6/27/12

10 New Year’s Resolutions for Budding Digital Humanists | HASTAC
Login Contact Join HASTAC

Home About Members Organizations Subscribe Help

Home  ›  Scholars  ›  Blog posts

10 New Year’s Resolutions for Budding Digital Humanists
View Comments Author: Melody Dworak Posted: 12/31/2011 ­ 1:18am Topics: Digital Humanities Tags: 2012, New Year's Resolutions In: Scholars, Scholar Class 2012

Scholars
› Home › About

    A just­for­fun post to ring in 2012, here are some ideas for digital humanities­related New Year’s resolutions. Organized from perceived effort needed to accomplish the potential resolution. Feel free to add more in the comments!   Easy­peasy 1) Find like­minded colleagues on Twitter or Google+. Follow Be followed (go public!) Microblog daily Engage in conversations at least once per week 2) Start that research blog you’ve been envisioning WordPress can build a simple self­publishing website Blogger serves basic blogging functions and easy for those who already have a Google account Tumblr makes for easy re­blogging and microblogging through online social networks Need an archives­based exhibition online space? Check out Omeka. 3) Hug a developer (who needs an excuse?)   Moderate 4) Learn what the heck makes people love Tumblr or Pintrest (a.k.a. explore another social media tool conducive to meeting new colleagues­­ pseudonymously or real­named­­and new ideas.) 5) Flesh out the information architecture of your new research blog What tabs or basic navigation do you want? Do you answer those basic journalistic questions of Who, What, Where, When, and Why? Do you give yourself enough credit without becoming a target for a Humblebrag? (We don’t need to know about your 4.0, but titles, honors, and fellowships are newsworthy enough.) Do you identify what it is that interests you and who you’re looking to engage with? 6) Follow along with an Academic Earth class about programming. Have access to Lynda.com classes through your university? Try out a XML tutorial!

› Forums › Blogs › Meet the Scholars › Groups

About Melody Dworak
Master's candidate in a School of Library and Information Science program...
Read more

HASTAC Scholars Tweets
Fiona Barnett

HASTACscholars
HASTACscholars RT @mkgold: Johanna Drucker on the @uminnpress blog: "Representation and the digital environment" bit.ly/JevGvJ #dhdebates
40 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

HASTACscholars Still thinking abt post by @NazcaTheMad "What Remains: Collaboration & Knowledge at a Non-Digital Unconf" bit.ly/JeDIPx #transformDH
40 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

HASTACscholars @adelinekoh @moyazb @anitaconchita woo! i'm gonna have a party at my place during MLA. fun!!
40 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

adelinekoh our panel on #race & #dh has been accepted for #mla13! featuring @alondra @anitaconchita @moyazb & more! #transformdh adelinekoh.org/blog/2012/04/0…
43 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

Join the conversation

hastac.org/blogs/melody-dworak/2011/12/31/10-new-year’s-resolutions-budding-digital-humanists

1/5

6/27/12

10 New Year’s Resolutions for Budding Digital Humanists | HASTAC
7) Blog about your research once per week Time and Effort Required 8) Feeling ambitious? Enroll in a free Stanford University online course like Natural Language Processing or Human­Computer Interaction. You may get a statement of accomplishment! 9) Learn Gephi for data visualization experiments 10) Submit and present your DH research at a conference! Microblogging and blogging are great ways to get feedback as your work develops, but presenting IRL to colleagues raises the ante.  

Upcoming Group Events
Submissions! : The International Wikimania Conference 2012 DC
July 12, 2012 (All day) ­ July 14, 2012 (All day)

Digital Humanities Congress 2012, University of Sheffield, UK
September 5, 2012 ­ 7:00pm ­ September 7, 2012 ­ 7:00pm

melody dworak's blog Login or register to post comments

The Digital Humanities Winter Institute @MITH
January 7, 2013 ­ 10:00am ­ January 11, 2013 ­ 10:00am

Obligatory #transformDH comment here!
Amanda Phillips 25 weeks 4 days ago Login or register to post comments

Love this list ­ while it fills me with anxiety about all of the things I need to accomplish in the next, oh, 30 days, it's still fun to see DH resolutions up on the HASTAC blog. One resolution I hope many DHers will share with me is to continue to find culture in our technology and to keep theorizing and/or experimenting with ways that DH can become a tool for social justice. This is thinking outside the box for a lot of us, so it's worthy to put it down on the list. Coming from a queer/feminist perspective, one of my New Years' resolutions, for example, will be to integrate more critical race and disability studies into my own work! Happy new year, y'all!

View events on calendar

Find Scholars
Filter by First Name

Filter by Last Name

Great addition!
Melody Dworak 25 weeks 22 min ago Login or register to post comments

Filter by Topic
<Any>

You might have already imagined that this list came together from my own ideas of what I should be doing. I have found it very hard to blog once each week, even though that's what's recommended to stay on people's radars. Some people do it daily, so what's from keeping me from doing it weekly? Honing in on one's own challenges is a great place to start for setting this year's goals.  I like your point about bringing critical perspectives to the forefront of our work, as well. Those are areas of study that you know belong in the work, but that don't always interlock as perfect puzzle pieces. Perhaps "engage in interdisciplinary discussions at least once per month" could go on the list? 

Filter by Tags

Find by Class Year
-Year

Submit

View All

More brilliance
Cathy Davidson 25 weeks 4 days ago Login or register to post comments

Love the list and the comment.  Thank you both!

Thank you for your comment!
Melody Dworak 25 weeks 12 min ago Login or register to post comments

It's been very inspiring to see all the discussions on here. The blogs are a great place to throw out ideas, get feedback, and to see where people are in their own thinking.

the microblogging challenge
Kirstyn Leuner 25 weeks 4 days ago Login or register to post comments

Melody, I love your idea of microblogging about your research once a week. I have tried, and failed, to microblog in the past. But the microblogs *always* turn into macroblogs (just check out my hastac blog for examples). And then I polish excessively, because it's a long post and because it represents me in more textual real estate to the community of scholars who might read my work. And then I've spent half a day on a blog post that is helpful for my thinking, but that took me away from what I really must get done (dissertate, grade, etc.). I assign microblogging to my students once a week, and this, I think, is a great opportunity to learn from them. They get it done and they have told me that it's worthwhile on the whole. I give them a very generous question that relates to the reading, and they either answer it or write about something else that suits their fancy (and ideally relates to

hastac.org/blogs/melody-dworak/2011/12/31/10-new-year’s-resolutions-budding-digital-humanists

2/5

6/27/12

10 New Year’s Resolutions for Budding Digital Humanists | HASTAC
the reading). 300 words is the minimum. But I wonder if I would be able to turn the tables, for my own assignment, and make it my maximum. HASTAC blog would be a great place to try this out: 300 words, 1x/week. It's a microblogging challenge.  

Microblogs vs. response papers
Kyle McAuley 25 weeks 3 days ago Login or register to post comments

I'll ask the curmudgeonly question: Why microblogs instead of response papers? As both an undergraduate and a graduate student I've had many classes where response papers, both short and long, were posted online in advance of class meetings. I ask because a 300 word minimum and highly polished writing sounds like a response paper to me ­­ perhaps just with embedded links instead of footnotes or parenthetical citations.

Weekly/Daily Blogging
Steven Berg 25 weeks 4 days ago Login or register to post comments

Etena Sacca­vajjena is my teaching blog.  My goal is to post an essay about once a week.  I have a clear focus of my perspective which I briefly describe on the blog’s home page.  Blog posts currently run 600­800 words.  Like Kirstyn Leuner , I found that the time for a posting was equivalent to half a day’s work or more for writing, editing, publishing, and distributing notifications.   However, I find the time to be well spent because I think about the blog daily.  Even when I don’t write about them, I often process experiences in terms of how I could write about them.  As a result, I remain mindful of key values (specifically the four Brahama Viharas) I try to incorporate into my life as a professor.  The constant reflection has improved my teaching.  Sharing on a weekly basis also builds connections with students who do read —and often cite in classes or conferences—what I have written. During the past couple of months, I am finding that I am writing quicker; in part because topics are frequently in mind.  I am also learning that I do not need to polish excessively —which does not mean that I do not polish blog entries or take my on­line persona seriously.  (I realize that I am in a very different career position than is Kirstyn.) Melogy Dwarak’s suggestion to microblog daily is fascinating.  However, I am not sure that I would put it into the “Easy­peasy” category.  Yesterday, I purchased a new journal which, in part, is intended to be a personal micro­blog.  While there are parts of the journal for notes, sketches, and so forth, I am intrigued by the idea of publicly microblogging on a daily basis and want to think about it more.

Audience for Daily Blogs?
Steven Berg 25 weeks 2 days ago Login or register to post comments

Melody, Who do you see as the audience for the daily microblogs?  As I mentioned yesterday, I am intrigued by the idea and decided to begin blogging today.  (I wasn't going to announce the blog until I was comfortable with it and was confident that I planned to continue it.)  However, I ran into difficulty because I was not sure of the audience for such postings.  Without understanding audience and purpose, I see no reason for me to publish the blog instead of just putting the notes in a private journal. Because comments do not include non­verbal cues, I want to assure you that this is a legitimate question asked in kindness by one who wants to understand.  Throughout the day, I have given the question thought and have some ideas as to possible benefits of the daily blog.  But I would be interested in yours as well. Steve Berg

Fair question!
John Carter McKnight 25 weeks 2 days ago Login or register to post comments

Steve, that's a good question, and I think the answer may vary greatly. One approach might be to ask, what would you gain by keeping it private? Changing your default assumptions might generate interesting answers. For me, I've been running Aporia for nearly four years. It started as a place to post book reviews for an independent study: at first the sole audience was my supervising professor, but I chose to blog rather than turn in "papers" in order to maintain a central and comprehensive locus for my work. I used the blog for assignments in several subsequent classes. I didn't actively publicize the blog for years: I saw it as a place to practice, with a

hastac.org/blogs/melody-dworak/2011/12/31/10-new-year’s-resolutions-budding-digital-humanists

3/5

6/27/12

10 New Year’s Resolutions for Budding Digital Humanists | HASTAC
small audience of friends and fellow students. As I've grown in confidence, my network of peers has grown in pace, and I've gotten comments from a number of the authors whose work I've reviewed. In short, the blog has grown along with me, and having a central repository of much of my work has been a great convenience along the way. I read a lot of other grad student blogs: they challenge me to step up my game, give me insights, and provide a sense of being part of a community of scholars extending far beyond my home institution. I think that's an invaluable gift from my peers.

Changing Assumptions
Steven Berg 25 weeks 1 day ago Login or register to post comments

One approach might be to ask, what would you gain by keeping it private? Changing your default assumptions might generate interesting answers. John, I just discovered that my response to your posting isn’t actually here.  I’m not sure what I did wrong, but I will try again—in a modified version because I have continued to think about this issue since I “posted” my response yesterday. You are correct that changing the default assumptions does change the answer.  As soon as I read your question, my immediate response was “Nothing.”  This then caused me to reconsider what could be gained by micro­ blogging.  The main difference between the journal and the micro­blog is that is gives the possibility for feedback and discussion.  There is also the incentive to keep on publishing the micro­blog because of its public nature. Because I am up for evaluation this year, for two months I recorded my activities as they related to service and professional development in a blog.  However, the purpose of this was to simply record facts; not to do any reflection.  And reflection is a key component of a micro­blog/journal. I have experienced the benefits of blogging while writing Etena Sacca­vajjena in which I try to publish approximately one essay a week during the regular academic year.  I have also created an author page on Facebook where I can share teaching thoughts with students and others.  And my website (which is being massively revised during semester break) has included detailed information about my teaching. Therefore, the thought public sharing does not bother me. I am now thinking that if I were to begin a micro­blog that I would need to be comfortable that I am not trying to reach a large readership; that I am doing more of a public journal that few people would read.  Even though there will be few readers, there will be more than if I confined my thoughts to a private journal.  It would also be possible for me to publicize individual entries in the micro­blog with students or others.  For example, I might reflect on something from class and ask students to voluntarily respond.  Or I could send the link to an entry to selected colleagues and ask them for feedback on some issue. There are two other issues which I think are important for a daily micro­blog.  First, it does not have to be written in daily.  That is a set up for failure.  The second is that reflections do not necessarily need to be posted on the exact day they take place.  For example, were I to begin the micro­blog later today, I could still post yesterday’s notes and give them a January 2 date. Thank you for your response which helped clarify my thinking.    

Micro­Blog Started
Steven Berg 24 weeks 3 days ago Login or register to post comments

I began a microblog called Microblog to which I have posted six of the past seven days.  I am not yet committed to keeping the blog running but I think it will meet my needs.  What I see as the reason for the blog is detailed on the "Home" and the "Posting Guidelines" pages. I did post a link to my most recent blog entry titled "Multi­Author Blogs in the Classroom and Between Classes" in Facebook.  I also sent out a couple of e­mails to individuals who might be interested in giving responses to help me develop and to clarify my thinking.  One person has posted a comment in Facebook and I am awaiting her

hastac.org/blogs/melody-dworak/2011/12/31/10-new-year’s-resolutions-budding-digital-humanists

4/5

6/27/12

10 New Year’s Resolutions for Budding Digital Humanists | HASTAC
response to my request that she repost her comment­­or allow me to repost on her behalf­­in the blog itself. I do not see the micro­blog replacing or competing­­in writing time or content­­with Etena Sacca­vajjena, my teaching blog.  Now to see how it goes...    

By accessing this site, you agree to be bound by the Legal Agreement. We respect your privacy: the HASTAC privacy policy provides details. Send us your questions or comments via the HASTAC feedback form. Except where otherwise noted, all content on this site is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution­NonCommercial­ShareAlike 3.0 License. A »Message Agency site.

hastac.org/blogs/melody-dworak/2011/12/31/10-new-year’s-resolutions-budding-digital-humanists

5/5

6/27/12

Video: Digital Humanities for Museums and Archives | HASTAC
Login Contact Join HASTAC

Home About Members Organizations Subscribe Help

Home  ›  Scholars  ›  Blog posts

Video: Digital Humanities for Museums and Archives
View Comments Author: Melody Dworak Posted: 11/1/2011 ­ 12:56am Topics: Arts & Humanities, HASTAC Scholars, Information Science & Archiving, History, Digital Humanities more... Tags: archives, Civil War, collaboration, crowdsource, Diaries more... In: Scholars, Scholar Class 2012

Scholars
› Home › About

One of the advantages of being a HASTAC Scholar is that you can pull people from different departments together to have a conversation. This showed up in my last post, and it's showing up again in today's.  On Wednesday, October 19, we talked with three professionals who provided us with critical insights into museums and archives. And we captured it on video to share. This 10­minute video features Greg Prickman, head of the University of Iowa Special Collections, Kathrine Moermond, education and outreach coordinator at the UI's Old Capitol Museum, and Nicki Saylor, head of Digital Library Services. They discuss what they've learned from their recent efforts in utilizing digital media to enhance their exhibitions and collections.  Spoiler alert: Nicki Saylor describes how one woman transcribed 400 documents in their Civil War Diaries Transcription Project, and how that kind of public engagement with "citizen scholars" can revitalize collections. (You'll hear my shocked "WOW!" in the background there.)  This moment completely changed my opinion about the role crowdsourcing plays in these type of projects. I've been thinking about it a bit pessimistically, thinking that's a way for commercial ventures to exploit unpaid labor (think Yelp! and food reviews being written by amateur journalists). The way it's talked about here inspires me to consider how this type of effort can enrich a person's life through meaningfully contributing to history's documentation. This is no crabby restaurant review. This is an experience that people will take with them, connecting with history through discovery and learning. The video panel was inspired by the efforts of Neal Stimler, asscociate coordinator of images at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and his questions posed for the Musuem Computer Network's annual conference. This year's conference theme is Hacking the Museum and takes place November 16­19 in Atlanta, Georgia.

› Forums › Blogs › Meet the Scholars › Groups

About Melody Dworak
Master's candidate in a School of Library and Information Science program...
Read more

Media

HASTAC Scholars Tweets
Fiona Barnett

HASTACscholars
HASTACscholars RT @mkgold: Johanna Drucker on the @uminnpress blog: "Representation and the digital environment" bit.ly/JevGvJ #dhdebates
40 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

melody dworak's blog Login or register to post comments

Interpretation & Interfaces
Eric Hoyt 32 weeks 5 days ago Login or register to post comments

Thanks for sharing this video, Melody. Lots of interesting ideas inside here. I especially liked the point about archivists and librarians needing to not be afraid to play an interpretive role. There are always various levels of mediation at play in an archive . I think accepting that we play mediating and interpretive roles can lead to better interface design ­­ whether that interface is a GUI or a bricks & mortar reading room. ­ Eric  

HASTACscholars Still thinking abt post by @NazcaTheMad "What Remains: Collaboration & Knowledge at a Non-Digital Unconf" bit.ly/JeDIPx #transformDH
40 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

HASTACscholars @adelinekoh @moyazb @anitaconchita woo! i'm gonna have a party at my place during MLA. fun!!
40 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

Interpretation
Melody Dworak 30 weeks 2 days ago

adelinekoh our panel on #race & #dh has been accepted for #mla13! featuring @alondra @anitaconchita @moyazb & more! #transformdh adelinekoh.org/blog/2012/04/0…
43 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

That was one of my favorite points as well. There's definitely a line between interpretation to explore meaning and interpretation to influence meaning. Avoiding the latter gives us greater credibility through an attempt at objectivity, while avoiding

Join the conversation

hastac.org/blogs/melody-dworak/2011/11/01/video-digital-humanities-museums-and-archives

1/3

6/27/12
Login or register to post comments

Video: Digital Humanities for Museums and Archives | HASTAC
the former is lazy scholarship. And isn't a core purpose of archives to preserve and share stories? Interpretation is a part of any good storytelling.  Sorry it took so long to reply! This month has been crazy busy.

Upcoming Group Events
Submissions! : The International Wikimania Conference 2012 DC
July 12, 2012 (All day) ­ July 14, 2012 (All day)

Crowdsourcing and user/audience engagement
David Meurer 31 weeks 5 days ago Login or register to post comments

Thank you for the Insightful interview Melody! I share your reluctance to blindly valorize or endorse the motivations behind many crowdsourcing initiatives. The success story of the civil war diary transcriptions mentioned in the interview offers fresh perspectives on how engaging audiences in cultural and historical scholarship can be beneficial all around. In best case scenarios the audience has the opportunity to work with materials first hand and make meaningful contributions, the general public gains through increased online availability of shared cultural resources, institutions can disseminate more works and raise awareness of their programs, and students, researchers and scholars are able to access corpora and multimedia collections for study. I work on a project that is taking a comparable approach to the problem of orphan works. We adapt the fair dealing exceptions in Canadian copyright to user interfaces for capturing information about rights holders in composite cultural works. With these tools, users of the online archive can clearly view rights holder information and easily submit additions or amendments. I will post about these tools soon (we are currently wrapping up the last phase of development) but it was nice to see a connection here.     

Digital Humanities Congress 2012, University of Sheffield, UK
September 5, 2012 ­ 7:00pm ­ September 7, 2012 ­ 7:00pm

The Digital Humanities Winter Institute @MITH
January 7, 2013 ­ 10:00am ­ January 11, 2013 ­ 10:00am

View events on calendar

Find Scholars
Filter by First Name

Crowdsourcing and engagement with learning
Melody Dworak 30 weeks 2 days ago Login or register to post comments

Filter by Last Name

Thanks for sharing your project! I'm keeping this on the radar. I am a part of another project that could make great use of mediated crowdsourcing, one with the goal of collecting metadata about a literary movement. (It's not up and running yet as we're still exploring methods and laying big ideas out on the table.) What inspires me so much about the CWD success is that the engagement is real. Contributors invest themselves in the material and care so much that the learning that happens is something that's going to stay with them. I had the opportunity to work with primary sources, researching a question on behalf of someone who couldn't come to the archives in person. The research was on railroad history and digging through the materials left me personally invested in the outcome or answer to the question. It was a very fulfilling (learning) experience. Seems like there are great pedagogical implications here. Filter by Topic
<Any>

Filter by Tags

Find by Class Year
-Year

Submit

View All

Crowdsourcing, History, and Learning...
Lori Steuart 31 weeks 5 days ago Login or register to post comments

I really enjoyed the interview; thanks for posting this, Melody! I'm sort of picking up on what David  and you both mention above regarding crowdsourcing and its motivations ­ today I noticed a post on CNet about the DARPA "Shredder Challenge," which proposes to discover new ways to "process and decode shredded documents confiscated in war zones, as well as test vulnerabilities in the shredding methods used by the U.S. national security community" through crowdsourcing (according to the CNet article). It struck me as an interesting intiative, given the ultimate motivation for the challenge (and its $50,000 prize). Anyway, it jumped out at me in the context of your post. Thanks again for the video; I hope to see/read more soon!

Thanks for the link!
Melody Dworak 30 weeks 2 days ago Login or register to post comments

This is fascinating. It makes me wonder if my puzzle­loving grandmother were still alive, would she be an expert at putting these shreds in order? She would piece together puzzles of the hardest variety­­ 2' x 3' images of popped popcorn, gumballs, you name it. The more redundant the better (or at least harder). This is potentially another example of a non­traditional scholar­­another stimulating question posed by Neal Stimler in his pitch for videos. In a traditional academic setting, I would never think to ask a retired grandma with no Ph.D. and nothing but time on her hands to make a meaningful contribution to a body of knowledge. But with a crowdsourced web­based project? Why not??

More on crowdsourcing for institutions
hastac.org/blogs/melody-dworak/2011/11/01/video-digital-humanities-museums-and-archives 2/3

6/27/12
Elizabeth Cornell 31 weeks 3 days ago Login or register to post comments

Video: Digital Humanities for Museums and Archives | HASTAC
Thanks for sharing this, Melody. Your post inspired me to write about the NYPL's "What's On the Menu?" crowdsourcing project.

Thanks for cross­posting
Melody Dworak 30 weeks 2 days ago Login or register to post comments

Thanks for cross­posting here! Giving it a read for sure.

By accessing this site, you agree to be bound by the Legal Agreement. We respect your privacy: the HASTAC privacy policy provides details. Send us your questions or comments via the HASTAC feedback form. Except where otherwise noted, all content on this site is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution­NonCommercial­ShareAlike 3.0 License. A »Message Agency site.

hastac.org/blogs/melody-dworak/2011/11/01/video-digital-humanities-museums-and-archives

3/3

6/27/12

Announcing THATCamp Iowa City, March 30-April 1, 2012 | HASTAC
Login Contact Join HASTAC

Home About Members Organizations Subscribe Help

Home  ›  Scholars  ›  Blog posts

Announcing THATCamp Iowa City, March 30­April 1, 2012
View Comments Author: Melody Dworak Posted: 11/30/2011 ­ 3:19pm Topics: Collaboration, Digital Humanities Tags: community, THATCamp, THATCamp Iowa City In: Scholars, Scholar Class 2012

Scholars
› Home › About

  Dear HASTAC Community: I wanted to use this post to share what my fellow University of Iowa HASTAC Scholar, Katherine F. Montgomery, and I have been doing with our free time lately. We have been inspired by our roles as HASTAC Scholars to convene a THATCamp (The Humanities and Technology Camp), with the incredible support of our sponsoring organizations, the Center for Teaching and the Obermann Center for Advanced Studies. The Obermann Center has been a part of the Public Humanities in a Digital World initiative, and is an advocate of the developing Digital Studio for Public Humanities. A lot of things are converging for us here. First, the timing of the above­ mentioned initiatives may coincide with a greater digital humanities movement, but it’s someone so many are already paying attention to. The pessimistic thing to say is that claiming digital humanities on one’s CV is the way for a humanities Ph.D. to get a faculty position in a humanities­ hating, monograph­hating climate, that this is a way to cope with change rather than to spur it on. The fact that digital humanities as an area is hard to define doesn’t help it’s case when having to combat that charge. If anyone can claim to do digital humanities work, does that mean the barrier of entry is so low it isn’t worth anything? If even librarians can be involved in digital humanities work, how prestigious can that be? Of course, I’ve read more articles praising digital humanities work than questioning it, even if the community involved is smaller than the set of traditional scholars. Just the idea of “potential” is exciting. The potential of using digital tools to investigate new questions and old assumptions—no matter what those questions are or who is asking them—is the core reason I’m spending so much of my free time these days engaged with something that doesn’t clearly fit well with the rest of my work. And yet I keep running into friends who might relate to the literature I’ve been reading. I have a friend who was using ArcGIS to map areas of New Orleans affected by Hurricane Katrina. Another friend just took a job as an evaluator of a museum’s education programming. I had to ask him whether they were using QR codes. And long before I had ever heard of HASTAC, my partner was culling data from police records to build a map of crime in my city, to visualize through map markers whether fears about certain neighborhoods were exaggerated. These peers of mine do not have doctorates. They are engaged as citizen scholars. I understand that there is a difference between an empirical study grounded in theory on an academic level and experimenting with code to answer a question that matters to you personally (the latter of which can be stopped at any time, but if your work is funded by a grant, you’d better deliver). However, ignoring that people outside academic establishments have the power to manipulate digital tools for the betterment of their community erects a false barrier and risks missing

› Forums › Blogs › Meet the Scholars › Groups

About Melody Dworak
Master's candidate in a School of Library and Information Science program...
Read more

HASTAC Scholars Tweets
Fiona Barnett

HASTACscholars
HASTACscholars RT @mkgold: Johanna Drucker on the @uminnpress blog: "Representation and the digital environment" bit.ly/JevGvJ #dhdebates
40 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

HASTACscholars Still thinking abt post by @NazcaTheMad "What Remains: Collaboration & Knowledge at a Non-Digital Unconf" bit.ly/JeDIPx #transformDH
40 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

HASTACscholars @adelinekoh @moyazb @anitaconchita woo! i'm gonna have a party at my place during MLA. fun!!
40 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

adelinekoh our panel on #race & #dh has been accepted for #mla13! featuring @alondra @anitaconchita @moyazb & more! #transformdh adelinekoh.org/blog/2012/04/0…
43 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

Join the conversation

hastac.org/blogs/melody-dworak/2011/11/30/announcing-thatcamp-iowa-city-march-30-april-1-2012

1/2

6/27/12

Announcing THATCamp Iowa City, March 30-April 1, 2012 | HASTAC
opportunities to explore other people’s realities. THATCamps are designed to remove these barriers and flatten these hierarchies. The lack of ahead­of­time programming means those who have registered and show up determine what they’re going to talk about. It’s scary to do it this way because you want people to leave having had a thrilling conversation and without advanced planning, how can you control for that? But by giving up control, you open the space up to opportunity. As HASTAC Scholars, we’ve been told to go out, find what digital humanities things are happening at Iowa and in the region, and report back. But given the elasticity of the definition and broadness of the community—we don’t know whom we don’t know. Convening THATCamp Iowa City allows us to reach farther and wider than we can through our university’s listserv. If you are in the area, consider registering. If you are not but still want to participate, be on the lookout for ways we’re able to extend THATCamp Iowa City to online participants (Twitter hashtags, collaborative Google Docs, maybe even session streaming??). Registration begins early January. For more information, visit iowacity2012.thatcamp.org or follow @THATCampIC on Twitter. To read more about THATCamps, visit the organization’s About page.

Upcoming Group Events
Submissions! : The International Wikimania Conference 2012 DC
July 12, 2012 (All day) ­ July 14, 2012 (All day)

Digital Humanities Congress 2012, University of Sheffield, UK
September 5, 2012 ­ 7:00pm ­ September 7, 2012 ­ 7:00pm

The Digital Humanities Winter Institute @MITH
January 7, 2013 ­ 10:00am ­ January 11, 2013 ­ 10:00am

View events on calendar

Find Scholars
Filter by First Name

melody dworak's blog Login or register to post comments

Filter by Last Name

Filter by Topic
<Any>

Filter by Tags

Find by Class Year
-Year

Submit

View All

By accessing this site, you agree to be bound by the Legal Agreement. We respect your privacy: the HASTAC privacy policy provides details. Send us your questions or comments via the HASTAC feedback form. Except where otherwise noted, all content on this site is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution­NonCommercial­ShareAlike 3.0 License. A »Message Agency site.

hastac.org/blogs/melody-dworak/2011/11/30/announcing-thatcamp-iowa-city-march-30-april-1-2012

2/2

6/27/12

Defining Terms: My First Step in Visualizing DH Crowdsourcing Models | HASTAC
Login Contact Join HASTAC

Home About Members Organizations Subscribe Help

Home  ›  Scholars  ›  Blog posts

Defining Terms: My First Step in Visualizing DH Crowdsourcing Models
View Comments Author: Melody Dworak Posted: 1/31/2012 ­ 6:45pm Topics: HASTAC Scholars, Digital Humanities Tags: crowdsourcing, data, definitions, digital humanities, digital humanities projects In: Scholars, Scholar Class 2012

Scholars
› Home › About

 

› Forums › Blogs › Meet the Scholars › Groups

According to Luis Von Ahn, professor at Carnegie Mellon and developer of Duolingo, one million people can translate the entirety of English Wikipedia into Spanish in just 80 hours. He calls that Human Computation, noting that others call it crowdsourcing. I went to a THATCamp AHA session facilitated by Ben Brumfield where those in the room posed questions to key players on two different projects that used crowdsourcing strategies in very different ways, both achieving success. Galaxy Zoo, represented by Chris Linet, is an example of a crowdsourcing project using highly technical means to gather and verify data, while the Civil War Diaries & Letters Transcription Project, represented by Jen Wolfe, uses technology mostly as the conduit to share the input from manual labor with the quality control of professional librarian labor. After hearing the comparison of these two projects, I wondered how else we might be able to pull out similarities and differences from Digital Humanities projects to see what’s working for whom. Do we have enough examples of successful projects to create crowdsourcing models that could inform future initiatives?* I really like this as a potential research question, but defining key terms to limit the scope, surveying the field for qualifying projects, and analyzing their crowdsourcing strategies that are unique but also transferable is an important first step. So let’s start with defining some terms. Clarifying three main concepts will help narrow the scope of this inquiry. What do we mean by “crowdsourcing”? What do we include under the umbrella of “digital humanities” and extend that to what counts as a “digital humanities project”? That last question may sound unneccesary without knowing what kinds of initiatives fell on my initial list of projects. Brainstorming, I listed all the initiatives I could think of from the Galaxy Zoo and Civil War Diaries examples to things like the Google Books digitization efforts and university partnerships like HathiTrust. The Google Books digitization efforts have huge implications for what’s possible to accomplish through digital humanities investigations, but the crowdsourcing that led to that mass digitization may stretch how I want to define the term. So let’s backtrack. What is “crowdsourcing”? A strategy showing up much more in business than in academia­­and especially in creating databases for smartphone and tablet apps­­crowdsourcing is the process of the sum of its parts

About Melody Dworak
Master's candidate in a School of Library and Information Science program...
Read more

HASTAC Scholars Tweets
Fiona Barnett

HASTACscholars
HASTACscholars RT @mkgold: Johanna Drucker on the @uminnpress blog: "Representation and the digital environment" bit.ly/JevGvJ #dhdebates
40 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

HASTACscholars Still thinking abt post by @NazcaTheMad "What Remains: Collaboration & Knowledge at a Non-Digital Unconf" bit.ly/JeDIPx #transformDH
40 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

HASTACscholars @adelinekoh @moyazb @anitaconchita woo! i'm gonna have a party at my place during MLA. fun!!
40 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

adelinekoh our panel on #race & #dh has been accepted for #mla13! featuring @alondra @anitaconchita @moyazb & more! #transformdh adelinekoh.org/blog/2012/04/0…
43 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

Join the conversation

hastac.org/blogs/melody-dworak/…/defining-terms-my-first-step-visualizing-dh-crowdsourcing-models

1/3

6/27/12

Defining Terms: My First Step in Visualizing DH Crowdsourcing Models | HASTAC

being more important than the size of the individual part. The successful 2008 fundraising by the Obama presidential campaign told donors that contributing $5 was just as important as contributing $1000. The outcome was raising both financial investments as well as personal investments in the political campaign. Organizers created buy­in, and buy­in can play a significant role in successful crowdsourcing efforts, as well. But buy­in isn’t required. Minor efforts by a large number of people are required. They can be major efforts, too, but don’t have to be. So let’s start by defining “crowdsourcing” as “the efforts of a number of people contributing to a significant outcome.” One definition taken care of. Now to define “digital humanities” before limiting the scope of what counts as a “digital humanities project.” The most expansive definition I’ve thought of for the term can be stated as “using technology to teach us something new.” Using digital tools for discovery fits this definition, as does parsing big data for the purpose of (re)telling stories. For the purpose of this research, I’m going to say projects are scholarly pursuits, where an agenda to fill a knowledge gap trumps an agenda to make profits. There is this trend of universities partnering with industries as one way to make up for budgets slashed by states. For me to want to consider a digital humanities project here, it has to be more for the betterment of humans than it is for a business’s bottom line. YouTube, Flickr, Facebook, and Twitter could all be seen as utilizing crowdsourcing strategies. If the for­profit world contributes to the body of knowledge about our world, then it may have a place among these other initiatives, but I don’t think we can justify using the term “digital humanities” unless it involves discovery about ourselves as humans. Two examples that help test these definitions are the Google Books digitization efforts mentioned above and the archiving of public tweets by the Library of Congress. The former has created a massive repository and the latter a massive database. Contributions to the former involve university partners presumably under some kind of contract or memorandum of understanding, while contributions to the latter are made by members of the public, either knowingly or unknowingly. And the digitization initiative exists to digitally archive works contributing to human knowledge, while the archived tweets represent moments of human expression. I feel as if those characteristics qualify these two initiatives as crowdsourcing initiatives that can contribute to the field of digital humanities, but I can’t quite call them projects yet without the influence of the interpretation by scholars to discover something new. 825 words later, here is where I begin. If I hope to visualize some models that can inform the crowdsourcing project I am working on, my next step is to start culling the web for projects to find what characteristics can be grouped together. Being in a Library and Information Science program, classification is right up my alley. Bring on the grunt work! *To be transparent, I have been pursuing this topic as a research inquiry as of mid­January 2012.
melody dworak's blog Login or register to post comments

Upcoming Group Events
Submissions! : The International Wikimania Conference 2012 DC
July 12, 2012 (All day) ­ July 14, 2012 (All day)

Digital Humanities Congress 2012, University of Sheffield, UK
September 5, 2012 ­ 7:00pm ­ September 7, 2012 ­ 7:00pm

The Digital Humanities Winter Institute @MITH
January 7, 2013 ­ 10:00am ­ January 11, 2013 ­ 10:00am

View events on calendar

Find Scholars
Filter by First Name

Filter by Last Name

Filter by Topic
<Any>

Filter by Tags

Find by Class Year
-Year

Submit

View All

hastac.org/blogs/melody-dworak/…/defining-terms-my-first-step-visualizing-dh-crowdsourcing-models

2/3

6/27/12

Defining Terms: My First Step in Visualizing DH Crowdsourcing Models | HASTAC

By accessing this site, you agree to be bound by the Legal Agreement. We respect your privacy: the HASTAC privacy policy provides details. Send us your questions or comments via the HASTAC feedback form. Except where otherwise noted, all content on this site is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution­NonCommercial­ShareAlike 3.0 License. A »Message Agency site.

hastac.org/blogs/melody-dworak/…/defining-terms-my-first-step-visualizing-dh-crowdsourcing-models

3/3

6/27/12

Digital Humanities for all? | HASTAC
Login Contact Join HASTAC

Home About Members Organizations Subscribe Help

Home  ›  Scholars  ›  Blog posts

Digital Humanities for all?
View Comments

Scholars
  I have a problem. I want to talk about the digital humanities in the most relatable terms. I want to make it so accessible that a high school student could grasp the fantastic possibilities of using digital means to describe the world. I want great aunts—who have just learned how to Skype with their great nephews and get to see their great grand nieces smile—to be able to post traditional recipes to a family website, a website that transforms into a digital archive through the richness of its content. My institution is involved with national movements that risk being closed off from the public engaging in them. “Digital humanities” and “public scholarship” are two terms that have the potential to be accessible to a wide group of people, but the academe lays claim to the terms more often than the public does. I’ve found myself wondering aloud (again through Twitter), what is the equivalent term for the “humanities” that people outside the academe identify with? Is it “life”? I haven’t gotten the impression the term is well understood outside the academe. Several academic articles I’ve read define “public scholar” squarely within the realm of the academe, while at least one opened it up to include members of the public. However, using the term with librarians, archivists, and museum professionals, the mental picture conjured is less of the tenured academic working in the field and more about the amateur researcher squatting in the stacks. It’s the tenacious collector who knows everything there is to know about Ron Perlman and his role in the 1980s television drama Beauty and the Beast. The locus of meaning is in the word “public” over the academic definition of “scholar.” It’s also telling that I can’t speak of members of the academe and members of the public as if they’re one in the same. It’s like the spaghetti and pasta example, where all spaghetti is pasta but not all pasta is spaghetti. Members of the academe can be members of the public, but members of the public might not be members of the academe. The distinction between the two groups is important when it comes to deciding who can teach whom in formal institutional settings, but it doesn’t carry the same weight when it comes to using digital tools to pursue personal research goals.   So back to my problem. How do I talk about digital humanities to everyone? How do other scholars talk about their field to a broad audience? How can scholars within the institution work with scholars outside the institution for mutual benefit? I’m very much taken with the idea of being a scholar in public, whether you identify as a member of the public or not. Digital tools facilitate being public. The common good relies on common goals.

Author: Melody Dworak Posted: 1/24/2012 ­ 11:37pm Topics: HASTAC Scholars, Digital Humanities Tags: #digitalhumanities, citizen scholar, humanities, language, lexicon more... In: Scholars, Scholar Class 2012

› Home › About › Forums › Blogs › Meet the Scholars › Groups

About Melody Dworak
Master's candidate in a School of Library and Information Science program...
Read more

HASTAC Scholars Tweets
Fiona Barnett

HASTACscholars
HASTACscholars RT @mkgold: Johanna Drucker on the @uminnpress blog: "Representation and the digital environment" bit.ly/JevGvJ #dhdebates
40 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

HASTACscholars Still thinking abt post by @NazcaTheMad "What Remains: Collaboration & Knowledge at a Non-Digital Unconf" bit.ly/JeDIPx #transformDH
40 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

HASTACscholars @adelinekoh @moyazb @anitaconchita woo! i'm gonna have a party at my place during MLA. fun!!
40 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

melody dworak's blog Login or register to post comments

adelinekoh our panel on #race & #dh has been accepted for #mla13! featuring @alondra @anitaconchita @moyazb & more! #transformdh adelinekoh.org/blog/2012/04/0…
43 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

Join the conversation

hastac.org/blogs/melody-dworak/2012/01/24/digital-humanities-all

1/2

6/27/12

Digital Humanities for all? | HASTAC

Upcoming Group Events
Submissions! : The International Wikimania Conference 2012 DC
July 12, 2012 (All day) ­ July 14, 2012 (All day)

Digital Humanities Congress 2012, University of Sheffield, UK
September 5, 2012 ­ 7:00pm ­ September 7, 2012 ­ 7:00pm

The Digital Humanities Winter Institute @MITH
January 7, 2013 ­ 10:00am ­ January 11, 2013 ­ 10:00am

View events on calendar

Find Scholars
Filter by First Name

Filter by Last Name

Filter by Topic
<Any>

Filter by Tags

Find by Class Year
-Year

Submit

View All

By accessing this site, you agree to be bound by the Legal Agreement. We respect your privacy: the HASTAC privacy policy provides details. Send us your questions or comments via the HASTAC feedback form. Except where otherwise noted, all content on this site is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution­NonCommercial­ShareAlike 3.0 License. A »Message Agency site.

hastac.org/blogs/melody-dworak/2012/01/24/digital-humanities-all

2/2

6/27/12

Archives, Access, and Gwendolyn Brooks (The Digital Kind) | HASTAC
Login Contact Join HASTAC

Home About Members Organizations Subscribe Help

Home

Archives, Access, and Gwendolyn Brooks (The Digital Kind)
View Comments Author: Melody Dworak Posted: 9/2/2011 ­ 1:22pm Tags: audio, authors, digital archive, digital libraries, Gwendolyn Brooks more...

About Melody Dworak
Master's candidate in a School of Library and Information Science program...
Read more

 

When I received the news I was chosen to represent The University of Iowa to the national digital humanities community as a HASTAC Scholar, I couldn’t contain my excitement. I am in my second and final year of the master’s program in the School of Library and Information Science here, which means I have an interest in just about every possible subject related to digital forums for learning and growing. Libraries house a diversity of knowledge, whether they represent physical buildings filled with books and journals or digital environments connecting remote users to PDFs and eBooks. Libraries are thus situated between the humanities and technology. The traditional mission has been to archive and provide access, but these roles have been changing as technology advances and needs for interconnectedness, collaboration, and creativity increase. I am honored to be a part of the cohort of library and information science professionals redefining roles in this profession. I’ve had the privilege of working as a graduate assistant for the Virtual Writing University Archive, spending a year learning about digital libraries in research universities. We’ve dealt with the traditional questions of what to archive, but now with a twist. Virtual storage allows a seemingly unlimited amount of space for digital formats. This digital age has prompted new questions for archivists and caretakers of knowledge delivery systems. Here’s a digitized recording of a 1980 reading by Gwendolyn Brooks­­who wants to know about this and how can we let them know where it is? When the majority has access to vast storage space, there’s so much potential for finding the most fascinating­­or the most banal­­items. Libraries haven’t traditionally been positioned to showcase collections on an international scale. Now, physical boundaries don’t box us in. Or take the quality of preservation question. We might have a digitized conversation between an author from Zimbabwe and a poet from Singapore discussing their perspectives on their respective political regimes, but the original recorder captured the sound of the wind more than the sound of their voices. Who might still be interested in that? You have to love the dedicated documentarians who see how precious these present moments are and what they might lend to our future fascinations, no matter what obstacles come up. These are not terribly complex questions, but they do have implications for how we connect seekers of information with

Popular tags
art badges for lifelong learning cfp

collaboration conference digital

humanities digital media &
learning digital media and learning competition DMLbadges education games HASTAC HASTAC Scholars humanities learning Mozilla pedagogy social media technology twitter

hastac.org/blogs/melody-dworak/2011/09/02/archives-access-and-gwendolyn-brooks-digital-kind

1/2

6/27/12

Archives, Access, and Gwendolyn Brooks (The Digital Kind) | HASTAC

havers of information, which is a core purpose of our efforts here. Digital humanities initiatives have the potential to connect like­missioned individuals with different expertise and expand the possibilities for learning. With such diverse talent, options become opportunities. I am thrilled to be a part of this.
melody dworak's blog Login or register to post comments

By accessing this site, you agree to be bound by the Legal Agreement. We respect your privacy: the HASTAC privacy policy provides details. Send us your questions or comments via the HASTAC feedback form. Except where otherwise noted, all content on this site is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution­NonCommercial­ShareAlike 3.0 License. A »Message Agency site.

hastac.org/blogs/melody-dworak/2011/09/02/archives-access-and-gwendolyn-brooks-digital-kind

2/2

6/27/12

Collaborations and Digital Humanities Centers | HASTAC
Login Contact Join HASTAC

Home About Members Organizations Subscribe Help

Home  ›  Scholars  ›  Blog posts

Collaborations and Digital Humanities Centers
View Comments Author: Melody Dworak Posted: 11/28/2011 - 11:10pm Topics: Data & Information, HASTAC Scholars, Information Science & Archiving, Digital Humanities, Higher Education Tags: collaborations, digital libraries, HathiTrust, libraries, partnerships more... In: Scholars, Scholar Class 2012

Scholars
› Home › About

On Wednesday, November 9, 2011, the Center for History of Print and Digital Cultural at the University of Wisconsin at Madison hosted Dr. John Unsworth for the 2011 Wisconsin Distinguished Lecture in LIS. Dr. Unsworth is the director for the Illinois Informatics Institute and the dean of the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at UrbanaChampaign. The following is how the lecture was described in an email I received, and what piqued my interest about the talk: "Merchants of Light, Depredators, and Pioneers: I'll take my Digital Humanities with Bacon! (Or, Digital Humanities and Librarianship in the 21st-Century Research University)" This talk will consider some computational methods that open new avenues for humanities research, and some examples of the kinds of questions scholars pursue in that research. Those questions, in turn, suggest ways in which the digital turn might bring us closer to university colleagues outside the humanities, and closer to non-academic audiences, at the same time. The same questions also suggest new roles for librarians, as part of a research team. My ears perk up any time I hear about libraries and digital humanities projects, and this was no exception. Although I was unable to attend the lecture in person, Anna Palmer, a coordinator for the Center, was kind enough to send a link to a non-public video to share his presentation that way [to request access to the video, email her at printculture(at)slis(dot)wisc(dot)edu]. I’d like to share a little of what I learned by watching his presentation via video. Dr. Unsworth centered the first part of his talk around the burgeoning movement of university-established digital humanities centers and the different roles they could play within the institutional framework. He began by discussing a report by Diane Zorich, “A Survey of Digital Humanities Centers in the United States” [PDF], but problematized what he saw as the role Zorich favored for such centers. He described her report as splitting centers into two functions: serving as collaborators and catalysts for digital humanities inquiries, and creating digital resources for a wider community. The latter is what he says Zorich favors in her report, which he challenges by asking what good resources are without the scholars who use them. By “resources,” he’s referring to repositories and databases that hold published knowledge like HathiTrust Digital Library. I‘m someone who is invested in the success of digital libraries as a source for information accessible on a grander scale, and as a way for more public institutions to take the reins as publishers. But I have always wondered, who is the audience and how do you link Person A up with Resource B?

› Forums › Blogs › Meet the Scholars › Groups

About Melody Dworak
Master's candidate in a School of Library and Information Science program...
Read more

HASTAC Scholars Tweets
Fiona Barnett

HASTACscholars
HASTACscholars RT @mkgold: Johanna Drucker on the @uminnpress blog: "Representation and the digital environment" bit.ly/JevGvJ #dhdebates
40 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

HASTACscholars Still thinking abt post by @NazcaTheMad "What Remains: Collaboration & Knowledge at a Non-Digital Unconf" bit.ly/JeDIPx #transformDH
40 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

HASTACscholars @adelinekoh @moyazb @anitaconchita woo! i'm gonna have a party at my place during MLA. fun!!
40 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

adelinekoh our panel on #race & #dh has been accepted for #mla13! featuring @alondra @anitaconchita @moyazb & more! #transformdh adelinekoh.org/blog/2012/04/0…
43 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

Join the conversation

hastac.org/blogs/melody-dworak/2011/11/28/collaborations-and-digital-humanities-centers

1/3

6/27/12

Collaborations and Digital Humanities Centers | HASTAC
The center-focused approach, as I understood it, is about forming partnerships to help deliver first the interface for the humanities researcher and then the research to its audience. My involvement at Iowa as a HASTAC Scholar has allowed me to be privy to some of the conversations going on as our own university works to develop and establish its version of a digital humanities center, the Digital Studio for Public Humanities. I don’t have full details in the inner workings of the Digital Studio, but I do know connecting scholars with the tools they need to explore their research and disseminate it more widely is a primary goal. In addition, my colleague and I have been discussing what kind of conversations our fellow Iowa DH enthusiasts are interested in being a part of. How faculty members and other scholars can work with librarians on joint projects has certainly come up. Because I’m in my own LIS program, I get to ask questions specific to the kinds of collaborations and partnerships we’re talking about here: What are the best ways to make use of libraries for digital humanities efforts? What do you want out of staff members who are at the ready to assist you in whatever ways they can (and are sanctioned by the organizational infrastructure)? Part of what drew me to HASTAC was the focus on collaborations and intersections, the notion that we are stronger together than we are as a lone (unread) monograph gathering dust on a shelf in the basement. How can we seek out and cement those partnerships to explore ideas and research to build new knowledge? Note: The image above, of Sir Francis Bacon, is of a key player in Dr. Unsworth’s talk. He inspired me to download the e-book of The New Atlantis, which is the basis for an extended metaphor for the present-day research university. I didn’t want to attempt reproducing each part of the metaphor without the speaker’s slides, but if I get a hold of them, I will certainly post! Always good to think about our roles and purposes in any organization. *Edit*: Dr. Unsworth made the PowerPoint presentation slides available. Download a .ppt file here.   Filter by Last Name

Upcoming Group Events
Submissions! : The International Wikimania Conference 2012 DC
July 12, 2012 (All day) - July 14, 2012 (All day)

Digital Humanities Congress 2012, University of Sheffield, UK
September 5, 2012 - 7:00pm - September 7, 2012 - 7:00pm

The Digital Humanities Winter Institute @MITH
January 7, 2013 - 10:00am - January 11, 2013 - 10:00am

View events on calendar

Find Scholars
Filter by First Name

Filter by Topic
<Any>

Filter by Tags

Find by Class Year
-Year

melody dworak's blog Login or register to post comments

Submit

View All

Librarians & Audiences - Vital for Successful DH Projects
Eric Hoyt 30 weeks 22 hours ago Login or register to post comments

Thank you, Melody, for another stimulating post and for sharing links to both Unsworth’s PowerPoint and Diane Zorich’s CLIR Report. I found both very interesting and compelling in their own ways. Ultimately, Unsworth’s vision does not strike me as incompatible with Zorich’s recommendations about maximizing impact. I wonder if he could have made most of his same points without using Zorich as a rhetorical straw man (or straw woman). I think your own post, though, synthesizes the big picture challenges and opportunities very well. You lay out some of the same questions I’ve been considering in my own work. I am currently preparing a 10-minute lecture on the Media History Digital Library’s collaborative model to give this weekend at HASTAC. As I read your post, here are a couple of the ideas that sprang to my mind. How faculty members and other scholars work with librarians on joint projects has certainly come up…. What are the best ways to make use of libraries for digital humanities efforts? What do you want out of staff members who are at the ready to assist you in whatever ways they can (and are sanctioned by the organizational infrastructure)? Librarians can and should play an important role in any Digital Humanities endeavor. Wendy Hagenmaier, a Masters student in UT-Austin’s School of Information, has been an invaluable collaborator in developing the Media History Digital Library. Among other things, Wendy is helping us make good decisions about extensible and exportable formats to store data and metadata. One idea Unsworth points toward in his discussion of Bacon is how the role of the librarian can exist outside the framework of a traditional library. The skills and expertise of collecting, navigating, and interpreting information are vital in any number of contexts. Granted, librarians will probably continue to need home institutions in order to earn a

hastac.org/blogs/melody-dworak/2011/11/28/collaborations-and-digital-humanities-centers

2/3

6/27/12

Collaborations and Digital Humanities Centers | HASTAC
living. But we need to think beyond the resources and collections of the home institution.  “How do we digitally make available our institution’s materials?,” is the wrong question. This is what leads to the silo syndrome and redundancy that Zorich identifies. Instead, the question needs to be: “How do we leverage our institution’s materials to create a network that best serves a base of scholarly and public users?” The Media History Digital Library may be an extreme example of leveraging a small collection to build something grander in scale. Aside from a small number of books owned by the project’s founder, David Pierce, all of the materials we have digitized have been loaned by institutions and private collections. I‘m someone who is invested in the success of digital libraries as a source for information accessible on a grander scale, and as a way for more public institutions to take the reins as publishers. But I have always wondered, who is the audience and how do you link Person A up with Resource B?  “Who is the audience?” is such a vital question! Far too many Digital Humanities projects consist of websites that no one visits. Scholars don’t spend time using them. Neither does the public. Unsworth hits the nail on the head when he writes, “What’s compelling to faculty is their own research, and if that research involves use or creation of digital resources, collaboration with others, computational methods, etc., then they’ll engage with those things—not for their own sake, but for the sake of their research.” Scholars, on the whole, tend to be efficient with their time.  They spend time seeking out the resources that they think will benefit their work. An article or dissertation can be quickly discovered, skimmed, and, if relevant, cited. Sometimes a creative web interface or original navigation design makes it harder for scholars to find material usable in their research. Ironically, these innovations can have the unintended consequence of driving away your potential user base. The design of the Media History Digital Library is meant to feel familiar and user-friendly. To enhance the website’s usability and research value, we are preparing to beta test a full-text search tool that we built with Solr (more on this soon). The MHDL is already popular with film historians and devoted fans who were previously familiar with the historic periodicals on the site. We are hoping the full-text search engine opens up the project to a much larger group of students and fans who are passionate about film and media but who were not previously aware of the existence of the periodicals like The Film Daily and Photoplay. Because film and media hold so much popular interest, we probably have a broader base of non-academic users than other important fields of the humanities that don’t have cable TV channels dedicated to them. I would be curious to hear the thoughts of scholars working in other Humanities fields about the opportunities and difficulties they have encountered in engaging non-academic users. Still, the question remains: “Who is the audience?” When a scholar walks through your door proposing a Digital Humanities collaboration, I would encourage you—as a librarian—to force the scholar to truthfully answer that question. Just to be clear, it doesn’t have to be a big audience. If a project adds value to the lives of a small but dedicated community of users, then that’s great. However, you need some identifiable user-base. Once you identify that user-base, design the project in a way that best engages those users. If a scholar can’t answer the audience question, then the best thing you can do is start helping him or her brainstorm a new digital project.    

By accessing this site, you agree to be bound by the Legal Agreement. We respect your privacy: the HASTAC privacy policy provides details. Send us your questions or comments via the HASTAC feedback form. Except where otherwise noted, all content on this site is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License. A »Message Agency site.

hastac.org/blogs/melody-dworak/2011/11/28/collaborations-and-digital-humanities-centers

3/3

6/27/12

Databases & Digital Humanities: Whose Power? Whose Peril? | HASTAC
Login Contact Join HASTAC

Home About Members Organizations Subscribe Help

Home  ›  Scholars  ›  Blog posts

Databases & Digital Humanities: Whose Power? Whose Peril?
View Comments Author: Melody Dworak Posted: 10/20/2011 ­ 10:51pm Topics: Data & Information, HASTAC Scholars, Information Science & Archiving, Digital Humanities, Research & Methodologies more... Tags: data curation, databases, digital archives, digital libraries In: Scholars, Scholar Class 2012

Scholars
› Home › About

This past Tuesday, Katherine Montgomery and I facilitated a conversation among nine University of Iowa (UI) faculty and staff who are all involved with digital research or digital humanities initiatives in one way or another. One theme expressed was the importance of databases in any work that moves forward. “Databases run everything,” said Dr. Jim Elmborg, adding that to Ed Folsom, the database is the new narrative. Dr. Elmborg’s project—that I have the honor of working on as a graduate assistant—is a plan to investigate a mid­20th­century literary movement through the tool of a database. The aim is to collect metadata on this literature for those approaching the tool to manipulate for their own research and learning goals. Dr. Elmborg believes that creating digital projects to drive theses changes traditional practices in the humanities. It’s no longer the professor­god determining importance; it’s bottom­up, potentially grassroots knowledge discovery. Paul Dilley, who is a part of the UI’s DH cluster hire, spoke of challenges he’s encountered in trying to bring attention to unknown Egyptian art and inscriptions. His tool of choice? A database. Issues arising for him include bibliographic control and copyright roadblocks in trying to make these works public. I may have been primed to see the importance of databases as the big takeaway from Tuesday’s discussion because of how immersed I’ve been in the idea of them since spring. There are things I understand and things I don’t understand. They thrive at both the big­vision level as well as the minute­detail level. Databases are not only critical to my current project but also shepherd my online existence from one growing pain to the next. What does Facebook and Google and Twitter store about me? How many blogs have I read and learned from? And how would my HASTAC Scholar blog work without one? Of the many ideas from Tuesday’s discussion that I need to follow up on is the idea that databases are tied to cultural and social imperatives. This is not something I feel confident to write about without additional references. The statement came from Dr. André Brock, who holds a joint appointment with the School of Library and Information Science and the Project on Rhetoric and Inquiry. I’m currently taking a course from him, so it shouldn’t be too hard to have him elaborate. But my hunch is that relying solely on this tool may be a cultural zero­sum game (i.e., there will be winners and losers). For me and my concerns about data curation and digital preservation, the pitfalls have to deal with the long­term accessibility and reliability of the infrastructure as systems change. In some ways, digital data is highly fragile. A file extension that works today may be obsolete tomorrow, while a crumbling book is still a book. Is this an empty concern? While looking around for information on data curation, I came across the Data Conservancy initiative, which aims to preserve data collected for scientific study. Although our data is different—the data I’m working to organize is squarely in the realm of the humanities—I have much to learn

› Forums › Blogs › Meet the Scholars › Groups

About Melody Dworak
Master's candidate in a School of Library and Information Science program...
Read more

HASTAC Scholars Tweets
Fiona Barnett

HASTACscholars
HASTACscholars RT @mkgold: Johanna Drucker on the @uminnpress blog: "Representation and the digital environment" bit.ly/JevGvJ #dhdebates
40 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

HASTACscholars Still thinking abt post by @NazcaTheMad "What Remains: Collaboration & Knowledge at a Non-Digital Unconf" bit.ly/JeDIPx #transformDH
40 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

HASTACscholars @adelinekoh @moyazb @anitaconchita woo! i'm gonna have a party at my place during MLA. fun!!
40 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

adelinekoh our panel on #race & #dh has been accepted for #mla13! featuring @alondra @anitaconchita @moyazb & more! #transformdh adelinekoh.org/blog/2012/04/0…
43 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

Join the conversation

hastac.org/blogs/melody-dworak/2011/10/20/databases-digital-humanities-whose-power-whose-peril

1/2

6/27/12

Databases & Digital Humanities: Whose Power? Whose Peril? | HASTAC
from the Data Conservancy’s approach. I’m guessing any data management plan that results from this will involve databases heavily. Despite causes for concern, potential uses for databases in DH projects are exciting. Their role shouldn’t be taken for granted or treated as a magical or mystical system. Better to understand what dominates us rather than succumb to its whims—or the whims of its programmers.

Upcoming Group Events
Submissions! : The International Wikimania Conference 2012 DC
July 12, 2012 (All day) ­ July 14, 2012 (All day)

melody dworak's blog Login or register to post comments

Digital Humanities Congress 2012, University of Sheffield, UK
September 5, 2012 ­ 7:00pm ­ September 7, 2012 ­ 7:00pm

The Digital Humanities Winter Institute @MITH
January 7, 2013 ­ 10:00am ­ January 11, 2013 ­ 10:00am

View events on calendar

Find Scholars
Filter by First Name

Filter by Last Name

Filter by Topic
<Any>

Filter by Tags

Find by Class Year
-Year

Submit

View All

By accessing this site, you agree to be bound by the Legal Agreement. We respect your privacy: the HASTAC privacy policy provides details. Send us your questions or comments via the HASTAC feedback form. Except where otherwise noted, all content on this site is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution­NonCommercial­ShareAlike 3.0 License. A »Message Agency site.

hastac.org/blogs/melody-dworak/2011/10/20/databases-digital-humanities-whose-power-whose-peril

2/2

6/27/12

Why Don't We Do This More Often? Co-Working Across Disciplines | HASTAC
Login Contact Join HASTAC

Home About Members Organizations Subscribe Help

Home  ›  Scholars  ›  Blog posts

Why Don't We Do This More Often? CoWorking Across Disciplines
View Comments Author: Melody Dworak Posted: 2/28/2012 - 12:59am Topics: Academia, Higher Education, Institutions & Organizations Tags: co-working, feedback, interdisciplinary, jelly In: Scholars, Scholar Class 2012

Scholars
› Home › About

Last Friday, I attended a workshop intended to be about working with digital tools in research. We wound up discussing presentation strategies for our research, and I walked away with solid direction about how to combine the conceptual background of my research with the compositional framing for a poster I need to design in the next month. Being able to discuss my work with others in a low-risk environment launched me ahead. I had no faculty members there, no supervisors to show deference to, it was a free platform to talk about what I want to achieve to people coming from their own research-driven perspectives. I found myself point-blank saying (succinctly) exactly what I wanted to accomplish with this research and where it fit in with the bigger picture, something I haven’t yet been able to accomplish in an abstract. That “I get it!” expression on my colleague’s face is a look I wish I could frame. I didn’t feel the pressure to use jargon as a shibboleth to allow me entry into this or that discipline’s conversation. It was about getting to the point. And I loved it. The evolution of the “study buddy” along the academic continuum, the “jelly” falls into that co-working camp where the point is to put on a pot of coffee and do some work. I’m sure I’m not the only one with an inconsistent schedule and an ever-expanding to-do list. Whether you meet over tea or coffee with an extra kick, the point is to meet and do. It’s not just digital tools that can facilitate work getting done, people can play a powerful support role in figuring out where to go next. In the discussions I’ve been a part of this past year, the idea of a space for whomever to come together to talk about digital humanities-related topics, projects, or ideas has come up. What’s the best way to get people together for this? Host monthly meet-ups at a local pub? Request that an on-campus organization interested in supporting interdisciplinary interactions host seminars for different levels of the institution’s hierarchy? Convene a THATCamp? Or a crossfield conference for graduate students? My time in my program is ticking down as I type. I’m privileged to be a part of some of these initiatives now. I hope interdisciplinary co-working meet-ups continue to spread after

› Forums › Blogs › Meet the Scholars › Groups

About Melody Dworak
Master's candidate in a School of Library and Information Science program...
Read more

HASTAC Scholars Tweets
Fiona Barnett

HASTACscholars
HASTACscholars RT @mkgold: Johanna Drucker on the @uminnpress blog: "Representation and the digital environment" bit.ly/JevGvJ #dhdebates
40 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

HASTACscholars Still thinking abt post by @NazcaTheMad "What Remains: Collaboration & Knowledge at a Non-Digital Unconf" bit.ly/JeDIPx #transformDH
40 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

HASTACscholars @adelinekoh @moyazb @anitaconchita woo! i'm gonna have a party at my place during MLA. fun!!
40 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

adelinekoh our panel on #race & #dh has been accepted for #mla13! featuring @alondra @anitaconchita @moyazb & more! #transformdh adelinekoh.org/blog/2012/04/0…
43 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

Join the conversation

hastac.org/blogs/melody-dworak/…/why-dont-we-come-here-more-often-co-working-across-disciplines

1/2

6/27/12

Why Don't We Do This More Often? Co-Working Across Disciplines | HASTAC

I’m done.

melody dworak's blog Login or register to post comments

Upcoming Group Events
Submissions! : The International Wikimania Conference 2012 DC
July 12, 2012 (All day) - July 14, 2012 (All day)

Digital Humanities Congress 2012, University of Sheffield, UK
September 5, 2012 - 7:00pm - September 7, 2012 - 7:00pm

The Digital Humanities Winter Institute @MITH
January 7, 2013 - 10:00am - January 11, 2013 - 10:00am

View events on calendar

Find Scholars
Filter by First Name

Filter by Last Name

Filter by Topic
<Any>

Filter by Tags

Find by Class Year
-Year

Submit

View All

By accessing this site, you agree to be bound by the Legal Agreement. We respect your privacy: the HASTAC privacy policy provides details. Send us your questions or comments via the HASTAC feedback form. Except where otherwise noted, all content on this site is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License. A »Message Agency site.

hastac.org/blogs/melody-dworak/…/why-dont-we-come-here-more-often-co-working-across-disciplines

2/2

6/27/12

Digital Humanities Resource Guide | HASTAC
Login Contact Join HASTAC

Home About Members Organizations Subscribe Help

Home  ›  Scholars  ›  Blog posts

Digital Humanities Resource Guide
View Comments

Scholars
Because I’m in a library and information science program and have a deep interest in the digital humanities, when an assignment to create a subject guide came up, I had to choose DH as a focus. It was really informative to work on, and I wound up grabbing resources that I thought demonstrated the field and its history well. I also wound up pointing to the HASTAC blogs and forums as a resource for people new to DH to find out more. I made the assignment public on my blog, but thought, why not host a copy here? Enjoy!
The term “Digital Humanities” (often called “DH” by members of the Digital Humanities community) was not widely used on university campuses until the 21st century. Now some see it as a way to rebuild the humanities in a time where grant funds are allocated to “innovations” in lieu of “research.” Others see it as a natural fit for their scholarly research, where they combine techniques borrowed from the computational sciences and apply them to subjects that teach about cultures, histories, and ways of life. Few scholars define “Digital Humanities” the same way. The Day of Digital Humanities is an initiative that asks those who consider themselves digital humanists to blog about their activities throughout the day, building awareness of the types of things they do. In order to participate in the Day of DH, one must define what the term means to them. Answers to the question, “How do you define DH?” range from “You don’t” (erochest) to “The development, exploration, and evaluation of computer­based technologies and resources for enabling the pursuit of research questions in the humanities” (Susan Brown). Digital Humanities scholarship has grown internationally since the mid­1980s. In 1986, Oxford University Press published the first issue of the journal Literary and Linguistic Computing, which was an early foray into using computational technologies to advance humanities scholarship. The University College of London (UCL) Centre for Digital Humanities published an infographic called Quantifying the Digital Humanities, which began as a blog post written by Melissa Terras after she began gathering statistics on the current state of Digital Humanities scholarship indicators. The infographic, also preserved on Wikipedia.org, displays the rapid growth of interest and scholarship in the field.

Author: Melody Dworak Posted: 4/23/2012 ­ 6:55pm Topics: HASTAC Scholars, Information Science & Archiving, Digital Humanities, Digital Media & Learning, HASTAC In: Scholars, Scholar Class 2012

› Home › About › Forums › Blogs › Meet the Scholars › Groups

About Melody Dworak
Master's candidate in a School of Library and Information Science program...
Read more

HASTAC Scholars Tweets
Fiona Barnett

HASTACscholars
HASTACscholars RT @mkgold: Johanna Drucker on the @uminnpress blog: "Representation and the digital environment" bit.ly/JevGvJ #dhdebates
40 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

HASTACscholars Still thinking abt post by @NazcaTheMad "What Remains: Collaboration & Knowledge at a Non-Digital Unconf" bit.ly/JeDIPx #transformDH
40 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

HASTACscholars @adelinekoh @moyazb @anitaconchita woo! i'm gonna have a party at my place during MLA. fun!!
40 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

Seminal & Current Books
Schreibman, S., Siemens, R., & Unsworth, J. (2004). Companion to Digital Humanities (Blackwell Companions to Literature and Culture). Blackwell Companions to Literature and Culture (Hardcover.). Oxford: Blackwell Publishing Professional. Retrieved from http://www.digitalhumanities.org/companion/ Companion to Digital Humanities is one of the seminal works

adelinekoh our panel on #race & #dh has been accepted for #mla13! featuring @alondra @anitaconchita @moyazb & more! #transformdh adelinekoh.org/blog/2012/04/0…
43 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

Join the conversation

hastac.org/blogs/melody-dworak/2012/04/23/digital-humanities-resource-guide

1/5

6/27/12

Digital Humanities Resource Guide | HASTAC
that published a collection of writings spanning several disciplines. This textbook provides thirty­seven chapters on topics involving humanities computing, a term used by Dr. John Unsworth before the term “Digital Humanities” became more widespread. The textbook is divided into four parts: History; Principles; Applications; and Production, Dissemination, and Archiving. Given the seminal nature of this work, it is a textbook often used in graduate­level courses on the Digital Humanities. Popular areas of research covered include Literacy Studies, Multimedia, Textual Analysis, and Speculative Computing. At its heart, the textbook aims to enlighten readers on the lessons learned in applying computational tools and methods to research inquiry. Schreibman, S., & Siemens, R. (2008). Companion to Digital Literacy Studies (Blackwell Companions to Literature and Culture) (Hardcover.). Oxford: Blackwell Publishing Professional. Retrieved from http://www.digitalhumanities.org/companionDLS Another critical textbook, Companion to Digital Literacy Studies contains chapters used in Digital Humanities courses. Outside of the introduction, “Imagining the New Media Encounter,” the work is split into three additional parts: Traditions, Textualities, and Methodologies. The textbook follows in the Companion to Digital Humanities Studies’ footsteps by maintaining a focus on methodology to teach how computational tools can be applied in humanities scholarship contexts. This textbook, however, keeps pace with the rapidly changing digital media realms that affect learning and making meaning of the world around us. So by being published in 2008, this text could then include new understandings on how new media tools such as games and blogs can play a role in literacy. Balsamo, A. (2011). Designing Culture: The Technological Imagination at Work. Duke University Press Books. Designing Culture: The Technological Imagination at Work is a polemic on how culture influences technology and vice versa. Designing Culture and its companion interactive website demonstrate how new media can be one outlet to realize Digital Humanities projects. Of particular focus in the book is recounting visions for the future of the document. How will technology change how we read? Having begun work on this book and its transmedia iterations, reading and media literacies have already been exposed to the digital revolution of reading brought on by smartphones and tablets. Designing Culture may be an intellectually entertaining entrance into the realm of new media as it unfolds in our ways of life.
 

Upcoming Group Events
Submissions! : The International Wikimania Conference 2012 DC
July 12, 2012 (All day) ­ July 14, 2012 (All day)

Digital Humanities Congress 2012, University of Sheffield, UK
September 5, 2012 ­ 7:00pm ­ September 7, 2012 ­ 7:00pm

The Digital Humanities Winter Institute @MITH
January 7, 2013 ­ 10:00am ­ January 11, 2013 ­ 10:00am

View events on calendar

Find Scholars
Filter by First Name

Filter by Last Name

Filter by Topic
<Any>

Filter by Tags

Find by Class Year
-Year

Submit

View All

Scholarly Articles from Peer­ Reviewed Journals
Fyfe, P. (2011). Digital Pedagogy Unplugged, Digital Humanities Quarterly 5(3). Retrieved from http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/5/3/000106/000106.html Because Digital Humanities have an intimate connection to institutions of higher education, where teaching plays a similarly critical role as research, the topic of pedagogy interlaces itself with digital research questions. What good is building knowledge without being able to share and teach it? In “Digital Pedagogy Unplugged,” Dr. Paul Fyfe explores the meaning of digital learning without the facilitation of instructional technology. With the instructional crutch of PowerPoint bullets, the author describes learning moments that subvert the new, sometimes unproductive ways of teaching. By playing with the idea of pulling the plug on instructional technology, the author urges other scholar­ teachers to reflect on their digital pedagogy.

hastac.org/blogs/melody-dworak/2012/04/23/digital-humanities-resource-guide

2/5

6/27/12

Digital Humanities Resource Guide | HASTAC
Gibbs, F. (2012). Critical Discourse in the Digital Humanities. Journal of Digital Humanities 1(1). http://digitalhumanitiesnow.org/2012/01/critical­discourse­in­the­ digital­humanities­by­fred­gibbs Journal of Digital Humanities is a new, open access journal whose first issue was released March 2012. The journal publishes pieces with an open peer review protocol rather than the anonymized peer review tradition. Open peer review makes a public call for reviewers through whatever publicity channels available and comments are attached to the names of the people reviewing the item. “Critical Discourse in the Digital Humanities” highlights the lack of such discourse currently in this field. The article was revised from a talk and is divided into three sections: Towards a Critical Discourse, The Value of Criticism, and New Kinds of Peer Review/Criticism. In that last section, the author advocates for a similar sort of peer review his own piece went through to be published in this open access journal. He also highlights how Digital Humanities efforts often require collaboration, and the resulting scholarship would thrive from such collaborative reviewing as well. Bucher­Gillmayr, S. (1996). A Computer­Aided Quest for Allusions to Biblical Texts Within Lyric Poetry. Literary and Linguistic Computing, 11(1), 1­8. doi:10.1093/llc/11.1.1 http://llc.oxfordjournals.org/content/11/1/1 First published in 1986, the journal Literary and Linguistic Computing from the Oxford University Press is one of the earliest journals that published articles on using computational methods in humanities research. “A Computer­ Aided Quest for Allusions to Biblical Texts Within Lyric Poetry” is a title that describes exactly that: this is a humanities research inquiry undertaken through the aid of the computer as a tool. The article describes marking texts to discover relationships between two genres with centuries separating them. The author primarily used tagging and search methods to re­imagine meanings within the poems studied. Some use of computer­aided textual analysis has come under criticism for being unscholarly at its root. Having the purpose and methods elaborated on in articles allows readers to judge the research individually. Sweetnam, M. S., & Fennell, B. A. (2012). Natural language processing and early­modern dirty data: applying IBM Languageware to the 1641 depositions. Literary and Linguistic Computing, 27(1), 39­ 54. doi:10.1093/llc/fqr050 http://llc.oxfordjournals.org.proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/content/27/1/39.full Using more robust computational tools than were available in 1996, “Natural Language Processing and Early­Modern Dirty Data: Applying IBM Languageware to the 1641 Depositions” elaborates on how the researchers adapted a piece of software in order to examine a rich body of historical documents. This piece describes the strengths of the software, the challenges of the project, and how they had to adapt the process along the way. The article emphasizes the amount of testing necessary to ensure computational methods are sound and rigorous. Their aim was to develop a model that could be used on other large collections of texts. This piece demonstrates how digital and computational tools must not be used carelessly for the purpose of fitting in with the Digital Humanities community of praxis.
 

Reference Source
Mapping History http://mappinghistory.uoregon.edu/ (Digital Learning Tool Example) The Spread of Cotton: 1790–1860. (n.d.) Mapping history. University of Oregon.

hastac.org/blogs/melody-dworak/2012/04/23/digital-humanities-resource-guide

3/5

6/27/12

Digital Humanities Resource Guide | HASTAC
http://mappinghistory.uoregon.edu/english/US/US18­ 01.html Many Digital Humanities projects turn to geolocational data and mapping software to discover patterns for scholarly research. Maps are also used to teach historical information in an interactive, new media format. “The Spread of Cotton: 1790­ 1860” is an example of such a map. Facts are represented as the combination of text and illustrations, and the person interacting with the tool determines the path on which the story unwinds. Information­rich maps allow new questions to be asked by enthusiasts who may have traditionally been alienated by barriers in the academy. Through “The Spread of Cotton: 1790­1860,” learners at all levels can engage with a Digital Humanities interface to explore their individual interests.
 

Websites
HASTAC hastac.org HASTAC (Humanities, Arts, Sciences, and Technology Advanced Collaboratory) is an online community of scholars whose research accomplishments and interests span the fields of study that comprise its acronym. Some of the most current ideas in Digital Humanities are posted on this website. According to the HASTAC website, “We are motivated by the conviction that the digital era provides rich opportunities for informal and formal learning and for collaborative, networked research that extends across traditional disciplines, across the boundaries of academe and community, across the ‘two cultures’ of humanism and technology, across the divide of thinking versus making, and across social strata and national borders.” HASTAC thrives on interdisciplinarity of research and convenes conferences and events for scholars at all levels in their academic careers. The organization was founded by Dr. Canty N. Davidson and Dr. David Theo Goldberg to advance interdisciplinary inquiry and exchange. DMLCentral dmlcentral.net DMLCentral is a blog focused on the application of digital media in a classroom, most often K­12. The three words that make up the acronym (digital media learning) each find a home in Digital Humanities scholarship on their own, but together, they bring a new frame to an old question: How does media affect learning? The blog publishes writing and resources that explore the potential of different digital tools and digital environments to enhance the educational growth of youth. The focus of DMLCentral is on original inquiry into the effects of digital media on youth and the potential impact innovative teaching strategies may have to advance 21st­ century learning. In addition to the blog component of the website, DMLCentral disseminates the latest resources coming out of the digital media and learning community, including reports, conference papers, and keynote presentations. In addition to being on the executive board at HASTAC, Dr. David Theo Goldberg is the executive director of Digital Media and Learning Research Hub, the organization behind the blog.
  melody dworak's blog Login or register to post comments

hastac.org/blogs/melody-dworak/2012/04/23/digital-humanities-resource-guide

4/5

6/27/12

Digital Humanities Resource Guide | HASTAC

By accessing this site, you agree to be bound by the Legal Agreement. We respect your privacy: the HASTAC privacy policy provides details. Send us your questions or comments via the HASTAC feedback form. Except where otherwise noted, all content on this site is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution­NonCommercial­ShareAlike 3.0 License. A »Message Agency site.

hastac.org/blogs/melody-dworak/2012/04/23/digital-humanities-resource-guide

5/5

6/27/12

Feminist Hulk Goes To (My) School: Exploring the use of Twitter as a research method | HASTAC
Login Contact Join HASTAC

Home About Members Organizations Subscribe Help

Home  ›  Scholars  ›  Blog posts

Feminist Hulk Goes To (My) School: Exploring the use of Twitter as a research method
View Comments Author: Melody Dworak Posted: 9/23/2011 ­ 4:01pm Topics: Academia, Arts & Humanities, Gender & Sexuality, Online Identity, Social Networks & Social Media more... Tags: digital and social media, feminism, Feminist Hulk, twitter In: Scholars, Scholar Class 2012

Scholars
› Home › About › Forums › Blogs › Meet the Scholars › Groups

@FEMINISTHULK came out in an interview with Ms. Magazine, published Aug. 22, as an English Ph.D. student at The University of Iowa—where I go! Cue the school pride. Three weeks ago, there’s a chance I spotted the tweeter­ behind­the­handle waiting for the elevator in the university’s Main Library. All of my classes meet in this building, and anyone traversing through is fair game for my caffeine­ drained war path, which probably looks more like a war limp. Dreds up in a headwrap, baby in a sling resting on her belly, I look and then double­take. Are these the eyeglasses I’ve seen online? Is that a peek of cerulean­teal dye straggling rebelliously outside the headwrap—as if a single cluster is ready to stand up to smash the patriarchy? Is the reason she seems familiar because she has more than 46,500 followers for saying things like, HULK WONDER IF STRAIGHT FOLK EVER GET ASKED IF THEY ARE "SURE" ABOUT ORIENTATION, OR NOT TO BE SO "BLATANT" ABOUT IT. In actuality, she could be any “white, vegan, queer, woman­ identified female Ph.D. candidate” here at Iowa. But what if she was the @FEMINISTHULK? Running into a Twitter celebrity—someone you know and yet don’t know—can happen when you least expect it. I have more hope for the possibility of a unique interaction with an online celebrity than I do in getting a personal response from my Congressperson. When you’re publicly accessible, you don’t know who’s listening to your thoughts. So you can mention the work of someone who inspires you and he or she might retweet you and even respond. This happened to me after I had finished reading Siva Vaidhyanathan’s book, The Googlization of Everything, and wrote a response pondering about it on my personal blog. (It may help if said author or celebrity is sitting at an airport, waiting for a connecting flight to go to a conference for other professionals in your field, but hey, it happened so I’m a believer.) [BLANK] Hulks on Twitter aren’t uncommon. I followed @EDTECHHULK for about a year before I got a little bored. When done well, Hulk Twitter meme profiles provide insightful commentary coming from a voice within a knowledge community. But as a friend of mine said, “Feminist hulk is the best one.” S/he’s ironic (identifies as male for the Twitter profile but female IRL), appropriating a highly masculine

About Melody Dworak
Master's candidate in a School of Library and Information Science program...
Read more

HASTAC Scholars Tweets
Fiona Barnett

HASTACscholars
HASTACscholars RT @mkgold: Johanna Drucker on the @uminnpress blog: "Representation and the digital environment" bit.ly/JevGvJ #dhdebates
40 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

HASTACscholars Still thinking abt post by @NazcaTheMad "What Remains: Collaboration & Knowledge at a Non-Digital Unconf" bit.ly/JeDIPx #transformDH
40 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

HASTACscholars @adelinekoh @moyazb @anitaconchita woo! i'm gonna have a party at my place during MLA. fun!!
40 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

adelinekoh our panel on #race & #dh has been accepted for #mla13! featuring @alondra @anitaconchita @moyazb & more! #transformdh adelinekoh.org/blog/2012/04/0…
43 days ago · reply · retweet · favorite

Join the conversation

hastac.org/blogs/melody-dworak/2011/09/23/feminist-hulk-goes-my-school

1/5

6/27/12

Feminist Hulk Goes To (My) School: Exploring the use of Twitter as a research method | HASTAC

comic book character for the purpose of disseminating a feminist message. It’s not a coincidence that @FEMINISTHULK has a firm background in feminist and literary theory. Seems to me that the best 140­character one­liners come from a deep internalization of the object of study. Experimenting with scholarly thought publicly on Twitter, whether in character or not, makes the internal external. It’s a fantastic medium for low­risk discourse­driven experiments that can provide evidence of a mainstream audience for an esoteric subject. As a Twitter project, @FEMINSTHULK is primarily one­sided communication. Shout­outs happen, but conversations are harder to observe. It’s less a format for collecting information in the empirical research tradition, but more for disseminating it. Without a documented back­and­forth, it’s hard to call what’s going on here community building. But what, then, is it? It seems less about research than it is about production, a production that falls very much outside the academy. Yet it’s more than entertainment. Perhaps that’s why I find this Twitter project relevant to the HASTAC community—it may not be an university­endorsed digital humanities project, but it is an exploration of a digital medium that gleans information on an inter/national temperament of a scholarly discourse. Creating a Twitter persona (or, you know, just tweeting as yourself) to engage a non­university audience has the potential for meaningful feedback on research. It’s about cultivating an online community to peer­review your 140 characters. Clicking the “Follow” button indicates passive approval of what’s being said. And responses are opportunities for public engagement. Disclaimer: I may have a biased opinion about this because my professional community—the library and information science geeks—has embraced Twitter as a tool for sharing information with each other. This makes me think everyone could develop online communities in their discipline if a critical mass amasses. I’ve seen other friends and colleagues not make it to this stage, so this kind of experimentation is not without challenges and limitations. Regardless, I encourage those looking for their discourse community to be bold and be public in online forums like Twitter. Somebody out there may be yearning to hear what you have to say.
  melody dworak's blog Login or register to post comments

Upcoming Group Events
Submissions! : The International Wikimania Conference 2012 DC
July 12, 2012 (All day) ­ July 14, 2012 (All day)

Digital Humanities Congress 2012, University of Sheffield, UK
September 5, 2012 ­ 7:00pm ­ September 7, 2012 ­ 7:00pm

The Digital Humanities Winter Institute @MITH
January 7, 2013 ­ 10:00am ­ January 11, 2013 ­ 10:00am

View events on calendar

Find Scholars
Filter by First Name

Filter by Last Name

Filter by Topic
<Any>

Filter by Tags

Find by Class Year
-Year

Submit

View All

Could Not Agree More!
Ashley Jackson 39 weeks 3 hours ago Login or register to post comments

Twitter is most definitely a great place to not only share your thoughts, but to reach out to others as well. I think sometimes I forget that twitter was inititally started for celebrity stalking so to speak, and it has been a way for me to connect with my friends and their thoughts. Have you ever been on Tumblr? It is also a new means to communicate all sorts of things such as fandom, thoughts, experiences through the medium of blogging. I have one, and my friends have them too. You should create one or even explore someone else's just to see what it is like. The transfer of energy gets serious.   Farewell, Ashley

Tumblr, Wordpress, Blogger, Oh My!
Melody Dworak

I have a Tumblr that I don't use because when I was creating my blog, I was going for the online portfolio/research blog format. I like the idea of blogging (and

hastac.org/blogs/melody-dworak/2011/09/23/feminist-hulk-goes-my-school

2/5

6/27/12

Feminist Hulk Goes To (My) School: Exploring the use of Twitter as a research method | HASTAC
39 weeks 2 hours ago Login or register to post comments

microblogging) for the purpose of sharing original thoughts. A lot of uses of Tumblr seem to be resharing cool things, and that wasn't what I was going for. One thing about sharing publicly via blogging or microblogging is that it can be such a time investment, so choosing formats feels like a greater commitment! Looks like I abandoned Tumblr (and the duckface profile pic) in August 2010. The short­form Tumblr may be more conducive to the quick sharing of thoughts, tho? There's not a whole lot of thought or energy exchange on my blog.  Thanks for your comment!

Real Conversations on Tumblr
John Carter McKnight 38 weeks 6 days ago Login or register to post comments

I'd thought of (and am using) Tumblr as a photoblogging site, but I've found a number of really good conversations there (for what I've found, at the intersection of feminist politics, minority identity and comics): it's remarkably well suited to shorter blog posts and viral commentary: reblogging spreads things far and wide, and allows for the spread of ideas across networks remarkably effectively. It's kind of the opposite of Google+, which confines things to circles. On Tumblr, you can watch something spread from an academic humanities blog to a comics network to a sustainaibility network to a steampunk network to a fashion network... it's great for talking to people *outside* those tiresome echo­chamber circles.

Great Feedback
Melody Dworak 38 weeks 6 days ago Login or register to post comments

This is great to know. I should really start to use it more but have been concerned about investing a lot of time to develop my niche and start using it well. Do you have strategies for cultivating the type of communities you're talking about?

just general web distraction
John Carter McKnight 38 weeks 5 days ago Login or register to post comments

and safely assuming that enough people who share my interest in Thing A wil also get me networked to Things B through Z. It's definitely a timesuck, and judicious use of the (quite good) search feature would have made the process more efficient. I use Tumblr for visual treats (aside from my own project, which was a *great* self­discipline tool ­ post one image a day from my research for a year ­ I'm about a month from done without having missed a day, and it got me doing a *lot* more work, and more open to serendipity, than I would have otherwise), so I've gone with the inefficient wandering ­ but one could be more focused. Let us know what you decide to do ­ I'd love to see what you come up with.

You've got me thinking that
Melody Dworak 38 weeks 5 days ago Login or register to post comments

You've got me thinking that perhaps Tumblr is even lower­risk than Twitter as a research tool, and one that potentially yields greater rewards. Maybe I'll start a DH­themed one so that it can be flexible but focused? That would definitely assist having inspiration and material for my HASTAC blog. I curate articles through Pearltrees and Curated.by, which may be similar but seems to require more structure. Those are more permanent bookmarking tools, tho, and aren't designed to be as serendipitous, even though they attempt to create user communities. I am inspired!

woot!
John Carter McKnight 38 weeks 5 days ago

That's a great plan!  Keep us posted!

hastac.org/blogs/melody-dworak/2011/09/23/feminist-hulk-goes-my-school

3/5

6/27/12

Feminist Hulk Goes To (My) School: Exploring the use of Twitter as a research method | HASTAC
Login or register to post comments

Followed!
Melody Dworak 38 weeks 4 days ago Login or register to post comments

Yyyup!

Tweeting and biological rhythms!
Katherine Montgomery 38 weeks 6 days ago Login or register to post comments

Twitter Study Tracks When We Are :) http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/30/science/30twitter.html I am sadly negligent about my tweeting, and this is not quite 100% relevant... but... I thought this might be relevant to your interests??

Thanks for the link!
Melody Dworak 38 weeks 5 days ago Login or register to post comments

I'm terribly interested in any social media study, so this suits me just fine. My instinct about this graph is to suggest we expect others want to hear we're having a great start to my day!! so that we don't poison the crowd with our grumpiness. It's so much about public performance. Will read this article, thanks much!

Blogging as Process
Anya Ventura 37 weeks 1 day ago Login or register to post comments

Hey everybody, I know I'm a bit late to this conversation, but I just want to second the use of blogs­as­ research process! My research interests have a tendency of being all over the map (or, at least the connections are not immediately apparent) and the Tumblr has already been useful to me in highlighting the connections between different lines of inquiry. Like a lot of people, I tend to think through the writing process and being stringent about posting has really helped me write more and solidify different ideas. I'm also very interested in process, documentation, and making learning visible, and the blog is a great way to do that. I thought the article "Thinking in Tumblr" (http://observersroom.designobserver.com/alexandralange/post/thinking­in­...) had some really interesting things to say not only about its usefulness in the research process, but as a kind of historical document: "considering this history project, my mind reassembled its pieces as a blog, asynchronic, motley, sketchy. Rough rather than smooth. An archive of affinities rather than a resolved history." Melody, what platform do you use for your research blog? I have found, as you guys have noted, that the Tumblr isn't best suited to long­form writing, and I'm interested to weighs the benefits of what else is out there. Suggestions?  Anya

Thanks for your comment
Melody Dworak 36 weeks 18 hours

I'm glad you weren't shy about responding after it's been up for a while. Blog comments don't have deadlines (unless used in classroom pedagogy, of course). 

hastac.org/blogs/melody-dworak/2011/09/23/feminist-hulk-goes-my-school

4/5

6/27/12

Feminist Hulk Goes To (My) School: Exploring the use of Twitter as a research method | HASTAC
ago Login or register to post comments

I've been using a WordPress installation for my long­form blog. WP has been very user­friendly­­easy to navigate, plethora of free themes, no­stress publishing. It does have an issue with spam comments, being such a popular blog format, but moderating comments should prevent any from sneaking through.  Sounds like dedicated posting is a great method to using blogging as a research tool effectively. Feel free to post your Tumblr URL here so people can check it out and follow. I just started my own (http://beyondthemelody.tumblr.com/)­­still fiddling with it, tho. I'd love to follow other research microblogs to see people's approaches.  Thanks for the link to the article, too! Interesting read.

Tumblr & Hulks
Mariah Cherem 35 weeks 6 days ago Login or register to post comments

Anya, thanks for sharing the link to "Thinking in Tumblr."  When I first started experimenting with Tumblr, I thought that I would use it more to jot and share quick thoughts.  As time passed, I found myself just sharing/re­sharing content ­­ using it more like svpply or Pinterest than Tumblr, but I do think there's a lot more potential there, and it's  great to read that piece.  Katherine ­­ I dig the bio­rythmn/twitter chart. It makes me think of one of my favorite Twitter/emotion vizualizations, We Feel Fine: http://www.wefeelfine.org And... this is a little bit of a tangent, but reading FilmCritHulk's most recent game review made me wish that Feminist Hulk and he could do a tag­team review/reaction: http://bit.ly/q2ptc3  

Thanks for the link to We
Katherine Montgomery 35 weeks 6 days ago Login or register to post comments

Thanks for the link to We Feel Fine! I hadn't seen it­­I love visualizations. :)

Those pics
Melody Dworak 35 weeks 5 days ago Login or register to post comments

Those pics on the FilmCritHulk's post remind me of pressing 58008 on an old school calculator then turning it upside down. The imagery is so junior­high, roll­yr­eyes obvious. (In other words, a tag team like that would be awesome.) Taking advantage of the comment Edit function: WeFeelFine is fantastic! The visuals are lovely and posts conjure that serendipitous feeling. Thanks for sharing! I've passed it on.

By accessing this site, you agree to be bound by the Legal Agreement. We respect your privacy: the HASTAC privacy policy provides details. Send us your questions or comments via the HASTAC feedback form. Except where otherwise noted, all content on this site is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution­NonCommercial­ShareAlike 3.0 License. A »Message Agency site.

hastac.org/blogs/melody-dworak/2011/09/23/feminist-hulk-goes-my-school

5/5