May 18, 2012 EAS215 - HW7 Justin Drawbert

Problem 16-43
End A of the bar moves to the left with a constant
velocity. Determine the angular velocity ω and angular acceleration α of the bar as a function of
its position x.
Equations
ω =

dt
(1)
α =

dt
(2)
Solution
We will first solve this by hand (for future reference, if for no other reason), and then show how
easy it is to solve in SAGE.
We first notice that
sin θ =
r
x
and cos θ =

x
2
−r
2
x
We then also note that
dx
dt
= v
A
So,
x =
r
sin θ
dx
dt
= v
A
=
−r cos θ
sin
2
θ

dt
=
−r cos θ
sin
2
θ
ω
−v
A
sin
2
θ
r cos θ
= ω
ω =
−v
A
_
r
x
_
2
r

x
2
−r
2
x
=
−v
A
r
x

x
2
−r
2
∴ ω =
−v
A
r
x

x
2
−r
2
4
May 18, 2012 EAS215 - HW7 Justin Drawbert
That wasn’t so bad. One might want a cup of coffee before this next one, though.
d
2
x
dt
2
=
d
dt
_
−r
cos θ
sin
2
θ

dt
_
= −r
d
dt
_

dt
cos θ
sin
2
θ
_
= −r
_
d
2
θ
dt
2
cos θ
sin
2
θ


dt
sin θ
sin
2
θ

dt
+

dt
_
−2
cos θ
sin
3
θ
cos θ

dt
_
_
= −r
_
_
d
2
θ
dt
2
cos θ
sin
2
θ
+
_

dt
_
2
_

2 cos
2
θ
sin
3
θ

1
sin θ
_
_
_
= −r
_
_
α
cos θ
sin
2
θ
+ ω
2
_

2 cos
2
θ
sin
3
θ

1
sin θ
_
_
_
= −r
_
_
α
cos θ
sin
2
θ
−ω
2
_
2 cos
2
θ
sin
3
θ
+
1
sin θ
_
_
_
= −r
_
_
α
cos θ
sin
2
θ
−ω
2
_
cos
2
θ + cos
2
θ sin
2
θ
sin
3
θ
_
_
_
= −r
_
_
α
cos θ
sin
2
θ
−ω
2
_
cos
2
θ + 1
sin
3
θ
_
_
_
v
A
is constant
0 = −rα
cos θ
sin
2
θ
+ rω
2
_
cos
2
θ + 1
sin
3
θ
_
so,
d
2
x
dt
2
= a = 0

cos θ
sin
2
θ
= rω
2
_
cos
2
θ + 1
sin
3
θ
_
α = ω
2
_
cos
2
θ + 1
sin
3
θ
__
sin
2
θ
cos θ
_
= ω
2
_
cos
2
θ + 1
sin θ cos θ
_
=
_
v
A
sin
2
θ
r cos θ
_
2
_
cos
2
θ + 1
sin θ cos θ
_
=
v
2
A
r
2
sin
3
θ
_
cos
2
θ + 1
cos
3
θ
_
=
v
2
A
r
2
_
r
3
x
3
_
_
¸
¸
_
1

x
2
−r
2
x
+
1
_

x
2
−r
2
x
_
3
_
¸
¸
_
=
v
2
A
r
x
3
_
x

x
2
−r
2
+
x
3
(x
2
−r
2
)
3/2
_
=
v
2
A
r
x
3
_
x
_
x
2
−r
2
_
+ x
3
(x
2
−r
2
)
3/2
_
=
v
2
A
x
3
_
rx
3
−r
3
x + rx
3
(x
2
−r
2
)
3/2
_
α = v
2
A
_
r
_
2x
2
−r
2
_
x
2
(x
2
−r
2
)
3/2
_
5
May 18, 2012 EAS215 - HW7 Justin Drawbert
∴ α = v
2
A
_
r
_
2x
2
−r
2
_
x
2
(x
2
−r
2
)
3/2
_
Computed in SAGE
#define variables
var(’r t x v_A omega1 alpha1’)
#define theta as a function of t
theta = function(’theta’, t)
#define function big X to avoid conflict later
X = r/sin(theta)
SAGE outputs
dX
dt
= −
r cos
_
θ (t)
_
D[0] (θ) (t)
sin
_
θ (t)
_
2
Which we can be rewritten as
dX
dt
= −
r cos(θ)
sin
2
(θ)

dt
#specity trig properties
sin1=r/x
cos1=sqrt(x^2-r^2)/x
#eq1, v_A = dx/dt
eq1 = v_A == -r*cos1*omega1/(sin1)^2
#define omega by eq1
omega = solve(eq1,omega1)[0].rhs()
SAGE returns
ω = −
rv
A

−r
2
+ x
2
x
Now, for a
A
, SAGE spits out
d
2
X
dt
2
=
rD[0] (θ) (t)
2
sin
_
θ (t)
_ +
2 r cos
_
θ (t)
_
2
D[0] (θ) (t)
2
sin
_
θ (t)
_
3

r cos
_
θ (t)
_
D[0, 0] (θ) (t)
sin
_
θ (t)
_
2
Which is a bit tricky to read at first, but its clearly the same as
d
2
X
dt
2
=
r
sin θ
_

dt
_
2
+
2r cos
2
θ
sin
3
θ
_

dt
_
2

r
sin
2
θ
·
d
2
θ
dt
2
#d^2x/dt = a_A = 0
#define eq2 in terms of alpha1 and omega
eq2 = 0 == r*omega^2/sin1 + 2*r*cos1^2*omega^2/sin1^3 - r*cos1*alpha1/sin1^2
#define alpha in by solving eq2
alpha = solve(eq2,alpha1)[0].rhs().factor()
α = −
_
r
2
−2 x
2
_
rv
2
A
(−r
2
+ x
2
)
(
3
2
)
x
2
6

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