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Women in Science and Engineering: Trends and Issues July 18, 2000

Dragana Brzakovic Office of Integrative Activities
Tel. 703-306-1040 ~ Email: dbrzakov@nsf.gov
http://www.nsf.gov/od/oia/presentations/

Representation of Women and Minorities in Undergraduate Engineering Enrollment

Source: Science & Engineering Indicators - 2000

Bachelor’s Degrees in S&E Fields Earned by Females

es nc cie lS ia oc S

es ienc Natural Sc Math and Computer S ciences Engineering

NOTE: Data for 1983 are estimated. Natural sciences include physical, earth, atmospheric, oceanographic, biological, and agricultural sciences. Social sciences include psychology, sociology, and other social sciences. Science & Engineering Indicators - 2000

Completion and Attrition Rates 5 Years After Beginning an S&E Major, by Race/Ethnicity and Sex

SOURCE: National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES), Beginning Postsecondary Student (BPS) Longitudinal Study (Washington, DC: 1996). (Based on subsample of 926 first-year S&E students in 1990 and 1995 follow-up.) Science & Engineering Indicators - 2000

Master’s Degree in S&E Fields Earned by Females

s ce n cie lS c ia So

ces cien Natural S

Math and Computer Sciences

Engineering

NOTE: Data are estimated for 1983. Natural sciences include physical, earth, atmospheric, oceanographic, biological, and agricultural sciences. Social Sciences include psychology, sociology, and other social sciences. Science & Engineering Indicators - 2000

Doctoral Degrees in S&E Fields Earned by Females

iences ocial Sc S
ces Scien l atura

N

Engineering

Math and Computer Sciences

NOTE: Natural sciences include physical, earth, atmospheric, oceanographic, biological, and agricultural sciences. Social sciences include psychology, sociology, and other social sciences. Science & Engineering Indicators - 2000

Percentage of Doctoral S&E Degree Earned by Women, by Country: 1997 or most Current Year
Degree field All S&E Natural Math/computer Agricultural Social degrees sciences sciences sciences sciences Engineering 10.4 10.5 10.8 35.0 22.5 27.7 26.7 33.8 33.7 10.2 18.8 15.2 41.4 25.9 34.4 22.4 32.7 34.9 7.7 31.0 14.3 22.9 17.1 18.4 14.2 18.2 20.2 15.7 14.0 38.5 51.2 35.5 31.6 36.9 27.1 26.4 23.4 13.4 25.8 36.3 27.5 32.7 50.2 43.3 51.6 5.5 3.0 2.3 22.5 8.3 13.4 9.1 18.5 12.3

Region/country Asia Japan South Korea Taiwan Europe France German United Kingdom North America Canada Mexico United States

Source: Science & Engineering Indicators - 2000

Computer Science Bachelor Degree Statistics
45000 40000 35000 30000 Number 25000 20000 15000 10000 5000 0 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1991 1993 1995 Female Male Total

Year
Sources: Virtual Workshop Report, “Research Foundations for Improving the Representation of Women in the Information Technology Workforce (held September 27, 1999 - November 5, 1999)”, submitted by Doris L. Carver, Dept. of Computer Science, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, May 29, 2000.

Information Technology Employment History
1,600,000 1,400,000 1,200,000 1,000,000 800,000 600,000 400,000 200,000 0

83

84

85

86

87

88

89

90

91

92

93

94

95 19

19

19

Computer Programmers

19

19

19

19

19

Sources: BLS "1983-95 National Industry-Occupation Employment Matrix Time Series"; "Total Employment 1996 and Projected 2006”

19

Computer Scientists and Engineers

19

19

19

19

19

96

Computer Science Masters Degree Statistics
12000 10000 8000

Number

Female Male Total

6000 4000 2000 0

77

79

81

75

83

85

87

89

91

93 19

19

19

19

19

19

19

19

19

19

Year
Sources: Virtual Workshop Report, “Research Foundations for Improving the Representation of Women in the Information Technology Workforce (held September 27, 1999 - November 5, 1999)”, submitted by Doris L. Carver, Dept. of Computer Science, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, May 29, 2000.

19

95

Computer Science Doctoral Degree Statistics
1200 1000 800 600 400 200 0 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1991 1993 1995
Female Male Total

Sources: Virtual Workshop Report, “Research Foundations for Improving the Representation of Women in the Information Technology Workforce (held September 27, 1999 - November 5, 1999)”, submitted by Doris L. Carver, Dept. of Computer Science, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, May 29, 2000.

Issues
Environmental Factors from Childhood to Pre-College:
cultural issues specialization of young girls peer pressure media portrayals role models

Higher Education Experience Lack of Knowledge About Careers

NSF Activities Aimed at Improving Participation of Women in Science and Engineering
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
POWRE/ADVANCE
http://www.nsf.gov/home/crssprgm/powre/start.htm

Program for Gender Equity in Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Technology (EHR)
http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/ehr/hrd/pge.asp

Information Technology Workforce (CISE)
http://www.interact.nsf.gov/cise/descriptions.nsf/pd/itw?OpenDocu ment

Special Projects
http://www.interact.nsf.gov/cise/descriptions.nsf/pd/speia?OpenD ocument

Sources
AAUW (American Association of University Women) ACM Committee on Women in Computing http://www.acm.org/women/ Association fow Women in Computing Center for Women and Information Technology CRA Committee on the Status of Women in Computer Science and Engineering Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing IEEE Women in Engineering Institute for Women and Technology IWITTS (Institute for Women in Trades, Technology & Science) Math/Science Network SWE (Society of Women Engineers) Systers TAP (The Ada Project) WCAR (Women in Computing Academic Resource) Women's Studies Program