P. 1
NASA: 182728main STS-118 Press Kit

NASA: 182728main STS-118 Press Kit

|Views: 5|Likes:
Published by NASAdocuments

More info:

Published by: NASAdocuments on Jan 12, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/08/2014

pdf

text

original

During the STS‐118 mission, the Advanced
Health Management System (AHMS) — an en‐
gine improvement system that shuts down an
engine if anomalies are detected — will be ac‐
tively operating on all three engines for the first
time. The AHMS collects and processes tur‐
bopump accelerometer data, a measure of tur‐
bopump vibration, and continuously monitors

turbopump health. If vibration anomalies are
detected, the system shuts the engine down.

The AHMS operated in monitor‐only mode on
one engine during the STS‐116 mission in De‐
cember 2006 and in active‐mode on one engine
during the STS‐117 mission in June 2007. Data
from STS‐117 indicated the AHMS operated as
intended.

The space shuttle main engine is the worldʹs most sophisticated reusable rocket engine.
During
 a shuttle launch, the shuttleʹs three engines operate for about
eight
andonehalf minutes during liftoff and ascent.

76

SPACE SHUTTLE MAIN ENGINE AHMS

JULY 2007

When a shuttle lifts off the launch pad, it does
so with the help of three reusable, high per‐
formance rocket engines. Each main engine is
14 feet long and 7.5 feet in diameter at the noz‐
zle exit. One engine weighs approximately
7,750 pounds and generates more than 12 mil‐
lion horsepower, equivalent to more than four
times the output of the Hoover Dam. The en‐
gines operate for about 8.5 minutes during lift‐
off and ascent — long enough to burn more
than 500,000 gallons of super‐cold liquid hy‐
drogen and liquid oxygen propellants stored in
the external fuel tank, which is attached to the
shuttleʹs underside. Liquid oxygen is stored at
‐298 degrees Fahrenheit, and liquid hydrogen is
stored at ‐423 degrees Fahrenheit. The engines
shut down just before the shuttle, traveling at
about 17,000 mph, reaches orbit.

This engine upgrade significantly improves
space shuttle flight safety and reliability. The
upgrade, developed by NASA’s Marshall Space
Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., is a modifica‐
tion of the existing main engine controller,
which is the on‐engine computer that monitors
and controls all main engine operations.

The modifications include the addition of ad‐
vanced digital signal processors, radiation‐
hardened memory and new software. These

changes to the main engine controller provide
the capability for completely new monitoring
and insight into the health of the two most
complex components of the space shuttle’s
main engine — the high‐pressure fuel tur‐
bopump and the high‐pressure oxidizer tur‐
bopump.

The fuel and oxidizer turbopumps rotate at ap‐
proximately 34,000 and 23,000 revolutions per
minute, respectively. To operate at such ex‐
treme speeds, the high‐pressure turbopumps
use highly specialized bearings and precisely
balanced components. The AHMS upgrade util‐
izes data from three existing sensors (acceler‐
ometers) mounted on each of the high‐pressure
turbopumps to measure how much each pump
is vibrating. The output data from the acceler‐
ometers is routed to the new AHMS digital sig‐
nal processors installed in the main engine con‐
troller. These processors analyze the sensor
readings 20 times per second, looking for vibra‐
tion anomalies that are indicative of impending
failure of rotating turbopump components such
as blades, impellers, inducers and bearings. If
the magnitude of any vibration anomaly ex‐
ceeds safe limits, the upgraded main engine
controller immediately shuts down the un‐
healthy engine.

JULY 2007

SHUTTLE REFERENCE DATA

77

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->