Thursday, July 19, 2012 www.somd.

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Story Page 20
Thursday, July 19, 2012
2 The County Times
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What’s Inside
What’s Inside
entertainment
Andrea Bridgett, 10, receives help building a model rocket from camp counselor Zack
Venables during Space Camp for elementary students this week at Great Mills High
School.
Dorothy, the Tin Man, the Scarecrow and the Cowardly Lion talk about going to meet
the Wonderful Wizard of Oz during a dress rehearsal for this year’s Summerstock
production, running this weekend and next.
education
Ray Raley, of Ridge, and his dog Ripken compete in a
DockDogs competition in Easton in 2011. Ripken is a
nationally ranked competitor in the sport of dock jumping.
“He was jumping out of his pants.”
Ray Raley, of Ridge, talking about his dog Ripken during his frst
DockDogs jumping competition in 2011
Also Inside
5 County News
13 Crime
14 Education
16 Obituaries
20 Feature Story
22 Letters
24 Community
26 Community Calendar
28 Entertainment
29 Entertainment Calendar
30 Business
31 Business Directory
32 Games
33 Newsmaker
34 Senior News
35 Columns
36 Home Entertaining
38 Sports
Weather
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On T he Cover
Thursday, July 19, 2012
3 The County Times
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Thursday, July 19, 2012
4 The County Times
ews
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TREASURE CHEST RAFFLE
Last Night of Carnival
Owned & Operated By H.V.F.D
By Guy Leonard
Staff Writer
The county’s alcohol beverage
board fned Loveville Tavern nearly
$2,000 last week after fnding them
guilty of allowing alcohol consumption
in their parking lot, having a number of
customers beyond their rated capacity
and hosting an event that had patrons
fghting amongst themselves in the bar
and strewn all over the shoulder of the
road outside.
The licensees of the bar, Christine
Ward and Joseph Husic initially pro-
tested the allegations, but near the end
of the nearly two-hour hearing were
apologetic.
Since opening about a year ago,
management at the bar has used social
networking sites like Facebook, as well
as promoters, to boost lagging business.
At the heart of their problem this time
was that the effort turned out to be more
successful than they had intended,
owners said.
“We hear it all the time [from pro-
moters] that we’re going to be busy and
we aren’t,” Ward testifed at the Alcohol
Beverage Board hearing July 12. “We
didn’t expect to be that busy.”
Several law offcers arrived at
Loveville Tavern the night of May
26 to a report of a major disturbance.
Sheriff’s Offce Alcohol Enforcement
Coordinator Dfc. James Stone testifed
he saw at least 12 people in the park-
ing lot drinking alcohol and counted
156 patrons in the establishment, six
more than the fre marshal’s limit. More
people were hopping a fence behind the
bar and, by the end of the night, Stone
counted at least 190 people.
Stone, with Cpl. Keith Moritz and
other offcers, were busy breaking up
several melees inside the bar.
“They were drinking as they came
out, but that wasn’t my biggest con-
cern,” Stone said. “It was the fght that
had broken out inside and the patrons
[wandering] up and down Route 5.”
Ward protested that management
could not inspect each vehicle in the
parking lot for alcohol, but Stone said
that if management saw alcohol being
consumed in the parking lot it was their
responsibility to report it.
“I can’t go outside and tell people
what they can do in their vehicle,” Ward
said.
“It’s the responsibility of the busi-
ness to check your parking lot,” Stone
responded.
Husic also protested the bar could
not be held responsible for parking out-
side of their own lot.
“Where does our responsibility
end?” Husic asked.
After the vote to fne the establish-
ment, Alcohol Board Chairman Moses
Saldana said it would be up to the busi-
ness to ensure they did not violate the
law again.
“Obviously this is signifcant,”
Saldana said. “We don’t tell you how to
run your business, that’s not our job.”
guyleonard@countytimes.net
Loveville Tavern Fined $1,900
The county government announced this week that a storm that occurred on
Sunday gained enough strength to be categorized as a small tornado that touched
down in Colton’s Point.
The tornado’s path ran along Windy Lane at about 4:30 p.m. according
to the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Agency (NOAA) reports and
reached speeds of about 75 miles per hour.
Local frefghters from the Seventh District fre station responded to help
clear downed trees and assist with some of the damage but no injuries were
reported.
Tornado Hits Coltons Point
Thursday, July 19, 2012
5 The County Times
ews
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By Guy Leonard
Staff Writer
For the past month rumors have
been swirling among local military con-
tractors that layoffs are a virtual cer-
tainty to keep in step with goals set by
the Obama administration calling for
15 percent reductions in spending. Lo-
cal Navy and contract offce leaders re-
cently met in a closed meeting with the
contracting community to try to assuage
their fears.
Uncertainty still exists as to how
much contract services will have to be
cut and where those cuts will be, insid-
ers say.
NAVAIR Commander Vice Adm.
David Architzel along with Kal Likach
and Diane Balderson of the NAVAIR
leadership team, headed the dais in front
of a packed room of contract service
providers at the Bay District fre house’s
social hall, which was closed to media
and the public.
Many of the problems started when
the federal government’s Offce of Man-
agement and Budget issued directives
to military commands to make spend-
ing cuts reaching 2010 levels and help
achieve about $487 billion in spending
cuts over the next 10 years, per the re-
cently passed National Defense Autho-
rization Act.
Del. John Bohanan said the direc-
tives were taken so literally that contrac-
tors began receiving phone calls from
the military side of the business saying
they would have to make cuts in their
staffng to meet new budge demands.
Bohanan said demands to go back
to 2010 spending levels would likely not
be across the board and there are “safety
valves” to ensure that some programs,
like the Joint Strike Fighter, would be
allowed to exceed those limits because
test fights for the strategically impor-
tant air superiority fghter are ramping
up.
“You can’t take the F-35 and bring
it back to 2010 [spending] levels,” Bo-
hanan said, but he cautioned that while
Pax River will continue to be important
in the national defense structure, it will
not continue to operate at the same level
of work it has become accustomed to.
“At some point the programs of
record [major programs] will start to
dwindle and go away,” Bohanan said.
“The question is what will pick up the
slack.”
County Commissioner Todd Mor-
gan, also a contractor consultant on
base with 30 years experience, said cuts
are inevitable and the question remain-
ing is how deep the cuts would have to
be dependent on the contractor provid-
ing the services.
He also said there are differences in
directives coming from the federal gov-
ernment, and that confuses contractors
implementing changes.
“This thing is extremely complicat-
ed,” Morgan said. “The Navy is reacting
to directives from one agency and react-
ing to the law dictated by the National
Defense Authorization Act.
“They’re not in sync.”
Morgan believes base leadership
and contractors have to continue to
make themselves adaptable to the re-
quirements of the military, a practice
that makes them valuable to new cus-
tomers, like special operations forces
and even the State Department.
The problem now is for contrac-
tors to wait and see how the direc-
tives will play out and fnd a way to be
competitive under budget constraints
simultaneously.
“The direction is the great un-
known; you don’t know where the cuts
are,” Morgan said. “But recognize that
we’re going to have cuts.”
guyleonard@countytimes.net
Defense Budget Cuts Coming
IT’S ALL ABOUT THE RIGHT ENVIRONMENT.
NOW ENROLLING
for the 2012-2013 Academic Year

ATTEND AN OPEN HOUSE:


Tuesday, July 31
Old South Country Club
Lothian, MD
5-7 p.m.
Sunday, July 29
The Calverton School
Huntingtown, MD
1-3 p.m.
410-535-0216 x 1101 | www.CalvertonSchool.org
Thursday, July 19, 2012
6 The County Times
ews
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MOTOR RALLY TO LEONARDTOWN
Motorcycles and Cars
August 17, 2012
5:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
(cards must be turned in by 8:00 pm)
Poker Walk with card pick-up
at participating businesses within town
($20 per hand)
Live Music, door prizes, and raffle
Food and drink available
prizes for high and low hand
All proceeds donated to
Southern Maryland
Vacation for Disabled Vets
at Greenwell State Park
RAIN DATE: AUGUST 24, 2012
(see back for card pickup stops)
Contact Jolanda Campbell: 301-373-9775
the greenwell foundation
Donated and Printed by:
By Guy Leonard
Staff Writer
County Commissioner Todd
Morgan says his wife Maria, who
was severely injured in a car crash
a little more than a year ago, has
returned home.
Maria remains under constant
care for a traumatic brain injury
received in the accident.
In an e-mail to supporters of
the family, he said that best place
for his wife to recover now is at
home.
“I have prayed for guidance on
this decision and think if Maria can
be home, in a familiar setting, sur-
rounded by her friends it can only
her speed and enhance recovery,”
Morgan wrote in a July 12 email.
“This is going to take a lot of work
and patience as she, and we, adapt
to a new and changing world.
“It’s going to be undoubtedly
different.”
It has been
a struggle for
the family to
deal with the
crisis for so
long, Morgan
stated.
“It is hard
to believe a
year has passed
since Maria’s
horrific inju-
ry,” he wrote.
“It has been an
endless journey
for our fam-
ily as we have ebbed and f lowed,
ridden emotional highs and many,
many emotional lows.”
The accident occurred the
morning of July 11, 2011, and re-
sulted in Maria Morgan being
f lown out by helicopter. Her Audi
TT was struck in the driver’s side
by a Ford F-150 driven by Michelle
Mason Malone, 26, from Mechan-
icsville, as Morgan was making a
left turn onto Route 235 from Mill-
stone Landing Road.
The collision’s force drove
Morgan’s car into a 2005 Nissan
Armada that was in the left turn
lane of southbound Three Notch
Road, police reported.
Malone pleaded guilty in
county district court back in Janu-
ary to two citations for running a
red light and negligent driving and
paid a $460 in fines.
guyleonard@countytimes.net
One Year Later, Morgan
Returns Home
The Metropolitan Commission has issued Level II water
restrictions for the communities of Leonardtown Farms and
Villages of Leonardtown effective this Friday, the water and
sewer utility announced this week.
The same level of water restrictions also remain in effect
for Forrest Farm’s public water system.
The new, heightened restrictions are a result of excessive
water usage in the communities beyond permitted levels, a
MetCom press release stated, and will be relieved once the
consumption reduces.
The restrictions include limiting the hours of irrigation
outdoors as well as cleaning tasks.
Violation of the restrictions can lead to fnes or even ter-
mination of water services.
For more information contact MetCom at 301-737-7400
at extension 101.
guyleonard@countytimes.net
MetCom Adds Water
Restrictions
Todd and Maria Morgan
Thursday, July 19, 2012
7 The County Times
Law Office of
A. Shane Mattingly, P.C.
301.475.9101
301.475.9035 (F)
41645 Church Street
Post Ofce Box 1906
Leonardtown, MD 20650
A. Shane Mattingly,
Esquire
Attorney at Law

Series Sponsors
• Arts Alliance of St. Mary’s College of Maryland
• Comcast Spotlight • Lockheed Martin • ManTech
• Maryland State Arts Council • Maryland Public Television
• MetroCast • Northrop Grumman • River Concert Series
Audience • SAIC • Smartronix • St. Mary’s Arts Council
• St. Mary’s County Commissioners • Wyle
Concert Sponsors
• ARINC • ASEC • AVIAN • BAE Systems
• Booz Allen Hamilton • Bowhead • Camber
• Cherry Cove • Compass • CSC • DCS Corp.
• Eagle Systems • General Electric • G&H Jewelers
• Giant • NTA • Old Line Bank • Phocus Video
• Resource Management Concepts • Sabre Systems
• Taylor Gas • W.M. Davis • Yamaha Pianos
June 22
A Little Bit of Gypsy
Franz Liszt — Hungarian Rhapsody
No. 2
Pablo Sarasate — Navarra (“Spanish
Dance”) for 2 violins Jessica and Katelyn
Lyons, violins
Antonin Dvořák — Gypsy Songs,
Op. 55
Edita Randova, mezzo-soprano
Antonin Dvořák — Symphony No. 9,
“New World Symphony”
June 29
A Perfect 10!!
George Gershwin — An American
in Paris
Maurice Ravel — Piano Concerto in G
Csíky Boldizsár, piano soloist
Maurice Ravel — Le tombeau de
Couperin
Maurice Ravel — Bolero

July 6
That Independent Feeling!!
John Williams — Superman
John Williams — The Patriot
Morton Gould — The Hosedown
American Songs with Hilary Kole
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky —
“1812 Overture”
John Phillip Sousa and FIREWORKS!!
July 13
Come, Ye Sons of Art
Larry Vote, guest conductor
Joan McFarland, soprano
Roger Isaacs, countertenor
Jeffrey Silberschlag, trumpet soloist
and the River Concert Series
Festival Choir*
George Frideric Handel — “Music for
the Royal Fireworks” (HWV 351)
Henry Purcell — Come ye Sons of Art
(Cantata for solo voices, chorus, orchestra)
George Frideric Handel — Concerto for
Trumpet in D with Oboes
George Frideric Handel — “Ombra
mai fu” (Vocal Solo)
George Frideric Handel — Vocal solo
Handel — Coronation Anthem: Zadok
the Priest
Handel — Hallelujah Chorus from
“Messiah”
* Chorus consists of talented students
from the area high schools, and
members of the St. Marie’s Musica, the
SMCM Choir and Chamber Singers.
July 20
A Wagnerian Finale for 2012
Richard Wagner — “Tristan and Isolde”
— Prelude and Liebestod
Claude Debussy — Nocturnes
I. “Nuages”
II. “Fêtes”
III. “Sirèns”
Edvard Grieg — Piano Concerto in
A Minor
Brian Ganz, piano soloist
Richard Wagner — “Götterdämmerung”
– Siegfried’s Death and Funeral Music
July 27
Firebird, “Bird,” and the
Stars in Our Constellation
Igor Stravinsky — Firebird Suite 1919
Charlie Parker — Super Sax
Jazz, Blues, and Folk artists join
the River Concert Series for our
grand fnale!!
2012 river concert series | www.smcm.edu/riverconcert
Edita Randova
The Lyons Sisters
Hilary Kole
Brian Ganz
Don Stapleson
Larry Vote
Joan McFarland
Roger Isaacs
Csíky Boldizsár

Series Sponsors
• Arts Alliance of St. Mary’s College of Maryland
• Comcast Spotlight • Lockheed Martin
• ManTech • Maryland State Arts Council
• Maryland Public Television • MetroCast
• Northrop Grumman • River Concert Series Audience
• SAIC • Smartronix • St. Mary’s County Arts Council
• St. Mary’s County Commissioners • Wyle
Concert Sponsors
• ARINC • ASEC • BAE Systems • Booz Allen Hamilton
• Bowhead • Camber • Cherry Cove • Compass
• CSC • DCS Corp. • Eagle Systems • General Electric
• G&H Jewelers • Giant • NTA • Old Line Bank
• Phocus Video • Resource Management Concepts
• Sabre Systems • Target • Taylor Gas
• W.M. Davis • Yamaha Pianos
June 22
A Little Bit of Gypsy
Franz Liszt — Hungarian Rhapsody
No. 2
Pablo Sarasate — Navarra (“Spanish
Dance”) for 2 violins Jessica and Katelyn
Lyons, violins
Antonin Dvořák — Gypsy Songs,
Op. 55
Edita Randova, mezzo-soprano
Antonin Dvořák — Symphony No. 9,
“New World Symphony”
June 29
A Perfect 10!!
George Gershwin — An American
in Paris
Maurice Ravel — Piano Concerto in G
Csíky Boldizsár, piano soloist
Maurice Ravel — Le tombeau de
Couperin
Maurice Ravel — Bolero

July 6
That Independent Feeling!!
John Williams — Superman
John Williams — The Patriot
Morton Gould — The Hosedown
American Songs with Hilary Kole
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky —
“1812 Overture”
John Phillip Sousa and FIREWORKS!!
July 13
Come, Ye Sons of Art
Larry Vote, guest conductor
Joan McFarland, soprano
Roger Isaacs, countertenor
Jeffrey Silberschlag, trumpet soloist
and the River Concert Series
Festival Choir*
George Frideric Handel — “Music for
the Royal Fireworks” (HWV 351)
Henry Purcell — Come ye Sons of Art
(Cantata for solo voices, chorus, orchestra)
George Frideric Handel — Concerto for
Trumpet in D with Oboes
George Frideric Handel — “Ombra
mai fu” (Vocal Solo)
George Frideric Handel — Vocal solo
Handel — Coronation Anthem: Zadok
the Priest
Handel — Hallelujah Chorus from
“Messiah”
* Chorus consists of talented students
from the area high schools, and
members of the St. Marie’s Musica, the
SMCM Choir and Chamber Singers.
July 20
A Wagnerian Finale for 2012
Richard Wagner — “Tristan and Isolde”
— Prelude and Liebestod
Claude Debussy — Nocturnes
I. “Nuages”
II. “Fêtes”
III. “Sirèns”
Edvard Grieg — Piano Concerto in
A Minor
Brian Ganz, piano soloist
Richard Wagner — “Götterdämmerung”
– Siegfried’s Death and Funeral Music
July 27
Firebird, “Bird,” and the
Stars in Our Constellation
Igor Stravinsky — Firebird Suite 1919
Charlie Parker — Super Sax
Jazz, Blues, and Folk artists join
the River Concert Series for our
grand fnale!!
2012 river concert series | www.smcm.edu/riverconcert
Edita Randova
The Lyons Sisters
Hilary Kole
Brian Ganz
Don Stapleson
Larry Vote
Joan McFarland
Roger Isaacs
Csíky Boldizsár

Series Sponsors
• Arts Alliance of St. Mary’s College of Maryland
• Comcast Spotlight • Lockheed Martin • ManTech
• Maryland State Arts Council • Maryland Public Television
• MetroCast • Northrop Grumman • River Concert Series
Audience • SAIC • Smartronix • St. Mary’s Arts Council
• St. Mary’s County Commissioners • Wyle
Concert Sponsors
• ARINC • ASEC • AVIAN • BAE Systems
• Booz Allen Hamilton • Bowhead • Camber
• Cherry Cove • Compass • CSC • DCS Corp.
• Eagle Systems • General Electric • G&H Jewelers
• Giant • NTA • Old Line Bank • Phocus Video
• Resource Management Concepts • Sabre Systems
• Taylor Gas • W.M. Davis • Yamaha Pianos
June 22
A Little Bit of Gypsy
Franz Liszt — Hungarian Rhapsody
No. 2
Pablo Sarasate — Navarra (“Spanish
Dance”) for 2 violins Jessica and Katelyn
Lyons, violins
Antonin Dvořák — Gypsy Songs,
Op. 55
Edita Randova, mezzo-soprano
Antonin Dvořák — Symphony No. 9,
“New World Symphony”
June 29
A Perfect 10!!
George Gershwin — An American
in Paris
Maurice Ravel — Piano Concerto in G
Csíky Boldizsár, piano soloist
Maurice Ravel — Le tombeau de
Couperin
Maurice Ravel — Bolero

July 6
That Independent Feeling!!
John Williams — Superman
John Williams — The Patriot
Morton Gould — The Hosedown
American Songs with Hilary Kole
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky —
“1812 Overture”
John Phillip Sousa and FIREWORKS!!
July 13
Come, Ye Sons of Art
Larry Vote, guest conductor
Joan McFarland, soprano
Roger Isaacs, countertenor
Jeffrey Silberschlag, trumpet soloist
and the River Concert Series
Festival Choir*
George Frideric Handel — “Music for
the Royal Fireworks” (HWV 351)
Henry Purcell — Come ye Sons of Art
(Cantata for solo voices, chorus, orchestra)
George Frideric Handel — Concerto for
Trumpet in D with Oboes
George Frideric Handel — “Ombra
mai fu” (Vocal Solo)
George Frideric Handel — Vocal solo
Handel — Coronation Anthem: Zadok
the Priest
Handel — Hallelujah Chorus from
“Messiah”
* Chorus consists of talented students
from the area high schools, and
members of the St. Marie’s Musica, the
SMCM Choir and Chamber Singers.
July 20
A Wagnerian Finale for 2012
Richard Wagner — “Tristan and Isolde”
— Prelude and Liebestod
Claude Debussy — Nocturnes
I. “Nuages”
II. “Fêtes”
III. “Sirèns”
Edvard Grieg — Piano Concerto in
A Minor
Brian Ganz, piano soloist
Richard Wagner — “Götterdämmerung”
– Siegfried’s Death and Funeral Music
July 27
Firebird, “Bird,” and the
Stars in Our Constellation
Igor Stravinsky — Firebird Suite 1919
Charlie Parker — Super Sax
Jazz, Blues, and Folk artists join
the River Concert Series for our
grand fnale!!
2012 river concert series | www.smcm.edu/riverconcert
Edita Randova
The Lyons Sisters
Hilary Kole
Brian Ganz
Don Stapleson
Larry Vote
Joan McFarland
Roger Isaacs
Csíky Boldizsár

Series Sponsors
• Arts Alliance of St. Mary’s College of Maryland
• Comcast Spotlight • Lockheed Martin • ManTech
• Maryland State Arts Council • Maryland Public Television
• MetroCast • Northrop Grumman • River Concert Series
Audience • SAIC • Smartronix • St. Mary’s Arts Council
• St. Mary’s County Commissioners • Wyle
Concert Sponsors
• ARINC • ASEC • AVIAN • BAE Systems
• Booz Allen Hamilton • Bowhead • Camber
• Cherry Cove • Compass • CSC • DCS Corp.
• Eagle Systems • General Electric • G&H Jewelers
• Giant • NTA • Old Line Bank • Phocus Video
• Resource Management Concepts • Sabre Systems
• Taylor Gas • W.M. Davis • Yamaha Pianos
June 22
A Little Bit of Gypsy
Franz Liszt — Hungarian Rhapsody
No. 2
Pablo Sarasate — Navarra (“Spanish
Dance”) for 2 violins Jessica and Katelyn
Lyons, violins
Antonin Dvořák — Gypsy Songs,
Op. 55
Edita Randova, mezzo-soprano
Antonin Dvořák — Symphony No. 9,
“New World Symphony”
June 29
A Perfect 10!!
George Gershwin — An American
in Paris
Maurice Ravel — Piano Concerto in G
Csíky Boldizsár, piano soloist
Maurice Ravel — Le tombeau de
Couperin
Maurice Ravel — Bolero

July 6
That Independent Feeling!!
John Williams — Superman
John Williams — The Patriot
Morton Gould — The Hosedown
American Songs with Hilary Kole
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky —
“1812 Overture”
John Phillip Sousa and FIREWORKS!!
July 13
Come, Ye Sons of Art
Larry Vote, guest conductor
Joan McFarland, soprano
Roger Isaacs, countertenor
Jeffrey Silberschlag, trumpet soloist
and the River Concert Series
Festival Choir*
George Frideric Handel — “Music for
the Royal Fireworks” (HWV 351)
Henry Purcell — Come ye Sons of Art
(Cantata for solo voices, chorus, orchestra)
George Frideric Handel — Concerto for
Trumpet in D with Oboes
George Frideric Handel — “Ombra
mai fu” (Vocal Solo)
George Frideric Handel — Vocal solo
Handel — Coronation Anthem: Zadok
the Priest
Handel — Hallelujah Chorus from
“Messiah”
* Chorus consists of talented students
from the area high schools, and
members of the St. Marie’s Musica, the
SMCM Choir and Chamber Singers.
July 20
A Wagnerian Finale for 2012
Richard Wagner — “Tristan and Isolde”
— Prelude and Liebestod
Claude Debussy — Nocturnes
I. “Nuages”
II. “Fêtes”
III. “Sirèns”
Edvard Grieg — Piano Concerto in
A Minor
Brian Ganz, piano soloist
Richard Wagner — “Götterdämmerung”
– Siegfried’s Death and Funeral Music
July 27
Firebird, “Bird,” and the
Stars in Our Constellation
Igor Stravinsky — Firebird Suite 1919
Charlie Parker — Super Sax
Jazz, Blues, and Folk artists join
the River Concert Series for our
grand fnale!!
2012 river concert series | www.smcm.edu/riverconcert
Edita Randova
The Lyons Sisters
Hilary Kole
Brian Ganz
Don Stapleson
Larry Vote
Joan McFarland
Roger Isaacs
Csíky Boldizsár

Series Sponsors
• Arts Alliance of St. Mary’s College of Maryland
• Comcast Spotlight • Lockheed Martin • ManTech
• Maryland State Arts Council • Maryland Public Television
• MetroCast • Northrop Grumman • River Concert Series
Audience • SAIC • Smartronix • St. Mary’s Arts Council
• St. Mary’s County Commissioners • Wyle
Concert Sponsors
• ARINC • ASEC • AVIAN • BAE Systems
• Booz Allen Hamilton • Bowhead • Camber
• Cherry Cove • Compass • CSC • DCS Corp.
• Eagle Systems • General Electric • G&H Jewelers
• Giant • NTA • Old Line Bank • Phocus Video
• Resource Management Concepts • Sabre Systems
• Taylor Gas • W.M. Davis • Yamaha Pianos
June 22
A Little Bit of Gypsy
Franz Liszt — Hungarian Rhapsody
No. 2
Pablo Sarasate — Navarra (“Spanish
Dance”) for 2 violins Jessica and Katelyn
Lyons, violins
Antonin Dvořák — Gypsy Songs,
Op. 55
Edita Randova, mezzo-soprano
Antonin Dvořák — Symphony No. 9,
“New World Symphony”
June 29
A Perfect 10!!
George Gershwin — An American
in Paris
Maurice Ravel — Piano Concerto in G
Csíky Boldizsár, piano soloist
Maurice Ravel — Le tombeau de
Couperin
Maurice Ravel — Bolero

July 6
That Independent Feeling!!
John Williams — Superman
John Williams — The Patriot
Morton Gould — The Hosedown
American Songs with Hilary Kole
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky —
“1812 Overture”
John Phillip Sousa and FIREWORKS!!
July 13
Come, Ye Sons of Art
Larry Vote, guest conductor
Joan McFarland, soprano
Roger Isaacs, countertenor
Jeffrey Silberschlag, trumpet soloist
and the River Concert Series
Festival Choir*
George Frideric Handel — “Music for
the Royal Fireworks” (HWV 351)
Henry Purcell — Come ye Sons of Art
(Cantata for solo voices, chorus, orchestra)
George Frideric Handel — Concerto for
Trumpet in D with Oboes
George Frideric Handel — “Ombra
mai fu” (Vocal Solo)
George Frideric Handel — Vocal solo
Handel — Coronation Anthem: Zadok
the Priest
Handel — Hallelujah Chorus from
“Messiah”
* Chorus consists of talented students
from the area high schools, and
members of the St. Marie’s Musica, the
SMCM Choir and Chamber Singers.
July 20
A Wagnerian Finale for 2012
Richard Wagner — “Tristan and Isolde”
— Prelude and Liebestod
Claude Debussy — Nocturnes
I. “Nuages”
II. “Fêtes”
III. “Sirèns”
Edvard Grieg — Piano Concerto in
A Minor
Brian Ganz, piano soloist
Richard Wagner — “Götterdämmerung”
– Siegfried’s Death and Funeral Music
July 27
Firebird, “Bird,” and the
Stars in Our Constellation
Igor Stravinsky — Firebird Suite 1919
Charlie Parker — Super Sax
Jazz, Blues, and Folk artists join
the River Concert Series for our
grand fnale!!
2012 river concert series | www.smcm.edu/riverconcert
Edita Randova
The Lyons Sisters
Hilary Kole
Brian Ganz
Don Stapleson
Larry Vote
Joan McFarland
Roger Isaacs
Csíky Boldizsár
2012 river concert series | www.smcm.edu/riverconcert
www.JoeStanalonis.com
or Call 301-904-8408
• Piano every Friday
and Saturday night
• Jazz cabaret/dancing
on special evenings
• 3-course prix-fxe
dinner menu
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6 pm daily and all night
on Wednesdays!
• $8 lunch & beverage
special daily
• Sunday brunch
á la carte items
• “Le Salon”
(private room) available
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web: cafedesartistes.ws
email: cafedesartistes@somd.us
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301-737-4241
Thursday, July 19, 2012
8 The County Times
ews
1
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Trinity Episcopal Church
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children 5 yrs.
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Call 301-862-4597 for more information
Email parishadmin@olg.com
308 San Souci Plaza, California, MD
301-737-4241
• Piano every Friday
and Saturday night
• Jazz cabaret/dancing
on special evenings
• 3-course prix-fxe
dinner menu
$23.95 available until
6 pm daily and all night
on Wednesdays!
• $8 lunch & beverage
special daily
• Sunday brunch
á la carte items
• “Le Salon”
(private room) available
SOMD
WINNER OF
• Best
Restaurant
• Best Fine
Dining
Restaurant
• Best Dessert
LUNCH: Tues. - Fri.
11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
DINNER: Tues. - Sat.
5 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Sun. 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Closed Mondays
41655 Fenwick Stret, Leonardtown
web: cafedesartistes.ws
email: cafedesartistes@somd.us
301-997-0500
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PHONE: 301-475-5150
FAX: 301-475-6909
Tickets $75.00 each
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42455 Fairgrounds Road
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301-399-6417
By Guy Leonard
Staff Writer
With the state having virtu-
ally no funds to undertake a major
road widening and improvement
project on Route 5, offcials with
the State Highway Administra-
tion (SHA) are hoping increased
signage warning drivers to slow
down will help continual traffc
jams and crashes on the heavily
traveled roadway.
An SHA presentation to
County Commissioners showed
by 2022 the four-lane road
through Leonardtown will start to
fail, though it is adequate for the
current traffc fow.
SHA is already working on
a $2.3 million study of Route 5
improvement options, bounded
by the intersections of routes 243
and 245, but even short-term small
projects to either widen the road or
put in an extra turn lane have been
deemed too expensive.
SHA now plans to move
ahead with augmented lane use
pavement markings, overhead
signs that warn of left turns and
signs that emphasize the proper
speed limits.
Leonardtown Mayor Dan
Burris said town offcials will take
a closer look at the plans to see
how they will affect traffc.
In the interim, however, Bur-
ris is pleased that SHA at least
took some action.
“It is a positive thing that
they’re looking at temporary im-
provements,” he told The County
Times. “We have to look at see ex-
actly what they’re doing.”
The corridor study showed
that speeds often exceed the 40
mph posted limit, often by 12 mph
or more.
The report also showed that
south of Moakley Street the crash
rate is still well above the state-
wide average, with left turn related
crashes being the most prevalent.
Laschelle McKay, town
administrator, said that Leonar-
dtown government is still look-
ing for ways to make intercon-
nectivity a priority by building
streets and roads through major
developments.
It is good to have at least
some assistance from the state,
she said.
“I wish there was more, but
it’s a diffcult problem,” McKay
said.
guyleonard@countytimes.
net
Route 5
Crashes
Prompt Study
Thursday, July 19, 2012
9 The County Times
ews
MHBR
No. 103
QBH Gradview County Times Half Ad_Layout 1 9/6/11 4:41 PM Page 1
By Sarah Miller
Staff Writer
Despite rain showers and other hic-
cups that can plague an outdoor festival,
especially during an inaugural weekend,
the frst ever Southern Maryland Sun and
Music Fest went smoothly.
The two-day festival had it all – beer
and locally produced wines, big name bands
like The Fabulous Thunderbirds to smaller
acts like newly formed Colossus of Clout.
With more than 2,000 tickets sold
for the event, Co-founder Jimmy Zirakian
said he is excited about the results from the
weekend, though he hopes the crowd will
be even larger next year.
A portion of ticket sales will go to Cal-
vert Hospice and End Hunger. Zirakian said
plans are to rotate the charities receiving
money every year, and continue to allow
other local charities to advertise free at the
festival. He said the fnal costs have not yet
been reconciled, but he is looking forward
to presenting checks once all the dust has
settled.
The Southern Maryland Sun and Music
Fest started as a wine festival. Zirakian and
co-founder Jim Meunier frst approached
historic St. Mary’s City as a venue, but were
told they only allowed one wine festival
per year. After more research, Zirakian
said they decided to “step it up a notch,”
transforming the festival into an “all in-
clusive” two-day event with wine, beer,
music and all types of vendors.
The event had two stages hosting
13 performers, fve Maryland winer-
ies, including Port of Leonardtown and
Cove Point Winery, and a number of lo-
cal breweries and vendors on site.
“This is what it takes,” said Detour
Winery owner and wine maker Dan
Tamminga, adding local events like the
Sun and Music Fest are a great way for
small, local wineries to build a reputa-
tion and interact with the community.
Vicki Fugrmann with Port of Leon-
ardtown Winery echoed Tamminga’s state-
ments, saying they encourage people to buy
local and try homegrown products by com-
ing out to hometown festivals.
Musician Barry Grubbs of Colossus of
Clout was also happy to be at the festival.
“It’s good music and good fun,” he
said.
When all is said and done, Zirakian
said he is “very encouraged” for next year.
“I think we laid a great foundation for
things to come,” he said.
sarahmiller@countytimes.net
First Ever Sun and Music Fest Rocks Southern Maryland
Visitors sample Port of Leonardtown wines.
Colossus of Clout takes the stage.
Photos by Sarah Miller
Thursday, July 19, 2012
10 The County Times
ews
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By Guy Leonard
Staff Writer
It’s been just over a year since Me-
chanicsville resident James Michael
Dayton was killed in a glider crash
on Route 235 shortly after departing
from St. Mary’s County regional air-
port, and federal investigators recently
concluded it was most likely poor com-
munication during the short f light with
the tow plane that carried the glider
aloft that was the main cause of the
crash.
The final report from the National
Transportation Safety Board (NTSB)
stated, the glider pilot, had a conversa-
tion before the July 15, 2011 f light with
the tow plane pilot to discuss what the
signals would be for going too fast or
too slow just before taking off, but did
not discuss what the signal would be
to check the spoilers on the wings of
the glider.
According to NTSB’s report, the
tow plane pilot stated that just af-
ter take off he noticed that the climb
rate was not as expected and when
he checked the glider, he noticed the
spoilers were deployed.
When he gave the “internation-
ally recognized” rudder-wag signal to
check the spoilers, Dayton’s communi-
cation to glider pilot Nicolas Morales
was to release the glider from the tow
instead of stowing the spoilers as he
should have.
This led to the glider making a left
turn to the north where it crashed into
a stand of trees on Route 235 across
from Airport Drive.
The report stated that Morales
understood the meaning of the rudder-
wag signal but instead heeded the call
of Dayton, his co-pilot.
Morales, who along with Day-
ton was not specifically mentioned in
the report, stated also that the spoil-
ers were stowed during the pref light
checks “but did not confirm that the
control was locked in its detent prior
to takeoff.”
Dayton, 55, fell out of the glider as
it lay in the trees and died as a result of
multiple injuries.
Morales sustained serious injuries
also as a result of the crash, the report
stated.
guyleonard@countytimes.net
Poor Communications
Blamed in Glider Crash
By Guy Leonard
Staff Writer
Efforts to revitalize and restore
much of Lexington Park have gone on
for years now with varying levels of
success, but the county’s Community
Development Corporation is looking
for more help from a regional non-
profit by leveraging its historic and
cultural sites for grant funding.
Corporation head Robin Finna-
com said partnering with the Southern
Maryland Area Heritage Consortium
to extend what the “heritage area clus-
ter” boundaries over other areas of
Lexington Park would allow for ap-
plication of grant funding to preserve
those sites and aid revitalization.
“It’s another tool for revitaliza-
tion,” Finnacom said, adding that the
grants that could be applied for could
go up to $100,000.
The consortium is a non-profit
organization funded by state grants to
funnel grant money to organizations
that preserve historic and cultural sites
around Southern Maryland.
Consortium Executive Direc-
tor Roz Racanello said the current
boundary drawn by the consortium
was drawn a decade ago and includes
mostly Patuxent River Naval Air Sta-
tion and little else.
The idea this time may be to ex-
tend those boundaries to certain spots
like Three Notch Theater and the re-
cently christened colored troops mon-
ument. The grant money that could
come from such collaboration would
not be used for generic revitalization
or building new structures, but only to
preserve a select type of site.
“We’re talking about history, heri-
tage and culture,” Racanello said. “We
have to take an inventory of what’s
happening and what might be happen-
ing in the next couple of years.”
Racanello said including the entire
Lexington Park Development District
in the boundary change is unlikely.
guyleonard@countytimes.net
Heritage Grant Money
Could Help Lex Park
Thursday, July 19, 2012
11 The County Times
ews
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By Guy Leonard
Staff Writer
There were only about three sharks, 10-inch chain Dogfsh to be exact, in a
small pool in an outdoor pavilion at Calvert Marine Museum over the weekend,
but those three small fsh still drew hefty crowds to Solomons Island on Saturday.
Sherrod Sturrock, the deputy director at the museum, said the sharks, which
the museum owns, will grow to about twice their size and will be put on display
there during special occasions.
Holding the shark display outside also kept lines more manageable this
year, Sturrock said, which meant that visitors were more apt to stay at the mu-
seum longer and take in the other exhibits from fossils to maritime history that
forged the character of communities along the Patuxent River’s banks.
In year’s past the museum was able to bring in bigger sharks — nurse
sharks that were at their largest three feet long — but their presence didn’t help
improve the visibility of the marine museum itself, she said.
People would come just to see the sharks and the lines were long. People
found themselves waiting in line for up to four hours to get a glimpse of the apex
predators.
“They were so exhausted they would come and touch the shark and then
they’d leave,” Sturrock said.
Sturrock said this year’s Shark Fest was a more balanced approach.
Visitors who milled around enough found out there were plenty of other exhib-
its and even opportunities to rent paddleboats and go for a cruise around the marsh
on the museum property.
“It was a successful event,” she said. “It wasn’t a mosh pit around the shark tank.”
But even with the sharks on hand, one of the biggest attractions at the event was still
the pair of otters in their own water tank.
Kids swarmed around the windows to watch them swim and play, and the otters re-
sponded by eyeing the kids as they swam past.
“Everyone loves the otters,” Sturrock said.
guyleonard@countytimes.net
Small Sharks Draw Big Crowds
Photo by Guy Leonard
Thursday, July 19, 2012
12 The County Times
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Money
for the love of
By Guy Leonard
Staff Writer
In November 2011, St. Mary’s County’s Chamber of Com-
merce gave county elected leaders a list of recommendations for
dealing with blighted and dilapidated properties, but county lead-
ers have yet to act on them.
In the meantime, properties in poor shape will remain that
way as long as the county does not act to give itself the authority
to remedy the situation, said Chamber of Commerce Executive
Director Bill Scarafa.
“There’s nothing to prevent it from getting worse,” he said.
Earlier this spring, the Board of County Commissioners sent
the chamber a letter outlining its concerns with implementing
tougher standards for maintaining properties, including the abil-
ity to levy fnes on non-compliant property owners.
“Since the report and recommendations were received and
drafting was begun after the package of legislative proposals for
the 2012 session of the General Assembly had been prepared,
enactment of enabling legislation in 2012 was not feasible,” the
March 27 letter reads. “However enabling legislation will be
drafted and requested by the Board of County Commissioners
this fall as part of the legislative process.”
As long as a property does not pose a health or safety hazard
to the public, the county has few tools to deal with it, planning and
zoning offcials said.
One example is a property located on Point Lookout Road
near Redgate with a tree resting on the roof since August of last
year when Hurricane Irene blew through the county. A nearby
homeowner also complained about the property becoming a local
dumping ground.
The County Times reported on the property’s condition and
confrmed with planning offcials that it had been deemed an un-
safe structure. The same offcials said that the process to get the
property cleaned up is a long, drawn out one.
guyleonard@countytimes.net
With County Inaction, Blighted Properties Remain
By Alex Panos
Staff Writer
Being sensible and speaking well can now be done side-by-
side in Leonardtown. Two former co-workers are running occupa-
tional therapy, “Sense-ability,” and speech therapy, “Speak Well
Solutions,” offces right next to St. Mary’s Hospital.
While Speak Well Solutions has been in business for nearly
seven years, Sense-ability opened its doors for the frst time June
22.
Sense-ability owner and occupational therapist Michelle
McCloskey opened her own private-practice in order to achieve a
personal goal she has maintained throughout her career – “to help
people be able to do things they want to do.”
McCloskey specializes in neuro-care, providing treatment to
pediatrics and adults who may have experienced traumatic brain
injuries such as strokes, or suffer from disorders such as autism.
She also possesses additional certifcation for vision disorders and
sensory integration.
A lifelong St. Mary’s County resident, McCloskey has been
an occupational therapist for the past 21 years, 16 of which while
serving at St. Mary’s Hospital. While she was able to aid a large
number of people during this time, she always desired the oppor-
tunity to see a patient from beginning to end.
“A lot of times patients (at the hospital) would end up being
transferred,” McCloskey said. By opening a private practice, she
has more control over her patients and the ability to focus on their
specifc needs.
During her tenure at the hospital, McCloskey met her one-
time co-worker and current new building mate Yvette McCoy. McCoy, who has also been
practicing her craft for 21 years, works with pediatrics and adults living with speech def-
cits. She is also certifed to care for people who experience swallowing disorders.
“I love to talk,” McCoy said. “I had to fgure out how to incorporate it into my pro-
fession … so I teach people to effectively
communicate.”
Like McCloskey, McCoy opened her
private practice for the opportunity to work
with patients from beginning to end, citing
“continuity of care” as a motivating factor
for leaving St. Mary’s Hospital to become
her own boss.
The new building mates hope to con-
tinue to maintain a local feel and friendly
atmosphere for their patients.
McCloskey and McCoy said they are
not trying to “build an empire,” but rather
create a local service that provides “quality
care, with integrity, to the residents of St.
Mary’s County.”
The hours of operation echo this state-
ment; both practices are open to any time
of day that best accommodates the patients.
“You don’t have to travel to DC, An-
napolis or Baltimore to receive world-class
care,” McCoy said. “You can get it right here in St. Mary’s at Sense-
ability and Speak Well Solutions.”
alexpanos@countytimes.net
New Occupational Therapy Opens in Leonardtown
Michelle McCloskey
Yvette McCoy
Thursday, July 19, 2012
13 The County Times
Punishment
Crime
&

Philip H. Dorsey III
Attorney at Law
- SERIOUS ACCIDENT, INJURY -
LEONARDTOWN: 301-475-5000
TOLL FREE: 1-800-660-3493
EMAIL: phild@dorseylaw.net
www.dorseylaw.net
• Personal Injury
• Wrongful Death
• Auto/Truck Crashes
• Pharmacy & Drug Injuries
• Workers’ Compensation
• Medical Malpractice
Briefs
Briefs 2
St. Mary’s Square Ban Enforced
On July 9, Lisa Marie Tippett, 47, of Lexington Park was served with a notice not to
trespass on the property of St. Mary’s Square Shopping Center located in Lexington Park
police stated but on July 14 deputies responded to St. Mary’s Square Shopping Center for a
trespassing complaint. Tippett was on the property of St. Mary’s Square in violation of the no
trespassing order, police alleged. She was arrested and charged with trespassing.
Screamer Arrested
On July 14, deputies responded to a reported disturbance at the 21000 block of Great
Mills Road. Witnesses reported Shuree S. Weems, 31, of Great Mills was screaming in the
parking lot of the apartment complex causing a disturbance. Deputies contacted Weems,
advised her of the complaint and asked her to lower her voice as not to cause any further
disturbance. Weems agreed and the deputies left the scene. Approximately fve minutes later
deputies were called back to the apartments. Witnesses reported that Weems threw a glass
causing it to shatter on the staircase of the apartment complex. Witnesses further reported
that when the glass shattered it almost struck three children who were in the area and that
Weems was again screaming and causing a disturbance, police reported. Deputies contacted
Weems and arrested her for disorderly conduct.
Woman Charged with Stabbing
On July 15, deputies responded to an assault call on Courtneyville Road in Park Hall.
Their investigation revealed Katwinis Shariko Faxon, 27, of Park Hall was engaged in a ver-
bal dispute with the victim which lead to a physical assault when Faxon allegedly stabbed the
victim in the hand with a knife. The victim fed the residence to avoid further injury, police
reported. Deputies contacted Faxon, arrested her and charged her with frst- and second-
degree assault.
By Guy Leonard
Staff Writer
One week after releasing their
images to the public, St. Mary’s
County sheriff’s offce investiga-
tors are continuing their search for
two suspects wanted for questioning
in the theft of items from the Food
Line grocery store in Charlotte Hall
located on Mt. Wolf Road.
The black male stands 6-feet tall
with a heavy build, police said, while
the white woman stands about 5-feet,
7-inches tall, also with a heavy build.
The incident occurred July 4,
police reported.
Anyone who can identify these
individuals is asked to call Dfc.
Vezzosi at 301-475-4200 extension
1943 or Crime Solvers at 301-475-
3333. Tipsters can text their tips
to “TIP239” plus your message to
“CRIMES” (274637). Callers and
tipsters do not have to leave a name,
just the information. If the informa-
tion leads to the arrest and convic-
tion, the caller/tipster may be eligible
for a cash reward of up to $1,000.
guyleonard@countytimes.net
Police Seek Shoplifting
Suspects
Police Make Arrest in Assault Case
On July 15, deputies responded to a residence on Flower Drive in Lex-
ington Park for a report of an assault. Investigation revealed Cynthia Ann
Hutchens, 31, of Lexington Park was engaged in a verbal dispute with the
victim which lead to a physical assault when Hutchens allegedly punched and
scratched the victim. Hutchens was arrested and charged with second-degree
assault.
Assault Arrest For Punch
On July 15, deputies responded to a residence on Darcy Lane in Lex-
ington Park for a report of an assault. Investigation revealed Michael Wayne
Weston, Jr., 35, of Lexington Park, was engaged in a verbal dispute with the
victim which lead to a physical assault when Weston allegedly punched the
victim. Weston was arrested and charged with second-degree assault.
Assault Arrest For Shove
On July 16, deputies responded to a residence on Megan Lane in Leonar-
dtown, for a report of an assault. Investigation revealed Allan Michael Joy, 22
of California, was engaged in a verbal dispute with the victim which led to a
physical assault when Joy pushed the victim to the ground causing an abrasion
to the victim’s knee. Joy fed the residence prior to the deputy’s arrival but was
located a short time later, arrested and charged with second degree assault.
Thursday, July 19, 2012
14 The County Times
Spotlight On
Why advertise your
goods and services
in SOMD Publishing?
• Readers are actively
looking for your listing.
• Our newspapers are also
online for everyone to see!
• Potential buyers can
clip and save your ad.
• NOW HIRING?
• GOT A LAWNMOWER TO SELL?
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People still turn to the Classifeds frst.
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To Place Your Ad Call Cindi @
301-373-4125 • countytimes.somd.com
The County Times
Serving St. Mary’s
By Alex Panos
Staff Writer
Ready to launch; elementary students prepared for lift-
off during the 2012 Space Camp Program at Great Mills
High School this week.
The camp, which featured kids entering the second to
sixth grade, culminated with each camper launching a cus-
tom made rocket into the sky on Thursday.
Trish Sagers, instructor for the ffth and sixth grade
campers, said a key educational aspect of the camp is to
teach students about some of the important pieces on a
rocket and explain to them why each piece plays an impor-
tant role to a functioning space craft.
Sagers explained to campers where some of the crucial
pieces necessary to launch a rocket into the sky go, like the
centering ring, launch pad and nose cone, and what func-
tion they play.
“This teaches them how everything works,” Sagers
said.
Building a smaller model rocket on Tuesday allows
students to gain knowledge before working on their custom
built rockets, which each student designs on a computer
program, for Thursday’s launch.
Along with Sagers, three counselors circulated through
the room to provide more one-on-one attention and answer
each student’s specifc questions.
Soon to be fourth grade students spent their time at
camp making foam plate gliders for their theme “fight
making rockets.”
Nikki Council, counselor for the fourth grade section,
said researching Newton’s Laws is key to understanding the
physics behind fight and building an effective glider.
Participants preparing to enter third grade in the fall
learned about “play time in space,” said the age group’s in-
structor Cheryl Raley.
By exploring the properties associated with micro-
gravity as well as potential and kinetic energy, campers
built toys that children would be able to enjoy in space and
on other planets.
Raley said the students researched how simple toys
work, such as the jump-rope, yo-yo and ball in a cup, and
studied the effects scientifc properties have on the physics
behind them.
“We teach them to understand it doesn’t work on an-
other planet as it does on Earth,” Raley, a third grade teach-
er at Piney Point Elementary said.
Second graders used typical arts and crafts mediums
to construct helicopters and space stations to call home if
Earth becomes uninhabitable.
They also prepared skits and brief Powerpoint presen-
tations of where to live post-Earth.
Students researched some of the best and worst quali-
ties of each planet in order to develop a new home planet for
the human race; each group featured a combination of their
favorite characteristics.
Members of the “Green Group” created a new planet
called “Jaturn,” a planet to live on when Earth becomes too
trashed – a concept from the recent flm “Wall-E” which the
kids found popular.
“Red Group” chose to compile traits from Uranus, Ju-
piter and Mars to form their
new super-planet.
“It’s completely out of
their imagination,” counselor and pre-K teacher at Green
Holly Elementary Jevanina Schettini said.
All resources accessed by students during the camp
are funded by St. Mary’s County Public Schools and Patux-
ent Partnership, and were specifcally purchased for this
event, according to SMCPS Stem and Science Supervisor
Tracy Heibel.
Each year, Heibel said the event continues to grow and
gain popularity in the community. She also credits camp
director Laura Carpenter for “all the greatness of space
camp.”
“Some students are here for their fourth year,” Heibel
said. “It’s just a real successful program.”
alexpanos@countytimes.net
Great Mills Hosts Space Camp
Soon-to-be second graders create model helicopters.
Andrea Bridgett, 10, receives help building a model rocket from camp counselor Zack Venables.
Thursday, July 19, 2012
15 The County Times
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CORNHOLE TOURNAMENT
PAYOUT: $1,000+
By Alex Panos
Staff Writer
“JOBS” are being created for Southern
Maryland’s troubled youth. The U.S De-
partment of Labor is providing the College
of Southern Maryland with a $1.5 million
grant for the Juvenile Offenders Building
Skills (JOBS) project – a program aimed at
providing individuals involved in the juve-
nile justice system with opportunities, skills
training and community service projects re-
lated to plumbing and Heating, Ventilation
and Air Conditioning (HVAC).
According to data from the Maryland
Department of Juvenile Services, the recon-
viction rate in Southern Maryland, which
averages about 20 percent, is projected to
drop to just 10 percent due to the program.
CSM Vice President for Continuing
Education and Workforce Development
Dan Mosser said Southern Maryland of-
fcials base these projections on the results
of similar programs conducted in Baltimore
and Prince George’s county.
Former non-violent offenders of the
juvenile justice system, ages 18 to 21 and
who have never had an adult conviction, are
eligible to apply. Participants will be cho-
sen based on in-person interviews and their
commitment to the program.
Accepted applicants will be required to
commit to six months of full-time training
and three months employed in either HVAC
or plumbing occupations. Mosser told The
County Times offcials will also be tracking
the ex-offenders daily with a time card in
order to ensure the participants are showing
up on time and giving their best effort.
At a nearly $15,000 per person invest-
ment, Mosser said the program is not re-
quired to accept everyone that submits an
application.
“They need to be willing to turn their
life around,” said Mosser, the grant’s ad-
ministrator. “If the youngster isn’t serious,
then it makes no sense to engage in the pro-
gram with them.”
The JOBS program, which has a capac-
ity of 96 total participants split up into four
cohorts, also features GED classes, employ-
ability training and job search instruction.
Sheriffs in Southern Maryland,
searching for a way to prevent ex-offenders
from returning to their old habits, proposed
the program be implemented to the area
during a recent advisory council meeting.
Mosser believes the sheriffs also look at the
program as a way for young adults to make
themselves marketable to employers.
Similar programs have previously
existed in the prison system, Mosser ex-
plained, but were cut due to budget re-
straints. In order to allow the ex-offenders
a possibility to start a new life, the advisory
board formulated a plan to bring back these
government-funded programs.
More than 30 Southern Maryland stra-
tegic partners are supporting this project,
including the county chambers of com-
merce, county departments of social ser-
vices and the county boards of education.
“These are funds that will truly help
society,” CSM President Bradley Gottfried
stated in a press release, “and together, we
are building a model program that will be
emulated in other communities.”
alexpanos@countytimes.net
CSM Awarded $1.5 Million
By Alex Panos
Staff Writer
St. Mary’s County Public Schools announced Tuesday they will receive nearly $1 mil-
lion for the Dream Team 21st Century After School Program –a three-year grant that funds
daily after schools activities for approximately 240 students at George Washington Carver
and Lexington Park elementary, Spring Ridge Middle School and the Carver Recreation
Center.
SMCPS Special Programs Coordinator Mark Smith said the grant was highly compet-
itive, with approximately 70 different school systems and non-proft organizations applying
and only one out of every 10 applicants was awarded.
“This is the largest source of after school programs, and one of the only sources of
funds,” Smith said.
After applying for the grant last year and not receiving it, Smith said the county is quite
fortunate to be receiving the funds this time around.
The program, which includes transportation to and from the facilities, will operate
three hours per day during the school year.
Students involved in the program will receive a snack and homework-help, followed by
extra-curricular activities such as chess, photography, ftness and even swimming lessons.
According to a press release, one specifc goal of the program is to teach each enrolled
child how to swim and practice water safety.
Smith said students are accepted into the program based on academic performance,
Maryland School Assessment scores and teacher recommendations.
Homeless students in the Title 1 project will also largely beneft from the grant, the
release states. SMCPS aims to have each child in the after school service profcient in math
and reading.
While the Title 1 program provides tutors for the homeless students, Smith said
without the after school grant the county would not have the funds necessary to provide
them with transportation, daily snacks or
the additional activities in the after school
program.
Collaborating with SMCPS in this
project are the efforts of many different
partners including St. Mary’s County Rec-
reation and Parks Department, St. Mary’s
College of Maryland, The University of
Maryland, Booz Allen Inc., The Kiwanis
Club of St. Mary’s, Maryland Educational
Chess Association and St. Mary’s County
Tennis Association.
alexpanos@countytimes.net
Vital Grant Received for At-Risk Students
By Alex Panos
Staff Writer
Harrisburg University, one of several institutions of higher learn-
ing available at the Southern Maryland Higher Education Center, was
recently recognized by G.I. Jobs Magazine for being in the top 15 per-
cent of military friendly schools nation-wide.
The recognition comes from survey based data submitted by vet-
erans from over 8,000 schools. Institutions made their way onto the list
by offering scholarships and discounts, veterans’ clubs, full-time staff,
military credit and other services to those who served, according to a
news release.
University Coordinator for the Southern Maryland Higher Educa-
tion Center Cynthia Shoemaker said it means a lot to our area and to
SMHEC for Harrisburg University to be named to the list, because there
are many military veterans in Southern Maryland due to the proximity
to Naval Air Station Patuxent River.
Over 90 different degrees are available at the Higher Ed Center.
Shoemaker said majors military veterans tend to gravitate to include
mechanical and chemical engineering, business and Masters of Busi-
ness Administration degrees.
“A lot of things have gone IT enabled including robotics, so we
need more scientifcally trained people,” Shoemaker said.
Along with the Higher Ed Center, Shoemaker told The County
Times the Navy College close to Gate 2 of Pax River base is another lo-
cal option for veterans seeking to further their education – in what has
become a push to help the futures of those that defend America.
“Better service for veterans is one of our goals,” Shoemaker said
of the Higher Ed Center.
Most of Harrisburg’s classes available at the Higher Learning
Center are face-to-face, but some are offered as video-conferences on-
line as well, which Shoemaker points out is likely a factor that makes
the university military friendly.
Communications and Marketing coordinator for Harrisburg Uni-
versity Steve Infanti said HU is accommodating veterans with unique
arrangements.
“Harrisburg University has a solid and growing Veterans Club,
and puts forth programming specifc to veterans,” Infanti said.
He also added HU is approved by the Veterans Administration
to participate in the “Yellow Ribbon” program – which allows institu-
tions to voluntarily pay a specifc dollar amount for veterans to return
to school, which will then be matched by the state.
Shoemaker believes the programs offered by the SMHEC are one
of many initiatives in what has become a national movement to aid re-
tired military, and encourage veterans of all ages that there is still time
to return to school.
“It gives me confdence that retired military will be properly han-
dled,” Shoemaker said.
alexpanos@countytimes.net
College at Higher Ed. Center ‘Military Friendly’
Thursday, July 19, 2012
16 The County Times
To Place A Memorial,
Please Call
301-373-4125
or send an email to
info@somdpublishing.net
Mary Bailey, 94
M a r y
Evelyn Bai-
ley, 94, of
Wi n f i el d ,
WV., for-
merly from
Morganza,
MD passed
away on
July11, 2012
in Leon,
WV. Born
on May 13,
1918 in Dawson, WV, she was the
daughter of the late Charles Ed-
ward, and Elzada Nutter Thomp-
son. Mary was the loving wife
of the late James “Harry” Bailey
whom preceded her in death on
August 19, 1998, and whom she
married in Washington, DC in
1956. Mrs. Bailey is survived by
her sister Christine Glidewell of
Alta Vista, VA, nephew Raymond
Anderson of Winfeld, WV, many
other nieces, and nephews.
Mary moved from Washing-
ton, DC to St. Mary’s County in
1978, and she worked as a billing
cashier for Sealtest Milk Compa-
ny for 25 years. Mrs. Bailey was a
member of various senior groups
in St. Mary’s County such as the
Senior Vibes, and St. Joseph’s
Catholic Church in Morganza,
MD., and she was often dressed as
Minnie Pearl at many events.
The family received friends
on July 16, 2012 in the Mattingley-
Gardiner Funeral Home, Leonar-
dtown, MD. A Mass of Christian
Burial was celebrated on Mon-
day, July 16, 2012 in St. Joseph’s
Catholic Church, Morganza, MD.
Interment followed in Charles
Memorial Gardens, Leonardtown,
MD.
Contributions may be made
to the Old St. Joseph’s Catholic
Cemetery Fund, P.O. Box 175,
Morganza, MD 20660.
Carolyn Bryant, 73
Carolyn Erma Bryant
“Mom”, 73 of Lusby Maryland
passed away on Saturday July 14,
2012, at her residence with her
family by her side.
She was born on October
31, 1938 in South Nuttal, W.Va.,
to Madge
H i c k s
Board and
Arthur C.
Board.
S h e
was the
loving wife
of Vernon
L. Bryant
whom she
married on December 3, 1956
in West Virginia. Carolyn was a
resident of Mt. Rainier, MD until
1987 when she relocated to Me-
chanicsville, MD. She was known
as “Mom” to everyone she met.
Carolyn loved yard sales and es-
pecially hosting them. She was
always a loving person who was
devoted to her family and many
friends. All who knew her will
miss her deeply.
She was preceded in death
by her parents; her husband Ver-
non L. Bryant who passed away
on October 18, 1996; her brothers
Wink Bryant and Boardie Board
and her great grandson Victor
Thurston.
Carolyn leaves behind her
daughter, Mary Dickson of Lus-
by, MD; son, Stephen Bryant of
Mechanicsville, MD; daughter
Carolyn Noonan of Lusby, MD;
one granddaughter, Katherine
Campbell; three great grandchil-
dren, Vernon Thurston, Robert
Thurston and Kourtney Campbell
and three sisters, Bonnie Reed of
Shelbysville, TN, Jane Bryant of
OH and Betty Fugate of OH.
The family will receive
friends on Friday, July 20, 2012
from 10 – 11:30 a.m. at the Rausch
Funeral Home, P. A., 20 Ameri-
can Lane, Lusby, MD. A service
celebrating her life will be held on
Friday, July 20, 2012 at 12 noon at
Charles Memorial Gardens Ceme-
tery, Leonardtown, MD with Pas-
tor Keith Corrick offciating.
Pallbearers are Stephen Bry-
ant, Vernon Thurston, Robert
Thurston, Wayne Jones, Jay Bon-
ner, Mike Campbell and Dustin
Jones.
Memorial contributions can
be directed to Calvert Hospice,
P.O. Box 838 238 Merrimac Court,
Prince Frederick MD 20678.
Robert Earnshaw, Sr., 76
R o b -
ert Lee
Ear nshaw,
Sr., 76, of
Mechanic-
sville, MD,
f o r ma l l y
from Clin-
ton, MD
died July
15, 2012 at
the Hospice
House of St.
Mary’s. Born August 2, 1935 in
Washington, D.C., he was the son
of the late Pinkney Andrew Earn-
shaw, Jr. and the late Alice Lusby
Earnshaw.
He attended Surrattsville
School and graduated in June
1953. After graduation he started
his own business, which he en-
joyed his entire life.
Robert was the Business
Owner and Operator for R. L.
Earnshaw Topsoil and Stone
and Southern Maryland Equip-
ment Co. He started his business
back in 1955 in Clinton, MD and
moved the family and business
to St. Mary’s in 1967. He enjoyed
spending time with the family at
his beach home on Canoe Neck
Creek (7th District). His favorite
thing was working with his Kubo-
ta Tractor around the farm. Robert
loved restoring old tractors, equip-
ment and dump trucks.
Robert is survived by his lov-
ing wife, Carolyn L Earnshaw;
his son: Robert Lee Earnshaw, Jr.
(Robin); his daughters Barbara C
Hall RN (Dennis) of Chaptico,
MD and Allison C Williams; and
his sister Patricia Knieb (Joseph).
Robert is also survived by his fve
grandchildren: Caitlyn, Ashlyn,
Josephine Earnshaw and Beau
and Sam Hall.
The family will receive
friends for Robert’s Life Celebra-
tion on Thursday, July 19, 2012
from 2-4 p.m. and 6-8 p.m. at
The Brinsfeld-Echols Funeral
Home, P.A., 30195 Three Notch
Road Charlotte Hall, MD 20622.
There will be a Service on Fri-
day, July 20, 2012, 10 a.m., at Mt.
Zion Methodist Church, 21708 Mt.
Zion Church Road, Mechanics-
ville, MD 20659. Rev. Sue Carns
will offciate. Interment will im-
mediately follow at the Church
Cemetery.
The pallbearers will be: Tom
Parker, Wade Earnshaw, Joe Mike
Tennyson, Kevin Peregoy, Mike
Cusic and Robert Wood. Honor-
ary Pall Bear’s will be: Billy Mun-
dy, Ralph Knott, Paul White, Beau
Hall and Sam Hall.
In Lieu of fowers, the fam-
ily requests donations are made
to: Hospice House of St. Mary’s
44724 Hospice Lane, Callaway,
MD 20620 or The Mechanics-
ville Volunteer Rescue Squad P.O.
Box 15 Mechanicsville, Maryland
20659.
Michael Eberhardt, 42
M i -
chael S.
Eberhardt,
42, of
Leonard-
town, MD,
p a s s e d
away at
St. Mary’s
Hos pi t a l
on July 9,
2012 after
losing his
2 year battle with Leukemia. Born
July 20, 1969 in Washington, DC,
he was the son of the late Emanuel
B. Eberhardt and Lucille A. Foster
Eberhardt.
He worked at St. Mary’s Hos-
pital in Nutritional Services for ten
years. Michael enjoyed spending
time with his family and friends,
especially his children, video
games, music, and The Washing-
ton Redskins. He had a huge DVD
collection.
He was preceded in death by
his father, Emanuel B. Eberhardt;
his grandmother, Lucille M. Foster
and father-in-law, James A. Robey.
Michael is survived by his
loving wife, Crystal Eberhardt;
his mother, Lucille A. Foster Eb-
erhardt of Columbia, MD; his
sons: Jonathan Fischer of Crisfeld,
MD, and Dai ‘Andre Eberhardt of
Leonardtown, MD; his daughters:
Shampaigne Adkins, Lexy Eber-
hardt and Liah Williams of Leon-
ardtown, MD; his brothers: Greg-
ory Eberhardt (Della) of Virginia,
Emanuel Eberhardt, Jr. of Colum-
bia, MD, James Eberhardt (Erica)
of Texas, Nick Eberhardt of Wash-
ington, DC; Terry Eberhardt (Col-
leen) of Columbia, MD; his sister,
Ramona Stratton of Laurel, MD;
his brother-in-law, James Robey of
Lusby MD; his sisters-in-law, Te-
resa Robey of Mechanicsville, MD
and Rebecca Williams of Leonar-
dtown, MD and his Nannie. Six
nieces, fve nephews and 6 great
nieces and nephews.
Family and friends were re-
ceived on Sunday, July 15, 2012 at
Brinsfeld-Echols Funeral Home,
P.A., 30195 Three Notch Road,
Charlotte Hall, MD 20622, with a
Funeral Service recited. Father Ray
Schmidt offciated. Inurnment will
be private.
In lieu of fowers, contribu-
tions may be made to the fam-
ily or Brinsfeld-Echols Funeral
Home, P.A. for funeral expenses.
Contributions can also be made
in Michaels name to First Saints
Community Church P.O. Box 95
Leonardtown, MD 20650
Raymond Etchison, 85
Raymond Edward Etchison,
85 of Charlotte Hall, MD died July
11, 2012 at the Charlotte Hall Vet-
erans Home.
Born April 11, 1927 in Boyds,
MD he was the son of the late Har-
vey Reid Etchison and Edith (Ben-
nett) Etchison.
Raymond is survived by his
son Terry Lee Etchison of Homes
Beach, FL, two granddaughters,
Katie and Kelly and one great-
grandson, Tyler. In addition to his
parents, Raymond was preceded
in death by his son, Raymond
“Rusty” Etchison and sisters, Ha-
zel Connors, Ruth Ward, Catherine
Hessie and Mary Ellen Parsley.
Family received friends on
Sunday, July 15, 2012 at the Brins-
feld Funeral Home, 22955 Hol-
lywood Road, Leonardtown, MD
20650. A funeral service was con-
ducted by Rev. Joe Orlando. in the
Brinsfeld Funeral Home Chapel.
Interment will be private.
Condolences to the family
may be made at www.brinsfeldfu-
neral.com.
Arrangements by the Brins-
feld Funeral Home, P.A., Leonar-
dtown, MD.
Mamie Fowler , 90
M a -
mie Aileen
Fowler, 90,
of Hun-
t i ngt own,
MD passed
away July
6, 2012
at her
residence.
S h e
was born
July 5, 1922 in Chaptico, MD
to John W. and Myrtle (Russel)
Morgan.
Mamie was raised in Chapti-
co, where she attending St. Mary’s
County public schools. She mar-
ried Fayette Leroy Fowler on May
28, 1940 at St. Paul’s Episcopal
Church and they made their home
on a large farm in Prince Freder-
ick. Primarily a homemaker, she
was also employed at Mademoi-
selle, a ladies fashion boutique in
Prince Frederick, as a salesperson
and manager until the store closed.
Mamie was a member of St. Paul’s
Episcopal Church, and was also a
member of the Calvert Memorial
Hospital Auxiliary, working in the
gift shop. She was also a volunteer
at the Calvert Pines Senior Center.
In her leisure time Mamie enjoyed
painting, crocheting, sewing, wild-
life, especially bird watching, and
spending time with her family.
Mamie was preceded in death
by her parents, a son Fayette L.
“Fred” Fowler, Jr., and by her hus-
band Fayette L. Fowler, Sr. who
passed away in 1991.
Mamie was the last surviv-
ing of 13 children born to John
and Myrtle Morgan. She is sur-
vived by daughters Betsy Ann
Fowler Bollo of Prince Frederick
and Mary Jane Fowler of LaPlata,
Thursday, July 19, 2012
17 The County Times
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MD; eight grandchildren, twenty
two great-grandchildren, and fve
great-great grandchildren; long-
time dear friends Gail Mixon and
Laura Marchand; and numerous
nieces and nephews.
A memorial service and
celebration of Mamie’s life was
held Saturday, July 14, 2012 at
St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 231
Church Street, Prince Frederick.
Inurnment followed in the church
cemetery.
Memorial contributions in
Mamie’s name may be made to St.
Paul’s Episcopal Church. For more
information or to leave condolenc-
es visit www.rauschfuneralhomes.
com.
Arrangements by Rausch Fu-
neral Home, 8325 Mount Harmony
Lane, Owings, MD.
Janice Hall, 71
Janice
Cullember
Hall, 71,
of Prince
Frederick,
Mar yl and
p a s s e d
away July
14, 2012
in Prince
Frederick,
Maryland.
She was born on May 13, 1941
in Prince Frederick, Maryland to
the late Hazel I. nee Walton and
James Wm. Cullember.
Janice worked for Mutual
Fire Insurance Company for many
years.
She was the beloved wife of
Robert Donald Hall, Sr. of Prince
Frederick, MD and devoted moth-
er of Robert D. Hall, Jr. of Prince
Frederick, MD, Jill Hall Dowell
of Sunderland, MD, Lisa Hall of
Prince Frederick, MD, Donna Gott
of Prince Frederick, MD , Debra
Hill of Prince Frederick, MD and
the late David Warren Gott. Grand-
mother of 15, she is also survived
by her siblings, Lorraine Catterton
of Owings, MD, Anna Mae Bowen
of Owings, MD, William Cullem-
ber of Harrington DE, Ronald Cul-
lember of Pittsburgh PA and Ar-
lene Sherbert of West River, MD.
The family received friends
on Tuesday July 17, 2012, at the
Full Gospel Assembly of God
Church 890 Solomons Island
Road, Prince Frederick, Md. where
services were held on Wednesday
July 18. Interment followed in As-
bury Cemetery, Bartow MD.
Barbara Hamilton, 80
Bar-
bara Rae
H a m i l -
ton, 80,
of Lusby
and Lex-
i n g t o n
Park, MD
for mally
of Seat
P l e a s -
ant, MD
passed away peacefully at Chesa-
peake Shores Nursing Center, Lex-
ington Park, MD on June 15, 2012.
She was born on April 11, 1932 in
Washington, D.C. to Dorothy Vir-
ginia Donaldson Evans and Ray-
mond Albert Evans. She gradu-
ated from Roosevelt High School,
Washington, D.C. and married
her second husband Bayard “Bud,
Hambone” Neil Hamilton in Oxon
Hill Methodist Church, Oxon Hill,
MD in 1956. Barbara worked as a
Bookkeeper in Washington, D.C.
and as the Cafeteria Manager
for the Prince George’s County
Schools for twelve years.
She was a resident of Prince
George’s County for ffty-two years
and resided in Calvert County, MD
for seven years. She was preceded
in death by her parents and her
two spouses, Walter Joseph Wiles
who passed away on December 7,
2000 and Bayard Neil Hamilton
who passed away on September 18,
2001.
Barbara is survived by her
children, Harry Raymond Wiles
of St. Mary’s County, Renee` Lee
Neff and her husband Robert of
Calvert County, MD, Steven Gail
Hamilton of Crossville, TN and
Stephanie Louise Schmidt and her
husband David of Newburg, MD;
sister Patricia Maude Tassa of Pet-
aluma, CA; ten grandchildren and
nine great-grandchildren.
A service celebrating her
life was held on Friday June 22,
2 p.m. at Bunky’s Charter Boats,
Solomons, MD with Rev. Robert
Wagner offciating. Interment was
private. For additional information
or to leave condolences visit www.
rauschfuneralhomes.com
Arrangements provided by
the Rausch Funeral Home, P. A.,
Lusby, MD.
Norma Hayes, 52
Norma Lee Hayes, 52, of
Charlotte Hall, MD, formally of
Waldorf, MD, died July 15, 2012
at Civista Hospital, La Plata, MD.
Born March 22, 1960 in Newport,
TN, she was the daughter of the
late Arvlee Thomas and the late
Pansy Marie King Thomas.
Norma attended Mars Hill
College in Mars Hill, NC before
beginning her career in the bank-
ing industry and later in Human
Resource for DRS Technology in
Herndon, VA and most recently
with DynCorp International.
Norma enjoyed reading books by
Nicholas Sparks and just last year
visited some of the towns of which
Sparks’ books were based. She
also liked shopping and spending
money on family and friends, and
going on vacations with her family
to Virginia Beach. Time spent with
family and friends was an impor-
tant part of Norma’s life. She was
always ready to hang out and have
a good time.
Norma is survived by her
loving husband, James Milton
Hayes; her two sons, Ben Hem-
bree (Wendy Hannah) and Tyler
Hayes; her siblings, Betty Lou
Norton (late husband, Woodrow),
Shirley Brown (late husband, Ray),
Douglas Thomas (Mary Ann),
Barbara Waldroup (Kenneth), Cal-
vin Thomas (Brenda), Lucy Brown
(Charlie), and Paula Tregoning
(Keith); and her two grandchildren,
Maycee Hembree and Kalli Grace
Keys and many nieces and neph-
ews that adored her.
Family and friends were re-
ceived for Norma’s Life Celebra-
tion on Wednesday, July 18, 2012 at
Brinsfeld-Echols Funeral Home,
P.A., 30195 Three Notch Rd., Char-
lotte Hall, MD 20622. Services and
Burial will be held in Enka, NC at
Forest Lawn Cemetery, 104 Sand
Hill Road, Enka, NC 28728.
In Lieu of fowers, family is
requesting that memorial dona-
tions be made to: Susan G. Komen
Foundation, P.O. Box 650309, Dal-
las, TX 75265-0309.
Donald Walker, 77
Donald Everett Walker, 77, of
Prince Frederick, MD passed away
July 6, 2012 at Calvert Memorial
Hospital.
He was born March 8, 1935 in
Washington, D.C. to William Luke
and Rose Ida (LaBille) Walker.
Donald was raised in Wash-
ington, D.C., until moving with his
family to Landover Hills. He at-
tended Bladensburg High School,
and later entered the US Army
serving from 1954 to 1958. Don-
ald made his home in Landover,
MD and has been a resident of the
Chapline House Senior Center in
Prince Frederick for the past six
years. Donald was employed as
a construction worker and was a
member of the American Legion
in Lusby, MD. In his leisure time,
he enjoyed playing Texas Hold’em,
video games, watching old movies
and traveling.
Donald was preceded in death
by his parents.
He is survived by children
Karen W. Whitwood and husband
Allen, Lynda LaMond and Don-
nie and Michael LaMond. Also
surviving are eight grandchildren,
one great granddaughter and a
sister Hazel A. Mallonee of Hun-
tingtown and numerous nieces and
nephews.
A memorial service and cele-
bration of Donald’s life will be held
at a later date. For more informa-
tion or to leave condolences visit
www.rauschfuneralhomes.com.
Robert Wilkinson, Jr., 55
Rober t
“Rob” Scott
Wilkinson,
Jr., 55 of Me-
chanicsville,
MD, passed
away at his
residence on
July 9, 2012.
He was born
December
28, 1956 in
Mansf ield,
Ohio. He was the son of the late
Robert Scott Wilkinson, Sr. and
the Charlotte C. Clutter (who raised
him) and birth mother, the late Jane
Kuntz.
He graduated from East Liv-
erpool High School in 1976. He
worked for Aramis Construction in
Waldorf for the last 25 years. Rob
enjoyed restoring old cars with his
son, Chris. He was drag racing his
own car from 1993 - 2002. He was
always interested in American His-
tory - loved to eat. His favorite past-
time was to just hang out with the
guys in the garage. Always very
helpful, and has mentored many,
teaching construction to help them
get better jobs. Rob always wanted
to make life easier for Lynn and
Chris.
He was preceded in death by
his parent, Robert Scott Wilkin-
son, Sr. and Jane Kuntz Wilkinson;
brother, Randy Wilkinson.
Rob is survived by his lov-
ing wife, Loretta Lynn and his
son, Robert “Chris” Wilkinson of
Mechanicsville, MD; his brothers,
James Lee Wilkinson (Liesa) of
Raleigh, NC; Charles Wilkinson
of Ohio; his sister, Kelly Baker
(Keith) of Ohio and sister-in-law,
Debbie Wilkinson of Ohio.
Family and friends were re-
ceived on Friday, July 13, 2012 at
Brinsfeld-Echols Funeral Home,
P.A., 30195 Three Notch Road,
Charlotte Hall, MD 20622. Father
Jonathan W. Allen, Sr. offciated.
Thursday, July 19, 2012
18 The County Times
Announcin
Issued Marriage Applications for June 2012
Call The County Times to Place an Engagement Announcement - It’s Free! 301-373-4125
June 1, 2012
Christopher Michael Grant 38
Leonardtown, MD
Deborah Ann Merkle 32 Hol-
lywood, MD
Douglas Noah Deshields, Jr., 37
Lexington Park, MD
Jennifer Nicole Edison 32 Lex-
ington Park, MD
Anthony James Goddard, Jr., 32
Valley Lee, MD
Chasity Lynne Buckler 32 Val-
ley Lee, MD
Brandon Charles Alexander 25
Lexington Park, MD
Ashley Nicole Cusick 20 Lex-
ington Park, MD
June 4, 2012
Anthony Michael Denierio 29
California, MD
Catherine Marie Greenwell 23
California, MD
Jeremy Dale Fleming 24 Lex-
ington Park, MD
Melissa Louise Riley 29 Lex-
ington Park, MD
Robert Edward Palmer 48 Lex-
ington Park, MD
Oluwafeyiyemi Abimbola Ca-
juste 33 Bronx, NY
Robertson Briggs Tenbroeck 46
Hollywood, MD
Barbara Ann Jones 43 Holly-
wood, MD
June 5, 2012
Isaac Joel Ali 24 Merrillville,
IN
Rachel Siron Alonzo 23 Crown
Point, IN
June 7, 2012
Carlos Rolando Morales-Her-
nandez 33 Lexington Park, MD
Fritzie Hazel Flores 27 Lexing-
ton Park, MD
Marvin Wendell Backwell, Sr.,
41 Lusby, MD
Agnes Ursula Johnson 41
Lusby, MD
Woodrow Wilson Norris, Jr., 48
Park Hall, MD
Jill Michelle Comer 45 Park
Hall, MD
Dustin Lee Carter 27 Califor-
nia, MD
Elizabeth Gayle Doughty 28
California, MD
Israel Cervantes Hernandez 30
Lexington Park, MD
Josefina Corona Valdes 31 Lex-
ington Park, MD
June 11, 2012
Andrew Mark Robinson Ciupek
25 Houston, TX
Sarah Margaret Bourdon 24
Houston, TX
Paul Timothy Holt, Sr., 35 Cal-
laway, MD
Kristina Rebecca Michael 36
Callaway, MD
Kenneth Michael Barwis 47
Leonardtown, MD
Maureen Ann Baxter 43 Leon-
ardtown, MD
June 12, 2012
Joseph Steve Seward 24 Cle-
ments, MD
Angela Denise O’Dell 24 Cle-
ments, MD
Bradley Thomas Mills 53 Lex-
ington Park, MD
Kimberly Ann Merkle 48 Lex-
ington Park, MD
June 13, 2012
William Benjamin Tawes 24
Great Mills, MD
Megan Ann Morgan 23 Great
Mills, MD
John Clifford Port, III, 27
Killeen, TX
Laura Eileen Stirling 26 St.
Inigoes, MD
Andrew McPherson Watts 29
Lexington Park, MD
Kristina Kay Vandyke 28 Lex-
ington Park, MD
June 14, 2012
Edmond Boyd Hardesty, III, 26
California, MD
Amanda Ann Several 25 Cali-
fornia, MD
June 15, 2012
Anthony Zachary Tucker 25
Lexington Park, MD
Lauron Marie Wiersma 22 Lex-
ington Park, MD
Robert Eugene Moore 30 Lo-
thian, MD
Megan Cherie Smith 24 Lo-
thian, MD
Joseph William Thomas 30
Leonardtown, MD
Kimberly Ann Warwick 29
California, MD
Thomas Caleb Getscher 21 Me-
chanicsville, MD
Emily Noel Thirion 21 Mechan-
icsville, MD
June 19, 2012
Matthew Wayne Henegar 31
Bristol, TN
Amanda Thomas Stover 25
Bristol, TN
Conor Kevin Bell 24 Annapo-
lis, MD
Frankie Rose Dickson 28 An-
napolis, MD
Stephen Michael Abell, Jr., 28
Hollywood, MD
Lindsay Marie Wilson 31 Hol-
lywood, MD
George Joseph Erskine 23 Me-
chanicsville, MD
Courtney Elizabeth Asher 22
Mechanicsville, MD
Brandon Deshawn Cuffee 26
Lexington Park, MD
Yanika Kimley Herring 21 Lex-
ington Park, MD
Jarrett Clifford Morton 24 Wal-
dorf, MD
Anna Rachel Turner 23 Wal-
dorf, MD
William Justin Horton 21 Cali-
fornia, MD
Kayla Marie Buckland 20 Cali-
fornia, MD
June 20, 2012
Lewis Gerald Cargill 44 Leon-
ardtown, MD
Shannon Leigh Lee 41 Leonar-
dtown, MD
Kyle Robert Coates 24 LaPlata,
MD
Paige Whitney Sowder 21 Char-
lotte Hall, MD
Jason Lynn Kidwell 20 Leonar-
dtown, MD
Amber Michelle Mandley 21
Leonardtown, MD
June 21, 2012
Aeron Michael Musumeci 18
California, MD
Krystin Nichole Clark 20 Cali-
fornia, MD
Sterling Patrick Debold, Jr., 34
Mechanicsville, MD
Courtney Lauren Hill 23 Me-
chanicsville, MD
June 22, 2012
Joshua Michael Scott 30 Me-
chanicsville, MD
Susan Renee Quade 35 Me-
chanicsville, MD
Kyle Anthony Blorstad 24
Prince Frederick, MD
Marie Suzanne Ferrante 24
Prince Frederick, MD
James Edward Hurst, Jr., 53
Clements, MD
Christina Lynn Davis 47 Cle-
ments, MD
Christopher Lee Barrera 22
California, MD
Kristi Susanne Gardiner 23
California, MD
Larry Allen Sturgill, Jr., 29
Great Mills, MD
Lisa Marie Ward 27 Great
Mills, MD
Gilles Raymond Syglowski 51
California, MD
Celia Lily Flores 46 Silver
Spring, MD
Ronald Steven Dittmer 45 Lex-
ington Park, MD
Katherine Marie Trulock 45
Lexington Park, MD
Morgan Shea O’Dell 44 Cle-
ments, MD
Melissa Lynn Ivanchan 30 Cle-
ments, MD
June 25, 2012
David William Freeman 30
Falls Church, VA
Erika Lynn Folk 32 Falls
Church, VA
Mark Thomas Payne 27 Me-
chanicsville, MD
Cayce Renee Butler 26 Mechan-
icsville, MD
Keith Gary Cordell 27 Lusby,
MD
Amanda Jo Wilson 26 Hughes-
ville, MD
Jacob Edward Bowers 23 Lex-
ington Park, MD
Meagan Justine Felitsky 21
Bushwood, MD
June 26, 2012
Christopher Stephen O’Brien 27
Clements, MD
Kari Anne Guy 23 Clements,
MD
Duane William Linger 37
LaPlata, MD
Lisa Marie Hutchins 36 King
George, VA
Dewon Antonia Dyson 31 Piney
Point, MD
Katie Marie Parrish 25 Lexing-
ton Park, MD
Tercel Desales Berry 32 Lusby,
MD
Tamisha Marie Davis 31 Lusby,
MD
June 28, 2012
Joseph Webster Elmore 29
Great Mills, MD
Laura Rose Hoover 24 Lusby,
MD
Ronald Ray Millsaps, III, 34
California, MD
Bobbie-Jo Lynn Weston 37
California, MD
June 29, 2012
Pierre Tyrone Brooks 29
Springdale, MD
Tiffany Renee Robinson 27
Seat Pleasant, MD
Jason Wade Mayer 27 Lexing-
ton Park, MD
Jessica Lynn Spendolini 28
Lexington Park, MD
Robert Lynwood Mitchell 34
Laurel, MD
Theresa Dawn Vorreyer 33
Laurel, MD
Christopher Raymond Gold-
smith 39 Mechanicsville, MD
Bertha Mae Conner 47 Mechan-
icsville, MD
Thursday, July 19, 2012
19 The County Times
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20 The County Times
STORY
By Alex Panos
Staff Writer
Mary Raley enters the kitchen where her husband,
Ray, and their boys are eating breakfast together. Ripken,
the family’s nationally ranked athlete, and his brother Tyson
are vigorously slurping and crunching as they fuel up for
a day of training. The boys fnish their Cheerios and will
shortly head outside, as soon as Ray picks their bowls up
off the foor.
Ripken is a three-year-old purebred Chocolate Labra-
dor, ranked number 53 out of an estimated 3700 registered
members nationwide of “Dockdogs” – the world’s premier
canine aquatics competition. He had been ranked as high as
20 in the last year, and has only slipped back in the rankings
due to inactivity from family issues.
He made his return to the dock on Saturday, July 14, at
“Woofstock” in Millersville, in the “Big Air” competition
– a long jump for dogs. In this event, the dog runs along a
40 foot long dock and jumps into the water after a toy. The
dog’s distance is determined by where the hind legs hit the
water.
In a competition Ray said 172 dogs and their handlers
traveled from as far as Ohio to attend, Ripken made the f-
nals in the Master division.
His brother Tyson, who is usually only able to be a rec-
reational Dockdogs participant due to a rod placed in his leg
after being struck by a car, was able to jump in the Junior
division and fnished ffth in the fnals.
The Raley’s also reported that an unknown 1-year-old
Vizsla from Hollywood jumped nearly 25 feet and set a re-
cord in the Elite division event.
According to Woofstock published standings, Halo,
owned by Tim Burke, of Hollywood, came in second place
in the elite division. Burke could not be reached for com-
ment as of press time Wednesday. Ray claimed Ripken has
been clocked at 27 miles per hour sprinting off the dock and
has come close to a vertical distance of 25 feet.
The Raley’s, who live on the water in Ridge, discov-
ered Rip’s talent when a family friend threw a chew toy off
the dock in their backyard. Ripken launched himself into
the water as if he had been shot out of a cannon.
“I’d never seen him jump like that before,” Ray said,
who became further intrigued after he saw a Dockdogs
event on television.
There must have been 300 people at that meet, he said,
and Ripken could hold his own against all of those dogs.
Inspired, the Raley’s traveled to Frederick to have the
dogs compete in their frst Dockdogs event. Despite sliding
off the wet dock in his frst career jump, Ripken made a
splash at his debut. By the time the competition ended, Rip’s
status ascended from novice to elite jumper.
“He was jumping out of his pants, 23 feet,” Ray said.
Then during a competition on the Eastern Shore, Rip-
ken continued to turn heads with his seemingly out-of-no-
where emergence.
A lot of the people that attend Dockdogs competitions
on the Eastern Shore are big on hunting and serious about
their sporting dogs, Ray explained. They were quite sur-
prised to see a new, unknown dog with a new, unknown
owner performing at such a high level.
“They see us and say ‘hey, who’s that dog?’ So we
just kept our heads down, competed and quietly got out of
there.”
Ripken and his brother Tyson are members of the
Chesapeake DockDogs division. The regional affliation
consists of trainers and their dogs from Maryland, Virginia,
West Virginia and Pennsylvania.
Labs, Chesapeake Retrievers and Belgian Malinois
typically dominate the competitions, but Ray said he has
seen dogs of all types participate in the events, and anyone
who loves dogs will have a blast.
“It’s a lot of fun,” Ray said, adding he would love to see
more people from St. Mary’s County join the Chesapeake
chapter.
While it’s a lot of fun, Ray and Ripken can get very
serious as well. Ray told The County Times once you get
involved, it’s easy to get “ate up” in all the sport has to of-
fer. As a handler, Ray is directly responsible for the dog’s
performance.
“It’s competitive,” Ray said, “you’ve got to be thinking
about the timing, when to get out of the way, when to release
the ball.”
At a competition in Baltimore, Ray failed to get out of
the way and Ripken ran into him right as he took off into
the water. Ray described the sequence as “his most embar-
rassing moment.”
It was a valuable learning experience which, along
with strategic skills, has improved the duo’s poise and
performance. Over the last year, Ray has acquired a lot of
knowledge on how to put Ripken in the best situation to
succeed.
“Some of the veterans told me I was standing too far
D
o
c
k
-
S
t
a
r
s
Photos courtesy of Ray Raley
Thursday, July 19, 2012
21 The County Times
STORY
from the dock, so I inched up closer,” Ray said. It infuences
Ripken to wait until he gets to the very edge of the dock
to make his leap, and allows him to “control where (Rip)
jumps.”
Ray also randomly discovered another tactic that has
become a crucial part of their game plan. When he would
toss the ball high in the air, Ripken would lose it in the sky
and take a small jump off the dock, while searching for the
ball. When he threw it more linear, Rip would not jump
very high and would, again, hit the water close to the pier.
One time off a whim, he decided to try a bounce while
practicing in the backyard. By bouncing the ball off the
pier, Ripken was able to follow the ball when it hit the dock
at his eye level, to its apex, causing Rip to jump as high and
as far as he possibly could.
Even though these tactics get Rip to jump close to the
edge and as far into the water as he can, Ray explained to
The County Times, perhaps the most important strategy
tactic is to make sure the dog is having the time of his life.
“You want your dog to have fun. If he’s not enjoying
it, he’ll quit on you. And you have to make him want it,” he
said while bouncing a tennis ball on the counter – causing
Ripken to jump, bark and claw with anticipation.
Along with an intense amount of desire, the effort Ray
and Ripken put into their craft is another reason the team is
able to thrive.
The two continue to work on jumping higher. As Rip
adds more and more arc to his jumps, his total distance con-
tinues to exceed previous records. Ray and Ripken train fve
to six times a week, but it’s hardly training when it’s some-
thing the dog loves to do.
“It’s like his play time,” Ray said.
Mary believes both the dogs are family orientated and
always excited to meet new people, often jumping on them
and constantly coming up to greet them when they walk
through the door.
“They think they’re people,” Mary added.
Which sometimes means committing human actions.
“I’ve seen him taking food off my table,” Mary said
as she turned towards Ripken and playfully added. “You’re
bad.”
alexpanos@countytimes.net
Photo by Paul Bulger
Thursday, July 19, 2012
22 The County Times
To The Editor
Legal Notice
P.O. Box 250 • Hollywood, Maryland 20636
News, Advertising, Circulation, Classifeds: 301-373-4125
James Manning McKay - Founder
Eric McKay - Associate Publisher..................................ericmckay@countytimes.net
Tobie Pulliam - Offce Manager..............................tobiepulliam@countytimes.net
Sean Rice - Editor....................................................................seanrice@countytimes.net
Angie Stalcup - Graphic Artist.......................................angiestalcup@countytimes.net
Sarah Miller- Reporter - Community..............................sarahmiller @countytimes.net
Guy Leonard - Reporter - Government, Crime...............guyleonard@countytimes.net
Alex Panos - Reporter - Education, Entertainment.........alexpanos@countytimes.net
Sales Representatives......................................................................sales@countytimes.net
I would like to thank everyone who contributed to the Relay for Life fundraiser for my team, Kris and
the Cancer Kickers, on Saturday, June 2, of which all of the proceeds went to the American Cancer Society.
Special thanks goes to Brian Tarleton, the owner of the Green Door in Park Hall who hosted the fundrais-
er at his establishment for the ffth year in a row, and for going through all of the motions to set up for the event.
Thank you to Cindy Broyles for the ffth time “guest bartending” with me. You have stood by my side
for 5 years to help to eradicate this disease. The gratitude I feel for this year and years past is beyond words.
Thank you to Kim Basso, Heather Marchione, Megan Seeman, Bridget Dunbar David Sushinsky and Chris
Harney for donating their time and expertise during the evening. Thank you, too to Elise Flynn and Jay Turen
for helping out throughout the night.
Thank you to my dear friends Lynne Howard, Sue Lyddon-Hayes, Michelle Russell, Kris Fleury and
Laura Herman Smith for helping by selling luminarias and 50/50 raffe tickets, and to Bonnie Kangas for be-
ing our “offcial photographer”.
Thank you to the Neil Tracy Band who played live music throughout the evening. It was wonderful en-
tertainment for all!
Thank you Denise Canter, owner of Smokey Joe’s Restaurant and Pit BBQ, for providing the delicious
food, rolls, side dishes and all the fxings for the patrons once again. As always, it was a perfect addition to the
event, and I appreciate your bringing so much good food to the fundraiser. Each year, more people say that
they came for the food!
Thank you, Viet Nyugen and Mike Fenhagen for cooking, serving and donating two whole roasted pigs
to the event. I know that is a lot of hard work, and it was much appreciated by all. It was a perfect donation by
the Society for the Preservation of The Green Door.
Thank you to Bill Bailey from Bailey’s Party Rentals for donating a beautiful tent, tables and chairs for
the overfow of people that came to the event.
A special thank you to Harold Lee who very effciently allowed the guest bartenders to feel we were
keeping up with the crowd, and at the same time picking up our slack. That happened rather often as the people
continued to come into the building!! You made it all so easy for us.
Mostly, I extend huge and heartfelt thanks to everyone who attended the fundraiser. Many patrons came
to support my team and the American Cancer Society Relay for Life. It is overwhelming to look around and
see the Relay for Life committee members, friends and family who have supported me every year. The dona-
tions from the evening totaled over $2800. That also includes the 50/50 raffe won by Phil Carroll, and donated
back to the cause! It was certainly the “Fifth Annual Blast from the Past” to eradicate cancer in the future. I
wish I could thank each person individually, but please know that I am overwhelmed with appreciation for the
support. It turned out to be a more than perfect evening.
Susan Blair Dudley,
Hollywood, MD
IN THE MATTER OF VIDALIA FLORES TETTEH
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO VIDALIA FLORES TRUJILLO
In the Circuit Court for St. Mary’s County, Maryland
Case No.: 18-C-12-001058

The above Petitioner has fled a Petition for Change of Name in which she seeks to change her
name from Vidalia Flores Tetteh to Vidalia Flores Trujillo. The petitioner is seeking a name change for
the following reason:
She was divorced October 9, 2011 and now wishes to be restored to her maiden name.
Any person may fle an objection to the Petition on or before the 13
th
day of August, 2012. The ob-
jection must be supported by an affdavit and served upon the Petitioner in accordance with Maryland
Rule 1-321. Failure to fle an objection or affdavit within the time allowed may result in a judgment by
default or the granting of the relief sought.
A copy of this Notice shall be published one time in a newspaper of general circulation in the
county at least ffteen (15) days before the deadline to fle an objection.
JOAN W. WILLIAMS,
Clerk of the Circuit Court for
St. Mary’s County Maryland
07-19-12
Cancer Fundraiser a Success
We would like to thank all that helped and participated in our In-
dependence Day Celebration on June 30th, particularly our residents,
BEMANCO, Joe Stanalonis, the St. Mary’s County Commissioners,
St. Mary’s County Sheriff’s Offce, Mechanicsville Fire Department,
Mechanicsville Rescue Squad, St. Mary’s County Republican Central
Committee, Volunteers of the Civic Association, Patriot Medical Trans-
port, The Boot Scooters and Butch Gleske.
Without you, our event would not have been the success that it was,
despite the HOT weather.
Kathy Owens
Golden Beach/Patuxent Knolls Civic Association
Independence Day
Celebration a Success
By Cindy Jones
St. Mary’s County Commissioner, District 1
On Tuesday, June 26 the Board of County Commissioners approved
the Board of Education’s FY 2013 budget. There were no members of
the Board of Education present to answer questions. This is signifcant
because there were substantial changes between the budget submitted in
April and the budget submitted for fnal approval.
Commissioners had two choices that day.
• Postpone approval until the next meeting.
• Approve the budget that day.
The Board elected to approve the budget that day.
The next scheduled Board of County Commissioners meeting was
Tuesday, July 17, more than two weeks after the beginning of the new fs-
cal year. Postponing the approval would result in closing the doors of the
St. Mary’s County Public Schools for two weeks and two or more days.
If Board of Education members will not appear to answer questions
at their fnal budget approval, why do we have a Board of Education?
Apparently, they would rather risk the closing of the school system’s
doors for two weeks, than appear before the Board of County Commis-
sioners to answer questions about their budget.
Is this an appropriate level of accountability for an entity that re-
ceives St. Mary’s County tax revenue?
Commissioner’s Corner
Accountability in the
County’s Budget Process
Thursday, July 19, 2012
23 The County Times
Thursday, July 19, 2012
24 The County Times
Community
• Mid day Dog walking while you work
• Pet Sitting in the comfort of home
• Cat Boarding in our lodge
And care for your
other pets, too!
301-997-0394
*Insured, Bonded & Internationally Certifed*
Serving St. Mary’s County since 2003
www.TrailsEndPetSitting.com
We’ll let the dogs out!
P
ET

W
E
E
K
O
F
THE
Sotterley Plantation hosted “The
Choice” on July 14, a true story about Per-
egrine Young, a one-time slave at Sotterley,
who joined the British Navy during the War
of 1812 after being promised his freedom.
As a soldier, he returned to Sotterley to free
dozens of slaves.
Directed by Dwain Diaz, the play was
set in the house and slave cabin at Sotterley,
on the very soil these events transpired cen-
turies ago.
Attendees of the play obtained insight
to Young’s decision, how his former owner,
John Rousby Plater, would have reacted
to the news and how interactions between
plantation owners and British offcers likely
took place during the War.
If you missed the performance, you
can catch it on Saturday, Aug. 11. Visit sot-
terly.org for more information
John Plater, guardian of George V and Sotterley Plantation, explains to his wife Elizabeth that the idea of
his slave Peregrine running away to join the Royal Navy is nonsense.
Sotterley Hosts ‘The Choice’
Pictured from left is Eric Zabiegalski playing Commodore Brown, Jay Hunter as Peregrine Young, Sh-
emika Berry as Elcie, Stephen Rumpf as John Rousby Plater, Shannon Ivanchev as Elizabeth Plater.
Hi, my name
is Luke and my
brother and I got
lost and wound up at the shelter where
this nice rescue group came and got us before our time
was completely up. I’m a year old and I’m so handsome
all the ladies are going to love me.... My foster mom says
I’m way sweeter and calmer than she ever thought I’d be,
but once she separated us, we both calmed right down,
okay some anyway. She is now in the process of crate and
house training us and trying to teach us some manners. I
suppose if a pig can swim I should be able to sit politely (ha).

Luke is doing really well
and is pretty quiet in his crate and when he comes out he
knows to go straight to the front door and wait for me to
open it. Luke likes to lay in your lap if you’ll sit on the foor
with him and just give him some personal loving time. Luke
truly is a sweetheart and will make a wonderful addition
to any home! Luke will be neutered and fully vetted...

If you would like to meet Luke please contact Second
Hope Rescue 301-904-0653
Elizabeth Fazio a
2012 graduate of St.
Mary’s Ryken High
School competed in
the Miss Maryland Pag-
eant held in Hagerstown
in June 2012. Fazio was
crowned winner in 2011
of the St. Mary’s County
Queen of Tolerance Pag-
eant, where she was spon-
sored by the Leonardtown
Lions Club.
The Miss Maryland
Pageant is the offcial pre-
liminary pageant of the
Miss America Pageant,
one of the nation’s leading achievement programs and the world’s larg-
est provider of scholarship assistance for young women. Scholarships
have been the cornerstone of the Miss America program since 1945
when Bess Myerson was the frst Miss America to receive a scholarship
from the Organization.
Fazio, with the generous support of local vendors, raised funds for
the Miss Maryland Scholarship Fund. The Fund promotes and sup-
ports the Miss Maryland Scholarship Program.
Fazio received a scholarship award for her participation, and will
be attending Virginia Tech in the fall.
Ryken Grad Receives
Miss Maryland
Scholarship
Elizabeth Fazio, when she was crowned St.
Mary’s County’s 2011 Queen of Tolerance.
For the fourth consecutive year, Travel Leaders Group has
been ranked as the top business travel management company in
the United States by Business Travel News, according to Dan
Parker, Owner/ President of Great Mill’s Travel Leaders.
The rankings, frst revealed on June 11, are based on the
reported volume of airline transactions for 2011 verifed by the
Airlines Reporting Corporation (ARC), which is the premier f-
nancial transaction processing and settlement corporation that
facilitates the distribution of travel products and related infor-
mation. Business Travel News is considered “the voice of au-
thority for corporate travel buyers throughout North America
for over 25 years.”
“We are very proud to be part of Travel Leaders and by
aligning our local travel agency with a national powerhouse, we
are able to provide the very best to both our business and leisure
travel clients in the greater Great Mills-area,” Parker said in a
press release. “We have the ability to assist large and small cor-
porate clients with comprehensive travel management planning
– which allows them to rein in unnecessary travel spending and
get the most possible return on investment for their business
travel dollars.”
Travel Leaders of Great Mills is part of Travel
Leaders Group – a leader in both the retail travel agency space
and corporate travel with gross travel sales of nearly $17 billion
– and it consistently ranks as one of the top travel companies
nationwide. In addition to the Business Travel News rankings,
Travel Leaders Group was again named among the Top 10 on
the Travel Weekly Power List (announced in late June) and a
Travel Leaders Franchise Group company earned frst place
on Entrepreneur’s latest Franchise 500 list of full-service travel
agency franchise businesses. As a locally owned and operated
franchise travel agency, Travel Leaders of Great Mills has been
assisting local travelers for over 35 years.
Travel Leaders Ranked as Top in Business Travel Management
Thursday, July 19, 2012
25 The County Times
Community
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functional and responsive to any need.
Homes should be sanctuaries, and there is
a unique kind of peace that is created when
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The Southern Maryland Heritage Area Consortium (SMHAC) announced Tuesday
that four projects in Southern Maryland submitting grant applications for Fiscal Year 2013
will receive funding from the Maryland Heritage Areas Authority.
These funds are made available to non-profts and government organizations inside
the Heritage Area that seek to promote heritage tourism and economic development. Heri-
tage tourism is defned as traveling to experience the places that authentically represent
the stories and people of the past and present – including historic, cultural and natural
resources, a press release states.
The Project Grant awards in Calvert and St. Mary’s counties are:
• Project: War of 1812 Fair and Reenactment
Recipient: Friends of Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum
Grant Award: $10,000
• Project: Enhancing Historic Sotterley’s Visitor Experience
Recipient: Historic Sotterley, Inc.
Grant Award: $16,250
“We are so honored to have this support for so many of our projects here Southern
Maryland,” said Roz Racanello, the executive director of the heritage area. “We continue
to be a source of support for projects like these so that visitors as well as residents can enjoy
our history and heritage.”
The SMHAC offce also received funding for support of the Heritage Area offce in
the amount of $60,000 for the year, these funds will also support the position of the By-
way Manager for the Religious Freedom National Scenic Byway. The total of all grants
awarded for Fiscal 2013 in the region will be $186,250.
All those who wish to learn more about membership or future grant offerings should
contact the Consortium at 301-274-4083, or by email, SoMdHeritage@tccsmd.org.
Additional information about the Southern Maryland Heritage Area is available on
the web at: www.DestinationSouthernMaryland.com.
Heritage Area Grants for
Tourism Projects Awarded
Thursday, July 19, 2012
26 The County Times
www.somd.com
Your Online Community For Charles,
Calvert, and St. Mary’s Counties
Thursday, July 19
• Hollywood Volunteer Fire De-
partment Carnival
Hollywood Volunteer Fire De-
partment (24801 Three Notch Road,
Hollywood) – 7 p.m.
The Hollywood Volunteer Fire
Department’s annual carnival will be
held July 19-22 and again July 26-30
beginning at 7 p.m. each night. Fea-
tured will be food, rides, and games.
Unlimited rides every night for $10, or
tickets may be purchased separately.
Free nightly prizes (must be present
to win). Free nightly bicycle raff le for
ages 12 and under (must be present
to win). A Treasure Chest cash prize
will be raff led the last night of the
carnival. Visit www.hvfd7.com.
• WARM Planning Meeting
Lexington Park United Methodist
Church (21760 Great Mills Road, Lex-
ington Park) – 5-6 p.m.
Wrapping Arms ‘Round Many
(WARM) is an interfaith program of-
fering shelter, hope, fellowship and
hospitality to our homeless communi-
ty during the winter months. WARM
meets monthly on the third Thursday
of the month.
Friday, July 20
• River Concert Series
St. Mary’s College of Maryland
(18952 E. Fisher Road, St. Mary’s
City) – 5 p.m.
The ever-popular St. Mary’s Col-
lege of Maryland’s River Concert Se-
ries on the shores of the St. Mary’s
River begins its 14th year on June 22
and runs every Friday through July
27. The weekly celebration includes
world-class music and delicious food
from local vendors. Gates open at 5
p.m. and concerts start at 8 p.m. Re-
nowned guest artists, including jazz
vocalist Hilary Kole, pianist Brian
Ganz, and jazz musician Don Staple-
son will join music director Jeffrey
Silberschlag and the Chesapeake Or-
chestra. The outdoor concerts are
free and open to the public, and pic-
nic baskets are welcome. For more
information, visit the River Concert
Series website at www.smcm.edu/
riverconcert.
This summer, the evening cel-
ebrations of music include works from
the Czech Republic, France, and Ger-
many performed by international art-
ists including mezzo-soprano Edita
Randova, pianist Cziky Boldizar, and
tenor Roger Isaacs. An Independence
Day celebration will include some of
John Williams’ famous movie themes
and classic American jazz music, con-
cluding with the “1812 Overture” and
fireworks. On July 20, the Chesapeake
Orchestra welcomes the River Concert
Series Festival Choir. The grand fina-
le on July 27 will showcase an abun-
dance of jazz, Blues, and folk artists.
This week’s selection will be A Wag-
nerian Finale for 2012 (in case the Ma-
yans are right). At least the world will
go out with a bang—this performance
features the compositions of Wagner
and Debussy, the latter of which will
be accompanied by a sixteen-woman
chorus and electronics. Piano soloist
Brian Ganz will perform Grieg’s en-
ergetic Concerto for Piano.
• The Wizard of Oz
Great Mills High School (21130
Great Mills Road, Great Mills) – 7
p.m.
This year’s Summerstock Musical
performance will be “The Wizard of
Oz” by L. Frank Baum. The produc-
tion will be held at Great Mills High
School on Friday, July 20 through
Sunday, July 22 and Thursday, July
26 through Sunday, July 29. Sunday
evening shows begin at 5:00 p.m. with
all other evening shows beginning at
7:00 p.m. There will also be a matinee
on Saturday, July 28 at 1 p.m. Ticket
prices are $14 for adults, $12 for se-
nior citizens 60 years and older and
$6 for children 10 and under. Matinee
prices are $10 for adults, $8 for senior
citizens 60 years and older and $4 for
children 10 and under. Ticket sales
will begin at 8:00 a.m. on June 4 for
online purchases www.stmarysmd.
com/recreate or walk in purchases at
the Recreation & Parks main office
in Leonardtown. Patrons purchasing
their ticket online must print their
ticket and bring to the show for ad-
mittance. Online ticket purchases are
highly encouraged due to the possibil-
ity of shows selling out and must be
purchased no later than 10 p.m. the
day before the show you plan to at-
tend. Doors to the school will open
one hour before each performance for
ticket sales and patrons will enter the
auditorium for general seating thirty
minutes before each show time. Cash
only will be accepted for ticket sales
at the door. Please call 301-475-4200
ext. 1800 for more information.
Saturday, July 21
• SunRise Yoga
Leonardtown Pier – 7:30 a.m.
Free open community yoga prac-
tice, weather permitting. Bring your
yoga mat, waterbottle and a canned
food item for donation to a local food
pantry. Sponsored by Evolve Yoga and
Wellness.
• No Limit Poker Tourney &
Cash Game
Bennett Building (24930 Old
Three Notch Road, Hollywood) – 7
p.m.
$40 No Limit Poker Tournament
starts at p.m. $25 to the Prize Pool
and $5 to the Charity gets you $5000
in chips 50/50 Raff le of $10 gets you
another $5000 in chips if you arrive
before 6:50 p.m. you get an addition-
al $2,500 in chips. Cash games with
dealers available with $1/$2 blinds.
Playing in the tournaments and cash
games will earn your way into a guar-
anteed $10,000 tournament on Sat-
urday, October 6th to be held at the
Hollywood Fire Deptartment Carni-
val Hall. Earn 60 hours for the full
$250 Buy In or 30 hours for half of
the buy in. There is a $50 add on for
additional chips. All food and drinks
are free. All proceeds benefit Special
Olympics/St.Mary’s County. For more
information, contact Jim Bucci,Sr at
301-373-6104 or 240-298-9616.
• The World of Red Wines at
Port of Leonardtown
Port of Leonardtown (23190 New-
towne Neck Road, Leonardtown) –
6-7:30 p.m.
The World of Red Wines: Stu-
dents will be taught the major red wine
grapes and their most famous growing
regions, characteristics, wine making
style, and common taste. The same
information for the winery’s other
red wines will also be taught as well
as brief summaries of lesser known
red wine grapes. Uncork wine educa-
tion will feature Port of Leonardtown
wines. Cost is $25 per person. Call
301-690-2192 to reserve your spot.
• Shakespeare in Love
Historic St. Mary’s City Visitor
Center () – 7 p.m.
Three centuries ago, William
Shakespeare’s plays delighted the
British hoi polloi. It’s likely that
many of the first Marylanders were
among his fans. Imagine what they
would think about a modern take on
his life and greatest works, coming to
Historic St. Mary’s City on film and in
a workshop for teens. Join us on July
21 for a viewing of Shakespeare in
Love. The romantic comedy starring
Joseph Fiennes and Gwyneth Paltrow
is rated R. On August 4 watch As You
Like It, director Kenneth Branagh’s
re-setting of Shakespeare’s classic
work. Bryce Dallas Howard takes the
lead in this PG-rated film. Both mov-
ies will be shown in the Visitor Center
auditorium at 7 p.m. Admission is $7
or $5 for Friends members. Teens are
invited to have Fun with Shakespeare
on August 11 and 12. Participants will
discover the joys of Shakespeare’s
words and work together to translate
and perform one of Shakespeare’s
comedies, Much Ado About Nothing.
The workshop will from from 9 a.m.
until 3 p.m. each day and is intended
for those ages 12-17. Reservations
are required by August 6. Like our
forbearers, we’ll never have enough
of Shakespeare, but this should keep
us satisfied for the summer. For more
information about the museum and its
programs visit www.stmaryscity.org
or contact 800-SMC-1634, 240-895-
4990, or info@stmaryscity.org.
Sunday, July 22
• Spiritual Renewal
Hollywood Recreation Center
(24400 Mervell Dean Road, Holly-
wood) – 10:30 a.m.
Worship Service Topic: Charles
Chauncy refused to accept emotional
conviction as the sole criterion and
foundation for religious faith. The hu-
man mind, he insisted, must also give
assent to the written word of God,
and human behavior toward self and
others must also be transformed. His
rigorous use of reasoning to find,
analyze, and explain the fundamental
human elements entailed in spiritual
experience is his legacy to us. Can
Chauncy’s legacy help us construct a
Theology of Spiritual Renewal rele-
vant to our lives today? Everyone wel-
come! Sunday School available. Visit
www.uufsm.org for details.
• No Limit Texas Hold ‘Em
Tournament
St. Mary’s County Elk’s Lodge
(45779 Fire Department Lane, Lex-
ington Park) – 2 p.m.
Buy-in $60.00/$4,000 in chips.
Top ten percent of places paid. A $5
add-on gets you an additional $1,000
in chips and your name in a 50/50
drawing for the money accumulated
in the add-on pool. Blinds start at
$25/$50 and progress from there ev-
ery 30 minutes. Earn points for every
tournament you participate in. Num-
ber of points you earn is determined
by how many people go out before
you. Points count towards the Spring/
Summer Leaderboard Challenge that
ends in August. Any tournament
could be a double points tournament,
determined by a f lip of the coin just
prior to tournament start!
Those accumulating the most
points will receive a free roll to the
$100 Leaderboard Challenge Tourna-
ment scheduled for August. Number
of players receiving the free roll will
be determined by the amount of mon-
ey that accumulates in the pool at the
end of the season. Side games avail-
able. Food and beverages available
for purchase. Please enter through the
side of the building.
• Lynyrd Skynyrd in Concert
St. Leonard Volunteer Fire De-
partment (200 Calvert Beach Road,
St. Leonard) – 7 p.m.
This concert series raises funds
to support the fire, rescue and EMS
services that are provided to the com-
munity and its neighbors by the St.
Thursday, July 19, 2012
27 The County Times
Chesapeake Auction House
St. Leonard, MD 20685 • 410-586-1161 • chesapeakeauctionhouse.com
East Coast Estate Auction
Friday, July 20th - 6 p.m.
Antiques, Collectibles and more!
(DON’T MISS THIS AUCTION!)
Leonard Volunteer Fire Department.
Tickets are $41 for general admission,
$46 for reserved and $56 for premi-
um. Purchase tickets online at www.
slvfd.org or call 410-586-1713. Gates
open at 5 p.m.
Monday, July 23
• Sotterley Colonial Farm
Sotterley Plantation (44300 Sot-
terley Lane , Hollywood) – 11 a.m., 12
p.m., 2 p.m., 3 p.m.
Summer Mini Camps at Sotterley
Plantation
July 23 – 25 - Grades 3 - 5
Students will have the opportu-
nity to learn about Sotterley’s history
as a farming community in creative
and fantastically fun ways! Children
will be working on team projects,
hiking in the morning, visiting ani-
mals, experiencing nature, learning
and experiencing foodways of the
colonial period, learning about tools,
planting, eco-system, and animal hus-
bandry, learning how the river and
the tidewater was and is still unique,
crabbing, fishing, playing Colonial
games, making items to take home
and more! Small group format, team-
work, problem solving, hands-on sen-
sory activities. Groups are limited to
25 students. Tuition is $95. Tuition
for children of Sotterley Members is
$85. Registration is now open. Print
registration form directly from www.
sotterley.org.
Tuesday, July 24
• CSM Twilight “The Complete
Works of William Shakespeare”
CSM Leonardtown Campus
(22950 Hollywood Road, Leonard-
town) – 6:30 p.m.
“The Complete Works of William
Shakespeare (abridged),”a fast-paced
theatrical performance of 37 plays in
97 minutes will be presented as part
of CSM’s Twilight Performance Se-
ries. Each week the series features a
different performance on each cam-
pus. Bring a picnic with a lawn chair
or blanket. Admission is free. 301-
934-7828, 240-725-5499, 443-550-
6199, 301-870-2309, Ext. 7828 or visit
www.csmd.edu/Arts.
Wednesday, July 25
• Zumba at Mechanicsville Vol-
unteer Fire Department
Mechanicsville Volunteer Fire
Department (28165 Hills Club Road,
Mechanicsville) – 7 p.m.
A fun, engertic aerobic workout
routine with a Latin inspired atmo-
sphere. Classes are $6 or $30 for six
classes. Punch cards are available.
For More Information email thered-
ding6@gmail.com or MeghanneT@
yahoo.com.
• St. Mary’s Transit System’s
Transportation Advisory Commit-
tee Meeting
Highways Room (44829 St. An-
drew’s Church Rd., California) – 1
p.m.
St. Mary’s Transit System will
host the quarterly Transportation Ad-
visory Committee meeting. The STS
Office is approximately 0.5 miles on
the left down St. Andrews Church
Road. The driveway is past the service
road to the landfill. Go through the
chain link gate and turn left. Please
use the entrance to the Highways and
Construction offices. For more infor-
mation, contact Mary Ann Coontz at
301-863-8400 ext. 1123.
• A Guide to Selling Farmland
The Real Estate Academy (8440
Old Leonardtown Road, Suite 211,
Hughesville) – 1:30-4:30 p.m.
“A Guide to Selling Farmland”
Class offered for licensed and pro-
spective realtors. Southern Maryland
Association of Realtors, in coopera-
tion with the Southern Maryland Ag-
ricultural Development Commission
(SMADC), is offering “A Guide to
Selling Farmland.” Selling farmland
requires an adequate understanding
of land preservation techniques and
zoning; the class will also cover how
to guide potential purchasers to land
appropriate to their farming needs.
Many farms in Southern Maryland
(Anne Arundel, Calvert, Charles,
Prince George’s, and St. Mary’s) have
recorded covenants or easements
that occasionally the current owner
is not aware of. Some purchasers of
farmland are interested in a particu-
lar type of farming and may ask real-
tors to help them to determine if the
proposed use is allowed by zoning.
Greg Bowen, former Director of the
Calvert County Department of Plan-
ning and Zoning and now a member
of the SMADC FarmLINK team, will
cover these and other topics and dis-
cuss how Maryland FarmLINK, a free
service, can help realtors handle these
issues in the sale of farmland. To reg-
ister for the classes go to the webpage
www.smadc.com. Classes are $40 for
realtors and $50 for non-realtors. For
more information, contact SMADC
at 301-274-1922, Ex. 1, fax 301-274-
1924, email cbergmark@smadc.com
or visit www.smadc.com.
Thursday, July 26
• Zumba Fitness
Hollywood Volunteer Rescue
Squad (23469 Rescue Lane, Holly-
wood) – 5:45 p.m.
Hollywood Volunteer Rescue
Squad Fundraiser Zumba Fitness
Classes. Every Tuesday and Thursday
from 5:45-6:45 p.m. The cost is $7 per
class or $25 for five classes. For in-
formation call 301-757-2336.
• The Wizard of Oz
Great Mills High School (21130
Great Mills Road, Great Mills) – 5
p.m.
This year’s Summerstock Musi-
cal performance will be “The Wizard
of Oz” by L. Frank Baum. The pro-
duction will be held at Great Mills
High School on Thursday, July 26
through Sunday, July 29. Sunday eve-
ning shows begin at 5 p.m. with all
other evening shows beginning at
7 p.m. There will also be a matinee
on Saturday, July 28 at 1 p.m. Ticket
prices are $14 for adults, $12 for se-
nior citizens 60 years and older and
$6 for children 10 and under. Matinee
prices are $10 for adults, $8 for senior
citizens 60 years and older and $4 for
children 10 and under. Ticket sales
will begin at 8:00 a.m. on June 4 for
online purchases www.stmarysmd.
com/recreate or walk in purchases at
the Recreation & Parks main office in
Leonardtown, MD. Patrons purchas-
ing their ticket(s) online must print
their ticket(s) and bring to the show for
admittance. Online ticket purchases
are highly encouraged due to the pos-
sibility of shows selling out and must
be purchased no later than 10:00 p.m.
the day before the show you plan to
attend. Doors to the school will open
one hour before each performance for
ticket sales and patrons will enter the
auditorium for general seating thirty
minutes before each show time. Cash
only will be accepted for ticket sales
at the door. Please call 301-475-4200
ext. 1800 for more information.
Friday, July 27
• River Concert Series
St. Mary’s College of Maryland
(18952 E. Fisher Road, St. Mary’s
City) – 5 p.m.
The ever-popular St. Mary’s Col-
lege of Maryland’s River Concert Se-
ries on the shores of the St. Mary’s
River begins its 14th year on June 22
and runs every Friday through July
27. The weekly celebration includes
world-class music and delicious food
from local vendors. Gates open at 5
p.m. and concerts start at 8 p.m. Re-
nowned guest artists, including jazz
vocalist Hilary Kole, pianist Brian
Ganz, and jazz musician Don Staple-
son will join music director Jeffrey
Silberschlag and the Chesapeake
Orchestra. The outdoor concerts are
free and open to the public, and pic-
nic baskets are welcome. For more
information, visit the River Concert
Series website at www.smcm.edu/riv-
erconcert. This week’s performance
is “Firebird, “Bird,” and the Stars in
Our Constellation.” The Grand Finale
will feature a profusion of regional
jazz, blues, and folk artists, including
Don Stapleson, Rick Humphries, and
others. Charlie Parker’s “Super Sax”
jazz piece and Stravinsky’s ballet hit,
Firebird Suite 1919, will end the River
Concert Series with a f lourish.
Saturday, July 28
• Unplug with Downtown Tunes
Leonardtown Square – 6-9 p.m.
This month Downtown Tunes,
sponsored by The Leonardtown Busi-
ness Association, will feature acous-
tic music. The popular music trio
Hamm-It-Ups and The Eds, an acous-
tic duo of terrific singers and guitar-
ists, take the stage in the Town Square
with just their instruments and voices.
But don’t let the term, or the numbers,
fool you. Even unplugged, these tal-
ented musicians are a powerhouse of
sound with a wide variety of musical
styles. Treat yourself and you family
to a good meal, a little ice cream and
great music at Downtown Tunes in the
Leonardtown Square.
• Wine, BBQ Ribs & GrooveSpan
Port of Leonardtown (23190 New-
towne Neck Road, Leonardtown) –
5-8 p.m.
Enjoy award winning local wines,
award winning food & the most ver-
satile band in area. Cafe des Artistes
& GrooveSpan will join us for an eve-
ning of Local, Local, and Local for
buy local challenge week. Chef Loic
of Cafe des Artistes will be making
BBQ Baby Back Pork Ribs with cole-
slaw and GrooveSpan will provide
entertainment. $20 advance reser-
vations. For more information, call
301-690-2192.
• Live Auction and More
Mt. Zion United Methodist (27108
Mt. Zion Church Road, Mechanics-
ville) – 2 p.m.
Doors open at 11 o’clock to view
items, auction begins at 2pm with
Rodney Thompson of Homestead
Auctions. Meet Pinch Mascot of the
So. Md. Blue Crabs Baseball Team,
Rada Cutlery Sale, baked goods,
homemade ice cream, hot dogs/ham-
burgers and more. If you would like
to make a donation to the auction con-
tact Tom Keller at 301-481-6388, all
donations are tax deductible.
Thursday, July 19, 2012
28 The County Times
The Calvert Gazette is always looking for more local talent to feature!
To submit art or band information for our entertainment section,
e-mail sarahmiller@countytimes.net.
By Sarah Miller
Staff Writer
Summer Stock welcomes the public to join Dorothy,
Toto, Tin Man, Cowardly Lion and the Scarecrow as they
follow the yellow brick road, and take a timeless classic
from the big screen and to the stage at Great Mills High
School.
St. Mary’s County summer stock welcomes youths
under the age of 21 from all over the tri-county area to
get their frst taste of professional theatre.
For Autumn Mallory, playing Dorothy Gale, this is
her third summer stock production, having been in “Cin-
derella” and “The Music Man” previously.
“I’ve always been into singing and acting, so I want-
ed to give it a try, and once I did I wanted to come again
and again,” Mallory said.
She carries her role as Dorothy well, from her
“Somewhere Over the Rainbow” solo that kicks off the
play to her defeat of the Wicked Witch of the West.
One thing that sets “The Wizard of Oz” apart from
earlier plays is the number of young children involved as
the denizens of Munchkin Land. Mallory said she has
enjoyed working with the younger kids.
“They really look up to me as Dorothy, it’s kind of
cute,” she said.
The younger actors aren’t the only factor making
this year’s production a challenge. Set designer Rachel
Mehaffey said the aesthetics of the play are vastly differ-
ent from 2011’s “The Music Man,” and de-
signing the set has been “a juggle between
the demands of the story and the demands
of the stage.” While last year’s goal was to
bring River City to life, this year’s goal is
to “play up the dreamland aspect” of Oz.
Mehaffey said she went to college for
theatre, and has worked on professional
stages putting together sets for as many as
fve shows in nine weeks. Working on one
play for an extended period has allowed
her to delve more into detail and indulge
her inner perfectionist, though she said
she is still “learning when to say that’s
good enough.”
She was also in summer stock when
she was a kid and “leapt at the opportu-
nity” to work on the productions again.
Music director Joey Hoopengarden-
er said several former actors came back
to support the production, and several
have gone on to be successful in the the-
atre community. He said summer stock
has produced “The Wizard of Oz” three
times. The last production was 10 years
ago, before several of the current Munch-
kins were born. From that production, he
said Dorothy started a theatre in Texas, a
munchkin now plays Belle on a Disney
cruise ship, and the Tin Man fell in love
with Glinda the Good Witch and they have
children
“It’s an experience they cherish the
rest of their lives,” he said.
Hoopengardener said he has been working with
summer stock for a number of years and always looks
forward to it.
“It’s really a nice way to spend my summer,” he said.
The actors have put their own spin on the classic
characters. Sean Scriber, the Tin Man, said comedy
ranges from the Scarecrow’s physical humor to the Cow-
ardly Lion’s colorful and outrageous personality, and
there is something for audience members of all ages.
The Cowardly Lion may be a chicken, but the Cal-
vert High School graduate playing him certainly is not.
This year is Christopher Lange’s frst summer stock pro-
duction, and he tackled the role with enthusiasm, and is
already looking forward to next year’s production, what-
ever that may be.
The production will be held at Great Mills High
School on Friday, July 20 through Sunday, July 22 and
Thursday, July 26 through Sunday, July 29. Sunday eve-
ning shows begin at 5 p.m. with all other evening shows
beginning at 7 p.m. There will also be a matinee on Sat-
urday, July 28 at 1 p.m. Ticket prices are $14 for adults,
$12 for senior citizens 60 years and older and $6 for chil-
dren 10 and under. Matinee prices are $10 for adults, $8
for senior citizens 60 years and older and $4 for children
10 and under.
Doors to the school will open one hour before each
performance for ticket sales and patrons will enter the
auditorium for general seating thirty minutes before each
show time. Cash only will be accepted for ticket sales
at the door. To purchase tickets online, visit www.st-
marysmd.com/recreate or walk in purchases at the Rec-
reation & Parks main offce in Leonardtown.
People purchasing tickets online must print their
ticket and bring to the show for admittance. For more
information, call 301-475-4200 ext. 1800.
sarahmiller@countytimes.net
From Kansas to the Emerald City
Summer Stock Brings the Wizard of Oz to Southern Maryland
Photos by Sarah Miller
Dorothy, the Tin Man, the Scarecrow and the Cowardly
Lion talk about the Wonderful Wizard of Oz.
Dorothy Gale meets the
Munchkins of Munchkin
Land.
Thursday, July 19, 2012
29 The County Times
By Alex Panos
Staff Writer
“No Green Jelly Beanz,” the cover band no-
torious for getting their audience up and dancing,
kicked off the annual College of Southern Maryland
Twilight Series for Leonardtown campus on Tues-
day night.
There were 365 audience members sitting on
the campus’ lawn by the time the concert reached
intermission, despite CSM Community Relations
Coordinator Christina D’Angelo expecting just 150
to 200 people to show up.
D’Angelo attributed the large turnout to a va-
riety of contributing factors. While “The Beanz”
local following and popularity certainly played a
role in the outpouring of fans, she also believes the
concerts’ venue attracts many people.
“There’s a big draw in Leonardtown, and a
great lawn,” D’Angelo said.
The large lawn encourages people to roll out
picnic blankets and enjoy a snack, or for kids to kick
around a soccer ball – which they did Tuesday night.
The property’s capability to entertain in multiple
ways adds dynamics to the series that makes it “en-
joyable even in the heat,” D’Angelo said, noting that
temperatures hovered around 90 degrees through-
out the evening.
She also attributes the strong showing to the
tight-knit local community in Leonardtown. Ac-
cording to D’Angelo, Leonardtown historically
carries the highest attendance of the three venues,
partly because residents in town communicate with
one another quite often.
“Something about Leonardtown, the people
have a real sense of community. Word spreads,”
D’Angelo said.
The Twilight series is celebrating its sixth sea-
son providing outdoor entertainment to Southern
Marylanders at CSM’s campus sites in La Plata,
Prince Frederick and Leonardtown.
A new twist to the series this summer is the
inclusion of theatre-style performances along with
the musical entertainment.
“We’re trying to add in variety appealing to
different masses,” D’Angelo said.
CSM’s fne arts department came up with the
idea to incorporate plays into the series in order to
interest even more people in coming to see all the
college has to offer.
Orchestrators of the event were faced with the
challenge of attempting to
grab the interest of a larger
number of people while
still appealing to specifc
locations.
Using surveys that
were distributed to audience
members during last year’s
shows, they discovered how
to better accommodate pa-
trons and make each venue
unique.
For example, D’Angelo
said other brass and big
band events that have been
popular in Prince Frederick
infuenced series coordina-
tors to schedule a brass band
perform on that campus.
“Solid Brass is ftting
for Prince Frederick be-
cause they have a high draw
for big bands,” D’Angelo
said.
Leonardtown meanwhile is big on live mu-
sic and “defnitely like rock,” she told The County
Times, so coordinators focused on that genre. They
also scheduled two bands to perform at CSM’s
southern campus and just one “Shakespeare” theat-
rical performance. The other two sites will have two
plays and one live music concert.
On site catering is also available for each per-
formance this summer. Quality Street Kitchen and
Catering is serving in Leonardtown, Maryland
County caterers will be in Prince Frederick and
Rita’s will provide refreshments in La Plata. As al-
ways, guests are also welcomed to bring their own
food to snack on throughout the night.
CSM Leonardtown Interim Vice-President
Regina Bowman-Goldring said CSM takes pride
in continuing to offer family friendly entertainment
throughout Southern Maryland.
The series “brings a sense of community, you
get to know your neighbors,” D’Angelo said. “It pro-
vides great entertainment and is free.”
All performances begin at 6:45 p.m. Although
all shows are anticipated to take place outdoors, in
the event of inclement weather, performances will
be moved inside.
For more information or a full list of perfor-
mance dates visit csm.edu.
Twilight Series Underway
Thursday, July 19, 2012
30 The County Times
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Thursday, July 19
HVFD Carnival, July 19 – 22.
Hollywood Volunteer Firehouse
(24801 Three Notch Rd., Hollywood)
No Limit Poker Tourney and
Cash Game
Conseling Service of Hollywood
(24930 Old 3 Notch Rd. Hollywood)
– 7:30 p.m.
CSM Twilight: You’re a Good
Man Charlie Brown
CSM LaPlata Campus (8730
Mitchell Road, La Plata) – 6:30 p.m.
Live Music: “Hydra FX”
Ruddy Duck Brewery (13200
Dowell Road, Dowell) – 7:30 p.m.
Live Music: “Rusty In The
Middle”
Sea Breeze Restaurant (27130
South Sandgates Rd., Mechanicsville)
– 8 p.m.
Free Comedy Night
DB McMillan’s (23415 Three
Notch Road, California) – 8:30 p.m.
Friday, July 20
Live Music: “Pint and Dale”
Calvert Marine Museum (14200
Solomons Island Rd., Solomons) – 7
p.m.
Live Music: “River Concert Se-
ries: A Wagnerian Finale for 2012”
St. Mary’s College of Mary-
land (18952 E. Fisher Rd St. Mary’s
City) – 8
p.m.
Texas HoldEm’ Tournament
VFW Post 2632 (23282 Three
Notch Rd ) – 7 p.m.
Live Music: “Town of LaPlata
Summer Concert”
LaPlata Town Hall (305 Queen
Anne Street) – 7 p.m.
Sunset Concert Festival
O’Donnell Lake Restaurant Park
(10440 O’Donnell Place, Waldorf) – 7
p.m.
Summerstock Production: “The
Wizard of Oz”
Great Mills High School (21130
Great Mills Road, Great Mills) – 7
p.m.

Live Music: “Dave and Kevin
Trio”
Ruddy Duck Brewery (13200
Dowell Road, Dowell) – 8 p.m.
Live Music: “Higher Heads”
(St. Charles Towne Center, Wal-
dorf) – 7 p.m.
Live Music: “Blues Jam”
Fat Boys Country Store (41566
Medleys Neck Road, Leonardtown)
– 9
p.m.
Saturday, July 21
Live Music: “Jennifer Cooper
and Carl Reichelt”
Back Creek Bistro (14415 Dowell
Road, Dowell) – 6:30 p.m.
Live Music: “Legends”
Ruddy Duck Brewery (13200
Dowell Road, Dowell) – 8 p.m.
Live Music: “R & R Train”
Dennis Point Marina (46555
Dennis Point Way, Drayden) – 5 p.m.
Summerstock Production:
“The Wizard of Oz”
Great Mills High School (21130
Great Mills Road, Great Mills) – 7
p.m.
Free Movie on the Beach: Har-
ry Potter
The Town of North Beach (8916
Chesapeake Ave., North Beach) – 8
p.m.
No Limit Poker Tourney and
Cash Game
Conseling Service of Hollywood
(24930 Old 3 Notch Rd. Hollywood)
– 7:30 p.m.
Live Music: “Country
Memories”
Vera’s White Sands Beach Club
(1200 White Sands Drive, Lusby) – 2
p.m.
Live Music: “TripWire”
Vera’s White Sands Beach Club
(1200 White Sands Drive, Lusby) –
9:30 p.m.
Live Music: “Facedown”
Sea Breeze Restaurant (27130
South Sandgates Rd., Mechanics-
ville) – 8 p.m.
Live Music: “Jim Ritter and
the Creole Gumbo Jazz Band”
The Westlawn Inn (9200 Chesa-
peake Avenue, North Beach) – 7:30
p.m.
Sunday, July 22
Lynard Skynard Live In
Concert
St. Leonard Volunteer Fire Deart-
ment (200 Calvert Beach Road, St.
Leonard) – 7 p.m.
Summerstock Production: “The
Wizard of Oz”
Great Mills High School (21130
Great Mills Road, Great Mills) – 5
p.m.
No Limit Texas Holdem’ Bounty
Tournament
St. Mary’s County Elk’s Lodge
(45779 Fire Department Lane
Lexington Park) – 5 p.m.
Live Music: “Down River Band”
Vera’s White Sands Beach Club
(1200 White Sands Drive, Lusby) – 3
p.m.
Live Music: “Legal Action”
Sea Breeze Restaurant (27130
South Sandgates Rd., Mechanicsville)
– 3 p.m.
Monday, July 23
Live Music: “Country
Memories”
Sotterley Plantation (44300 Sot-
terley Lane , Hollywood) – 6 p.m.
Team Trivia
DB McMillan’s (23415 Three
Notch Road, California) – 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday, July 24
CSM Twilight “The Complete
Works of William Shakespeare
CSM Leonardtown Campus
(22950 Hollywood Road, Leonard-
town) – 6:30 p.m.
Open Mic Night
Ruddy Duck Brewery (13200
Dowell Road, Dowell) – 6:30 p.m.
Live Music: “Fair Warning”
DB McMillan’s (23415 Three
Notch Road, California) – 4 p.m.
Wednesday, July 25
CSM Twilight “The Complete
Works of William Shakespeare”
CSM LaPlata Campus (8730
Mitchell Road, La Plata) – 6:30 p.m.
Beginner Line Dance Lessons
Hotel Charles (15110 Burnt Store
Road, Hughesville) – 7 p.m.
Thursday, July 19, 2012
31 The County Times
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Serving Te Great Southern Maryland Counties since 1994
Employer/Employee Primary Resource Consultants
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Health, Dental, Vision, AFLAC, Life, Long Term Care,
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Phone 301-884-5900
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28231 Tree Notch Rd, #101
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DireCTory
Business
Classifieds
The County Times will not be held responsible for any
ads omitted for any reason. The County Times reserves
the right to edit or reject any classifed ad not meeting
the standards of The County Times. It is your respon-
siblity to check the ad on its frst publication and call
us if a mistake is found. We will correct your ad only
if notifed after the frst day the frst publication ran.
Important
To Place a Classifed Ad, please email your ad to:
classifeds@countytimes.net or Call: 301-373-
4125 or Fax: 301-373-4128 for a price quote. Of-
fce hours are: Monday thru Friday 8am - 4pm.
The County Times is published each Thursday.
Deadlines for Classifeds
are Tuesday at 12 pm.
Real Estate
Builders Personal Custom Home For Sale.
This 4 Bedroom 3.5 Bath Cape Cod w/
wrap around porch has plenty of upgrades.
Features include Island style kitchen,
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and mantel made from wood off the lot, 1st
foor bedroom with private bath, billards
room with pellet stove, stone surround and
vaulted ceilings, 2 stair cases (one on each
end of the house) 2 seperate living rooms,
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Real Estate Rentals
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Please call Kim Guy @ (301)475-6752 to
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Pittman’s offers an excellent compensation
package to include top industry wages,
retirement plan with company match,
and paid vacations and holidays. Come
grow with us! We offer opportunities
for advancement, ongoing training, and
continuing education. CDL & ISA
certifcation a plus. Contact Melody at:
800-708-1860, Fax: 540-636-4174,
Email:melody@pittmansinc.com
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Thursday, July 19, 2012
32 The County Times
CLUES ACROSS
1. 3rd VP Aaron
5. Not hard
9. Revolutions per minute
12. Assoc. of Licensed Air-
craft Engineers
13. Being of use or service
14. Macaws
15. 1960’s college civil
rights organization
16. Protection from
extradition
17. Animal examiner
18. Japanese persimmon
19. Commands right
20. A stage of development
22. Irish, English & Gordon
24. Showing keen interest
25. Doyens
26. Remain as is
27. 36 inches (abbr.)
28. Told on
31. Making a sustained din
33. Poked from behind
34. 24th state
35. Himalayan goat
36. Diver breathing gear
39. Groups of three
40. Not tightly
42. Regenerate
43. Strung necklace part
44. Breezed through
46. Imitate
47. Do-nothings
49. Unconsciousness
50. Golf score
51. Fertilizes
52. Used for baking or
drying
53. Autonomic nervous
system
54. Turner, Williams &
Kennedy
55. Hawaiian goose
CLUES DOWN
1. Usually in the sun
2. Arm bones
3. Placed on a display stand
4. Repeat a poem aloud
5. Eyelid gland infections
6. Lubes
7. A contagious viral
disease
8. Stormy & unpeaceful
9. Devastated & ruined
10. Put in advance
11. Pater’s partner
13. Exploiters
16. Meeting schedules
21. Intensely dislikes
23. “Tim McGraw” was her
1st hit
28. Fishing implement
29. Atomic #18
30. Microgadus fshes
31. Blue jack salmon
32. Of I
33. Feet frst somersault
dives
35. Tool to remove bone
from the skull
36. Glides high
37. Tower signal light
38. Small recess off a larger
room
39. Water chestnut genus
40. City on the River Aire
41. It’s capital is Sanaa
43. Lost blood
45. A citizen of Denmark
48. River in NE Scotland

Last Week’s Puzzle Solutions
e
r
K
i
d
d
i
e
K
o
r
n
Thursday, July 19, 2012
33 The County Times
ewsmakers
Spotlight on Volunteers
By Sarah Miller
Staff Writer
The Promise Resource Center in Charlotte Hall offers supplements to the
state-approved education curriculum, in addition to free educational materials
for parents and families in Calvert, Charles and St. Mary’s counties.
“People really need to know this place is not just for child care providers and
educators,” said Executive Director Siobhan Ponder. Anyone in the community,
including parents, grandparents and other guardians, are welcome to come to the
center for educational ideas and materials.
Volunteer Cyndi Scheffer came to the center in an unusual way – she got
a speeding ticket, and when provided with a list of places the could serve com-
munity service at in exchange for keeping points off her license, she chose the
Promise Resource Center. With a background in childhood development and edu-
cation, she thought it was a perfect ft.
Even though her community service obligation ended years ago, Scheffer
has remained as a volunteer with the center because she believes they offer a
valuable service to the community.
Scheffer said she left for a little while once she was fnished with her com-
munity service hours, but when she started teaching pre-school she came back
for supplies, ideas and eventually began volunteering at the center once again.
Every couple of months, Scheffer spends a day at the resource center doing
whatever they need done, from assembling take-home kits in three ring binders
to laminating cutouts and even pasting together construction paper components
for pre-school games.
Even though Scheffer gives up her free time to help the center, she never
feels like her time isn’t well spent.
“Any time spent on or for children is not time wasted,” she said.
Most materials from The Promise Resource Center are completely free, and
using volunteers helps keep it that way, Ponder said. They also apply for grants,
state and county fnding and hold periodic fundraisers.
Currently, the center is planning a Celtic music festival fundraiser for De-
cember. Ponder said the tentative venue is the Wildewood Lodge in California,
though they are still confrming details. She said they can use volunteers to help
with the festival.
Anything that can help children develop skills before entering the classroom
is needed, she said, adding the center’s goal is to get tools and information out
in the community to help children.
The kits have suggestions for
getting children actively involved
in reading. For example, “The
Very Hungry Caterpillar” by Eric
Carle, involves laminated illustra-
tions of all the things the caterpil-
lar ate, which kids can sort into
different categories and decide
which ones are healthy and discuss
why, giving them a lesson on the
importance of making healthy eat-
ing choices.
The resource center is look-
ing for volunteers from all over
the tri-county area to help prepare
materials, as well as organize and
run open houses. Ponder said they
have a presence in public libraries,
community centers and schools
throughout Southern Maryland.
They also work with the Judy
Center, the United Way and social
services.
“It’s a gem of a resource,”
Ponder said.
For more information, visit
thepromisecenter.org or call 301-
290-0040 or 866-290-0040.
sarahmiller@count yt imes.
net
The Promise Resource Center
Photos by Sarah Miller
Various activity folders are available for teachers, care
providers and families to use.
Siobhan Ponder demonstrates reading “The Very Hungry Caterpillar.”
Cyndi Scheffer cuts out ducks for an activity folder.
Thursday, July 19, 2012
34 The County Times
SENIOR LIVING
St. Mary’s Department of Aging
Programs and Activities
Lofer Senior Activity Center 301-737-5670, ext. 1652; Garvey Senior Activity Center, 301-475-4200, ext. 1050
Northern Senior Activity Center, 301-475-4002, ext. 1001; Ridge Nutrition Site, 301-475-4200, ext. 1050.
Visit the Department of Aging’s website at www.stmarysmd.com/aging for the most up-to date information.
Department of Aging Center Information:
Loffer Senior Activity Center 301.737.5670, ext.
1658; Garvey Senior Activity Center, 301.475.4200, ext.
1050; Northern Senior Activity Center, 301.475.4002,
ext. 1001; Ridge Nutrition Site, 301.475.4200, ext.
1050.
Visit the Department of Aging’s website at
www.stmarysmd.com/aging for the most up-to date
information.
Mosaic Flower Pots
Decorate a terra cotta fower pot using broken
ceramic tile pieces at the Garvey Senior Activity
Center on Tuesday, July 24, 31 and August 7 at 2:00
p.m. Cost: $7.00. This project requires attendance
at all three sessions in order to complete. Sign up in
advance by calling 301.475.4200, ext. 1050.
Celebrate National Hot Dog Month
In celebration of National Hot Dog Month the
Garvey Senior Activity Center will be grilling hot
dogs on Thursday, July 26 at Noon. In addition to hot
dogs, the menu includes baked beans, cole slaw, fresh
fruit salad, brownies and ice cream. Entertainment
will be provided at 12:30 p.m. by Tommy Alvey &
Friends. Sign up in advance by calling, 301.475.4200,
ext. 1050.
“Senior Matters”
This group meets at the Northern Senior Activity
Center this month on Tuesday July 24th at 10:45 a.m.
Structured like a small study or focus group, partici-
pants explore issues and concerns related to aging as
facilitated by Elizabeth Holdsworth (LCSW-C). Top-
ics may include, but are not limited to, health care,
challenges of rural living, emotional issues, advance
directives, fnance challenges, community resources
and more. Please contact the center for more informa-
tion. 301-475-4002 ext. 1001.
Get Your Tickets for the Loffer Luau Now
July 26 is the date Loffer will host its annual
Loffer Luau. The fun begins at 10 a.m. and contin-
ues until 2 p.m. This party will be sprinkled with
dancing (Music by Mean Gene DJ), Hula Demonstra-
tion, Fashion Runway (wear your best tropical garb in
case you are asked to stroll down our runway), 50/50
Raffe, and a feast prepared by our own chef which
will feature Huli Huli Chicken, Rice Pilaf, Pineapple
Chunks, Sesame Cabbage Salad, Cucumber Salad and
Key Lime Pie. Tickets ($8 suggested donation) are
required and are available at Loffer Senior Activity
Center. We will meet you at the door with a lei hand-
selected to complement your outft. For more infor-
mation call 301.737.5670 ext. 1658.
New York City Holiday Tour
Start off your holiday season with a trip to the
Big Apple! This trip takes place December 7-9, 2012
and includes: 3 days/2 nights, 2 continental break-
fasts, 2 family style dinners, 2 shows (The Nutcracker
at Lincoln Center and The Rockettes at Radio Center
Music Hall, guided food and history tour of West Vil-
lage, holiday decorations tour. The cost is $900 pp
double occupancy. For more information call Joyce
at 301.737.5670 ext. 1656 or email: joyce.raum@st-
marysmd.com
Last Call for Myrtle Beach Trip
This trip is almost full so it is DEFINITELY go-
ing to happen! However, we still have a few more seats
left on the bus for last-minute procrastinators. This
trip will take place October 4-7, 2012 and includes 3
nights in ocean front room at Ocean Reef Resort; 3
breakfasts; 3 full course dinners; shopportunities, 2
full-length shows, plenty of time to relax on the beach.
All this for only $660 pp double occupancy. For more
information call Shellie at 301.737.5670 ext. 1655 or
email Sheila.graziano@stmarysmd.com
By Mark Underwood
The annual Tour de France bike race in Europe
is one of the ultimate tests of strength, endurance and
tenacity. Just completing the race is a life accomplish-
ment for most riders.
But recently, scientists who have been studying
the effects of biking on the brain and body have found
biking can improve brain health as well as having
physical benefits.
We were designed to work and exert energy
through exercise, but can biking really be good for your
brain? The brain needs to be exercised so research has
demonstrated that as fitness levels increase depression
levels can be reduced and wellbeing improves.
With a daily 30 minute bike ride of medium inten-
sity, you can improve your mood and wellbeing, and
most importantly, reduce stress. Just like the heart, the
brain needs to be active and fit to perform at optimum
levels.
Have helmet will travel
Biking has been found to be one of the most ef-
fective ways to improve your physical health. It’s an
easy, low impact exercise and can be adjusted to your
own fitness level.
Riding a bike regularly may have many benefits
that we’re just beginning to understand. One thing
that is known is that biking, like other aerobic activi-
ties, helps to stimulate the brain, and reduce the bur-
den of stress.
One concentrated study at Tohoku University in
Japan looked at motorcycle use and it’s the effects on
the brain. They studied Magnetic Resonance Imaging
(MRI) scans and found that riding activates prefrontal
areas of the brain. These prefrontal areas are stimu-
lated as the brain zips signals to the body to steer the
bike.
Their Department of Functional Brain Imaging
found that riding helps keep drivers young by invigo-
rating their brains.
The study found an area called the bilateral pre-
frontal cortex (PFC) was activated while riding. When
these areas are simulated, they positively affected
cognitive functions, stress reduction, memory, and
concentration. These studies also suggest similar re-
sults will be found with bike riders.
A recipe for better brain health
In addition to biking, you can stimulate key areas
of brain used for memory and concentration and boost
your overall mental health with Prevagen, a newly de-
veloped supplement based on over 15 years of scien-
tific research.
Thanks to the scientific research behind Preva-
gen, you can now reap the benefits of this natural sup-
plement. All you have to do is incorporate the innova-
tive, natural dietary supplement in your daily routine.
We now understand how important sleep is to our
overall mental and physical health. Many variables
contribute to poor sleep, from diet to daily exercise.
Current research is studying the connection between
sleep and memory.
But research has shown that quality sleep in order
adults may help repair some of the damage from aging
brain cells. This damage may contribute to memory
problems, concentration and other important mental
tasks.
Prevagen, a proven brain cell protector, is a
groundbreaking, supplement that was developed by
Quincy Bioscience. Prevagen helps people throughout
the country enjoy a better quality of their life with im-
proved brain power, better sleep, memory, concentra-
tion and focus.
It is common knowledge that inactivity, lack of
exercise or poor sleep can lead to feeling a low level of
energy or mental stamina.
Prevagen can help you sleep like a baby and enjoy
a better quality, well rested feeling when you awake.
Like muscular strength, brainpower is a “use it
or lose it” proposition. The more you work out your
brain, the better you’ll be able to process and remem-
ber information. Like any form of exercise giving your
brain a boost means you’re keeping it health and fit.
Mark Underwood is a neuroscience researcher,
president and co-founder of Quincy Bioscience, a
biotech company located in Madison, Wisconsin fo-
cused on the discovery and development of medicines
to treat age related memory loss and the diseases of
aging. Mark is a contributor to the “Brain Health
Guide” which highlights the research at Quincy Bio-
science and offers practical tips to help keep health
brain function in aging. More articles and tips for
healthy aging can be found at: www.TheGoodNews-
AboutAging.com.
Biking For Mind And Body
Thursday, July 19, 2012
35 The County Times
A Journey Through Time A Journey Through Time
The Chronicle
Wanderings
of an Aimless Mind
2 a.m. and here I was awake sitting at the dining room
table in the dark – writing by the light of my cell phone, and
hoping against hope that I might be able to fall back asleep
shortly. This is the new sleep cycle for the last few months.
No matter whether I fall asleep by 10 p.m., 11 p.m., or rarely
as late as midnight (depending how Jay Leon’s monologue
goes) I still wake up sometime between 2 and 2:20 a.m. It’s
the same routine. I come out of the bedroom, walk into the
kitchen thinking that I won’t look at the clock. I don’t want
to know. I’ll just drink a little water, and not look. But, I
always look.
Oh well, might as well answer e-mails on my phone,
and check to see what’s happening on Facebook. Horo-
scopes don’t come through until about 3 or 4 a.m. I’ll be
asleep again by then. Hopefully soon I’ll cycle to 3 a.m.
for a few months, and then cycle up to a 4 or 5 a.m. wake
up time. But as of now, my internal sleep timer and heating
system say 2 a.m. and no later.
After a bit I looked up, blurry-eyed at the digital
clock on the kitchen stove and read 2:41 a.m. By 3 a.m. I
had already put away a few stray items on the counter and
sprayed a few of the ants which had just started showing up
in my kitchen. As they were my only other middle of the
night companions, spraying them seemed rather sad. Tidbit
did rouse herself off her big fuffy doggie pillow just long
enough to see what I was doing in the kitchen. When she
saw that no food was forthcoming, she sauntered back to
the bedroom and to doggie dreamland. I wonder if I could
sleep curled up next to her – she probably doesn’t throw off
near as much heat as my husband does. Oh, how I envied
her at that moment. And in fact I did go lay down next to
her pillow for a few moments, but the foor was rather hard
even with my padding. Off to the next part of my middle of
the night sojourn – the couch.
By 3:17, after trying to fnd the right position on
the couch where the air conditioner wouldn’t blow artic air
straight in one of my ears, I was hit with a revelation. I had
decided that the reason I could not sleep in the bedroom,
besides my overheating, was the neon green light display on
the bedroom air conditioner, and the bright orange VIZIO
light on the TV. These are the vampire lights; quite ftting
after last week’s article about our shutter bats. Twenty min-
utes or so later of searching I found a black fle folder, scis-
sors and tape. My plan was to cut up the black folder in
shapes to match the offending lights. An article in Oprah
magazine or somewhere said you should cover these lights.
With that fnished, I laid back down with a contented sigh,
assured that I would sleep like a baby for the last hour and a
half before dawn. It was 4:35 and there were still a few mo-
ments left of near darkness and relative silence.
Okay, that worked real well. My mind wanted to run
a marathon race, and was not content to rest until it reached
the fnish line…the vanishing fnish line. The house was al-
ready beginning to lighten up. I wondered if I had enough of
the black fle folders left to cover the windows and the door
to our deck. Do they still make black-out curtains? Even
as a young girl, I would cover the bedroom window with
a quilt…and I love sunrise and sunlight. Singing, now the
birds have started singing…a sound I normally love. But
they have had a full night’s sleep. Ear plugs. I know I have
some near the bed, no they got wet the time I knocked the
water over and swelled up like elephant ears. What to do
now???? I think I’ll just join the birds and sing!!
To each new night’s adventure, Shelby
Please send your comments or ideas to: shelbys.wan-
derings@yahoo.com
“Night Patrol”
Clement F. Dorsey,
son of John and Mary
(Hammond) Dorsey
was born 1774 in Anne
Arundel County. Af-
ter graduating from
St. John’s College in
1793 he began pursu-
ing a career in law. In
1799 he married Pris-
cilla Hebb, daughter of Colonel Vernon and
Anna (Hopewell) Hebb of “Porto Bello” in
St. Mary’s County. Between 1800 and 1810
the family moved to neighboring Charles
County where Priscilla died prior to 1812.
The second wife of Clement Dorsey was
Dicandia Smith Ireland, only child of Dr.
John Ireland and his wife, Susanna Reed-
er of “Summerseat” in St. Mary’s County.
Dicandia had been married first to Henry
Arundel Smith who died in 1809*. Through
her first marriage, Dicandia had also in-
herited Henry Smith’s property located at
Benedict in Charles County**.
As the British made their way up the
Patuxent with the express purpose of burn-
ing Washington, D.C., over 5,000 of their
soldiers made camp at Benedict. On June
17, 1814 Mr. Dorsey wrote to General Philip
Steuart that when he reached the hill over-
looking Benedict, he “ found a few of the
neighbors collected there from curiosity,
and but one musquet among them.” They
watched helplessly as the British loaded
their ships with cattle and plunder and then
set fire to a barn across the river in Calvert
County.
Mr. Dorsey then discovered the towns-
people had deliberately left poisoned whis-
key for British consumption. “I considered
the American character as deeply impli-
cated in this horrible deed, so inconsistent
with humanity and the established usages of
nations, that its immediate disclosure was
called for, lest its effects might produce the
intended design, and thus give to our unfor-
tunate situation a more desolating complex-
ion.” As a result, Mr. Dorsey warned British
officers.
Shortly afterwards, Mr. Dorsey was
told by his neighbors that a group of British
soldiers was “advancing to Mr. Sothoron’s
residence” (located in St. Mary’s County,
just across a small creek from Benedict). A
small contingent of the neighborhood men,
led by Mr. Dorsey “advanced, but with one
gun, without anything to reload her with”
and pretended to be a large military force
with Mr. Dorsey calling loudly for the “cav-
alry and artillery to advance.” The ploy
worked and the house was saved.
Clement Dorsey had a long and distin-
guished career. In addition to a successful
law practice, he represented Maryland’s
First Congressional District in the U.S.
House of Representatives from 1825-1831.
He then served as judge of the fifth circuit
court of Maryland from 1832 until his death
on August 8, 1846 while holding court at
Port Tobacco. He was buried at his home
“Summerseat” in St. Mary’s County. See:
http://www.summerseat.org/
*Henry Arundel Smith was the uncle of
Charles Somerset Smith IV (son of Charles
Somerset Smith III and Ann Sothoron), the
only native Marylander who fought at the
Battle of the Alamo where he was killed on
March 6, 1836.
**There is a road sign on the left side
of Route 231 at Benedict, just before your
cross the bridge into Calvert County, that
reads “Dicandia Dorsey Road.”
Thursday, July 19, 2012
36 The County Times
Oakville
5 minutes North of Hollywood
41170 Oakville Road
Mechanicsville 20659
301-373-9245 • 800-451-1427
Charlotte Hall
30315 Three Notch Rd,
Charlotte Hall 20622
301-884-5292
800-558-5292
Prince Frederick
1700 Solomon’s Island Rd,
Prince Frederick 20678
410-535-3664
1-866-535-3664
Wentworth Nursery
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8-7, Sat. 8-6, Sun. 9-5
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 7:30-6, Sat. 7:30-5
Sales good thru August 7th, 2012
Got A Project?
Now ScheduliNG Summer hArdScAPeS
PAtio PAckS StArtiNG At $ 899.00 PluS tAx for mAteriAlS or $ 2,175.00 iNStAlled
GArdeN Store SAviNGS
keeP AwAy the critterS & SAve!
NurSery & GreeNhouSe SAviNGS
Wall Stone
Natural or Colonial Grey
$
225
00
/Full Pallet
Bellingham Bamboo Glove
1/2 Price! reg. $9.99
Now Only
$
4
98
ea.
Mole Max
10 lb. Only
$
14
88
ea.
Bayer Ant & Termite Spray
Great for paver patios & walks.
Conc. Only
$
29
88
ea.
All Tropicals
Hibiscus, Bananas & more.
Save 50
%
Any Size
Cambridge Edgestone
Only
$
1
75
/foot
Select Garden Hose
5/8” x 50’ long
Only
$
9
88
Rabbit & Dog Repellent
Only
$
5
88
ea.
Mosquito Dunks
Only
$
11
88
ea.
Mixed Ornamental Grasses
All 3 gal. size Only
$
17
88
ea.
Bradstone Steppers
Special Only
$
13
88
ea.
Novelty Watering Can
Special Only
$
5
88
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$
11
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ea.
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$
2
99
ea.
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When You Buy 5 or More. Mix or Match
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40 lb. bags Only
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4
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Corona Hand Pruner
Choose from Anvil or Bypass
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11
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Deer Liquid Fence
Keep deer away. Easy to apply granular
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$
22
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Slug Pellets
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9
88
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All Small Fruits
Blueberries, Grapes, Raspberries & more
Buy 2 or More Save 33
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Snacking often elicits mixed reviews. Some health plans say that it is important to eat
several small meals or snacks during the day to keep metabolism rates in check. Other in-
formation states that snacks can be a person's undoing, causing unnecessary weight gain
-- especially when snacking is frequent. These mixed feelings can be a little confusing.
The National Health and Nutrition Survey supports snacking. The survey found that
people who eat snacks in addition to three meals a day had higher levels of nutrients in
their diets. But not all snacks are a good idea. Consuming a fattening bag of potato chips
is an unhealthy approach to snacking. However, a piece of dark chocolate or a handful of
nuts can add essential nutrients to a person's diet.
Many different snacks make healthy additions to a person's diet. Two to three snacks
a day may be all that's needed to help keep a person feeling satiated and less likely to
overeat at meals. Here are some healthy snack ideas.
* Olives: A handful of olives can quench a salty craving and provide essential fatty
acids that may help to improve heart health.
* Hummus: Hummus is made from chickpeas, which are naturally low in fat and
high in fber. This dip will keep you feeling full.
* Edamame: These are a variety of soybeans that are sweeter, larger and more easily
digested than other soybeans. They are a natural source of antioxidants and isofavones.
* Banana and chocolate:Rolling a banana in semi-sweet chocolate chips can satisfy
a fruit and chocolate craving.
* Dark chocolate bark: Melt dark chocolate and add a desired fruit, such as dried
cranberries, cherries, or raisins. Enjoy a small piece, which will be high in antioxidants,
to fend off hunger pangs.
* String cheese: An individual serving of low-fat mozzarella or Monterey Jack string
cheese offers a serving of dairy and protein to keep you full.
* Smoothie: Whip up a smoothie made from protein-rich Greek yogurt and some
frozen fruit. Add a dash of fruit juice and blend. Enjoy as a meal replacement or a refresh-
ing snack.
* Fruit: There's no better snack than fruit. Keep a bowl of fruit or some homemade
fruit salad on hand and enjoy a small portion when you want to fll up without consuming
too many calories.
* Whole-grain crackers: Fiber-full grain crackers can satisfy salty cravings as well as
fll your stomach with something hearty.
Men and women can choose among a variety of healthy snacks throughout the day.
Smart snacking can mean reducing feelings of hunger and increasing the amount of nutri-
ents in the body. Snacks also may be an integral component of a healthy weight-loss plan.
Snacking Doesn't Have To
Be Unhealthy
Thursday, July 19, 2012
37 The County Times
Running the 2nd & 4th Week of Each Month
To Advertise in the Church Services Directory, Call The County Times at 301-373-4125
CHURCH SERVICES DIRECTORY
CATHOLIC
BAHA’I FAITH
God is One, Man is One,
and All Religions are One
Discussions 3rd Wed. 7-8
Lex Pk Library, Longfellow Rm
301-884-8764 or www.bahai.org
BAHA’I FAITH
HUGHESVILLE BAPTIST CHURCH
A member of the Southern Baptist Convention
8505 Leonardtown Road, Hughesville, MD 20637
301-884-8645 or 301-274-3627
Pastor Keith Corrick
Associate Pastor Kevin Cullins
• Sunday Morning Worship 10:30am
• Sunday School (all ages) 9:15 am
• Sunday Evening Worship & Bible Study 6:00 pm
• Wednesday Discipleship Classes 7:00 pm
(Adults, youth & Children)
Vigil Mass: 4:30 pm Saturday
Sunday: 8:00 am
Weekday (M-F): 7:30 am
Confessions: 3-4 pm Saturday
St. Cecelia Church
47950 Mattapany Rd, PO Box 429
St. Mary’s City, MD 20686 301-862-4600
UNITED
METHODIST
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Sundays - 9:30 AM
41695 Fenwick Street Unit 3
Leonardtown, MD 20650
301/475-9337
www.amosm.net
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Thursday, July 19, 2012
38 The County Times
Sp rts
On Friday, July 20 Maryland International Raceway
(MIR) will host a Test & Tune. This event is open to all
streetcars, racecars, street bikes, drag bikes, and junior
dragsters. This will be a full night of time runs, grudge rac-
ing, and testing with no gambler eliminations. The test &
tune will be from 6:30 to 11:30 p.m. Admission is just $10
to watch or $20 to race.
On Saturday and Sunday, MIR will host the MIROCK
- XDL Fast By Gast / WPGC Bike Fest presented by Mick-
ey Thompson tires.
This is the biggest motorcycle drag race in the country!
All of the top pros will be here this weekend in the 500hp
Pro Mod class, the 200mph Pro Street class, and the DME
Racing Real Street class. There will also be the following
sportsman classes: Top Sportsman, Crazy 8’s, 5.60 Index,
Pro ET, Street ET, and the Grudge racing category.
This weekend be sure to take in the biggest motorcycle
midway ever as over 1,500 feet of vendors will be here sell-
ing apparel and racing accessories.
On Sunday, the WPGC Bike Fest will include a cus-
tom bike show, the beer garden under the circus tent with
bikini bartenders, the stuntbike arena competition, a huge
streetbike corral, live performance by Reesa Renee, and the
$1,200 bikini contest hosted by Flex. Also WPGC will be
in the house with a live broadcast from their on air jocks!
The schedule for this weekend is as follows. Gates will
open Saturday at 9 a.m., Pro Qualifying starts at 1 p.m., and
Pro ET and Street ET eliminations start at 3 p.m. The XDL
Stuntbike Arena will be live from 10am-10pm. Also on
Saturday night, the Afterdark Underground comes to the
surface with a 2-hour grudge racing program after elimi-
nations! On Sunday gates will open at 8 a.m., Bike show
judging starts at 9 a.m., the XDL Stunt Bike arena practice
starts at 10 a.m. and the Stuntbike Competition begins at
1pm. Eliminations for all racing classes start at 12 p.m., the
live performance by Reesa Renee start at 2 p.m., and the
bikini contest starts at 4 p.m.. Admission is only $20, or you
can buy a 2-day pass for $35. Kids ages 6-11 are only $5.
For full details and class rules check out the MIR web
site at mirdrag.com or mirockracing.com. For even more
information call 301-884-RACE.
MIROCK WPGC Bike Fest This Weekend
Thursday, July 19, 2012
39 The County Times
Sp rts
The Good News
Angler Angler
The Ordinary
By Keith McGuire
White perch are still bit-
ing in shallow water around
the area. These fsh are very abundant this year and it’s easy to fnd several 10 inchers for
dinner. In the shallows where you fnd white perch, there are also croakers, small puppy
drum (too small to keep), and spot. Break out the light fshing rod and go catch some!
Small jigs and spinner baits can provide great action on white perch, but bloodworms on a
bottom rig will also work.
Bigger croakers can be found in the rivers and on the Bay in decent numbers. They
will be in deeper water (40’ deep – or more) during the daytime hours and in shallower
water in the evenings. Shrimp, squid, bloodworms, and peeler crabs make very good baits
for croakers.
Speckled trout are still being caught. These fsh have to be 14” to keep and most are
found over on the Eastern Shore side of the Bay. If you want to take a ride on your boat to
look for these fsh, check out the waters around the Honga River and the marsh islands over
behind the Target Ship. Most of the speckled trout are being caught in skinny water (3 – 10
feet deep) where the water is clear and there is a moving current. Bright colored jigs or
minnows rigged Carolina style will do the trick.
Striped bass are being caught in several areas, but there seem to be a lot of small ones
in our area this summer. Don’t get me wrong. It is possible to fnd keeper size rockfsh in
the rivers and the Bay, but they seem to be just a little bit harder to fnd this summer. Strip-
ers can be caught trolling small bucktails dressed with a “sassy shad” or twister tail. Try to
get your trolling rigs to run deep in 20 – 50 feet of water over structure or changes in bottom
contours. Of course these fsh can also be caught by other methods like chumming, jigging
and live-lining small spot.
Bluefsh have made an appearance in good numbers in our region of the Bay. These
are great fsh for the smoker. Look for schools of breaking fsh to fnd stripers and bluefsh.
Cast into the schools of breaking fsh with small metal jigs for great fun.
Despite my report and picture last week of a founder in the Patuxent River, I have not
been able to fnd fshable numbers of the fsh; nor have I found a good report of founder
catches in our area. Flounder anglers don’t talk much, so they could be here and I just
haven’t found them yet!
Public Meeting: This week the Southern Maryland Chapter of the Maryland Saltwa-
ter Sportfshing Association will have a meeting on Thursday evening at 7:00 PM at the
Solomons Fire House. Their guest speaker will be Joseph Love, Ph. D. of the Maryland
Department of Natural Resources who will give a talk about invasive species of fsh in our
region. This discussion will probably focus on the snakehead invasion in our area, but
may include a discussion of other types of invasive marine life. Smokey Joe’s will have
barbeque pork and chicken sandwiches for sale beginning at 6:00 PM and other refresh-
ments will be available.
Remember to take a picture of your catch and send it to me with your story at river-
dancekeith@gmail.com.
Keith has been a recreational angler on the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries for
over 50 years; he fshes weekly from his small boat during the season, and spends his
free time supporting local conservation organizations.
Richard Everson with a nice speckled trout. Eating your tackle is optional.
Getting geared up for deer season? Want some tops on how best to get a big
fsh on the line? Or maybe you just want to come out and be a part of Maryland’s
biggest outdoor show.
The 6th annual TOYOTA/SCION of Waldorf’s Buck Wild Outdoors Expo
– held Aug. 24-26 at the Charles County Fairgrounds in La Plata – has something
for outdoorsmen of all ages and interests. The Expo’s reputation is growing each
year and for the frst time it has expanded to three days.
On Saturday and Sunday, get a dose of reality from “Swamp People” stars
R.J. and J. Paul Molinere. Bring your bow and participate in the “Ultimate Bow-
hunter Challenge” 3D tournament. Or get your trophy scored for the state record
book during the Maryland Trophy Deer Contest.
If you enjoy hunting, fshing, camping, boating and everything the great
outdoors has to offer, you can’t miss this event. There will be door prizes, raffes
and giveaways all weekend. The show starts on Friday with a new gun given
away every 30 minutes, courtesy of Benelli, Beretta and Savage Arms. The frst
500 through the gates on Saturday and Sunday will be entered to win a Stihl
chainsaw.
And don’t forget to bring the young ones. The free Kids Zone is bigger and
better than ever, featuring a moon bounce, games and plenty of other attractions.
For more information on exhibits and schedules, visit www.BuckWIldEx-
po.com.
6th Annual Buck Wild Outdoors Expo Coming
Thursday, July 19, 2012
40 The County Times
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