com/ title/ tt0078526/ ) [6] "Great Performances" Show Boat (TV episode 1989) - IMDb (http:/ / www. imdb. com/ title/ tt0201928/ ) [7] Dr. Bhupen Hazarika - Bistirna Parare - YouTube (http:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?v=OcO6hIcN1A0) [8] Ganga Behti ho kyun - Bhupen hazarika - YouTube (http:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?v=OzWa6yuLX2A) [9] Bhupen Hazarika » Blog Archive » Old man river… keeps rolling along (http:/ / www. bhupenhazarika. com/ wordpress/ ?p=13) [10] Amazon.com: Paul Robeson. (9780822215158): Phillip Hayes Dean, Phillip Hayes Dean: Books (http:/ / www. amazon. com/ dp/ 0822215152) [11] Sarah Lennox (2011). "Reading Transnationally: the GDR and American Black Writers" in Elaine Kelly, Amy Wlodarski (eds.), Art Outside the Lines: New Perspectives on GDR Art Culture. Editions Rodopi. ISBN 978-90-420-3341-2. p.124 [12] William Warfield performs "Old Man River" (Robeson version) - YouTube (http:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?v=-WLtCPRjqb0) [13] OTR.Network Library (The Old Time Radio Network) (http:/ / www. otr. net/ ) [14] From Rolling Stone, March 23, 2006: "One day, his girlfriend, Michelle Williams, wrote a song title -- "Old Man River" -- on his forearm. Ledger got a tattoo artist to run the needles over her words, the way a shopkeeper will frame his first dollar. The song comes from a sad musical, and contains this key advice: "He must know somethin', but he don't say nothin'."

"Ol' Man River"

419

External links
• 1927 lyrics to Ol' Man River (http://lyricsplayground.com/alpha/songs/o/olmanriver.shtml) • Ol' Man River in Hebrew (http://zemer.co.il/song.asp?id=1655)

Further reading
• The chapter "Ol' Man River" in the book Stardust Melodies: The Biography of Twelve of America's Most Popular Songs by Will Friedwald (New York: Pantheon Books, 2002).

"Stormy Weather"
"Stormy Weather" is a 1933 song written by Harold Arlen and Ted Koehler. Ethel Waters first sang it at The Cotton Club night club in Harlem in 1933 and recorded it that year, and in the same year it was sung in London by Elisabeth Welch and recorded by Frances Langford. It has since been performed by artists as diverse as Frank Sinatra, Clodagh Rodgers, and Reigning Sound and most famously by Lena Horne and Billie Holiday. Leo Reisman's orchestra version had the biggest hit on records (with Arlen himself as vocalist), although Ethel Waters's recorded version also sold well. "Stormy Weather" was featured in the 1943 movie of the same name, as mentioned in Wikipedia "Stormy Weather (1943 film). The song tells of disappointment, as the lyrics, "Don't know why there's no sun up in the sky", show someone pining for her man to return. The weather is a metaphor for the feelings of the singer: "stormy weather since my man and I ain't together, keeps raining all the time." The original handwritten lyrics, along with a painting by Ted Koehler, were featured on the (US) Antiques Roadshow on 24 January 2011, where they were appraised for between $50,000 and $100,000. The lyrics show a number of crossings out and corrections.[1] Ethel Waters's recording of the song in 1933 was inducted in the Grammy Hall of Fame in 2003, and the Library of Congress honored the song by adding it to the National Recording Registry in 2004.

Other versions
• Frances Langford recorded the song in 1933. • Duke Ellington recorded an instrumental version of the song in 1933 and another version with singer Ivie Anderson in 1940.[2] • Lena Horne first recorded the song in 1941 for RCA Victor. In 1943, she recorded another version of Stormy Weather for the movie of the same name (which she made while on loan to 20th Century Fox from MGM). Horne recorded the song at least five times throughout her career. Horne's version of the song was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 2000.[3] In 1984, this version of the song was made into a music video on D-TV, featuring clips from the Disney cartoon The Old Mill and the Pastoral Symphony scene from Fantasia. • Connee Boswell recorded the song for Decca on July 8, 1941 with Victor Young's Orchestra. • Shirley Bassey recorded the song in 1956 and it appeared on the B-side of her first single "Burn My Candle (At Both Ends)" released on the Philips record label. • Lou Rawls recorded one version in the seventies. • Frank Sinatra recorded three studio versions of the song; the first as a single for Columbia in the 1940s, the second, in 1959 for the album No One Cares, and lastly, in 1984 for the album L.A. Is My Lady. • Glenn Miller recorded a version on V-Disc, No. 91A, which was issued in January 1944 by the U.S. War Department featuring the AAFTC Orchestra.

"Stormy Weather" • Ella Fitzgerald's interpretation can be found on her Verve release "Ella Fitzgerald Sings the Harold Arlen Songbook" • Olga Guillot recorded a Spanish language version of the song. • Billie Holiday recorded a version of the song on July 27, 1952, in New-York. It was released on a 7-inch album with the B-side "Don't Explain", and has since been included on many anthologies. • In 1952, R&B group The Five Sharps recorded "Stormy Weather" for Jubilee Records, and test pressings were made. The master was later lost (either to fire or flood; sources vary), and only three extant original pressings (all on 78 RPM) are known to exist (although original 45 RPM issues on Jubilee are still, currently 56 years later [2008], rumored to exist). In the 1960s, Jubilee released a rock-and-roll recording, by a different group, with label attribution to the Five Sharps; this version holds little interest to collectors. All known 45 RPM copies of the 1952 version bearing the Jubilee label (as well as a 1972 reissue on Bim Bam Boom records) have been bootlegged from one of the three known 78 copies (a cracked copy, whose crack is audible on all reissues). A version similar to the original Five Sharps recording was also recorded and released in the 1960s by a New York based group, the Five Sharks. • Judy Garland recorded a studio version of the song for her "London Sessions" with Capitol. Most notable is her live performance of the song recorded for the Grammy Award-winning album Judy At Carnegie Hall. • Django Reinhardt performed this song, and it can be found on the album Keep Cool: Guitar Solos (1950–1953). • • • • Sarah Vaughan recorded the song on her 1960 album Dreamy. Etta James recorded the song in 1961 on her debut album At Last!. Earl Grant instrumental version from his 1961 album Ebb Tide And Other Instrumental Favorites In the last sequence of Derek Jarman's The Tempest (1979), a film adaptation of William Shakespeare's play, the singer / actress Elisabeth Welch, appearing as 'a goddess', sings the song; which she had taken as her signature tune since 1933. On-U Sound supergroup New Age Steppers has a reggae cover on their third album titled Foundation Steppers (1983) with Ari Up on the vocals. Industrial/hip-hop group Tackhead released a cover of the song as a 12-inch single under their Fats Comet alias in 1985. Viola Wills covered the song in 1982, it peaked at number four on the dance charts.[4] Rock star Jeff Lynne (of Electric Light Orchestra fame) recorded a cover of the song on his 1990 solo album Armchair Theatre. Rest Assured recorded a cover of the song in 1993 to coincide with the song's 60th birthday although somewhat different from the original due to the use of samples and a rap. It was produced by Harry Sutcliffe. Toots Thielemans recorded this song with Oleta Adams in 2006 for his album One More for the Road Reigning Sound This song which opens their 2002 album Time Bomb High School. Chelsea Krombach recorded a cover of the song in her second jazz album Profile, released in 2004. Royal Crown Revue Recorded in their 1998 album "the contender", the RCR gave this little ditty a shuffle feel. Joni Mitchell sang the song for AT&T's concert for the benefit of the Walden Woods Project and the Thoreau Institute. Keller Williams released a live version of the song on his 2005 DVD Sight. Performing at Carnegie Hall, The London Palladium and The Hollywood Bowl, Martha Wainwright guested to brother, Rufus Wainwright, for his Rufus, Rufus, Rufus Does Judy, Judy, Judy concert, a recreation of Judy Garland's celebrated 1961 concert of the same venue. LaKisha Jones sang this song during her course of American Idol under the guidance of Tony Bennett.

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• • • • • • • • • • • •

• In the first season of The Muppet Show, Wayne and Wanda (a recurring duet couple) tried to sing the song, but as with most of their attempts to perform, it ends with slapstick violence. Because copyright licensing was not available, however, the segment does not appear on the DVD release.

"Stormy Weather" • The radio program Marketplace uses "Stormy Weather" as background music when the major stock market indices are down for the day.[5] • Joe Sample recorded an instrumental version of this song on his 1993 album Invitation. • Wayne Hancock covers the song on his South Austin Sessions album. • 15 year-old Gitte Haenning recorded the song in 1961 on the Danish HMV Label (X 8439) • The German a cappella group (cf. Doo-Wop) Comedian Harmonists recorded their version of this song, "Ohne Dich", in German in Sep. 4, 1933 (Berlin). They further made a version in French language, "Quand il pleut", recorded Sep. 7, 1933 (Fechner, Eberhard (1988) (in German). Die Comedian Harmonists. Sechs Lebensläufe. Weinheim: Quadriga. ISBN 3-88679-174-2.). • The Chicago punk group, the Smoking Popes, recorded their version of this song, in 2001 • Michael Crawford recorded this song for his 1993 album A Touch of Music in the Night • Eric Dolphy recorded it on 20 October 1960, with the following personnal: Drums – Dannie Richmond, Saxophone [Alto], Clarinet [Bass], Flute – Eric Dolphy, Piano – Nico Bunick, Trumpet – Lonnie Hillyer, Ted Curson, Saxophone [Alto] – Charles McPherson. The track "Stormy Weather (Take 1)" is included on the Candid Dolphy LP. It is an instrumental track. • Imelda May recorded a cover version in her album Jump Jack Jump when singing with Blue Harlem

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Homage
• The song is referenced in the 1962 Academy Award nominated animated short Disney musical film, A Symposium on Popular Songs during the song, "Although I Dropped $100,000" written by Robert & Richard Sherman. • The song is also referenced in the song "Frank Sinatra" by Cake. The following lyrics are found in the chorus: "While Frank Sinatra sings 'Stormy Weather,' the flies and spiders get along together; cobwebs fall on an old, skipping record." • The first line of "Weather with You" by the New Zealand group, Crowded House, is "Walking 'round the room singing 'Stormy Weather.'" • The song is played on the business radio program Marketplace heard daily on many NPR stations. If all three major market indices are lower, "Stormy Weather" is the background music ("We're in the Money" is played if markets are up, and "It Don't Mean a Thing (If It Ain't Got That Swing)" is played if markets are mixed). • The nudie-cartoon anthology Sex to Sexty included a "Balled-Up Ballad," parodying the lyrics thus: "Can't go on: Doctor says I got the gon. Stormy Weather, Can't keep my poor legs together-Keeps running all the time!"

In popular culture
The music of the song appears in the film "All About Eve" (1950). It is played on the piano at the party when Margo is going upstairs. It also appears periodically in Federico Fellini´s film, Amarcord (1973). a section from Stormy Weather was referenced by British heavy metal band Iron Maiden through their song "Revelations" off of their album Piece Of Mind.

"Stormy Weather"

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Further reading
• The chapter "Stormy Weather" in the book Stardust Melodies: The Biography of Twelve of America's Most Popular Songs by Will Friedwald (New York: Pantheon Books, 2002).

Footnotes
[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] Antiques Roadshow 24 January 2011 (http:/ / www. pbs. org/ wgbh/ roadshow/ archive/ 201001A41. html) A Duke Ellington Panorama (http:/ / www. depanorama. net/ ts. htm) Grammy Hall of Fame (http:/ / www. grammy. org/ recording-academy/ awards/ hall-of-fame#s) Whitburn, Joel (2004). Hot Dance/Disco: 1974-2003. Record Research. p. 281. Marketplace FAQ (http:/ / marketplace. publicradio. org/ about/ faq. html) from its website

"When Your Lover Has Gone"
"When Your Lover Has Gone" is a 1931 composition by Einar Aaron Swan[1] which, after being featured in the James Cagney film Blonde Crazy that same year, has become a jazz standard. The song was used in the 1991 film, The Rocketeer during the part where Neville Sinclair takes Jenny to The South Seas Club. This song is unusual in that, after a simple verse, it does not follow the usual 64-bar refrain that characterizes the structure of most pop music, but tells its entire story in 32 bars. According to www.jamesdean.com, The Billie Holiday version was the favorite song of James Dean.

Recordings
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Gene Austin (1931) Louis Armstrong (1931) Chet Baker - Baker's Holiday (1965) Ethel Waters (1931) Benny Goodman (1931) Maxine Sullivan (1942) Frank Sinatra - In the Wee Small Hours (1955) Harry James (1944) Billie Holiday (1945) Nat King Cole (1951) Doris Day - You're My Thrill (1949) Carmen McRae (1955) Julie London (1956) Sonny Rollins (1956) Julie Wilson (1957) The Four Freshmen - Love Lost (1959) Ray Charles - The Genius of Ray Charles (1959) Andy Williams (1959) Anthony Newley (1960) Sarah Vaughan - The Divine One (1961), How Long Has This Been Going On? (1978), Send in the Clowns (1981) Ella Fitzgerald - Ella Swings Brightly with Nelson (1962), Ella and Oscar (1975), All That Jazz (1989) Vic Damone - 1963

• Kate Smith - Kate Smith at Carnegie Hall (1963) • Brenda Lee - 1964 • Kenny Clarke/Francy Boland Big Band - All Smiles (1968)

"When Your Lover Has Gone" • • • • • • • • Linda Ronstadt with Nelson Riddle - Lush Life (1984) Mina - Uiallalla (Vol.1 ) (1989) Carly Simon - My Romance (1990) Dorothy Loudon - Saloon (1991) Sue Raney - When Your Lover Has Gone/Songs For A Raney Day (1997) Stacey Kent - Dreamsville (2001) Derek Bailey - Ballads (2002) Kevin Spacey (2004)

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References
[1] Swedish-Finnish Historical Society (http:/ / sfhs. eget. net/ portal/ index. php?option=com_wrapper& Itemid=60)

"Dream"
"Dream", sometimes referred to as "Dream (When You're Feeling Blue)", is a jazz and pop standard with words and music written by Johnny Mercer in 1944. It has been and performed by many artists, with the most popular versions of this song recorded by The Pied Pipers, Frank Sinatra, and Roy Orbison. For Capitol Records, The Pied Pipers, with lead singer June Hutton, made a version of "Dream" (catalog number 185, with the flip side "Tabby the Cat"[1]) which became a major hit in 1945. Vocal group The Skylarks, singing with Ray Anthony's orchestra, would revive this ballad in the 1955 Fred Astaire-Leslie Caron musical film, Daddy Long Legs. In 1970, a vocal quartet which included lead singer Sue Allen (who sang with The Pied Pipers in the 1950s), recorded it with the same arrangement as the 1945 hit version, for Time-Life Records. On October 22, 2008, this version was used in the teaser trailer for the 2K Games Bioshock sequel, BioShock 2: Sea of Dreams. "Dream" was also recorded (on April 14, 1958) by Betty Johnson (issued by Atlantic Records as catalog number 1186, with the flip side "How Much")[2][3] in a version that spent seven weeks on the charts: #19 on the Billboard chart of songs most played by disc jockeys and #58 on the Billboard top 100 chart. Roy Orbison included a cover of the song on his popular and critically acclaimed 1963 album for Monument Records, In Dreams. More recently, Orbison's version was resurrected for the soundtrack to the 1998 film, You've Got Mail. A lush version, with orchestrations and arrangements by Nelson Riddle can be heard on the 1964 Verve release Ella Fitzgerald Sings the Johnny Mercer Songbook. Other notable versions include a best-selling single by Frank Sinatra on Columbia Records (with the Axel Stordahl Orchestra and the Ken Lane singers; originally catalog number 36797, with the flip side "There's No You";[4] reissued as catalog number 40522, with flip side "American Beauty Rose"[5]) which spent 7 weeks on the charts, peaking at #5 in 1945, (as well as a version on his 1960 album for Capitol, Nice 'n' Easy), a rendition from blues legend Etta James in 1961, Ringo Starr's version in 1970 album Sentimental Journey, and most recently Michael Bublé's version in 2007.

"Dream"

424

References
[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] Capitol Records in the 101 to 499 series (http:/ / 78discography. com/ Capitol100. htm) Atlantic Records discography: Betty Johnson (http:/ / www. jazzdisco. org/ atlantic-records/ discography-1958/ #580414) Atlantic Records discography (http:/ / 78discography. com/ Atlantic. htm) Columbia Records in the 36500 to 36999 series (http:/ / www. 78discography. com/ COL36500. htm) Abrams, Steven and Settlemier, Tyrone Columbia Records in the 40500 to 40999 series (http:/ / www. 78discography. com/ COL40500. htm)

"If I Loved You"

425

"If I Loved You"
"If I Loved You"
Song from Carousel Published 1945 Writer Oscar Hammerstein II

Composer Richard Rodgers

"If I Loved You" is a show tune from the 1945 Rodgers and Hammerstein musical Carousel. The song was introduced by John Raitt as "Billy Bigelow" and Jan Clayton as "Julie". It was performed in the 1956 Carousel (film) version by Gordon MacRae and Shirley Jones. In the show, the characters of Billy Bigelow and Julie Jordan sing this song as they hesitantly declare their love for one another, yet are too shy to express their true feelings. The song was in turn inspired by lines of dialogue from Ferenc Molnár's original Liliom, the source material for the musical.

Recorded versions
There are many recordings of "If I Loved You" including by: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Ronnie Aldrich Renato Russo - from The Stonewall Celebration Concert Thomas Allen Ernie Andrews Julie Andrews (1994) - Broadway: The Music of Richard Rodgers[1] Barbra Streisand (1985) The Broadway Album[2] P. J. Proby (1965) Dave Apollon Michael Ballam Jimmy Beaumont Isabel Bigley Paul Bley Bob Brookmeyer Ray Brown Trio Artie Butler José Carreras Benny Carter Carmen Cavallaro Chad & Jeremy Charlotte Church (2001) - Enchantment Victoria Clark Richard Clayderman Jan Clayton and John Raitt (1945) for the Carousel Original Broadway Cast Recording[3] Perry Como Ray Conniff Michael Crawford

"If I Loved You" • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Henri Crolla Bing Crosby Eileen Farrell Art Garfunkel Annie Haslam Michael Hayden and Sally Murphy on the 1994 Broadway Revival Cast Recording[4] Fred Hersch Sergio Franchi recorded on his 1965 RCA Victor Red Seal album Broadway, I love You.[5] Mario Lanza Amel Larrieux Jeanette MacDonald (1946) Gordon MacRae and Shirley Jones on the 1956 film soundtrack[6] Frank Sinatra Jo Stafford - Autumn in New York (1950) Sammy Davis, Jr. Renata Tebaldi Bryn Terfel (1996) - Something Wonderful: Bryn Terfel Sings Rodgers and Hammerstein

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• The Vogues • Sarah Brightman (1987) - Single Carousel • Alfie Boe

References
[1] Julie Andrews - Broadway: The Music of Richard Rodgers, Philips Records, D106250 (1994) [2] Barbra Streisand: The Broadway Album. Columbia Records/CBS, Inc. (1985) [3] If I Loved You" - John Raitt and Jan Clayton with the Carousel Orchestra under the direction of Joseph Littau. Recorded May 16, 1945 in New York City, Master # 72863-A, originally released on Decca single 29173A and Original Cast Album DA-400, July 19, 1945. Source notes from Front Row Center: The Broadway Gold Box, 1935 - 1988. Four Compact Disc Set, Broadway Gold/MCA Classics, MCAD4-11353 (1996) [4] Carousel (1994 Broadway Revival Cast), Angel Records (June 14, 1994) [5] http:/ / www. discogs. com Sergio Franchi [6] Carousel (1956 Film Soundtrack). Reissued on CD by Angel Records (March 13, 2001)

"You'll Never Walk Alone"

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"You'll Never Walk Alone"
"You'll Never Walk Alone" Introduced in the 1945 musical, Carousel
Music by Lyrics by Language Richard Rodgers Oscar Hammerstein II English

Original artist Christine Johnson Recorded by Judy Garland Doris Day Billy Eckstine Gerry & The Pacemakers Perry Como Frank Sinatra Elvis Presley Barbra Streisand Bob Dylan Patti LaBelle Lee Towers Jackie Wilson

Performed by Jerry Lewis in the annual MDA Telethon

"You'll Never Walk Alone" is a show tune from the 1945 Rodgers and Hammerstein musical Carousel. In the musical, in the second act, Nettie Fowler, the cousin of the female protagonist Julie Jordan, sings "You'll Never Walk Alone" to comfort and encourage Julie when her husband, Billy Bigelow, the male lead, kills himself to avoid capture during a failed robbery. It is reprised in the final scene to encourage a graduation class of which Louise (Billy and Julie's daughter) is a member. Billy watches this ceremony during his return to Earth. The song is also sung at association football clubs around the world, where it is performed by a massed chorus of supporters on matchday; this tradition began at Liverpool Football Club in the early 1960s and later spread to several other clubs.[1]

Background
Christine Johnson, who created the role of Nettie Fowler, introduced the song in the original Broadway production.[2] Later in the show Jan Clayton, as Julie Jordan, reprised it, with the chorus joining in. In the film, it is sung by Claramae Turner as Nettie. The weeping Julie Jordan (Shirley Jones) tries to sing it but cannot; it is later reprised by Julie and a chorus.

Subsequent history
Besides the recordings of the song on the Carousel cast albums and the film soundtrack, the song has been recorded by many artists, with notable hit versions made by Frank Sinatra, Gerry & the Pacemakers, Judy Garland, Elvis Presley and Doris Day. Progressive rock group Pink Floyd took a version sung by the Liverpool F.C. Kop choir, and "interpolated" it into their own song, "Fearless", on their 1971 album, Meddle. From 1964 through 2010, Jerry Lewis concluded the annual Jerry Lewis MDA Telethon by singing the song.[3] After the end of a concert by the rock group Queen, the audience spontaneously sang this song, according to guitarist Brian May,[4] and this helped to inspire the creation of their songs "We Are the Champions" and "We Will Rock You".

"You'll Never Walk Alone" Italian-American tenor Sergio Franchi sang a notable version accompanied by the Welsh Men's Choir on the June 9, 1968 telecast of The Ed Sullivan Show.[5] He also covered this song in his 1964 RCA Victor album The Exciting Voice of Sergio Franchi.[6] American singer and songwriter Barbra Streisand sang this song in a surprise appearance at the close of the 2001 Emmy Awards, in honor of the victims of the September 11th, 2001 attacks.[7] In The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, the onboard computer Eddie sings this song in an attempt to calm the crew of the Heart of Gold as their imminent destruction approaches in the form of a missile.[8] In Cheers Season 1 Episode 15 "Father Knows Last", the barroom erupts in an impromptu version to honor Carla as she walks stoically out the front door with a collection taken up by the bar patrons for her unborn child. Renée Fleming sang the song at the Concert for America, which marked the first anniversary of 9/11,[9] and for the Inauguration of Barack Obama on January 20, 2009. In 2010, this was sung during the festivities of the Last Night of the Proms, with the choir at the Albert Hall joined by crowds of the public from Hillsborough Castle, Northern Ireland; Caird Hall, Dundee; Hyde Park, London; Salford, Greater Manchester; and Wales, to commemorate the death of Oscar Hammerstein II.

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Sporting anthem
"You'll Never Walk Alone"
Single by Gerry and the Pacemakers Released Recorded Length Label October 1963 July 2, 1963, Abbey Road Studios 2:40 Columbia (EMI) (UK) Laurie Records (US) George Martin [10]

Producer

Gerry and the Pacemakers singles chronology

"I Like It" (1963)

"You'll Never Walk Alone" (1963)

"I'm the One" (1964)

In the United Kingdom, the song's most successful recording was released in 1963 by the Liverpudlian Merseybeat group Gerry and the Pacemakers (peaking at number one in the singles chart for four consecutive weeks). The song quickly became the anthem of Liverpool Football Club and is invariably sung by its supporters moments before the start of each home game.[11] The words "You'll Never Walk Alone" also feature in the club crest and on the Shankly Gate entrance to Anfield, the home stadium. According to former player Tommy Smith, Gerry Marsden presented Liverpool manager Bill Shankly with a tape Shankly Gates recording of his forthcoming cover single during a pre-season coach trip in the summer of 1963. "Shanks was in awe of what he heard. [...] Football writers from the

"You'll Never Walk Alone" local newspapers were travelling with our party and, thirsty for a story of any kind between games, filed copy back to their editors to the effect that we had adopted Gerry Marsden's forthcoming single as the club song."[12] Marsden himself told BBC Radio how, in the 1960s, the DJ at Anfield would play the top-ten commercial records in ascending order, with the number one single transmitted last, shortly before kickoff. Spectators would sing along, but unlike with other hit singles, once "You'll Never Walk Alone" dropped out of the top-ten, instead of dropping the song, supporters continued to sing along.[13][14] The song was later adopted by Scottish team Celtic F.C.,[11] Dutch teams Feyenoord, FC Twente and SC Cambuur,[15] Germany's Borussia Dortmund, Mainz 05, 1. FC Kaiserslautern, Borussia Mönchengladbach, Alemannia Aachen, FC St Pauli, SV Darmstadt 98[16] and Japan's F.C. Tokyo.[17] The Pink Floyd song "Fearless", from their 1971 album Meddle, includes a recording of the Liverpool Kop singing "You'll Never Walk Alone". The recording is repeated many times during the song and appears solely as a conclusion at the end of the track. A special recording of the song was made in solidarity with Bradford City following the Valley Parade fire in 1985, when 56 spectators died and many more were seriously injured. The song was performed by The Crowd, featuring Gerry Marsden, Paul McCartney and Rolf Harris, among others. Some years later, after witnessing a rendition of "You'll Never Walk Alone" at Anfield in 2007, the President of the Spanish Olympic Committee, Alejandro Blanco, said he felt inspired to seek lyrics to his country's wordless national anthem, the Royal March, ahead of Madrid's bid to host the 2016 Olympic Games.[18][19] The song was also performed by 17-year-old highschool student Alina Schmidt at the public funeral of German football goalkeeper Robert Enke (who had committed suicide after years of depression) to an audience of 45,000 at his team's Hanover's stadium on November 15, 2009. The song was sung by supporters of the A-League team Brisbane Roar to commemorate the victims of the 2010–2011 Queensland floods at the 2011 A-League Grand Final.

429

Chart performance
Chart (1963) Peak position 1 Peak position 33

UK Singles Chart Chart (2010)

UK Singles Chart

Recorded versions
• • • • • • • • • • • The Adicts[20] Alex K Alfie Boe ("Onward") (2007) Alicia Keys (Hurricane Katrina disaster relief, 2005) André Hazes André Rieu (2009 Maastricht concert) Aretha Franklin (1972, on the live album "Amazing Grace") The Bachelors Barbra Streisand Barry Manilow & Cilla Black (1993)[21] Bela B. & the Tikiwolves feat. Gary'o'Wolf[16] (official FC St. Pauli Stadionhymn, 1992)

"You'll Never Walk Alone" • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Bryn Terfel (1996) – Something Wonderful: Bryn Terfel Sings Rodgers and Hammerstein Charice (2008) Chris de Burgh (2008) Christy Gibson (Thai Language Version) (2001) – Soo Yod Kao Christine Johnson on the Carousel Original Cast Album (1945) Claramae Turner on the Carousel film soundtrack (1956) The Crusaders (1966) David Campbell (2010) David Whitfield Die Toten Hosen (2000, Bayern ep) Dionne Warwick (1967, On Stage and in the Movies album track) Doris Akers (1963) Doris Day (on the album of the same name) (1962) Dudu Fisher (2006) Elvis Presley (1968 single release) Frank Sinatra (1945) (1963) Frankie Vaughan (1979)

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• Gene Vincent (1958) (Gene Vincent Rocks and the Blue Caps Roll album track) • Billy Eckstine (1960): Live album "No Cover, No Minimum", recorded in Las Vegas. Production was by Teddy Reig. The album was originally released by Roulette Records, but is also available on the Blue Note label. • Gerry & The Pacemakers (1963) • Hayley Westenra (2001) • John Barrowman (2010) (John Barrowman album track) • Joyce Drake (1983) • Johnny Cash (2003) • Jo Stafford and Gordon MacRae (1963) • Johnny Maestro & The Brooklyn Bridge (1969) • Juan Diego Flórez (Live 8 – Berlin) (2005) • Judy Garland (1960)[22] • Katherine Jenkins (2005) • Kevin Rowland (1999) • Kiri Te Kanawa with the Mormon Tabernacle Choir (1990) – Songs of Inspiration • Lee Greenwood • Lee Towers (1976)[23] • The Lettermen (1964)[24] • Liverpool FC (1977) (FA Cup single 'A' side We Can Do It & Liverpool Lou 'B' side We Shall Not Be Moved & You'll Never Walk Alone) • Los Fastidios • Louis Armstrong (1954) in a medley with Tenderly • Mahalia Jackson • Malcolm Vaughan (1959) • Mario Lanza (1952 and 1956) • Michael Ball (1996) – The Musicals • Michael Crawford (1987) • Nina Simone (1959) • Olivia Newton-John (1989) – Warm and Tender • Patti Labelle & The Blue Belles (1964)

"You'll Never Walk Alone" • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Patti LaBelle (1980's) Pink Floyd (1971) – Fearless Pips, Chips & Videoclips (Dernjava album, 1995) The Priests (2009) Perry Como (1956) Ray Charles (Ingredients in a Recipe for Soul album track, July 1963) Regine Velasquez (2004) Renée Fleming (2003) The Righteous Brothers (1965) Robson & Jerome (1996) Roy Hamilton (1954) Rykers (2000) Samuel Ramey (1989) Sergio Franchi recorded on 1964 RCA album, The Exciting Voice of Sergio Franchi The Shadows (Reflection album track, 1990) Shirley Bassey (1962, single B-side to "Ave Maria")[25] Sissel Kyrkjebø (2004) Smoking Popes Steven Houghton (1997) – Steven Houghton Tammy Wynette The Three Tenors (1998) Tokyo Ska Paradise Orchestra (2009) – Paradise Blue Tom Jones (1969) Vocal Majority (1997) – How Sweet the Sound Wayne Hussey and Julianne Regan (2011) (in support of Liverpool F.C.'s disability charity, Respect 4 All)[26]

431

References
[1] Liverpool vs. Leeds United (http:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?v=8AXxf52k0cE), F.A. Cup Final, BBC, 1965. "The song was covered by Liverpool group Gerry & The Pacemakers in 1963. At this time, supporters standing on the Spion Kop terrace at Anfield began singing popular chart songs of the day. The mood was captured on camera by a BBC Panorama camera crew in 1964. One year later, when Liverpool faced Leeds in the cup final, the travelling Kop sang the same song and match commentator Kenneth Wolstenholme commended the 'Liverpool signature tune'." Paul Coslett, You'll Never Walk Alone (http:/ / www. bbc. co. uk/ liverpool/ content/ articles/ 2008/ 06/ 09/ youll_never_walk_alone_feature. shtml) BBC Online. June 9, 2008. [2] "You'll Never Walk Alone (original version 1945)" (http:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?v=wlsUfOjVhrM). Youtube. . Retrieved 2011-04-20. [3] "Milestones: Retiring: Jerry Lewis", Time magazine, May 30, 2011, p. 17 [4] Interview with Tom Browne for BBC Radio One, broadcast Christmas Eve and Boxing Day 1977 [5] DVD is not dated (http:/ / www. edsullivan. com/ sofa-entertainment) [6] http:/ / www. discogs. com/ sergio-franchi [7] Streisand's stage fright spiked with thought of terror (http:/ / www. usatoday. com/ life/ music/ 2001-12-12-streisandside. htm), By Edna Gundersen, USA TODAY, 12 12 2001 [8] "The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy – Character Guide – British Comedy Guide" (http:/ / www. comedy. co. uk/ guide/ tv/ hitchhikers_guide_galaxy/ characters/ ). Comedy.co.uk. . Retrieved 2011-04-20. [9] http:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?v=C44TbswC2io [10] http:/ / www. britbands. bravepages. com/ gerrydiary. html Gerry and the Pacemakers diary [11] Aldred, Jessica. Liverpool or Celtic: who Walked Alone first? (http:/ / football. guardian. co. uk/ news/ theknowledge/ 0,9204,912750,00. html) The Guardian. March 12, 2003. [12] Smith, Tommy. Anfield Iron, Bantam Press, p. 68-69 [13] Cavanagh, John. "The History of You'll Never Walk Alone", BBC Songlines, 2006. [14] Morgan, John. "The Other Mersey Sound", BBC Panorama, 1964. [15] Whyatt, Chris. McClaren's new charges (http:/ / news. bbc. co. uk/ sport1/ hi/ football/ europe/ 7556749. stm) BBC. August 13, 2008. [16] Bela B. & The Tikiwolves feat. Gary 'O' Wolf: You'll Never Walk Alone (FC St. Pauli hymn) (http:/ / www. discogs. com/ master/ 294393) at Discogs (list of releases)

"You'll Never Walk Alone"
[17] Nagatomo tells Japan "You'll never walk alone" (http:/ / www. webcitation. org/ 5xWbctyiG), The mainichi Daily News. March 2011. [18] Liverpool fans inspire Spain to write words to anthem (http:/ / www. webcitation. org/ 5bUccOnOm), Reuters. June 5, 2005 [19] Spain to add lyrics to wordless national anthem (http:/ / www. msnbc. msn. com/ id/ 19442872/ ), MSNBC. June 26, 2007. [20] John The Punk. "Welcome to The Adicts Official Website!" (http:/ / adicts. us/ adictsmusic. html). Adicts.us. . Retrieved 2011-04-20. [21] "Cilla Black Discography: You'll Never Walk Alone (duet with Barry Manilow) – Single" (http:/ / www. cillablack. com/ music-youllneverwalkalone-single. htm). . Retrieved May 21, 2009. [22] Recorded for Capitol Records (http:/ / www. jgdb. com/ capstud. htm) Judy Garland with Orchestra conducted, by Norrie Paramor, August 3, 1960. [23] It's Raining In My Heart (http:/ / www. leetowers. nl/ lp. htm) (LP/MC) (Goud & Platina) 1976 [24] "You'll Never Walk Alone" (http:/ / www. thelettermen. com/ 1960. html). Thelettermen.com. . Retrieved 2011-04-20. [25] Columbia Catalog Number DB4816" [26] "You'll Never Walk Alone" (http:/ / www. youtube. com/ liverpoolfc#p/ u/ 13/ xy8MPNixmgI). Youtube.com (Liverpool FC's Channel). Retrieved 2011-12-27.

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"Mighty Lak' a Rose"
"Mighty Lak' a Rose" is a 1901 song with lyrics by Frank Lebby Stanton and music by Ethelbert Nevin. The lyrics are written in an approximation of an African American accent; such "dialect songs" were common in the era. The title thus means "Mighty (very much) like a rose"; this assessment is addressed by a mother (or perhaps an observer) to her newborn son. The dialect has been modified by some singers, such as Frank Sinatra. Audiences of various cultures and backgrounds have been able to identify with the narrator, the mother, and the child. The tune became a Tin Pan Alley hit, and it was a perennial of traditional pop music for generations.[1] Deanna Durbin sang it as a lullaby in the 1943 feature film The Amazing Mrs. Sheet music cover Holliday.[2] Other notable recordings include those by Jane Powell, Lillian Nordica, Geraldine Farrar, Vincent Lopez, Paul Robeson, Art Tatum, Wilbur DeParis, Frank Sinatra, Nina Simone, Petula Clark, John McCormack, and Roger Whittaker.[3] An orchestra arrangement was directed by Frank Chacksfield.[4] Bob Becker's xylophone rendition is available performed by McGill University's Amie Watson.[5] In an episode of Are You Being Served? Mrs Slocombe, Miss Brahms and Mr Humphries sang it as a lullaby to two babies. The song was Nevin's final composition. He died on 17 February 1901, shortly after composing it, never living to realize the song's success. Stanton died in 1927.[6]

References
Notes
[1] Go to the Dixieland rendition of "Mighty Like a Rose" (http:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?v=QL2ulsZkTe8) as performed by the Left Bank Bearcats. [2] Deanna Durbin sings "Mighty like a Rose" (http:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?v=yUiC8ALzlsQ) in the role of Ruth Kirke Holliday. [3] Like Durbin's, Whittaker's rendition of "Mighty like a Rose" (http:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?v=_lah0Sh46j8) has been associated with Christmas. Petula Clark, prior to her rendition (http:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?v=DF58vg-TWpgher), explicitly mentioned the song's sentimentality. [4] Frank Chacksfield's orchestra rendition. (http:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?v=xFDe4PLs1IE) [5] Amie Watson's xylophone rendition. (http:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?v=WVqjp5QR5W8& feature=related) [6] See the articles on Nevin and Stanton.

"Nancy (With the Laughing Face)"

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"Nancy (With the Laughing Face)"
"Nancy (With the Laughing Face)" is a song composed in 1942 by Jimmy Van Heusen, with lyrics by Phil Silvers. It is commonly believed that the song was written for the birthday of Nancy Sinatra. This was a misunderstanding that eventually led to the song being recorded by Frank Sinatra.

Origin of the Song
Former broadcast executive and music historian Rick Busciglio tells the story of the song's inception as related to him by Van Heusen: "In 1979, I was working with songwriter Jimmy Van Heusen on a TV special with Frank Sinatra and Bob Hope that was never produced. Jimmy told me that one day (circa 1942) he and his lyricist Johnny Burke were working at 20th Century-Fox composing for a film. While Burke was out of their writer's bungalow, Phil Silvers, the comedian, a friend to both, entered and suggested to Jimmy that they write a song for Johnny's wife, Bessie, who was soon to celebrate a birthday. Silvers provided the lyrics, later revised by Van Heusen and Burke. At the party they sang "Bessie... with the laughing face." It was such a hit that they used it at other female birthday events. When they sang it as "Nancy... with the laughing face" at little Nancy Sinatra's birthday party, Frank broke down and cried thinking that it was written specially for his daughter - the trio wisely didn't correct him. Jimmy assigned his royalties to Nancy after Frank recorded it for Columbia."[1]

Notable recordings
• • • • • • • Cannonball Adderley, Bill Evans, Percy Heath, Connie Kay - Know What I Mean? (1961) Ray Charles - Dedicated To You (1961) The Fleetwoods - Softly (1961) John Coltrane - Ballads (1962) Frank Sinatra - Sinatra's Sinatra (1963) Tony Bennett - Perfectly Frank (1992) The Four Freshmen - Voices in Standards (1996), Four Freshmen And Five Saxes/Four Freshmen And Five Guitars (1998) • Flip Phillips - Phillips Head (1975)

References
[1] Google Books: Sinatra! The Song Is You: A Singer's Art (http:/ / books. google. com/ books?id=MDX1V3cap-MC& lpg=PA142& ots=eOXEbpdo0g& pg=PA142#v=onepage& q& f=false)

External links
• Excerpt (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cW56AlLDFDc) from lecture "Confessions of An Ad Man," by Rick Busciglio telling the story of the creation of the song.

"America the Beautiful"

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"America the Beautiful"
"America the Beautiful"

Commemoration plaque atop Pikes Peak Patriotic Published Writer Composer 1895 (poem) Katharine Lee Bates Samuel A. Ward

"America the Beautiful"

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"America the Beautiful" is an American patriotic song. The lyrics were written by Katharine Lee Bates and the music composed by church organist and choirmaster Samuel A. Ward. Bates originally wrote the words as a poem, Pikes Peak, first published in the Fourth of July edition of the church periodical The Congregationalist in 1895. At that time, the poem was titled America for publication. Ward had originally written the music, Materna, for the hymn O Mother dear, Jerusalem in 1882. Ward's music combined with the Bates poem was first published in 1910 and titled America the Beautiful. The song is one of the most beloved and popular of the many American patriotic songs.[1] From time to time it has been proposed as a replacement for The Star-Spangled Banner as the national anthem, including television sign-offs.

History
In 1893, at the age of thirty-three, Bates, an English professor at Wellesley College, had taken a train trip to Colorado Springs, Colorado, to teach a short summer school session at Colorado College. Several of the sights on her trip inspired her, and they found their way into her poem, including the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, the "White City" with its promise of the future contained within its alabaster buildings; the wheat fields of America's heartland Kansas, through which her train was riding on July 16; and the majestic view of the Great Plains from high atop Zebulon's Pikes Peak. On the pinnacle of that mountain, the words of the poem started to come to her, and she wrote them down upon returning to her hotel room at the original Antlers Hotel. The poem was initially published two years later in The Congregationalist, to commemorate the Fourth of July. It quickly caught the public's fancy. Amended versions were published in 1904 and 1913. Several existing pieces of music were adapted to the poem. A hymn tune composed by Samuel A. Ward was generally considered the best music as early as 1910 and is still the popular tune today. Just as Bates had been inspired to write her poem, Ward too was inspired to compose his tune. The tune came to him while he was on a ferryboat trip from Coney Island back to his home in New York City, after a leisurely summer day in 1882, and he immediately wrote it down. He was so anxious to capture the tune in his head, he asked fellow passenger friend Harry Martin for his shirt cuff to write the tune on. He composed the tune for the old hymn "O Mother Dear, Jerusalem", retitling the work "Materna". Ward's music combined with Bates' poem were first published together in 1910 and titled, America the Beautiful.[2] Ward died in 1903, not knowing the national stature his music would attain, as the music was only first applied to the song in 1904. Bates was more fortunate, as the song's popularity was well established by her death in 1929. At various times in the more than 100 years that have elapsed since the song was written, particularly during the John F. Kennedy administration, there have been efforts to give "America the Beautiful" legal status either as a
Sheet music version

"America the Beautiful" national hymn, or as a national anthem equal to, or in place of, "The Star-Spangled Banner", but so far this has not succeeded. Proponents prefer "America the Beautiful" for various reasons, saying it is easier to sing, more melodic, and more adaptable to new orchestrations while still remaining as easily recognizable as "The Star-Spangled Banner." Some prefer "America the Beautiful" over "The Star-Spangled Banner" due to the latter's war-oriented imagery. Others prefer "The Star-Spangled Banner" for the same reason. While that national dichotomy has stymied any effort at changing the tradition of the national anthem, "America the Beautiful" continues to be held in high esteem by a large number of Americans. When Richard Nixon visited China in 1972, this song was played as the welcome music. The song is often included in songbooks in a wide variety of religious congregations in the United States.

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Lyrics
O beautiful for spacious skies, For amber waves of grain, For purple mountain majesties Above the fruited plain! America! America! God shed His grace on thee, And crown thy good with brotherhood From sea to shining sea! O beautiful for pilgrim feet Whose stern impassion'd stress A thoroughfare for freedom beat Across the wilderness America! America! God mend thine ev'ry flaw, Confirm thy soul in self-control, Thy liberty in law. O beautiful for heroes prov'd In liberating strife, Who more than self their country lov'd, And mercy more than life. America! America! May God thy gold refine Till all success be nobleness, And ev'ry gain divine. O beautiful for patriot dream That sees beyond the years Thine alabaster cities gleam Undimmed by human tears. America! America! God shed His grace on thee,

"America the Beautiful" And crown thy good with brotherhood From sea to shining sea.

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Original poem (1893)
America. A Poem for July 4. O beautiful for halcyon skies, For amber waves of grain, For purple mountain majesties Above the enameled plain! America! America! God shed His grace on thee, Till souls wax fair as earth and air And music-hearted sea! O beautiful for pilgrim feet Whose stern, impassioned stress A thoroughfare for freedom beat Across the wilderness! America! America! God shed His grace on thee Till paths be wrought through wilds of thought By pilgrim foot and knee! O beautiful for glory-tale Of liberating strife, When once or twice, for man's avail, Men lavished precious life! America! America! God shed His grace on thee Till selfish gain no longer stain, The banner of the free! O beautiful for patriot dream That sees beyond the years Thine alabaster cities gleam Undimmed by human tears! America! America! God shed His grace on thee Till nobler men keep once again Thy whiter jubilee!

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Popular versions
Possibly the most notable current version of "America the Beautiful" is the setting for band and symphonic orchestra by the late arranger/conductor/composer Carmen Dragon. Performed thousands of times in recent years, Mr. Dragon's arrangement has been played for state occasions such as the memorial services for Presidents Ford and Reagan and at tribute concerts for events such as the Oklahoma City bombing and 9/11. Three different renditions of the song have entered the Hot Country Songs charts. The first was by Charlie Rich, which went to number 22 in 1976.[3] A second, by Mickey Newbury, peaked at number 82 in 1980.[4] An all-star version of "America the Beautiful" performed by country singers Trace Adkins, Billy Dean, Vince Gill, Carolyn Dawn Johnson, Toby Keith, Brenda Lee, Lonestar, Martina McBride, Jamie O'Neal, Kenny Rogers and Keith Urban reached number 58 in July 2001. The song re-entered the chart following the September 11 terrorist attacks.[5] Popularity of the song increased greatly following the September 11, 2001 attacks; at some sporting events it was sung in addition to the traditional singing of the national anthem. During the first taping of the Late Show with David Letterman following the attacks, CBS newsman Dan Rather cried briefly as he quoted the fourth verse.[6] Ray Charles is credited with the song's most well known rendition in current times (although Elvis Presley had success with it in the 1970s). Charles' recording is very commonly played at major sporting and entertainment events, such as the Super Bowl, and WrestleMania 2; Charles gave a live performance of the song prior to Super Bowl XXXV, the last Super Bowl played before the September 11 terrorist attacks, as well as during Game 2 of the 2001 World Series after the attacks. He places the third verse first, after which he sings the usual first verse. In the third verse (see above), the author scolds the materialistic and self-serving robber barons of her day, and urges America to live up to its noble ideals and to honor, with both word and deed, the memory of those who died for their country. He also performed the song on Red Sox opening day at Fenway Park in 2003, though the game was eventually rained out. A version with Alicia Keys was included in Charles' 2005 duets album Genius & Friends. Symbolically, Marian Anderson (a noted opera singer of her day) sang a rendition of "America the Beautiful" on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in 1939 after being refused use of Constitution Hall by the Daughters of the American Revolution because of her skin color. In 2009, on her album Running for the Drum, Buffy Sainte-Marie released a new version of "America the Beautiful". Her version contained some new lyrics, as well as a small modification of the melody. This version includes only two verses, the second of which is original. O beautiful for vision clear, That sees beyond the years, The nightime sky, our hopes that fly, Undimmed by human tears. America! America! God shed His grace on thee, 'Til selfish gain no longer stain, The banner of the free. And crown thy good with brotherhood, From sea to shining sea. Wellesley students honor Bates with a version at graduation, substituting And crown thy good with SISTERhood, From sea to shining sea. After Mitt Romney 2012 presidential campaign's gaffe American political satirist, television host and actor Stephen Colbert publicly performed "Amercia, Amercia..." song.[7][8]

"America the Beautiful"

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Idioms
"From sea to shining sea" is an American idiom meaning from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean (or vice versa). Many songs have used this term, including the American patriotic songs "America, The Beautiful" and "God Bless the USA". In addition to these, it is also featured in Schoolhouse Rock's "Elbow Room". A term similar to this is the Canadian motto A Mari Usque Ad Mare ("From sea to sea.")

Books
• Lynn Sherr's 2001 book America the Beautiful discusses the origins of the song and the backgrounds of its authors in depth. The book points out that the poem has the same meter as that of "Auld Lang Syne"; the songs can be sung interchangeably. Additionally, Sherr points out that this was the original third verse written by Bates:[9] America! America! God shed His grace on thee, 'Til selfish gain no longer stain, The banner of the free. • Barbara Younger has written a children's book about the writing of the song: Purple Mountain Majesties: The Story of Katharine Lee Bates and "America the Beautiful". The book has illustrations by artist Stacey Schuett.

References
[1] "Materna (O Mother Dear, Jerusalem) / Samuel Augustus Ward [hymnal]:Print Material Full Description: Performing Arts Encyclopedia, Library of Congress" (http:/ / lcweb2. loc. gov/ diglib/ ihas/ loc. natlib. ihas. 100010615/ full. html). Lcweb2.loc.gov. 2007-10-30. . Retrieved 2011-08-20. [2] Collins, Ace (2003). Songs Sung Red, White, and Blue: The Stories Behind America's Best-Loved Patriotic Songs (http:/ / books. google. com/ books?id=kKsA1Qi8BBgC& pg=PA19#v=onepage& f=false). Harper. p. 19. ISBN 0-06-051304-7. . [3] Whitburn, Joel (2008). Hot Country Songs 1944 to 2008. Record Research, Inc. p. 350. ISBN 0-89820-177-2. [4] Whitburn, p. 297 [5] Whitburn, p. 24 [6] Zacharek, Stephanie (2001-09-18). "Dan Rather's tears; Journalists don't cry on camera. That was before last week." (http:/ / archive. salon. com/ ent/ tv/ feature/ 2001/ 09/ 18/ rather/ index. html). Salon.com. . [7] Stephen Colbert’s Anthem for Mitt Romney’s ‘Amercia’ (http:/ / nymag. com/ daily/ intel/ 2012/ 05/ stephen-colberts-anthem-to-romneys-amercia. html) [8] Stephen Colbert shows Mitt Romney speech repetition following Iowa win (http:/ / article. wn. com/ view/ 2012/ 01/ 05/ Stephen_Colbert_shows_Mitt_Romney_speech_repetition_followin/ ) [9] Sherr, Lynn (2001). America the Beautiful: The Stirring True Story Behind Our Nation's Favorite Song. PublicAffairs. ISBN 978-1-58648-085-1.

Sherr, Lynn (2001). America the Beautiful: The Stirring True Story Behind Our Nation's Favorite Song. PublicAffairs. ISBN 978-1-58648-085-1.

Sources/external links
• MP3 and RealAudio recordings available at the United States Library of Congress (http://memory.loc.gov/ cocoon/ihas/loc.natlib.ihas.200000001/default.html) • Free sheet music (http://cantorion.org/pieces/3049/America_the_Beautiful_(Materna)) of America the Beautiful from Cantorion.org • Words, sheet music & MIDI file (http://hymntime.com/tch/htm/o/b/f/obfsskis.htm) at the Cyber Hymnal • America the Beautiful Park (http://www.springsgov.com/Page.asp?NavID=5138) in Colorado Springs named for Katharine Lee Bates' words. • Archival collection (http://web.me.com/highlandsarchives/The_Highlands_Archives/America.html) of America the Beautiful lantern slides from the 1930s.

"America the Beautiful" • Another free sheet music (http://www.traditional-songs.com/download_score.php?name=America the Beautiful&country=Usa) • David Firestone - When Romney’s Reach Exceeds His Grasp - Mitt Romney quotes the song (http:// loyalopposition.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/01/03/ mitt-romney-and-america-the-beautiful-when-reach-exceeds-grasp/?ref=opinion)

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"Day by Day"
"Day by Day" is a popular song with music by Axel Stordahl and Paul Weston and lyrics by Sammy Cahn.

Recorded versions
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Ernestine Anderson Ray Anthony Shirley Bassey Les Brown & His Orchestra (vocal: Doris Day) (1946) Kenny Clarke-Francy Boland Sextet Clayton-Hamilton Orchestra Gloria Cooper Bing Crosby & Mel Tormé (1946) Vic Damone (1959) Doris Day (1956) Trudy Desmond Lou Donaldson John Entwistle Cynthia Fee (as the theme song for the 1988-1989 NBC situation comedy "Day by Day") Ella Fitzgerald (1953) Arne Fogel & The Wolverines Helen Forrest The Four Freshmen (1956) Astrud Gilberto (1964) Dizzy Gillespie Eydie Gormé (1957) Lionel Hampton Coleman Hawkins Dick Haymes Ted Heath Woody Herman Hinda Hoffman Johnny Holiday Hot Butter June Hutton Mike Jones Lewis Keel

• Gene Krupa • Julio Martini • Johnny Mathis

"Day by Day" • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Carmen McRae (1963) Natasha Miller The Monitors Chris Montez (1966) Mary Ann Moore Lee Morgan Danny Moss Tony Mottola Lennie Niehaus Oscar Peterson Sonny Phillips Jim Porcella Viacheslav Preobrazhenski Johnnie Ray (1958) Denise Richards Betty Roché Jimmy Roselli (1964) Cynthia Scott "Little" Jimmy Scott (1952) Don Sheldon Pete Siers Frank Sinatra (1946) (1961) Jo Stafford (1946) Buddy Tate Caterina Valente Sarah Vaughan (1958) Kalil Wilson Rickey Woodard

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"Full Moon and Empty Arms"

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"Full Moon and Empty Arms"
"Full Moon and Empty Arms" is a 1945 popular song by Buddy Kaye and Ted Mossman, based on Sergei Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 2.[1] The best-known recording of the song was made by Frank Sinatra in 1945. Other recordings: Erroll Garner Trio (Instr.)-1946, Eddie Fisher-1955, Donna Brooks-1956, Robert Goulet-1961, Sarah Vaughan-1963, Jerry Vale-1964 Also recorded by: Caterina Valente; Mina; The Platters; Carmen Cavallaro; Jim Nabors; June Valli; Billy Vaughn.

References
[1] "Full Moon and Empty Arms", Time, 23 June 1947 (http:/ / www. time. com/ time/ magazine/ article/ 0,9171,798001,00. html)

"Soliloquy (Part 1 & 2)"

443

"Soliloquy (Part 1 & 2)"
"Soliloquy"
Song from Carousel Published 1945 Writer Oscar Hammerstein II

Composer Richard Rodgers

"Soliloquy" is a 1945 song composed by Richard Rodgers, with lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II, written for their 1945 musical Carousel, where it was introduced by John Raitt. The now jobless carousel barker Billy Bigelow, the antihero of the musical, sings this seven-and-a-half minute song just after he has learned he is about to become a father. In it, he happily daydreams over what it would be like to be a father to a boy, but midway through the song, he is horrified and disappointed to realize that it could turn out to be a girl. The song immediately becomes more tender, as he begins to like the idea. At song's end, he considers that a girl needs the very best a father can offer, and decides to get money to provide for her. It is this idea that spurs him on to help his criminal pal Jigger Craigin in committing a robbery, an act which ultimately leads to personal disaster for Billy. Frank Sinatra had recently become a father when he recorded "Soliloquy" for the first time on May 28, 1946. With the time limitation of about 3:30 on a 10" 78-rpm record his 7:57 long recording was released on Columbia's Masterwork label (the classical division) as two sides of a 12" record. The song is extremely unusual in that it requires the singer to sing solo (and occasionally speak) for a full seven-and-a-half minutes, in the manner of an operatic aria, without the benefit of an accompanying choral group "taking up the slack", as is usually the case in long musical numbers (e.g. Ol' Man River). The lengthy song Glitter and Be Gay, from Leonard Bernstein's Candide, makes a similar requirement of the soprano performing it.

Notable recordings
Cast and studio albums feature John Raitt, Robert Goulet, Robert Merrill, Gordon MacRae, Alfred Drake, Michael Hayden and Samuel Ramey as Billy. Other recordings include the following: • • • • • • Frank Sinatra - The Concert Sinatra (1963), Sinatra 80th: Live in Concert (1995) Anthony Warlow - Centre Stage Mandy Patinkin - Mandy Patinkin James Barbour - Broadway in Concert (2007) Jason Howard - 100 Greatest Musicals (2010) Bryn Terfel - Something Wonderful (1996)

"Begin the Beguine"

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"Begin the Beguine"
Not to be confused with the R.E.M. song "Begin the Begin" or the television episode "Begin the Begin" (Grey's Anatomy).

"Begin the Beguine"
Single by Artie Shaw and His Orchestra (original issues as "Art" Shaw) A-side B-side Recorded Genre Length Label Indian Love Call Begin the Beguine July 24, 1938, New York, New York Jazz 3:11 Bluebird B-7746 Cole Porter; (Arranged by Artie Shaw and Jerry Gray)

Writer(s)

"Begin the Beguine" is a song written by Cole Porter (1891–1964). Porter composed the song at the piano in the bar of the Ritz Hotel in Paris. In October 1935, it was introduced by June Knight in the Broadway musical Jubilee produced at the Imperial Theatre in New York City.

Music
The beguine music and dance form, a slow, close couples' dance, comes from the Caribbean, especially Martinique and Guadeloupe, where in the local Creole language the name means "White lady". It is a combination of French ballroom dance and Latin folk dance, which became popular in Paris and spread further abroad in the 1940s, largely due to the influence of the Porter song. Based on the title dance, the song is notable for its 108-measure length, departing drastically from the conventional thirty-two-bar form. Where a typical "standard" popular song of its time was written in a fairly strict 32-measure form consisting of two or three eight-measure subjects generally arranged in the form A-A-B-A or A-B-A-C, "Begin the Beguine" employs the form A-A-B-A-C1-C2 with each phrase being sixteen measures in length rather than the usual eight. The final "C2" section is stretched beyond its 16 measures an additional twelve bars for a total of 28 measures, with the twelve additional measures providing a sense of finality to the long form. The slight differences in each of the "A" sections, along with the song's long phrases and final elongated "C2" section at the end, give it unique character and complexity. The fact that the song's individual parts hold up melodically and harmonically over such a long form also attests to Porter's talent and ability as a songwriter. Porter reportedly once said of the song, "I can never remember it — if I want to play I need to see the music in front of me!" Alec Wilder described it in his book American Popular Song: The Great Innovators 1900-1950 as "a maverick, an unprecedented experiment and one which, to this day, after hearing it hundreds of times, I cannot sing or whistle or play from start to finish without the printed music".[1]

"Begin the Beguine"

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Artie Shaw version
At first, the song gained little popularity, perhaps because of its length and unconventional form (108 bars). Josephine Baker danced to it in her return to America in the 1936 Ziegfeld Follies, but neither she nor the song were successful. Two years later, however, bandleader Artie Shaw recorded an arrangement of the song, an extended swing orchestra version, in collaboration with his right-hand arranger and orchestrator Jerry Gray. After signing a new recording contract with RCA Victor records in the summer of 1938, Shaw called up "Beguine" to be the first of six tunes he would record at his initial recording session on July 24. Until then Shaw's band had been having a tough time finding an identity and maintaining its existence without having had any popular hits of significance; his previous recording contract with Brunswick had lapsed at the end of 1937 without being renewed. RCA's pessimism with the whole idea of recording the long tune "that nobody could remember from beginning to end anyway" sealed its fate as being released on the "B" side of the record it appeared on ("Artie Shaw and His Orchestra" issued by Bluebird Records as catalog number B-7746 B). Shaw's persistence paid off, though, when "Begin the Beguine" became a best-selling record in 1938, peaking at #3. Despite Shaw's earlier obscurity, the release of his recording of "Beguine" skyrocketed Shaw and his band to fame and popularity. The recording, indeed, became one of the most famous and popular anthems of the entire Swing Era. Subsequent re-releases by RCA Victor (catalog number 20-1551[2]) and other releases on LPs, tapes and CDs have kept the recording readily available continuously ever since its initial release. Later on, when composer Cole Porter met the by-then famous bandleader, he jokingly remarked to Shaw, "I'm glad to finally meet my collaborator." Shaw reportedly replied, "Does this mean I get half of the royalties?"

Later popularity
After Shaw introduced the song to dance halls, MGM brought out the musical film Broadway Melody of 1940 in which Fred Astaire and Eleanor Powell danced "Begin the Beguine". In short order, all the major big bands recorded it, including Harry James, Benny Goodman, Tommy Dorsey and Glenn Miller, often as an instrumental as in the film. As a vocal song, it also became a pop standard, beginning with Cole Porter and Tony Martin; new interpretations are often still measured against renditions by Frank Sinatra and Ella Fitzgerald, and even Elvis Presley did an adaptation of his own. "Begin the Beguine" became such a classic during the war years that the painter Max Beckmann adopted the title for a painting in 1946 (now at University of Michigan Museum of Art).

Releases by notable artists
• Tony Martin[3] recorded Begin the Beguine at least twice: on March 14, 1939 for Decca Records (catalog numbers 2375a[4] and later 25018[5] in 78 rpm, 9-25018 in 45 rpm) and for RCA Victor Records in the late 1940s (catalog number 20-2814,[6] 47-3228). • Leslie Hutchinson recorded a version in the 1930s. In the 1930s, this recording was given to the Indian spiritual teacher Meher Baba, who later asked that it be played seven times at his tomb when his body was laid to rest, which occurred a week after his death on 31 January 1969. • Eddie Heywood and his orchestra recorded a single version in 1944. • Alys Robi recorded a 78 rpm version in 1944. • The Andrews Sisters recorded a single version in collaboration with Glenn Miller and his orchestra. • Jo Stafford recorded a version in the early 1950s. • Mario Lanza recorded a successful version in the late 1950s. • Frank Sinatra recorded a version, re-released on The Columbia Years (1943-1952). • Charlie Parker's album "The Cole Porter Songbook" (1950–54; re-released on CD in 1991) contains one of the most influential versions. • Caterina Valente recorded a version on her 1956 album The Hi-Fi Nightingale.

"Begin the Beguine" • Liberace recorded and performed a spirited version with his brother, George Liberace, on his live television show in 1956. • Ella Fitzgerald recorded a version for the Cole Porter Songbook records on Verve, 1956 • Louis Prima and Keely Smith recorded a single version in 1961. • Elvis Presley recorded his own song in 1962, based on the Cole Porter song, entitled "You'll Be Gone". Presley co-wrote the original aspects of the song with his bodyguard Red West and assistant Charlie Hodge. • Andy Williams recorded a version for his 1964 album The Great Songs from My Fair Lady and other Broadway Hits. • Tom Jones recorded a version in 1966, for his album From the Heart. • Django Reinhardt recorded several times a gipsy jazz version of Begin the Beguine. • Les Paul recorded a jazz guitar version of the song. • Juan García Esquivel recorded a lounge-music version of the tune. • Pete Townshend recorded a version in 1970 for his album Happy Birthday. • Johnny Mathis recorded an eight minute long disco version in 1979, as well as a samba rendition. • Sammy Davis, Jr. recorded a version in 1979 for his album Hearin' is Believin'. • Julio Iglesias recorded a version in 1981, which reached number 1 in the UK. • Richard Clayderman's album Music of love (1984) includes this song. • Tuck Andress recorded a version in 1990, for his album Reckless Precision. • Thomas Hampson recorded a version on his Cole Porter album, "Night and Day" for EMI (1991). This features the original arrangements by Robert Russell Bennett, performed by the London Symphony Orchestra conducted by John McGlinn. • Michael Nesmith recorded a version in 1992, for his solo album Tropical Campfires. • Pearl Django recorded a gypsy jazz version in 2000, for the album Avalon. • Sheryl Crow recorded a version for the 2004 Porter Biopic, "De-lovely".

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Uses in films
• • • • • • Fred Astaire and Eleanor Powell danced to an instrumental version in Broadway Melody of 1940. Deanna Durbin sang it in the film Hers to Hold (1943). In the 1946 movie Night and Day, the Latin singer Carlos Ramirez performed this song. "Begin the Beguine" was referenced in the 1968 animated movie Yellow Submarine in a conversation between the characters John and Jeremy. It was also sung by Sammy Davis Jr. in Moon Over Parador Begin the Beguine was the chosen English title for Volver a Empezar (José Luis Garci, 1982), the first Spanish film to win an Academy Award in Hollywood for a foreign language movie. Garci includes another tribute to Cole Porter in another of his films, You're the One (2000). The song is referenced in the movie The Worst Witch, during the song "Anything Can Happen on Halloween" sung by Tim Curry as The Grand Wizard. (1986) The song is featured in the 1989 documentary The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg, during the chapters in which Hank is drafted into the armed forces and in a part of the chapter about the relationship between Hank and his wife, Carol. "Begin the Beguine" is sung by actress Melora Hardin in the South Seas Club scene in The Rocketeer (1991). A rousing instrumental march arrangement of the song appears on the soundtrack of Evil Under the Sun (1982 film). Sheryl Crow performs the song in the biopic film about Cole Porter, De-Lovely (2004).

• •

• • •

• Instrumental music played during a ballroom scene in the 2008 movie Australia includes "Begin the Beguine" performed by Australian clarinetist Andy Firth and the Ralph Pyle Big Band.

"Begin the Beguine" • "Begin the Beguine" is referenced in the movie The Aristocrats as the song Susie Essman's grandmother plays every night.(2005) • In the film Hope and Glory, the song is sung by the character Dawn while her family is repairing windows broken during an air raid. • Used in the film "The Josephine Baker Story" in 1991 • Used in the film "Ballet Shoes" in 2007

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Uses in other media
• A character in Michael Ondaatje's Divisadero (2007) refers to this song several times. • The song is quoted musically and affectionately parodied in Noël Coward's tongue-twisting 1944 song Nina. • Mentioned several times in Jeffrey Eugenides' Middlesex. Milton Stephanides, father of the novel's main character, Cal, plays the song on his clarinet in order to woo Tessie, Cal's mother. • Mentioned in Jimmy Buffett's novel A Salty Piece of Land. • In the Little Mermaid song "Under the Sea", Sebastian the crab sings "When the sardines begin the beguines, it's music to me." • In the short story "Julio Iglesias" by Haruki Murakami, Iglesias' recording of the song proves to be unbearable to a group of sea turtles. • Tom Lehrer refers to it in his song "Alma" - "Her lovers were many and varied/From the day she began her -beguine." • The song is cited by name in the first episode of the BBC sitcom, Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads. • Fictional Medal of Honor recipient Ernie Yost sings the song in an episode of NCIS when he proclaims his love for Artie Shaw over Benny Goodman in the episode "Call of Silence". • In the Valentine's Day episode of the hit sitcom The Golden Girls, Julio Iglesias and Sophia (Estelle Getty) sing the first line. • In a sixth-season The West Wing episode called "A Good Day", President Bartlet (Martin Sheen) sings part of the song while dancing in the Oval Office with the First Lady, Abby (Stockard Channing). • In Episode 8 of Twin Peaks, character Leland Palmer regains consciousness after collapsing and menacingly exclaims "I feel good... Begin the beguine!". • On the "Chess" concept album, in the song "Mountain Duet", the Russian sings "Get to the point, begin the beguine". • In the musical "Kiss of the Spider Woman", Molina sings "And sultry girls beginning some beguine" in the song "Only in the Movies".

Citations
[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] Wilder, Alec. American Popular Song: The Great Innovators 1900-1950 (New York: Oxford University Press, 1972), pg. 240 RCA Recordings in the 20-1500 series (http:/ / 78discography. com/ RCA201500. htm) Biography of Tony Martin (http:/ / www. feinsteinsattheregency. com/ bio. php?id=72) Decca recordings in the 2000 series (http:/ / 78discography. com/ Dec2000. htm) Decca recordings in the 25000 series (http:/ / 78discography. com/ Dec25000. htm) RCA Recordings in the 20-2500 series (http:/ / 78discography. com/ RCA202500. htm)

"Silent Night"

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"Silent Night"
"Silent Night" (German: Stille Nacht, heilige Nacht) is a popular Christmas carol, composed 1818 in Austria. It was declared an intangible cultural heritage by the UNESCO in March 2011.

History
The song was first performed on Christmas Eve 1818 at the St Nicholas parish church in Oberndorf bei Salzburg. The small town on the Salzach river, part of the former Archbishopric of Salzburg, had just passed to Austria in 1816. The young priest Father Joseph Mohr had come to Oberndorf the year before, he had already written the original lyrics of the song "Stille Nacht" in 1816 at Mariapfarr, the hometown of his father in the Salzburg Lungau region, where he had worked as a coadjutor. The melody was composed by Franz Xaver Gruber, schoolmaster and organist in the nearby village of Arnsdorf. Before Christmas Eve, Mohr brought the words to Gruber and asked him to compose a melody and guitar accompaniment for the church service.[1] Both performed the carol during the mass on the night of December 24. In his written account regarding the composition of the carols, Gruber gives no mention of the specific inspiration for creating the song. According to the song's history provided by Austria's Silent Night Society, one supposition is that the church organ was no longer working so that Mohr and Gruber therefore created a song for accompaniment by guitar. Silent Night historian Renate Ebeling-Winkler Berenguer says that the first mention of a broken organ was in a book published in the United States, The Story of Silent Night (1965) by John Travers Moore. There is evidence that a radio play of this version was performed as a Hallmark Theatre Broadcast in 1948.[2] Some[3] believe that Mohr simply wanted a new Christmas carol that he could play on his guitar. The Silent Night Society says that there are "many romantic stories and legends" that add their own anecdotal details to the known facts.
Franz Xaver Gruber, painted by Sebastian Stief (1846) Autograph of the carol by Franz Xaver Gruber

The Nikolaus-Kirche was demolished in the early 1900s as a result of flood damage and because the town's center was moved up the river to a safer location, with a new church being built in the new town, close to the new bridge. A tiny chapel, called the "Stille-Nacht-Gedächtniskapelle" (Silent Night Memorial Chapel), was built in the place of the demolished church and a nearby house was converted into a museum, attracting tourists from all over the world, not only but primarily in December.
Silent Night Museum and Memorial Chapel in Oberndorf

"Silent Night" The original manuscript has been lost. However a manuscript was discovered in 1995 in Mohr's handwriting and dated by researchers at ca. 1820. It shows that Mohr wrote the words in 1816 when he was assigned to a pilgrim church in Mariapfarr, Austria, and shows that the music was composed by Gruber in 1818. This is the earliest manuscript that exists and the only one in Mohr's handwriting. Gruber's composition was influenced by the musical tradition of his rural domicile. The melody of "Silent Night" bears resemblance to aspects of Austrian folk music and yodelling. Another popular story claims that the carol, once performed, was promptly forgotten until an organ repairman found the manuscript in 1825 and revived it. However, Gruber published various arrangements of it throughout his lifetime and we now have the Mohr arrangement (ca. 1820) that is kept at the Museum Carolino Augusteum in Salzburg.

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Translations
In 1859, John Freeman Young (second Bishop, Episcopal Diocese of Florida) published the English translation that is most frequently sung today.[4] The version of the melody that is generally sung today differs slightly (particularly in the final strain) from Gruber's original, which was a sprightly, dance-like tune in 6/8 time, as opposed to the slow, meditative lullaby version generally sung today. Today, the lyrics and melody are in the public domain. The carol has been translated into 140 some-odd languages.[5][6] It is sometimes sung without musical accompaniment. The song was sung simultaneously in French, English and German by troops during the Christmas truce[7] of 1914, as it was one carol that soldiers on both sides of the front line knew.

Recordings
The song has been recorded by virtually every artist, past and present, who has made a Christmas album. There are versions by Enya (sung in Gaelic), Andrea Bocelli (sung in Italian), Stevie Nicks, Bing Crosby, Mahalia Jackson, an acoustic version by American R 'n' B group Boyz II Men, and an instrumental version by Mannheim Steamroller. Simon & Garfunkel recorded an ironic version of the song in which a depressing radio news report is overheard in the background. There have been choral recordings by the King's College Choir, the Cambridge Singers, the Robert Shaw Chorale, the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, the Harry Simeone Chorale, the Vienna Boys' Choir, and countless other classical choral groups. Other recordings include Perry Como (several times), Andy Williams from The Andy Williams Christmas Album, Frank Sinatra, Barbra Streisand, Jim Reeves from Twelve Songs of Christmas (1963), Elvis Presley from Elvis' Christmas Album (1957), Reba McEntire from Merry Christmas to You (1987); Mariah Carey from Merry Christmas (1994); Linda Ronstadt from A Merry Little Christmas (2000); Christina Aguilera from My Kind of Christmas (2000), Plus One from Christmas (2002), Josh Groban from Noël (2007); Tori Amos from Midwinter Graces (2009), Jackie Evancho from O Holy Night and Richard Marx from The Christmas EP (2011). The version recorded by Bing Crosby is one of the fewer than thirty all-time singles to have sold 10 million (or more) copies worldwide. The African-American singer-activist Paul Robeson recorded the song several times; his 1937 recording uses a British translation rather than the one more commonly found in the USA. In 1943, the Austrian exile Hertha Pauli wrote the book Silent Night. A Story of a Song, in which she explained to American children the origin of the song. The book was illustrated by Fritz Kredel.[8] Glendale, California's radio broadcaster, Bob Holiday narrated this Christmas carol impersonating God as a tribute to the terrorist attacks. Westlife performed the song live with Sinéad O'Connor in 2001. In 2006, Brad Paisley recorded the song for Brad Paisley Christmas. In 2007, Damien Leith included a recording on a limited special Christmas edition of Where We Land. In 2010 Annie Lennox included this track on her new album A Christmas Cornucopia.

"Silent Night" In 2008, the song was featured on a compilation release of heavy metal supergroups, performed by members of Testament, Anthrax, Shadows Fall, and The Cult. In 2011, it was recorded by Joe McElderry for his third studio album, Classic Christmas.

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References
[1] "BBC Religion & Ethics" (http:/ / www. bbc. co. uk/ religion/ religions/ christianity/ christmas/ carols_2. shtml). Bbc.co.uk. 2009-08-04. . Retrieved 2011-12-06. [2] "Hallmark Theatre Broadcast in 1948" (http:/ / media. podcastingmanager. com/ 94060-86797/ Media/ 481223 The Story of Silent . mp3). . Retrieved 5 December 2011. [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] Historical background (http:/ / www. stillenacht. at/ de/ liedentstehung. asp), Stille Nacht Geselleschaft (Silent Night Society) (German) Underwood, Byron Edward, "Bishop John Freeman Young, Translator of 'Stille Nacht'", The Hymn, v. 8, no. 4, Oct. 1957, pp. 123–132. Ronald M. Clancy, William E Studwell. Best-Loved Christmas Carols. Christmas Classics Ltd, 2000. "Silent Night" (http:/ / silentnight. web. za/ index. htm). Silent Night. . Stanley Weintraub Silent Night: The Remarkable Christmas Truce of 1914. New York: Free Press, 2001. Hertha Pauli: Silent Night. A Story of a Song. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1943.

External links
• Lyrics to "Silent Night" (http://www.christmassongswords.com/silent-night-songs.htm) • Sheet music on Wikifonia (http://wikifonia.org/node/202) • Free arrangements for piano (http://cantorion.org/music/15/Silent+Night) and voice (http://cantorion.org/ music/54/Silent+Night) from Cantorion.org (cc-by-sa) • Stille-Nacht-Association, Salzburg (http://stillenacht.at), text and music (http://stillenacht.at/en/ text_and_music.asp), verse1 (de) (http://stillenacht.at/music/strophe1.mp3), verse4 (de) (http://stillenacht. at/music/strophe4.mp3) • Silent Night Chapel, Origin of song (http://www.stillenacht.info/en/silent-night/index.asp) • Silent Night Web (http://silentnight.web.za): translations (193 versions in 130 languages), notation, and history. • Joseph Mohr Memorial Organ, Wagrain, Austria (http://www.orgelbau.at/german/orgeln/orgeldetail_external. php?id=1&lang=de)

"Adeste Fideles"

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"Adeste Fideles"
"Adeste Fideles" is a hymn tune. The text itself has unclear beginnings, and may have been written in the 13th century by John of Reading, though it has been concluded that John Francis Wade was probably the author.[1] The original four verses of the hymn were extended to a total of eight, and these have been translated into many The start of "Adeste Fideles". Play languages. The English translation of 'O Come, All Ye Faithful', by the English Catholic priest, Frederick Oakeley[2] is widespread in most English speaking countries.

Tune
Before the emergence of John Francis Wade as the probable composer, the tune had been purported to be written by several musicians, from John Reading and his son to Handel and even Gluck, including the Portuguese composer Marcos Portugal. There are several similar musical themes written around that time, though it can be hard to determine whether these were written in imitation of the hymn, the hymn was based on them, or they are totally unconnected. The earliest existing manuscript shows both words and tune. John Francis Wade included it in his own publication of Cantus Diversi (1751). It was published again in the 1760 edition of Evening Offices of the Church. It also appeared in Samuel Webbe's An Essay on the Church Plain Chant (1782).

Lyrics
Commonly used and/or accepted lyrics are:

English
O come, all ye faithful, Joyful and triumphant! O come ye, O come ye to Bethlehem; Come and behold him Born the King of Angels: Chorus: O come, let us adore Him, O come, let us adore Him, O come, let us adore Him, Christ the Lord. God of God, Light of Light, Lo, he abhors not the Virgin's womb; Very God, Begotten, not created:

"Adeste Fideles" Sing, choirs of angels, Sing in exultation, Sing, all ye citizens of Heaven above! Glory to God In the highest: Yea, Lord, we greet thee, Born this happy morning; Jesus, to thee be glory given! Word of the Father, Now in flesh appearing!

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Latin
The following verses are generally attributed to Wade and correspond to the English verses given above. Adeste fideles triumphantes, Venite, venite in Bethlehem. Natum videte Regem angelorum. Venite adoremus (ter) Dominum. Deum de Deo, lumen de lumine Gestant puellae viscera. Deum verum, genitum non factum. Venite adoremus (ter) Dominum. Cantet nunc 'Io', chorus angelorum; Cantet nunc aula caelestium, Gloria! Soli Deo Gloria! Venite adoremus (ter) Dominum. Ergo qui natus die hodierna. Jesu, tibi sit gloria, Patris aeterni Verbum caro factum. Venite adoremus (ter) Dominum. There are additional Latin verses in various sources. For example: En grege relicto, humiles ad cunas, Vocati pastores adproperant: Et nos ovanti gradu festinemus, Venite adoremus, venite adoremus, Venite adoremus Dominum.

"Adeste Fideles"

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Text
The original text has been from time to time attributed to various groups and individuals, including St. Bonaventure in the 13th century or King John IV of Portugal in the 17th, though it was more commonly believed that the text was written by an order of monks, the Cistercian, German, Portuguese and Spanish orders having, at various times, been given credit. The original text consisted of four Latin verses, and it was with these that the hymn was originally published. The Abbé Étienne Jean François Borderies wrote an additional three verses in the 18th century; these are normally printed as the third to fifth of seven verses, while another, anonymous, additional Latin verse is rarely printed. The text has been translated innumerable times, but the most used version today is the English "O Come, All Ye Faithful". This is a combination of one of Frederick Oakeley's translations of the original four verses and William Thomas Brooke's of the three additional ones, which was first published in Murray's Hymnal in 1852.

King John IV
The most commonly named Portuguese author is King John IV of Portugal (Portuguese: D. João IV de Portugal, pronounced: [ʒuˈɐ̃w̃]). "The Musician King" (1603–1656, came to the throne in 1640) was a patron of music and the arts, and a considerably sophisticated writer on music; in addition, he was a composer, and during his reign he collected one of the largest libraries in the world (destroyed in the Lisbon earthquake of 1755). The first part of his musical work was published in 1649. He founded a Music School in Vila Viçosa that "exported" musicians to Spain and Italy and it was there at his Vila Viçosa palace that the two manuscripts of the "Portuguese Hymn" have been found. Those manuscripts (1640) predate Wade's eighteenth-century manuscript. Among the King's writings is a Defense of Modern Music (Lisbon, 1649). In the same year (1649) he had a huge struggle to get instrumental music approved by the Vatican for use in the Catholic Church. His other famous composition is a setting of the Crux fidelis, a work that remains highly popular during Lent amongst church choirs.

Jacobite connection
The hymn has been interpreted as a Jacobite birth ode to Bonnie Prince Charlie.[3] Professor Bennett Zon, head of music at Durham University, claims the carol is actually a birth ode to Bonnie Prince Charlie, the secret political code being decipherable by the "faithful" — supposedly the Jacobites, with Bethlehem a common Jacobite cipher for England and Regem Angelorum a pun on Angelorum (Angels) and Anglorum (English).[3] From the 1740s to 1770s the earliest forms of the carol commonly appeared in English Roman Catholic liturgical books close to prayers for the exiled Old Pretender. In the books by Wade it was often decorated with Jacobite floral imagery, as were other liturgical texts with coded Jacobite meanings.[4]

Performance
In performance verses are often omitted, either because the hymn is too long in its entirety or because the words are unsuitable for the day on which they are sung. For example the eighth anonymous verse is only sung on Epiphany, if at all; while the last verse of the original is normally reserved for Christmas Midnight Mass, Mass at Dawn, or Mass During the Day. In the United Kingdom and United States it is often sung today in an arrangement by Sir David Willcocks, which was originally published in 1961 by Oxford University Press in the first book in the Carols for Choirs series. This arrangement makes use of the basic harmonisation from The English Hymnal but adds a soprano descant in verse 6 (verse 3 in the original) with its reharmonised organ accompaniment, and a last verse harmonisation in verse 7 (verse 4 in the original), which is sung in unison. This carol has served as the second-last hymn sung at the Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols in King's College, Cambridge, after the last lesson from Chapter 1 of the Gospel of John.

"Adeste Fideles" Numerous cover versions have been recorded by artists from around the world, including Jackie Evancho, Gerry Rafferty, Frank Sinatra, Bing Crosby, Nat King Cole, Elvis Presley, Celine Dion, Josh Groban (Noël, 2007), Twisted Sister, Brian McKnight, Mariah Carey, Christian Bautista, Jim Reeves, Tennessee Ernie Ford, Enya and Take 6. In 1965 Sergio Franchi recorded the English version on his Billboard Top 40 album, The Heart of Christmas.[5] In 2011, Joe McElderry recorded a bilingual version for his third studio album, Classic Christmas. In February 2012 Nicki Minaj performed "Roman Holiday" at the Grammy's. The song references the first two lines of "O Come, All Ye Faithful" to illustrate the belief in the power of faith to overcome evil. The song itself otherwise contains no "religious" themes, however the staged performance was seen as provocative. Choreographer Laurieann Gibson, said ""I personally chose to stay away from any religious moves. There were no crosses. There were no religious symbols. We made sure we were very respectable. The bishop was a symbolic figurehead. He was not [intended] in a negative light, but in a position of authority".[6]

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The Portuguese Hymn
The hymn was known for a while as the Portuguese Hymn after the Duke of Leeds in 1795 heard the hymn being sung at the Portuguese embassy in London and assumed that it had originated from Portugal.[1] The translation that he heard differs greatly from the Oakeley-Brooke translation. Also a different account of the story, which is more believed to be true, is that King John IV of Portugal wrote this hymn to accompany his daughter Catherine to England, where she married King Charles II. Wherever she went she and her embassy, were announced and accompanied with this hymn, which became widely known in England as the Portuguese Hymn, because it actually represented Portugal (in the form of the Princess).

References
[1] Stephan, John (1947). Adeste Fideles: A Study On Its Origin And Development (http:/ / www. hymnsandcarolsofchristmas. com/ Hymns_and_Carols/ Images/ Stephan/ adeste_fideles_a_study_on_its_or. htm). Buckfast Abbey. Archived (http:/ / web. archive. org/ web/ 20071013014840/ http:/ / hymnsandcarolsofchristmas. com/ Hymns_and_Carols/ Images/ Stephan/ adeste_fideles_a_study_on_its_or. htm) from the original on 13 October 2007. . Retrieved 1 October 2007. [2] "Frederick Oakeley 1802-1880" (http:/ / www. hymntime. com/ tch/ bio/ o/ a/ oakeley_f. htm). . [3] "Carol is 'ode to Bonnie Prince'" (http:/ / news. bbc. co. uk/ 1/ hi/ england/ wear/ 7789477. stm). BBC. 18 December 2008. . Retrieved 18 December 2007. [4] "News & Events : News" (http:/ / www. dur. ac. uk/ news/ newsitem/ ?itemno=7328). ‘O Come All Ye Faithful’ - Bonnie Prince Charlie and the Christmas Carol. Durham University. 19 December 2008. Archived (http:/ / web. archive. org/ web/ 20081225082610/ http:/ / www. dur. ac. uk/ news/ newsitem/ ?itemno=7328) from the original on 25 December 2008. . Retrieved 21 December 2008. [5] http:/ / www. discogs. com Sergio Franchi [6] Rogulewski, Charlie (2012-02-16). "The Creative Director Behind Nicki Minaj's Blasphemous Grammy Production" (http:/ / www. rollingstone. com/ music/ news/ the-creative-director-behind-nicki-minajs-blasphemous-grammy-production-20120216). Rolling Stone. . Retrieved 2012-04-12.

• Musica Sacra em Minas Gerais no século XVIII, ISSN nº 1676-7748 - n25 1998, Professor José Maria Neves

"Adeste Fideles"

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External links
• Text, translations and settings of Adeste Fideles (http://www.cpdl.org/wiki/index.php/Adeste_fideles) in the Choral Public Domain Library (ChoralWiki) • Free sheet music (http://cantorion.org/music/489/Christmas Carol Songbook) of O Come, All ye Faithful for SATB from Cantorion.org • Adeste, Fideles (http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/NonEnglish/ adeste_fideles.htm) - two 19th century arrangements • Original Latin and English translation (http://members.tripod.com/~gavvie/adeste.html)

"Jingle Bells"
"Jingle Bells" is one of the best-known and commonly sung winter songs in the world. It was written by James Lord Pierpont (1822–1893) and published under the title "One Horse Open Sleigh" in the autumn of 1857. Even though it is commonly thought of as a Christmas song, it was actually written and sung for Thanksgiving.[1]

Composition
James Lord Pierpont originally composed his song in 1850. A plaque commemorating the "birthplace" of "Jingle Bells" adorns the side of a building in Medford, Massachusetts. Pierpont wrote the song there, at the former Simpson Tavern, now 19 High Street in the center of Medford Square. According to the Medford Historical Society, the song was inspired by the town's popular sleigh races during the 1800s.

Musical notation for the chorus of "Jingle Bells"

"Jingle Bells" was originally copyrighted with the name "One Horse Open Sleigh" on September 16, 1857.[2] It was reprinted in 1859 with the revised title of "Jingle Bells, or the One Horse Open Sleigh". The song has since passed into public domain.

"Jingle Bells"

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Music historian James Fuld notes that "the word jingle in the title and opening phrase is apparently an imperative verb."[3] In the winter in New England in pre-automobile days, it was common to adorn horses' harnesses with straps bearing bells as a way to avoid collisions at blind intersections, since a horse-drawn sleigh in snow makes almost no noise. The rhythm of the tune mimics that of a trotting horse's bells. However, "jingle bells" is commonly taken to mean a certain kind of bell.

Plaque at 19 High Street, Medford, Massachusetts

Lyrics
The first verse and chorus are the most well-remembered sections of "Jingle Bells": Dashing through the snow In a one-horse open sleigh O'er the fields we go Laughing all the way Bells on bobtail ring Making spirits bright What fun it is to ride and sing A sleighing song tonight! (chorus) Jingle bells, jingle bells, Jingle all the way. Oh! what fun it is to ride In a one-horse open sleigh. Jingle bells, jingle bells, Jingle all the way; Oh! what fun it is to ride In a one-horse open sleigh. Although less well-known than the opening, the remaining verses depict high-speed youthful fun. In the second verse, the narrator takes a ride with a girl and loses control of the sleigh:A day or two ago I thought I'd take a ride And soon, Miss Fanny Bright Was seated by my side, The horse was lean and lank

"Jingle Bells" Misfortune seemed his lot He got into a drifted bank And then we got upsot. |: chorus :| In the next verse (which is often skipped), he falls out of the sleigh and a rival laughs at him: A day or two ago, The story I must tell I went out on the snow, And on my back I fell; A gent was riding by In a one-horse open sleigh, He laughed as there I sprawling lie, But quickly drove away. |: chorus :| In the last verse, after relating his experience, he gives equestrian advice to a friend to pick up some girls, finds a faster horse, and take off at full speed: Now the ground is white Go it while you're young, Take the girls tonight and sing this sleighing song; Just get a bobtailed bay Two forty as his speed Hitch him to an open sleigh And crack! you'll take the lead. |: chorus :|

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Notes to lyrics
^ a: The horse's name is not "Bobtails" or "Bob". The horse is described as "bobtail" or "bobtailed" which refers to the tail as being "bobbed": cut shorter or docked, which was commonly done to the tails of carriage horses to keep them neat and reduce the chance of the tail getting caught in the reins. ^ b: An archaic past participle of upset, in this instance meaning "capsized", but was also slang for "drunk or intoxicated", perhaps by association with the British term "sot" (drunkard). ^ c: Two forty refers to a mile in two minutes and forty seconds at the trot, or 22.5 miles per hour. This is a good speed, and suggests the horse should be a Standardbred. The "Jingle Bells" tune is used in French and German songs, although the lyrics are unrelated to the English lyrics. Both celebrate winter fun. The French song, titled Vive le vent ("Long Live the Wind"), was written by Francis Blanche[4][5] and contains references to Father Time, Baby New Year, and New Year's Day. There are several German versions of "Jingle Bells", including the popular Roy Black versions of Christkindl and Christmastime.[6]

"Jingle Bells"

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Original lyrics
The 1857 lyrics differed slightly from those we know today. It is unknown who replaced the words with those of the modern version.[3] Dashing through the snow In a one-horse open sleigh O'er the hills we go Laughing all the way. Bells on bobtail ring Making spirits bright Oh what sport to ride and sing A sleighing song tonight. |: chorus :| Jingle bells, jingle bells Jingle all the way! O what joy it is to ride In a one-horse open sleigh. A day or two ago I thought I'd take a ride And soon Miss Fannie Bright Was seated by my side The horse was lean and lank Misfortune seemed his lot He got into a drifted bank And we - we got upsot |: chorus :| A day or two ago The story I must tell I went out on the snow And on my back I fell A gent was riding by In a one-horse open sleigh He laughed as there I sprawling lie But quickly drove away |: chorus :| Now the ground is white Go it while you're young Take the girls tonight And sing this sleighing song Just get a bobtailed bay Two forty is his speed

"Jingle Bells" Hitch him to an open sleigh And crack! You'll take the lead. |: chorus :|

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Melody
The original 1857 "Jingle Bells" had a slightly different chorus featuring a more classical-style melody. The "I V vi III IV I V I" chord progression is a common theme in classical music; except for the final two chord changes, the melody as originally written follows the same pattern as Pachelbel's Canon, resembling the tune Jolly Old Saint Nicholas, which appeared about fifty years after "Jingle Bells".

Recordings and performances
James Lord Pierpont's 1857 composition "Jingle Bells" became one of the most performed and most recognizable secular holiday songs ever written, not only in the United States, but around the world. In recognition of this achievement, James Lord Pierpont was voted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame. "Jingle Bells" was first recorded by the Edison Male Quartette in 1898 on an Edison cylinder as part of a Christmas medley entitled "Sleigh Ride Party". In 1902, the Hayden Quartet recorded "Jingle Bells". In 1943, Bing Crosby and the Andrews Sisters recorded "Jingle Bells" as Decca 23281 which reached No. 19 on the charts and sold over a million copies. In 1941, Glenn Miller and His Orchestra with Tex Beneke, Marion Hutton, Ernie Caceres and the Modernaires on vocals had a No. 5 hit with "Jingle Bells" on RCA Victor, as Bluebird 11353. In 1935, Benny Goodman and His Orchestra reached No. 18 on the charts with their recording of "Jingle Bells". In 1951, Les Paul had a No. 10 hit with a multi-tracked version on guitar. In 2006, Kimberley Locke had a No. 1 hit on the Billboard Adult Contemporary chart with a recording of the song. "Jingle Bells" has been performed and recorded by a wide variety of musical artists, including Louis Armstrong, The Beatles, The Chipmunks, Judy Collins, Nat King Cole, Perry Como, Placido Domingo, Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald, Spike Jones, Barry Manilow, The Million Dollar Quartet (Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins, and Elvis Presley), NSync, Luciano Pavarotti, Smokey Robinson and the Miracles, The Sex Pistols, Frank Sinatra, Fats Waller and Yello, among many others. In 1955, Don Charles, from Copenhagen, Denmark, recorded a novelty version with dogs barking to the melody of "Jingle Bells" as RCA 6344, and a version credited simply to "St. Nick" called "Jingle Bells (Laughing All the Way)" features someone laughing, rather than singing, the entire song.

"Jingle Bells"

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First song in outer space
"Jingle Bells" was the first song broadcast from space, in a Christmas-themed prank by Gemini 6 astronauts Tom Stafford and Wally Schirra. While in space on December 16, 1965, they sent this report to Mission Control: "We have an object, looks like a satellite going from north to south, probably in polar orbit... I see a command module and eight smaller modules in front. The pilot of the command module is wearing a red suit...." The astronauts then produced a smuggled harmonica and sleighbells and broadcast a rendition of "Jingle Bells."[7] The harmonica, shown to the press upon their return, was a Hohner "Little Lady", a tiny harmonica approximately one inch long, by 3/8 of an inch wide.

Parodies and homages
Like many simple, catchy and popular melodies, "Jingle Bells" is often Wally Schirra and Tom Stafford of Gemini VI the subject of parody. "Jingle Bells, Batman Smells" has been a (1965) well-known parody since the mid 1960s,[8] with many variations on the lyrics.[9] Bart Simpson sings this version on The Simpsons, the first time being on "Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire".[10] The Joker himself also sings it in the Batman: The Animated Series episode "Christmas with the Joker". In addition, comedian Phil Snyder recorded a full-length version of the song, adding new verses utilising other comic superheroes.[11] This same parody was also done in an episode of SpongeBob Squarepants with the lyrics being changed to match the context of Mermaidman and Barnacleboy. Parodies or novelty versions of "Jingle Bells" have been recorded by many artists, and include Yogi Yorgesson's "Yingle Bells," Da Yoopers' "Rusty Chevrolet," The Three Stooges' Jingle Bell Drag" and Jeff Dunham's "Jingle Bombs", performed in his "Achmed the Dead Terrorist" sketch. Another popular spoof of the song is "Pumpkin Bells", a "Pumpkin Carol" which celebrates Halloween and the "Great Pumpkin". It originated in the Peanuts series of TV specials. "Jingle Bell Rock" by Bobby Helms pays homage to "Jingle Bells", directly referencing the source song's lyrics, but with a different melody. Originally recorded and released by Helms in a rockabilly style, "Jingle Bell Rock" has itself since become a Christmas standard.[12]

References
Notes
[1] "Jingle Bells (Christmas Read-Aloud Stories, Carols, & more)" (http:/ / www. readersdigest. ca/ christmas/ kind_christmas/ jingle_bells. html). Reader's Digest. . Retrieved 2010-11-19. [2] "J. Pierpont, "One Horse Open Sleigh", Boston: Oliver Ditson & Co., deposited 1857 with Library of Congress" (http:/ / memory. loc. gov/ cgi-bin/ ampage?collId=sm1820& fileName=sm2/ sm1857/ 620000/ 620520/ mussm620520. db& recNum=0& itemLink=r?ammem/ mussm:@filreq(@field(NUMBER+ @band(sm1857+ 620520))+ @field(COLLID+ sm1820))& linkText=0). Library of Congress. . Retrieved 2006-12-26. [3] James J. Fuld, The Book of World-Famous Music, Fifth Edition, Dover Publications (New York), p. 313. [4] "Vive le vent (French chorus and literal English translation)" (http:/ / french. about. com/ library/ blxm-vivelevent. htm). About.com. . Retrieved 2006-12-26. [5] "Vive le vent (with verses and augmented refrain)" (http:/ / www. paroles. net/ chansons/ 23868. htm). Paroles.net. . Retrieved 2006-12-26. [6] "Roy Black, "Jingle Bells" (German lyrics and literal English translation)" (http:/ / german. about. com/ library/ blmus_jingleb. htm). About.com. . Retrieved 2006-12-26. [7] Smithsonian Magazine. December 2005. pp. 25.

"Jingle Bells"
[8] Studwell, William Emmett (1994). The Popular Song Reader: A Sampler of Well-Known Twentieth Century-Songs. Psychology Press. pp. 224. [9] Bronner, Simon J. (1988). American Children's Folklore. August House. pp. 105. [10] Groening, Matt (2001). The Simpsons season 1 DVD commentary for the episode "Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire" (DVD). 20th Century Fox. [11] "'Jingle Bells Batman Smells' Christmas Song with New Verses by Phil Snyder". YouTube. 2009. [12] Collins, Ace (2010). Stories Behind the Greatest Hits of Christmas. Zondervan. pp. 101–103.

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External links
• Allmusic search showing over 5,500 artists have recorded this song (http://www.allmusic.com/search/track/ Jingle+Bells/order:default-asc) • Lyrics to "Jingle Bells" (http://www.christmaslyrics.tv/jingle-bells) • An original arrangement of "The One Horse Open Sleigh" at The Library of Congress (http://memory.loc.gov/ cgi-bin/ampage?collId=sm1820&fileName=sm2/sm1857/620000/620520/mussm620520.db&recNum=0& itemLink=r?ammem/mussm:@filreq(@field(NUMBER+@band(sm1857+620520))+@field(COLLID+ sm1820))&linkText=0) • The Story of "Jingle Bells" (http://www.americanmusicpreservation.com/jinglebellssong.htm) • Free arrangements for piano (http://cantorion.org/music/13/Jingle+Bells) and voice (http://cantorion.org/ music/49/Jingle+Bells) from Cantorion.org • James Lord Pierpont (http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/Biographies/ james_lord_pierpont.htm) – discussion of the song's history • Complete lyrics to "Jingle Bells" (http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/ jingle_bells.htm) • Story of the Singing Dogs (http://users.cybercity.dk/~bse5560/dogs.html) • Jingle Belles (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0293295/plotsummary)

"September Song"

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"September Song"
"September Song" is an American pop standard composed by Kurt Weill, with lyric by Maxwell Anderson, introduced by Walter Huston in the 1938 Broadway musical Knickerbocker Holiday. It has since been recorded by numerous singers and instrumentalists. It was also used in the 1950 film September Affair, and for the credits in the television series May to December (a quote from the opening line of the song).

Origins
The song originated from Walter Huston's request that he should have one solo song in Knickerbocker Holiday, if he was going to play the role of the aged dictator Peter Stuyvesant. Anderson and Weill wrote the song specifically for Huston's gruff voice and limited vocal range, in a couple of hours.[1] The musical enjoyed only moderate success and closed in April 1939 after six months, but the song quickly became established as a modern standard.

Subsequent Recordings
September Song has been performed and recorded by many artists since the 1940s. Those listed below are some of the more famous examples.

Male vocalists
Bing Crosby recorded the song twice, in 1943 and again in 1977 one month before his death. The former opera singer Ezio Pinza recorded a version in the early 1950s, as did Billy Eckstine. Nat King Cole also recorded a version with George Shearing (in addition to the latter's instrumental version discussed below) in 1962, and Jimmy Durante included the song on an album of pop standards in 1963. Other versions have been recorded during the 1950s and 1960s by Maurice Chevalier, Pat Boone, Matt Monro and Mel Tormé. Versions of the song have been recorded by several members of the Rat Pack: Frank Sinatra recorded it three times: in July 1946 on a single (Columbia Record 37161) on the album Point of No Return in (1962), and again for September of My Years (1965); Dean Martin and Sammy Davis, Jr. have also recorded versions. James Brown included the song on his 1970 big band jazz album Soul on Top, and Willie Nelson on Stardust, his 1979 album of standards (his version would hit the Top 20 of the country charts in 1979). Andy Williams also recorded a version in the 1970s. In 1985, for the Kurt Weill tribute album Lost in the Stars, the Music of Kurt Weill, Lou Reed recorded an unusual upbeat rock 'n' roll version of the song, featuring mostly his undistorted electric rhythm guitar --- typical of Reed's sound of the era, but ending in a searing lead guitar solo. During the period of the album's initial release, Reed was quoted as saying that he wanted to be known as the "Kurt Weill of rock 'n' roll." At only 24, Ian McCulloch, of Echo & the Bunnymen, released a version of the song as a solo single which reached number 51 on the U.K. Singles Chart in 1984 [2]. McCulloch's single was backed with a rendition of "Molly Malone". The following year the album Billy Eckstine Sings with Benny Carter included the track and in 1990, Jeff Lynne recorded the song for his first solo record, Armchair Theatre. In 1997, Lou Reed recorded the song again for the second Kurt Weill tribute album September Songs: The Music of Kurt Weill, this time in a slower, less rocking version. Lindsey Buckingham included the song on his 1981 debut solo album Law and Order, and in 1990 Jeff Lynne, released Armchair Theatre (album). Bryan Ferry recorded a version on As Time Goes By in 1999. Other more recent versions include Bryan Ferry (As Time Goes By 1994), Rod McKuen (Kurt Weill - The Centennial 2001) and Pascal Comelade. Jean Sablon sung a French translation 'J’ai peur de l’automne (Café de Paris 2009). Ronnie Drew, formerly of The Dubliners, recorded the song on his 2006 solo Album There's Life In The Old Dog Yet. Pianist Pascal Comelade released his quirky September Song EP in 2000 featuring the inimitable Robert Wyatt as a singer. In 2006 Jonny Fair recorded the song on his "One Dark Day"

"September Song" album.

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Female vocalists
Although the song was written as an old man's lament for the passing of his youth, some of the most famous versions have been recorded by women artists. Thus Sarah Vaughan's version of 1955, and Ella Fitzgerald's with pianist Paul Smith on the 1960 Verve release Ella Fitzgerald Sings Songs From Let No Man Write My Epitaph are both regarded as Jazz classics. Eartha Kitt and Weill's wife Lotte Lenya both recorded the song in 1957, and Jo Stafford, Patti Page as well as Anne Shelton also recorded versions during the 1950s. In 1958 Eydie Gormé included the song in her album, Love is the season and in 1989 both Lena Horne in The Men in My Life, and Julie Wilson in an album of Kurt Weill songs. Elaine Paige recorded the song for her 1993 album Romance & the Stage and a live performance was featured on her 2004 greatest hits compilation Centre Stage: The Very Best of Elaine Paige. Rosemary Clooney included the title on (For the duration 1991). A version was also recorded by June Christy. Betty Buckley performed the song live on June 10, 1996 at Carnegie Hall and it was subsequently featured in the cd release of that concert later in 1996, titled An Evening at Carnegie Hall: Betty Buckley. In 2009, Patricia Kaas recorded a version of this song on Kabaret (listed only on the international and German versions of the album) and Masha Qrella another for her 2009 release Speak Low (Loewe & Weill in Exile), a project commissioned by Haus der Kulturen der Welt (House of World Cultures).

Groups
The song was recorded by Les Brown and his band of renown, and on different occasions by Stan Kenton and his band, once with a band vocal, once with The Four Freshmen and June Christy, once with Tex Ritter. Billy Ward and His Dominoes recorded the song, coupled with When the saints go marching in, for Decca during the 1950s. During the 1960s recordings were made by Dion and the Belmonts (1960), The Platters 1962, and The Impressions (1964). In 1991, seminal Swiss Industrial music band The Young Gods released their album of Kurt Weill songs, Play Kurt Weill, including an almost ambient version of September Song, which remains an audience favorite at their concerts to this day. Peter, Paul & Mary covered the song for their 1996 album LifeLines. Recent version by groups include Come Shine 2001, El Pino & the Volunteers, the Swiss Post-industrial band The Young Gods, and The Puppini Sisters on their Hollywood album 2011.

Instrumental renditions
The Melachrino Strings recorded an instrumental version of the song in London on August 18, 1950. It was released by EMI on the His Master's Voice label as catalog number B 9952. There are many instrumental renditions during the 1950s as well, including versions by Artie Shaw, Dave Brubeck, Errol Garner, Harry James, Liberace, Earl Bostic, Art Tatum, Mantovani, Sidney Bechet, Red Norvo and Charles Mingus and George Shearing on Velvet Carpet (1956). One of the most famous recent versions are the piano solo by Roger Williams, and a "smokey" version by jazz-trumpet legend Chet Baker recorded in 1983. Other instrumental versions include: Art Pepper on Straight Life (1980). Other instrumental versions include Bireli Lagrene (A tribute to Djano Rheinhart 2006), Gary Burton (Departure 2007), Thomas Dutronc (Comme un manouche sans guitare 2007), Jan Lundgren European standards 2009), Ignasi Terraza (Jazz a les Fosques 2009) and David Grisman.

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Use in films and television
"September Song" was used in the 1950 film September Affair, and the popularity of the film caused Huston's recording to hit the top of the 1950 hit parade.[3] In a 1961 episode ("Fly Away Home") of the TV series Route 66, it is performed by actress Dorothy Malone, and serves as the background music to much of the episode. It was also used in the 1987 Woody Allen film Radio Days. Woody Allen mentioned that the song may be the best American popular song ever written[4]. The title was used for a UK comedy-drama television series starring Russ Abbot and Michael Williams which ran for three series between 1993 and 1995. The music was also used for the credits British sitcom in the television series May to December (a quote from the opening line of the song), which ran for 39 episodes, from 2 April 1989 to 27 May 1994 on BBC One. It was covered by Anjelica Huston (Huston's granddaughter) in an episode of the NBC musical series Smash.

References
[1] [2] [3] [4] Lisle, Tim (editor) (1994). Lives of the great songs. London: Penguin books. pp. 54. ISBN 0-14-024957-5. http:/ / www. chartstats. com/ artistinfo. php?id=4237 Answers.com (http:/ / www. answers. com/ topic/ september-affair) Stig Bjorkman (ed.) Woody Allen on Woody Allen, . London: Faber and Faber, 1995, Revised Edition 2004, p. 160.

"Sweet Lorraine"
"Sweet Lorraine" is a popular song by Cliff Burwell (music) and Mitchell Parish (lyrics) that was published in 1928 and has since become a jazz standard. It has been recorded by many artists, including Rudy Vallee in 1928, Teddy Wilson in 1935 and, most famously, by Nat King Cole in 1940.[1]

Notable Recordings
• • • • • • • • • • • • Rudy Vallée (1928) Teddy Wilson (1935) Nat King Cole (1940) - The Absolutely Essential Collection (2009) Frank Sinatra (1941) - The Best Of The Columbia Years 1943-1952 (1995 & 2003) The Singers Unlimited - The Complete A Capella Sessions (2006) Coleman Hawkins' Swing Four (December, 1943) Chet Baker (1954) June Christy - Cool Christy (2002) Louis Armstrong (1957) Marvin Gaye (1965) Stephane Grappelli, Lisa Eckinger, Ike Isaacs and the Diz Disley Trio (1975) Jamie Cullum (1999)

Notes
[1] "Sweet Lorraine" at jazzstandards.com (http:/ / www. jazzstandards. com/ compositions-0/ sweetlorraine. htm)

"Time after Time"

465

"Time after Time"
"Time After Time" is a jazz standard written by Sammy Cahn and Jule Styne in 1947. It was introduced by Frank Sinatra (and subsequently by Kathryn Grayson) in the film It Happened in Brooklyn.

Cover versions
It has been recorded by many artists, including:
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Cliff Adams Jamey Aebersold Ron Affif Ernestine Anderson Ernie Andrews Paul Anka Ray Anthony Audubon Jazz Explosion Ethel Azama Chet Baker - My Funny Valentine (1994) Shirley Bassey Louie Bellson Jane Ira Bloom David Braham Rick Braun Lenny Breau Teresa Brewer Bob Brookmeyer James Brown Lawrence Brown Les Brown Ray Brown Milt Buckner Carol Burnett Vikki Carr Philip Catherine Bill Charlap Alex Chilton Harry Connick Jr. Jamie Cullum & Geoff Gascoyne Vic Damone Claire Danes - featured in the film Evening • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Miles Davis Placido Domingo - Perhaps Love (1992) Ella Fitzgerald - Whisper Not (1968) Connie Francis Judy Garland on her 1963 TV series. Robert Goulet Stéphane Grappelli The Isley Brothers Keith Jarrett Jack Jones Judy Kuhn Abbey Lincoln Chris Montez Anita O'Day - This Is Anita (1955) (2007) Keanu Reeves - featured in the film Sweet November Ruby & The Romantics Sandie Shaw Carly Simon Frank Sinatra - the original biggest hit Brent Spiner on his 1991 album Ol' Yellow Eyes Is Back Dusty Springfield Rod Stewart Steven Burton Barbra Streisand The Temptations Tuck & Patti Sarah Vaughan The Vogues Dinah Washington Ben Webster Margaret Whiting - featured in the film Julie & Julia Nancy Wilson

June Christy - The Intimate Miss Christy (1963) •

"Mam'selle"

466

"Mam'selle"
"Mam'selle" is a bittersweet song about a rendez-vous with a "mam'selle" (mademoiselle) in a small café. The music was written by Edmund Goulding, the lyrics by Mack Gordon. The song originally appeared in the movie, "The Razor's Edge," with Tyrone Power in 1947. Five versions of the song became top ten hits in 1947: by Art Lund, by Dick Haymes, by Frank Sinatra, by Dennis Day, and by The Pied Pipers. Frankie Laine had a hit jazz version, renowned for its vibe solo by Lou Singer. The Art Lund recording was recorded on February 20, 1947 and released by MGM Records as catalog number 10011. The record first reached the Billboard magazine charts on April 11, 1947 and lasted 11 weeks on the chart, peaking at #1.[1] The Dick Haymes recording was recorded on March 6, 1947 and released by Decca Records as catalog number 23861. The record first reached the Billboard magazine charts on April 25, 1947 and lasted 8 weeks on the chart, peaking at #4.[1] The Frank Sinatra recording was recorded on March 11, 1947 and released by Columbia Records as catalog number 37343. The record first reached the Billboard magazine charts on May 10, 1947 and lasted 4 weeks on the chart, peaking at #6 on the Best Seller chart, and #1 on the Jockey chart.[1] The Dennis Day recording was released by RCA Victor Records as catalog number 20-2211. The record first reached the Billboard magazine charts on April 25, 1947 and lasted 5 weeks on the chart, peaking at #8.[1] The Pied Pipers recording was recorded on March 14, 1947 and released by Capitol Records as catalog number 396. The record first reached the Billboard magazine charts on May 2, 1947 and lasted 4 weeks on the chart, peaking at #9.[1] The Frankie Laine recording was recorded on March 28, 1947 and released by Mercury Records as catalog number 5048. Barbershop Harmony Society 2006 quartet champion Vocal Spectrum recorded Tom Sando's arrangement of the song on their first CD.[2]

Other Notable Recordings
• • • • The Four Freshmen - Four Freshmen And Five Trombones (1955) Johnny Hartman - And I Thought About You (1959) Dick Haymes - The Very Best Of Dick Haymes (1997) The Hi-Lo's - A Musical Thrill (2006)

References
[1] Whitburn, Joel (1973). Top Pop Records 1940-1955. Record Research. [2] Mack Gordon, Edmund Goulding, Tom Sando (2008). Mam'selle. Barbershop Harmony Society. BHSno202220.

"Almost Like Being in Love"

467

"Almost Like Being in Love"
"Almost Like Being in Love" is a popular song published in 1947. The music was written by Frederick Loewe, and the lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner. The song was made popular by David Brooks and Marion Bell in the musical Brigadoon. It was later performed in the 1954 film version by Gene Kelly. The song was revived in a downbeat ballad version by singer Michael Johnson (#32, 1978). It was also made popular by British singing sensation Dame Shirley Bassey. Nat King Cole recorded more than one version of the song.

Cover versions
Other singers who have recorded "Almost Like Being in Love" include: • • • • • Ella Fitzgerald Dean Martin Judy Garland Frank Sinatra Jo Stafford - Autumn in New York (1950)

• A later version by Nat King Cole was used as the closing song in the 1993 movie Groundhog Day which starred Bill Murray. • In 1961, Judy Garland performed the song as a medley with "This Can't Be Love" at the "Judy at Carnegie Hall" concert. • Kelly Broadway, 2001, "In Concert" album [1]

References
[1] http:/ / www. cduniverse. com/ search/ xx/ music/ pid/ 2767638/ a/ In+ Concert. htm

"Tea for Two"

468

"Tea for Two"
"Tea for Two" is a song from the 1925 musical No, No, Nanette with music by Vincent Youmans and lyrics by Irving Caesar. It is a duet sung by Nanette and Tom (Louise Groody and Jack Barker) in Act II as they imagine their future.

Analysis
The song contains abrupt key changes between A-flat major and C-major. The song also consists mostly of dotted eighth and quarter notes. Alec Wilder described these features as being uncharacteristic of a great theatrical song but acknowledged the song's great success regardless.[1] The story may be apocryphal, but Irving Caesar indicated on Steve Allen's radio show that the lyrics were intended to be temporary. Hoyt Axton later did much the same thing with the "Jeremiah was a bullfrog" part of "Joy to the World".

Uses
"Tea for Two" became a jazz standard and was recorded by numerous bands and instrumentalists. One famous interpretation of the song is Tommy Dorsey's cha-cha-cha version, top ten in 1958, re-popularized in 2005 by adverts for McVitie's biscuits. Another notable recording was made by Art Tatum in 1939. Pianist Thelonious Monk knew the song well, reharmonizing the song and recording it with a bebop-style melody in 1952 with the name "Skippy" and returning to the original melody with a charming arrangement for his 1963 album Criss Cross. It was also used, with altered lyrics as the theme tune for BBC sitcom Next of Kin (1995-7). Anita O'Day's rendition of the song at the 1958 Newport Jazz Festival was considered one of its highlights. In October 1927, the conductor Nikolai Malko challenged Dmitri Shostakovich to do an arrangement of a piece in 45 minutes. His "Tea for Two" arrangement, Opus 16, was first performed on 25 November 1928. It was incorporated into Tahiti Trot from his ballet The Golden Age first performed in 1929. The song was covered by Alvin and the Chipmunks for their 1965 album The Chipmunks Sing with Children. The song was used in the French comedy Don't Look Now - We're Being Shot At! ("La Grande Vadrouille"), set during World War 2, as a recognition code with a British flyer. Tommy Dorsey's version is used as an intermission on the 1997 album Ixnay on the Hombre by California punk band The Offspring. "Tea for Two" was the most played song on The Lawrence Welk Show, played on 67 different shows in a more than 1000 show run. A brief part of the song was used by comedian Stewart Francis for one of his one-liners concerning an over-active imagination and tap-dancing chipmunks.

References
[1] Alec Wilder, James T. Maher (1972-04-27), American popular song: the great innovators, 1900-1950 (http:/ / books. google. co. uk/ books?id=bt-YD80ZZbIC), ISBN 9780195014457,

"My Romance"

469

"My Romance"
"My Romance"
Song from Jumbo Published 1935 Writer Lorenz Hart

Composer Richard Rodgers

"My Romance" is a popular song, with music by Richard Rodgers and lyrics by Lorenz Hart, written for Billy Rose's musical, Jumbo (1935). In the 1962 movie version of Jumbo, Doris Day performed the song. The song is featured in a commercial for Ralph Lauren's Romance fragrance. Over the years "My Romance" has also become identified as a sort of anthem connected with movie palaces and movie theatre organs.

Recorded versions
It has been covered by many artists, including: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Claudia Acuña Beegie Adair Nat Adderley Quintet Ron Affif Howard Alden Jackie Allen John Allred Gene Ammons Ernestine Anderson The Andrews Sisters Patrick Arena Jim Bajor Kenny Ball Don Bennett Tony Bennett David Benoit Daniel Benzali Richard Berman Art Blakey The Boswell Sisters Connee Boswell Chris Botti[1][2] Joanne Brackeen Ruby Braff Hadda Brooks Deborah Brown Les Brown Ray Brown Dave Brubeck John Bunch

"My Romance" • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Gary Burton Charlie Byrd Trio Mike Campbell Royce Campbell Cantabile Gaylord Carter Rosemary Clooney Vic Damone Sammy Davis, Jr., 1962, Belts the Best of Broadway Doris Day, 1962, Jumbo film soundtrack Bill Evans Ella Fitzgerald Roberta Flack Sutton Foster Sergio Franchi 1965 album The Songs of Richard Rodgers[3] Maria Friedman Stan Getz Hampton Hawes, Album Blues for Bud Bruce Hornsby Joni James (1956) Mario Lanza Wynton Marsalis Bob Mintzer Maureen O'Hara Seal Carly Simon Frank Sinatra Jo Stafford Enzo Stuarti The Supremes Ben Taylor (the son of James Taylor and Carly Simon) James Taylor Mel Tormé Tuck & Patti Sarah Vaughan & Hal Mooney's Orchestra

470

References
[1] "When I Fall In Loveoverview" (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ album/ r709152). Allmusic.com. . [2] "Chris Botti Comments on Current Tour" (http:/ / www. stingus. net/ nieuwsuk_comments. php?id=490_0_2_0_C). Stingus.net. . [3] http:/ / www. discogs. com/ sergio-franchi

"So Far"

471

"So Far"
"So Far"
Song from Allegro Published 1947 Writer Oscar Hammerstein II

Composer Richard Rodgers

"So Far" is a show tune from the 1947 Rodgers and Hammerstein musical Allegro. On July 28, 1947 (see 1947 in music), the song was recorded by Perry Como, and released by RCA Victor Records as a 78rpm single, catalog number 20-2402-A, with the flip side "A Fellow Needs a Girl". The song reached #11 on the Billboard charts. Other versions were recorded by Frank Sinatra and by Margaret Whiting.[1] The song was also used in the 1996 stage musical State Fair.

References
[1] Hischak, Thomas S. (2007). The Rodgers and Hammerstein encyclopedia. Greenwood Publishing Group, p. 251. ISBN 0-313-34140-0

"A Fellow Needs a Girl"

472

"A Fellow Needs a Girl"
"A Fellow Needs a Girl"
Song from Allegro Published 1947 Writer Oscar Hammerstein II

Composer Richard Rodgers

"A Fellow Needs a Girl" is a show tune written by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II for their 1947 musical Allegro. It has since become a standard, with recordings by many vocalists including Perry Como, Doris Day, Frank Sinatra and Bryn Terfel. Como's recordings were made in 1947 and 1961. The 1947 recording, made on July 28, with Russ Case and his orchestra, was released by RCA Victor Records as a 78rpm single, catalog number 20-2402-B, with the flip side "So Far," and reached #25 on the charts. It has also been included on several LP albums. The 1961 recording, made on May 17, with Mitchell Ayres and his orchestra, was recorded as part of a medley with "Thank Heaven for Little Girls" and "You Were Meant for Me". It was never issued as a single but was included on some albums of Como's. Doris Day recorded the song on December 11, 1959 for her Columbia album What Every Girl Should Know, with Harry Zimmerman's Orchestra. Bryn Terfel's rendition of the song was included on his 1996 CD of Rodgers and Hammerstein songs, Something Wonderful, named after the song of the same title in The King and I.

"But Beautiful"
"But Beautiful" is a popular song with music written by Jimmy Van Heusen, the lyrics by Johnny Burke. The song was published in 1947. One of five songs written by Burke and Van Heusen featured in the Paramount Pictures movie Road to Rio (1947), it was introduced by Bing Crosby and is also associated with his leading lady Dorothy Lamour. The original key is G major and has the form A-B1-A-B2. It is usually performed as a ballad.

Other Versions
• • • • • • • • • • Tex Beneke released a version in 1947 with Garry Stevens on vocal. The Coasters on their album One by One (1960). Alma Cogan - With You in Mind (1962) Nat King Cole on his album The Very Thought of You (1958). Shawn Colvin sang the song for AT&T's concert for the benefit of the Walden Woods Project and The Thoreau Institute at Walden Woods, which was released on the album Stormy Weather (1998).[1] Doris Day released at version in 1957 on her Day by Day album. In 1996, an album titled But Beautiful was released that featured live recordings by Bill Evans and Stan Getz made in 1974. The album includes a version of the Burke/Van Heusen standard. Aretha Franklin on her album Soft and Beautiful (1969). The Four Freshmen on their album Voices In Latin/The Freshmen Year (2001). Johnny Hartman recorded the song for his 1958 album, And I Thought About You.[2]

"But Beautiful" • • • • • • • Billie Holiday on her album Lady in Satin (1958). Shirley Horn recorded the song for her 1989 Verve album, Close Enough For Love. Freddie Hubbard recorded the song for his album Open Sesame (1960). Carmen McRae on her album Torchy/Blue Moon (1999). Barbra Streisand on her album The Movie Album (2003). Nancy Wilson on her album But Beautiful (1969). (Gregory Porter)(jazz singer) recorded the song But Beautiful on his (2010) "Water" album

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External links
• "But Beautiful" at jazzstandards.com [3]

References
[1] AT&T Presents Stormy Weather (http:/ / www. amazon. com/ dp/ B00068AEHK) Retrieved February 8, 2012. [2] Johnny Hartman, And I Thought About You (http:/ / www. amazon. com/ dp/ B000005H9Z) Retrieved February 8, 2012. [3] http:/ / www. jazzstandards. com/ compositions-1/ butbeautiful. htm

"I've Got a Crush on You"
"I've Got a Crush on You" is a song composed by George Gershwin, with lyrics by Ira Gershwin. It is unique among Gershwin compositions in that it was used for two different Broadway productions, Treasure Girl (1928), and Strike Up the Band (1930).

Notable Recordings
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Lee Wiley, recorded on November 15, 1939 Sarah Vaughan, recorded on July 18, 1946 Frank Sinatra, recorded on November 5, 1947 Ella Fitzgerald - Ella Sings Gershwin (1950), Ella Fitzgerald Sings the George and Ira Gershwin Songbook (1959), and Nice Work If You Can Get It, a 1983 Pablo release with Andre Previn Dinah Washington - "In the Land of Hi-Fi" (1956) Nat Adderley - Work Song (1960) Anna Maria Alberghetti Cleo Laine Linda Ronstadt, on the album What's New (1983). Ronstadt previously performed the song on "The Muppet Show". Frank Sinatra and Barbra Streisand (from Duets (Frank Sinatra album), 1993) Carly Simon, on the album The Glory of Gershwin (1994) Rod Stewart and Diana Ross (duet) Steve Tyrell Chris Connor - Warm Cool: The Atlantic Years (1999) Stacey Kent - Dreamsville (2000) Michael Bublé, on the EP With Love (2006) Brian Wilson - Brian Wilson Reimagines Gershwin (2010) Luscious Jackson- Red Hot + Rhapsody (1998)

• Darius de Haas and Steven Blier - Quiet Please (2010)

"I've Got a Crush on You"

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Featured
• Featured in Woody Allen's Manhattan (film) which was scored exclusively with Gershwin music.