P. 1
BASIC STIRLING ENGINE MODAL

BASIC STIRLING ENGINE MODAL

|Views: 330|Likes:
Published by Rohan Goralkar
HOW TO CONSTRUCT STIRLING ENGINE MODAl
HOW TO CONSTRUCT STIRLING ENGINE MODAl

More info:

Published by: Rohan Goralkar on Jun 20, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as DOCX, PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/11/2015

pdf

text

original

In practice, simple idealized thermodynamic cycles are usually made out of
four thermodynamic processes. Any thermodynamic processes may be
used. However, when idealized cycles are modeled, often processes where
one state variable is kept constant are used, such as an isothermal process
(constant temperature), isobaric process (constant pressure), isochoric
process (constant volume), isentropic process (constant entropy), or an
isenthalpic process (constant enthalpy). Often adiabatic processes are also
used, where no heat is exchanged.

13

Some example thermodynamic cycles and their constituent processes are as follows:

Cycle

Process 1-2
(Compression)

Process 2-3
(Heat
Addition)

Process 3-4
(Expansion)

Process 4-1
(Heat
Rejection)

Notes

Power cycles normally with external combustion - or heat pump cycles:

Bell
Coleman
adiabatic

isobaric

adiabatic

isobaric

A reversed
Brayton cycle

Carnot

isentropic

isothermal isentropic

isothermal

Ericsson isothermal

isobaric

isothermal

isobaric

the second
Ericsson cycle
from 1853

Rankine

adiabatic

isobaric

adiabatic

isobaric

Steam engine

Scuderi

adiabatic

variable
pressure
and volume

adiabatic

isochoric

Stirling isothermal

isochoric isothermal

isochoric

Stoddard adiabatic

isobaric

adiabatic

isobaric

Power cycles normally with internal combustion:

Brayton

adiabatic

isobaric

adiabatic

isobaric

Jet engines
the external
combustion
version of this
cycle is known as
first Ericsson
cycle from 1833

Diesel

adiabatic

isobaric

adiabatic

isochoric

Lenoir

isobaric

isochoric

adiabatic

Pulse jets
(Note: Process 1-
2 accomplishes
both the heat
rejection and the
compression)

Otto

adiabatic

isochoric

adiabatic

isochoric Gasoline / petrol
engines

Known Thermodynamic Cycles: TABLE: 1

14

1.4 HISTORY:

The Stirling engine were invented in 1816 by Robert Stirling in Scotland,
some 80 years before the invention of diesel engine, and enjoyed substantial
commercial success up to the early 1900s. A Stirling cycle machine is a
device, which operates on a closed regenerative thermodynamic cycle, with
cyclic compression and expansion of the working fluid at different
temperature levels. The flow is controlled by volume changes so that there
is a net conversion of heat to work or vice versa. The Stirling engines are
frequently called by other names, including hot-air or hot-gas engines, or
one of a number of designations reserved for particular engine arrangement.
In the beginning of 19th century, due to the rapid development of internal
combustion engines and electrical machine, further development of Stirling
engines was severely hampered.

Sketch of Robert Stirling of his invent

FIGURE: 6

15

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->