#1 JOHN HUDSON SUMNER

Read about the Sumner connection at Martha Philips’ web page.

#2 JOSEPH JOHN SUMNER

Read about the Sumner connection at Martha Philips’ web page.

#3 WILLIAM HENRY SUMNER

Read about the Sumner connection at Martha Philips’ web page.

#4 JOSEPH PHILIPS His sister Martha Philips wrote: “Joseph Philips born 1802 died 1803”

#5 CHARLOTTE PHILIPS (Daughter of Joseph Philips 1763-1822 & Milbry Horn) Her sister Martha Philips wrote: “My sister Charlotte Philips, at the age of 16 was sent to boarding school not far from Nashville. Mrs. Dr. Priestley was the teacher. Her husband was President of Cumberland College. Mrs. Priestley often went in the river bathing, taking the girls with her. My sister being fond of the pleasure was generally one of the party. Unfortunately one day she went in but never returned. The next day her body was found and. buried at my father’s. Truly it was sad for my parents.” Priestly Spring School was located where the Two Rivers mansion now stands.

#6 HENRY HORN PHILIPS (Son of Joseph Philips 1763-1822 & Milbry Horn) His sister Martha Philips wrote: “Henry Philips was born in 1797. At the age of 16 my father sent him to college. He remained there until he was nineteen. Then he engaged in the mercantile business, but very soon after was taken sick and died in his 20 th year. A young man of character & much beloved by all his friends.”

In 1930 Mrs. Katherine W. Ewing Philips reported the following inscription on this stone: Henry Horn Philips Born 5 Sept 1797 Died 4 Oct 1816 at the age of 20 years

#7 WILLIAM P. HARDNG AND MILBRY C. PHILIPS

William Duncan Philips' daughter Milberry married William Perkins Harding on 5 May 1853 and they had a daughter named Mary "Mollie" DeMoville Harding who wrote the following in her memoires: “I was once a little child. Can you believe it? The first time I can remember myself is when I kissed my mother and hugged her not to cry. She was leaving her home and family the last year of the War of the States for the South (1865). Atlanta was to be our destination. A faithful servant’s illness changed all of our plans. We had to stop in a little mountain in Tennessee where she died after our mother had tenderly nursed her for some weeks. Our mother contracted typhoid fever, then pneumonia from which she died six weeks later leaving us a wee baby brother; besides there were three other children of us for our father to care for. We could not remain in this town after mother had left us, and it was our father’s desire to take us to our grandmother’s as he had promised (in Nashville, Tennessee). My father faced prison and possibly death if he returned since all good citizens were given such treatment in those years of turmoil.” Read the full story at Milbry Catherine Philips' Web Page Link. .

#8 EAST WILLIAM WILLIAMS & SALLY PHLIPS

William Williams and Sally Philips, a daughter of Joseph Philips and Milbrey Horn, were married in Davidson County, February, 1807, by the Rev. Thomas B. Craighead. She was a woman of firmness, of kindness, and of practical sense. The children born of this marriage were Eliza, Martha, Charlotte, Henry, Mary, William, John, Joseph, Maria, and Evander. The girls were educated at the Nashville Female Academy. All of them died soon after reaching womanhood except Charlotte, who married Col. W. B. A. Ramsey, of Edgefield. Henry, Joseph, and Evander died in early manhood. (Source: page 248 of the book "History of Davidson County Tennessee" by W. Woodford Clayton and available in the Tennessee Archives, call # F443. D2. C6 1880A v.2c.1 (Books).)

#8 SOUTH WILLIAM WILLIAMS

William Williams' Web Page Link William Williams was born in Halifax Co., N. C., April 15, 1776. He graduated at Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., in 1799. Judge Joseph Story was a member of the same class, and as warm personal friends they corresponded through life. Returning home, he read law with Judge Haywood. In 1804 he came to Nashville with the view of settling, and Purchased the Evans grant of six hundred and forty acres, four miles from Nashville, on the Gallatin road. The following year he moved to the farm, bringing with him his father and mother and brothers. His father, then in bad health, died soon after. (Source: page 248 of the book "History of Davidson County Tennessee" by W. Woodford Clayton and available in the Tennessee Archives, call # F443. D2. C6 1880A v.2c.1 (Books).)

#8 NORTH SARAH “SALLY” PHILIPS (Daughter of Joseph Philips 1763-1822 & Milbry Horn)

Her sister Martha Philips wrote: “Sally Philips married in 1807 William Williams from North Carolina, a lawyer of great worth. His parents being wealthy, much time was spent on his education. A gentleman in every respect. His attention was turned more to farming than the practice of law. They lived to old age, my sister to be seventy, and her husband eighty-six. Mr. Williams’ mother was ninety-six” (William Williams’ mother is Sarah Josey, also buried here.)

#9 WEST ELISHA WILLIAMS & SARAH JOSEY

ELISHA WILLIAMS web page link Elisha Williams was a close friend of Joseph Philips in NC and later in Tennessee. Two of his sons married two of Joseph’s daughters. John Maxey Williams, son of Josiah Frederick Williams & Margaret “Peggy” Thomas Philips wrote: “In 1806 my grandfather Williams came from Halifax County North Carolina bringing his wife and three sons -- William about 23, Josiah about 20 and Elisha about 18. Grandfather settled on the hill above the large spring in the rear of the house built by uncle William. One daughter who had married remained in North Carolina, near Warrenton. She first married Mr. Williams (not related to our family) and afterwards married Mr. Alston.” The 1880 book "History of Davidson County" relates: "In 1804 he (William Williams) came to Nashville with the view of settling, and purchased the Evans grant of six hundred and forty acres, four miles from Nashville, on the Gallatin road. The following year he moved to the farm, bringing with him his father and mother and brothers. His father, then in bad health, died soon after."

# 9 SOUTH ELISHA WILLIAMS

#9 NORTH SARAH JOSEY

#10 J. P. WILLIAMS (JOSEPH PHILIPS WILLIAMS is a son of William Williams and his wife Sarah “Sally” Philips.)

J. P. WILLIAMS Born Feb 16 1824 Died Apr 14 1846

#11 JOSIAH FREDERICK WILLIAMS (Son of Elisha Williams 1749-1811 & Sarah Josey)

JOSIAH FREDERICK WILLIAMS web page link The top layer of these ground level tomb covers have eroded over time. Mrs. Katherine W. Ewing Philips reported the following inscription in 1930: To The memory of JOSIAH F. WILLIAMS This monument is erected by his children. He was born on the 2nd day of February 1780 and died on the 29th day of November 1851 His life was characterized by (Illegible) Inflexible honest, sterling (Illegible) the most unpretending (Illegible) (Illegible)

#12 MARGARET THOMAS PHILIPS Her sister Martha Philips wrote: “My sister Margaret Philips born 1799 married Josiah Williams, a gentleman of unblemished character. They raised a large family of sons & daughters. My sister died 1844 leaving 12 children. Mr. Williams died 1851. Blessed are the dead that die in the Lord.”

The top layer of these ground level tomb covers have eroded over time. Mrs. Katherine W. Ewing Philips reported the following inscription in 1930: To the memory of MARGARET THOMAS WIFE OF JOSIAH F. WILLIAMS daughter of Joseph and Milbrey Philips Born Sept. 30th 1799 Died Apr. 14 1844

#13 WILLIAM DUNCAN PHILIPS & ELIZABETH DWYER His sister Martha Philips wrote: “William D. Philips, born 1804 the youngest of the family, married 1825 to S. T. Clark. Intelligent & amiable in all her ways, truly did I love her. She passed away too soon to her Father in heaven. In 1828 he married Eliza Dwyre, born & raised in Dublin Ireland. A lovely & charming lady, she died in 1872.”

WILLIAM DUNCAN PHILIPS web page link.

#14 JOSEPH PHILIPS & MILBIRY HORN

JOSEPH PHILIPS web page link A history of Tennessee and Tennesseans, the leaders and representative men in commerce, industry and modern activities – Will Thomas Hale, Dixon Lanier Merritt, Page 205 Joseph Philips married in about 1784, in North Carolina, Milberry Horn, who was born in Edgecombe County, that state, where her parents were pioneer settlers. She died on the home farm, in Davidson County, Tennessee, in 1849. Shortly after his marriage, in 1791, Joseph Philips started with his wife for the wilds of Tennessee. They made an overland journey with teams, following a blazed trail a large part of the way, bringing with them their household goods, and all of their stock and slaves. He located in Davidson County, which he had previously visited, and which was then very thinly populated. He bought a tract of land (640 acres) lying six miles north of Nashville, and began the establishment of a home, his first step in that direction being the erection of a log cabin which he and his family occupied until 1804, when it was burned, the fire occurring in March of that year. He then burned a kiln of brick, and erected a substantial house, in commodious colonial style, using whip-sawed timbers in its construction. This was the first brick house built in Davidson County, and is still standing in good condition (until about 1963), and a part of the original log barn, built in 1791, is also standing. When he located there Nashville was but a hamlet, and for more than half a century afterward there were no railroads in the state. He improved a fine homestead, and with the help of his slaves was there engaged in general farming until his death in 1818 (actually 1822).

#15 ELIZABETH “BETSY” NORFLEET WILLIAMS

According to the Tennessee State Library and Archives Photographs of Portraits record 30038 showing a photograph of a portrait of Evander McIver, his wife Elizabeth Williams died of typhoid fever 12 days after their wedding in 1826 and he later married Matilda Wendell.

#16 HENRY HORN WILLIAMS

#17 MARTHA WILLIAMS

#18 SARAH PHILIPS

In 1930 Mrs. Katherine W. Ewing Philips reported a headstone (not there in 2013) for this footstone with the following inscription: Sacred To the memory of SARAH Infant child Of William D. and ?

#19 ROBERT WILLIAMS

In 1930 Mrs. Katherine W. Ewing Philips reported a headstone (only partially there in 2013) with the following inscription: ROBERT Infant son of J. F. & M. T. WILLIAMS (These parents are Josiah Frederick Williams and Margaret “Peggy” Thomas Williams.)

# 20 MARY WHARTON WILLIAMS

# 20 SOUTH SIDE MARY WHARTON WILLIAMS

#21 WILLIAM WILLIAMS

#22 DAVID D. WILLIAMS

#23 MARIA GRAHAM MCIVER

MARTHA “PATSY” PHILIPS web site link

# 24 EVANDER MC IVER

#25 WILLIAM P. HARDING & MILBERRY C. PHILIPS

See grave marker #7 for a similar grave marker. Normally a marker like this would indicate the burial of an un-named child, but we know of none. Still it’s possible.

The following grave markers could not be located in 2013:

REBECCA WILLIAMS (Daughter of Joseph Philips 1763-1822 & Milbry Horn) Her sister Martha Philips wrote: “Rebecka died quite an infant in 1792.” Her headstone and grave was not found in 2013 but her headstone inscription was reported in 1930 by Mrs. Katherine W. Ewing as follows: Rebecca Philips born Edgecomb Co. 1790 Died Davidson Co. 1792

JOHN FELIX DEMOVILLE & JOSEPHINE DEMOVILLE (JOSEPHINE PHILIPS DEMOVILLE 1861-1865 is a daughter of JOHN FELIX DEMOVILLE 1823-1884 & Mary L. Philips 18371919) It’s not clear from Mrs. Ewing’s record below exactly who, if anyone is buried beneath this marker, if indeed this is a grave marker. This headstone and grave was not found in 2013 but the headstone inscription was reported in 1930 by Mrs. Katherine W. Ewing as follows: JOHN FELIX DEMOVILLE JOSEPHINE DEMOVILLE

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