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Shaker Social Media Use Implications

Shaker Social Media Use Implications

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Published by Jakolien Sok
Social media—also referred to as Web 2.0—describes online platforms and technologies that allow people to interact, collaborate, share information, and publish content on the Web in a simple, user-friendly way. Examples of social media include social networking sites, blogs, wikis, podcasting, videocasting, and RSS feeds, to name a few.

The year of 2008 is another one of increased visibility for social media as use transitions from a novelty to a part of mainstream culture. Social networking sites continue to see significant growth in traffic, while advertisers allocate higher percentages of their marketing budgets toward capturing the attention of those site visitors. The space also has become more crowded as the success of category giants MySpace and Facebook, has opened the door for long-tail niche social networks to emerge.

The acceptance of OpenSocial and Facebook platforms has led to the proliferation of Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) by third parties into the space. Even now, amidst an economic recession, the momentum has continued.

Even mainstream recruitment advertising Web sites have started to incorporate social media as part of their product offerings. In January 2008, Monster Worldwide announced that it had acquired Affinity Labs, a network of vertical community sites, for approximately $61 million. More recently, CareerBuilder, like Jobster before it, announced strategic partnerships with Facebook. Job aggregator Simply Hired has created applications on MySpace and Facebook that can be customized into widgets on individuals' profile pages or desktops.

Yet despite the growth and adoption, in the minds of human resources professionals, the question still remains: Can the use of social media positively impact an organization’s recruitment marketing efforts…?
Social media—also referred to as Web 2.0—describes online platforms and technologies that allow people to interact, collaborate, share information, and publish content on the Web in a simple, user-friendly way. Examples of social media include social networking sites, blogs, wikis, podcasting, videocasting, and RSS feeds, to name a few.

The year of 2008 is another one of increased visibility for social media as use transitions from a novelty to a part of mainstream culture. Social networking sites continue to see significant growth in traffic, while advertisers allocate higher percentages of their marketing budgets toward capturing the attention of those site visitors. The space also has become more crowded as the success of category giants MySpace and Facebook, has opened the door for long-tail niche social networks to emerge.

The acceptance of OpenSocial and Facebook platforms has led to the proliferation of Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) by third parties into the space. Even now, amidst an economic recession, the momentum has continued.

Even mainstream recruitment advertising Web sites have started to incorporate social media as part of their product offerings. In January 2008, Monster Worldwide announced that it had acquired Affinity Labs, a network of vertical community sites, for approximately $61 million. More recently, CareerBuilder, like Jobster before it, announced strategic partnerships with Facebook. Job aggregator Simply Hired has created applications on MySpace and Facebook that can be customized into widgets on individuals' profile pages or desktops.

Yet despite the growth and adoption, in the minds of human resources professionals, the question still remains: Can the use of social media positively impact an organization’s recruitment marketing efforts…?

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Categories:Types, School Work
Published by: Jakolien Sok on Jan 09, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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10/16/2011

Another aspect to be considered when contemplating social media is the trust factor. The trust factor
represents the maximum potential reward in social media. It is a basic marketing principle that word
of mouth is one of the most effective forms of advertising. The viral nature of social media makes this
comparison worth evaluating.

The endorsement of a product or organization from a perceived trusted source is one of the best ways
to generate interest and “conversions” within an organization. In fact, in a recent study, a
recommendation from another individual was listed as the number 1 source for driving individuals to
visit Web sites.6

Human resource professionals need not look further than their own employee referral programs to see
this phenomenon in action.

This conclusion is substantiated in other notable studies conducted where individuals turn to
perceived like-minded individuals or other “users” to gain information insight into a company or
product.

An annual survey conducted by the Edelman public relations firm reports that “a person like me” is
the most trusted form of peer-to-peer communication (58 percent). Communication that comes from
a “regular employee of a company” came in at 38 percent.7

A similar study conducted by Marketing Sherpa research firm reports that nearly 83.8 percent of
individuals trust user reviews over a critic. If that user review is from a friend, the number increases to
86.9 percent.8

Social media is viral by nature. The ability to interact with potential job seekers in a transparent way—
and the possibility of those individuals directing even more individuals to your message—will help to
build loyalty and trust concerning a company's brand, from consumer and employment perspectives.

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