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Data Management & Warehousing

SAMPLE

Requirements Examples
DAVID M WALKER
Version: 0.1 Date: 01/01/2006

Data Management & Warehousing 138 Finchampstead Road, Wokingham, Berkshire, RG41 2NU, United Kingdom http://www.datamgmt.com

Sample - Requirements Examples

Table of Contents
Table of Contents ...................................................................................................................... 2 Synopsis .................................................................................................................................... 3 Intended Audience .................................................................................................................... 3 About Data Management & Warehousing ................................................................................. 3 Business Requirements ............................................................................................................ 4 Data Requirements ................................................................................................................... 9 Dimensions ........................................................................................................................... 9 Performance Measures ....................................................................................................... 11 Query Requirements ............................................................................................................... 15 Interface Requirements ........................................................................................................... 16 Copyright ................................................................................................................................. 17

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Synopsis
This document has a number of samples of completed sections from the four sets of requirements (Business, Data, Query and Interface) to aid analysts in completing their own templates. The requirements are a merger of actual requirements taken from Telcos around the world. They are not consistent nor should anything be read into any requirements as coming from any particular operator. There are no examples from the Technical Requirements as they do not have the same form of template table.

Intended Audience
Reader Executive Business Users IT Management IT Strategy IT Project Management IT Developers Recommended Reading Synopsis through to Background Synopsis through to Background Entire Document Entire Document Entire Document Entire Document

About Data Management & Warehousing
Data Management & Warehousing is a specialist consultancy in data warehousing, based in Wokingham, Berkshire in the United Kingdom. Founded in 1995 by David M Walker, our consultants have worked for major corporations around the world including the US, Europe, Africa and the Middle East. Our clients are invariably large organisations with a pressing need for business intelligence. We have worked in many industry sectors but have specialists in Telco’s, manufacturing, retail, financial and transport as well as technical expertise in many of the leading technologies. For further information visit our website at: http://www.datamgmt.com

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Business Requirements
BUSINESS REQUIREMENT Business Requirement Number 1 Organisations & Individuals (Customers) Business Requirement Name Priority High Currently available in the Data Warehouse Yes Description There is a requirement to hold details and build a history of customers’ activities with Telco, tracking them through their Telco relationship ‘life cycle’, from initial marketing prospect, through sales, service provisioning, billing, etc. Organisations and individuals include customers and prospects for Telco products and services and all others for which information can be obtained. Organisations may also be OLO (Other Licensed Operators) network customers, third-party dealers, the customers of third-party dealers, and other organisations such as Telco own business units, OFTEL, contractors, suppliers, etc. Note: prospects details are only required for prospects that have become customers or prospects that form part of the Target Account List. The information held for organisations and individuals must include name, address, postcode, etc. and a standardised version the customer name into a common search format. For organisations, other details should include: • Basic company information - business and trading names, company registration number. A detail of all organisations sites e.g. addresses and service locations of installed equipment. Parent company, subsidiaries, international ownership and partners An indication of serviced customer or third party customer.

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The relationships between organisations and individuals must be maintained, e.g. multiple contacts for customer organisations. This should include the individual’s full contact details and what they do, such as influencers, decision makers, finance/procurement contact, IT director or contact, telephony contact, billing contact, data network contact, marketing contact, etc. These is also a need to hold enhanced profile information about organisations such as: • • Turnover, numbers of sites and number of employees per site. Telecomm profile - Comms spend (not just with Telco), telecomm products/services used, equipment used, other suppliers used (and products), PBX supplier. OFTEL information on licensed operators.

There is a need to maintain a history of the relationship between a customer and other associated information. This information includes contracts, orders, products and services, accounts, usage, non-usage, billing, payments, contacts, faults, sites, telephone numbers, sales channels, sales account manager, market segmentation, etc.

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It is required to be able to record and analyse organisations by a number of different organisational hierarchies. These hierarchies will change over time and customers may also be in multiple hierarchies at any one time. For example : • Customer defined hierarchies e.g. business and trading names of an organisation and all its subsidiaries and parent companies. This is how the customer sees himself or herself - this might be for revenue reporting purposes. Legal hierarchies, e.g. as the government or tax authorities see a customer organisation - i.e. the official company structure. Dun and Bradstreet method of customer hierarchies. Wholesale customers may be made up of intermediary organisations that actually deal with Telco end user customers - where possible details of these levels should be held, i.e. from wholesaler to end user. Telco defined hierarchies or groupings, such as: o o o o o Holding Company, Group Customer, Customer Account, Customer Site and Customer Line Identity. Sales channel related hierarchies, i.e. how sales view their customers. ‘Forced hierarchies’, e.g. car dealerships with different names. Limited grouping of customers by customer name. Marketing sectors, segments, geography.

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Over time, as history information is accumulated, these hierarchies will allow detailed analysis of behaviour to be performed by relating the revenue, product, account, orders etc. together for an organisational structure. There is a requirement to have the ability to monitor and analyse • Customer profitability. Initially this will only include interconnect in-payments / outpayments against products and services delivered. When available, sources of actual cost information should be included. Product mix by revenue within customer. Customer details, e.g. monthly numbers and revenue, by customer life cycle status, customer hierarchy level, SOV (Sales Order Value), product, price package, discount plan, actual and potential comms spend, installed equipment, geography, campaign response or marketing activity, market segment, sector. Customer churn by product, reason, location, market segment, sector, sales channel, campaign code, etc. This will enable the proactive identification of revenue drop and provide customer churn KPI. Number and names of customers lost, their worth and billing trends. Other patterns in the customer base, e.g. customer lifecycle, customer historic trends, customer buying cycle, customer revenue, cost profiles, profitable/nonprofitable, customer site moves, etc. The dealer and reseller relationship, including revenue and payments, by call type,

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national, mobile, international, etc. Also, aggregate third party customers into their respective dealers / suppliers. • • Existing resellers and dealers to identify potential reseller and dealer companies. OLO customer revenue (in-payments and out-payments) and usage patterns and trends, by routes/points of interconnect, tail costs, time of day, inbound, outbound, etc.

Definition of Key Terms • Customer: An organisation or individual of interest to Telco in the provision of Telco products and services. Multiple views of a customer hierarchy may exist e.g. the customer own view of their organisation, Telco sales view, the billing systems view etc. Prospect: A prospect is a customer that Telco intends to attempt to sell Telco products and services to. ‘Prospect’ is usually treated as a status of the customer as a whole, or of the customer for particular products, services or campaigns. Organisation: An organisation is a grouping of one or more individuals, or of one or more companies, or other business activities, or for some other reason are required to be known about. An organisation may be a legal entity or just some recognised group. Examples of organisations include customers and prospects of Telco products and services, network customers, third-party dealers, the customers of third-party dealers, OLO (Other Licensed Operators), competitors, contractors, suppliers, government bodies, Telco own business units, etc. Individual: An individual is a person for which information can be obtained. An individual may be associated with an organisation, for example as a contact for an organisation (e.g. influencers, decision makers, finance/procurement contact, IT director or contact, telephony contact, billing contact, data network contact, marketing contact, etc.). An individual may also be a customer or prospect for Telco products and services or the customer of a third-party dealer. OLO (Other Licensed Operators): An organisation that is licensed by OFTEL to provide telecomm network services. Customer Churn: Customer Churn is defined as the number of customers leaving Telco from a given level of the customer hierarchy as a proportion of the total customer base at that level (presented either as a number or a percentage and calculated at monthly, quarterly and yearly intervals) - churn is also calculated by the value of the customer leaving Telco as a proportion of overall revenue. Dealer: A dealer is a third party organisation that has an existing business base through which it can sell standard Telco Branded Products. Telco owns the customer and consequently the Customer benefits from 24hr customer care and management reports etc. In return for acquiring customers on Telco’s behalf the dealer receives an ongoing 'revenue share’ this is a proportion the customers billing. Reseller: The Reseller purchases Telco products at wholesale rates and 'resells' them under their own brand. The contractual relationship is between the reseller and the customer, not Telco. The reseller sets his own retail pricing, bills the customer, arranges premise routing and provides customer care. Telco will provide the reseller with a monthly wholesale bill and provide customer care for bill queries and network faults to the reseller only, contact is not made between Telco and the reseller's customer. The reseller can be further subdivided into two groups: those who aggregate carrier

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minutes (an Aggregator) and those who merely resell (Direct Reseller) from one or two carriers. Aggregator: By using 'smart' MLU technology e.g. black box or via sophisticated PBX software, customer premise routing is made over a number of carriers according to price. Aggregators are able to maximise their buying power to secure the best possible rate for each route. Aggregators approach customers as an independent telecomm provider. The offer is to remove the purchase and pricing decision from the customer by pooling rates from all carriers and therefore always offering the best possible combination of rates. Effectively they will manage a customer’s telephony needs. Description of limitations of current data warehouse • The solution should not support lead tracking, contact management - Not all the information that the sales force will require is likely to be held in the warehouse as this will not be a suitable repository. Prospect and Customer hierarchies - will need to be given as manual or automated input details of group customer s and holding companies. Customer profitability - Initially this will only include interconnect payments/outpayments against products and services delivered. Sources of actual cost information to be investigated and reported on when available. No payment information will be available until increment 4 Data Overview Dimensionality / Ordered By / Described By • Customer (organisation, individual, TAL customer, OLO, supplier, dealers, resellers, aggregators etc.) Customer ‘life cycle’ status Organisation structure/hierarchy level Geography Contract Orders Product Account (status, date, etc.) Billing Payment Fault Telephone number Call Distance Network Sales channel hierarchy Market segment and sector Installed equipment Campaign (response, activity) Churn reason Time

Performance Measures • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Turnover Number of sites Number of employees Telco spend (actual and potential) Account measures Revenue Payment amount Term Number of accounts Customer measures Profitability Worth Churn Number of customers SOV (Sales order value) Network event measures (usage) Network tail cost Price, charge, discount (usage, non-usage)

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Technical Assessment

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Data Retention Requirements

Other Comments

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Data Requirements
Dimensions
Dimension Number Dimension Name Description DIMENSION 1 Party

The Party dimension represents individuals, their parent organisations and the higher-level organisation structure.

Hierarchy Structure
Holding Company Customer Reporting Hierarchy Customer Group Customer Account

Customer Site Customer Line Identity

Additional Descriptive Information This dimension is intended to represent individuals and organisations of interest to Telco – so, for instance, this may represent organisations with which Telco have a customer, supplier or interconnect relationship. The diagram above depicts one of the specific hierarchies that is required – the customer reporting hierarchy. Other requirements for the representation of organisation hierarchies may include : • Business and trading names of an organisation and all its subsidiaries and parent companies. Legal hierarchies, e.g. as the government or tax authorities see a customer organisation - i.e. the official company structure. Dun and Bradstreet method of customer hierarchies. Wholesale customers may be made up of intermediary organisations that actually deal with Telco end user customers - where possible details of these levels should be held, i.e. from wholesaler to end user.

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Telco defined hierarchies or groupings, such as: o o o o o Sales channel related hierarchies, i.e. how sales view their customers. ‘Forced hierarchies’, e.g. car dealerships with different names. Marketing sectors, segments, geography. TAL method of grouping customers for a sales account manager. Customer hierarchies defined on an ad-hoc basis for Telco internal reporting.

Organisations also include third-party dealers, the customers of third-party dealers, OFTEL, contractors and suppliers. No hierarchical structure within any of these is required. Data Steward Status Changes (Slowly Changing Dimensions) The customer reporting hierarchy is likely to change at a rate between quarterly and annually. The Telco sales organisation is likely to change at a rate between monthly for small changes and annually for large changes. Currently available in the Data Warehouse Limitations of current availability Yes

Description of Known Data Quality Problems

Data Retention Requirements
This information would be required indefinitely.

Data Refresh Requirements
It is important that this information stays as up to date as possible for those organisations with which Telco carries out transactions. For other organisations, such as prospects, the data refresh requirement is more lenient.

Implementation Notes
Customers are the holders of (active or deactivated) billing system accounts.

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Performance Measures
PERFORMANCE MEASURE Performance Measure Number 1 Vanilla Rated Call Revenue Amount Performance Measure Name Measure Type Basic Definition
The Vanilla Rated Call Revenue is the amount of revenue generated by a call, and is attached to a Call Detail Record (CDR) by the first pass of the rating engine.

Additional Commentary As such, this Vanilla Rated Call Revenue Amount is the basic revenue value attached to the call record, and includes factors such as the time of day the call was made, the day of the week, the message source code, the charge band and the specific rating group. It excludes any subsequent rating changes that are applied by the billing system, which turn Vanilla Rated Call Revenue into the Re-Rated Call Revenue. The Vanilla Rated Call Revenue Amount could also loosely be referred to as unbilled usage revenue, and should therefore have a revenue status type of unbilled usage revenue. Data Steward Dimensionality / Ordered By / Described By • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Party – Customer Organization Account Customer Site (Service Location) Product / Service Product / Service Instance (Product / Service + Customer Site) Message Source Code Time – charge time (at the individual charge level) and billed time. Telephone Number and its Geography (where applicable) Account Address and its Geography Sales Channel Market Segment Campaign Distance Band Time Band Revenue Status Type Scheme Volume Band Duration Band Yes

Currently available in the Data Warehouse Limitations of current availability

For unbilled usage: Vanilla Rated Call Revenue Amount will be accumulated alongside the Call Duration on a daily basis by telephone number per bill cycle, and will be zeroed at the start of each bill production run for that telephone number. A later increment may load individual unbilled usage revenue at the CDR level for both Vanilla Rated Call Revenue and Call Duration.

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For billed usage: Vanilla Rated Call Revenue Amount will be stored at the individual CDR level alongside the Call Duration and the Re-Rated Call Revenue Amount. Description of Known Data Quality Problems

Data Retention Requirements
Individual Call Detail Records are required for a rolling three months, which therefore implies that Vanilla Rated Call Revenue Amounts will be available for a rolling three months.

Data Refresh Requirements See above comments in Limitations in Increment 1. The cumulative unbilled usage (Vanilla Rated Call Revenue Amount and Call Duration) by telephone number by bill cycle will be a daily feed into the system. This should be replaced, in a later increment, by a daily feed of individual unbilled usage CDR records. At the billed usage level, this information should be loaded into the system once per bill production run. That is, there are currently estimated to be six bill production runs per month. Implementation Notes

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PERFORMANCE MEASURE Performance Measure Number 2 Number of Services Performance Measure Name Measure Type Count Definition The Number of Services is an aggregated performance measure that is a simple count of the number of occurrences of at least one instance of a product/service code at a particular chosen level of interrogation Additional Commentary
For example – we may wish to know the number of different service codes and their

descriptions by account number and service location, in order to explore service mix. Data Steward Dimensionality / Ordered By / Described By • • • • • • • • Party – Customer Organization Account Customer Site (Service Location) Product / Service Product / Service Instance (Product / Service + Customer Site) Account Address and its Geography Market Segment Scheme Yes

Currently available in the Data Warehouse Limitations of current availability

Description of Known Data Quality Problems

Data Retention Requirements

Data Refresh Requirements

Implementation Notes

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PERFORMANCE MEASURE Performance Measure Number 3 Performance Measure Name Bill Balance Brought Forward Amount Measure Type Derived Definition The Bill Balance Brought Forward Amount is the balance brought forward from the previous bill cycle's bill Additional Commentary The Bill Balance Brought Forward Amount should be the same as the previous bill cycle’s Bill Balance Carried Forward Amount. The Bill Balance Brought Forward Amount will be sourced directly from the source billing systems. Data Steward Dimensionality / Ordered By / Described By • • • • • • • Party – Customer Organization Account Account Address and its Geography Time – billed time Sales Channel Market Segment Campaign Yes

Currently available in the Data Warehouse Limitations of current availability

The speed of response will depend on the available level of pre-calculated aggregates. This information could be made available from the source systems should the Systems Roadmap point to this being an area of high priority. Description of Known Data Quality Problems

Data Retention Requirements

Data Refresh Requirements

Implementation Notes

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Query Requirements
Query Requirement Number Query Requirement Name Description Query Requirement 1 Credit/aged report

A report that show the outstanding debt by account and credit group Definition of Key Terms

Currently available in data warehouse YES Description of limitations within current implementation

Requested by Data Overview Debts by account and how long that debt has been outstanding Performance Measures • • • • • • credit limit current balance balance 30 days balance 60 days balance 90 days balance 120+ days Dimensionality / Ordered By / Described By • • • credit class account number bill cycle/run

Technical Assessment

Data Retention Requirements

Other Comments

Frequency Type

Weekly Regular

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Interface Requirements
Interface Number Interface Name Target System Name Output Type Output Location Output File Name Output File Type Output Format Output Character Set Output Frequency CSV Specifics Field Separator Record Separator Quoting Character Escaping Character XML Specifics Validation Validation Location Description/Purpose of File Interface 1 Customer Segmentation Groups CRM System File /BI/ftp/outgoing/CRM csg.csv CSV ASCII US-ASCII Daily Comma (,) Carriage Return – Line Feed Double Quote (“) Double Quote (“)

This file is used to update the CRM system with the current market segment group and score information Data Definition Field Name Customer_id Market_Segment Segment_Score

Source Field Name Customer.customer_id MarSeg.segment_name Custom_MarSeg_History.score

Mandatory? Yes Yes Yes Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No

Currently available from the Data Warehouse Limitations of current availability

Yes

Description of Known Data Quality Problems

Implementation Notes

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Copyright
© 2006 Data Management & Warehousing. All rights reserved. Reproduction not permitted without written authorisation. References to other companies and their products use trademarks owned by the respective companies and are for reference purposes only.

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