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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 809 • July 19 - August 1, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

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Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 809 • July 19 - August 1, 2012

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WORDS FROM THE EDITOR

by Kathleen McCarthy km@rcreader.com

A

Get Active or Get Swallowed Whole
every bank and brokerage firm in the United States. According to Wikipedia, in 2011, the DTC held approximately $1.7 quadrillion of the world’s wealth, with many of the rights of legal ownership, if not the benefits derived therefrom, accruing to it via modern digital transactions replacing the traditional certificate system. If you happen to have stock or bond certificates in your name from oldfashioned trades of the past, then you are still the registered owner and have all the benefits and attributes of true ownership. But if you trade in the current system of digital transactions, you are not the true owner, but merely the beneficiary of the stocks and bonds you paid your hard-earned money for. It is a deception of the highest order, yet it is perfectly legal under the modern U.S. Treasury regulations that have been implemented under the radar since the mid-1990s without our consent. It is hard to believe, but it is absolutely true. Just try and get a physical stock or bond certificate from your broker and see what occurs. He/she will likely tell you that registered ownership and beneficiary ownership are virtually the same thing, especially because you receive dividends, voting rights, etc. You will also likely be told that a central clearinghouse for securities transactions is safer and more efficient. This is patently false. Cede & Company is the fictitious name, or street name, used by the DTC to legally hold your stock as the rightful owner, while allowing you the benefits of ownership without actually passing to you – the actual buyer – any legal title to the physical property that the stocks and bonds represent. It is speculated, with good reason, that the Federal Reserve System holds this wealth as collateral against the fiat money it prints for the federal government’s unsustainable borrowing. Eventually, when Federal Reserve Notes (U.S. dollars) are no longer accepted by creditors, the assets held in trust by Cede & Company for the DTC will be surrendered in lieu of payment. This is permitted under the War Powers Act, giving the President unfettered powers to suspend the U.S. Constitution, including the Bill of Rights, by declaring a national emergency and seizing all the country’s resources, including its labor and privately owned assets. It is a nightmare scenario that has merit when you connect other seemingly unrelated dots. Recall that this asset grab already happened in the 1930s, when Franklin Delano Roosevelt confiscated all the privately owned gold. Americans were told that it was to shore up the economy during the Great Depression, but history tells us the real reason was because we borrowed funds from France, which in turn insisted on, and succeeded in, redeeming their notes in gold. We suddenly had no gold in reserve to back our own currency. So Roosevelt claimed the gold belonging to American citizens under penalty of law if we refused. It was a form of theft, even though we traded for Federal Reserve Notes, which were essentially useless otherwise.

fter nearly 20 years of opining in these pages, I am going to try a shock-and-awe approach to informing. Hopefully readers will be either inspired or outraged, or at least curious enough to pursue the topics here, and to not just verify but also to help better connect relevant dots, adding substantially to the scope of knowledge required to effect real change. For instance, did you know that when you purchase stocks and bonds in today’s market, you don’t actually own them? Instead, you are only purchasing beneficiary rights that come with each unit. The real owner of your stocks and bonds is the little known Cede & Company, a division of the Depository Trust Company (DTC), which handles 99 percent of all securities trades in the United States and the majority of trades abroad. In other words, this privately held corporation (approximately 35 percent of which is owned by the New York Stock Exchange), which is actually a division of the Federal Reserve System, processes all book-entry securities transactions for

Continued On Page 22

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 809 • July 19 - August 1, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com by Rich Miller CapitolFax.com

ILLINOIS POLITICS

A

Southern-Illinois District Looks to Be a Challenge for Democrats

new poll taken last week has Republican congressional candidate Jason Plummer leading his new Democratic challenger by 11 points. The poll, taken July 9 by We Ask America, found Plummer ahead of Democrat Bill Enyart 45-34. The automated poll of 1,510 likely voters had a margin of error of 2.5 percentage points. Plummer is significantly below 50 percent, and 23 percent of voters are undecided, so he doesn’t have this one in the bag yet. Enyart was appointed to the ballot late last month, so he has barely had any time at all to make an impression on the voters of the 12th Congressional District. It appears that Enyart’s newness is hurting him with fellow Democrats. While Plummer is backed by 79 percent of Republicans, Enyart is supported by just 62 percent of Democrats. More than 29 percent of Democrats are undecided, so as they “come home,” Enyart should tighten this race up some more. Just 43.5 percent of African Americans are supporting Enyart right now, according to the poll, and that will definitely increase. And a full 28 percent of independents are undecided, compared to 25 percent who support Enyart and 46 percent who back Plummer. Again, we will probably see some of those folks move toward Enyart as he becomes better known. In theory, this is supposed to be a district drawn for Democrats. Longtime incumbent Jerry Costello currently represents the 12th. In reality, though, the district was drawn to re-elect Costello. When he dropped out of the race, he helped engineer the appointment of Brad Harriman to the ballot. Harriman was an incredibly weak candidate and couldn’t put a decent campaign together, so the district went up for grabs. Harriman had to go, and he dropped out last month, citing an unnamed medical condition. Enyart retired as the Illinois National Guard’s top general shortly before he was appointed to the ballot. Generals, like mayors and sheriffs, don’t always make the best candidates because they are accustomed to barking orders, not taking

In theory, this is a district drawn for Democrats. In reality, it was drawn for one Democrat.

them. He’s never run for any office before this one, and he’ll have to raise a ton of money to defeat Plummer. He also has no combat experience to highlight during his campaign. And Enyart is a Metro East guy, which may not play well in the more “southern” portions of the district. His campaign points out that he led the National Guard’s efforts during the 2011 flood, which hurt several southern counties, and that he has family in the southern section (Sparta) and opened his first law office in Monroe County. Still, though, he’ll be perceived as St. Clair County’s guy, which, in fact, he is. He was also appointed to the National Guard post by Rod Blagojevich, and his law firm twice contributed small sums to Blagojevich’s campaign fund. Perhaps the best news for Democrats in this district is that President Barack Obama appears to be doing a little better than expected. Just under 46 percent of voters approve of Obama’s job performance, while 52 percent disapprove. Yes, he’s upside down, but Obama has not been doing well at all outside Cook County, and he’s been doing especially bad in southern Illinois. A 46-percent approval rating is better than some had figured. The president will undoubtedly be a drag on Democrats up and down the ticket in many areas of the state if he doesn’t improve his standing soon. Some Democratic state-legislative incumbents nave been targeted for defeat in the 12th Congressional, including Senator Bill Haine and Representatives Dan Beiser and Jerry Costello II. They’ll need a stronger performance from the president and a much better Enyart effort to help them hold on to their seats. According to the poll, almost 54 percent of the district’s likely voters oppose “Obamacare,” the national health-care-reform law. Only 70 percent of Democrats support the law, compared to 87 percent of Republicans who oppose it. That’s obviously not great news for Democratic candidates. Rich Miller also publishes Capitol Fax (a daily political newsletter) and CapitolFax. com.

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 809 • July 19 - August 1, 2012

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T

Cops Say Legalize Drugs. One Tells Why
• Nearly 25 percent (or 155,900 people) of jail inmates in 2002 were being held for drug offenses, including 10.8 percent for possession; • 20 percent (or 253,300 people) of stateprison inmates were being held for drug offenses in 2005; and • 53 percent (or 95,446 people) of federal prisoners in 2007 were drug offenders. The anti-drug-war Drug Policy Alliance claims that more than 1.6 million people were arrested in the United States in 2010 on nonviolent drug charges. It further says that more than $51 billion is spent each year in the United States on the drug war. So the expensive War on Drugs has been very successful at locking up people, many of whom posed no threat beyond that to their own health. But, as Eduardo Porter pointed out in a July 3 New York Times column (RCReader. com/y/legalize), the effort has failed in two key areas: supply and demand. Illegal-drug use now is at roughly the same level as it was 20 years ago, while prices have dropped for nearly all illegal drugs except marijuana, he noted. Beyond the numbers, there are the human lives derailed or ruined by arrests and incarcerations for nonviolent drug offenses. From a law-enforcement perspective, Ryan said, police also pay a price beyond the actual costs of drug-enforcement programs. Narcotics officers have low morale, he said. And “in law enforcement in general, the greatest source of complaints ... has to do with narcotics enforcement.” So in Ryan’s and LEAP’s views, ending the drug war would pay many dividends: to state and federal prison budgets, and to the images and budgets of local, state, and federal law-enforcement agencies. Ryan said that neither he nor LEAP has a specific preferred policy for legalization, or what would happen after. “We just know that we have a policy that has failed miserably and has caused more damage than it’s ever helped,” he said. “We need to change that so we can get on to a program. ... “The first step is just to say: There’s no such thing as a completely illegal drug. And we go from there and say: However, there are regulations where there are illegal things you can do with drugs.” The general framework, he said, might mimic regulations currently governing alcohol, tobacco, and prescription drugs: “There are certain people that are authorized to sell those. Certain people authorized to buy them – those are age restrictions [on alcohol and tobacco]. And especially with alcohol, you’re definitely held responsible for misuse and what you do because of your misuse. That’s kind of what we’re looking for. ... It’s not a free-for-all.” He also said he favors releasing people now in prison for nonviolent drug-possession offenses. Resources currently used for drug enforcement and incarceration could be diverted to treatment, education, and reacclimation programs, Ryan said: “I couldn’t tell you what the cost of that would be, but I’m making a pretty good guess that it would be less than the cost of keeping them” in prison. He acknowledged that drug legalization would not be a panacea, with new problems to address – including what would happen to the current illegal-drug-trade infrastructure.

NEWS

by Jeff Ignatius jeff@rcreader.com

ony Ryan says his organization has an effective tool in the war on the War on Drugs: a T-shirt. It reads: “Cops say legalize drugs. Ask me why.” And people do. Ryan served 36 years in Denver, Colorado’s police department before retiring in 2003. He’s now a member of the board of directors of LEAP – Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (LEAP. cc). The 10-year-old organization, he said, has 50,000 members, ranging from current and former law-enforcement officers to prosecutors to judges. The former cop (who retired as a lieutenant) said that although he never worked in narcotics, he watched the effects of drugs – and drug enforcement – firsthand in Denver’s poorer neighborhoods. “I saw a lot of drug activity,” he said in a phone interview last week. “I saw the damage that is done by drug use and drug addiction, but I also saw the damage that’s being done by the country’s policy – in those days the War on Drugs. ... I’m of the mindset ... that the damage that has done ... is worse than what the drugs themselves cause.” Ryan will speak at and participate in an August 1 forum organized by Iowa staterepresentative candidate Mark Nelson. The event will be held at 7 p.m. at Central Perk (226 West Third Street in Davenport). The price of the drug war has been undeniably high. First, there are the cash costs of incarceration. A 2012 survey of 40 states by the Vera Institute of Justice found the average annual cost of incarceration was $31,307 per inmate. And according to the federal Bureau of Justice Statistics:

“There are lots of human ills that people can cater to,” he said. With the caveats that he didn’t talk openly about his drug-war views when he was an active officer and that he’s been retired for nine years, Ryan said that many in law enforcement share his perspective – although they might not speak out because they fear they could lose their jobs. “I think there are a lot more than people might imagine currently active police officers who are sympathetic to what we have to say,” he said. He guessed that 40 percent of police officers “think we could be doing something else, spend our time on other ills.” But, he emphasized, while individual police departments might de-prioritize drug enforcement, it’s still fundamentally a legislative issue – and legalization arguments continue to fall on largely deaf ears with lawmakers, particularly at the federal level. Ryan said that when he talks to legislators, they’re polite but noncommittal: “‘Thank you. I’m glad we had this talk.’ ... There aren’t very many that I come across at this point in time” who say they agree with LEAP’s positions. Of course, some state and local jurisdictions have legalized medical marijuana, or decriminalized marijuana possession. But elsewhere, Ryan said, police officers are required to enforce the law, and federal drug policy hasn’t changed: “As long as something is just illegal, there’s nothing more you can do except arrest people ... and put them in prison. ... It doesn’t solve the problem of drugs. It just collects money. Except that we spend more than we ever collect.”

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 809 • July 19 - August 1, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

O T

Triple Play
This issue features interviews with The Sea & Cake’s Sam Prekop and JEFF the Brotherhood’s Jake Orrall. We interviewed The Baseball Project’s Scott McCaughey last year, and that article can be found at RCReader.com/y/baseballproject. In addition to McCaughey – known for the Young Fresh Fellows and the Minus 5 – the band includes Steve Wynn (of Dream Syndicate and Gutterball), Peter Buck (of R.E.M.), and Linda Pitmon (who has regularly worked with Wynn). As we wrote last year, songwriters McCaughey and Wynn help the band transcend gimmickry: “The songs don’t settle for easy recitations of historical highlights. Some are pure celebrations – such as the punky ‘Ichiro Goes to the Moon’ – that exude a love of the game through their understanding of it. But most of the songs are more complicated.” More information and tickets for all these concerts are available at RIBCO.com.

MUSIC

ver the course of a week, from July 21 to July 27, RIBCO will offer an impressive array of acts: half of The Sea & Cake on Saturday, the national-pastime-themed supergroup The Baseball Project on Thursday, and the up-and-coming garage-rock duo JEFF the Brotherhood on Friday.

Constant Reinvention
Sam Prekop & Archer Prewitt, July 21 at RIBCO
he venerable Chicago band The Sea & Cake will release its 10th album in September. Singer/guitarist/songwriter Sam Prekop told me it will be called Runner. And ... well, that’s about all he offered initially. “I haven’t actually listened to it,” he said in a phone interview last week, promoting his July 21 RIBCO show with The Sea & Cake bandmate Archer Prewitt. “It’s like a really fond memory already. I’m like: Why listen to it and attempt to take it apart?” Prekop said he’s in the “recovery period” for the album – the time between when it’s finished and when he and the band need to learn the songs for live presentation and to prepare a new show. He said that at first he dreads reworking the songs for concerts, comparing the process to how most people feel about (and procrastinate with) taxes and homework. But something with deeper roots could be contributing to his ambivalence about The Sea & Cake. The long-running outfit – which the All Music Guide called “the elder statesmen of impressionistic indie rock” – might just be inherently frustrating to Prekop’s admittedly “restless” nature. “I think we might have to wield a radically new palette to get us somewhere else,” he told TinyMixtapes.com in 2010. “We can’t ... repeat what we have done,” he said to the Chicago Tribune last year. “If we felt like we couldn’t come up with something different, we’d stop.” And: “We still have a great record in us and we haven’t done it. ... One day we are going to make a great record.” Put simply, reinvention is easier as a single person than as a band, and Prekop is clearly most fond of his 2010 solo record Old Punch Card, on which he ditched the pop of his first two solo records and The Sea & Cake in favor of a noisy, atmospheric cut-up album. “I just like it more,” he said. “I think that one for me is such an alien palette,” involving “tossing out most things I knew.” As a result, he said, he actually listens to that record. “There’s no Sea & Cake on my iPod,” he said. “If a track [from Old Punch “A lot of it felt really radically new to me while I was doing it,” he said. “In retrospect, at the end I’m always somewhat – not disappointed, but things don’t quite hold up as well. It’s not that they don’t hold up as well; it depends on when you talk to me. ... “I’m quite restless in terms of working and wanting to always move on and change things up. I felt while I was making this record ... I had really hit upon some new stuff – for us, anyway. I doubt anybody would term it radical in the realm of all other music.” And here it’s important to note perhaps one of the biggest – and most obvious – obstacles blocking full renewal for The Sea & Cake: singing. “I don’t think I’d be interested in hearing me unlearn how I don’t know how to sing anyway,” Prekop said. As for his upcoming show with Prewitt, Prekop said the centerpiece is drawn from his soundtrack for the movie Pavilion – which is similar in instrumentation to Old Punch Card, but more melodic and with some singing. Beyond that, the show will feature songs from Prekop’s two pre-Old Punch Card solo albums and some from The Sea & Cake. “It’s nice to expose the working parts to some Sea & Cake songs,” he said. “You just hear the guitar and vocals differently ... .” And without the remainder of the band – bassist Eric Claridge and drummer John McEntire – the dynamic changes. “It’s much more walking the tightrope,” he said. “It’s definitely the most challenging live situation, but in exchange the most rewarding when it really comes off. ... “Just the very exposed nature of two guitars and me singing adds up to a whole different feel. ... I feel we take more chances in a way. We’re not really improvising, but there’s more of a chance element involved.” Sam Prekop & Archer Prewitt will perform on Saturday, July 21, at RIBCO (1815 Second Avenue in Rock Island). The 9 p.m. show also features The Multiple Cat and Seth Knappen. Advance tickets (RIBCO.com) and at-the-door admission are $10.

Card] came up on my iTunes, I would let it play. Whereas a Sea & Cake song, I would probably skip it.” To be clear, this is probably a passing phase more than a hardened distaste for The Sea & Cake. Prekop said that come fall, he’ll likely be excited about playing from Runner and the band’s catalog. And, he said, people who have listened to Runner say it’s yet another expansion of the band’s range. “The few people that have

heard it feel that it’s really quite different,” Prekop said. “I don’t know that I could vouch for that. It’s quite possible.” He said that fast on the heels of last year’s 33-minute The Moonlight Butterfly, Runner features “broader strokes in a way. Sort of things we’ve done before but more intensely” – at times more rock-oriented and at other more ambient. He noted intricate harmonies with acoustic guitar and voice only – something the band hadn’t tried before.

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com by Jeff Ignatius jeff@rcreader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 809 • July 19 - August 1, 2012

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Poised to Conquer
JEFF the Brotherhood, July 27 at RIBCO
ake Orrall said that major labels these days wouldn’t put out something like Hypnotic Nights, the just-released album from JEFF the Brotherhood. They might have in 1994, he said in a phone interview last week, in advance of his band’s July 27 show at RIBCO. And if that seems an odd date to choose, consider that was the year DGC released Weezer’s self-titled debut, popularly known as the Blue Album. You’ll have no difficulty making the stylistic link between the two records, both packed with candied rock hooks, punkish drive, infectious melodies, and gleefully arrested development. As Stereogum casually put it: “Whenever people say to me, ‘Man, I miss Blue Album-era Weezer,’ I reply, ‘Then why the hell aren’t you listening to JEFF The Brotherhood already?’” To which the A.V. Club added (discussing JEFF’s 2011 album): “They’ve sidestepped Rivers Cuomo and created the album he’s no longer interested in making.” The irony is that Hypnotic Nights was released by Warner Bros. But don’t consider that fact a lucky break for the brothers Orrall, Jake (on guitars and vocals) and Jamin (on drums). And don’t fear for their sanity or bank accounts – another band sure to get chewed up in the major-label machinery. Despite their youth (Jake is 26 and Jamin 24), they’re hardly green: The band has been around since 2001, Hypnotic Nights is their seventh record, and the previous six were released by the family-owned Infinity Cat Recordings. And their father, singer/songwriter Robert

Photo by Jo McCaughey

J

Ellis Orrall, is a country-music veteran who could offer his kids plenty of cautionary tales. But he didn’t, Jake said: “He knows that we won’t listen to him.” Yet the Orrall children saw enough Nashville ugliness that they deliberately kept things small – basement tours and selfreleased recordings. “Running an indie label I’ve always thought of as an opportunity – having not known how to run a major label – to be able to sort of reinvent how record labels run,” Jake said. “We never really saw any use for a major label.” That’s different now, though, and shrewd bands hold the power, he said: “The music business has changed so much, especially major labels, which are now just desperately trying to find a way to stay afloat. That presents a lot of opportunities for bands who know how to play their cards right. ... The major label for us is a solution. It’s really allowed us to do a lot of things that we otherwise wouldn’t have been able to do, and reach a lot more people.” So JEFF the Brotherhood was able to retain creative control, and got much of what it wanted after a year and a half of contract negotiations with Warner Bros., which also distributed last year’s triumphantly titled We Are the Champions. For a band whose music is this dumb (in the best sense), the Orralls look pretty damned smart. As for Hypnotic Nights, co-produced by The Black Keys’ Dan Auerbach, there are hints of ambition, balls, stupidity, cheekiness, or some

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 809 • July 19 - August 1, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Vol. 19 · No. 809
THEATRE
By Thom White

July 19 - August 1, 2012
River Cities’ Reader
532 W. 3rd St. Davenport IA 52801 RiverCitiesReader.com (563)324-0049 (phone) (563)323-3101 (fax) info@rcreader.com

The Crate Escape
Moving, at the Playcrafters Barn Theatre through July 22

T

here’s a lovely sincerity to the Playcrafters Barn Theatre’s production of Bernard Slade’s Moving, and Saturday’s performance possessed such realism – with notable acting from every member of director Bryan Woods’ cast – that I had to wonder how such an impressively produced piece could feel so mismatched with its script. The problem, as I saw it, was that Slade’s tale of a family’s moving day is a comedy, and much of the humor was lost in Woods’ realistic presentation. I mean, the show features a grandfather who talks about his sexual urges and brags about keeping his plant in constant bloom, not realizing it’s plastic; a 15-year-old son who wants to lose his virginity before the moving truck pulls out of the driveway; a daughter who dropped out of college to pump gas simply because she’s “mechanically inclined”; another daughter who unexpectedly returns from Oxford pregnant and looking like a rock-band groupie; and a moving man who, because he wants to dance, pliés his way between lifting assignments. This is overtly funny material, but Woods – whose humor I’ve enjoyed in several of his stage roles over the years – takes a subtler approach, turning Slade’s comedy into more of a slice-of-life drama (at least in the first act, as the laughs do pick up a bit in the second). To be clear, Woods’ gentle treatment of the script – despite failing to fully capture the urgency of the day – is still beautifully rendered, with its focus on the confusion and emotional impact of packing up and moving. Much of the piece’s heart lies with Nancy Teerlinck, who portrays Barbara Hartman, the matriarch and owner of the family home. While Teerlinck was hilarious in the Richmond Hill Barn Theatre’s Christmas Belles last year, she doesn’t incorporate her natural comicality in this role nearly as much. That’s both unfortunate, as the play could be funnier with her humor on display, and not so bad, because Teerlinck’s fully shaped portrayal is so earnest that it’s hard to find fault in such an emotional performance.

worried that her father Fred may be senile, with that unrecognized plastic plant a seemingly sure sign of it. (As Fred, Bill Peiffer adds a touch of soft humor to his aging but somewhat randy dad.) Barbara is also trying to handle the demands of pushy realtor Mavis Cruikshank, and enacting the role, Molly Wilkinson is one of two actors here who lean toward the sillier side of the script’s humor, offering a frantic frustration that’s more funny than fierce. The other actor who plays to the broad comedy is Steve Marriott, who, as movingbusiness owner Harry Alex Richardson and Stephanie Moeller Picardo, incorporates a consistent Italian accent with inflections There’s also notable chemistry between stereotypical of a man of lesser intelligence Teerlinck and Patrick Gimm, who matches well-equipped for physical labor. her sincerity in his role as Barbara’s exAlex Richardson manages to (thankfully) husband Charlie. When Charlie returns avoid caricature as a closeted gay man with to tell Barbara that he left the “tart” he dreams of being a ballet dancer, which previously left Barbara for, and tries to patch the actor does by skipping the stereotypes things up between them, the two argue about typically employed for comic effect and, selling the house, and the verbal spat between instead, playing the part with genuineness. Teerlinck and Gimm had me believing And Cindy Ramos-Parmley offers a similar the two had been married for years, their candor as Barbara’s housekeeper Rosa, familiarity with each other evident in their making the maid a stalwart anchor for the argument. family, despite keeping a rather scandalous Portraying their children, Alec Peterson secret. With such nuanced performances blossoms when his horny teen Timmy pairs from the cast, Playcrafters’ Moving may with girlfriend Lisa (played with sweet charm not hit the right laugh notes, but Woods’ by Sydney Dexter) in a search for a hidden production does impress nonetheless. At one spot in which to do the deed; Stephanie point here, Barbara says, “It’s kinda been a Moeller’s Jennifer – the tough, truck-fixing funny kind of day.” Under Woods direction, daughter – offers an amusingly butch moxie; this is also only kinda a funny kind of play, and Liz Paxton’s pregnant Hilary exudes a but it’s definitely a memorable piece of “c’est la vie” attitude that makes clear that theatre. her A-student’s high-achievement life hit a breaking point, and that she’s now taking life Moving runs at the Playcrafters Barn Theatre as it comes. (4950 35th Avenue, Moline) through July 22, In addition to the “joys” of parenthood and information and tickets are available by that Barbara is dealing with, she’s additionally visiting Playcrafters.com.

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 809 • July 19 - August 1, 2012

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10

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 809 • July 19 - August 1, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 809 • July 19 - August 1, 2012

11

Cold Turkey
ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT
With Ice Age: Continental Drift, we are now four movies into the apparently neverending 20th Century Fox franchise, and it might finally be time to ask: Has there ever been a less animated animated lead than Ray Romano’s woolly mammoth Manny? Part of this character’s problem, it seems to me, lies in simple Straight-Man(ny) Syndrome: Playing ringleader to a bunch of more physically and vocally manic buffoons in this Pleistocene-era comedy series, Romano’s mammoth is consequently stuck with most of its dullest dialogue and storylines. (Continental Drift finds Manny, having wound up adrift in the ocean, desperate to return home and mend his relationship with his adolescent daughter.) A larger part has to do with the mere casting of Romano – a gifted comedian, yes, but one whose every over-familiar, soporific reading sounds like it’s being delivered through a deep yawn. But boy oh boy is this creature uninteresting to look at. Animated so that he’s routinely seen face-front, Manny’s enormous proboscis (like those of Ice Age’s fellow mammoth figures) almost completely masks his mouth, making it appear as though he’s speaking telepathically, and his cross-eyed stare is intensely offputting; you feel cross-eyed just watching him. The plush, lumbering character is drawn well enough, and as he resembles the world’s largest carnival-game prize, it’s easy to see what the littlest of kids find adorable about this animated Snuffleupagus. For this adult, though, Manny is tiresome both aurally and visually, thereby proving all-too-perfect a

Movie Reviews

by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com

I wouldn’t have missed it for anything, because its first five minutes are damned near extraordinary. Not coincidentally, they have nothing to do with Ice Age. If you want to understand everything that’s Ice Age: Continental Drift missing from Continental Drift, protagonist for what has become an increasingly all you have to do is watch the movie’s prelude – a tiresome family-film enterprise. new, brilliant Simpsons short titled “The Longest Heaven knows there’s a lot of stuff going Daycare,” in which the infant Maggie tussles on in this third sequel – pirate attacks, siren with her fiendish, unibrow-ed nemesis at the calls, Scrat pursuing his ever-elusive acorn. But Ayn Rand School for Tots. Boasting ingeniously nothing about the movie feels freshly imagined or dramatically vital, the action scenes and comic orchestrated slapstick, exquisite visual gags (the Raggedy Ayn Rand dolls were an especially fine gambits feel like (frozen) leftovers from far touch, as was the day-care’s welcome sign “Your better works, and even the shrillest of voice-over freedom assured by our probing”), sublime music performances, such as those of John Leguizamo and Wanda Sykes, feel phoned-in here. What’s the cues (Pagliacci!), and a narrative both involving and, in the end, surprisingly touching, the point in hiring talents as diverse as Aziz Ansari, short is an unintentional rebuke to the generic, Peter Dinklage, Nick Frost, Jennifer Lopez, Simon Pegg, Queen Latifah, Seann William Scott, contract-obligation blandness of the feature presentation. It’s also something that you too Patrick Stewart, and Alan Tudyk if they’re going often wish Continental Drift itself was: blessedly to sound this interchangeable? (Denis Leary free of dialogue. A decade into its run, the Ice Age seems particularly disengaged as the grumpy franchise may finally be completely out of stream. saber-toothed tiger Diego, and I wanted to weep A quarter-century into its run, The Simpsons for the actor when, during the end credits, we steadfastly refuses to be anything less than eh-h-hbriefly saw him grimacing his way through h-h-h-xcellent. the cast recording of an awful pop number; Leary’s pained expression said more about the Continental Drift experience than any review SAFETY NOT GUARANTEED possibly could.) Yet for as little fun as I had at my Aubrey Plaza’s grim-faced deadpan and screening of this latest Ice Age, it turns out that

sandpaper-dry readings on TV’s Parks & Recreation are things of comic beauty, especially in those rare moments right before they give way to expressions of genuine happiness. (Acting opposite Amy Poehler and Chris Pratt, it’s hard to imagine anyone staying sour for terribly long.) Until director Colin Trevorrow’s indie comedy Safety Not Guaranteed, however, I’d never imagined that Plaza’s specific gifts could be so successfully employed for the duration of an entire feature film. Man, are they ever. Playing a dissatisfied, mildly depressed magazine intern investigating the author of a mysterious want ad – one requesting a companion for a risky experiment in time-travel – Plaza lends the film her trademark, downbeat wit, and her dead-eyed incredulity and withering yet seemingly accidental sarcasm are oftentimes laugh-outloud funny. Yet she also brings to the film curiosity and poignancy and an unanticipated amount of emotional accessibility, and her scenes with Mark Duplass’ sweet-natured but obviously damaged time-machine inventor are minor miracles of tentative connection; these two lost souls advance and retreat with a wary warmth that feels absolutely genuine. A few of the film’s diversions, including the arrival of a pair of potential government spooks, are too sketchy for comfort, and much of screenwriter Derek Connolly’s dialogue is too self-consciously cute in the style of Diablo Cody. (“How do I eject?” asks Plaza during an uncomfortable conversation with screen dad Jeff Garlin.) But with the wonderful Jake M. Johnson cast in a rather trenchant parallel narrative involving a conceited jerk seeking his own personal form of time travel, Safety Not

Listen to Mike every Friday at 9am on ROCK 104-9 FM with Dave & Darren

Continued On Page 20

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 809 • July 19 - August 1, 2012

Connecting the Dots

ART

A

Waxing Poetic: Exploring Expression in Art, through October 7 at the Figge Art Museum

museum patron expects to find informative signage near an artwork., including biographical information about the artist, a description of the piece’s historical context, or critical acclaim. Instead, the placard near the Marlene Miller sculpture Girl 1 – currently on display in the Figge Art Museum’s Waxing Poetic show – reads: “what gestates in the roots unseen / reveals herself as tall on the inside / grown whole-sprung from a trunk / full of well manners & bluest eyes / puzzled by where she comes from.” This pairing of a visual work with a poem highlights how we assign meaning to art. In his words, Ryan Collins captures the literal appearance of the work– referencing the tree trunk, the girl’s intensely blue eyes, and her polite but befuddled posture and expression. But it also reads the sculpture. “Grown whole-sprung” and “tall on the inside” refer to the aged and androgynous face, contrasted with the child’s body: The texture of the head is chunky and scratchy, as opposed to the smoothness of the body. Collins imagines the sudden appearance of this creature, enhancing our view of it without dictating a specific interpretation. The exhibit – running through October 7 – is less about the artworks as standalone objects than about the process of inferring meaning. In addition to artworks matched with poetry in specific response to them, viewers are invited to create their own written reactions. At the center of the exhibit is a writing table with pens and paper, and under each work is a hanging packet of collected visitor responses. The technologically inclined are prompted to Tweet their responses to designated hashtags. Amelia, 15, at a Weight-Loss Camp by Lauren Greenfield seems to be a straightforward photographic portrait. The girl is slightly off-center, with her face and upper torso filling the composition. She stares at the viewer, looking mostly blasé, with one eyebrow slightly raised. She has precisely applied makeup, and a tank top with the word “Sugar” emblazoned in red. The accompanying poem, “Femme” by Neal Allen, is a girl’s point of view on the culturally enforced connection between sexuality and being “grown up.” When viewed next to the photograph, one can imagine Amelia herself writing the words: “I’ve learned myself / how to anoint my ears, / the slit between my breasts / with the musk of sugar, / the musk of spice.” It

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: Louis Faurer - Barnum & Bailey Dressing Room; Ella Traugi - The Captured Spring; Jim Dine - Sovereign Nights
is clear that the girl longs to feel beautiful, with her coy expression and careful makeup, but her overweight body and participation in a weight-loss camp suggest this is a struggle. Her shirt brings the point home; the word “sugar” often suggests sexuality but is ironic on a person trying to control her weight. Another photograph, Barnum & Bailey Dressing Rooms by Louis Faurer, illustrates the gap between a performer as a person and as a character. This black-and-white image from 1950 shows a man in full clown regalia, including a papier-mâché tiger supported by a thin rod attached at his waist. This would be an enjoyable illusion were the clown running about in a fictional panic, but it looks lifeless when attached to a still man standing backstage. Faurer’s photo has two accompanying poems: “Pucker Up, Tiger” by E. Marie Bertram and “Circus Haze” by Shea Doyle. While the photo itself presents this behindthe-scenes look at the circus through an objective lens, the poets describe it from the perspective of the performers. Written in second person, Bertram’s poem imagines the bittersweet rush of performing through the clown’s connection to his prop tiger: “You’d mash / Your red showman’s lips against her papier-mâché pout long enough to feel / The weight of your hollow bodies.” Doyle writes of the connection of the performer to the spectators: “who could blame them / confusing what was real and what was not / suspending all belief so the audience would too.” All three works propose that the inherent sadness in happy fiction

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 809 • July 19 - August 1, 2012

13

by Michelle Garrison michelle_m_garrison@hotmail.com

Romare Bearden - Tidings
The composition is divided in half with a precise white line, and the left side of the etching is a skull, centered in a void of darkness. Scratchy, curving gray marks break up the background space, providing texture. The shading on the skull is similarly scratchy and hurried in appearance. The right half is filled with an iconic heart shape. Its surface, as well as the background, is full of finger-paint-like smudges, and smears of brightly-colored ink. This work invokes love and death on the surface, but digging deeper, it is an analysis of symbolism. The images of the skull and heart have been used for centuries, to the point of being beyond Lauren Greenfield - Amelia, 15, at a cliché. The accompanying poem by Weight-Loss Camp Catie Osborn calls this out right away, starting: “It seems like a terrible poetic they coming together, or about to part? nightmare / to write a poem comparing What tidings, or news, are the women death and love / because everyone does hearing? Bearden has included images of that.” She then goes on to write about hope – a flower, the rainbow, and birds dinosaurs and the Batmobile before flying in the distance – but they seem addressing the heart and skull themselves. crushed under the dull colors and intense These seemingly unrelated associations black cloud. (love is like the Batmobile?) are an example Tidings seems a narrative of living day of the pleasantly subjective nature of art by day in the shadow of fading hope – interpretation. Although art will most pragmatic and depressing. Shea Doyle always have a theme, and a message to captures this tone in her accompanying varying degrees of elusiveness, each viewer poem, “Hello Sweetheart,” in which she will ultimately decide its meaning. While takes on the voices of these women: “we one person sees a heart and thinks of are not meant for this world / it lacks a spouse, another may be reminded of imagination / and traffics in lost dreams pizza, or even the Batmobile. Dine uses / when we have the sky / in all its empty symbolism so obvious that is forces these beauty.” idiosyncratic, subconscious links. Jim Dine’s Sovereign Nights also contrasts The engraving The Captured Spring emotions, but through juxtaposed symbols.

Marlene Miller - Girl 1
is that it is not reality, yet it is valuable nonetheless. Tidings by Romare Bearden establishes an emotional arc through the use of found imagery employed in a screen print. This 1971 work shows two women in the foreground to the right, in a loose embrace, with one holding a flower. They appear emotionless, with hard-to-read expressions, as Bearden has rendered their faces in deep shadow. In the distance, we see an anachronistic steam-engine train, dilapidated buildings, a modern road with painted lines, and bare trees among a rolling landscape. A rainbow emerges from the chimney of a building on the right but fades into a black cloud in a flat gray sky. The train suggests travel, although the situation of the women is ambiguous. Are

by Ella Traugi and the accompanying poem, “Genesis” by Neal Allen, explore how viewers interpret an action-infused narrative image without context. We see a young nude woman caught in the gnarled branches of a leafless tree. The background is two hills, leading our eyes downward to three flowered bushes also in the foreground. The intricate detail in the bushes and grass balance the smooth, light-valued sky. The flow of action in the composition shoots to the top right, drawing our eyes to the woman, but the branches whip back down, creating a dizzy, swirling visual path. The menacing tree has a gaping void in its center, and appears to be pulling the woman toward this opening. The woman fights against the branches, with tense muscles and a defiant face. Short branches writhe throughout the composition, infusing it with anxious motion. The image is black-and-white, with short hatching lines adding tonal shifts. Although mostly realistic in style, Traugi has exaggerated the texture of everything, enhancing the smoothness of the woman’s flesh against the roughness of the bark. Although clearly a dramatic scene, Traugi has given no indication of who is winning, or the specifics behind the conflict. Do the bare trees need to capture spring to bloom, or does spring force them out of hibernation? The tree seems the antagonist, as it is dark, large, and monstrously gnarled. However, the woman does not fit the traditional role of “damsel in distress,” with her muscular frame and warlike glare. The viewer is not aware of a particular setting, with no architecture, clothing, or props present. When confronted with only part of a story, our inclination is to connect the dots. Allen does this, making a poetic myth: “She did a dance / to make the rains come.” Later, Allen verbalizes the struggle’s intensity and ambiguity: “She reached and twisted / her fingers in the vines to hoist – / or were the vines fingers / twisting around her hands / to hoist her up?” This interpretation reminds us of the simple joy of making up stories – like a pre-literate child “reading” a book based only on its pictures. Michelle Garrison is a mixed-media artist who teaches art and design at Geneseo Middle School.

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What’s Happenin’
Event
2012 Mississippi Valley Fair
Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds Tuesday, July 31, through Sunday, August 5
throughout the week, with evening performances by – in order of appearance – the multi-platinum-selling recording artists Rodney Atkins, The Band Perry, Billy Currington (performing with special guest Brantley Gilbert), REO Speedwagon, Hank Williams Jr., and Montgomery Gentry (pictured). Finally, the numerous grounds attractions will offer everything from the family-friendly fun of Gym Bob’s Jamboree to the daring feats of Todd the Stiltwalker and Dallas the Fire Guy to the chainsaw-art demonstrations of Pat Doyle, and that’s without even mentioning three additional daily happenings listed on the fair’s Web site: “Zip Line,” “Great Cats,” and “Live Bear Show.” Just think! Zip lines and tigers and bears! And if any of you read that last bit without thinking to yourself, “Oh my,” I’m very disappointed. Tickets to the 2012 Mississippi Valley Fair are $3 to $10 for daily admission (entry to the grandstand concerts not included) or $40 to $45 for six-day “Fun Card” admission and grandstand-act entry, and more information is available by calling (563)326-5338 or visiting MVFair.com. t’s hard to believe that this year’s Mississippi Valley Fair – taking place July 31 through August 5 at, appropriately enough, Davenport’s Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds – marks the event’s 92nd anniversary. What’s even harder to believe is that despite an exhaustive search, I’ve been unable to find a Web site that reveals what the traditional gift for a 92nd anniversary is. Thanks for nothing, Internet. I guess a write-up here will have to do, but thankfully, this year’s fair gives me plenty to write about. As usual, the popular midsummer experience will feature numerous carnival-themed attractions and rides and the annual tractor parade, plus prizes awarded for the finest in area arts and crafts, horticulture, livestock, and more. There will be nightly concerts with some of the most well-known and -loved musicians and bands in the Quad Cities region, among them Buddy Olson, Corporate Rock, The Dani Lynn Howe Band, The Diamonds, Hap Hazzard, House Arrest, The Lovedogs, North of 40, Simon Says Uncle, Stevie J, The Tailfins, Vodkaseven, and Wild Oatz. National sensations, meanwhile, will be flooding the grandstand stage all

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 809 • July 19 - August 1, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Music

John Fullbright

Music

I

D

Rozz-Tox Friday, July 27, 9 p.m.

Heartland Jam

iscussing the widely acclaimed musician who will perform a special concert at Rock Island’s Rozz-Tox on July 27, the legendary singer/ songwriter Jimmy Webb is quoted as saying, “I have no doubt that in a very short time, John Fullbright will be a household name in American music.” I can’t imagine how Webb knew that Fullbright would eventually be highlighted in the Reader’s What’s Happenin’ pages, but let’s get cracking on that household-name thing! A native, and continued resident, of Okemah, Oklahoma – birthplace of folk-music icon Woody Guthrie – Fullbright has stated that his passion for music started with his first piano lessons, meaning that the man’s road to professional success began at the ripe old age of five. Nowadays, at the ripe old age of 24, the singer/songwriter/pianist/guitarist is considered one of the most promising artists on the folk-rock and Americana scenes, sharing stages with the likes of Michael Fracasso, Joe Ely, and Steve Poltz, and inspiring the Chicago Sun-Times to write that Fullbright’s recent SXSW showcase “was as perfect as if it were a Jonathan Demme concert film.” (For those not in the know, Demme directed the Talking Heads’ concert-film classic Stop Making Sense. That’s awfully damned perfect.) Happily for the artist, the critical plaudits continued with the May release of Fullbright’s From the Ground Up, an evocative, eclectic blend of selfwritten songs featuring everything from a moving testament to parental love (“Song for a Child”) to a literal God’s-eye view of the world (“Gawd Above”). The Houston Press’ William Michael Smith praises the CD’s “lyrical brilliance.” The Raleigh News-Observer’s David Menconi calls the album “an extraordinary collection of surpassing depth and maturity.” And Backroads Music magazine’s Naomi Koppel states that Fullbright “has produced a collection of songs that deserve to be heard across the planet.” I can’t imagine how Koppel knew that this What’s Happenin’ article would include a link to music clips on Fullbright’s Web site (JohnFullbrightMusic. com/music), but let’s get cracking on that planetary-awareness thing! Admission to John Fullbright’s all-ages concert is $8, and more information on the evening is available by e-mailing info@rozztox.com or visiting RozzTox.com.

F

Centennial Park Friday, July 20, and Saturday, J

or anyone who’s ever and 21, when Daven Jam. A festival featur event will find a significan dedicated to assisting the f also feature the significant Lynn Howe Band, North o plus eight national acts wh become an annual one. To get in the proper spir to the right with the Heart For more information a com.

Music
Eddie Turner
The Muddy Waters Saturday, July 21, 9 p.m.

A

noted Blues Mu Music Award no guitarist Eddie T be-scorching concert at 21. Then again, with Blu stating that “you get chi a note,” maybe a more a be “sure-to-be-freezing. Born in Cuba and rai his first taste of professi

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 809 • July 19 - August 1, 2012

15

by Mike Schulz mike@rcreader.com

July 21

Dierks Bentley

r wanted the city to be more like the country, you’ll get your wish on July 20 nport’s Centennial Park hosts the country-music celebration the Heartland ring some of the heartland region’s most exciting entertainers, the concert nt portion of its proceeds benefiting the Loren Arp Memorial Foundation, families of children at the University of Iowa’s burn-treatment center. It will t musical talents of Danika Holmes, The Farm, Grazin’ District, The Dani of 40, the Dirt Road Rockers, Cora Zoan, the Cal Stage Band, and Ty Brown – hose appearances suggest that this inaugural event might, as promoters hope,

1) “In a Real Love” 2) “Findin’ a Good Man” 3) “If Heaven Wasn’t So Far Away” 4) “Feel That Fire” 5) “Best Song Ever” 6) “Redneck Woman” 7) “From a Table Away” 8) “Lost in This Moment”

What Else Is Happenin’
Friday, July 20 – Shinedown. Multiplatinum-selling rockers in concert, with opening sets by Adelitas Way and In This Moment. Adler Theatre (136 East Third Street, Davenport). 7:30 p.m. $41.50. For tickets, call (800)745-3000 or visit AdlerTheatre.com. Saturday, July 21 – Flute Fiesta. A concert in the Black Hawk Chamber Music Festival presented by flutist Jeffrey Cohan, featuring 13 flutes from the Renaissance. Trinity Cathedral (121 West 12th Street, Davenport). 7:30 p.m. $10-15 suggested donation. For information, call (563)323-9989 or visit BHCMF.com. Saturday, July 21 – Sam Prekop and Archer Prewitt. Indie rockers of The Sea & Cake in concert, with opening sets by Multiple Cat and Seth Knappen. Rock Island Brewing Company (1815 Second Avenue, Rock Island). 9 p.m. $10. For information, call (309)793-4060 or visit RIBCO.com. Saturday, July 21 – Mary Chapin Carpenter. Concert with the singer/songwriter and five-time Grammy Award-winner. Englert Theatre (221 East Washington Street, Iowa City). 8 p.m. $35-55. For tickets and information, call (319)688-2653 or visit Englert.org. Sunday, July 22 – Beethoven to Modern. A concert in the Black Hawk Chamber Music Festival, with Jeffrey Cohan and Oleg Timofeyev performing works on an eight-keyed flute and a guitar made in the early 19th Century.

MUSIC

usic Award and Independent ominee, veteran blues singer/ Turner will play a sure-tot The Muddy Waters on July uesToDo.com’s Jeff Jaisun ills every time the guy strikes accurate description would .” ised in Chicago, Turner got ional acclaim in the early

1970s, when the man moved to Colorado and joined Grammy nominee Tracy Nelson (from the famed group Mother Earth) in the punk/R&B outfit The Immortal Nightflames. Thirty years later – following additional stints with Zephyr, trumpeter Ron Miles’ electric ensemble, and The Otis Taylor Band – Turner has developed an enormous following as a touring performer through Europe and North America, with his exhilarating blend of psychedelic-rock and Deltablues stylings showcased on a trio of solo CDs: 2005’s Rise, 2006’s The Turner Diaries, and 2010’s Miracles & Demons. While blues fans have greeted his many annual headlining and festival appearances with rapturous appreciation, their enthusiasm is matched in the raves that Turner has amassed from music critics. Blues Revue’s Michael Cote wrote, “Eddie Turner’s brand of blues evokes an otherworldly feel; a

Answers: 1 – F, 2 – E, 3 – B, 4 – A, 5 – C, 6 – D, 7 – B, 8 – H. Of course, in the end, all those songs are by performers who are big and rich, but let’s not quibble. dreamscape of fire and passion, pleasure and pain.” BarrelHouseBlues.com called Miracles & Demons “an astonishing CD,” with Turner playing “a lot like Jimi Hendrix once did, only with a more musical and controlled style.” And ending where we began, the aforementioned Jeff Jaisun went on to opine, “If anybody ever went down to the crossroads and let the devil tune his guitar, it was probably Eddie.” Which is, you know, ridiculous! That’d be like someone selling his soul to Satan for an easygoing career with an independent newspaper writing about cool musicians and local artists and movies and ... ! But maybe I’ve said too much. Tickets to Eddie Turner’s Bettendorf concert are $5, and for more information, call (563)355-0655 or visit TheMuddyWaters.com.

A) Dierks Bentley B) Justin Moore C) Katie Armiger D) Gretchen Wilson E) Danielle Peck F) Phil Vassar G) Sunny Sweeney rit for the two-day festival, test your country-music savvy by pairing the songs H) Big & Rich tland Jam performers who made them famous. and tickets to the Heartland Jam, call (563)391-0888 or visit HeartlandJam.

Continued On Page 18

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 809 • July 19 - August 1, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Anniversary Savings on American Leather

In the Walnut Center | 4711 N. Brady Street | Davenport, Iowa | 563.345.6250 | www.LifeStylesFurniture.com

Your Life. Your Style.

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 809 • July 19 - August 1, 2012

17

MUSIC

Continued From Page 7

Poised to Conquer
combination of the four – and not always encouraging. You’ll hear horns (“Country Life”) and what sounds like a sitar (“Mystic Portal II”) and what sounds like a harpsichord (“Wood Ox”), and the record closes with a cover of Black Sabbath’s “Changes” with only Moog synthesizer and vocals – a bizarre choice in both song and treatment. (Jake admitted it’s “the most corny song you could pick,” with its painfully direct lyrics.) Fret not, though. If you aren’t charmed by the summery, bright warmth of the guitarrock-anthem openers “Country Life” (“I want a place where I can smoke meats”) and “Sixpack” (“Let’s load the car up / I got a bag of ice / I got a six-pack / And I don’t wanna go back”), you probably find Weezer juvenile and simple – true enough, but beside the point. “Hypnotic Mind” adds a touch of metal riffage to the pop – a sensibility that’s developed in the closing explosion of “Hypnotic Winter” and the sludgy vibe of “Dark Energy,” a key difference from early Weezer. Jake said the instrumental flourishes were the band’s ideas, and Auerbach helped them polish the ear candy – from the vocals to the melodies. “Dan’s role was more helping us make sure the songs were not just making sense to us ... ,” he said. “He’s been very successful with his

jeff@rcreader.com by Jeff Ignatius
band because he knows how to write songs in a way where they’re accessible to a much wider audience.” He helped refine the songs that “get in people’s ears” and “made sense to the masses. Or tried to, at least.” That speaks to the band’s commercial goals: JEFF the Brotherhood believes it can build a large audience, and Warner Bros. is a tool to achieve that. If there’s a downside to being on a major label now, Jake said, it’s finding time to write new material. JEFF the Brotherhood has never been much for practicing, but the schedule is getting even more crowded. “We write when we rehearse, which is very, very rarely – especially right now,” he said. “We don’t have a practice space. We tour so much that we know all of our songs. And we’re brothers, so we kind of get enough of each other on the road.” JEFF the Brotherhood will perform on Friday, July 27, at RIBCO (1815 Second Avenue in Rock Island). The 7:30 p.m. all-ages show also features Juiceboxx and Healing Power. Advance tickets (RIBCO.com) are $10, and admission at the door is $12. For more information on JEFF the Brotherhood, visit JEFFTheBrotherhood.com.

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 809 • July 19 - August 1, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Continued From Page 15

What Else Is Happenin’
Trinity Cathedral (121 West 12th Street, Davenport). 7:30 p.m. $10-15 suggested donation. For information, call (563)323-9989 or visit BHCMF.com. Tuesday, July 24 – Broadway Blondes for Bethany. Cabaret performance of show-tune classics with the cast of Legally Blonde: The Musical, in a fundraiser for Bethany for Children & Families. Circa ’21 Dinner Playhouse (1828 Third Avenue, Rock Island). 7 p.m. $1215. For tickets and information, call (309)786-7733 extension 2 or visit Circa21.com. Tuesday, July 24 – Todd Snider and Hayes Carll. Acclaimed singers/ songwriters in concert. Englert Theatre (221 East Washington Street, Iowa City). 8 p.m. $22-25. For tickets and information, call (319)6882653 or visit Englert.org. For a 2009 interview with Snider, visit RCReader. com/y/snider. Thursday, July 26 – The Baseball Project. Baseball-themed rock super-group composed of Peter Buck, Scott McCaughey, Steve Wynn, and Linda Pitmon, with an opening set by Break Up Art. Rock Island Brewing Company (1815 Second Avenue, Rock Island). 8 p.m. $1215. For information, call (309)7934060 or visit RIBCO.com. For a 2011 interview with McCaughey, visit RCReader.com/y/baseballproject. Friday, July 27 – JEFF the Brotherhood. All-ages rock concert featuring brothers Jake and Jamin Orrall, with opening sets by Juiceboxx and Healing Powers. Rock Island Brewing Company (1815 Second Avenue, Rock Island). 7:30 p.m. $10. For information, call (309)793-4060 or visit RIBCO.com. Friday, July 27 – Mickey Gilley. Concert with the legendary country musician. Quad-Cities Waterfront Convention Center (1777 Isle Parkway, Bettendorf ). 7:30 p.m. $20-30. For information, call (800)724-5825 or visit Bettendorf. IsleOfCapriCasinos.com. Thursday, July 19, through Sunday, July 29 – The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee. Tony Award-winning musical comedy with audience participation. Clinton Area Showboat Theatre (311 Riverview Drive, Clinton). ThursdaySaturday 7:30 p.m.; Sunday and Wednesday 3 p.m. $16-23. For tickets and information, call (563)242-6760 or visit ClintonShowboat.org. Thursday, July 19, through Saturday, July 29 – BoeingBoeing. Marc Camoletti’s Tony Award-winning farce, directed by Derek Bertelsen. Timber Lake Playhouse (8215 Black Oak Road, Mt. Carroll). Tuesday-Saturday 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, Wednesday, and July 21 2 p.m. $15-23. For tickets and information, call (815)244-2035 or visit TimberLakePlayhouse.org. Thursday, July 19, through Saturday, July 28 – Mr. U.S. Grant: A Man & a Patriot. Oneman historical drama written by and starring Dan Haughey. District Theatre (1611 Second Avenue, Rock Island). July 19-21 8 p.m.; July 21 and 28 2 p.m. $15. For tickets and information, call (309)235-1654 or visit DistrictTheatre.com. Friday, July 20, and Saturday, July 21 – Seussical Jr. Storybook musical comedy performed by students in the center’s summer camp for grades 3-12. The Center for Living Arts (2008 Fourth Avenue, Rock Island). Friday 7 p.m.; Saturday 2 and 7 p.m. $10. For information, call (309)788-5433 or visit Center4Living.com. Friday, July 20, through Sunday, July 22 – The Pirates of Penzance. Gilbert & Sullivan’s comic operetta in a co-presentation with the Prairie Players Civic Theatre. Orpheum Theatre (57 South Kellogg Street, Galesburg). Friday and Saturday 7:30 p.m.; Sunday 2 p.m. $5-25. For tickets and information, call (309)342-2299 or visit TheOrpheum.org. Saturday, July 21, and Sunday, July 22 – The Oresteia. Genesius Guild’s presentation of Aeschylus’ classic drama, performed in two parts over two nights. Lincoln Park (11th Avenue and 38th Street, Rock Island). 8 p.m. Donations encouraged. For information, visit Genesius.org. Thursday, July 26, through Sunday, September 2 – Church Basement Ladies: A Second Helping. Follow-up to the Minnesotabased musical-comedy smash. Old Creamery Theatre (39 38th Avenue, Amana). Friday and Saturday 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, Wednesday, and Thursday 3 p.m. $17.50-27. For tickets and information, call (319) 622-6194 or visit OldCreamery.com. Friday, July 27, and Saturday, July 28 – Honk Jr. One-act version of the musical comedy based on The Ugly Duckling, performed by the summer-stock interns. Clinton Area Showboat Theatre (311 Riverview Drive, Clinton). Friday 7:30 p.m.; Saturday 3 p.m. For tickets and information, call (563)242-6760 or visit ClintonShowboat.org. Saturday, July 28, through Sunday, August 5 – The Frogs. Genesius Guild’s satirical take on Aristophanes’ classic comedy. Lincoln Park (11th Avenue and 38th Street, Rock Island). Saturday and Sunday 8 p.m. Donations encouraged. For information, visit Genesius.org. Wednesday, August 1, through Sunday, August 12 – Love Letters. A.R. Gurney’s famed two-character romance, performed in repertory with Hate Mail. Clinton Area Showboat Theatre (311 Riverview Drive, Clinton). Wednesday-Sunday 3 and 7:30 p.m. $16-23. For tickets and information, call (563)242-6760 or visit ClintonShowboat.org. Saturday, July 21, through Sunday, February 24 – Lights! Sirens! Action! Hands-on exhibit exploring how firefighters, lawenforcement officers, EMTs, and dispatchers take care of emergency situations. Putnam Museum (1717 West 12th Street, Davenport). Monday-Thursday and Saturday 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Friday 10 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sunday noon-5 p.m. Free with $5-7 museum admission. For information and tickets, call (563)324-1933 or visit Putnam.org. Friday, July 20 – Paula Poundstone. An evening with the comedienne, author, and NPR regular. Englert Theatre (221 East Washington Street, Iowa City). 8 p.m. $35-55. For tickets and information, call (319)688-2653 or visit Englert. org. Friday, July 27 – The Blacklist’s “Drinkin’ Spelling Bee.” A fourround competition with the improv comedians, with a free beer earned for each correctly spelled word. Circa ’21 Speakeasy (1818 Third Avenue, Rock Island). 8 p.m. $3-5. For tickets and information, call (309)786-7733 extension 2 or visit Circa21.com. Friday, July 20 – Bucktown Bash. Annual celebration featuring the opening of Steve Banks’ and Heidi Hernandez’s exhibit Merican-Tastic, a silent auction, a wine-tasting, raffles, tarot readings, and music by Bez n Megan, Corey Peak, Mark Brown, Leah Leah, DJ Brandon Hoskins, and Dave Schroeder. Bucktown Center for the Arts (225 East Second Street, Davenport). 6-9 p.m. Donations ecnouraged. For information, visit BucktownArts.com. Friday, July 20, through Sunday, July 22 – Kaaba Shrine Circus. A big-top experience featuring acrobats, animals, clowns, and more. Davenport RiverCenter (136 East Third Street, Davenport). Friday 7:30 p.m.; Saturday 11 a.m., 3 p.m., and 7:30 p.m.; Sunday 10:30 a.m., 2:30 p.m., and 6:30 p.m. $12-22. For tickets, call (800)745-3000 or visit RiverCtr.com. Friday, July 27, and Saturday, July 28 – 2012 Street Fest. Annual outdoor party featuring live music, food vendors, arts and crafts, children’s activities, a Video Games Etc. tent, and more. Downtown Davenport (Second Street between Brady and Ripley streets). Friday 10 a.m.; Saturday 9 a.m. Free admission. For information, call (563)823-2681 or visit DowntownDavenport.com. Friday, July 27, and Saturday, July 28 – Living Proof Live. A Bible-study, teaching, and worship experience led by evangelist Beth Moore and worship leader Travis Cottrell. i wireless Center (1201 River Drive, Moline). Friday 7 p.m.; Saturday 8:30 a.m. $65. For information and to register, call (800)254-2022 or visit Lifeway.com. Saturday, July 28 – 2012 Bix 7. Annual seven-mile foot race with thousands of dollars in prize money awarded, with the Jr. Bix 7 for ages 12 and under. Downtown Davenport (Fifth and Brady streets). 8 a.m. $40 adult registration; $12-15 Jr. Bix registration. For information, call (563)383-2489 or visit Bix7.com.

EVENTS

EXHIBIT

COMEDY

THEATRE

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Spiky Charms

MUSIC

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 809 • July 19 - August 1, 2012

19

by Jeff Ignatius jeff@rcreader.com

T

The Statistix, American Dream EP; Performing July 21 at the Moline Viking Club
hopeless song titles suggest, there aren’t many surprises here, and no discernible wit or humor beyond an interlude that botches a change-thelightbulb joke. (It’s actually subtly funny, and I’m guessing the phrasing error is the joke.) As a result, there’s a by-the-numbers, rote vibe. That’s offset to a large degree, however, by the EP’s energy and rage, and by some sharp touches. The hoarse but nimble vocals on the title song are compelling, and its tempo changes and shifts in dynamics – when layers of the cacophony are peeled away – give the impression of something roughly crafted instead of merely spat out. And not to overstate the comparison, but “Sex with a Philosopher” and “F--- the Media” recall Hüsker Dü in its indie-label days, with the speed and coarseness unwilling to mask core melodicism. “Sex with a Philosopher,” in particular, wouldn’t be out-of-place next to Zen Arcade’s opening two tracks, with expressive vocals conveying actual emotion in the tuneful punk fury. The Statistix will peform on Saturday, July 21, at the Moline Viking Club (1450 41st Street, Moline), with Minor Decline; No Coast Criminals; Brains! Brains! Brains!; Waffles, & His 32 Imaginary Friends; Eat the Wrench; The Demographix; and Captains! Vessels! Admission to the 6 p.m. all-ages show is $5. For more information on the Statistix, visit Facebook.com/TheStatistix.

he sound on the Statistix’s American Dream EP is rough, with echoing, thin, buried drums, and vocals that are often blown out and as a result sometimes have an unpleasant, visceral piercing quality. The bass on the 37-second-long “Punk as F---” is bloated and warped. The volume varies from track to track. It is, in other words, pure punk, assaulting ears for less than 13 minutes over its eight songs. None of this is a complaint exactly. The Quad Cities trio is simply conforming to the movement’s shabby-DIY template: full-throttle and full volume, with little patience for nuance – with little patience, period. The members of the band – bassist/vocalist Spencer Statistic (born Spencer Scott), guitarist/ vocalist Ian Adolescent (born Ian Carter), and drummer Jacob Disaffiliate (born Jacob Shuck) – are in their teens or early 20s, and they wear their immaturity with honor. The bio provided by the Statistix boasts of an early eight-minute set, threatened arrests, a guitar cabinet catching on fire, and an aborted show (“one of their proudest moments”). So if you go to their July 21 EPrelease show at the Moline Viking Club, you’ve been warned about what might go wrong. All that aside, the American Dream EP has a fair amount of spiky charm. Obviously, there’s no opportunity for the EP and its songs to wear out their welcomes, and the elemental riffs provide a strong skeleton. Two primary vocalists offer variety and, on occasion, effective counterpoints to each other – such as on lead track “No Future.” But as the anti-establishment, defiant,

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 809 • July 19 - August 1, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com By Mike Schulz mike@rcreader.com

Cold Turkey
Continued From Page 11
Guaranteed is a lovely, spirited, lightly profound entertainment, with a finale that will likely enrage some viewers while exhilarating others. Either way, they’ll be talking about it, and considering how few summer movies feature endings worth discussing at all, that’s high praise right there. some outside-the-box thinking. The movie, though, turns out to be the opposite of interesting – a perfectly acceptable, unadventurous, by-thenumbers endeavor that doesn’t, in any significant way, improve on Sam Raimi’s oh-so-ancient Spider-Man from 2002. I’ll readily concede that the film is an upgrade from 2007’s misbegotten Spider-Man 3, that one in which Peter Parker strutted down the street like Tony Manero’s dipstick nephew and socked Mary Jane Watson in the face. But then again, a blank screen would’ve accomplished much the same thing; Webb’s outing is too accomplished to get in a dither about, yet it’s too timid and obsequious to seem even the slightest bit necessary. I’m presuming we can skip this origin tale’s plot synopsis. (Watch out for that radioactive spider, Pete! Watch out for that gun-wielding thief, Uncle Ben!) So why couldn’t the filmmakers have skipped the plot synopsis? If audiences had simply been launched into a brand-new web-slinger saga with Andrew Garfield donning Tobey Maguire’s old spandex, would anyone have bitched? Sadly, we’ll never know, and are now stuck with a good-

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
Director Marc Webb’s Marvel Comics reboot The Amazing Spider-Man isn’t bad. Bad, here, might have at least been interesting, and suggested

MY STORY
CHRIST I

OF MELANOMA
Actual Patient of Soderstrom Skin Institute

I’ve been tanning most of my adult life. Just recent ly I noticed a mole on my leg star ted to itch, something didn’t feel right. If it wasn’t for the free screening, I may not have had it checked. I’M SO GLAD I DID!

IN CANCETR SK PI .
SPOT IT. STO

One half unlike the other Scalloped or poorly defined borders One area to another: shades of tan, brown, black, white, red or blue Diameter larger than 6 mm as a rule (width of pencil eraser)

A. ASYMMETRY

DO ANY OF YOUR MOLES OR SPOTS LOOK LIKE THIS?

B. BORDERS IRREGULAR C. COLOR VARIED

D. DIAMETER

Changing in any way including stinging, itching, burning or bleeding

E. EVOLVING

6 mm

looking yet sadly inconsequential comic-book escapade that, for nearly its entire length, feels like a $200-million experiment in marking time. Despite the cosmetic changes – Emma Stone’s Gwen replacing Kirsten Dunst’s Mary Jane, Rhys Ifans’ Lizard replacing Willem Dafoe’s Green Goblin – The Amazing Spider-Man’s narrative arc is all but indistinguishable from its 2002 forebear’s, and that’s a shame. Yet what’s even more bothersome is that the movie is so rote that there’s precious little joy to be found; it feels like Raimi’s Spider-Man as scored to a downbeat, indie-folk soundtrack. [There’s less visual wit on display here than in Webb’s previous feature, (500) Days of Summer, but the film boasts the same melancholy vibe.] Every once in a while, we’re treated to flashes of legitimate exuberance, as when Peter first learns to harness his powers, or, in the movie’s one truly imaginative sequence, he accidentally lays waste to a subway car full of stunned onlookers. And while their relationship doesn’t (yet) exude the soulfulness of Maguire’s and Dunst’s tortured romance, the byplay between Garfield and Stone is relaxed and charming – at least until, like everyone else, they get engulfed in the effect-filled melee of the protracted action climax. (I was also bummed that Stone, one of our most radiant big-screen redheads, was forced to sport Gwen’s traditional, platinum-blond tresses, as the look dulls her features and appears to rob the performer of some of her natural vitality.) But from the blandness of Ifans’ megalomania to the sitcom cuteness of Martin Sheen’s Ben and Sally Field’s Aunt May to composer James Horner’s generically pummeling music cues, the movie simply refuses to swing, and true originality only pops up in the quickest of bursts. (Denis Leary, bless his rascally heart, brings welcome comic fire to a few of his readings.) Like The Avengers, Webb’s offering gives its Marvelloving base exactly what they expect – including, I must admit, one of Stan Lee’s more amusing cameos – yet almost nothing that might surprise or challenge them, and I left the auditorium (in what is, again, sure to be a distinct minority) feeling just as underwhelmed as I did leaving Joss Whedon’s summer-blockbuster behemoth. With Christopher Nolan’s The Dark Knight Rises on the immediate horizon, I’m not quite ready to break up with comic-book movies. After The Amazing Spider-Man, however, I’m thinking a trial separation might definitely be in order. For reviews of Savages, Katy Perry: Part of Me, To Rome with Love, Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Witness Protection, Rescue 3D, and other releases, visit RiverCitiesReader.com. Follow Mike on Twitter at Twitter.com/ MikeSchulzNow.

FREE SKIN CANCER SCREENING
Saturday, July 21 • 8am-12pm
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY

1800 E. 54TH STREET, DAVENPORT • 344-7546

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 809 • July 19 - August 1, 2012

21

NOw OpeN At the Figge

THEATRE

By Thom White

Hollywood and Fine

L

Singin’ in the Rain, at North Scott High School through July 22

NASA | ART:
50 Years of Exploration
JulY 14–OcTObER 7, 2012

Featuring nearly five decades of creations by artists as diverse as Annie Leibovitz, Norman Rockwell and Andy Warhol, this exhibition offers unparalleled insight into the private and personal moments, tragic accidents and triumphant victories that form the storied history of NASA.
For program information, visit the Figge website at www.figgeartmuseum.org
Organized by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in cooperation with the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum. The Smithsonian Community Grant program, funded by MetLife Foundation, is a proud sponsor of these public programs.

Sponsored locally by

ALCOA

Additional support provided by Cobham, plc

Robert T. McCall, Apollo 8 Coming Home, 1969, oil on canvas, courtesy Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Davenport, Iowa 563.326.7804 www.figgeartmuseum.org

eaving Friday’s Countryside Community Theatre performance of Singin’ in the Rain, I overheard one woman say to another, “Well, that was a different take on it.” Actually, I would love to see a different take on this classic musical written by Betty Comden and Adolph Green, with lyrics by Arthur Freed and music by Nacio Herb Brown. But director/choreographer Christina Myatt’s production is, instead, an homage to the original film with onlyslightly-adjusted re-creations of Gene Kelly’s original choreography, yet one boasting just enough beautiful, original touches to avoid direct mimicry of the movie. While perusing the program prior to the production’s start, I will admit disappointment at seeing Myatt listed as its director – not because I thought she’d be a poor choice, but because I thought she’d be a great Kathy Selden, giving the Singin’ in the Rain character (Debbie Reynolds in the movie) a brassier edge and self-certainty. However, I quickly noted that Melissa Pepper – whom I adored as the lead in Quad City Music Guild’s Cinderella last year – was playing Kathy, and I figured the role was in good hands. I was mostly right. Pepper’s initial appearance, in which she first meets (real-life husband) Daniel Pepper’s silent-film star Don Lockwood, is a bit stiff, particularly physically; Melissa acts as if she’s lost the ability to turn her neck, forcing her to constantly, and awkwardly, direct her focus out to the audience. (She also refuses to make eye contact with Daniel for most of the scene, even when they’re speaking to each other directly.) However, Melissa redeems herself during her first number – the flashy “All I Do Is Dream of You,” performed by Kathy and a group of female dancers at a studio party. While Myatt’s dance steps are fantastically showy and filled with high energy, Melissa is clearly the star of the scene, adding extra exuberance, smiles, and personal touches to the choreography. She shines in the song, vocally and physically, and continues to shine through the rest of her performance. Daniel Pepper, however, doesn’t miss a beat from beginning to end. His turn as Lockwood, the actor hoping to continue his film career by segueing into talkies, is so smooth that it’s hard to tell he’s even acting; Daniel seems a natural on stage and carries the entire production through his captivating performance. (Though it’s a Gene Kelly role, Daniel’s characterization bears a delightful, uncanny resemblance, in physicality and personality, to Clinton Kelly,

Daniel Pepper
co-host of the daytime program The Chew.) As the other half of the silent-film team Lockwood & Lamont, Dianna McKune’s Lina Lamont exudes all of the air-headed humor of Jean Hagen, who originated the role in the film, but with a more believable, human-sounding voice than Hagen. That is, while McKune employed the high-pitched squeaks and dimwitted tones required of the role, the actress also sometimes dropped the voice enough to make me wonder why Don and the studio ever saw the need to cover it up in their first talking picture. McKune’s take on the part, however, maintains the fun of it, and exposes a sexier side of Lina in her “What’s Wrong With Me?” solo, a song (and, in my opinion, an out-of-place one) added to the movie musical’s stage adaptation. Of course, the big question regarding any stage production of Singin’ in the Rain is: “Does it rain?” Yes, it does, though the curtain of drips is hard to see against this production’s bright background of white, with its buildings painted in light blues. (I had to look up to the lights to see sparkles of raindrops falling.) What is apparent, though, is the rain’s effect, as Daniel Pepper’s costume gets wetter and wetter, and a puddle grows on stage as it escapes the tray meant to catch the water. (On Friday, I actually missed some of the dance steps as I nervously watched the pool of rain creep toward the orchestra pit.) The show could be made better with a few tweaks. Its scene transitions are sometimes too long, with the time spent without any singing or dialogue creating an uneven pacing, and Eric Reyes could be a bigger ham as Don’s best friend Cosmo Brown (although his miming mimicry in the song “Moses” is spot-on silly and hilarious). However, Countryside Community Theatre’s presentation of Singin’ in the Rain is still a good one, as Myatt and her cast craft something satisfyingly familiar with enough distinct personality to make the production feel fresh. Singin’ in the Rain runs at North Scott High School’s Fine Arts Auditorium (200 South First Street, Eldridge) through July 21, and information and tickets are available by calling (563)285-6228 or visiting CCTOnStage.org.

22

If your wife says another man’s name while making love, what does that mean? It was her ex’s name – my stepson’s dad. She apologized, saying it was only because she remembered needing to call him about problems their son’s having at school. Although I don’t think she’s cheating, I can’t say I believe her excuse, as she compares me negatively with previous men in her life. Had I blurted out another woman’s name, she never would’ve forgiven me. She has lots of anger and a very suspicious nature. She goes through my phone and constantly checks up on me. I know she’s had men cheat on her, but I’ve given her no reason to doubt me. Her response when I try to have a healthy discussion about this or anything is either “whatever” or calling me names and starting a full-blown argument, then suggesting we shouldn’t be together. That’s the last thing I want for our kids. – Upset There you are, trying your best to give your wife an orgasma-tastical time in bed, and not only does she belt out another man’s name, she decides to get a head start on her to-do list. (Apparently, what you thought was her sex face is also her “Did I schedule that parent-teacher conference?” face.) Chances are, your wife’s explanation – that this was just a brain burp – is the truth. And people’s minds do wander during sex, especially when it’s not exactly their first time with a particular partner. They just don’t usually let on that they’re talking dirty but staring up at the crown molding and resisting the impulse to reach for the telescoping feather duster. Although every relationship gives rise to wounds, slights, and things you wish you could un-hear, how you respond depends largely on what your “base” is – personally and as a couple. If you’re emotionally secure and your relationship is loving, you can shrug off a whole lot – maybe even tease your wife about her sexual faux pas by yelling out your own name in bed or moaning your to-do list: “Ohhh ... when you do that to me, it makes me think about calling to change our health insurance to a PPO.” When you get married, it isn’t just to a woman and all her annoying in-laws; you also marry all her unresolved issues. Your wife’s insecurity makes her feel vulnerable, but instead of expressing her fears and giving you the

Bitter Homes and Gardens

Ask

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 809 • July 19 - August 1, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

the

Advice Goddess

WORDS FROM THE EDITOR
BY AMY ALKON

Continued From Page 3

Get Active or Get Swallowed
You can research this information for yourself. There have been countless books, articles, essays, and editorials written over the years on these very subjects – perspectives deliberately omitted from the mainstream news by the media cartel, whose interests are not ours. I know it is shocking to think that our own government would conspire with industry cartels against us, but if you continue to bury your head and ignore these facts, you will be remembered in history as the generation that allowed America to fail. It all matters, it all has consequences, and it all requires our getting up to speed if we are going to act. Notice how the politicians, media-cartel pundits, and the myriad foundations and associations that endlessly meet in forums and on panels that are broadcast on C-SPAN, C-SPAN2 and C-SPAN3 – including the absurdly unproductive congressional hearings – never discuss meaningful solutions. Ever. America has experienced nothing but one insanely long bitch session for three decades. In most cases, government and non-government agencies’ and organizations’ performance/outcomes have only gotten worse. America’s leadership is so profoundly incompetent as to defy reason. And the American people have become dangerously spoiled, lazy, and self-entitled. Solutions for a lot of this are common sense, sprinkled with some moral character, because it will require sacrifice, whether of time or money; some of us will have to donate both. There is a pecking order of importance as it relates to civic participation. First and foremost, protect elections and the voting booths by getting involved with the election process. Become a precinct election judge. Demand to be one of the objective citizens who verifies your precinct’s vote count during an election, whether general or local. Familiarize yourself with the potential problems with elections, especially computerized voting. Visit BlackBoxVoting.org. Every American needs this information to be vigilant against schemes to corrupt our votes. Second, run for a local office, even for just one term. If you can’t do that, then at least pick a city-council or county-supervisors committee or department and follow it. Browse your city’s and county’s Web sites for a list of committees and departments and what each is responsible for. Pick one that interests you or is in your wheelhouse. Get a group together to help stay on top of the committee’s or department’s activities. Share what you learn via a blog or community Web site that accepts such data for public consumption. If such a Web site doesn’t exist, start one. If each of us followed a single committee and informed the rest of us in a timely manner, we could really effect change. You can’t imagine the growing amount of international influence on our local governance, especially via Agenda 21. We should all have a say in such a serious transformation, but, so far, we don’t. Too much is occurring behind closed doors, where the public is not allowed access. This is evident throughout the process that established the Scott County’s so-called consolidated dispatching center, SECC 911, and its illconceived “no-cap tax” authority. Call your county clerk’s office and request the names and contact information of the grand-jury members currently seated, and inform the clerk that you need this information so that you can notify the grand jury of any instances when public officials have allegedly violated the law (e.g., abuse of power, extortion) and/or their oaths of office. Grand juries are the most effective method, in some cases the only method, to hold public officials accountable, but are also the most forgotten aspect of our government system. It starts at home, folks. It is a trickle-up theory. America was founded in townhall meetings, with most communities’ families, neighbors, and friends engaged on some civic level. Today, precious few are involved on any civic level, and the country is greatly suffering for this lack. Politicians, bureaucrats, and industry cartels are colluding with ever greater frequency and destructive consequences, thanks to less and less accountability and a lack of enforcement of existing laws and regulations. Our government has forgotten that it is the servant, not the master. Its privileged and protected excesses, which also extend to the industry cartels, have been successfully disguised as law and order. To witness this distortion of law firsthand, attend a Rock Island County Municipal Code Enforcement “hearing.” They are held in the Rock Island City Council chambers (RCReader.com/y/ munices) and are operated as a revenue stream for the Bi-State Regional

chance to allay them, she takes the emotionally “safe” way out – attacking you. Her motto: “Don’t go to bed mad. Stay up and scream about what a worthless worm your husband is.” Tell your wife that you need to remake your marriage to save it – because you love her and for your kids’ sake. Because she fights dirty and you seem unable to stand up to her, you should bring in a therapist as a referee. What you can do yourselves is make a pact to never treat each other like you’ve forgotten you love each other. For backup, the way couples have a “safe word” in sex, you can agree to call “Empathy!” if the poo-flinging gets out of hand – your signal to stop and call up some compassion for what the other person must be feeling. It won’t teleport you into instant maturity. But because it’s really hard to be a hugger and a hater at the same time, it should remind you that “’til death do us part” is supposed to be a really romantic promise, not a battle cry.

My wife of five years wants us to go to couples counseling. We’ve been fighting a lot these past two years, but I don’t think that’s reason to talk to some stranger about our issues. We love each other. Shouldn’t that be enough for us to work through things together? – Do-It-Yourself-er Is this also your approach to a broken leg? “Who needs some stranger with a medical degree? Lemme see what I got in the garage.” Or when your house is burning down: “I see no reason to invite some stranger from the fire department into my life.” Love might be the answer to some things, like who to get chocolate for on Valentine’s Day, but it doesn’t make you a great communicator. When you aren’t getting through to each other on your own, the wise (and courageous) thing to do is seek help. This does require letting go of the need to be right and overcoming qualms about being judged. But exposing what isn’t working is your best shot at fixing things ... much as you’d probably rather stamp your feet and insist, “Everything I need to know about being married I learned in kindergarten!” (Apparently, “Don’t eat paste” is a little-known cure for everything from financial woes to erectile dysfunction.)

Making Shove Last

171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (AdviceGoddess.com)
©2012, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved.

Got A Problem? Ask Amy Alkon.

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com by Kathleen McCarthy km@rcreader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 809 • July 19 - August 1, 2012

23

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY
ARIES (March 21-April 19): Acro-Yoga is a relatively new physical discipline. According to a description I read on a flyer in Santa Cruz, it “blends the spiritual wisdom of yoga, the loving kindness of massage, and the dynamic power of acrobatics.” I’d love to see you work on creating a comparable hybrid in the coming months, Aries – some practice or system or approach that would allow you to weave together your various specialties into a synergetic whole. Start brainstorming about that impossible dream now, and soon it won’t seem so impossible. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Unless you grow your own or buy the heirloom variety at farmer’s markets, you probably eat a lot of tasteless tomatoes. Blame it on industrial-scale farming and supermarket chains. They’ve bred tomatoes to be homogenous and bland – easy to ship and pretty to look at. But there’s a sign of hope: A team of scientists at the University of Florida is researching what makes tomatoes taste delicious, and is working to bring those types back into mainstream availability. I think the task you have ahead of you in the coming weeks is metaphorically similar, Taurus. You should see what you can to do restore lost flavor, color, and soulfulness. Opt for earthy idiosyncrasies over fake and boring perfection. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): It’ll be a humming, murmuring, whispering kind of week – a time when the clues you need will most likely arrive via ripplings and rustlings and whirrings. Here’s the complication: Some of the people around you may be more attracted to clangs and bangs and jangles. They may imagine that the only information worth paying attention to is the stuff that’s loudest and strongest. But I hope you won’t be seduced by their attitudes. I trust you’ll resist the appeals of the showy noise. Be a subtlety specialist who loves nuance and undertones. Listen mysteriously. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Most change is slow and incremental. The shifts happen so gradually that they are barely noticeable while you’re living in the midst of them from day to day. Then there are those rare times when the way everything fits together mutates pretty quickly. Relationships that have been evolving in slow motion begin to speed up. Long-standing fixations melt away. Mystifying questions get clear answers. I think you’re at one of these junctures now, Cancerian. It’s not likely you’ll be too surprised by anything that happens, though. That’s because you’ve been tracking the energetic build-up for a while, and it will feel right and natural when the rapid ripening kicks in. LEO (July 23-August 22): Lately you’ve been spending time in both the off-kilter parts of paradise and the enchanting areas of limbo. On one notable occasion, you even managed to be in both places simultaneously. How’d you do that? The results have been colorful but often paradoxical. What you don’t want and what you do want have gotten a bit mixed up. You have had to paw your way out of a dead-end confusion but have also been granted a sublime breakthrough. You explored a tunnel to nowhere but also visited a thrilling vista that provided you with some medicinal excitement. What will you do for an encore? Hopefully, nothing that complicated. I suggest you spend the next few days chilling out and taking inventory of all that’s changed. VIRGO (August 23-September 22): The painter Philip Guston loved to express himself creatively. He said it helped him to get rid of his certainty, to divest himself of what he knew. By washing away the backlog of old ideas and familiar perspectives, he freed himself to see the world as brand new. In light of your current astrological omens, Virgo, Guston’s approach sounds like a good strategy for you to borrow. The next couple of weeks will be an excellent time to explore the pleasures of unlearning and deprogramming. You will thrive by discarding stale preconceptions, loosening the past’s hold on you, and clearing out room in your brain for fresh imaginings. LIBRA (September 23-October 22): Nineteenth Century author Charles Dickens wrote extensively about harsh social conditions. He specialized in depicting ugly realities about poverty, crime, and classism. Yet one critic described him as a “genial and loving humorist” who showed that “even in dealing with the darkest scenes and the most degraded characters, genius could still be clean and mirth could be innocent.” I’m thinking that Dickens might be an inspirational role model for you in the coming weeks, Libra. It will be prime time for you to expose difficult truths and agitate for justice and speak up in behalf of those less fortunate than you. You’ll get best results by maintaining your equanimity and good cheer. SCORPIO (October 23-November 21): For many years, ambergris was used as a prime ingredient in perfumes. And where does ambergris come from? It’s basically whale vomit. Sperm whales produce it in their gastrointestinal tracts to protect them from the sharp beaks of giant squid they’ve eaten, then spew it out of their mouths. With that as your model, Scorpio, I challenge you to convert an inelegant aspect of your life into a fine asset, even a beautiful blessing. I don’t expect you to accomplish this task overnight. But I do hope you will finish by May of 2013. SAGITTARIUS (November 22-December 21): “Interruption” will be a word of power for you in the coming days. No, really: I’m not being ironic, sarcastic, or satiric. It is possible that the interruptions will initially seem inconvenient or undesirable, but I bet you will eventually feel

by Rob Brezsny
grateful for their intervention. They will knock you out of grooves you need to be knocked out of. They will compel you to pay attention to clues you’ve been neglecting. Don’t think of them as random acts of cosmic whimsy, but rather as divine strokes of luck that are meant to redirect your energy to where it should be. CAPRICORN (December 22-January 19): You don’t have to stand in a provocative pose to be sexy. You don’t have to lick your lips or radiate a smoldering gaze or wear clothes that dramatically reveal your body’s most appealing qualities. You already know all that stuff, of course; in light of this week’s assignment, I just wanted to remind you. And what is that assignment? To be profoundly attractive and alluring without being obvious about it. With that as your strategy, you’ll draw to you the exact blessings and benefits you need. So do you have any brilliant notions about how to proceed? Here’s one idea: Be utterly at peace with who you really are. AQUARIUS (January 20-February 18): I brazenly predict, my dear Aquarius, that in the next 10 months you will fall in love with love more deeply than you have in over a decade. You will figure out a way to exorcise the demons that have haunted your relationship with romance, and you will enjoy some highly entertaining amorous interludes. The mysteries of intimacy will reveal new secrets to you, and you will have good reasons to redefine the meaning of “fun.” Is there any way these prophecies of mine could possibly fail to materialize? Yes, but only if you take yourself too seriously and insist on remaining attached to the old days and old ways. PISCES (February 19-March 20): Be alert for fake magic, and make yourself immune to its seductive appeal. Do not, under any circumstances, allow yourself to get snookered by sexy delusions, enticing hoaxes, or clever mirages. There will in fact be some real magic materializing in your vicinity, and if you hope to recognize it you must not be distracted by the counterfeit stuff. This is a demanding assignment, Pisces. You will have to be both skeptical and curious, both toughminded and innocently receptive. Fortunately, the astrological omens suggest you now have an enhanced capacity to live on that edge. Homework: Make two fresh promises to yourself – one that’s easy to keep and one that’s at the edge of your capacity to live up to. Share at FreeWillAstrology.com.

Commission. Chances are good that you will observe an “administrative hearing officer” preside over a kangaroo court where primarily poor people come to have their “violation” of regulations, such as grass being too tall or placing a yard-sale sign in the wrong spot, “adjudicated.” On the rare occasion a “violator” brings up the Constitution and any of the protections afforded in it, such as the Bill of Rights, one will hear the hearing-officerimpersonating-a-judge tell him/her that the Constitution has no effect in these proceedings. One hearing officer actually stated that he was “precluded by Illinois statute from allowing the Constitution into this court.” Yet these same administrativehearing “officers” are allowed to set the fines at their own discretion. To add insult to injury, the fines are before court costs, and the court costs are on a tiered scale depending on how large the fine is. How can any matter cost the court more, or less, depending on the size of the arbitrarily set fine?  One can see the potential for abuse in these circumstances. Courts are at the heart of most things corrupted in this country, whether by poor rulings that have no basis in the Constitution, especially as it relates to the Bill of Rights, or lack of enforcement on the elite and over-enforcement on the poor. This has become painfully obvious in the overcrowded prisons and overwhelmed district courts, as well as the complete lack of prosecution of banksters and the upper management of industry cartels. Not to mention that there is broad-based consensus that most derivatives, including the systemically risky Credit Default Swaps that are still being abundantly traded, would not be a trade-able instrument if the courts did not enforce such abstract contracts. Chaos is prevailing because the rule of common law is being either ignored or replaced with administrative-procedure law that has no mandate for justice, only revenue streams via fees and penalties. Americans inherently know this to be true. We must stop denying it, then commit to stopping it by getting active in our communities’ governance. If you don’t have time, then make it. Your forefathers managed to do this, with none of the conveniences that we enjoy today. We have no excuses, no matter what you tell yourself to absolve your civic responsibility. No more excuses. Get active, or get swallowed whole.

EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES & DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny's

1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 809 • July 19 - August 1, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

NOW HERE THIS - July 19, 2012

July 5 Answers: Right

July 5 Crossword Answers

ACROSS 1. Pronto! 5. Cedar anagram 10. MLB player 15. Dustcloths 19. “Downton Abbey” name 20. Blusher 21. More secure 22. Gardner or Halliburton 23. Magpie 25. “Herzog” author: 2 wds. 27. Stomach 28. Treasure _ 30. Set phrases 31. Part of NB 32. Adorn 33. Lex Luthor’s henchman 34. Role in “Swan Lake” 37. Anuran 38. Quartz variety 42. Runs 43. Party essentials 46. Ovine animal 47. Cause for complaint 48. Retinue 49. Brings in 50. Scheme 51. Serv. rank 52. Some Scouts 53. Tuber known as cocoyam 54. Whitman and Disney 55. Unthinking 57. Police van 58. Threadlike 59. _ -ho 60. Compare 61. Tough tissue 62. Go by 64. Audio device 65. Underscored 68. Architectural elements 69. Desire personified 70. Makes less 71. Seaman 72. Brickbat 73. Gloss 75. Troubled 76. Comic strip possum 77. Before

78. Out like a light: 2 wds. 80. Fork parts 81. Scaly creatures 83. Chooses 84. Dead ducks 85. Easter treats 86. High-ranking Turk 88. Gall 89. Early calculator 92. Pacific island nation 93. ENT instrument 97. Place for tennis enthusiasts: 2 wds. 99. Gen-X’er predecessor: 2 wds. 101. Mud 102. Obliterate 103. Name in a Rousseau title 104. Grandmother 105. Jumper 106. Worker on a ranch 107. Spud 108. Eagles DOWN 1. Pt. of CPA 2. Tribeca neighbor 3. Shrinking sea in Asia 4. Inventor of record 5. Coin 6. A vessel 7. Yokel 8. _ ideal 9. Grape sugar 10. Guild: Abbr. 11. Chesterfieldian 12. Bona fide 13. Kinsman: Abbr. 14. Space probes 15. Take pleasure in 16. Name in folk music 17. Steal 18. Stitches 24. Brings forward (with “out”) 26. Emends 29. Fad 32. A porridge 33. Foretoken 34. Figure in religious art 35. Capital of Bangladesh (Var.) 36. Special-effect producer: 2 wds. 37. Frustrates

38. Ohio city 39. Western park 40. Strikes 41. Rigid 43. Take care of 44. Insufficient 45. Golden calf creator 48. Tool also called riddle 50. Blanches 52. Monocle 53. Gets hold of 54. Oenophile’s passions 56. Portable dwelling 57. Kirk or Ryder 58. Let go 60. Drew 61. Kind of sore throat 62. Goes at a snail’s pace 63. French department 64. Time of life 65. Auctions 66. Impatient 67. Waste matter 70. Work by Michelangelo 73. Singer of ballads 74. Shelters 75. Kind of soup 76. Strobilus 78. Smooth transition 79. Middling: Hyph. 80. Trunk 82. Used a keyboard 84. Peanut 86. DVR button 87. Fossilized resin 88. Coiffure 89. Sergeant at _ 90. Stay-out-of-jail payment 91. Four roods 92. Cuff 93. News item, for short 94. Epps or Gooding 95. Robert _ Warren 96. Times 98. _ -Magnon 100. Prof. org.

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 809 • July 19 - August 1, 2012

25

2012/07/19 (Thu)

ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Danika Holmes -ReFresh Lounge, Cafe Fresh, 1514 5th Ave. Moline, IL DJ Scott & Karaoke -Greenbriar Restaurant and Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL Douglas & Tucker (6:30pm) -Bettendorf Public Library, 2950 Learning Campus Bettendorf, IA Dream Anabelle - Gored by a Deer Lighthouses - Searching for Security -RME (River Music Experience), 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ -Parker’s, 635 15th St Moline, IL Hap Hazzard -Rock Island County Fairgrounds, Archer Drive & Avenue of the Cities East Moline, IL Jam Sessions with John O’Meara & Friends -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Live Lunch w/ Alan Sweet (noon) -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA Matt Barber (1:30pm) -Bettendorf Public Library, 2950 Learning Campus Bettendorf, IA Rozz-Vox Open Mic Night -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL The Avey Brothers -Rascals Live, 1418 15th St. Moline, IL

THURSDAY

19

2012/07/20 (Fri)

The Blushing Gun -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL The Brew -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA

The Gratest Story Ever Told: Grateful Dead Tribute -The Establishment Theatre, 220 19th St. Rock Island, IL Thumping Thursday w/ DJ Hypnotic and Patrick Rifley -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL Tony Hamilton Orchestra -Bass Street Landing Plaza, Moline, IL

ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA ABC Members-Only Karaoke -Moose Lodge - Davenport, 2333 Rockingham Rd Davenport, IA Brer Bucktown’s Traveling Tent Show -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Bucktown Bash: Bez ‘n’ Megan - Corey Peak - Mark Brown - Leah Leah - DJ Brandon Hoskins - Dave Schroeder (6pm) -Bucktown Center for the Arts, 225 E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Buddy Olson -Bleyarts Tap, 2210 E. 11th St. Davenport, IA Caught in the Act -Hey Bryan’s, 1140 15th Ave. Moline, IL Cross Creek Karaoke -Firehouse Bar & Grill, 2006 Hickory Grove Rd. Davenport, IA Curtis Hawkins Band CD Release Party -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Deutsche Polka Band -Bill Bowe Memorial Bandshell, Middle Park Bettendorf, IA Dueling Pianos at The Establishment -The Establishment Theatre, 220 19th St. Rock Island, IL Emanation Series: Part VII - Steve Grismore & Brent Sandy -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL EmJay - Fast as a Cat -Barrel House 211, 211 E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ -Parker’s, 635 15th St Moline, IL

FRIDAY

20

Unified Soul -Edje Nightclub at Jumer’s Casino and Hotel, I-280 & Hwy 92 Rock Island, IL Who Cares Band -Rock Island County Fairgrounds, Archer Drive & Avenue of the Cities East Moline, IL 2012/07/21 (Sat)

SATURDAY

21

Mary Chapin Carpenter @ Englert Theatre – July 21
Heartland Jam Side Stage: North of 40 - The Dirt Road Rockers -Centennial Park, Beiderbecke Dr. & Marquette Davenport, IA Heartland Jam: Danika Holmes (12:30pm) - Katie Armiger (2pm) - The Farm (4pm) - Danielle Peck (6pm) - Justin Moore (8pm) - Dierks Bentley (10pm) -Centennial Park, Beiderbecke Dr. & Marquette Davenport, IA Jeff Miller (6pm) - David Killinger & Friends (10pm) -G’s Riverfront Cafe, 102 S Main St Port Byron, IL Just Chords -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Justine Blazer - Boothill Ridge -RME (River Music Experience), 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Chuck’s Tap, 1731 W. 6th St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL Karaoke Night -Roadrunner’s Roadhouse, 3803 Rockingham Rd. Davenport, IA Keep off the Grass -River House, 1510 River Dr. Moline, IL Kooby’s Karaoke -Wide Open Bar & Grill, 425 15th St. Moline, IL

Friday Live @ Five: The Dawn (5pm) -RME Courtyard, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Funktastic Five -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Half Naked - DJ Dolla - DJ THC -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA

Night Light -Rustic Ridge Golf Course, Eldridge, IA Rob Dahms (6pm) -Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street Milan, IL Rock Steady -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA Russ Reyman Trio (5:30pm) - Machine Gun Willie (9:30pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Shinedown - Adelitas Way - In This Moment -Adler Theatre, 136 E. 3rd St. Davenport, IA The Music of Dr. Joe Seng -Joe’s Club, 1402 W. 7th St. Davenport, IA The Post Mortems - As Big as a Mouse - Permasmile -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

Lee Blackmon (6:30pm) -Cool Beanz Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL Live Lunch w/ Ellis Kell (noon) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA

ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Crossroads -Mound Street Landing, 1029 Mount St. Davenport, IA Cross Creek Karaoke -Firehouse Bar & Grill, 2006 Hickory Grove Rd. Davenport, IA DJ Scott & Karaoke -Greenbriar Restaurant and Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL Dueling Pianos at The Establishment -The Establishment Theatre, 220 19th St. Rock Island, IL Eddie Turner -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Fairhaven - Genie -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ -Parker’s, 635 15th St Moline, IL Heartland Jam Side Stage: Cora Zoan - Cal Stage Band - Ty Brown -Centennial Park, Beiderbecke Dr. & Marquette Davenport, IA Heartland Jam: Grazin District (12:30pm) - The Dani Lynn Howe Band (2pm) Sunny Sweeney (4pm) - Phil Vassar (6pm) - Gretchen Wilson (8pm) - Big and Rich featuring Cowboy Troy & Bradley Gaskin (10pm) -Centennial Park, Beiderbecke Dr. & Marquette Davenport, IA Jeff Miller (6pm) - David Killinger & Friends (10pm) -G’s Riverfront Cafe, 102 S Main St Port Byron, IL Just Chords -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Justin Morrissey - Drunken Angels -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Justine Blazer -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA

Karaoke Night -Chuck’s Tap, 1731 W. 6th St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL Karaoke Night -Roadrunner’s Roadhouse, 3803 Rockingham Rd. Davenport, IA Kooby’s Karaoke -Headquarters Bar & Grill, 119 E. 22nd Ave. Coal Valley, IL Lee Blackmon (2pm) -Creekside Vineyards Winery & Inn, 7505 120th Ave. Coal Valley, IL Lynn Allen -River House, 1510 River Dr. Moline, IL Mary Chapin Carpenter -Englert Theatre, 221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA Mike Blumme Trio (6pm) -Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street Milan, IL Night People -Len Brown’s North Shore Inn, 7th Street and the Rock River Moline, IL ONO - Nude Sunrise - X + X - G.R.I.D.S. -RozzTox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Open Mic Night -Downtown Central Perk, 226 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Russ Reyman, Pianist (7pm) -Phoenix, 111 West 2nd St. Davenport, IA Sam Prekop & Archer Prewitt - Multiple Cat - Seth Knappen -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL Tailfins -Rock Island County Fairgrounds, Archer Drive & Avenue of the Cities East Moline, IL Tapped Out -Blueport Junction, 6605 W River Dr Davenport, IA The Statistix - Minor Decline - No Coast Criminals - Brains! Brains! Brains! - Waffles, & His 32 Imaginary Friends - Eat the Wrench - The Demographix - Captains! Vessels! -Moline Viking Club, 1450 41st St., Moline, IL Tronicity -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA Unified Soul -Edje Nightclub at Jumer’s Casino and Hotel, I-280 & Hwy 92 Rock Island, IL

Continued On Page 26

Herman’s Hermits
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gin blossoms
august 31

august 10

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August 17

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© 2012 Isle of Capri Casinos, Inc. Must be 21 to enter the casino. Management reserves all rights. Gambling a problem? There is help. And hope. Call 1-800-BETS-OFF. www.theislebettendorf.com

26

Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
2012/07/24 (Tue)

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 809 • July 19 - August 1, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Continued From Page 25
Zither Ensemble (10am) -German American Heritage Center, 712 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA 2012/07/22 (Sun)

TUESDAY

24

The Avey Brothers -Rascals Live, 1418 15th St. Moline, IL

SUNDAY

22

ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA

The Baseball Project - Break Up Art -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Thumping Thursday w/ DJ Hypnotic and Patrick Rifley -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL Wicked Liz & the Bellyswirls (6:30pm) -4th & Brady Streets, Davenport, IA 2012/07/27 (Fri)

ABC Karaoke -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Brandon Gibbs Band (2pm) -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA Buddy Olson -Ducky’s Lagoon, 13515 78th Ave Andalusia, IL Cross Creek Karaoke -Bootleggers Sports Bar, 2228 E. 11th St. Davenport, IA Funday Sunday with Dave Ellis (6pm) -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Gray Wolf Band (5pm) -The Captain’s Table, 4801 River Dr. Moline, IL Karaoke for Kids (3-5pm) -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL River City 6-LeClaire Park, River Dr & Ripley St Davenport, IA Russ Reyman, Pianist (10am-2pm brunch) -The Lodge Hotel, 900 Spruce Hills Dr. Bettendorf, IA Sunday Jazz Brunch at Bix Bistro (10:30am & 12:30pm) -Hotel Blackhawk, 200 E. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Tronicity -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA 2012/07/23 (Mon)

Acoustic Music Club (4:30pm) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Broadway Blondes for Bethany -Circa ‘21 Dinner Playhouse, 1828 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) -O’Melia’s Supper Club, 2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock Island, IL Jam Night w/ Jordan Danielsen -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA Lover’s Speed - Relentless Approach - Servus - Bath Salts -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL

FRIDAY

00 27

45 on High -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA

Open Mic Night -Cool Beanz Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL

Justine Blazer @ River Music Experience – July 20
Karaoke Night -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL

Open Mic Night -The Dam View Inn, 410 2nd St Davenport, IA Southern Thunder DJ Service (5pm) & Karaoke (9pm) -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL Todd Snider & Hayes Carll -Englert Theatre, 221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA

Karaoke Night -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL ABC Karaoke -Greenbriar Restaurant and
Keller Karaoke -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Live Lunch w/ Kelsey Lillion (noon) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Old 57’s (6pm) - Karaoke King (9:30pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Open Mic Night -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114 1/2 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA

2012/07/26 (Thu)

THURSDAY

26

Tuesday Night Dance Party -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
2012/07/25 (Wed)

Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA

Christopher Bell -Cool Beanz Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL

MONDAY

23

Buddy Olson -Kitty’s Longbranch Saloon, 119 Cherry St. Atalissa, IA RiverCity 6 -Moline Activity Center, 620 18th St Moline, IL

A Party to Go Karaoke Night -Stacks Bar, 525 14th St. Moline, IL ABC Karaoke -Abblebee’s Neighborhood Grill - Elmore Ave., 3838 Elmore Ave. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -Barrel House 211, 211 E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Cross Creek Karaoke -Bootleggers Sports Bar, 2228 E. 11th St. Davenport, IA Jason Carl & Friends -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA

WEDNESDAY

25

Open Mic Night -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Rocktastic 4 -Rascals Live, 1418 15th St. Moline, IL The Chris & Wes Show -Mound Street Landing, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA Troy Harris, Pianist (10pm) -Red Crow Grille, 2504 53rd St. Bettendorf, IA

Curtis Hawkins Band -Bass Street Landing Plaza, Moline, IL Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ -Parker’s, 635 15th St Moline, IL Jam Sessions with John O’Meara & Friends -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA RiverCity 6 -Aledo Town Square Bandshell, Downtown Aledo, IL Smooth Money Gesture - Tasty Trigger -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Tapped Out (6:30pm) -Bettendorf Public Library, 2950 Learning Campus Bettendorf, IA

ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -Greenbriar Restaurant and Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL ABC Members-Only Karaoke -Moose Lodge - Davenport, 2333 Rockingham Rd Davenport, IA Barrel House Bix Bash: Blackstones (5pm) Funktastic Five (9pm) -Barrel House 211, 211 E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Bettendorf Park Band Favorites Concert -Bill Bowe Memorial Bandshell, Middle Park Bettendorf, IA Blackstones -Barrel House 211, 211 E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Cross Creek Karaoke -Firehouse Bar & Grill, 2006 Hickory Grove Rd. Davenport, IA Dueling Pianos at The Establishment -The Establishment Theatre, 220 19th St. Rock Island, IL Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ -Parker’s, 635 15th St Moline, IL Funktastic Five -River House, 1510 River Dr. Moline, IL Jeff Miller (6pm) - David Killinger & Friends (10pm) -G’s Riverfront Cafe, 102 S Main St Port Byron, IL

John Fullbright -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Justin Morrissey - Drunken Angels -Headquarters Bar & Grill, 119 E. 22nd Ave. Coal Valley, IL Karaoke Night -Chuck’s Tap, 1731 W. 6th St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL Karaoke Night -Roadrunner’s Roadhouse, 3803 Rockingham Rd. Davenport, IA KARASHO - Ghost Science - Dark Grey - Monument -2nd Ave. Dance Club, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL Kooby’s Karaoke -Wide Open Bar & Grill, 425 15th St. Moline, IL Live Lunch w/ Christopher Bell (noon) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Mercury Brothers -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Mickey Gilley -Quad-Cities Waterfront Convention Center, 1777 Isle Parkway Bettendorf, IA Nitecrawlers (5:30pm) - Scott Millage & the Devil’s Candy (9:30pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA North of 40 -Len Brown’s North Shore Inn, 7th Street and the Rock River Moline, IL Rob Dahms & Detroit Larry (6pm) -Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street Milan, IL

JEFF the Brotherhood - Juiceboxx Healing Powers -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

Rootless Experience -Cool Beanz Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL

Russ Reyman Trio (6pm) -Phoenix, 111 West 2nd St. Davenport, IA Scott-Free Band -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA Smooth Groove -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Street Fest 2012: Jason Carl Band (11am) - Night People (1:45pm) - Orangadang (4pm) - Superfly Samurai (6pm) - Euguene Smiles Project (8pm) - Vodkaseven (10pm) -Downtown Davenport, IA

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ -Parker’s, 635 15th St Moline, IL Greenbriar Bash w/ Third Rail -Greenbriar Restaurant and Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL Housenation - Lady D - DJ Buddha - Chronik Solutionz -4Play Sportsbar, 1704 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL Jeff Miller (6pm) - David Killinger & Friends (10pm) -G’s Riverfront Cafe, 102 S Main St Port Byron, IL Joe Peña Band Memorial Jam w/ Serious Business -Geezer’s Draft House, 1654 W. 3rd St., Davenport, IA Justin Morrissey -Bleyarts Tap, 2210 E. 11th St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Chuck’s Tap, 1731 W. 6th St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL Karaoke Night -Roadrunner’s Roadhouse, 3803 Rockingham Rd. Davenport, IA

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 809 • July 19 - August 1, 2012

27

Tangent -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA The Music of Dr. Joe Seng -Joe’s Club, 1402 W. 7th St. Davenport, IA

The Myers Brothers (6pm) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA The Tailfins -Edje Nightclub at Jumer’s Casino and Hotel, I-280 & Hwy 92 Rock Island, IL
2012/07/28 (Sat)

A Party to Go Karaoke Night -Wooden Nickel Saloon, 2042 W 3rd St Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Alan Sweet (2pm) -Creekside Vineyards Winery & Inn, 7505 120th Ave. Coal Valley, IL Barlowe & James (6pm) -Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street Milan, IL Barrel House Bix Bash: Danika Holmes (noon) - Live DJ (3pm) - Jason Carl Band (6pm) - Just Chords (9:30pm) -Barrel House 211, 211 E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Bettendorf Bandshell -Barrel House 211, 211 E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA

SATURDAY

28

Shinedown @ Adler Theatre – July 20
Street Fest 2012: Keep off the Grass (9:30am) - Busted Chandeliers (11:30am) - Identity Crisis (1pm) - Bob Dorr & the Blue Band (3pm) - The Dawn (5:30pm) - Cal Stage Band (7:30pm) - Funktastic Five (10pm) -Downtown Davenport, IA Tangent (10am) -Mac’s Tavern, 316 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA The Funnies -River House, 1510 River Dr. Moline, IL Bill Chrastil (2pm) -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA Buddy Olson -Ducky’s Lagoon, 13515 78th Ave Andalusia, IL Cory Peak & the Peaks - Mija - Disgruntled Noisebox -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Cross Creek Karaoke -Bootleggers Sports Bar, 2228 E. 11th St. Davenport, IA Funday Sunday with Dave Ellis (6pm) -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Jim Ryan (2pm) -Len Brown’s North Shore Inn, 7th Street and the Rock River Moline, IL Karaoke for Kids (3-5pm) -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL Russ Reyman, Pianist (10am-2pm brunch) -The Lodge Hotel, 900 Spruce Hills Dr. Bettendorf, IA Sunday Jazz Brunch at Bix Bistro (10:30am & 12:30pm) -Hotel Blackhawk, 200 E. 3rd St. Davenport, IA 2012/07/31 (Tue)

ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Acoustic Music Club (4:30pm) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Corporate Rock -Wells Fargo Pavilion Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds, 2815 W. Locust St. Davenport, IA Danika Holmes -The Clubhouse, 2501 53rd Ave. Bettendorf, IA Diamonds (7 & 9pm) -Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds, 2815 W. Locust St Davenport, IA Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) -O’Melia’s Supper Club, 2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock Island, IL Hap Hazzard -Farmer Beer Tent - Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds, 2815 W. Locust St Davenport, IA Jam Night w/ Jordan Danielsen -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA

King of the Tramps -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA

Open Mic Night -Cool Beanz Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL

ABC Karaoke -Abblebee’s Neighborhood Grill - Elmore Ave., 3838 Elmore Ave. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -Barrel House 211, 211 E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -Ganzo’s, 3923 N. Marquette St. Davenport, IA Corporate Rock -Farmer Beer Tent - Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds, 2815 W. Locust St Davenport, IA Cross Creek Karaoke -Bootleggers Sports Bar, 2228 E. 11th St. Davenport, IA Diamonds (7 & 9pm) -Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds, 2815 W. Locust St Davenport, IA Jason Carl & Friends -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL

Karaoke Night -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

Brains! Brains! Brains! - Johnny Scum -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

Community Drum Circle (10:30am) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Cosmic -Mound Street Landing, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA Cross Creek Karaoke -Firehouse Bar & Grill, 2006 Hickory Grove Rd. Davenport, IA Danika Holmes -The Grape Life Wine Emporium - Davenport, 3402 Elmore Ave. Davenport, IA Doug Gabriel (8 & 10pm) -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA Douglas & Tucker (5pm) -V.F.W. 1303, 3715 9th St Rock Island, IL Dueling Pianos at The Establishment -The Establishment Theatre, 220 19th St. Rock Island, IL

Kooby’s Karaoke -Headquarters Bar & Grill, 119 E. 22nd Ave. Coal Valley, IL Machine Gun Willie -Generations Bar & Grill, 4100 4th Ave. Moline, IL Matt Hill Band -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Minus Six - Dan Hubbard & The Humadors -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA Nitrix -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL North of 40 -Milan American Legion, 515 W 1st Ave Milan, IL Open Mic Night -Downtown Central Perk, 226 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Russ Reyman, Pianist (7pm) -Phoenix, 111 West 2nd St. Davenport, IA Son of a Gun: Tribute to Hank Williams (2pm) -The District Theatre, 1611 2nd Ave Rock Island, IL

The Tailfins -Edje Nightclub at Jumer’s Casino and Hotel, I-280 & Hwy 92 Rock Island, IL
Vodkaseven -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Widetrack -Moose Lodge - Rock Island, 4410 9th St Rock Island, IL Zither Ensemble (10am) -German American Heritage Center, 712 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA 2012/07/29 (Sun)

Open Mic Night -The Dam View Inn, 410 2nd St Davenport, IA Rodney Atkins -Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds, 2815 W. Locust St Davenport, IA Southern Thunder DJ Service (5pm) & Karaoke (9pm) -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL Stevie J. (8pm) -Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds, 2815 W. Locust St Davenport, IA Tailfins (6 & 10pm) -Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds, 2815 W. Locust St Davenport, IA Texas Instruments - Tim Blood & the Gut Panthers - Art Fad - Clyde Webb - Captains Vessels -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL

Keller Karaoke -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Open Mic Night -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114 1/2 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA

Open Mic Night -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA

SUNDAY

29

Tuesday Night Dance Party -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
2012/08/01 (Wed)

ABC Karaoke -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA

TUESDAY

31

ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA

A Party to Go Karaoke Night -Stacks Bar, 525 14th St. Moline, IL

WEDNESDAY

1

Rocktastic 4 -Rascals Live, 1418 15th St. Moline, IL Stevie J. (8pm) -Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds, 2815 W. Locust St Davenport, IA Tailfins (6 & 10pm) -Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds, 2815 W. Locust St Davenport, IA The Band Perry -Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds, 2815 W. Locust St Davenport, IA The Chris & Wes Show -Mound Street Landing, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA Troy Harris, Pianist (10pm) -Red Crow Grille, 2504 53rd St. Bettendorf, IA Wild Oatz -Wells Fargo Pavilion - Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds, 2815 W. Locust St. Davenport, IA

28

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 809 • July 19 - August 1, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

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