DIVA TALK: Glory Crampton, Leslie Kritzer, Julie Reiber, Josefina Scaglione, Natalie Toro and Rachel York

's NYMF Chats
By Andrew Gans 13 Jul 2012

Julie Reiber Julie Reiber Stealing Time at the PTC Performance Space July 15-16 How did you get involved with this production? Julie Reiber: My friend Eden Espinosa, I've worked with [her] in Brooklyn and Wicked, had to bow out and referred them to me. Anything she is doing is worthy of doing for sure, so I was happy to jump in. What other NYMF productions have you been a part of? JR: I've wanted to do something in NYMF, but I've always been busy with other projects, so I'm happy to say this is my NYMF debut! How would you describe the character you're playing?

JR: Maya is a woman who is going through the motions in her life right now. Her relationship has lost its love and support and is somewhat emotionally abusive. She's lost her way with herself and who she is. She's known she needed to move on for a while, but has not had the strength and has wanted to stay for her child. When she meets Ben, she not only falls in love, but is re-inspired to her own life. Motivated again to live for herself as well as others and gains the strength to make choices she needs for her life to be full again and move forward. Why do you think audiences should attend this particular production? JR: Well, the music is wonderful and the cast is stellar so that can't hurt. But even more so, I think the story and content is important. The topic of infidelity touches a lot of folks, but isn't talked about so much. But this show is about much more than that. It's about people finding themselves again and making the right choices for themselves so they can be full again in life, themselves and love. Why do you think NYMF is so important? JR: We need now, more than ever, new, unique, thoughtful musicals. I love me a movie musical, but I much prefer a brand-new idea from brave, talented writers that are willing to put ideas out there and take that risk. So I hope NYMF only gets bigger and stronger with more and more new musicals evolving from its doors. NYMF celebrates new musicals, but which role in a classic musical would you most like to perform? JR: Ah. Well...new musicals and creating roles is my favorite thing to do, but I would still love to play Evita someday. What an incredible woman/character to portray. Do you have any other projects in the works? JR: I'll be doing a one-night reading of one of my favorite pieces, The Last Five Years, on Aug. 3 in the Hamptons. I'm working on a demo for a new musical called Dillinger, and I'm also most importantly hard at work on my own new project of creating a human! I'm five months pregnant and so excited about my new role of Mom... so I'd say that will be taking up most of my time in the immediate future.

Rachel York Stealing Time at the PTC Performance Space July 15-16 How did you get involved with this production? Rachel York: Tor Hyams, the composer of Stealing Time has been a friend and collaborator for many years. He produced my first solo album, "Let's Fall in Love." In fact, one of my favorite tracks on the album, "Too Good To Be True," is an original composition written by Tor. When he called and asked me to be involved in Stealing Time, it was a no-brainer. What other NYMF productions have you been a part of? RY: Last year, I took part in a musical called Ghostlight, which was my first NYMF production. How would you describe the character you're playing? RY: Early on in her life, the character I'm portraying, Maya, had a successful modeling career. She has the inherent ability to fill a room with light, charm and positivity. In her early twenties, Maya gave up her career after meeting Thomas (her future husband). Thomas wasn't supportive of her modeling career as it conflicted with his vision of where their lives should go. Now, 13 years later, she deeply questions her decision. Where there was once an abundance of confidence, her husband's controlling behavior has contributed to Maya's low selfesteem. Maya feels trapped and unable to grow as a person. When she meets Ben, she finds love, inspiration and awakening. This is her journey. Why do you think audiences should attend this particular production? RY: I find the subject matter to be a window into the human condition. There will be those in the audience that can relate to Maya's struggle

to regain her self, and consequently, appreciate her emotional journey towards self-realization and the growth that ultimately ensues. Why do you think NYMF is so important? RY: NYMF is an important vehicle for courageous writers to develop new works that otherwise wouldn't have a platform. It gives writers, actors, designers and audiences an opportunity to take risks and experience theatre in an organically raw setting. NYMF celebrates new musicals, but which role in a classic musical would you most like to perform? RY: I would welcome the opportunity to play Anna in The King and I again. I had the opportunity to take on the role last year in a beautiful production at The Walnut Street Theater and enjoyed the experience immensely. A role that is not in the cards for me (for obvious reasons), but one that I have always loved and appreciated, is Maria in West Side Story. As much as I enjoy the classic musicals, though, I find creating roles in new musicals, the most fun and fulfilling of opportunities. Do you have any other projects in the works? RY: I am excited to be playing Reno Sweeney in the first national tour of Kathleen Marshall's Tony Award-winning revival of Anything Goes, which kicks off in Cleveland this October.

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