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Shaker Social Media Use Implications

Shaker Social Media Use Implications

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Published by Jakolien Sok
Social media—also referred to as Web 2.0—describes online platforms and technologies that allow people to interact, collaborate, share information, and publish content on the Web in a simple, user-friendly way. Examples of social media include social networking sites, blogs, wikis, podcasting, videocasting, and RSS feeds, to name a few.

The year of 2008 is another one of increased visibility for social media as use transitions from a novelty to a part of mainstream culture. Social networking sites continue to see significant growth in traffic, while advertisers allocate higher percentages of their marketing budgets toward capturing the attention of those site visitors. The space also has become more crowded as the success of category giants MySpace and Facebook, has opened the door for long-tail niche social networks to emerge.

The acceptance of OpenSocial and Facebook platforms has led to the proliferation of Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) by third parties into the space. Even now, amidst an economic recession, the momentum has continued.

Even mainstream recruitment advertising Web sites have started to incorporate social media as part of their product offerings. In January 2008, Monster Worldwide announced that it had acquired Affinity Labs, a network of vertical community sites, for approximately $61 million. More recently, CareerBuilder, like Jobster before it, announced strategic partnerships with Facebook. Job aggregator Simply Hired has created applications on MySpace and Facebook that can be customized into widgets on individuals' profile pages or desktops.

Yet despite the growth and adoption, in the minds of human resources professionals, the question still remains: Can the use of social media positively impact an organization’s recruitment marketing efforts…?
Social media—also referred to as Web 2.0—describes online platforms and technologies that allow people to interact, collaborate, share information, and publish content on the Web in a simple, user-friendly way. Examples of social media include social networking sites, blogs, wikis, podcasting, videocasting, and RSS feeds, to name a few.

The year of 2008 is another one of increased visibility for social media as use transitions from a novelty to a part of mainstream culture. Social networking sites continue to see significant growth in traffic, while advertisers allocate higher percentages of their marketing budgets toward capturing the attention of those site visitors. The space also has become more crowded as the success of category giants MySpace and Facebook, has opened the door for long-tail niche social networks to emerge.

The acceptance of OpenSocial and Facebook platforms has led to the proliferation of Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) by third parties into the space. Even now, amidst an economic recession, the momentum has continued.

Even mainstream recruitment advertising Web sites have started to incorporate social media as part of their product offerings. In January 2008, Monster Worldwide announced that it had acquired Affinity Labs, a network of vertical community sites, for approximately $61 million. More recently, CareerBuilder, like Jobster before it, announced strategic partnerships with Facebook. Job aggregator Simply Hired has created applications on MySpace and Facebook that can be customized into widgets on individuals' profile pages or desktops.

Yet despite the growth and adoption, in the minds of human resources professionals, the question still remains: Can the use of social media positively impact an organization’s recruitment marketing efforts…?

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Published by: Jakolien Sok on Jan 09, 2009
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10/16/2011

At the wireless industry's CTIA (International Association for the Wireless Communications Industry)
trade show (April 1–3, 2008), the news was all about the mobile Web, which, Vodafone CEO Arun
Sarin said in a keynote address, “will shape the future development of the industry and change who
the successful companies are going to be. The mobile Internet is the new, new thing in the industry
and it is here for real and happening now”.62

My Space is pleased with what it has accomplished on the mobile platform since its first entry more
than two years ago. “We thought there was significant demand for this, and our initial thoughts were
confirmed,” said Colin Digiaro, Senior Vice-President of sales at MySpace. “[Now,] our advancement
into mobile is one of the key initiatives on MySpace, extremely key to our growth. It's a huge
opportunity.” My Space would prefer if its network's mobile applications would come preloaded onto
all mobile phones sold, thereby becoming as integral a wireless handset feature as an alarm clock,
calendar, or mobile e-mail.63

Providing access to the Web through wireless mobile technology relates directly to efforts on the part
of U.S. mobile operators to open up their networks. Federal Communications Chairman Kevin Martin,
in fact, during a CTIA keynote address, told such operators that he was rewarding their efforts by not
pushing for more regulation.

Dan Hesse, Sprint Nextel's CEO, who also spoke at CTIA, said this will continue to make it easier for
customers to get access to any application and to use a wide variety of devices on the network. “The
'walled garden' networks are a thing of the past,” he said. “As a charter member of Open Handset
Alliance, we will explore and push wireless data even further than it's ever been pushed before.” And
Verizon Wireless CEO Lowell McAdam also made it clear during his CTIA keynote speech that the
industry has to be proactive to keep regulation at bay. He said that if the carriers open up their
networks and listen to what customers want, there will be no need for regulators to get involved.64

Nielsen’s Mobile Advertising Report

In March 2008, 23 percent of U.S. mobile subscribers (58 million people) were reported in a Nielsen
study as saying they had seen mobile advertising in the previous 30 days—and half of mobile data
users (51 percent, or 28 million people) who recall seeing a mobile ad say they responded to the ad in
some way. However, just 10 percent of U.S. mobile data (e.g., text messaging) users say they think
advertising on their mobile devices is acceptable—but an increasing number appear to understand the
value proposition of ad-supported mobile content. Some 32 percent of mobile data users say they are
open to mobile advertising if it lowers their overall bill. Nearly 1 in 10 of the mobile users who saw
mobile ads used the uniquely mobile marketing feature of “click to call” at least once. That feature
offers mobile marketers the opportunity to bring mobile users through the sales channel and engage
them further at the very moment they view the marketing message.

The findings are from the biannual Mobile Advertising Report from Nielsen Mobile and are based on a
survey of more than 22,000 active mobile data users who used at least one non-voice mobile service in
the fourth quarter.

Social Media and Recruitment/Employment
Whitepaper page 27

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Among other findings of the study:

• The number of data users who recalled seeing mobile advertising between the second and
fourth quarters of 2007 increased 38 percent (from 42 million to 58 million).
• Teen data users (age 13–17) were the most likely age segment to recall seeing mobile
advertising (46 percent recalled seeing some type of mobile advertisement, compared with 29
percent of all data users).
• Asian-Americans and African-Americans are more likely to recall mobile advertising (42
percent and 40percent percent, respectively, compared with 29% of all data users).
• 26 percent of those who saw an ad responded at least once by sending an SMS text message,
the most popular ad response.
• 9 percent say they have used click-to-call to respond to a mobile ad (i.e., users follow a link on
their phone to call a specific number).
• 13 percent (18 percent of males) said they are open to mobile advertising if it improves the
media and content currently available.
• 14 percent said they are already open to mobile advertising so long as it is relevant to their

interests.

• 23 percent expect to see more mobile advertising in the future (up from just 15 percent in Q1

2007).

About the study: Nielsen’s Mobile Advertising Report examines consumer recall, responses
and attitudes toward banner ads on mobile Web pages, SMS text-message advertising,
sponsored applications, video advertising, and other types of advertising that reach consumers
while using data applications on their mobile phones.65, 66

“Mobile social networks, like their Internet counterparts, face the challenge of bridging
consumer demand with a business model that can scale appropriately,” said John du Pre
Gauntt, senior analyst at eMarketer. “Content and service subscriptions in mobile often
hit a wall much sooner than their business plans call for. Advertising requires a level of
scale and targeting sophistication that isn't there yet.”

“What this suggests to marketers is that consumer demand is necessary but not sufficient to make
mobile social networks a must-buy in 2008,” Mr. Gauntt says. “It's still experimental.” 67

But major Internet media companies are seeking appropriate advertising programs to provide value to
advertisers. Yahoo!’s advertising initiative revolves around an integrated approach for search, display,
and mobile advertising. Sponsored search—a pay-per-click advertising model used on search engines,
advertising networks, Web sites and blogs—leads this model in combination with traditional and well-
established online display ad platforms as well as mobile advertising.68

In addition to social networking sites (such as Facebook) available on mobile units, other companies
offering a parallel Web experience for phone and PDA users include Amazon, Ebay, Fandango, Flickr,
Wapipedia (the WAP [Wireless Application Protocol] version of Wikipedia), Netflix, and Orbitz. The
mobile version of Facebook has been rated as one of the best-looking sites on an iPhone. While it
doesn’t have all of the Facebook features (such as no add-on applications), it does offer Facebook’s
news feed, the user’s inbox and access to all their Face-friends right on their telephone.69

Social Media and Recruitment/Employment
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