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Pilot Report:
SIKORSKY S92
Regulating Night Vision
Heli-Expo 2012 Preview
Training for ‘the Ditch’
2 ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE | JUNE 2011
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Editor’s Notebook
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A
s we head into Heli-Expo,
it’s important to again bring
up the subjects of training
and safety. Learning lessons
from the mistakes of others is one of
the most basic ways of improving.
The U.S. National Transportation
Safety Board issued similar rulings
on January 19 involving two helicop-
ter EMS crashes where pilots flew
into storms at night. The first crash,
which occurred Sept. 25, 2009 near
Georgetown, S.C., involved a Carolina
Life Care Eurocopter AS350B2 oper-
ated by Omniflight Helicopters. Three
people died in the crash, the pilot, a
flight nurse and a flight paramedic.
According to the report, the pilot
decided “to continue the VFR flight
into an area of IMC, which resulted in
the pilot’s spatial disorientation and a
loss of control of the helicopter.”
NTSB noted “inadequate oversight
of the flight by Omniflight’s Opera-
tional Control Center” as a contrib-
uting factor to the accident, which
happened at around 11:30 p.m. as the
crew was headed back from dropping
off a patient.
The second accident took place
on March 25, 2011 near Brownsville,
Tenn. The Hospital Wing Eurocopter
AS350B3, registered to Memphis
Medical Air Center, went down after
heading straight into a quick-develop-
ing weather cell, resulting in the deaths
of the pilot and two flight nurses. The
safety board ruled that attempting to
fly into “adverse weather, resulting in
an encounter with a thunderstorm
with localized IMC, heavy rain and
severe turbulence,” is the probable
cause of the crash.
What’s disturbing is the part of the
report’s narrative that describes the
pilot’s apparent state of mind before
the crash. In a conversation with an
oncoming shift pilot, the pilot alleg-
edly said he “wanted to get the heli-
copter out” after sitting on the helipad
at Jackson-Madison County Gen-
eral Hospital and waiting for the flight
nurses. The shift pilot suggested park-
ing the helicopter, but the active duty
pilot insisted there was enough time
to make it, believing “he had about 18
minutes to beat the storm and return
to home base” while leaving the nurses
behind. The shift pilot later spoke with
one of the flight nurses, who in fact
made it on board and said they were
about 30 seconds from arrival, when
the helicopter went down.
Witnesses reported lighting, thun-
der and “heavy rain bands” in the area
at the time of the accident.
NTSB faults the decision-making
process of the pilot, saying that he
“could have chosen to stay at the hospi-
tal helipad. The pilot, however, decid-
ed to enter the area of weather, despite
the availability of a safer option. Based
on the pilot’s statement to the oncom-
ing pilot about the need to ‘beat the
storm’ and his intention to . . . bring the
helicopter back, he was aware of the
storm and chose to fly into it.”
The report continues by stating the
pilot “made a risky decision to attempt
to outrun a storm in night conditions,
which would enable him to return the
helicopter to its home base and end his
shift there, rather than choosing a safer
alternative of parking the helicopter in
a secure area and exploring alternate
transportation arrangements or wait-
ing for the storm to pass and returning
to base after sunrise when conditions
improved.”
NTSB also noted that the pilot
“was nearing the end of his 12-hour
shift, during which he had flown pre-
vious missions and may have had lim-
ited opportunities to rest. He had been
on duty overnight, and the accident
occurred at an early hour that can be
associated with degraded alertness.”
Sometimes, we are our own worst
enemy. Human error, whether it’s
caused by fatigue, the desire to finish
a shift, or any of a large number of
other casual factors, is a part of avia-
tion operations. The stakes for aircraft
operators are high, we all know that,
but it’s important to keep this in mind
as an example of where the decision
to push forward into the gray area can
have dire consequences. When deal-
ing with Mother Nature, know your
limits. The line may be closer than you
think, and at times we can all be one
bad decision away from disaster.
The New Face of
Rotorandwing.com
If you haven’t had the opportunity
already, take a moment to go to www.
rotorandwing.com and look at
the new design and features of our
website. In addition to the home page,
there are individual landing pages
for different sectors of the helicopter
market—Commercial, Military, Public
Service, Personal/Corporate, Train-
ing, Products and Services.
On each of these landing pages, we
aggregate our own news and edito-
rial coverage, photos and videos with
press releases from industry vendors
and links to important stories we’ve
run across from other sources on the
web—all targeted to the unique inter-
ests of operators in each sector. Each
landing page also serves as a central
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specific coverage. Check it out and let
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Look for reports from the Heli-Expo
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WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
5 JANUARY 2012 | ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE
By Andrew Parker
aparker@accessintel.com
right attitude/right approach/right alongside
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WHEN LAW ENFORCERS
DEPEND ON IT,
WE’RE RIGHT ALONGSIDE.
Good news for all law enforcement operators. Whatever
platforms you use for your search and rescue, Goodrich
has a hoist that’s ready and available.
Whether you operate AS350s, EC145s or A109s,
there’s a Goodrich hoist you can rely on to provide
the perfect solution.
Goodrich is unique in providing the translating drum
technology, which has the highest reliability in the
industry and no fleet angle restrictions. And Goodrich
has the lowest life cycle costs.
So whichever platforms fly your missions, depend on
Goodrich to be right there with you.
For more information about Goodrich rescue hoists,
email sis@goodrich.com
26418_Goodrich_LAW_ENF_Rotor&Wing_Sep09_273x199:Job number required 11/08/2009 14:35 Page 1
6 ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2012 WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
Public Service Military Commercial Personal|Corporate
THIS MONTH FROM
32
DEPARTMENTS
12 Rotorcraft Report
20 People
20 Coming Events
30 Hot Products
62 Training News
65 Classified Ads
67 Ad Index
COLUMNS
4 Editor’s Notebook
8 Feedback
10 Meet the Contributors
64 Leading Edge
66 Law Enforcement Notebook
68 Safety & Training
70 Military Insider
12

FEATURES
COVER STORY
32 ■Pilot Report: Sikorsky S-92
Rotor & Wing takes to the skies in Sikorsky’s S-92 and gets behind
the controls of the S-76D. By Ernie Stephens, Editor-at-Large
38 ■Heli-Expo 2012 Preview
An inside look at some of the highlights and what to expect during
this year’s Heli-Expo in Dallas. By Dale Smith
44 ■Night Vision Renaissance
Providers of NVG cockpit modifications thrive despite the global
economic situation and a new set of FAA regulations governing this
niche market. By Andrew Parker, Editor-in-Chief
48 ■Prepping for the Ditch
EASA workshop focuses on how to increase the survival rate in
helicopter ditching incidents. By Thierry Dubois
56 ■Recovery Training in Spain
Spanish Air Force hosts EAG’s Combined Joint Personnel Recovery
Standardization course. By Andrew Drwiega, Military Editor
On the Cover: Sikorsky S-92 with the Legacy of Heroes paint scheme. Sikorsky Photo by Stuart Walls.
(Above) AgustaWestland’s AW189 lifts off for its first flight.
(Bottom) An inside look at the cockpit of the Sikorsky S-92.
Photo by Ernie Stephens. (Right) Air-to-air view showing a
German Army Aviation Sikorsky CH-53G over Spain.
7
FEBRUARY 2012 | ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
Services Products Training Public Service
©2011 by Access Intelligence, LLC. Contents may not be reproduced in any form without written permission.
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WHAT DO THE EXPERTS THINK?
• Ask questions to three experts on the topics of helicopter aerodynamics, AS9100
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insights about the science behind helicopter flight. NVG certification expert Jessie
Kearby fields questions about NVGs for both military and commercial uses.

DIRECT TO YOUR DESKTOP: CHECK YOUR EMAIL
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• Digital edition of Rotor & Wing February 2012. Electronic version with enhanced web
links makes navigating through the pages of Rotor & Wing easier than ever.
WEEK OF FEBRUARY 27
• HOT PRODUCTS for Helicopter Operators—Latest in equipment upgrades, performance
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56
Vol. 46
|
No. 2
February 2012
8 ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2012
From Facebook
The following comments appeared on
Rotor & Wing’s Facebook page: www.
facebook.com/rotorandwing
Accident Reduction
The following responses are to the ques-
tion, “What more needs to be done to
reduce helicopter accidents?”
More IFR training and IFR flights. In
the helicopter world, IFR flights are a
rare occurrence for most operators.
Most guys don’t realize how easy it is
and how much safer it is to file, get a
clearance, and “punch in” versus scud
running. I understand some operators
aren’t equipped, but for those who
are....
Brad Weeks
Dual-pilot requirement for EMS mis-
sions. Certainly for those during IFR
and IMC.
Jim Hickman
Install a 44-oz. drink holder because
with it between my legs it interferes
with my cyclic. Also a CD player would
be great because ATC gives me a head-
ache so I take off my headset and all I
hear is “whupwhupwhup” . . . and some
Manilow would be welcome.
Peter McNees
The majority of accidents come from
human error. That being the case, you
can train and train and train all you want,
but in the end we are only human and
will make mistakes whether we are 25 or
65 years old, have 1,000 hours or 25,000.
We will never fix human error. Just like
friendly fire; It will always happen.
Marc Raglin
Fly helicopters unmanned.
Ron Hall
Definitely more practice with 0/0
instrument takeoffs. Could have saved
a bunch of guys when they browned
out. More simulation time, too. The
virtual red screen is a lot more forgiv-
ing than a real world one.
Charles Lamb
Emphasis on disciplined flying, report
and ground the undisciplined pilots
instead of looking the other way and
allowing the “mishaps” to do the cull-
ing for us.
Carl Bush
I+I+I (Inversion by operators plus
Instruction of crews plus Innovation
application).
Jose Roca
Equipment Upgrades
Responses to the question, “If you had
an unlimited budget to make a single
upgrade to your company’s or unit’s
helicopter (but could only pick one
upgrade), what would it be and why?”
We are in the process of replacing our
Garmin (Apollo) 480s with Garmin
430s. I wish we could ditch the 430s
and separate transponders, and just go
with a Garmin 530s. Or, the ultimate
would be all glass.
Wylie Mathis
Upgrading the BFT so it would not
burn out the VHF-AM radio.
Christopher Newlon
New avionics for sure; synthetic vision
(moving map ), more accurate naviga-
tion and improved IMC capability.
Bülent Aydın
Night vision enhancements. Clarity
and range.
Charlie Meadors
A more comfortable seat.
Mike Cumbie
Equipment Upgrades
Response to the question, “What’s on
your mind regarding the helicopter
industry? What has struck a chord
with you lately, or been on your mind
regarding a recent issue, broad or
specific?”
What actions must a pilot take if he
gets into some serious downdrafts? In
this case, the helicopter is a Eurocop-
ter Ecureuil AS350 BA.
Sobit Gauchan
Do you have comments on the rotorcraft industry or recent articles and viewpoints we’ve published? Send them to: Editor, Rotor
& Wing, 4 Choke Cherry Road, Second Floor, Rockville, MD 20850, fax us at 301-354-1809 or email us at rotorandwing@accessintel.
com. Please include a city and state or province with your name and ratings. We reserve the right to edit all submitted material.
“The majority of accidents
come from human error.”

R&W’s Question of the Month

What do you think of the
new look of the redesigned
www.rotorandwing.com?
Let us know, and look for your and others’ responses in
a future issue. You’ll find contact information below.
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Meet the
Contributors
CLAUDIO AGOSTINI, aerospace and
defense consultant, has been engaged
with helicopter market competitive intel-
ligence for more than 20 years. He has
been writing for Rotor & Wing about heli-
copters in Latin America since 1999. He has also been
engaged with local helicopter events and seminars since
2002, and regularly provides support in some areas to the
Brazilian Association of Helicopter Pilots (ABRAPHE)
in São Paulo, where he is based. Although not a licensed
pilot, he’s had the opportunity to fly in a wide range of
helicopters, from the Robinson R22 up to the Mil Mi-26,
in many parts of the world.
KEITH CIANFRANI is a retired U.S.
Army lieutenant colonel, master aviator
and Army instructor pilot, rated in both
helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft. He
holds a master’s degree in aerospace
safety from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. Keith
is a certificated flight instructor and has flown com-
mercial aircraft for more than 20 years in and around the
New York City area.
ANDREW DRWIEGA, Military Editor, is a
senior defense journalist with a particular
focus on international military rotorcraft.
He has reported on attachment from Iraq
three times (the latest of which was with a
U.S. Marine Corps MV-22 squadron), and three times with
British forces in Afghanistan (Kandahar and Camp Bas-
tion), as well as from numerous exercises. He has flown in
a wide variety of rotorcraft including the MV-22B Osprey,
AH-64D Apache, Rooivalk and many others.
THIERRY DUBOIS is a long-time con-
tributor to Access Intelligence publica-
tions. He has been an aerospace journal-
ist for 12 years, specializing in helicopters
since 2006. He writes on technical sub-
jects, both for professional media and a popular science
magazine in France.
FRANK LOMBARDI, an ATP with both
fixed-wing and rotary-wing ratings, began
his flying career in 1991 after graduating
with a bachelor’s of science in aerospace
engineering, working on various airplane
and helicopter programs as a flight test engineer for Grum-
man Aerospace Corp. Frank became a police officer for a
major East Coast police department in 1995, and has been
flying helicopters in the department’s aviation section since
2000. He remains active in test and evaluation, and holds a
master’s degree in aviation systems-flight testing from the
University of Tennessee Space Institute.
DOUGLAS NELMS has more than 30 years
of experience as an aviation journalist and
currently works as a freelance writer. He has
served as managing editor of Rotor & Wing.
A former U.S. Army helicopter pilot, Nelms
specializes in writing about helicopters.
CHRIS SHEPPARD is the Associate Editor
of Rotor & Wing. Coming from a strong
background in journalism and public rela-
tions, she was an editor for a leading online
newswire for several years. She has covered
a wide range of topics, both online and in print since 2002.
Chris is currently pursuing her master’s degree in Journalism
at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. She can be
reached at csheppard@accessintel.com.
DALE SMITH has been an aviation journal-
ist for 24 years specializing in business avia-
tion. He is currently a contributing writer
for Rotor & Wing and other leading aviation
magazines. He has been a licensed pilot
since 1974 and has flown 35 different types of general avia-
tion, business and WWII vintage aircraft.
ERNIE STEPHENS, Editor-at-Large, began
flying in the 1980s, earning his commer-
cial pilot’s license and starting an aerial
photography company as a sideline. In his
regular job as a county police officer, he was
transferred to the department’s newly established aviation
unit, where he served as the sergeant in charge and chief pilot
until his retirement in 2006.
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12 ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2012 WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
For daily and breaking news involving helicopters, go to:
www.aviationtoday/rw
Become a fan of Rotor & Wing on
Follow us on @rotorandwing
■ MILITARY
|
PROCUREMENT
Army Orders 39
Lakotas from EADS
EADS North America has received
a U.S. Army contract for 39 UH-72A
Lakota light utility helicopters (LUHs).
The $212-million contract will involve
32 Lakotas outfitted with a mission
equipment package (MEP) being
delivered to the Army’s security and
support (S&S) battalion. Those 32
helicopters will enter service with the
U.S. Army National Guard. EADS
North America has handed over a total
of 198 UH-72A Lakotas to the Army
through early January 2012, with a total
of 345 helicopters expected for delivery
by 2015.
■ MILITARY
|
AIRFRAMES
Boeing Wins
Chinook Contract
The U.S. Army has contracted Boeing
to supply 14 CH-47F Chinooks as part
of the government’s foreign military
sales (FMS) program. The contract,
valued at $370 million, will involve
seven helicopters for the Australian
Defence Force and six for the United
Arab Emirates (UAE). The other
CH-47F will be dispatched to the U.S.
Army. According to H-47 program vice
president Leanne Caret, the contract
raises Boeing’s Chinook backlog above
200 aircraft. Boeing is also awaiting the
Army’s decision on a second five-year,
firm fixed-price proposal for additional
Chinooks.
■ SERVICES
|
FLIGHT TESTING
AW189 Takes Maiden Flight
AgustaWestland’s AW189 prototype has taken to the skies for the first time.
Chief test pilot Giuseppe Lo Coco was at the controls for the AW189, which he
said “performed as expected” following the flight. The initial prototype will be
used mainly for avionics testing and offshore certification. A second prototype
will conduct load survey testing during 2012. AgustaWestland expects civil
certification of the helicopter in 2013, with deliveries to begin in 2014. The
AW189 made its public debut at the 2011 Paris Air Show.
■ COMMERCIAL
|
AIRFRAMES
Range Extension: Transport Canada
Approves Bell 429 Performance Boost
Transport Canada has granted approval for a 500-lb. increase to the weight of
the Bell 429. The move increases the maximum gross weight of the helicopter
to 7,500 lbs., which gives operators additional range “to take better advantage of
the helicopter’s IFR/WAAS capabilities,” according to Larry Roberts, senior vice
president of Bell Helicopter’s Commercial business unit. The approval follows
months of testing and evaluation. Transport Canada concluded that the 429 “would
suffer no technical constraints by increasing the gross weight.” Bell plans to petition
FAA and EASA for a Part 27 exemption from the max gross weight of 7,000 lbs.
With onlookers witnessing the landmark event, AgustaWestland’s newest variant—the
AW189—went airborne for the first time Dec. 21 at its plant in Cascina Costa, Italy.
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14 ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2012 WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
Rotorcraft Report
■ COMMERCIAL
|
OFFSHORE
Multitrole EC225s Support
Heli-Union, COHC
Eurocopter has delivered two EC225s to French air transport
operator, Heli-Union. The new helicopters will be used for
offshore oil and gas transport missions. Heli-Union has also
purchased four EC175s, with a projected delivery date of 2013.
The manufacturer has also received an order for seven
EC225LP Super Pumas from CITIC Offshore Helicopter
Co. (COHC) in China for oil and gas transport missions. In
addition to the purchase, the two companies are develop-
ing a joint venture that will focus on cooperative training
and launch a Chinese maintenance facility. Deliveries of the
EC225s are set to start in December 2012 and run until 2015.
In addition, Eurocopter has agreed to supply a second
EC225 to the Tokyo Fire Department’s Tachikawa Air Squad-
ron. The helicopter will be equipped with a belly-mounted
water tank and EMS interior, and is expected to service
Tokyo city, western mountainous areas and Hachijo-jima
Island. The EC225 will join Tachikawa’s existing fleet, which
consists of seven Eurocopter types—four Dauphin N3s, two
Super Puma L1s and one EC225.
■ PUBLIC SERVICE
|
COMPLETIONS
SAR-Configured S-92 Joins
Irish Coast Guard Fleet
Sikorsky has finished
production on an S-92
for CHC Helicopter.
CHC will operate the
search and rescue (SAR)
dedicated helicopter for
the Irish Coast Guard.
The S-92 will replace
the Coast Guard’s S-61,
which has been in service
for around 20 years. The S-92 will be stationed in Shannon,
Ireland. CHC supplies a fleet of six S-61s on behalf of the
Irish Coast Guard. The S-92 will serve offshore islands and
provide SAR coverage from Cork to Galway.
■ SERVICES
|
ENGINES
M International Acquires
Keystone Engine Services
McLean, Va.-based M International has purchased the Keystone
Engine Services division of Sikorsky Global Helicopters. M
International has formed a new company, Keystone Turbine
Services, that will operate from a 30,000-square-foot facility
in Coatesville, Pa. The acquisition expands M’s turboprop and
turboshaft engine maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO)
services, notes CEO Richard McConn. Keystone Turbine is a
Rolls-Royce and Honeywell-approved MRO facility.
This Sikorsky S-92 replaces an S-61.
From left to right: CNN CEO Patrick Molis, Eurocopter CEO Lutz
Bertling and Heli-Union CEO Jean-Christophe Schmitt.
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16 ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2012 WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
Rotorcraft Report
■ MILITARY
|
COMPLETIONS
Italian Armed Forces Receive NH90s
PARTS AND SERVICES YOU CAN TRUST...EVERY STEP OF THE WAY!
PLEASE VISIT US AT 2012 HELI-EXPO, BOOTH # 9046
TEL: 305-251-7200 • FAX: 305-251-2300
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■ SERVICES
|
EMS
Reach Launches
New Texas Base
Santa Rosa, Calif.-based Reach Air
Medical has teamed with Methodist
Healthcare of Houston to establish
a second HEMS base. Methodist
AirCare 2, located in Pearsall, Texas,
will operate a Bell 407, equipped
with night vision goggles (NVGs).
Reach Air Medical has also added
three new hospitals to its service
region in southwest Texas.
■ MILITARY
|
AVIONICS
Sagem Services
Strix Systems
SIMMAD has contracted Safran
Group subsidiary, Sagem, to provide
life-cycle support for Strix sighting
systems on the French Army’s fleet
of Eurocopter Tigers. The five-
year agreement with the Army’s
air division (ALAT) covers 50
Strix turret-mounted systems for
maintenance and service. Sagem
will also establish an ALAT hotline
in France and in overseas locations
where the Tigers are in service.
The first NH90 NATO Frigate Helicopters from AgustaWestland’s Venice Tessera assembly line
have been delivered to the Italian Army and Navy. The Italian Armed Forces have ordered 60
helicopters in total.
AgustaWestland has completed deliveries of two NH90 NATO Frigate Helicopters
(NFHs) to the Italian Army and Navy. The helicopters were the first from
AgustaWestland’s NH90 final assembly line in Venice Tessera, Italy. The Italian
Army’s delivery was the first of a 60-helicopter order as part of a fleet replacement,
with the Italian Navy ordering 46 NFHs and 10 tactical transport helicopter (TTH)
NH90 variants.
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At Aeronautical Accessories, demanding quality is a way of life. We are a proven industry leader
with global capabilities and stringent quality systems. But quality is more than our experience and
achievements—it’s about our people. Our team takes pride in enabling our customers’ mission, and
getting it right the first time. That personal commitment drives us to deliver reliable, top-quality parts
you can depend on.
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©2012 Bell Helicopter Textron Inc. All rights reserved.
Innovation. Reliability. Performance.
John Friedrichs
Director, Quality Control
18 ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2012 WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
Rotorcraft Report
■ SERVICES
|
MAINTENANCE
Helibras to Maintain Brazilian EC725s
Eurocopter subsidiary, Helibras, has reached an agreement to provide parts,
service, inspections, overhaul and repairs for the Brazilian Armed Forces’ fleet of
50 Eurocopter EC725s on order. The five-year contract covers all three branches
of Brazil’s military. Helibras will also dispatch teams to provide on-site service at
EC725 bases. Three EC725s have entered service with the Brazilian Air Force,
Army and Navy, with production on the remaining 47 helicopters scheduled to
start in 2012.
■ COMMERCIAL
|
OFFSHORE
Russia Certifies,
UTair and Kenya
Receive AS350s
The Interstate Aviation Committee has
approved the Eurocopter AS350B3e
in Russia. This certification allows
Ecureuil operation in Russia and the
Commonwealth of Independent States.
Following the certification, UTair
Aviation took delivery of three of the
type. UTair placed an order in 2010 for 20
helicopters from Eurocopter, comprising
13 AS350B3es, six AS355NPs and one
AS350B3. The helicopters will be used
for cargo airlift, oil and gas pipeline
patrols, surveillance and executive
transport missions throughout Russia
and Siberia.
Eurocopter has also handed over
an AS350B3e to the Kenya Police
Air-Wing, making it the first African
operator of the variant. The aircraft fly
anti-poaching, counterterrorism and
other law enforcement duties.
The Brazilian Armed Forces has a total of 47 more Eurocopter EC725s on order.
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HeliCenter
September 11–16, 2012
Berlin ExpoCenter Airport
www.ila-berlin.com
Solutions for
any mission
Hosted by
Europe’s top helicopter event in 2012
Extensive networking possibilities
Exceptional conference offer
20 ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2012 WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
Rotorcraft Report
2012:
PEOPLE
The EADS board
of di rectors has
e l e c t e d S e a n
O’Keefe as chair-
man of the board.
The EADS North
America CEO will replace the retiring
Ralph Crosby. O’ Keefe served as
vice president of the technology
infrastructure sector of General
Electric before being appointed CEO
of EADS in 2009.
Fargo, N.D.-based Spectrum Aer-
omed has hired Michael Gallagher as
vice president and project manager. He
will oversee design, product develop-
ment, sales and system analysis of air
medical equipment. Gallagher comes
to Spectrum from Curtis Construction
Company, where he was the owner.
Phil Sprio has
been named presi-
dent and CEO of
Man Lift Manufac-
turing in Cudahy,
Wis. Spiro replaces
Jeff Bailey, who founded the com-
pany in 2000 and will remain as a
director.
The Civil Aviation Authority of
New Zealand has appointed Graeme
Harris chief executive and director.
Harris will succeed Steve Doug-
las following his resignation, which
will take effect in April. Harris has
worked with the CAA in a variety of
roles since 2004.
Dr. Nidal Sammur has been pro-
moted to director of engineering for
FlightSafety International’s simula-
tion facility in Bro-
ken Arrow, Okla.
Sammur was most
recently staff sci-
entist for the com-
pany before being
promoted to replace the retiring Ron
Jantzen. Nidal has worked with Flight-
Safety since 1992.
Greg Setter has joined Mesa,
Ariz.,-based BDN Aerospace Market-
ing as account director. Setter, who has
more than 25 years of aviation experi-
ence, will oversee strategic planning
and account services for BDN. Setter
was previously with Honeywell Aero-
space as its marketing communications
strategy manager for commercial avia-
tion, and held similar roles at GE Avia-
tion and Rockwell Collins.
Feb. 11–14: Helicopter Association International (HAI) Heli-
Expo 2012, Dallas, Texas. Contact HAI, 1-703-683-4646 or visit
www.rotor.com
Feb. 12–15: 1st Asian/Australian Rotorcraft Forum and
Exhibition (ARF & Exhibition 2012), Busan, South Korea. Contact
Asian Rotorcraft Forum, phone +82-42-350-5756 or visit www.
arf2012.org/
Feb. 15–17: Helicopter Maintenance Management Seminar
(HMMS), Irving, Texas. Contact Conklin & de Decker, phone
1-817-277-6403 or visit www.conklindd.com
Feb. 22–24: Association of the U.S. Army (AUSA) Winter
Symposium, Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Contact AUSA, 1-703-841-4300,
toll free 1-800-336-4570 or visit www.ausa.org
March 16–18: Helicopter Association of Canada (HAC) 16th
Annual Convention and Trade Show, Ottawa, Canada. Contact
HAC, phone 1-613-231-1110 or visit www.h-a-c.ca
March 15–16: SAR Europe 2012, Dublin, Ireland. Contact
Shephard Group, phone +44 (0) 1753 727015 or visit www.
shephard.co.uk/events
April 3–6: 55th Annual AEA International Convention & Trade
Show, Washington, D.C. Contact AEA, phone 1-816-347-8400 or
visit www.aea.net/convention
April 22–27: Medical Transport Leadership Institute, Wheeling,
W.V. AAMS, 1-703-836-8732 or visit www.aams.org
May 1–3: AHS Intl. 68th Annual Forum and Technology
Display, Fort Worth, Texas. Contact AHS Intl, phone 1-703-684-
6777 or visit www.vtol.org
May 17–19: 5th International Helicopter Industry Exhibition,
Moscow, Russia. Contact HeliRussia, phone +7 (0) 495 958 9490 or
visit helirussia.ru/en
May 23–24: Heli & UV Pacific 2012, Queensland, Australia.
Contact Shephard Group, phone +44 (0) 1753 727015 or visit www.
shephard.co.uk/events
Sept. 4–7: European Rotorcraft Forum 2012, Amsterdam, The
Netherlands. Contact National Aerospace Laboratory NLR, phone
+31 88 511 3165 or visit www.erf2012.nlr.nl/index.html
Sept. 26–27: The Helicopter Show, Luffield Abbey, England.
Contact The Helicopter Show, phone +44 (0) 20 8330 4424 or visit
www.thehelicoptershow.com
Oct. 30–Nov.1: Helicopter Military Operations Technology
Specialists’ Meeting (HELMOT XV), Williamsburg, Va. Contact
AHS Intl, phone 1-703-684-6777 or visit www.vtol.org
Nov. 6–8: Dubai Helishow 2012, Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
Contact Mediac Communications and Exhibitions, phone +44
(0)1293 823 779 or visit www.dubaihelishow.com
2013:
May 21–23: AHS Intl. 69th Annual Forum and Technology
Display, Phoenix, Ariz. Contact AHS Intl, phone 1-703-684-6777 or
visit www.vtol.org
Rotorcraft Report
21 FEBRUARY 2012 | ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
Visit us at Heli-Expo
Booth 3122
The most important thing we build is trust
HeliSAS is STC’d for Bell 206/407
and Eurocopter AS350 Series/EC130
Cobham Commercial Systems
One S-TEC Way
Mineral Wells, TX 76067
(817) 215-7600
sales.mineralwells@cobham.com
www.helisas.com
Enhances Flight Stability.
As one of HeliSAS’ two main
functions, the Stability
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control during all modes of
flight, regardless of wind
conditions or aircraft
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Reduces Pilot Workload.
As a two-axis attitude hold,
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control system, HeliSAS
significantly reduces pilot
workload. When engaged,
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Eurocopter AS350 Series
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HeliSAS
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Autopilot and
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■ MILITARY
|
COMPLETIONS
British Army
Receives Final Lynx
AgustaWestland has handed over the
last Lynx AH Mk9A to the British
Army Air Corps. The Lynx Mk9A is
a f leet-wide upgrade of the Lynx
Mk9, outfitted with new engines and
modifications to the gearbox, fuselage
and interior displays. AgustaWestland’s
Yeovil facility produced 22 of the
upgraded helicopters under the Urgent
Operational Requirement contracts
from the Ministry of Defence.
■ SERVICES
|
CERTIFICATION
FAA Approves Metro
EC155 EMS Kit
Shreveport, La.-based Metro Aviation
has received a supplemental type
certificate (STC) for its emergency
medical system kit for the Eurocopter
EC155B1. The certification marks the
first time an EC155B1 with an EMS
package has received approval in the
U.S., according to Metro. The STC
covers a variety of EMS interior options
including secondary patient restraint,
seating and a cabin overhead module
with four audio and control touch
panels.
AgustaWestland has delivered the final British
Army Lynx AH Mk9A.
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Rotorcraft Report
■ MILITARY
|
UAV
Unmanned K-MAX
Operational in Afghanistan
Lockheed Martin and Kaman Aerospace’s unmanned
K-MAX has entered combat service with the U.S. Marine
Corps in Afghanistan. USMC’s Unmanned Aerial Vehicle
Squadron 1 received the first K-MAX unmanned aerial
system in early December, with the initial cargo re-supply
mission taking place on Dec. 17. The unmanned helicopter
transported more than 3,000 lbs. of food and supplies
from Camp Dwyer to troops at Combat Outpost Payne in
the Helmand Province—all in less than two hours.
“We delivered cargo today that was supposed to be
delivered by convoy, now that convoy has three pallets
that it does not have to carry,” noted Maj. Kyle O’Connor,
the officer-in-charge of Squadron 1’s cargo resupply
detachment. The delivery signifies the first step in a six-
month testing period in Afghanistan, after which the
Marine Corps may opt to use the K-MAX as part of its
aerial resupply capabilities. The demonstration phase will
“test the true capabilities of this aircraft and how well it
can perform its job in a combat environment,” O’Connor
continued.
While the unmanned K-MAX will lessen the threat of
personnel loss during deliveries, the Navy doesn’t plan to take
unnecessary risks with the K-MAX, stating that a majority of
the re-supply operations “will be conducted at night and at
higher altitudes … to keep out of small arms range.”
The UAV completed a five-day quick reaction assess-
ment (QRA) for the U.S. Navy in mid-2011. The QRA
was part of a $45.8-million contract awarded in Decem-
ber 2010 to test the UAV in a cargo resupply role for the
Marine Corps.
■ SERVICES
|
MAINTENANCE
American Eurocopter Becomes
EC135, EC145 MRO Hub
Eurocopter has designated its U. S. subsidiary as a
maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) center for
EC135s and EC145s in North and Latin America. With
this designation, American Eurocopter is now able to
perform Level D MRO actions on EC135/145 airframes,
blades and dynamic components. The manufacturer
expects turnaround ti mes on repai rs to decrease
for operators through the designation. American
Eurocopter, the largest of the parent company’s various
geographical subsidiaries, already supports the AS350,
AS365, EC120/130, and EC155.
■ MILITARY
|
AVIONICS
DRS Upgrades Pave Hawks
Dayton, Ohio-based DRS Defense Solutions’ intelligence,
communications and avionics solutions (ICAS) division
has won a $12-million U.S. Air Force contract to upgrade
Sikorsky HH-60G Pave Hawks. DRS will replace first-
generation altitude hold and hover stabilization systems
(AHHS) with fifth-generation improved altitude hold and
hover stabilization systems (IAHHS). The contract also
covers platform integration, the development of a technical
data package, production kits, spares and support. According
to Logan Thiran, president of DRS ICAS, the avionics system
will help pilots navigate through brownout conditions in
Afghanistan and Iraq.
The unmanned K-MAX is now in the midst of a six-month aerial
resupply testing period in Afghanistan.
The K-MAX unmanned aerial helicopter during its first cargo
delivery for the U.S. Marine Corps in Afghanistan.
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23 FEBRUARY 2012 | ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
© 2012 Cobham. All rights reserved.
Cobham Commercial Systems
One S-TEC Way
Mineral Wells, TX 76067 USA
T: 817-215-7600
F: 940-325-3904
E: sales.mineralwells@cobham.com
Interested in becoming a HeliSAS
dealership? Contact Judy Kring at
judy.kring@cobham.com
www.cobham.com
Aerial Avionics
Hillsboro Aviation
Eagle Copters
Mayday Avionics
NexAir Avionics LLC
Wysong
Enterprises, Inc.
Edwards & Associates
United Rotorcraft Solutions
Uniflight, LLC Metro Aviation
RJ Corman Aircraft Maintenance, LLC
Aeronautical Accessories
Sarasota Avionics
Gardner Aviation Specialists, Inc.
Aerial Avionics
josephm@aerialavionics.com
408-258-5858
Aeronautical Accessories
sales@aero-access.com
423-538-5151
Eagle Copters
growe@eaglecopters.com
403-250-7370
Edwards & Associates
cwoodward@bellhelicopter.textron.com
423-391-3806
Gardner Aviation Specialists, Inc.
khgardner@gardneraviation.com
770-486-6061
Hillsboro Aviation
tdalquist@hillsboroaviation.com
503-648-2831
Mayday Avionics
rbrooks@maydayavionics.com
616-957-4920
Metro Aviation
lharvey@metroaviation.com
318-698-5200
NexAir Avionics LLC
davidfetherston@nexair.com
508-339-7077
RJ Corman Aircraft Maintenance, LLC
kari.hammons@rjcorman.com
859-881-2480
Sarasota Avionics
ryan@sarasotaavionics.com
941-360-6877 x127
Uniflight, LLC
dhornung@uniflight.com
972-623-3444
United Rotorcraft Solutions
david@unitedrotorcraft.com
940-627-0626
Wysong Enterprises, Inc.
bnorthrup@wysongusa.com
423-325-6900
International dealership list available
at www.helisas.com.
The most important thing we build is trust
HeliSAS
®
Authorized
Dealerships
■ MILITARY
|
COMPLETIONS
Polish Air Force
Upgrades Fleet
AgustaWestland subsidiary PZL-Swidnik
has inked an agreement with the Polish
Ministry of National Defence to provide
five W-3WA Sokols and upgrade 14
more. The Polish Air Force will use the
W-3WAs for government and military
transport. Plans call for PZL-Swidnik to
overhaul eight Russian Mi-2s, convert
four W-3 Sokols to the W-3PL Gluszec
armed configuration and upgrade
two W-3s with a FADEC system. The
converted W-3PLs are scheduled for
delivery in 2014.
■ TRAINING
|
SIMULATORS
CAE Wins Military,
Civil Contracts
Canada-based CAE has received a
number of recent military and civil
contracts totaling more than C$100
million ($99 million). The Department of
National Defence in Canada has tasked
CAE with upgrading its Bell CH-146
Griffon and Lockheed CC-130H
simulators. The Griffon simulator will
feature an updated computer system and
instructor operator station.
Professional Way in Malaysia has
signed with CAE for maintenance
and support on the 3000 Series
AgustaWestland AW139 full-flight
simulator that CAE is developing.
The company is also providing a 3000
Series FFS and training services for two
undisclosed customers.
■ COMMERCIAL
|
AIRFRAMES
Robinson Doubles
2010 Production
Torrance, Calif.-based Robinson
Helicopter Company is reporting an
upswing in production for 2011,
comprising 56 R22s, 88 R66s and 212
R44s. The total number of 356 is a sharp
increase over 2010, when Robinson
assembled 162 helicopters.
24 ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2012 WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
Rotorcraft Report
FAA PMA
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SAME-DAY SHIPPING
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■ SERVICES
|
MAINTENANCE
Canadian Forces
Signs with Bell
Bell Helicopter has won a 10-year,
C$640 million ($630.9 million) contract
for support and service for the Canadian
Forces’ fleet of CH146 Griffons. The
CH146 optimized weapon system
support (OWSS) contract will cover
mai ntenance and management
services, spare parts and engineering
and technical publications. OWSS also
has four one-year options available after
the initial 10-year contract expires and
will combine three existing contracts
for engineering, overhaul, repairs and
supplies. According to Bell, the Mirabel
plant and Calgary supply center will
provide the materials needed to fulfill
the agreement.
■ MILITARY
|
AIRFRAMES
Russian Air Force
Expands Fleet
Russian Helicopters has reached an
agreement to provide the Russian Air
Force with up to 30 Kamov Ka-226s by
2020, according to Defense Ministry
spokesman Vladimir Drik. The Air
Force’s training center in Torzhok
already took delivery of 17 helicopters
i n December 2011, i ncl udi ng
Mi-8MTVs, Mi-28Ns, Mi-35s and
Ka-52s. Four Ka-226s were projected
for delivery to the training center by
the end of January.
■ PRODUCTS
|
REPLACEMENT PARTS
V-22 Awards Parts
Contract
The Bel l -Boei ng Joi nt Proj ect
Office has obtained a $7.2-million
modification involving a fixed-price-
incentive-fee contract. The adjustment
involves production line preparation
of spare parts for the V-22 program.
Bell-Boeing expects to complete the
parts by October 2014.
■ PUBLIC SERVICE
|
LAW ENFORCEMENT
Fairfax Bell 429 Includes Becker Audio
Bell has handed over the first of two 429s to the Fairfax County Police Department
in Northern Virginia. The helicopters come equipped with Becker Avionics’
DVCS6100 digital audio system. Paradigm Aerospace Corporation/PAC
International customized the helicopter for both law enforcement and EMS
missions at its facility in Mount Pleasant, Pa. Bell Helicopter plans to deliver the
second Fairfax 429 later this year. Fairfax County has two additional Bell 407s in
its Helicopter Division fleet. The new Bell 429 is also the first of the type to feature
the new multi-mission configuration for airborne law enforcement, EMS and
search and rescue (SAR).
See page 38 for a photo of the Fairfax County
Bell 429. Look for the full story from Editor-at-
Large Ernie Stephens in Rotor & Wing’s Show Day
publication at Heli-Expo, and visit our web page:
www.aviationtoday.com/rw/heliexpo2012
Rotorcraft Report
25 FEBRUARY 2012 | ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
■ COMMERCIAL
|
AVIONICS
S-92 Receives STC
for Blue Sky
Blue Sky Network has earned a
suppl ement al type certi f i cate
(STC) for its communication and
tracking systems on the Sikorsky
S-92. La Jolla, Calif.-based Blue
Sky’s D1000A uses built-in GPS
position reporting with satellite
transceivers and telemetry data to
provide near real-time tracking.
The ACH1000 allows voice and
two-way communication between
pi l ots and ground crews. The
helicopter can also be securely
tracked with Blue Sky’s onl ine
portal SkyRouter.
■ SERVICES
|
MILITARY
AECOM Supports
USAF Helicopters
Los Angeles, Calif.-based AECOM
Technol ogy Cor porat i on has
received a $16.5-million task order
contract by the U.S. Air Force for
Contract Field Teams (CFT). The
three-year order covers field and
limited sustainment maintenance
for the USAF’s Boei ng AH-64
Apaches, CH-47 Chinooks, Sikorsky
UH-60 Black Hawks and HH-60
Pave Hawks. Ground support
equipment is also included with the
contract.
■ COMMERCIAL
|
EMS
Metro Completes
Sanford EC145
Metro Aviation of Shreveport, La.
has handed over the first of three
Eurocopter EC145s for Sanford
Health’s facility in Sioux Falls,
S.D. The helicopter is expected to
enter service in January. Scheduled
for delivery later this year, the
remaining helicopters will be based
out of Fargo, N.D.
Visit us at Heli-Expo,
Booth 3122
Cobham Aerospace
Communications
6400 Wilkinson Drive
Prescott, AZ 86301 USA
1-928-708-1550
sales.prescott@cobham.com
www.cobham.com
The most important thing we build is trust.
We didn’t invent tactical
radios. We just keep
perfecting them.
The Cobham RT-5000P

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frequency bands with one radio.

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P-25 channel information. No computer required!

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© 2012 Cobham plc. All rights reserved.
The new
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in one radio.
All-band P25 capability
26 ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2012 WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
Rotorcraft Report
■ MILITARY
|
ATTACK
Longbow Snares
Apache Contract
Lockheed Martin and Northrop
Grumman’s joint venture, Longbow
LLC, has won an U.S. Army contract
worth $181 million for Boeing
AH-64D Apache Block III Longbow
systems. The contract also covers
Taiwan’s purchase of 15 Block III
Longbow fire control radar (FCR)
systems. The agreement marks the
first international sales of the FCR.
Longbow will also provide 14
unmanned aerial system tactical com-
mon data link assembly (UTA) sys-
tems and 18 Radar Electronic Units
(REU), plus spares, for the Army’s new
fleet of Block III Apaches.
Lockheed Martin’s facilities in
Ocala and Orlando, Fla. and Northrop
Grumman’s plant in Baltimore, Md.
will perform the work under the new
contract.
■ TRAINING
|
CERTIFICATION
CASA Grants 147
to Australian Aero
Australian Aerospace has received
Part 147 certificate approval from
the Civil Aviation Safety Authority
(CASA). Austral i an Aerospace
becomes the first civil helicopter
maintenance training operator in
the Asia-Pacific region to receive
such approval under a new series of
maintenance safety regulations in
Australia.
“The new regulations, which came
into force in June this year, will enhance
safety because they introduce require-
ments for safety management systems
and human factors training into the
maintenance sector for the first time,”
according to John McCormick, direc-
tor of aviation safety for CASA.
McCormick also added that while
operators had up to two years to tran-
sition to the new safety regulations,
Australian Aerospace completed it in
less than six months.
■ PUBLIC SERVICE
|
EMS
Doctor Heli Adds GrandNew to Fleet
AgustaWestland has completed delivery of a GrandNew to Kagoshima International
Aviation of Japan for the Doctor Heli EMS system. The helicopter is the first EMS-
configured GrandNew operating in the country. Doctor Heli’s latest helicopter has
entered service the Kagoshima Prefecture in southern Japan.
■ SERVICES
|
NIGHT VISION
Aero Dynamix Upgrades Toll Bell 412s
Euless, Texas-based Aero Dynamix has incorporated night vision goggle (NVG)
cockpit upgrades into two Bell 412s in service with Toll Remote Logistics. Toll
contracted Spokane, Wash.-based Eagle Helicopters for the modifications, who
in turn, subcontracted Aero Dynamix. The newly outfitted Bell 412s will be used
for multi-mission operations.
■ PUBLIC SERVICE
|
MISSION EQUIPMENT
Helijet and Max-Viz Outfit Canadian
Sikorsky S-76s with EVS
Portland, Ore.-based Max-Viz has teamed with Helijet of Vancouver, Canada to
equip three Sikorsky S-76s with the Max-Viz EVS1500 system. The helicopters
will perform EMS missions for the British Columbia government under a
contract with Helijet. Pilots flying the S-76s with the enhanced vision system
have already reported back that they are able to see “fog and cloud formations and
concentrations of precipitation during the day enabling them to pick safer routes
ahead,” according to Max-Viz.
Doctor Heli files the first EMS-equipped AgustaWestland GrandNew in Japan.
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27 FEBRUARY 2012 | ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
■ CORPORATE
|
VIP
Capital Air Flies
EC135 Hermes
Eurocopter has delivered an EC135
“l’ Hel icoptere par Hermes” to
London, England-based Capital Air
Services. The House of Hermes-
detailed helicopter features more
than 150 design changes to both the
interior and exterior. The EC135 is
the fifth for Capital Air Services and
will be used for corporate charter
flights. Capital Air’s fleet also includes
EC155 B1s, and AS355s.
■ SERVICES
|
MILITARY
Sikorsky Wins UAE
Conversion Contract
The U.S. Army has awarded Sikorsky
Ai rcraft Corp. an $81. 2-mill ion
firm-fixed-price contract to convert
UH-60M Black Hawks for the United
Arab Emirates (UAE) Armed Forces.
Sikorsky’s facility in Stratford, Conn.
will handle the conversions, which are
expected for completion by December
2012. The U.S. Army Contracting
Command, based out of Redstone
Arsenal, Ala. is tasked with the
contracting activity.
Capital Air’s fleet now boasts a House of
Hermes-outfitted Eurocopter EC135 for
executive transport in the UK.
E
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c
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© 2012 Cobham. All rights reserved.
Cobham’s DACS delivers complete audio
control among aircraft transceivers,
receivers, and audio warning sources.
DACS is configurable to suit mission-
specific communication needs. Designed
for tactical operations, the DACS
three-component system offers significant
technological advancements and
end-user benefits.
Benefits and features:
Enhanced sound performance
Reduced weight
Reduced complexity
Reduced installation cost
Flexible, configurable with
DACS software
Integrated Audio Warning Generator
Digital audio processing and control
TSO-C139, ETSO-C50c
Cobham Aerospace
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6400 Wilkinson Drive
Prescott, AZ 86301 USA
1-928-708-1550
sales.prescott@cobham.com






www.cobham.com
Visit us at Heli-Expo, Booth 3122
DACS Digital Audio Control System.
You’ll hear the difference.
The most important thing we build is trust
28 ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2012 WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
Rotorcraft Report
Sgt. Joshua Stevens, a parachute rigger, prepares to hook up a sling load to a Russian Mi-8 at Forward Operating Base Salerno in Afghanistan
in early January. Task Force Spartan recently took over areas of responsibility in Paktya and Khowst provinces.
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■ SERVICES
|
MAINTENANCE
Marine Discovers
Maintenance Issue
U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Christopher
Lemke has received the Navy and
Marine Corps Achievement Medal in
Afghanistan thanks to his discovery
of previously unknown maintenance
issue on a Bell UH-1Y Huey.
Lemke, a mechanic with Marine
Light Attack Helicopter Squadron
369, was performing a routine phase
inspection of the helicopter’s trans-
mission compartment when he dis-
covered that the transmission pylon
beam and the main beam joint, which
attaches the transmission to the Huey
airframe, were decomposing.
“When two metals rub together,
it creates this black liquid, and that’s
what I found,” Lemke said. “No one
else had ever found such an issue, but
when we looked at another aircraft
we had in phase, it had the same
problem.”
The area Lemke was inspecting
is known as the “hell hole” as it is dif-
ficult to reach and was not required
that day as there was no known issue
with that portion of the helicopter.
Following Lemke’s find, there was
a fleet-wide inspection and an engi-
neering advisory report.
“Our job isn’t just replacing things.
If we don’t do it right, that’s someone’s
life,” Lemke said.
© 2012 Cobham. All rights reserved.
Visit us at Heli-Expo
Booth 3122
Find out why Carson Helicopters and the Los Angeles Police
Department have selected Cobham’s 3D Synthetic Vision
EFIS for their helicopter fleets:
Superior precision/increased reliability
for higher dispatch rates
£ADAHRS handles special mission flight
requirements such as multiple tight orbits
£Lower operating costs
£Lighter weight for increased payload
£Reduced pilot workload and fatigue
for safer operation
£Field-updatable software allows new functionalities
without replacing hardware components
Cobham Commercial Systems
Integrated Systems
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Mineral Wells, TX 76067
817-215-7600
sales.mineralwells@cobham.com
www.cobham.com
Sikorsky S-61, S-76, and UH-60 Retrofits
Los Angeles Police Department
Trusted by Carson Helicopters and
the Los Angeles Police Department
The most important thing we build is trust
© 2012 Cobham. All rights reserved.
Sgt. Christopher Lemke under the “hell
hole” of a Bell UH-1Y Huey.
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for Helicopter Operators
Aero Dynamix Provides Garmin Avionics
Products and Repairs
Aero Dynamix, Inc. (ADI) is the industry leader and principle innovator of integrated Night
Vision Imaging System (NVIS) solutions for both commercial and military aircraft. ADI is a
full-line distributor and certified repair station for Garmin avionics, and offers internal NVG
instrument modifications for Garmin products that do not compromise on the Garmin fac-
tory warranty. Featured here are the Garmin GTN 650 and GTN 750. The GTN family
combines GPS, COM and NAV functions with powerful multifunction display capabilities
like high-resolution terrain mapping, graphical flight planning, satellite weather, traffic
display and much more. The touchscreen interface provides quick and intuitive access to all
GTN functions including pan and zoom, waypoint entry and route modification, weather,
terrain, and communications. Data entry is handled through the on-screen keyboard. The GTN 750 offers a 6.9-inch diagonal
high-resolution display. It’s even designed with raised grips in the bezel and a shelf across the lower edge of the display that
serve as anchor points in both smooth and turbulent flight conditions. The GTN 650 packs the same powerful touchscreen
technology as the GTN 750, but has been optimized to make the most of it smaller 4.9-inch diagonal screen. Contact Aero
Dynamix today at sales@aerodynamix.com for more information or to request a quote. Aero Dynamix has a wide array of
optional equipment with the best prices and exceptional customer support for all your Night Vision requirements. Let Aero
Dynamix be your one-stop-shop for Night Vision solutions. For more information, visit www.aerodynamix.com
Professional Aviation Associates Ofers
Extended Life Starter Generator Program
Professional Aviation Associates’ Helicopter Starter Program for starter generators
offers a custom designed inspection process to track brush wear. These custom solu-
tions may extend the life of your starter generators, increase reliability, and reduce
unscheduled removals and operating expenses. Our alliance partner A.O.G starter/
generator overhaul facility is well maintained to provide consistent and quality ser-
vice. Ultrasonic cleaners are used on all armatures and stators to eliminate carbon
shorting. This ensures a more dependable operation and a longer life for the arma-
ture and stator. Two high-speed generator stands are available to test the operation of the unit after it has been serviced. Our
reputation was built upon providing a high level of quality along with competitive pricing. For more information in the U.S.
and Canada, please call 1-800-283-2015 or visit us at www.proaviation.com
CORRIDOR Aviation Maintenance Software
CORRIDOR is industry-proven software developed to streamline the aviation
maintenance process. Created by aviation professionals more than 15 years ago,
CORRIDOR continues to improve efficiency, reduce errors, increase control and
visibility, reduce costs, and elevate customer service levels for rotor and fixed-wing
service providers. CORRIDOR handles all functions in real time. CORRIDOR’s
modular design allows each organization to tailor the application to their specific
needs. Modules include those for Inventory Control, Procurement & Logistics,
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an experienced in-house staff to support each business throughout training and implementation and continued user support.
Contact us today for more information or to request a demo, call 1-512-918-8900 or visit www.corridor.aero
for Helicopter Operators
32 ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2012 WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
PRODUCTS | AIRFRAMES
Sikorsky recently invited Rotor & Wing to fly the S-92
over rural Virginia and the S-76D (shown here) from its
West Palm Beach facility in Florida.
S
ince 2009, the economy has
ravaged many sectors of rotor-
craft industry. Corporations
have cut back on flying, and
some public service operations have
shuttered their hangars altogether.
But the good news is that the offshore
industry, with its gas and oil explora-
tion endeavors, managed to dodge the
bullet. That was good news for the folks
at Stratford, Conn.-based Sikorsky Air-
craft, because only a few years before,
it had introduced the S-92, a hefty-size
helicopter that was exactly what the
offshore industry needed.
Many oil and gas companies drill-
ing in the Gulf of Mexico have pushed
farther away from the shore, so they
need a helicopter with good reach, high
seating capacities, and the muscle to
tote lots of people and equipment. The
S-92 surfaced as the rotorcraft of choice
for several operations around the world,
including Cougar Helicopters of St.
John’s, Newfoundland; PHI in Lafayette,
La.; and Brunei Shell Petroleum based
in Seria, Brunei Darussalam.
However, the S-92 is not a one-
trick pony. It is a medium, twin-engine
helicopter with a stand-up cabin that
can be completed for a variety of
missions, including executive
transport, cargo hauling,
military applications,
and ai r ambu-
lance service.
In the back is
a huge, cabin-
wi dth door that
opens into a cargo ramp, or, in the VIP
role, accesses a cavernous baggage com-
partment apart from the passenger area.
At the forward end is a state-of-the-art
flight deck that will do everything for
the pilot, but order lunch.
While a Sikorsky crew was passing
through the Washington, D.C., area
showing off a brand new S-92 in a
special Legacy of Heroes commemora-
tive livery—a paint scheme depicting
soldiers, firefighters and police officers
in silhouette—I was invited to take it
for a spin. Stafford Regional (RMN) is
a sleepy little airport in rural Virginia
about 34 nautical miles southwest of
the District of Columbia. That made
the 60-foot long, 15-foot tall S-92 look
supremely out of place amidst the
Cessna 172s parked nearby.
Inside the FBO, I met Les Gerrard,
the senior applications engineer on the
S-92 program; Stacy Sheard, a program
test pilot, and Joel Vigue, another of
the test pilots. They briefed me on the
lineage of the program, the general
capabilities of the aircraft, the avionics,
and the local weather conditions—all of
which were impressive. It was now time
to go flying!
The gunmetal grey aircraft, s/n
920146, was the 146th ship of its kind
to roll off the assembly floor at the
Coatesville, Pa. plant, and was showing
By Ernie Stephens, Editor-at-Large
AT THE CONTROLS:
Rotor & Wing Editor-at-Large Ernie Stephens at the controls of the Sikorsky S-76D as part of a Dec. 8
demo flight. The S-76D shares the same sleek, elegant lines as earlier variants, but comes equipped
with a state-of the-art Thales cockpit, composite rotor blades, and a set of Pratt & Whitney Canada
210S engines. See story on page 33.
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just about 50 hours on the Hobbs meter. Others in the fleet have been
in service around the world in offshore drilling support, SAR
operations and VIP service since its FAA certification
back in 2004. The model was also the first aircraft
to be certified under the newer, more rigorous
safety standards adopted by the European Avia-
tion Safety Agency/Joint Aviation Authorities.
When it comes to size, the S-92 is no
Chinook, but it certainly is large. When I
stepped inside, I found seating for about 15
passengers—22 is the maximum—in webbed,
fold-down crew seating affixed with their backs
to the wall. And because it was built as a SAR
demonstrator as well, there were three fold-up
patient litters along the starboard wall, leaving the rest
of the cabin with the utilitarian look one would expect
in a SAR configuration.
Up front in the cockpit, pilot Joel Vigue was already strapped into the
left seat, leaving me the other side to occupy. So, I stepped through the cockpit
door, and belted myself in.
The flight deck is about the size of the front office in a UH-60 Black Hawk, and was equipped
with four color, multi-function displays (MFDs), with a blank center position for a fifth one. The massive
center console and overhead panel were loaded with all of the usual radios, switches and knobs, which Vigue was
already configuring for our flight. Between the pedals that could be moved closer and farther away, and the nicely cushioned
seat that could be adjusted in four directions; this 250-lb. writer had no problem finding a comfortable position for piloting.
The field of view from the cockpit of the S-92 is excellent. The center windshield post and windshield wipers, which park ver-
tically, weren’t bothersome, and the wide windshields and side windows offered a good look at everything throughout a better-
Sikorsky S-92 & S-76D
S92 & S76D
LS:
S-76D: The S-92’s New Stablemate
In 1979, Sikorsky sold the first models of the Sikorsky
S-76 intermediate, twin-turbine helicopter. Billed as the
first true executive transport helicopter, it could also be
found flying in a wide variety roles where a spacious
cabin was a must. There was even a military version, but
it found limited popularity.
In a high-density seating configuration, the S-76 can
carry 13 passengers, plus two pilots. For EMS missions,
it can easily transport two patients in a fully equipped
medical cabin.
Powerplant options were added in the ensuing
years, giving customers a choice between the original
Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6Bs, the Turbomeca Arriel 1S,
the Arriel 1S1 and the P&WC PT6B-36A. The last model
of the S-76 to be certified, the C++, receives power
from a pair of 922-shp Arriel 2S2 engines, and became
exceptionally popular in the executive transport arena.
Eric Welch, who operates a C++ in the northeast corridor
of the U.S., equipped his company aircraft for executive
transport. “We have the latest in state-of-the-art equip-
ment in the back,” said Welch. “We have flat-screen
digital TV, XM stereo and worldwide communications.
We are very happy with it.”
Sikorsky, however, has not stopped improving on the
S-76. On Dec. 8, 2011, the company gave Rotor & Wing a
look at the new S-76D. The D model has all-composite
rotor blades that are spun by a pair of 1,050-shp P&WC
210S engines with FADEC, a quiet tail rotor and a Thales
cockpit. Engineers say the aircraft has increased range,
and an even quieter cabin. In addition, many of the D’s
features will be backward-compatible to older S-76s.
Certification of the S-76D is expected in 2012, and
will be assembled in Coatesville, Pa. alongside the S-92.
34 ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2012 WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
PRODUCTS | AIRFRAMES
than-180-degree sweep. Two small win-
dows overhead were nice, but the chin
windows weren’t good for much more
than checking the polish on my boots.
(They just don’t show enough out the
front of the aircraft.) The instrument
panel was just right: not too high, not to
low, not too deep, and not too shallow.
And the engineers were kind enough
to keep the height of the panel lower on
the ends than in the middle, making it
easy to see over while on approach.
Vigue already had the two Gen-
eral Electric CT7-8A engines—rated at
2,520 shp each—online with the S-92’s
four-bladed, fully articulated main rotor,
and canted four-bladed tailrotor system.
All that was left to do was to take a quick
look at the numbers being displayed
on the Rockwell Collins Pro Line IV
instrument suite, which we both did.
With everything well in the green, I was
awarded the controls.
Picking up the S-92 was unevent-
ful. The ship, which was approximately
18,000 lbs. as loaded (about 8,500 lbs.
less than its max gross takeoff weight),
got light on its gear, and came up nose
first, as is common with wheeled heli-
copters. It granted me a nice, stabilized
hover about 15 feet off the ground
before I pulled it into a normal takeoff.
The S-92, like most rotorcraft its
size, has a couple of trim triggers on
the collective and cyclic which, when
squeezed, allow the flight controls to
move with the ease of a much smaller
helicopter. Let them go, and the controls
immediately adopt that position, allow-
ing the pilot to relax a bit. They aren’t
locked there, mind you. They’re just
trimmed to that position. However, I
wanted to get to know this aircraft, so I
kept the triggers in through climb out,
crosswind, and a bit of the downwind.
I’ve flown a lot of helicopters for Rotor
& Wing, but this was one of the quickest
to get comfortable with. Because after
just a few minutes on the controls, it
was clear to see that the S-92 wanted to
“talk” to its pilot. Feedback through the
cyclic was just enough to let me know
that I had her full cooperation, but light
enough to feel like I was in something
several thousand pounds lighter. Even
the information on the Rockwell Collins
MFDs were easy to interpret; not that
there was much to stare at. The ship was
holding airspeed, heading and altitude
without a fuss, and the gages showed
that the engines were barely breaking a
sweat, let alone being overworked.
Under most conditions, my first
approach in an aircraft under evaluation
would be a normal one to the numbers.
But I actually felt so comfortable with
N146UK, I asked Vigue to advise local traf-
fic that we would be extending our down-
wind, in anticipation of a run-on landing.
At a little less than a mile off the
approach end of the runway, I brought
the aircraft through a base leg, and
turned final. The ride down was a non-
event. The infamous “clothes line” we
were all taught to slide down felt like
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it was actually running through the
centerline of the aircraft as we coasted
down. Tweaking the descent and haul-
ing it back to the recommended run-on
landing speed of 50 KIAS was more a
matter of thinking about it than com-
manding it.
For grins, I decided to do it at 46
KIAS, and had no trouble holding exact-
ly that all the way to the touchdown
zone. A bit of aerodynamic braking just
after touchdown, and toe brakes at 34
KIAS, brought the aircraft to a smooth
stop without so much as a shutter.
Next on the menu was a maximum
performance takeoff, which I spoke to
Vigue about first, since he was the one
the company signed the aircraft out to.
I think he was waiting for me to ask, so
he could make the recommendation
that he loves making during all S-92
demonstrations.
“Try it with your feet off the pedals,”
he said.
I replied: “Excuse me?” After all,
snatching-in a boatload of power is as
much an exercise in pedal work as it is in
collective control, right?
Well, to ease pilot workload, Sikorsky
equipped the S-92 with an anti-torque
hold system that takes over as soon as
the pilot removes his or her feet from
the pedals. But barely touch a pedal, and
the system’s micro-switch will know, and
instantaneously understand that you’re
back in command. (At least that’s how
Vigue said it worked.)
From a hover, I pulled the collective
smartly, with my size 11 boots flat on the
floor, and one eye on the compass. Up
we went. The magnetic compass might
as well have been glued in its housing,
because it didn’t rotate by so much as a
degree, not even after I reached 50 feet
and was pushed the nose over to dial
up some airspeed. (I believe I heard the
aircraft laugh just a bit.)
After a couple more takeoffs and
landings, Vigue suggested we depart the
pattern, so I could check out a few of the
other features of the S-92.
Coupling up the four-axis autopilot
to put us on a departure course gave me
time to take a better look at the other fea-
tures. Just about everything you’d expect
to find on the flight deck of a business
jet was here, plus some. The engineers
packed this aircraft with a 500-param-
eter health and usage management
system (HUMS), traffic collision avoid-
ance system (TCAS), enhanced ground
proximity warning system (EGPWS),
navigation management system, weath-
er radar, optional rotor anti-ice system
and a host of other tools.
Of special interest was an in-flight
diagnostic system. If you suspect that
one of the four main rotor blades—or
one of the four tail rotor blades, for that
matter—isn’t playing well with the oth-
ers, it’s no problem. The ship can per-
form a track and balance examination of
Sikorsky S-92 & S-76D
36 ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2012 WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
PRODUCTS | AIRFRAMES
all eight blades, and make the appropri-
ate adjustments to permanently correct
the problem while cruising at altitude;
a nice feature, since 70 percent of all
S-92s delivered are used in offshore
support missions.
But that’s not all. If a VIP or litter
patient is getting too rough of a ride,
that same set of force generators can
be commanded to smooth out the ride
in that passenger’s particular zone.
Sikorsky built this aircraft with SAR
in mind, so it comes equipped with
an autopilot that will fly a hands-off,
crew-defined search pattern over
water. It has a hard time holding grid
and spiral searches over the kind of
terrain found in central Virginia, so it
had a tough time when I tried it. But
having flown the same system over
Long Island Sound, I can testify that
it works well in the environment for
which it was intended: water.
After a nice airborne visit with the
S-92, we steered back to Stafford Region-
al for a break. Once back, I followed
Chad Phillips, a mechanic with Sikorsky’s
final production team, as he performed a
quick post-flight check of the aircraft.
As Phillips conducted his visual
inspection of the titanium main rotor
blades, he explained that there were cur-
rently about 340,000 hours of flight time
on the entire fleet of S-92s produced to
date, which was 147 aircraft as of Octo-
ber 2011. The line was sold out through
the rest of the year.
“This is the easiest aircraft to
maintain,” said Phillips, who was
speci al l y sel ected to travel wi th
N146UK. Most hose fittings, inspec-
tion ports and linkages can be seen
without mirrors, or having to assume
contortionist’s positions. “Every-
Powerplant and fuel system
Number of
Engines
2
Engine Type GE CT7-8A
Take-off Shaft
horsepower
(5 min)
2,520 shp 1,897 kw
OEI Shaft
horsepower
(30 sec)
2,740 shp 2,043 kw
Performance
Maximum Gross
Weight
26,500 lbs 12,020 kg
Maximum Cruise
Speed
151 kts 280 kph
Maximum Range -
No Reserve
539 nm 999 km
HIGE Ceiling 9,000 ft 2,743 m
HOGE Ceiling 6,500 ft 1,981 m
OEI Service Ceiling 5,000 ft 1,524 m
AEO Service
Ceiling
15,000 ft 4,572 m
Accommodations
Cabin
Length
20 ft 6.1 m
Cabin Width 6.6 ft 2.0 m
Cabin Height 6.0 ft 1.8 m
37 FEBRUARY 2012 | ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
thing is really easy to get to,” he said.
After our break, I went up with Stacy
Sheard, a former Army Black Hawk
pilot. Don’t tell Sikorsky, but this was
more of a fun flight, since I had con-
cluded the evaluation portion with
Vigue. I just wanted a couple more
turns around the airport to enjoy the
feel of hand-flying the S-92, and prac-
ticing with the systems.
“How much is an S-92?” you ask?
With all the variations of equip-
ment and contract deals available,
Sikorsky was—as would most heli-
copter manufacturers—reluctant
to discuss sticker prices. But my
educated guess puts the Legacy
ship that I flew in the neighborhood
of $20 million. At the end of the
day, the Sikorsky S-92 gave a great
showing. Interior-space versatility,
cockpit design, avionics, and ease
of mai ntenance put s i t hi gh on
my list of impressive helicopters. I
guess the best way to describe it is
to say that it flies along with you,
as if it’s an extension of your own
body and thoughts. And what bet-
ter compliment can a pilot give an
aircraft?
N146UK, designated Sikorsky’s Legacy of Heroes S-92 aircraft, was specially painted to salute the contributions of U.S. military, fire,
rescue, and police personnel, whose silhouettes appear on each side. In October 2011, it began a six-month world tour that included
scheduled stops throughout the Americas, Asia and India.
P
h
o
t
o

b
y

E
r
n
i
e

S
t
e
p
h
e
n
s
Sikorsky S-92 & S-76D
38 ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2012 WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
COMMERCIAL | EVENT COVERAGE





• • •
• •

FLIGHTSAFETY HELICOPTER ADVANTAGE AD - ROTOR & WING - BIeed: 8-1/8"w x 11"h Trim: 7-7/8" x 10-3/4" h PDF/X-1a VIA EMAIL
I
n case you haven’t attended in
the past few years (and why
not?), Heli-Expo has grown to
be the world’s largest helicop-
ter event. According to Helicopter
Association International, this year’s
iteration will be one of the biggest ever,
taking up more than 1 million square
feet of the Dallas Convention Center.
The 2012 edition will feature 600-plus
exhibitors with more than 60 helicop-
ters on display. That’s on top of hun-
dreds of hours of meetings, technical
briefings, educational courses and the
ever-popular Job Fair.
With all that floor space and all
those exhibitors to cover—not to men-
tion navigating through an expected
attendance of above 18,000 people—
trying to take it all in three days can be
just a bit overwhelming.
In an effort to help save time and
energy before hitting the convention
floor, we’ve collected a handful of the
announcements that helicopter suppli-
ers uncovered leading up to the show.
Take a minute to check out a few of these
not-to-be-missed exhibitors.

For more highlights, news and cover-
age from the show, look for Rotor &
Wing’s Show Day publication at Heli-
Expo, and visit our dedicated web
page: www.aviationtoday.com/rw/
heliexpo2012
Appareo Systems
(Booth 7834)
Appareo Systems, which is best known
for its ALERTS (Aircraft Logging and
Event Recording for Training and
Safety) system, plans to introduce elec-
tronic flight bag (EFB) software that
is being developed for CHC Helicopter.
According to John Pederson, man-
ager, marketing communications
for Appareo Systems, the new CHC
EFB will run on the Apple iPad. The
software will help CHC flight crews
increase efficiency by providing a tool
for routing, fuel planning and weight
and balance calculations.
The CHC project “taps into our
considerable software development
expertise, leveraging our experience
in mobile development and cloud
computing,” notes Barry Batcheller,
president and CEO of Appareo. “We’re
honored to be partners with CHC,” he
adds.
While Appareo will only have a
prototype of the EFB at Heli-Expo,
the company will have its full array of
ALERTS systems on hand, including its
latest unit, ALERTS Vision 1000. Jointly
developed by Appareo and Eurocopter,
Vision 1000 captures inertial and posi-
tioning data, as well as cockpit imagery
and audio.
Cobham (Booth 3122)
Cobham and Carson Helicopters
recently announced a program to
retrofit Sikorsky S-61, S-76 and UH-60
Heli-expo preview
THE BIGGEST ‘LITTLE HELICOPTER SHOW’ IN TEXAS
Major league
baseball has the
World Series. The
NFL has the Super
Bowl. NASCAR has
the Daytona 500.
When it comes to
the biggest event
in helicopters, of
course it’s Heli-Expo.
Photo by Ernie Stephens, Editor-at-Large
Virginia’s Fairfax County Police Department is displaying its new Bell 429 at Heli-Expo in Dallas.
For the full story and coverage from the event, visit www.aviationtoday.com/rw/heliexpo2012
and look for Rotor & Wing’s Show Day publication on the convention center floor. By Dale Smith
Label Feature
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We continue our decades-long helicopter safety leadership
with the world’s first Level 7 helicopter flight training devices
for effective and economical training, and the world’s only
Level D Eurocopter EC135 simulator. And we are the only
source for simulation-based night vision goggle training,
which delivers comprehensive instruction night or day,
allowing wide-ranging scenarios not possible in the aircraft
while leaving your helicopter free for its intended mission.
Mission-specific training uses realistic scenarios to
prepare pilots and crew for the conditions and situations
they encounter in the field. Whether your mission is
corporate/executive transportation, emergency medical
transport, offshore support, law enforcement or
newsgathering, our industry-leading training focuses on
your particular challenges, helping ensure that you’re
prepared when the routine turns into the unforeseen.
We offer training for Bell helicopters at Fort Worth, Texas,
and Lafayette, Louisiana, and for Sikorsky helicopters at
West Palm Beach, Florida; London Farnborough, England;
and Lafayette. Our Lafayette Learning Center dedicates
its efforts wholly to helicopter safety training, offering
Customer-specific training supporting multiple aircraft
manufacturer product lines. The center’s training programs
serve all sectors of the industry, including the large and
diverse fleet operating in the Gulf of Mexico.
Our Eurocopter training includes cost-effective AStar
training on a Level 7 FTD in Tucson, Arizona, and Level D
full flight simulator EC135 training at DFW Airport, Texas.
For information, contact Scott Fera, Vice President
Marketing • 718.565.4774 • sales@flightsafety.com
flightsafety.com • A Berkshire Hathaway company
FLIGHTSAFETY HELICOPTER ADVANTAGE AD - ROTOR & WING - BIeed: 8-1/8"w x 11"h Trim: 7-7/8" x 10-3/4" h PDF/X-1a VIA EMAIL
40 ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2012 WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
COMMERCIAL | EVENT COVERAGE
COST-EFFECTIVE ROTARY WING SIMULATION
Your training programs maintain pilot and operator readiness; our integrated off-the-shelf
software allows you to build applications that address your unique needs. Working with Presagis
enables you to develop high fidelity cost-effective rotary-wing training and simulation systems on
time and on budget. With proven software solutions and expert technical services, Presagis can
help take your training programs to new heights.
SEE FOR YOURSELF AT HELI-EXPO BOOTH 8840 OR VISIT WWW.PRESAGIS.COM/HELI
© Presagis Canada Inc. and/or Presagis USA Inc. 2012. All rights reserved. All other
trademarks contained herein are the property of their respective owners.
helicopters with Carson’s performance
modifications and Cobham’s suite of
integrated avionics. The new deck will
include Cobham’s large-format EFIS
displays with 3D synthetic vision/
highway-in-the-sky (HITS), integrated
flight hazard alerting (terrain, traffic
and weather), VHF com/nav, audio/
radio management and more.
According to Frank Carson, owner
of Carson Helicopters, adding Cob-
ham’s avionics “dramatically reduces
pilot workload, increases safety and
provides for future growth.”
Cobham also comes to Heli-Expo
2012 with some additional supplemen-
tal type certificate (STC) approvals
for its HeliSAS autopilot and stabil-
ity augmentation system, including for
the Bell 206/407 and the Eurocopter
AS350 and EC130. The company has
also received Brazilian validation
for aftermarket installation of its 3D
synthetic vision system aboard the
Eurocopter AS350/355 series.
Columbia Helicopters
(Booth 7334)
Columbia Helicopters is looking toward
Heli-Expo to kick-off a big 2012. “Our
pursuit of commercial and military
helicopter maintenance and operation-
al contracts in new areas has resulted in
our ability to hire more people,” reports
Michael Fahey, president of the Aurora,
Ore.-based company. “At the same
time, we are continually developing
new contracts with our global petro-
leum and logging customers.”
The company is certainly enjoying
growth across the board. According
to its year-end release, hiring is up
12 percent over 2010, with nearly
200 jobs added since late 2009. That
brings its global workforce to nearly
700 with over 200 more employed by
international subsidiaries or affiliate
support organizations.
Columbia’s aircraft fleet is pretty
healthy, too. It currently operates seven
Model 234 Chinooks and 14 Model
107-IIs. According to Fahey, much of
the recent growth has been fueled by
the company’s entry into the military
operation market. Columbia deployed
five heavy-lift helicopters and support
personnel to Afghanistan on Dec. 1,
2011 as part of a multi-million dollar
contract to supply non-tactical support
for the U.S. Transportation Command.
“The Afghanistan mission is a pre-
fect fit for the skill levels and expertise
we have built over our 55-year his-
tory and our understanding that we
are making a difference,” Fahey says.
“The military has repeatedly expressed
great appreciation of our operational
tempo, high level of availability and the
flexibility of our crews to perform our
missions in a timely, and very profes-
sional manner.”
In addition to the growth in its
military sector, Columbia continues its
support work for its global commercial
operators. To keep up with demand
the company has recently invested in
upgrading maintenance capabilities for
both groups, as well as other operators
who use helicopters similar to those in
the Columbia fleet.
“While we have grown conserva-
tively,” Fahey says, “we do not expect
our business model to change.”
Era Training Center
(Booth 4023)
To help meet the rapidly growing
demand for the AgustaWestland
AW139, Era Training Center in Lake
Charles, La. has received FAA certifica-
tion for its Level 6, full-motion flight
simulation training device (FSTD).
According to Marc Schechter,
general manager, the simulator is the
second in North America to receive
FAA certification. “With the resound-
ing popularity of this type of aircraft,
the demand for AW139 training has
been surging.”
The FSTD includes the latest flight
software for the AW139’s FMS and
replicates the aircraft in every detail.
It features a high-fidelity simulation of
the helicopter’s flight characteristics
and, with the aid of a high-performance
electric control loading system, deliv-
ers a “realistic” flying experience. The
FSTD features a high-resolution visual
imagery system presented on a spheri-
cal screen using TruVision Global
database, which includes over 10,000
runways, coastlines and other geo-
graphic features.
Along with the AW139 program,
Era Training Center has two other FAA-
approved Level 6 FSTDs—one Euro-
copter EC135P2+ and one AS350B2.
Both simulators are designed by Frasca
International to provide training for
both single- and dual-pilot IFR configu-
rations. The company also offers a vari-
ety of training programs for helicopter
pilots and crewmembers, including in
the corporate, oil and gas, EMS, ENG,
law enforcement, government and
military sectors.
Cobham
Sikorsky S-61 panel from Carson Helicopters and Cobham.
41 FEBRUARY 2012 | ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
Label Label
PRE-LIVE THE FUTURE
COST-EFFECTIVE ROTARY WING SIMULATION
TAKE YOUR TRAINING
TO NEW HEIGHTS
Your training programs maintain pilot and operator readiness; our integrated off-the-shelf
software allows you to build applications that address your unique needs. Working with Presagis
enables you to develop high fidelity cost-effective rotary-wing training and simulation systems on
time and on budget. With proven software solutions and expert technical services, Presagis can
help take your training programs to new heights.
SEE FOR YOURSELF AT HELI-EXPO BOOTH 8840 OR VISIT WWW.PRESAGIS.COM/HELI
© Presagis Canada Inc. and/or Presagis USA Inc. 2012. All rights reserved. All other
trademarks contained herein are the property of their respective owners.
42 ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2012 WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
COMMERCIAL | EVENT COVERAGE
Garmin (Booths 31
and 9432)
For many Heli-Expo attendees, their
first stop this year will be the Garmin
booth for the opportunity to reach
out and touch the new GTN 650 and
GTN 750 series avionics—successors
to Garmin’s GNS 430/530 GPS/nav/
com. The highlight of the GTN design
is a large touchscreen for data entry and
radio tuning. The units recently received
EASA validation.
The GTN series has received a good
market response, “with thousands of
units already installed,” says Carl Wolf,
Garmin’s vice president of aviation sales
and marketing. He adds that because
of the EASA validation, European
operators can now employ “the latest
technology, simplified interface and
enhanced safety features” of the GTN
series. Garmin also recently announced
that its new GMA 35 remote mount
audio processor has the ability to inter-
face with the GTN 750. This optional
installation configuration will enable
the GTN 750 to act as a touchscreen
control head for the aircraft’s audio and
intercom functions. A Garmin spokes-
person said that the company is cur-
rently working on a blanket STC from
the FAA and EASA covering helicopter
installations for the GTN series.
L-3 Communications
(Booth 8056)
L-3 Communications recently donated
a set of night vision goggles (NVGs) to
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical Universi-
ty’s Prescott, Ariz. campus. The NVGs
will be used in the university’s bachelor
of aeronautical science, helicopter spe-
cialty degree program.
The NVG system will train stu-
dents in a variety of environmental
conditions. The ground instruction
on NVG operations course will be
administered in accordance with the
requirements outlined in FAR Part
61.31(k). As part of the program,
students will also get to the tour L-3
Warrior Systems’ El ectron Tube
Operations facility to see how the
NVGs are made.
“NVGs are playing an ever-increas-
ing role in night helicopter operations,”
says Bryan Cox, assistant professor,
ERAU. “It provides not only hands-on
training, the field trip to L-3 also gives
students an appreciation for emerging
technology that will undoubtedly be
useful in the helicopter industry.”
Rockwell Collins
(Booth 6119) and
Vector Aerospace
Helicopter Services
(Booth 7139)
For a company that’s not normally
viewed a leader in commercial helicop-
ter avionics systems, Rockwell Collins is
headed to Heli-Expo aiming to further
position itself in the rotorcraft market.
The avionics maker’s booth will feature
a mock-up of the Sikorsky S-61 Pro
Line 21 avionics upgrade program that
Vector Aerospace announced at last
year’s event. John Peterson, director of
avionics and flight controls marketing
for Rockwell Collins, notes that Vector
Aerospace received an STC in June
2011 for the Pro Line 21 installation,
adding that Vector has “already deliv-
ered two aircraft into service.”
Rockwell Collins is “bringing next-
gen capabilities to legacy aircraft,” with
the Pro Line 21, Peterson says, adding
that it “provides a host of features that
you typically see on the latest OEM
aircraft like graphical weather, charts,
runway charts, maps, video inputs, solid
state MEMS, ADS-B Out as well as
solid-state AHARS.” From an avionics
perspective, he continues, “we’ve moved
that aircraft well into the future with
respect to operations, efficiency and
reliability. All of this is certified for Part
29 IMC operations. Rockwell Collins
is seeing an increase in demand for the
upgrade with S-61 operators around
the world. Peterson said the company is
also in the process of certifying Pro Line
21’s synthetic vision suite, which will be
available on the Vector S-61 upgrades.
In addition to the S-61 panel and its
new ADS-B Out transponder, Rockwell
Collins is also displaying its Venue cabin
management system for executive and
VIP helicopters.
Marenco
Swisshelicopter
(Booth 4417)
Marenco Swisshelicopter is planning to
bring a full-size pre-prototype carbon-
fiber mock-up of the SKYe SH09 light
helicopter to Heli-Expo. Unveiled
during last year’s convention, the SKYe
SH09 is a light, single-engine turbine
designed to provide multiple missions
in adverse weather environments.
The SKYe SH09 is being developed
specifically to meet the needs of opera-
tors who require hot and high altitude
performance, greater payload capacity,
an augmented sling load capability and
faster cruise speed, according to the
company. Preliminary specifications
indicate a cruise speed of 145 knots
(270 km/h), making it one of the fastest
single-engine light helicopters in the
category. Marenco Swisshelicopter says
that the first flying prototype is in the
assembly stage and the program is on
track to begin deliveries in 2015.
The SKYe SH09 will have a maxi-
mum takeoff weight of 6,170 lbs. (2,800
kg) and feature a new modular cabin
design with a large flat floor and a
“unique high ceiling” concept, offering
multiple seating configurations for up
to seven passengers.
Photo by Ernie Stephens
View of the show floor at Heli-Expo 2011.
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44 ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2012 WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
SERVICES | NIGHT VISION
D
espite the challenges of the
global marketplace, cutbacks
by public-use helicopter
operators and new guidance
in the form of FAA Order N8900.152
that took effect in April 2011, compa-
nies that provide night vision goggle
(NVG) cockpit modifications are
doing well, posting higher year-end
returns and expanding at a time when
many businesses are pulling back on
the reins.
Rotor & Wing spoke with three of
the major commercial NVG cockpit
modifiers—Aero Dynamix Inc. (ADI),
Aviation Specialties Unlimited (ASU)
and REBTECH—to gauge the state of
the specialized market and find out the
impacts of N8900.152, Special Empha-
sis Inspection of Night Vision Imaging
System Lighting Installations, on both
operators and modifiers.
“Across the board, NVG demand
lately is high,” says Dennis Trout, gen-
eral manager of Euless, Texas-based
Aero Dynamix. “Back in the old days,
and I’m just throwing figures out there,
probably 10 percent of rotary wing
aircraft required NVGs. Now, even
though the market for aircraft is down
overall, roughly 30 percent of new
aircraft require NVG. All market sec-
tors are up—EMS, police, law enforce-
ment, offshore, military—it’s across the
board, they’re all turning to NVG.”
The percentage of NVG users “has
continued to grow, even in the eco-
nomic situation that we have,” he adds.
“Once the economy returns in earnest,
we expect to see the demand for NVG
to go even higher than it is today.”
The worldwide economy “has had
only a slight impact on REBTECH
over the past few years,” notes Richard
Borkowski, president of the Bedford,
Texas-based company. “The market is
pretty strong right now. We do foresee
that it’s probably already hitting its
peak—maybe. Our sales have contin-
ued to rise at a pretty healthy rate over
the past four and a half years.”
While the numbers are steadily
going up overall, Borkowski observes
that some taxpayer-funded operations
are “being forced to go with the lowest
modification bid over a source which is
sometimes preferred by the pilots and
maintenance personnel. Many in the
law enforcement field have seen their
operational budgets cut drastically to
the point of not being able to acquire
NVG equipment at the moment, or in
piece parts over a period of time.”
But in the next few years, he sees
“more and more air applications need-
ing and benefiting from the use of
NVGs,” including those units who
had previously held back because of
budget concerns.
Shawn Woodworth, director of
maintenance for ASU out of Boise,
Idaho, says his colleagues have been
expecting this business to start drop-
ping off soon. “But for the past three
years, every year we’ve been [modify-
ing] more and more aircraft—2011
was a booming year for us despite all
the challenges we’ve had, and 2012 is
starting out to be a boom year too.”
Hannah Gordon, director of sales
and marketing for ASU, explains that
EMS is the company’s biggest sector.
“It used to be police, but under the
‘new economy,’ public uses have taken
the biggest hit on extra spending.”
She adds that ASU sees the global
marketplace as a major growth area—
although that brings its own chal-
lenges, due to U.S. government export
regulations and varying rules among
different countries.
The increased awareness of the
importance of NVGs as a safety tool
has helped isolate some of the losses
experienced in the public use arena.
“NVG is an operational require-
ment in many cases these days. Before it
was a luxury, but today a lot of operators
won’t do without it,” Trout observes.
A
e
r
o

D
y
n
a
m
i
x
45 FEBRUARY 2012 | ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
NVG Modifications
As the attitudes and
perceptions of night vision
goggles (NVGs) has evolved
from “luxury” or “toy” to
an essential safety device,
the night vision cockpit
modification business remains
healthy despite challenges
in the global economy and new
guidance from FAA governing
this niche market.
By Andrew Parker, Editor-in-Chief
MOD MARKET FLOURISHES
Gilbert Martinez, chief inspector and R&D
supervisor for Aero Dynamix, looks at a panel at
the company’s facility in Euless, which recently
underwent an expansion.
46 ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2012 WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
SERVICES | NIGHT VISION
“We’ve seen a trend to go toward
NVG,” says Borkowski, “whether you’re a
law enforcement, EMS, offshore opera-
tor, etc. We do a lot with operators
like the Ontario Ministry of Natural
Resources, for example—those that fly
power lines at night, those that check
on control towers or cell phone towers.
They are flying all the time and they’re
realizing that they’re a lot safer if they are
trained properly, have an STC-approved
cockpit, and using a good quality set of
goggles. They’re seeing that there’s not as
many nighttime crashes” for operators
with NVGs.
Unfortunately, says Jeff Stubbs, senior
vice president of operations and systems
technology for REBTECH, public ser-
vice aircraft units, with a few exceptions,
have historically “been treated as an
unwanted evil, and NVGs as toys. Once
we can convince a decision maker that
this could save lives and avert a possible
‘incident,’ then we can move forward.”
“There are obviously times when
we know that an operator’s going to
get a couple of aircraft completed and
due to their budget situation, will drop
NVG—but it’s a pretty rare occasion
comparative to what it was four or five
years ago,” notes Tonka Hufford, opera-
tions manager for Aero Dynamix. “Back
then NVGs might be the first thing off
the list, today it’s one of the biggest things
that people fight to keep on the list.”
One of the recent issues impacting
operators in the NVG modification
industry is FAA’s N8900.152, which
took effect in April 2011.
Stubbs says that the biggest chal-
lenge for NVG operators and modifiers
in dealing with the FAA “is that unlike
any other STC, civil NVG approval can
be subjective.”
Regardless of experience, education
or training, he continues, “ultimately an
individual is making a decision that is
based on perception or opinion.”
Kim Harris, director of operations
for ASU, agrees. Much of the NVG pro-
gram within the FAA is kind of a round
peg in a square hole, he says.
Both Woodworth and Harris elabo-
rate that NVG evaluations can be very
subjective—while one inspector might
decide that daylight readability in a
particular aircraft is adequate, another
might have a different opinion.
Describing it as an ongoing “learning
experience for both the industry and
the FAA,” the process of developing and
enforcing the regulations has created
additional time and costs for NVG mod-
ifiers, according to Harris. The company
worked with FAA in 2007/2008 in a pro-
cess that involved “paperwork cleanup
and a lot of special emphasis inspec-
tions,” Gordon explains.
The initial aircraft reviews were
“a huge expense for us, but a definite
learning experience for everyone—us,
the FAA and the operators,” Harris says,
adding that when the special emphasis
inspection guidelines came out in 2011,
“the lessons learned from our experi-
ence helped the entire industry.”
According to Stubbs, “when we were
first made aware of N8900.152 a couple
months before it came out, I was prob-
ably the ‘chicken little’ of REBTECH,
running around concerned about what
was going to come out of it.”
But in reality, he continues, “out of
our 300 aircraft, we really did have less
than three percent of our fleet affected
by 152, and that three percent was solely
operators who had modifications a few
years ago and they lost documentation.
It really did not impact us much at all.
For other companies, it nearly ruined
them.”
For operators, “one of the biggest
challenges is the budget,” Trout says of
N8900.152. “These new demands have
a big impact on their budget—some
instruments either have to be updated,
or the user wants to make changes to
improve safety or effectiveness. From
our side, the regulations have given the
operators and maintenance provid-
ers more awareness of what the FAA
guidelines have evolved to.”
That increased awareness, Hufford
explains, “has driven the operators to
realize that, while they may have added
a couple small units over the years and
thought everything was just fine, often
times the maintenance providers may
have overlooked the impact the change
may have had on the NVG certification.”
Aero Dynamix has experienced “a
huge increase in demand [to answer]
questions. That’s driven a very large,
new requirement for STC updates and
re-certifications. That is, aircraft that
were field approved before 2003/2004,
or even as far back as the late 90s, that
are now coming back and requiring a
full FAA STC,” Hufford continues.
The increased demand has been a
factor in helping drive a recent expan-
sion of the Aero Dynamix headquarters
in Euless to 23,000 square feet, with a
workforce now approaching 100 people.
Stubbs says that the FAA Special
Emphasis Inspection “was not only
needed but long overdue. N8900.152
has provided the FSDOs with initial
NVG training and a regulatory format
in which to insure the NVG STC is
maintained and documentation is cur-
rent. Many of our operators have taken
N8900.152 and are implementing it
into their quality system as well.”
From an operator’s perspective, “it’s
an entire shift in how they perceive
modifying their aircraft,” says Gordon.
“So in that regard, there’s a lot of dis-
crepancies a lot of modifiers are dealing
with. A good 30-40 percent of those
problems have to do with an operator
upgrading their GPS but not realizing
that they have to get an ECO [engineer-
ing change order] to do that. They can’t
do it with a [Form] 337 anymore.”
Economics is based on filling a
demand, and the demand for NVG
modifications remains high and it
should continue to be a productive
segment for many years to come. While
the sector involves a very complicated
product—with issues like daylight read-
ability still a case-by-case challenge—it
clearly isn’t on the decline.
“Filtering infrared light today is not
the hardest part of modifying equip-
ment, it’s the balance and the daylight
readability,” Trout explains.
“It’s easy to make a cockpit NVIS
compatible, but can you read it during
the day? That really is the challenge,”
adds Woodworth.
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ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2012
M
ost ditching events and
water impacts would be
survived if on the ground.
Civil aviation authorities,
helicopter makers and equipment man-
ufacturers are struggling to improve the
survivability of these accidents, as the
number of fatalities due to drowning of
conscious occupants is still unacceptable.
Improving floatability is a major focus.
Just as important, avoiding helicopter
capsizing would save many lives.
Emergency breathers can help, but
can be challenging to use. Underwa-
ter evacuation training helps, too, but
only happens once every four years. At
December’s European Aviation Safety
Agency (EASA) helicopter ditching
workshop in Cologne, Germany, about
65 attendees—a lot of them representing
North Sea oil-and-gas offshore oper-
ators—heard how difficult it will be to
make this safety picture somewhat rosier.
Let’s first define what they are dealing
with. A ditching event is an emergency
landing on water. It is performed so
that it enables a “safe and orderly egress”
of the occupants. A water impact is
uncontrolled or partially controlled. An
example is a Sikorsky S-76C+ accident
in 2005 near Tallin, Estonia. All 14 pas-
sengers and crewmembers drowned
(they inhaled water), although there
was enough survivable volume after
the impact. Statistics show that what is
probably the most strictly run helicopter
activity, offshore transportation, lags
behind in terms of safety. Commercial
airlines have 0.9 fatal accidents per mil-
lion flight hours. Offshore helicopter
transportation has 5.7 (2010 numbers).
Why focus on ditching and water
impacts? According to a review of world
civil water impacts, 98 survivable water
impacts happened between 1971 and
1992. They caused 338 fatalities, includ-
ing 192 caused by drowning. An under-
water escape (from a flooded helicopter
cabin) too often mismatches breath-hold
time.
Shell Aircraft senior aviation advi-
sor Alan Ward insisted his company
has “a strong belief in using more mod-
ern aircraft.” Oil companies wanting
to buy safer aircraft is one more incen-
tive for the manufacturers to carry on
with their efforts in this direction. First,
they may want to have manufacturers
better understand ditching dynamics.
Russia-based Kazan Helicopter is thus
endeavoring to properly model these
forces. “This will help determine proper
piloting,” said Dmitry Nedelko, chief of
Kazan’s calculation bureau.
Operators may want to have their
helicopters floating longer. As John
By Thierry Dubois
Helicopter Industry Struggles to Improve Ditching Survivability
Bristow Group’s Eurocopter EC225s fly over water on a regular basis,
making ditching a necessary part of pilot and crew training.
49
WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M FEBRUARY 2012 | ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE
Ditch Training
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Introducing the
Franklin, an EASA safety analysis coor-
dinator, noted, in 26 of 184 accidents
(since 1970) that involved ditches, the
helicopter sank much too early. This was
immediately or during the evacuation.
Sometimes floats did not inflate.
Sometimes they inflated, then deflated.
So what about emergency floatation sys-
tem (EFS) crashworthiness? “Statistics
indicate improving floatation is the most
important factor for better survivabil-
ity,” noted Dave Howson, UK civil avia-
tion authority (CAA) flight operations
research manager. Indeed, the major
drowning cause is the inability to escape
an inverted helicopter.
Surprisingly, computation has shown
that a 100-percent increase of EFS design
strength translates into a modest crash-
worthiness improvement. A designer
should think of a greater number of
floats rather than stronger floats. In
simulations, the helicopter stayed afloat
in all impacts, providing it had two high-
mounted floats—in addition to the usual
four floats at the bottom of the airframe.
The two upper floats bring redundancy
and a side-floatation capability.
Other ways to save lives by improving
floatation include, for example, auto-
matic activation. This can be done with
immersion switches. However, to auto-
matically activate the EFS, it has to be
armed at all times.
This has a cost. “You either have to
demonstrate inadvertent deployment
does not jeopardize the flight or certify a
system, using speed or altitude switches
for example, to prevent such inadvertent
deployment,” Howson explained. As a
result, the estimated cost per life saved
would be about $380,000. This is consid-
ered highly cost effective. “Oil & Gas UK
uses a figure around $7 million per life
saved,” Howson reminded.
All of the North Sea helicopters
already have automatic floats. They
proved their value in a Super Puma
(G-REDU) accident there in Febru-
ary 2009. “Most of us believe that the
helicopter would have capsized and
drowned at least some of the occupants
if it hadn’t been for the automatic activa-
tion system,” Howson told Rotor & Wing.
AgustaWestland claims to have dem-
onstrated its AW139 medium twin is
seaworthy up to sea state 6 (very rough
sea). Initially, it was just complying with
the regulation—sea state 4 (moderate).
The flight manual now refers to sea
state 6.
The Anglo-Italian manufacturer
recalculated float and structural loads.
It then performed tests in a water tank
on a 1/12th model, said Daniele Robust-
elli, marine and general airframe systems
50
WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2012
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See us at Heli-Expo,
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TRAINING | SPECIALTY
specialist. On a video, the AW139 model
appears not to capsize, despite the simu-
lated waves and wind.
Robustelli was challenged, though.
The audience expressed surprise at see-
ing smooth water surface on the video.
It turned out that the rules that govern
such demonstrations are quite relaxed.
“I agree irregular waves may be a more
severe environment, which we have not
tested,” Robustelli added.
A Eurocopter representative pointed
out that irregular wave testing would
require a huge water tank. This would
be to accommodate the drift caused by
the simulated wind over the irregular
wave scheme period. EASA rotorcraft
certification manager Massimo Maz-
zoletti wondered, “should we mandate
sea state 6?”
As for post-ditch stability, adding float
scoops would be a significant improve-
ment. The EFS would then just cost 10
percent more or so. A float scoop is a
small, flexible bucket, attached to the
exterior of the float. It naturally fills up
with water when the float immerses.
The added weight of the water acts to
increase the aircraft’s righting moment
when above the water. The drag of the
pocket also dampens rolling when below
the surface. As a result, the helicopter can
withstand one more sea state—sea state
5 instead of sea state 4, for example.
It remains that capsizing is a non-
linear process. “Therefore, it is difficult
to relate it to measurable helicopter
parameters such as dimensions,” How-
son noted. Fundamentally, the reason
why helicopters roll over is that a lot of
weight is located on the top—engines
and main rotor. “Don’t stay in the aircraft
if it seems to keep upright, as it may cap-
size,” warned UK CAA’s Tony Eagles, a
former Royal Navy pilot.
Other ideas have been pitched to
avoid capsizing and sinking. Mazzoletti
pleaded for the “jettison fuel” item to be
removed from the ditching checklist. “It
This model shows an example of the “side floating” concept.
6
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to 8
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52
WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2012
TRAINING | SPECIALTY
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does not improve floatability and makes
the cg higher,” he said.
Separately, the suggestion to let some
water in (the “wet floor” concept) to
stabilize the aircraft has been ruled
out. It brings a risk of capsizing when
the water rolls—this is called the “free
surface effect.” The side-floating concept
brought a lot of attention and debate.
Howson supports it. Human subject
trials showed it is much easier to escape
from a helicopter that is floating on its
side, rather than inverted. An asymmet-
ric configuration, with only one upper
float, is preferred, he said. It provides a
single rather than two-side floating posi-
tion. This avoids the helicopter switching
from one position to the other. Moreover,
it is cheaper, lighter and generates less
aerodynamic drag (even when stored,
emergency floats make the helicopter’s
exterior less smooth).
Eurocopter had quite a different view.
Louis Delorme, in charge of EFS design,
does not quite like seeing a float near the
main rotor, in case of inadvertent deploy-
ment. Moreover, the proximity of gas
exhaust requires new fabrics or thermal
protection. Then, the weight of the extra
floats can be close to 200 lbs.
On the asymmetric configuration,
Delorme said it does not provide as
much air volume in the cabin as a sym-
metrical one. “Today, we are not sure of
the risk-benefit ratio of side floating,” he
summarized. Eurocopter is therefore
focusing on upright stability.
What about a sea anchor? Howson
said it is good because it helps keep the
helicopter facing waves—hence much
more stability. Therefore, the helicopter
has a better chance to avoid rolling over.
“But the time it takes to deploy a sea
anchor is an issue,” he added. It doesn’t
work until the connecting line is tight
and the helicopter could capsize before
that is achieved.
François Hochart, an investigator at
the French BEA (the equivalent of the
NTSB), noted additional equipment to
prevent helicopter capsizing appears
to be difficult to design. “Were other
ways investigated in terms of design or
training to improve safety?” he asked.
He suggested to find other locations for
emergency exits and to enhance pas-
senger training.
As things stand, if the efforts to keep
some exits “dry” fail and the helicopter
actually inverts, occupant disorientation
is immediate. According to Paul Sparkes,
a UK CAA flight operations inspector,
the occupants’ allies will be training,
equipment “and a lot of good luck.” Seats
should be aligned with windows. “Oth-
erwise, once inverted, you’ll never find
your way,” Sparkes stressed. Not all mod-



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TRAINING | SPECIALTY
ern helicopters used today in offshore
operations have such alignment.
Once the occupant has pushed the
window out, he or she often needs some-
thing to hang on the fuselage to help
egress. But recent aircraft have smooth,
aerodynamic surfaces. This does not
make egress easier, several speakers
noted. The Sikorsky S-61 Sea King had
a lifeline rope. It even had a hull properly
designed for landing on water, like the
Sud Aviation SA321 Super Frelon.
Although the fuselage offers little
to hang on, it happens that it dam-
ages liferafts. “We have to delethalize
the fuselage,” Sparkes said. Also, as Paul
Hannant, a UK Aircraft Accident Inves-
tigation Branch (AAIB) senior inspector
emphasized, survival equipment should
not be mounted on a door that can be
jettisoned.
Then, an occupant has to wear a
well-sized immersion suit. “They are
sometimes chosen too large for comfort
reasons,” Michael Cunningham, investi-
gator in charge of the 2009 Cougar flight
91 (a Sikorsky S-92) crash, said. There is
also a risk of snagging. Involved can be
emergency breathers or, for the military,
survival equipment (such as a dinghy)
attached to the back of the pilot.
Water temperature can add one chal-
lenge. To keep dexterity, occupants are
encouraged to put gloves on only after
egress. But, in one instance, a survivor
got his fingers so cold that he could not
don his goggles. This affected his vision.
Typical escape time is 45 to 60 sec-
onds in a real accident. Meanwhile,
breath-hold time can be as short as 20
seconds in cold water.
To help solve the mismatch between
underwater escape and breath-hold
time, three types of emergency breathing
systems (EBS) are available. The first one
uses a small bottle of compressed air. The
second one is a rebreather. The third type
is a hybrid of the first two.
The idea is to have at least one min-
ute of breathing time. “It helps over-
come panic and disorientation,” Howson
added. Training is needed, though. In
addition to the snagging hazard, the
added buoyancy can impede egress from
an inverted aircraft. Research is going on
to ensure there is a net safety benefit in
using EBS. Howson hopes the EASA will
adopt the resulting specification. It could
then issue it as a European Technical
Standard Order (ETSO).
Consultant Sue Coleshaw is devel-
oping a technical standard for EBS. She
pointed out that using an EBS should
be easy. For example, the mouthpiece
should not be hidden in the folds of the
stored air pocket. Also, the emergency
breather should not prevent harness
release. Designing an EBS with a deploy-
ment time clearly below breath-hold
time is still a challenge.
Underwater escape training is obvi-
ously very useful but it must be properly
done. Regulations only call for one such
training session every four years. In a pre-
sentation by Michael Taber, director of
research and development with Survival
Systems Training, it appeared this brings
somewhat contradictory requirements.
The simulated cabin has to be as real-
istic as possible with accurate window
and handle locations etc. However, as
training sessions do not occur often, the
simulator also should be representative
for several types. One passenger may be
carried in several different helicopters
over the four-year interval.
Taber also insisted the stress level in
underwater escape training should be
high enough for knowledge and skills to
be retained.
The North Sea is a Hostile Environment—But What
About Other Places?
As one attendee, representing an operator flying off West African coasts,
told Rotor & Wing, rulemakers should not forget about those environments
that are less hostile than the North Sea. For example, should helicopter occu-
pants off Nigeria wear immersion suits? Yes, if one thinks helicopter search-
and-rescue services there are virtually non-existent—rescue will come by boat.
But, if they wear an immersion suit during a flight in Africa’s hot environment,
they will dehydrate, the attendee pointed out.
In addition, do all occupants there have the necessary culture to take ben-
efit from safety training? “The cooks we fly to oil platforms may find it chal-
lenging to use European-designed, complex safety devices,” he said.
About aircraft ditching certification, some participants suggested sea state
4 is perfectly acceptable for environments like the Mediterranean and the Gulf
of Mexico.
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56 ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2012 WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
TRAINING | MILITARY
In October the Spanish Air Force
hosted the European Air Group’s
5th Annual Personnel Recovery
Training Meet, CJPRSC.
By Andrew Drwiega, Military Editor
TEST PERSONNEL
RECOVERY TECHNIQUES
T
he fifth gathering of European international military aircrews that
were seeking to improve their knowledge and skills in personnel
recovery techniques met at the Albacete airbase in Spain from Octo-
ber 14-26, 2011 under the auspices of the European Air Group.
This was the annual Combined Joint Personnel Recovery Standardization
course (CJPRSC), formally known as the Combined Joint Combat Search
and Rescue course (CJCSAR), organized under the direction of the EAG’s Lt.
Col. Uwe Schleimer (JPR-1), based at RAF High Wycombe in the UK. This
was Schleimer’s fourth course in as many years, although he was deputy com-
mander the first time around. The basis for the course actually goes back to
2002-2006 with the VOLCANEX/CSAR exercises.
Spanish Air Force AS332B behind one of the
international extraction forces.

58 ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2012 WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
TRAINING | MILITARY
BUSINESS AVIATION
ON FULL DISPLAY
IN SHANGHAI — MAKE
PLANS TO BE THERE
The concept behind the annual
CJPRSC is to provide individual
training for those with responsibility
for personnel recovery tasks.
It trains and tests their knowledge
and proficiency in pl anning and
executing PR missions “in a non per-
missive, multinational environment
embedded in a COMAO [Composite
Air Operation], using operational
documents.”
The structure of the CJPRSC “is
virtually unchanged since last year,”
said Schleimer, adding that, “the only
real difference was that the course
was more operator-oriented and a
little more away from the theoretical.”
Most of the participants are new to
the course although a good num-
ber of the instructors and directors
return to assist with instruction.
The course has matured over
the years and although some of the
participants are knowledgeable in its
requirements, most have no expe-
rience. Which is a good balance,
explained Schleimer.
Those on the course get to know
tactics, techniques and procedures
(TTPs) and identify common operat-
ing principals instead of using their
own standard operating procedures
(SOPs) and standing SPINS (Special
Instructions).
EAG held the initial planning
meeting at its RAF High Wycombe
headquarters in January 2011, fol-
lowed by a further planning meeting
at the airbase in Spain during June.
The Program of Instruction (PoI) is
based around four days of theoretical
instruction and seven days of fly-
ing sorties. During the flying phase,
Schleimer revealed that 90 percent
of the scheduled sorties took place.
Once again however, as in recent
years, no night flying exercises were
possible due to limited residual con-
ditions and the two night missions
became day missions instead.
The program calls for the aircraft
present to be divided into two PR Task
Force groups, with each group receiv-
ing their own separate task. Forward
Air Refuelling Points (FARPS) were
once again used although the Spanish
conditions led to some unscheduled
‘brownout’ training.
Once again the course attracted a
good international attendance with
13 nations sending a total of 319 per-
sonnel and 17 helicopters and fixed-
wing aircraft. The main nations con-
A pair of Spanish Air Force Super Pumas acting as recovery vehicles.
59 FEBRUARY 2012 | ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE
Label Feature
WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
Shanghai, China
March 27, 28, 29, 2012
Shanghai Hawker Pacific Business Aviation Service
Centre on Hongqiao International Airport
Exhibits, Dozens of Aircraft on Side-by-Side Display and
Education Sessions All in One Location
WWW.ABACE.AERO
The Asian Business Aviation Conference & Exhibition is
co-hosted by The National Business Aviation Association (NBAA),
the Asian Business Aviation Association (AsBAA) and The Shanghai
Exhibition Center, in Partnership With Shanghai Airport Authority.
BUSINESS AVIATION
ON FULL DISPLAY
IN SHANGHAI — MAKE
PLANS TO BE THERE
60 ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2012 WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
TRAINING | MILITARY
tributing forces and benefiting from
the CJPRSC training were Spain,
France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Swe-
den and the United States.
Personnel from six other nations
contributed to support and observer
roles.
“The Spanish forces should be
recognized for the great effort that
they put into making this CJPRSC
one of the best with 10 fixed-wing
sorties per day. There was also the
chance to use fast jet pilots as on
scene commanders—something that
rarely happens in exercise but can
happen operationally,” explained Lt.
Col. Schleimer.
Although a fi xed-wing NATO
E-3A Sentry airborne early warning
(AEW) aircraft wasn’t available, the
role was performed by an EH 101 C2
from the Italian Navy.
Enemy ground forces were pro-
vided by the Spanish Military Police
with the Swedish, Polish, French and
Italian militaries provided the extrac-
tion forces.
“Today we are not looking at high-
intensity warfare or home country
defense,” said Schleimer.
“Now what i s more usual i s
expeditionary warfare. We have a
moral obligation to try and get our
people back.”
The amount of financial invest-
ment that countries make in training
and qualifying their flying personnel
makes them expensive assets. In
the current difficult financial cli-
mate, cuts to training will mean that
individuals will be harder and cost-
lier to replace in the future, Schliemer
stated.
Overall the course achieved its
training objectives, despite the lack
of night flying. As Schleimer outlined
in his debriefing document, “The
shift in focus away from pure CSAR
missions towards the wider scope of
Personnel Recovery operations con-
tinues to prove beneficial to tailor the
course objectives towards real time
requirements.”
The ultimate lessons learned by
the teams that participate in the
CJPRSC will hopefully be taken away
and used when they are called upon
to plan and execute real PR missions
in a non-permissive multinational
scenario operating within a Com-
bined Air Operation (COMAO).
The next European Air Group
CJPRSC training course will be held
later this year. It is scheduled to run
from October 8 through Oct. 26,
2012 in the Schönewalde/Holzdorf
region in Germany.

LEADERS

Participating Aircraft:
CJPRSC Exercise
1 x MC-130, USAF
1 x EH-101 C2, Italian Navy
2 x F1M, Spanish Air Force
2 x F-18M, Spanish Air Force
2 x AS555, French Air Force
2 x AB212, Italian Air Force
1 x EH101, Italian Navy
1 x CH-53G, German Army
1 x SA330, French Air Force
2 x AS332B, Italian Air Force
2 x HH3F, Italian Air Force
Total hours flown: 227
(Above) Italian Navy EH101 on the ground prior to takeoff with an extraction force. (Bottom)
The CJPRSC 2011 group photo at the Tactical Leadership Program (TLP) facilities at Albacete
Air Base, Spain.
FIDAE
March27April1
Sanago,Chile
FarnboroughIntlAirshow
July915
Farnborough,UK
AfricaAerospace&Defence
September1923
Pretoria,SouthAfrica
JapanAerospace
October914
Nagoya,Japan
AirshowChina
November1318
Zhuhai,China
ORGANIZERSOF THESEANDOTHERFINESHOWS
REPRESENTEDINTHEU.S.BY
KallmanWorldwideInc.www.kallman.com(201)2512600
JOINTHETEAMOFLEADINGCOMPANIESLIKETHESE
EXHIBITWITHCONFIDENCE™ATTHESEINTERNATIONALTRADESHOWS:
L3Communicaons
Laversab,Inc.
Lektro,Inc.
MarvidInternaonalPteLtd
NewportAeronaucalSales
OceofNavalResearch
PartsBase
PASTechnologies
PelicanProducts,Inc.
RobertsonAviaon,L.L.C.
RockwellCollins
RolledAlloys
RubbInc.
SatcomDirect,Inc.
SegersAeroCorporaon
SeyTec/CWAerotech
SigmaAerospaceMetals,LLC
SOIAviaon
TelephonicsCorp.
TradeAPlane
TransaeroInc.
Transupport,Inc.
TronairInc.
U.S.MarineCorpsWarghngLab
UniversalAvionicsSystemsCorp.
WestCoastIndustries,Inc.
ZipChemProducts
AccurateBushingCompany
AeroPrecisionIndustries
AerospaceProductsInternaonal(API)
AirTractor,Inc.
AllSystemAerospaceInt'lInc.
AMGeneralCorporaon
ArgosyInternaonal,Inc.
ArrowheadProducts
ATK/AlliantTechsystems124686
BralcoMetals
BreezeEastern
CBOLCorporaon
CompositeEngineeringInc.
CustomControlSensors,Inc.
DakotaAirPartsIntl.Inc.
DefenseNewsMediaGroup
DefenseTechnologyEquipmentInc.
DeAerospaceCoangs
DynatechInternaonalCorporaon
FlightDirector,Inc.
FLIRHQ
ForecastInternaonal/DMS
FrascaInternaonal
GATelesisLLC
Glenair,Inc.
HarrisCorporaon
InsituPacicLimited
JabilDefense&Aerospace
LEADERS
U.S.INTERNATIONALPAVILIONSINGAPOREAIRSHOWFEBRUARY1419
Follow
the
62 ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2012 WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
CATEGORY | INFO CATEGORY | INFO
TRAINING NEWS
CATEGORY | INFO
Army Unit First to Train on
Upgraded Block III Apaches
The U.S. Army’s 1st Infantry Division, part of the 1st Attack
Reconnaissance Battalion, 1st Aviation Regiment, Combat
Aviation Brigade, has become the first unit to fly the Boeing
Apache Block III. Pilots flying the Block III, which features
26 new technological upgrades, will receive three weeks of
training on the revamped helicopters at Boeing’s facility in
Mesa, Ariz.
Lt. Col. Edward Vedder, commander of the 1-1 ARB,
explains that there are new components to the helicopter.
“There is new head tracker, a new helmet and new flight
pages. It doesn’t take additional skills to fly it, but the aircraft
is significantly different.”
Vedder is one of the first 10 Apache pilots to undergo
Block III training in Arizona. He also has the distinction
of having flown all three incarnations of the Apache—the
AH-64A Block I and AH-64D Longbow Block II, in addition
to the current iteration.
“At Block II, it has a certain level of power when you pick
it up. This is totally different,” notes Vedder. “When you pick
this aircraft up you are going to immediately feel the power
difference.” The Block III variant also comes with the ability
to communicate with unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and
its controllers, as well as watching the UAV video feed and
taking control of the UAV, should the situation warrant it.
The unit currently has 85 Apache pilots that will require
training on the Block III. The first 75 will train in Mesa, with
the remainder handled via mobile training at Fort Riley, Kan.
All pilots will be trained on the Block III prior to their next
deployment. —Information from Sgt. Jeff Troth contributed to
this report.
Lt. Col. Edward Vedder using an AH-64D Apache Block III simulator at Boeing’s facility in Mesa, Ariz.
Bell 412 FFS in Toluca.
U
.
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EASA Prepares for ‘the Ditch’ 48
Apache Block III Enters Service 62
Enhancing Safety & Professionalism 68
Navy Employs Sikorsky Virtual
Environment Trainer
The U.S. Navy has begun using its first virtual reality training
device, a Sikorsky MH-60S aircrew virtual environmental
trainer (AVET). MH-60S and HH-60H crew members will
practice aerial gunnery, cargo replenishment, confined area
landings and search and rescue (SAR) with the new full-
motion simulator. Capt. John Feeney, Naval Aviation Train-
ing Systems Program Office (PMA-205) program manager,
says that future plans call for the Navy to “network this trainer
with the tactical operational flight trainers for multi-crew
mission rehearsal training.” The simulator is based at Naval
Air Station North Island in San Diego, Calif.
Bell Sim Opens
at CAE Mexico
CAE has launched a new train-
ing center in Mexico for Bell
helicopter and business jet pilot
training. The facility features a
Bell 412 Level D-equivalent full-
flight simulator (FFS) as well as
various fixed-wing simulators,
all qualified by Mexico’s Direc-
torate General of Civil Aviation
(DGAC). The Toluca, Mexico
location is CAE’s ninth for civil helicopter training.
63 FEBRUARY 2012 | ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
Label Feature
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“Others sell parts, WE SELL SUPPORT”®
HR Smith Group of Companies www.hr-smith.com
Techtest Limited r Street Court r Kingsland
Leominster r HR6 9QA r England
T. +44(0) 1568 708744 E. sales@hr-smith.com
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63 FEBRUARY 2012 | ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
64 ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2012 WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
COMMERCIAL | TECHNOLOGY
Quiet Please
Leading Edge
T
he beginning of a new year
seems like an appropriate
time to look at what l ies
ahead with evolving helicop-
ter systems and technologies. One
area that always welcomes improve-
ment is that of helicopter noise and
vibration. A quieter, smoother heli-
copter makes those who fly in them
smile bigger, and those who are on
the ground complain less; a win-win
for all. There are many oscillating
forces and moments at work creat-
ing sources of noise and vibration in
flight. One of the most well known
sources is due to blade-vortex inter-
action (BVI), otherwise known as
“blade slap.”
Just like an airplane wing, higher-
pressure air will spill out from under a
rotor blade at the tip, get sucked toward
its upper surface, and create a strong
corkscrewing swirl of air, or tip vortex.
Under normal conditions in level flight,
these vortices tend to sink and lose
energy as they get blown below the
rotor. In autorotation, they pass above
the helicopter as the aircraft descends
quickly. However, in a partial-power
descent, or when the helicopter is
rolled into a turn, an approaching blade
will often come into the vicinity of a tip
vortex left by a preceding blade. When
the high-energy swirling air strikes the
rotor blade, it causes a sudden change
in angle of attack and an associated
change in pressure on the surface of
the blade. This is what creates the loud
impulsive noise that can be annoying
to those on the ground. There can be
increased vibrations in the cockpit
due to BVI, especially as the aircraft is
slowed on approach. As you begin to
“ride the burble,” the tip vortices impart
high vibratory loads on the blades that
pass down the rotor shaft, into the
fuselage, and into the seat of your pants
until the helicopter slows to a hover
and the vortices are once again blown
down beneath the rotor.
There is more than one way to less-
en BVI. In recent months, Eurocopter
has publicized its latest efforts to make
friendlier-sounding, smoother-riding
helicopters, developing both passive
and active systems to combat blade-
vortex interaction. The manufacturer’s
passive system, which is called Blue
Edge, involves redesigning the conven-
tional straight rotor blade from the root
outward, to include forward sweep, aft
sweep, and anhedral (droop) at the tip.
The intensity of the BVI is governed by
the distance between the vortex center
and the plane of the blade, the strength
of the vortex at the time it meets the
blade, and how parallel the vortex is to
the blade edge when they meet. Blue
Edge combats all three of these. The
forward and aft sweep of the blade
sit at an oblique angle to the vortex
during contact, while the anhedral, or
drooped tip weakens and deposits the
vortex lower, giving the approaching
blade more clearance over the top.
This has produced a reduction of noise
levels by 3-4 decibels, according to the
company. Blue Edge has been said to
increase hover performance as well,
since reducing the strength of tip vorti-
ces will increase rotor efficiency.
Eurocopter’s Blue Pulse technology
is an active noise/vibration canceling
system that uses piezoelectric actua-
tors to control trailing edge flaps on
each rotor blade. Piezoelectric actua-
tors can change their shape when an
electrical voltage is applied, and actuate
those flaps at 15-40 times per second,
effectively flying it up and over or down
and under the approaching vortex
with every revolution, greatly reduc-
ing transmitted noise and vibration.
Eurocopter has reported a 5-decibel
decrease with the system.
These methods of BVI reduction
have been around for a while, but only
now are they coming into their own.
The constant development of materi-
als technology is what has allowed this
to be so. The unconventional shape of
the Blue Edge rotor would plague engi-
neers with difficult bending and twist-
ing loads that try to distort the shape
of the blade in flight, were it not for the
advent of composite materials that can
resist such aeroelastic effects. With Blue
Pulse, piezoelectric actuators made
largely of ceramic light-weight materi-
als and virtually no mechanical parts
have proven to be very robust while
living in the high-g, oscillatory environ-
ment of the spinning rotor; something
that has long-troubled earlier projects
exploring active-blade control.
Until these newer systems are fully
integrated into the helicopter produc-
tion line, it falls upon us to keep the
negative public perception of our flying
to a minimum. Knowing what causes
BVI and the regimes of flight it is com-
monly encountered in allows us to do
our best to avoid it, and we should con-
tinue to be good neighbors and use “fly
friendly” techniques until technology
gives us a quiet helping hand.
By Frank Lombardi
65 FEBRUARY 2012 | ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
#
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66 ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2012 WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
A Paid Advertisement?!
On a Police Helicopter?!
PUBLIC SERVICE | POLICE
A
good friend of mine sent me
a news clipping the other
day. Basically, the sheriff of a
fair-size department is hav-
ing such a tough time financing his air
unit, he has decided to solicit sponsors
to help cover the costs of the operation.
Now, if the image of a decal-lad-
en NASCAR vehicle comes to mind,
you’re headed in the right direction. Just
change the car to a helicopter, and the
laundry detergent logo on the hood to,
oh, maybe a local grocery store chain,
and you’ll be dead on. Because just like
Tony Stewart’s #14 Chevy with “Home
Depot” emblazoned across the hood,
that agency’s helicopter will be a flying
billboard for whichever companies take
the sheriff up on his offer.
The only reason this news didn’t
shock me was because it was not the
first time I had heard of such an idea. San
Diego Fire Department (SDFD) did the
same thing several years ago when they
invited area companies and organiza-
tions to place logos on the department’s
Bell 212, in exchange for a donation
toward the then-one ship operation. It
worked well, too. They had logos from
a medical center, a Native American
resort, and a couple of other outfits; not
to mention a happy little bundle of cash.
Deputy Chief Brian Fennessey, a
lieutenant at the time I met him in 2007,
said the sponsorship method was the
only option the SDFD had to get their
unit up and running—a unit that battles
brush fires nearly all year. The deal made
some in the SDFD nervous. After all,
if the choice has to be made between
which fire to work now and which one
to work later—and a sponsor’s interest
is one of the properties in harm’s way—
how will it play out? Will the involved
sponsor expect—or subtly demand—
priority consideration, and withdraw
its support if it doesn’t get it? And if the
sponsor legitimately deserves priority,
will the “regular citizen” assume money
drove that decision?
For the record, I know Fennessey.
I’m sure he would never let sponsorship
interfere with how the SDFD prioritized
its missions. But for every honorable
public servant like him, there are plenty
who are less honorable, and might very
well allow contribution-dollars to cloud
their better judgment. (Refer to the
politics section of your local newspaper
to learn more about money can corrupt
decision-making.) The meat and pota-
toes of this whole method for finding
revenue is just another piece of the eco-
nomic-meltdown pie, especially since
things got really ugly back in 2008. The
woes of the housing market clobbered
the tax base that public services need
to operate. Unlike private businesses,
which can divest, merge, and do a bunch
of other things, government agencies
are pretty much limited to cutting costs,
raising taxes and selling bonds to make-
up for the shortfall.
So, here we have a sheriff, who is
wedged between a financial rock and
an operational hard place with his heli-
copter unit. I’m betting he has already
reduced staffing to the bare bone, virtu-
ally cut out all overtime, and must hold
his fleet of patrol cars together with
bailing wire. And now, his helicopter
operation—which not only patrols, but
is needed for search and rescue services
in remote areas—could go the way of
other units that have had to sell their
ships due to lack of funding.
Once all of the discussions, gnash-
ing of teeth, and moaning passes, here
is where I land: Trading ad space on
a police helicopter for operating cash
would be so far down on my list of unit-
saving options, you’d skin your knees
trying to get low enough to read it. It isn’t
that I would feel obligated to give pref-
erential treatment to a sponsor, because
I wouldn’t. And if I were an elected unit
head, as this sheriff is, I wouldn’t be too
worried about outside influence trying
to make me do otherwise. I would, how-
ever, be concerned if I were an appoint-
ed official, who might have to deal with
a boss or political figure that might lean
on me to play favorites based upon who
send in the largest check.
That said, if I were stuck in the unen-
viable position of having to rely on spon-
sors to operate my unit, I’d do my best to
limit it to those who probably wouldn’t
need my services, such as the non-res-
ident providers of my unit’s radio gear,
jet fuel, or mission equipment. It would
keep my unit from having to face accusa-
tions that I gave better police service to a
sponsor than to a non-contributor.
So, while I salute that sheriff ’s efforts
to keep his deputies flying, and don’t
blame him for looking for outside
sponsors if that’s his last resort, I sure
hope it works for him. Air assets are
extremely important. Hopefully, he
can discontinue the whole sponsorship
deal once things get better, as the SDFD
was able to do.
67 FEBRUARY 2012 | ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
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advertiser index
Page# .........Advertiser ........... Website Page# .........Advertiser ........... Website
35, 37..........................Aero Dynamix ............................. www.aerodynamix.com
24 ...............................Aerometals ................................. www.aerometals.aero
17 ...............................Aeronautical Accessories ............ www.aero-access.com
18 ...............................Aerospace Optics Inc................... www.vivisun.com
67 ...............................AeroXS ........................................ www.aeroxs.com
65 ...............................Air Technology Engines .............. www.airtechnology.com
65 ...............................Alpine Air Support ...................... www.alpine.aero
72 ...............................American Eurocopter .................. www.eurocopterusa.com
9 .................................Aspen Avionics ........................... www.aspenavionics.com
16 ...............................Aviation Instrument Services ..... www.aviation-instrument.com
14 ...............................Becker Avionics........................... www.beckerusa.com
2 .................................Bell Helicopters .......................... www.bellhelicopter.com
3 .................................BLR Aerospace ............................ www.blrvgs.com
51 ...............................CAE ............................................. www.cae.com
67 ...............................Chopper Spotter ......................... www.jbk.rotor.com
21, 23..........................Cobham/HeliSAS ........................ www.helisas.com
25 ...............................Cobham/Radios .......................... www.cobham.com
27 ...............................Cobham/Audio ........................... www.cobham.com
29 ...............................Cobham/EFIS .............................. www.cobham.com
67 ...............................Component Control .................... www.componentcontrol.com
47 ...............................Donaldson Filtration .................. www.afs.donaldson.com
39 ...............................FlightSafety ................................ www.flightsafety.com
50 ...............................Frasca International ................... www.frasca.com
31 ...............................Garmin International ................. www.garmin.com
5 .................................Goodrich Corp. Sensor ................ www.sensors.goodrich.com
63 ...............................Helicopter Accessory Repairs ..... www.helicopteraccessoryrepairs.com
63 ...............................HR Smith .................................... www.hr-smith.com
28 ...............................JSSI ............................................. www.jetsupport.com
71 ...............................L3-Communications/Avionics .... www.l-3com.com
63 ...............................Machida Inc. ............................... www.machidascope.com
15 ................................Marenco Swisshelicopter .............www.marenco-swisshelicopter.com
19 ...............................Messe Berlin ............................... www.ila-berlin.com
63 ...............................Precision Heliparts ..................... www.precisionaviationgroup.com
41 ...............................Presagis ...................................... www.presagis.com
49 ...............................Robinson Helicopter ................... www.robinsonheli.com
11...........................................RollsRoyce.................................................www.rolls-royce.com/defence_aerospace
65 ...............................Survival Products ....................... www.survivalproductsinc.com
65 ...............................Switlik ........................................ www.switlik.com
67 ...............................Tanis Aircraft ............................... www.tanispreheat.com
34 ...............................Tech Tool Plastics ........................ www.tech-tool.com
13 ...............................Turbomeca ................................. www.turbomeca.com
36 ...............................Uniflight ..................................... www.uniflight.com
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68 ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2012 WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
By Keith Cianfrani
TRAINING | EVENT COVERAGE
I
had the pleasure of attending
the Eastern Region Helicopter
Council (ERHC) seminar in Sep-
tember last year in Mahwah,
N.J. and enjoyed spending time with
the council’s President, Jeff Smith, and
HAI’s Safety Director Stan Rose. The
first several sessions were focused
around employment in the rotary wing
industry. Attending were young pilots
looking to get that “perfect” flying job
and a few more experienced pilots try-
ing to back into the cockpit.
Smith spoke on the state of the indus-
try and explained what the ERHC is and
what they do. He explained that local
helicopter pilots who were interested in
the availability of IFR flight for rotorcraft
started the organization in 1977. Their
ad hoc meetings in New York City, using
the initial name of Northeast Helicopter
Operator Council (NEHOC), were
the initial step in forming the eastern
seaboard’s first locally organized aviation
group to represent helicopters. After the
charter member pilots realized their suc-
cess in joining together with respect to
the IFR issue, they incorporated in 1979,
renaming the non-profit organization
Eastern Region Helicopter Council, Inc.
to represent their interests in aviation.
ERHC has always had an active com-
munity outreach program to address
the concerns of residents, relating to
helicopter and heliport issues. In 1982,
the ERHC was awarded the first-ever
Fly Neighborly Award from HAI, and
is featured as an example in the Fly
Neighborly Guide. ERHC is an affiliate
member of HAI and NBAA. Since 2007,
the group has strengthened its bonds
with other local aviation groups, such
as the Mid-Atlantic Pilots Association
(MAPA), Mid-Atlantic Aviation Coali-
tion (MAAC), Long Island Business
Aviation Association (LIBAA), and New
Jersey Aviation Association (NJAA). The
council meets five times yearly. Its first
priority always has been, and remains—
safety. Since 1977, ERHC has promoted
communication among local-elected
officials, FAA, the public and the region’s
helicopter operators to enhance safety,
professionalism, efficiency and com-
munity compatibility. Following Smith’s
presentation, the chief pilot of Liberty
Helicopters, Paul Tramontana, gave an
update regarding sightseeing along the
Hudson River and how they’ve adjusted
to the new airspace limitations in the
New York area. Liberty Helicopters is
one of the major tour operators and hires
low-time pilots to fly the river for several
years before they are upgraded to other
types of flying. Other companies flying in
the area are Manhattan Helicopters, Zip
Aviation and Helicopter Flight Services.
The air tours operate under CFR 49, Part
136. There are three heliports in use,
West 30th Street, East 34th Street Heli-
port, and the Downtown Heliport.
Rose presented several sessions on
the “State of the Industry” and safety
awareness. He spoke on the reasons why
we crash aircraft and that these mishaps
are all preventable. Shortly after his ses-
sion, I had the opportunity to speak with
Stan and we talked about many areas
of safety in our industry. He went on to
say that HAI is a lobbyist organization
promoting safety and helicopter aviation
worldwide while representing interests
of owners, most of which have less than
five aircraft. We discussed how HAI
is working with ERHC to reduce acci-
dents in the community by promoting
aeronautical decision-making assess-
ments, obtaining legal weather briefings,
and reviewing safety “hot spots.” We
discussed how pilots need to plan for all
flight conditions on the ground prior to
each flight. He believes every solution
begins with each and every pilot.
Of course, we then talked about new
CFIs and how many of them do not have
the ideal cognitive skills and aeronautical
experience, a topic I have written about
several times. Rose went on to say how
pilots are task overloaded and how risk
management is not performed on all
occasions, as there are limitations to see
and avoid and how it is the responsibility
of the PIC to manage the workload.
Rose finished our interview with
mentioning what pilots need to know
about the industry. He stated that 30
percent of the Vietnam Era pilots (many
of which are approximately 65 years old)
would retire, but because of the poor
performance of their 401K plans, still
need to work. Pilots must know their
competition. With many of these pilots
retiring in the next five years, there may
be opportunities for employment.
Finally, the FAASafety Team conduct-
ed a seminar concerning areas of interest
such as the ongoing work of IHST and
how with PRIA a pilots training history
will be tracked. In other words, if you
fail a check ride, it stays on your record
permanently. They also discussed that
there is no evidence that twin-engine
helicopters are safer than single-engine
models and the need for LARS. Overall,
it was a great event, featuring very profes-
sional presenters and and opportunity
for operators and pilots to network. I was
very glad the focus was on safety and risk
management. Good job guys.
Enhancing Safety and
Professionalism
Safety & Training
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For more than 68 years AHS International has worked to advance
the development of worldwide vertical flight technology.
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technology.
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at www.vtol.org. This is truly an outstanding event that you will want to
include on your business calendar.
• Reach top military program managers
• Showcase your rotorcraft technology to
the industry’s finest engineers and
designers
• Hear the latest from the CEOs of the top
manufacturers
• Hear more than 280 presentations on
Aerodynamics, Acoustics, Dynamics,
Flight Simulation, HUMS, Handling
Qualities, History, Manufacturing
Technology and Processing, Modeling
and Simulation, Structures and
Materials, Test & Evaluation, UAVs and
much more…
• Network at the Vertical Flight
Foundation Reception and AHS Grand
Awards Banquet
• Exhibitors include companies
representing airframes, avionics and
sensors, components, design
capabilities, display systems, electro-
optics, engine/propulsion, fabrication,
fuel and utility systems, HUMS, mission
support, safety systems, simulation and
training and more
Æ
70 ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2012 WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M
By Andrew Drwiega
MILITARY | COMBAT
W
ith Afghanistan already
in the drawdown stages
in the minds of politicians,
the challenge ahead for
U.S. Army Aviation commanders will
be to maintain the quality, capability, vol-
ume and performance of the force it has
built up since the windfall in spending
following the cancellation of the Coman-
che program. As its commander Maj.
Gen. Anthony Crutchfield stated during
his opening address at the recent AUSA
Institute of Land Warfare (ILW) aviation
conference, “the last 10 years of war are
not the blueprint for the next war.”
But Army Aviation is starting this
new phase in U.S. global defense strat-
egy from a position of strength. It is well
on the way to modernizing its entire
fleet—with the exception of the Kiowa
Warrior and the oldest fleet in the books,
the variety of training aircraft at Fort
Rucker, Ala. It is also well into the process
of constituting its 13th Combat Aviation
Brigade (CAB)—getting it through the
budgetary door before it slams shut. Six
CABs are currently committed globally:
four in Afghanistan, one in Kuwait (still
supporting the Iraq forces in spite of the
heavy PR campaign emphasizing depar-
ture of all troops from that country) and
one in South Korea. But the “elephant in
the room” is the government’s declared
commitment to cutting $487 billion from
defense spending in the next decade.
Speaking in January 2012, Secretary
of Defense Leon Panetta said, “...with
the end of U.S. military commitments
in Iraq and the drawdown that is already
under way in Afghanistan, the Army
and Marines will no longer need to be
sized to support the kind of large-scale,
long-term stability operations that have
dominated military priorities and force
generation over the past decade.” So if
there is a reduction in ground force num-
bers, it is likely that Army Aviation will
be reduced accordingly. Panetta added
to his remarks saying the “U.S. joint force
will be smaller, and it will be leaner.”
So joint is also in; remember, this
is why the Joint Multi-Role (JMR) air-
craft is—this time—unlikely to go away.
Joint equipment programs are going to
increasingly appeal to DoD financiers
because a shared platform across differ-
ent forces equates to reductions in not
only procurement but also through-life
ownership costs. So better for the Army,
the Marines, the Air Force and the Navy
to have their share of JMR aircraft rather
than lose out by not participating—then
have no option further down the road.
The first players in this development
will have an opportunity to shape the
design for the future—those coming to
the table reluctantly at a later stage may
be limited in their ability to influence
such a program.
Panetta also stated the requirement
to the future force being able to regener-
ate and mobilize quickly, and that it was
a priority to maintain a strong National
Guard. The challenge will be to ensure
that the Guard is equipped, trained and
paid in line with the level of commit-
ment expected of it in the future. If, as
has already been stated, it will continue
to take its share of front line duties, car-
rying out the same tasks and missions as
its regular colleagues, then the build up in
its force structure and ability to integrate
with regular formations must continue.
Many have stated in recent times that
it’s still not at a level that will be required,
particularly in terms of pre-deployment
training with regular units, unmanned
aerial systems (UAS) and Special Forces.
On-the-job training, while possible at
times in Afghanistan, may not be pos-
sible next time around. In the case of
the Guard, it will be very tempting for
financiers to contemplate slipping back
into the mindset that placed the Guard at
a lower level of requirement to the regu-
lars—but this must not happen if they are
to be relied upon to be interchangeable
operationally with the regular force.
Crutchfield’s will lay down his line on
the general way ahead for Army Aviation
in April at Quad-A in Nashville, Tenn.
He will release his Vision 2030 paper and
campaign plan for the future, but gave
a brief insight as to its contents during
AUSA. “We need to sustain the active
reserve when the Army is not at war. We
need to know what our advisories can
exploit in our current equipment. And
we have to rethink the current way of
doing business in our acquisition pro-
cess.” Finally, he said, everyone in avia-
tion needs to take an “appetite suppres-
sant” for the journey ahead. “We need
to be happy with what is good enough.”
By this he didn’t mean cutting capabil-
ity, but having what was required to get
the job done in a balanced way, mea-
sured against the overall capability of
the force available. In short, there won’t
be any more Comanches.
The Challenge to be Good
Enough
Military Insider
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Æ
71 OCTOBER 2011 | ROTOR & WING MAGAZINE WWW. R OT O R A N D WI N G . C O M

I
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EDITORIAL
Andrew Parker Editor-in-Chief, aparker@accessintel.com Chris Sheppard Associate Editor, csheppard@accessintel.com Ernie Stephens Editor-at-Large, estephens@accessintel.com Andrew Drwiega Military Editor, adrwiega@accessintel.com Claudio Agostini Latin America Bureau Chief Joe West United Kingdom Correspondent Contributing Writers: Chris Baur; Lee Benson; Shannon Bower; Igor Bozinovski; Tony Capozzi; Keith Cianfrani; Steve Colby; Frank Colucci; Dan Deutermann; Pat Gray; Frank Lombardi; Vicki McConnell; Robert Moorman; Douglas Nelms; Mark Robins; Dale Smith; Terry Terrell; Todd Vorenkamp; Richard Whittle.

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” is the probable cause of the crash. bring the helicopter back. whether it’s caused by fatigue. rather than choosing a safer alternative of parking the helicopter in a secure area and exploring alternate transportation arrangements or waiting for the storm to pass and returning to base after sunrise when conditions improved.S. S.” NTSB noted “inadequate oversight of the flight by Omniflight’s Operational Control Center” as a contributing factor to the accident. He had been on duty overnight. and at times we can all be one bad decision away from disaster. take a moment to go to www. Three people died in the crash.C. however. Products and Services. Public Service.m. he was aware of the storm and chose to fly into it. who in fact made it on board and said they were about 30 seconds from arrival. heavy rain and severe turbulence. The stakes for aircraft operators are high. The first crash. In a conversation with an A oncoming shift pilot. there are individual landing pages for different sectors of the helicopter market—Commercial. Training. photos and videos with press releases from industry vendors and links to important stories we’ve run across from other sources on the web—all targeted to the unique interests of operators in each sector. went down after heading straight into a quick-developing weather cell. but it’s important to keep this in mind as an example of where the decision to push forward into the gray area can have dire consequences. The U. 2009 near Georgetown. we aggregate our own news and editorial coverage. we all know that. National Transportation Safety Board issued similar rulings on January 19 involving two helicopter EMS crashes where pilots flew into storms at night. The pilot. which happened at around 11:30 p.” Sometimes. Human error. believing “he had about 18 minutes to beat the storm and return to home base” while leaving the nurses behind. The second accident took place on March 25. know your limits.” The report continues by stating the pilot “made a risky decision to attempt to outrun a storm in night conditions.. the pilot. The shift pilot suggested parking the helicopter.Editor’s Notebook Own Worst Enemy aparker@accessintel. When dealing with Mother Nature. Learning lessons from the mistakes of others is one of the most basic ways of improving. as the crew was headed back from dropping off a patient. registered to Memphis Medical Air Center. Military. 2011 near Brownsville. the pilot allegedly said he “wanted to get the helicopter out” after sitting on the helipad at Jackson-Madison County General Hospital and waiting for the flight nurses. we are our own worst enemy. . . NTSB faults the decision-making process of the pilot.aviationtoday. The shift pilot later spoke with one of the flight nurses. Check it out and let us know what you think. resulting in an encounter with a thunderstorm with localized IMC. or any of a large number of other casual factors. the pilot decided “to continue the VFR flight into an area of IMC. it’s important to again bring up the subjects of training and safety. a flight nurse and a flight paramedic.com If you haven’t had the opportunity already. The New Face of Rotorandwing. R O T O R A N D W I N G . Tenn. the desire to finish a shift.com and look at the new design and features of our website. The Hospital Wing Eurocopter AS350B3. involved a Carolina Life Care Eurocopter AS350B2 operated by Omniflight Helicopters. which occurred Sept. which resulted in the pilot’s spatial disorientation and a loss of control of the helicopter. In addition to the home page. According to the report. when the helicopter went down. Witnesses reported lighting. and the accident occurred at an early hour that can be associated with degraded alertness.” NTSB also noted that the pilot “was nearing the end of his 12-hour shift. saying that he “could have chosen to stay at the hospital helipad. The line may be closer than you think. C O M . resulting in the deaths of the pilot and two flight nurses. 25. On each of these landing pages.com By Andrew Parker s we head into Heli-Expo. What’s disturbing is the part of the report’s narrative that describes the pilot’s apparent state of mind before the crash. Look for reports from the Heli-Expo show floor at www. decided to enter the area of weather. The safety board ruled that attempting to fly into “adverse weather. despite the availability of a safer option. thunder and “heavy rain bands” in the area at the time of the accident. Personal/Corporate. is a part of aviation operations. which would enable him to return the helicopter to its home base and end his shift there. but the active duty pilot insisted there was enough time to make it. Each landing page also serves as a central point for users to drill down into more specific coverage. during which he had flown previous missions and may have had limited opportunities to rest. rotorandwing. com/rw/heliexpo2012 4 R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 W W W. Based on the pilot’s statement to the oncoming pilot about the need to ‘beat the storm’ and his intention to .

Whether you operate AS350s. For more information about Goodrich rescue hoists.goodrich. Goodrich has a hoist that’s ready and available. email sis@goodrich. EC145s or A109s. WE’RE RIGHT ALONGSIDE.WHEN LAW ENFORCERS DEPEND ON IT.ROTORANDWING.com www. Whatever platforms you use for your search and rescue. By Andrew Parker aparker@accessintel. Goodrich is unique in providing the translating drum technology. there’s a Goodrich hoist you can rely on to provide the perfect solution. depend on Goodrich to be right there with you.com right Wattitude/right Oapproach/right alongside WW . So whichever platforms fly your missions.C M JA N UA R Y 2 0 1 2 | R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E 5 .com Good news for all law enforcement operators. which has the highest reliability in the industry and no fleet angle restrictions. And Goodrich has the lowest life cycle costs.

By Andrew Drwiega. Sikorsky Photo by Stuart Walls. R O T O R A N D W I N G . Editor-at-Large Report: Sikorsky S-92 2012 Preview ■ Heli-Expo ■ Night An inside look at some of the highlights and what to expect during this year’s Heli-Expo in Dallas. Editor-in-Chief Vision Renaissance for the Ditch 32 48 56 ■ Prepping ■ Recovery EASA workshop focuses on how to increase the survival rate in helicopter ditching incidents. By Ernie Stephens. COLUMNS 4 Editor’s Notebook 8 Feedback 10 Meet the Contributors 64 Leading Edge 66 Law Enforcement Notebook 68 Safety & Training 70 Military Insider FEATURES 32 38 44 COVER STORY ■ Pilot Rotor & Wing takes to the skies in Sikorsky’s S-92 and gets behind the controls of the S-76D. (Right) Air-to-air view showing a German Army Aviation Sikorsky CH-53G over Spain. By Andrew Parker. C O M .THIS MONTH FROM Personal|Corporate Commercial Military Pub 12 DEPARTMENTS 12 Rotorcraft Report 20 20 30 62 65 67 People Coming Events Hot Products Training News Classified Ads Ad Index (Above) AgustaWestland’s AW189 lifts off for its first flight. (Bottom) An inside look at the cockpit of the Sikorsky S-92. Photo by Ernie Stephens. By Dale Smith Providers of NVG cockpit modifications thrive despite the global economic situation and a new set of FAA regulations governing this niche market. 6 R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 W W W. Military Editor Training in Spain On the Cover: Sikorsky S-92 with the Legacy of Heroes paint scheme. By Thierry Dubois Spanish Air Force hosts EAG’s Combined Joint Personnel Recovery Standardization course.

2 February 2012 blic Service Training Products Services 56 ONLINE www. Contents may not be reproduced in any form without written permission. ©2011 by Access Intelligence. NVG certification expert Jessie Kearby fields questions about NVGs for both military and commercial uses. forward. from Military Editor Andrew Drwiega. Northbrook. Change of address two to eight weeks notice requested. AS9100 quality management systems audits and night vision goggle (NVG) certification at rotorandwing. Publication Mail Sales Agreement No. GO TO: WWW. Box 3089. all the information you need is right at your fingertips and easy to sort. Tweet or like! Take a look and let us know what you think.O. two years $178. which features an in-depth Story of the Week. 1-301-354-1839. Subscriptions: Free to qualified individuals directly involved in the helicopter industry.com. 4 Choke Cherry Rd.rotorandwing. Send both new and old address. Customer Services. USA. print. Periodical postage paid at Rockville. All other subscriptions. Che Masters.com and look at the new design of the Rotor & Wing website. All editorial inquiries should be directed to Rotor & Wing magazine. USA. Canada Post PM40063731. comment. Md.rotorandwing. 40558009 W W W. PO Box 54. performance modifications. USA or call 1-847-559-7314.O.ROTORANDWING. Sign up now by visiting: www.html WHAT DO THE EXPERTS THINK? • Ask questions to three experts on the topics of helicopter aerodynamics. Helicopter Jobs and links to Rotor & Wing’s Facebook and Twitter pages. certification engineer for NSF-ISR. R O T O R A N D W I N G .com.com CHECK OUT OUR NEW LOOK ON THE WEB • If you haven’t had the opportunity already. Electronic version with enhanced web links makes navigating through the pages of Rotor & Wing easier than ever. 46 | No. including mailing label to Attn: Rotor & Wing magazine. test and evaluation pilot. provides insights about the science behind helicopter flight. WEEK OF FEBRUARY 27 • Rotor & Wing’s Military Insider. 20850. Ill. Rotor & Wing (ISSN-1066-8098) is published monthly by Access Intelligence. Frank Lombardi. USA. C O M F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 | R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E 7 . Whether it’s just looking for the most important headlines or performing due-diligence research for an important contract or purchase decision. Windsor. 60065-3089.: one year $89. 2nd Floor. E-mail: RW@omeda. Get the latest updates from helicopter defense companies around the world.com..com/rw/collective_form. DIRECT TO YOUR DESKTOP: CHECK YOUR E MAIL FEBURARY 1 • Digital edition of Rotor & Wing February 2012. TO SUBSCRIBE TO ANY OF OUR EXCLUSIVE EMAIL PRODUCTS. discusses aerospace quality registration. P. Box 3089. take a moment to go to www. two years $258. and additional mailing offices.. Northbrook.S. 20850.Vol. archive. E-mail: rotorandwing@ accessintel. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Rotor & Wing. fax 1-301-762-8965. U. 60065-3089. 4 Choke Cherry Rd. Rockville. Ill.COM Get connected: Become a fan of Rotor & Wing on Follow us on @rotorandwing The editors welcome new product information and other industry news. Return Undeliverable Canadian Addresses to: Station A. Rockville. WEEK OF FEBRUARY 27 • HOT PRODUCTS for Helicopter Operators—Latest in equipment upgrades. P. two years $198. SIGN UP FOR THE ROTOR & WING COLLECTIVE • Subscribe today for our free weekly e-letter for helicopter news—The Rotor & Wing Collective. Top News Picks. Foreign: one year $129. Md. Md. 2nd Floor. Canada: one year $99. training devices and other tools for the rotorcraft industry. ON N9A 6J5. LLC.aviationtoday.

Carl Bush I+I+I (Inversion by operators plus Instruction of crews plus Innovation application). Peter McNees The majority of accidents come from human error. You’ll find contact information below.rotorandwing. More simulation time. We reserve the right to edit all submitted material. and just go with a Garmin 530s.. That being the case. Certainly for those during IFR and IMC. have 1. synthetic vision (moving map ). com. Christopher Newlon New avionics for sure. report and ground the undisciplined pilots instead of looking the other way and allowing the “mishaps” to do the culling for us. Mike Cumbie “The majority of accidents come from human error. Just like friendly fire. the ultimate would be all glass. Charles Lamb We are in the process of replacing our Garmin (Apollo) 480s with Garmin 430s. Accident Reduction The following responses are to the question. Brad Weeks Dual-pilot requirement for EMS missions. more accurate navigation and improved IMC capability. Wylie Mathis Upgrading the BFT so it would not burn out the VHF-AM radio.com/rotorandwing R&W’s Question of the Month What do you think of the new look of the redesigned www. “What’s on your mind regarding the helicopter industry? What has struck a chord with you lately. get a clearance.. broad or specific?” What actions must a pilot take if he gets into some serious downdrafts? In this case.000. It will always happen. I understand some operators aren’t equipped. 4 Choke Cherry Road. Most guys don’t realize how easy it is and how much safer it is to file.” Install a 44-oz. The virtual red screen is a lot more forgiving than a real world one. Also a CD player would be great because ATC gives me a headache so I take off my headset and all I hear is “whupwhupwhup” . you can train and train and train all you want. drink holder because with it between my legs it interferes with my cyclic. . I wish we could ditch the 430s and separate transponders. Ron Hall Definitely more practice with 0/0 instrument takeoffs.Feedback Personal|Corporate Commercial Military Public Service Training Products Services From Facebook The following comments appeared on Rotor & Wing’s Facebook page: www. “What more needs to be done to reduce helicopter accidents?” More IFR training and IFR flights. Bülent Aydın Night vision enhancements. too. . MD 20850. We will never fix human error. fax us at 301-354-1809 or email us at rotorandwing@accessintel. Sobit Gauchan Equipment Upgrades Responses to the question. Jose Roca Equipment Upgrades Response to the question. but for those who are. Please include a city and state or province with your name and ratings. 8 R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 . Jim Hickman Fly helicopters unmanned. but in the end we are only human and will make mistakes whether we are 25 or 65 years old. and “punch in” versus scud running. and look for your and others’ responses in a future issue. Rockville. Rotor & Wing. and some Manilow would be welcome. “If you had an unlimited budget to make a single upgrade to your company’s or unit’s helicopter (but could only pick one upgrade). IFR flights are a rare occurrence for most operators. Marc Raglin Emphasis on disciplined flying. the helicopter is a Eurocopter Ecureuil AS350 BA. Could have saved a bunch of guys when they browned out.000 hours or 25. In the helicopter world. what would it be and why?” Do you have comments on the rotorcraft industry or recent articles and viewpoints we’ve published? Send them to: Editor. facebook. or been on your mind regarding a recent issue. Or.com? Let us know.. Second Floor. Clarity and range. Charlie Meadors A more comfortable seat.

www. The Evolution Flight Display’s flexible intuitive interface enhances mission safety: Aspen’s unique PFD/MFD window layout flexibility allows you to prioritize critical flight data. ”Aspen Avionics. .” “Evolution Flight Display System.com/helicopter Heli-Expo Booth 10-11 Copyright 2012 Aspen Avionics Inc. Aspen’s reliable. Multiple views at your command significantly enhance situational awareness. solid-state AHRS technology meets the challenges of your most demanding missions and ensures your critical flight data is there when you need it. Solid Reliability.” and the Aspen Avionics aircraft logo are trademarks of Aspen Avionics Inc.” “Connected Panel. and equipped with built-in 30-minute battery backup. reliable EFIS system on the helicopter market today. All rights reserved. robust.Solid State.aspenavionics. Lightweight. EFD500H MFD EFD1000H Pro PFD Evolution 1500H: Unrivaled Reliability Made Affordable. the Evolution Flight Display system is the most affordable.

focus on international military rotorcraft. Coming from a strong is a certificated flight instructor and has flown combackground in journalism and public relamercial aircraft for more than 20 years in and around the tions. helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft. as well as from numerous exercises. He has also been engaged with local helicopter events and seminars since 2002. She has covered a wide range of topics. earning his commerTHIERRY DUBOIS is a long-time concial pilot’s license and starting an aerial tributor to Access Intelligence publicaphotography company as a sideline. served as managing editor of Rotor & Wing. where he is based. he was ist for 12 years. DOUGLAS NELMS has more than 30 years of experience as an aviation journalist and currently works as a freelance writer.C. magazine in France. He writes on technical sub. Army helicopter pilot. business and WWII vintage aircraft. from the Robinson R22 up to the Mil Mi-26.S. began his flying career in 1991 after graduating with a bachelor’s of science in aerospace engineering. He holds a master’s degree in aerospace CHRIS SHEPPARD is the Associate Editor safety from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. He has reported on attachment from Iraq three times (the latest of which was with a U. She can be senior defense journalist with a particular reached at csheppard@accessintel. working on various airplane and helicopter programs as a flight test engineer for Grumman Aerospace Corp. where he served as the sergeant in charge and chief pilot until his retirement in 2006. R O T O R A N D W I N G . ERNIE STEPHENS. Frank became a police officer for a major East Coast police department in 1995. In his tions. an ATP with both fixed-wing and rotary-wing ratings. DALE SMITH has been an aviation journalist for 24 years specializing in business aviation. has been engaged with helicopter market competitive intelligence for more than 20 years. AH-64D Apache. in many parts of the world. He is currently a contributing writer for Rotor & Wing and other leading aviation magazines.S. Military Editor. He has KEITH CIANFRANI is a retired U. began flying in the 1980s. Chris is currently pursuing her master’s degree in Journalism ANDREW DRWIEGA. Rooivalk and many others. and three times with British forces in Afghanistan (Kandahar and Camp Bastion).com. is a at Georgetown University in Washington. he’s had the opportunity to fly in a wide range of helicopters. specializing in helicopters since 2006. He has been a licensed pilot since 1974 and has flown 35 different types of general aviation. He remains active in test and evaluation. Marine Corps MV-22 squadron). 10 R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 W W W. FRANK LOMBARDI. Army lieutenant colonel. aerospace and defense consultant.S. and regularly provides support in some areas to the Brazilian Association of Helicopter Pilots (ABRAPHE) in São Paulo. C O M . He has been an aerospace journalregular job as a county police officer. and holds a master’s degree in aviation systems-flight testing from the University of Tennessee Space Institute. master aviator A former U. she was an editor for a leading online New York City area. D. and has been flying helicopters in the department’s aviation section since 2000. Nelms and Army instructor pilot. newswire for several years. rated in both specializes in writing about helicopters. He has been writing for Rotor & Wing about helicopters in Latin America since 1999. both online and in print since 2002. both for professional media and a popular science unit. He has flown in a wide variety of rotorcraft including the MV-22B Osprey.transferred to the department’s newly established aviation jects. Editor-at-Large. Keith of Rotor & Wing. Although not a licensed pilot.Meet the Contributors CLAUDIO AGOSTINI.

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Transport Canada concluded that the 429 “would suffer no technical constraints by increasing the gross weight. According to H-47 program vice president Leanne Caret. Army National Guard. Army. Boeing is also awaiting the Army’s decision on a second five-year. AgustaWestland expects civil certification of the helicopter in 2013. AgustaWestland’s newest variant—the AW189—went airborne for the first time Dec. A second prototype will conduct load survey testing during 2012. with a total of 345 helicopters expected for delivery by 2015.” Bell plans to petition FAA and EASA for a Part 27 exemption from the max gross weight of 7. The initial prototype will be used mainly for avionics testing and offshore certification.aviationtoday/rw Become a fan of Rotor & Wing on Follow us on @rotorandwing 12 R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 W W W. will involve seven helicopters for the Australian Defence Force and six for the United Arab Emirates (UAE).S. valued at $370 million. which he said “performed as expected” following the flight. ■ COMMERCIAL | AIRFRAMES Range Extension: Transport Canada Approves Bell 429 Performance Boost Transport Canada has granted approval for a 500-lb.” according to Larry Roberts. The contract. The other CH-47F will be dispatched to the U. Italy. Army has contracted Boeing to supply 14 CH-47F Chinooks as part of the government’s foreign military sales (FMS) program. The $212-million contract will involve 32 Lakotas outfitted with a mission equipment package (MEP) being delivered to the Army’s security and support (S&S) battalion. The approval follows months of testing and evaluation.Personal|Corporate Commercial Military Public Service Training Products Services ■ SERVICES | FLIGHT TESTING ■ MILITARY | PROCUREMENT AW189 Takes Maiden Flight AgustaWestland’s AW189 prototype has taken to the skies for the first time. the contract raises Boeing’s Chinook backlog above 200 aircraft. Army Orders 39 Lakotas from EADS EADS North America has received a U. For daily and breaking news involving helicopters. EADS North America has handed over a total of 198 UH-72A Lakotas to the Army through early January 2012. with deliveries to begin in 2014. Army contract for 39 UH-72A Lakota light utility helicopters (LUHs). which gives operators additional range “to take better advantage of the helicopter’s IFR/WAAS capabilities.. firm fixed-price proposal for additional Chinooks. C O M .S. Those 32 helicopters will enter service with the U.000 lbs.S.500 lbs. The move increases the maximum gross weight of the helicopter to 7. increase to the weight of the Bell 429. AgustaWestland ■ MILITARY | AIRFRAMES Boeing Wins Chinook Contract With onlookers witnessing the landmark event. Chief test pilot Giuseppe Lo Coco was at the controls for the AW189. The U. senior vice president of Bell Helicopter’s Commercial business unit. R O T O R A N D W I N G . 21 at its plant in Cascina Costa. The AW189 made its public debut at the 2011 Paris Air Show. go to: www.S.

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COHC Eurocopter has delivered two EC225s to French air transport operator. Eurocopter CEO Lutz Bertling and Heli-Union CEO Jean-Christophe Schmitt. The S-92 will replace This Sikorsky S-92 replaces an S-61. The EC225 will join Tachikawa’s existing fleet. Keystone Turbine Services. which consists of seven Eurocopter types—four Dauphin N3s. repair and overhaul (MRO) services. Heli-Union. the Coast Guard’s S-61. with a projected delivery date of 2013. M International has formed a new company. notes CEO Richard McConn. western mountainous areas and Hachijo-jima Island. The helicopter will be equipped with a belly-mounted water tank and EMS interior. The manufacturer has also received an order for seven EC225LP Super Pumas from CITIC Offshore Helicopter Co. The S-92 will be stationed in Shannon. C O M . CHC will operate the search and rescue (SAR) dedicated helicopter for the Irish Coast Guard. Ireland. which has been in service for around 20 years. Heli-Union has also purchased four EC175s. Pa.000-square-foot facility in Coatesville. Deliveries of the EC225s are set to start in December 2012 and run until 2015.Rotorcraft Report ■ COMMERCIAL | OFFSHORE ■ PUBLIC SERVICE | COMPLETIONS Multitrole EC225s Support Heli-Union. that will operate from a 30. In addition. The S-92 will serve offshore islands and provide SAR coverage from Cork to Galway. the two companies are developing a joint venture that will focus on cooperative training and launch a Chinese maintenance facility. Va. R O T O R A N D W I N G . CHC supplies a fleet of six S-61s on behalf of the Irish Coast Guard. The acquisition expands M’s turboprop and turboshaft engine maintenance. Keystone Turbine is a Rolls-Royce and Honeywell-approved MRO facility. From left to right: CNN CEO Patrick Molis. In addition to the purchase. SAR-Configured S-92 Joins Irish Coast Guard Fleet Sikorsky has finished production on an S-92 for CHC Helicopter. two Super Puma L1s and one EC225. Eurocopter has agreed to supply a second EC225 to the Tokyo Fire Department’s Tachikawa Air Squadron. 14 Eurocopter R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 W W W. ■ SERVICES | ENGINES Sikorsky M International Acquires Keystone Engine Services McLean. The new helicopters will be used for offshore oil and gas transport missions. and is expected to service Tokyo city. (COHC) in China for oil and gas transport missions.-based M International has purchased the Keystone Engine Services division of Sikorsky Global Helicopters.

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Reach Air Medical has also added three new hospitals to its service region in southwest Texas.com 16 R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 W W W. C O M . Sagem.. with the Italian Navy ordering 46 NFHs and 10 tactical transport helicopter (TTH) NH90 variants.Rotorcraft Report ■ MILITARY | COMPLETIONS ■ SERVICES | EMS Italian Armed Forces Receive NH90s Reach Launches New Texas Base Santa Rosa. AgustaWestland has completed deliveries of two NH90 NATO Frigate Helicopters (NFHs) to the Italian Army and Navy. R O T O R A N D W I N G . will operate a Bell 407.EVERY STEP OF THE WAY! PLEASE VISIT US AT 2012 HELI-EXPO. 129TH CT.aviation-instrument. to provide life-cycle support for Strix sighting systems on the French Army’s fleet of Eurocopter Tigers. • MIAMI. ■ MILITARY | AVIONICS AgustaWestland Sagem Services Strix Systems The first NH90 NATO Frigate Helicopters from AgustaWestland’s Venice Tessera assembly line have been delivered to the Italian Army and Navy.com www.W. SIMMAD has contracted Safran Group subsidiary. Texas. Calif. The fiveyear agreement with the Army’s air division (ALAT) covers 50 Strix turret-mounted systems for maintenance and service.. equipped with night vision goggles (NVGs). Italy. Sagem will also establish an ALAT hotline in France and in overseas locations where the Tigers are in service.-based Reach Air Medical has teamed with Methodist Healthcare of Houston to establish a second HEMS base. The Italian Army’s delivery was the first of a 60-helicopter order as part of a fleet replacement. BOOTH # 9046 Extensive Inventory of Rotor/Fixed Wing Spares EXCHANGES • SALES • REPAIR • OVERHAULS TEL: 305-251-7200 • FAX: 305-251-2300 12181 S. Methodist AirCare 2. The helicopters were the first from AgustaWestland’s NH90 final assembly line in Venice Tessera. located in Pearsall. FL 33186 sales@aviation-instrument. PARTS AND SERVICES YOU CAN TRUST. The Italian Armed Forces have ordered 60 helicopters in total.

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Eurocopter The Brazilian Armed Forces has a total of 47 more Eurocopter EC725s on order. UTair Aviation took delivery of three of the type. Following the certification. Eurocopter has also handed over an AS350B3e to the Kenya Police Air-Wing. UTair placed an order in 2010 for 20 helicopters from Eurocopter. making it the first African operator of the variant. six AS355NPs and one AS350B3. counterterrorism and other law enforcement duties. C O M . with production on the remaining 47 helicopters scheduled to start in 2012. The five-year contract covers all three branches of Brazil’s military. Helibras. surveillance and executive transport missions throughout Russia and Siberia. comprising 13 AS350B3es. has reached an agreement to provide parts. This certification allows Ecureuil operation in Russia and the Commonwealth of Independent States. The helicopters will be used for cargo airlift. Eurocopter subsidiary. 18 R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 W W W. UTair and Kenya Receive AS350s The Interstate Aviation Committee has approved the Eurocopter AS350B3e in Russia. service. The aircraft fly anti-poaching. overhaul and repairs for the Brazilian Armed Forces’ fleet of 50 Eurocopter EC725s on order. inspections. Helibras will also dispatch teams to provide on-site service at EC725 bases. Army and Navy. oil and gas pipeline patrols. R O T O R A N D W I N G . Three EC725s have entered service with the Brazilian Air Force.Rotorcraft Report ■ SERVICES | MAINTENANCE ■ COMMERCIAL | OFFSHORE Helibras to Maintain Brazilian EC725s Russia Certifies.

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phone 1-703-6846777 or visit www.org March 16–18: Helicopter Association of Canada (HAC) 16th Annual Convention and Trade Show. Contact Asian Rotorcraft Forum. 1-703-683-4646 or visit www. Ariz. 26–27: The Helicopter Show. N. 1-703-841-4300. shephard. South Korea. phone 1-816-347-8400 or visit www..com 2013: May 21–23: AHS Intl.net/convention April 22–27: Medical Transport Leadership Institute. 4–7: European Rotorcraft Forum 2012. Phoenix. Phil Sprio has been named president and CEO of Man Lift Manufacturing in Cudahy. Harris will succeed Steve Douglas following his resignation. Ireland. Contact HeliRussia. phone 1-613-231-1110 or visit www. Queensland. Fort Lauderdale. Fort Worth.aea. Williamsburg.html Sept. Washington.Rotorcraft Report PEOPLE The EADS board of directors has elected Sean O’Keefe as chairman of the board. United Arab Emirates.co.vtol. Contact Conklin & de Decker.org 20 R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 W W W. phone +44 (0)1293 823 779 or visit www.ca March 15–16: SAR Europe 2012. The Civil Aviation Authority of New Zealand has appointed Graeme Harris chief executive and director. 69th Annual Forum and Technology Display. Contact AHS Intl. which will take effect in April. Ariz. 30–Nov.1: Helicopter Military Operations Technology Specialists’ Meeting (HELMOT XV). R O T O R A N D W I N G . phone +44 (0) 1753 727015 or visit www.nlr. 1-703-836-8732 or visit www.erf2012.com Oct. 6–8: Dubai Helishow 2012. AAMS. 22–24: Association of the U. Contact The Helicopter Show. The Netherlands.co.-based Spectrum Aeromed has hired Michael Gallagher as vice president and project manager.com Feb. Russia. Wheeling. Va. Texas. Contact AEA. Contact Shephard Group. Dallas. Greg Setter has joined Mesa. phone 1-703-684-6777 or visit www.com Feb. and held similar roles at GE Aviation and Rockwell Collins.uk/events Sept. phone +44 (0) 20 8330 4424 or visit www. product development. Contact AUSA. 12–15: 1st Asian/Australian Rotorcraft Forum and Exhibition (ARF & Exhibition 2012). Ottawa. The EADS North America CEO will replace the retiring Ralph Crosby. who founded the company in 2000 and will remain as a director. Fargo. where he was the owner. phone +82-42-350-5756 or visit www. Nidal Sammur has been promoted to director of engineering for FlightSafety International’s simulation facility in Broken Arrow.vtol.org May 17–19: 5th International Helicopter Industry Exhibition. phone +44 (0) 1753 727015 or visit www. shephard. toll free 1-800-336-4570 or visit www. Okla.ru/en May 23–24: Heli & UV Pacific 2012.-based BDN Aerospace Marketing as account director.conklindd. 15–17: Helicopter Maintenance Management Seminar (HMMS). Contact HAC. Harris has worked with the CAA in a variety of roles since 2004. 2012: Feb. 68th Annual Forum and Technology Display. W.C. phone +31 88 511 3165 or visit www. Contact AHS Intl.org/ Feb. England. Sammur was most recently staff scientist for the company before being promoted to replace the retiring Ron Jantzen. Contact AHS Intl. Dubai.ausa. Contact Shephard Group. Contact HAI. Contact Mediac Communications and Exhibitions. Canada. phone 1-817-277-6403 or visit www. Setter was previously with Honeywell Aerospace as its marketing communications strategy manager for commercial aviation. Australia. phone +7 (0) 495 958 9490 or visit helirussia. Moscow.org Nov. who has more than 25 years of aviation experience. arf2012. Spiro replaces Jeff Bailey. Busan.S. Fla. Wis. C O M .aams.nl/index. Amsterdam.org May 1–3: AHS Intl. will oversee strategic planning and account services for BDN. Dr.D. Irving.uk/events April 3–6: 55th Annual AEA International Convention & Trade Show. Nidal has worked with FlightSafety since 1992. Texas. Luffield Abbey. sales and system analysis of air medical equipment. phone 1-703-684-6777 or visit www. D. Texas. O’Keefe served as vice president of the technology infrastructure sector of General Electric before being appointed CEO of EADS in 2009. Contact National Aerospace Laboratory NLR.h-a-c. Gallagher comes to Spectrum from Curtis Construction Company.V. Setter.dubaihelishow. Dublin. 11–14: Helicopter Association International (HAI) HeliExpo 2012. He will oversee design.vtol.thehelicoptershow.rotor. Army (AUSA) Winter Symposium.

As one of HeliSAS’ two main functions. AgustaWestland’s Yeovil facility produced 22 of the upgraded helicopters under the Urgent Operational Requirement contracts from the Ministry of Defence. The Lynx Mk9A is a fleet-wide upgrade of the Lynx Mk9. outfitted with new engines and modifications to the gearbox. AgustaWestland has handed over the last Lynx AH Mk9A to the British Army Air Corps. HeliSAS is STC’d for Bell 206/407 and Eurocopter AS350 Series/EC130 Enhances Flight Stability.S. Reduces Pilot Workload. flight control system. All rights reserved. fuselage and interior displays. seating and a cabin overhead module with four audio and control touch panels. The certification marks the first time an EC155B1 with an EMS package has received approval in the U. according to Metro.helisas. La.Rotorcraft Report ■ MILITARY | COMPLETIONS © 2012 Cobham. As a two-axis attitude hold. the Stability Augmentation System (SAS) provides precise control during all modes of flight..mineralwells@cobham. The STC covers a variety of EMS interior options including secondary patient restraint. When engaged.com Visit us at Heli-Expo Booth 3122 www. regardless of wind conditions or aircraft center of gravity.-based Metro Aviation has received a supplemental type certificate (STC) for its emergency medical system kit for the Eurocopter EC155B1. HeliSAS significantly reduces pilot workload. the pilot may perform cockpit functions hands-free. attitude command. British Army Receives Final Lynx AgustaWestland Eurocopter AS350 Series Eurocopter EC130 Bell 206 / 407 AgustaWestland has delivered the final British Army Lynx AH Mk9A. Cobham Commercial Systems One S-TEC Way Mineral Wells. TX 76067 (817) 215-7600 sales. C O M F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 | R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E 21 .com W W W. ■ SERVICES | CERTIFICATION HeliSAS Autopilot and Stability Augmentation System ® The most important thing we build is trust FAA Approves Metro EC155 EMS Kit Shreveport. R O T O R A N D W I N G .

The delivery signifies the first step in a sixLockheed Martin/Kaman The K-MAX unmanned aerial helicopter during its first cargo delivery for the U. of food and supplies from Camp Dwyer to troops at Combat Outpost Payne in the Helmand Province—all in less than two hours. American Eurocopter is now able to perform Level D MRO actions on EC135/145 airframes. already supports the AS350. Ohio-based DRS Defense Solutions’ intelligence. AS365. The manufacturer expects turnaround times on repairs to decrease for operators through the designation. C O M .Rotorcraft Report ■ MILITARY | UAV Unmanned K-MAX Operational in Afghanistan Lockheed Martin and Kaman Aerospace’s unmanned K-MAX has entered combat service with the U.S. month testing period in Afghanistan. president of DRS ICAS. subsidiary as a maintenance. The unmanned helicopter transported more than 3. 22 R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 W W W.S. the largest of the parent company’s various geographical subsidiaries. production kits. communications and avionics solutions (ICAS) division has won a $12-million U. blades and dynamic components. EC120/130. The unmanned K-MAX is now in the midst of a six-month aerial resupply testing period in Afghanistan.S.S. The demonstration phase will “test the true capabilities of this aircraft and how well it can perform its job in a combat environment. and EC155. With this designation. EC145 MRO Hub Dayton.” O’Connor continued. after which the Marine Corps may opt to use the K-MAX as part of its aerial resupply capabilities. the Navy doesn’t plan to take unnecessary risks with the K-MAX. Eurocopter has designated its U.8-million contract awarded in December 2010 to test the UAV in a cargo resupply role for the Marine Corps. USMC’s Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Squadron 1 received the first K-MAX unmanned aerial system in early December. Marine Corps in Afghanistan. Marine Corps in Afghanistan. the development of a technical data package.” The UAV completed a five-day quick reaction assessment (QRA) for the U. repair and overhaul (MRO) center for EC135s and EC145s in North and Latin America. Kyle O’Connor. “We delivered cargo today that was supposed to be delivered by convoy. According to Logan Thiran.” noted Maj. the officer-in-charge of Squadron 1’s cargo resupply detachment. Air Force contract to upgrade Sikorsky HH-60G Pave Hawks. While the unmanned K-MAX will lessen the threat of personnel loss during deliveries. DRS will replace firstgeneration altitude hold and hover stabilization systems (AHHS) with fifth-generation improved altitude hold and hover stabilization systems (IAHHS). stating that a majority of the re-supply operations “will be conducted at night and at higher altitudes … to keep out of small arms range. with the initial cargo re-supply mission taking place on Dec. ■ SERVICES | MAINTENANCE ■ MILITARY | AVIONICS American Eurocopter Becomes DRS Upgrades Pave Hawks EC135.000 lbs.S. American Eurocopter. the avionics system will help pilots navigate through brownout conditions in Afghanistan and Iraq. now that convoy has three pallets that it does not have to carry. R O T O R A N D W I N G . Navy in mid-2011. 17. spares and support. The QRA was part of a $45. The contract also covers platform integration.

Rotorcraft Report
■ MILITARY | COMPLETIONS
Eagle Copters
© 2012 Cobham. All rights reserved.

Polish Air Force Upgrades Fleet
AgustaWestland subsidiary PZL-Swidnik has inked an agreement with the Polish Ministry of National Defence to provide five W-3WA Sokols and upgrade 14 more. The Polish Air Force will use the W-3WAs for government and military transport. Plans call for PZL-Swidnik to overhaul eight Russian Mi-2s, convert four W-3 Sokols to the W-3PL Gluszec armed configuration and upgrade two W-3s with a FADEC system. The converted W-3PLs are scheduled for delivery in 2014. ■ TRAINING | SIMULATORS

Hillsboro Aviation

NexAir Avionics LLC Mayday Avionics

Aerial Avionics

RJ Corman Aircraft Maintenance, LLC Aeronautical Accessories

Edwards & Associates Wysong Enterprises, Inc.

United Rotorcraft Solutions Uniflight, LLC

Gardner Aviation Specialists, Inc. Metro Aviation Sarasota Avionics

CAE Wins Military, Civil Contracts
Canada-based CAE has received a number of recent military and civil contracts totaling more than C$100 million ($99 million). The Department of National Defence in Canada has tasked CAE with upgrading its Bell CH-146 Griffon and Lockheed CC-130H simulators. The Griffon simulator will feature an updated computer system and instructor operator station. Professional Way in Malaysia has signed with CAE for maintenance and support on the 3000 Series AgustaWestland AW139 full-flight simulator that CAE is developing. The company is also providing a 3000 Series FFS and training services for two undisclosed customers. ■ COMMERCIAL | AIRFRAMES

HeliSAS Authorized Dealerships
®

The most important thing we build is trust

Aerial Avionics josephm@aerialavionics.com 408-258-5858 Aeronautical Accessories sales@aero-access.com 423-538-5151 Eagle Copters growe@eaglecopters.com 403-250-7370 Edwards & Associates cwoodward@bellhelicopter.textron.com 423-391-3806 Gardner Aviation Specialists, Inc. khgardner@gardneraviation.com 770-486-6061 Hillsboro Aviation tdalquist@hillsboroaviation.com 503-648-2831 Mayday Avionics rbrooks@maydayavionics.com 616-957-4920 Metro Aviation lharvey@metroaviation.com 318-698-5200 NexAir Avionics LLC davidfetherston@nexair.com 508-339-7077

RJ Corman Aircraft Maintenance, LLC kari.hammons@rjcorman.com 859-881-2480 Sarasota Avionics ryan@sarasotaavionics.com 941-360-6877 x127 Uniflight, LLC dhornung@uniflight.com 972-623-3444 United Rotorcraft Solutions david@unitedrotorcraft.com 940-627-0626 Wysong Enterprises, Inc. bnorthrup@wysongusa.com 423-325-6900 International dealership list available at www.helisas.com.

Robinson Doubles 2010 Production
Torrance, Calif.-based Robinson Helicopter Company is reporting an upswing in production for 2011, comprising 56 R22s, 88 R66s and 212 R44s. The total number of 356 is a sharp increase over 2010, when Robinson assembled 162 helicopters.

Cobham Commercial Systems One S-TEC Way Mineral Wells, TX 76067 USA T: 817-215-7600 F: 940-325-3904 E: sales.mineralwells@cobham.com Interested in becoming a HeliSAS dealership? Contact Judy Kring at judy.kring@cobham.com www.cobham.com

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Rotorcraft Report
■ PUBLIC SERVICE | LAW ENFORCEMENT ■ SERVICES | MAINTENANCE

Fairfax Bell 429 Includes Becker Audio
Bell has handed over the first of two 429s to the Fairfax County Police Department in Northern Virginia. The helicopters come equipped with Becker Avionics’ DVCS6100 digital audio system. Paradigm Aerospace Corporation/PAC International customized the helicopter for both law enforcement and EMS missions at its facility in Mount Pleasant, Pa. Bell Helicopter plans to deliver the second Fairfax 429 later this year. Fairfax County has two additional Bell 407s in its Helicopter Division fleet. The new Bell 429 is also the first of the type to feature the new multi-mission configuration for airborne law enforcement, EMS and search and rescue (SAR).

Canadian Forces Signs with Bell
Bell Helicopter has won a 10-year, C$640 million ($630.9 million) contract for support and service for the Canadian Forces’ fleet of CH146 Griffons. The CH146 optimized weapon system support (OWSS) contract will cover maintenance and management services, spare parts and engineering and technical publications. OWSS also has four one-year options available after the initial 10-year contract expires and will combine three existing contracts for engineering, overhaul, repairs and supplies. According to Bell, the Mirabel plant and Calgary supply center will provide the materials needed to fulfill the agreement. ■ MILITARY | AIRFRAMES

See page 38 for a photo of the Fairfax County Bell 429. Look for the full story from Editor-atLarge Ernie Stephens in Rotor & Wing’s Show Day publication at Heli-Expo, and visit our web page: www.aviationtoday.com/rw/heliexpo2012

Russian Air Force Expands Fleet

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Russian Helicopters has reached an agreement to provide the Russian Air Force with up to 30 Kamov Ka-226s by 2020, according to Defense Ministry spokesman Vladimir Drik. The Air Force’s training center in Torzhok already took delivery of 17 helicopters in De cember 2011, including Mi-8MTVs, Mi-28Ns, Mi-35s and Ka-52s. Four Ka-226s were projected for delivery to the training center by the end of January. ■ PRODUCTS | REPLACEMENT PARTS

V-22 Awards Parts Contract
The Bell-Boeing Joint Project Office has obtained a $7.2-million modification involving a fixed-priceincentive-fee contract. The adjustment involves production line preparation of spare parts for the V-22 program. Bell-Boeing expects to complete the parts by October 2014.

ph: 1.916.939.6888

www. aerometals.aero

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Rotorcraft Report
■ COMMERCIAL | AVIONICS
© 2012 Cobham plc. All rights reserved.

S-92 Receives STC for Blue Sky
Blue Sky Network has earned a supplemental ty pe certificate (STC) for its communication and tracking systems on the Sikorsky S-92. La Jolla, Calif.-based Blue Sky’s D1000A uses built-in GPS position reporting with satellite transceivers and telemetry data to provide near real-time tracking. The ACH1000 allows voice and two-way communication between pilots and ground crews. The helicopter can also be securely tracked with Blue Sky ’s online portal SkyRouter. ■ SERVICES | MILITARY

All-band P25 capability

AECOM Supports USAF Helicopters
Los Angeles, Calif.-based AECOM Te chnolo g y Cor p or ation ha s received a $16.5-million task order contract by the U.S. Air Force for Contract Field Teams (CFT). The three-year order covers field and limited sustainment maintenance for the USAF’s Boeing AH-64 Apaches, CH-47 Chinooks, Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawks and HH-60 Pave Hawks. Ground support equipment is also included with the contract. ■ COMMERCIAL | EMS

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Metro Completes Sanford EC145
Metro Aviation of Shreveport, La. has handed over the first of three Eurocopter EC145s for Sanford Health’s facility in Sioux Falls, S.D. The helicopter is expected to enter service in January. Scheduled for delivery later this year, the remaining helicopters will be based out of Fargo, N.D. The Cobham RT-5000P

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Covers all current and future P-25 public service frequency bands with one radio. Front Panel Programmable (FPP) of all AM/FM/ P-25 channel information. No computer required! The new and powerful SCAN function monitors any frequency, any mode. Communication Without Limits.

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The helicopters will perform EMS missions for the British Columbia government under a contract with Helijet.-based Eagle Helicopters for the modifications. Longbow will also provide 14 unmanned aerial system tactical common data link assembly (UTA) systems and 18 Radar Electronic Units (REU). CASA Grants 147 to Australian Aero Australian Aerospace has received Part 147 certificate approval from the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA). subcontracted Aero Dynamix. Toll contracted Spokane. Texas-based Aero Dynamix has incorporated night vision goggle (NVG) cockpit upgrades into two Bell 412s in service with Toll Remote Logistics. Md.-based Max-Viz has teamed with Helijet of Vancouver. Pilots flying the S-76s with the enhanced vision system have already reported back that they are able to see “fog and cloud formations and concentrations of precipitation during the day enabling them to pick safer routes ahead. Fla. which came into force in June this year. Lockheed Martin’s facilities in Ocala and Orlando. has won an U. director of aviation safety for CASA. Army contract worth $181 million for Boeing AH-64D Apache Block III Longbow systems. Longbow LLC. McCormick also added that while operators had up to two years to transition to the new safety regulations. will enhance safety because they introduce requirements for safety management systems and human factors training into the maintenance sector for the first time. plus spares. 26 R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 W W W.Rotorcraft Report ■ MILITARY | ATTACK Longbow Snares Apache Contract Lockheed Martin and Northrop Grumman’s joint venture. Australian Aerospace completed it in less than six months. The helicopter is the first EMSconfigured GrandNew operating in the country. Doctor Heli’s latest helicopter has entered service the Kagoshima Prefecture in southern Japan. Ore. will perform the work under the new contract.S. for the Army’s new fleet of Block III Apaches. ■ SERVICES | NIGHT VISION Aero Dynamix Upgrades Toll Bell 412s Euless. The newly outfitted Bell 412s will be used for multi-mission operations. The contract also covers Taiwan’s purchase of 15 Block III Longbow fire control radar (FCR) systems. “The new regulations. Canada to equip three Sikorsky S-76s with the Max-Viz EVS1500 system.” according to John McCormick. and Northrop Grumman’s plant in Baltimore. ■ TRAINING | CERTIFICATION AgustaWestland Doctor Heli files the first EMS-equipped AgustaWestland GrandNew in Japan. Australian Aerospace becomes the first civil helicopter maintenance training operator in the Asia-Pacific region to receive such approval under a new series of maintenance safety regulations in Australia.” according to Max-Viz. Wash. ■ PUBLIC SERVICE | EMS Doctor Heli Adds GrandNew to Fleet AgustaWestland has completed delivery of a GrandNew to Kagoshima International Aviation of Japan for the Doctor Heli EMS system. R O T O R A N D W I N G . who in turn. C O M . The agreement marks the first international sales of the FCR. ■ PUBLIC SERVICE | MISSION EQUIPMENT Helijet and Max-Viz Outfit Canadian Sikorsky S-76s with EVS Portland.

based out of Redstone Arsenal. Booth 3122 www. an $81.com Visit us at Heli-Expo. The House of Hermesdetailed helicopter features more than 150 design changes to both the interior and exterior.com W W W. ETSO-C50c Cobham Aerospace Communications 6400 Wilkinson Drive Prescott.S. Capital Air Flies EC135 Hermes Eurocopter has delivered an EC135 “l’Helicoptere par Hermes” to London. Designed for tactical operations.Rotorcraft Report ■ CORPORATE | VIP © 2012 Cobham. All rights reserved. The EC135 is the fifth for Capital Air Services and will be used for corporate charter flights. Conn. Ala.cobham.2-million firm-fixed-price contract to convert UH-60M Black Hawks for the United Arab Emirates (UAE) Armed Forces. Sikorsky’s facility in Stratford. Army Contracting Command. Cobham’s DACS delivers complete audio control among aircraft transceivers. is tasked with the contracting activity. The most important thing we build is trust Eurocopter DACS Digital Audio Control System. Capital Air’s fleet now boasts a House of Hermes-outfitted Eurocopter EC135 for executive transport in the UK. and AS355s. receivers. and audio warning sources. configurable with DACS software Integrated Audio Warning Generator Digital audio processing and control TSO-C139. Army has awarded Sikorsky Aircraft Corp. England-based Capital Air Services. AZ 86301 USA 1-928-708-1550 sales.S. R O T O R A N D W I N G . the DACS three-component system offers significant technological advancements and end-user benefits. Capital Air’s fleet also includes EC155 B1s. You’ll hear the difference. ■ SERVICES | MILITARY Sikorsky Wins UAE Conversion Contract The U. C O M F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 | R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E 27 .prescott@cobham. which are expected for completion by December 2012. DACS is configurable to suit missionspecific communication needs. will handle the conversions. The U. Benefits and features: Enhanced sound performance Reduced weight Reduced complexity Reduced installation cost Flexible.

28 CWO2 Michael Morris R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 W W W. Task Force Spartan recently took over areas of responsibility in Paktya and Khowst provinces. prepares to hook up a sling load to a Russian Mi-8 at Forward Operating Base Salerno in Afghanistan in early January. C O M .Rotorcraft Report Sgt. R O T O R A N D W I N G . a parachute rigger. Joshua Stevens.

a mechanic with Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 369. Marine Discovers Maintenance Issue U. Lemke. If we don’t do it right. TX 76067 817-215-7600 sales.com W W W.com Photo by Cpl. C O M F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 | R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E 29 .Rotorcraft Report ■ SERVICES | MAINTENANCE © 2012 Cobham.cobham.mineralwells@cobham.S. Following Lemke’s find. Christopher Lemke under the “hell hole” of a Bell UH-1Y Huey. which attaches the transmission to the Huey airframe. Brian Adam Jones ADAHRS handles special mission flight requirements such as multiple tight orbits Lower operating costs Lighter weight for increased payload Reduced pilot workload and fatigue for safer operation Field-updatable software allows new functionalities without replacing hardware components Visit us at Heli-Expo Booth 3122 www. that’s someone’s life. there was a fleet-wide inspection and an engineering advisory report. R O T O R A N D W I N G . Marine Corps Sgt. it had the same problem. and that’s what I found. All rights reserved. was performing a routine phase inspection of the helicopter’s transmission compartment when he discovered that the transmission pylon beam and the main beam joint. “When two metals rub together. but when we looked at another aircraft we had in phase.” The area Lemke was inspecting is known as the “hell hole” as it is difficult to reach and was not required that day as there was no known issue with that portion of the helicopter. S-76. and UH-60 Retrofits Los Angeles Police Department The most important thing we build is trust Sgt. Sikorsky S-61.” Lemke said. Trusted by Carson Helicopters and the Los Angeles Police Department Find out why Carson Helicopters and the Los Angeles Police Department have selected Cobham’s 3D Synthetic Vision EFIS for their helicopter fleets: Superior precision/increased reliability for higher dispatch rates Cobham Commercial Systems Integrated Systems One S-TEC Way Mineral Wells. “No one else had ever found such an issue. were decomposing.” Lemke said. “Our job isn’t just replacing things. it creates this black liquid. Christopher Lemke has received the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal in Afghanistan thanks to his discovery of previously unknown maintenance issue on a Bell UH-1Y Huey.

Accounting Integration. CORRIDOR’s modular design allows each organization to tailor the application to their specific needs. The GTN 650 packs the same powerful touchscreen technology as the GTN 750. Contact us today for more information or to request a demo. increase control and visibility. terrain. CORRIDOR continues to improve efficiency. Maintenance & Shop Management. Aircraft Maintenance Record Keeping. Data entry is handled through the on-screen keyboard.for Helicopter Operators Aero Dynamix Provides Garmin Avionics Products and Repairs Aero Dynamix. COM and NAV functions with powerful multifunction display capabilities like high-resolution terrain mapping.corridor. Two high-speed generator stands are available to test the operation of the unit after it has been serviced. Inc. Our alliance partner A.com Professional Aviation Associates Ofers Extended Life Starter Generator Program Professional Aviation Associates’ Helicopter Starter Program for starter generators offers a custom designed inspection process to track brush wear. CORRIDOR is backed by an experienced in-house staff to support each business throughout training and implementation and continued user support. Modules include those for Inventory Control. reduce errors. weather.aerodynamix. graphical flight planning. For more information. and Canada. Customer & Vendor Management. The touchscreen interface provides quick and intuitive access to all GTN functions including pan and zoom. Aero Dynamix has a wide array of optional equipment with the best prices and exceptional customer support for all your Night Vision requirements. ADI is a full-line distributor and certified repair station for Garmin avionics.9-inch diagonal screen. and reduce unscheduled removals and operating expenses. Our reputation was built upon providing a high level of quality along with competitive pricing. R O T O R A N D W I N G . It’s even designed with raised grips in the bezel and a shelf across the lower edge of the display that serve as anchor points in both smooth and turbulent flight conditions. traffic display and much more.G starter/ generator overhaul facility is well maintained to provide consistent and quality service. satellite weather. These custom solutions may extend the life of your starter generators.S.proaviation. Contact Aero Dynamix today at sales@aerodynamix. This ensures a more dependable operation and a longer life for the armature and stator. Ultrasonic cleaners are used on all armatures and stators to eliminate carbon shorting. (ADI) is the industry leader and principle innovator of integrated Night Vision Imaging System (NVIS) solutions for both commercial and military aircraft. increase reliability. reduce costs. please call 1-800-283-2015 or visit us at www. waypoint entry and route modification. Featured here are the Garmin GTN 650 and GTN 750. and communications.aero 30 R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 W W W.O. call 1-512-918-8900 or visit www.com CORRIDOR Aviation Maintenance Software CORRIDOR is industry-proven software developed to streamline the aviation maintenance process. Created by aviation professionals more than 15 years ago.com for more information or to request a quote. CORRIDOR handles all functions in real time. For more information in the U. and elevate customer service levels for rotor and fixed-wing service providers. The GTN 750 offers a 6. Let Aero Dynamix be your one-stop-shop for Night Vision solutions. and offers internal NVG instrument modifications for Garmin products that do not compromise on the Garmin factory warranty. The GTN family combines GPS. visit www. Part Sales & Retail Distribution. C O M . Procurement & Logistics. and more.9-inch diagonal high-resolution display. but has been optimized to make the most of it smaller 4.

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because only a few years before. But the good news is that the offshore industry. and the muscle to tote lots of people and equipment. and Brunei Shell Petroleum based in Seria. accesses a cavernous baggage compartment apart from the passenger area. cabinwidth door that opens into a cargo ramp. plant. Brunei Darussalam. a hefty-size helicopter that was exactly what the offshore industry needed. 8 demo flight. PHI in Lafayette. another of the test pilots. I met Les Gerrard. It was now time to go flying! The gunmetal grey aircraft. area showing off a brand new S-92 in a special Legacy of Heroes commemorative livery—a paint scheme depicting soldiers. cargo hauling. and some public service operations have shuttered their hangars altogether. Many oil and gas companies drilling in the Gulf of Mexico have pushed farther away from the shore. and was showing R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 W W W. the S-92 is not a one- trick pony. Stafford Regional (RMN) is a sleepy little airport in rural Virginia about 34 nautical miles southwest of the District of Columbia. the senior applications engineer on the S-92 program. That made the 60-foot long. They briefed me on the lineage of the program. s/n 920146. Newfoundland. high seating capacities. a program test pilot. S 32 Sikorsky Aircraft ince 2009. the avionics. the general capabilities of the aircraft. so they need a helicopter with good reach. the economy has ravaged many sectors of rotorcraft industry. The S-92 surfaced as the rotorcraft of choice for several operations around the world. and the local weather conditions—all of which were impressive. with its gas and oil exploration endeavors. Inside the FBO. but order lunch. firefighters and police officers in silhouette—I was invited to take it for a spin. It is a medium. That was good news for the folks at Stratford. D. Corporations have cut back on flying. John’s. C O M . but comes equipped with a state-of the-art Thales cockpit. managed to dodge the bullet. in the VIP role. and a set of Pratt & Whitney Canada 210S engines. was the 146th ship of its kind to roll off the assembly floor at the Coatesville. The S-76D shares the same sleek. Pa. See story on page 33. Stacy Sheard.C. it had introduced the S-92. 15-foot tall S-92 look supremely out of place amidst the Cessna 172s parked nearby. including Cougar Helicopters of St.PRODUCTS | AIRFRAMES AT THE CONTROLS: Sikorsky recently invited Rotor & Wing to fly the S-92 over rural Virginia and the S-76D (shown here) from its West Palm Beach facility in Florida. However. By Ernie Stephens. At the forward end is a state-of-the-art flight deck that will do everything for the pilot. La. While a Sikorsky crew was passing through the Washington. composite rotor blades.-based Sikorsky Aircraft. elegant lines as earlier variants. and air ambulance service.. or. Editor-at-Large Rotor & Wing Editor-at-Large Ernie Stephens at the controls of the Sikorsky S-76D as part of a Dec. and Joel Vigue. R O T O R A N D W I N G . Conn. including executive transport. military applications. twin-engine helicopter with a stand-up cabin that can be completed for a variety of missions.. In the back is a huge.

“We have the latest in state-of-the-art equipment in the back. The center windshield post and windshield wipers. it could also be found flying in a wide variety roles where a spacious cabin was a must. I stepped through the cockpit door. R O T O R A N D W I N G . The last model of the S-76 to be certified. the Turbomeca Arriel 1S. and was equipped with four color. and the nicely cushioned seat that could be adjusted in four directions. “We have flat-screen digital TV. The massive center console and overhead panel were loaded with all of the usual radios.050-shp P&WC 210S engines with FADEC. and the wide windshields and side windows offered a good look at everything throughout a better- S-76D: The S-92’s New Stablemate In 1979. Billed as the first true executive transport helicopter. So. There was even a military version. When I stepped inside. there were three fold-up patient litters along the starboard wall. receives power from a pair of 922-shp Arriel 2S2 engines. but it certainly is large. leaving the rest of the cabin with the utilitarian look one would expect in a SAR configuration. this 250-lb. plus two pilots. multi-function displays (MFDs). who operates a C++ in the northeast corridor of the U. 2011. On Dec. Up front in the cockpit. it can easily transport two patients in a fully equipped medical cabin. And because it was built as a SAR demonstrator as well. 8. alongside the S-92. weren’t bothersome.. the S-76 can carry 13 passengers. pilot Joel Vigue was already strapped into the left seat. Sikorsky sold the first models of the Sikorsky S-76 intermediate. fold-down crew seating affixed with their backs to the wall. Pa. C O M F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 | R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E 33 . however. In addition. Certification of the S-76D is expected in 2012. twin-turbine helicopter. Others in the fleet have been in service around the world in offshore drilling support. Engineers say the aircraft has increased range. and became exceptionally popular in the executive transport arena. and will be assembled in Coatesville. I found seating for about 15 passengers—22 is the maximum—in webbed. XM stereo and worldwide communications. and belted myself in. In a high-density seating configuration. with a blank center position for a fifth one. the S-92 is no Chinook. the C++. writer had no problem finding a comfortable position for piloting. Eric Welch.” said Welch. many of the D’s features will be backward-compatible to older S-76s. SAR operations and VIP service since its FAA certification back in 2004. The field of view from the cockpit of the S-92 is excellent. Powerplant options were added in the ensuing years.Sikorsky S-92 & S-76D S 92 & S 76D just about 50 hours on the Hobbs meter. giving customers a choice between the original Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6Bs. the company gave Rotor & Wing a look at the new S-76D. equipped his company aircraft for executive transport. The model was also the first aircraft to be certified under the newer. switches and knobs. more rigorous safety standards adopted by the European Aviation Safety Agency/Joint Aviation Authorities.” Sikorsky. the Arriel 1S1 and the P&WC PT6B-36A. but it found limited popularity. The D model has all-composite rotor blades that are spun by a pair of 1. When it comes to size. which park vertically. W W W.S. a quiet tail rotor and a Thales cockpit. and an even quieter cabin. which Vigue was already configuring for our flight. We are very happy with it. has not stopped improving on the S-76. The flight deck is about the size of the front office in a UH-60 Black Hawk. leaving me the other side to occupy. Between the pedals that could be moved closer and farther away. For EMS missions.

) The instrument panel was just right: not too high. making it easy to see over while on approach. not too deep. and a bit of the downwind. allowing the pilot to relax a bit.500 lbs. it was clear to see that the S-92 wanted to “talk” to its pilot. Because after just a few minutes on the controls. Picking up the S-92 was uneventful. and canted four-bladed tailrotor system. And the engineers were kind enough to keep the height of the panel lower on the ends than in the middle. less than its max gross takeoff weight). mind you.000 lbs. fully articulated main rotor. let alone being overworked. heading and altitude without a fuss. as is common with wheeled helicopters. Let them go. v Come x Heli-E po oth 012 Bo 2 isit us at 3506 34 R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 W W W. has a couple of trim triggers on the collective and cyclic which. (They just don’t show enough out the front of the aircraft. ready to ship for most Eurocopter models. I was awarded the controls.520 shp each—online with the S-92’s four-bladed. They aren’t locked there. and the controls immediately adopt that position. crosswind. TX 76108 USA 1-800-433-2210 1-817-246-4694 Fax: 1-817-246-7402 info@tech-tool. as loaded (about 8. Perfect Fit. I brought the aircraft through a base leg.PRODUCTS | AIRFRAMES than-180-degree sweep. The ship.tech-tool. not to low. Under most conditions. Aircraft AOG? Need windows? Tech-Tool Plastics has long-life. With everything well in the green. in anticipation of a run-on landing. Vigue already had the two General Electric CT7-8A engines—rated at 2.com www.com EC120/130 windows available with crack resistant edging. 7800 Skyline Park Drive Fort Worth. Our Windows. The S-92. The ride down was a nonevent. R O T O R A N D W I N G . All that was left to do was to take a quick look at the numbers being displayed on the Rockwell Collins Pro Line IV instrument suite. my first approach in an aircraft under evaluation would be a normal one to the numbers. Mission accomplished! Tech-Tool Plastics. At a little less than a mile off the approach end of the runway. and turned final. Two small windows overhead were nice. However. which we both did. not that there was much to stare at. I asked Vigue to advise local traffic that we would be extending our downwind. but this was one of the quickest to get comfortable with. The ship was holding airspeed. stabilized hover about 15 feet off the ground before I pulled it into a normal takeoff. Even the information on the Rockwell Collins MFDs were easy to interpret. like most rotorcraft its size. and came up nose first. C O M . allow the flight controls to move with the ease of a much smaller helicopter. perfect-fit. Feedback through the cyclic was just enough to let me know that I had her full cooperation. so I kept the triggers in through climb out. It granted me a nice. your helicopter will be ready in no time. I wanted to get to know this aircraft. but light enough to feel like I was in something several thousand pounds lighter. The infamous “clothes line” we were all taught to slide down felt like Your Eurocopter. got light on its gear. But I actually felt so comfortable with N146UK. and the gages showed that the engines were barely breaking a sweat. but the chin windows weren’t good for much more than checking the polish on my boots. mission-specific replacement windows in stock. when squeezed. With easy installation and less down time. and not too shallow. They’re just trimmed to that position. I’ve flown a lot of helicopters for Rotor & Wing. which was approximately 18. Inc.

(At least that’s how Vigue said it worked. brought the aircraft to a smooth stop without so much as a shutter. (I believe I heard the aircraft laugh just a bit. Sikorsky equipped the S-92 with an anti-torque hold system that takes over as soon as the pilot removes his or her feet from the pedals. it’s no problem. Just about everything you’d expect to find on the flight deck of a business jet was here. and had no trouble holding exactly that all the way to the touchdown zone.” he said. Next on the menu was a maximum performance takeoff. Coupling up the four-axis autopilot to put us on a departure course gave me time to take a better look at the other features. which I spoke to Vigue about first. so he could make the recommendation that he loves making during all S-92 demonstrations. snatching-in a boatload of power is as much an exercise in pedal work as it is in collective control. I think he was waiting for me to ask. to ease pilot workload. so I could check out a few of the other features of the S-92. because it didn’t rotate by so much as a degree. Tweaking the descent and hauling it back to the recommended run-on landing speed of 50 KIAS was more a matter of thinking about it than commanding it. C O M F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 | R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E 35 . Up we went. not even after I reached 50 feet and was pushed the nose over to dial up some airspeed. I decided to do it at 46 KIAS. The magnetic compass might as well have been glued in its housing. Vigue suggested we depart the pattern. for that matter—isn’t playing well with the others. A bit of aerodynamic braking just after touchdown. weather radar. If you suspect that one of the four main rotor blades—or one of the four tail rotor blades. traffic collision avoidance system (TCAS). navigation management system. But barely touch a pedal. and toe brakes at 34 KIAS. I replied: “Excuse me?” After all. and the system’s micro-switch will know. and instantaneously understand that you’re back in command. The ship can perform a track and balance examination of W W W. right? Well. The engineers packed this aircraft with a 500-parameter health and usage management system (HUMS).Sikorsky S-92 & S-76D it was actually running through the centerline of the aircraft as we coasted down. For grins. with my size 11 boots flat on the floor. R O T O R A N D W I N G . plus some. “Try it with your feet off the pedals.) From a hover. I pulled the collective smartly.) After a couple more takeoffs and landings. enhanced ground proximity warning system (EGPWS). Of special interest was an in-flight diagnostic system. optional rotor anti-ice system and a host of other tools. since he was the one the company signed the aircraft out to. and one eye on the compass.

The line was sold out through the rest of the year.500 lbs 151 kts 539 nm 9. “Every- 36 R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 W W W. I can testify that it works well in the environment for which it was intended: water. which was 147 aircraft as of October 2011.020 kg 280 kph 999 km 2. he explained that there were currently about 340. as he performed a quick post-flight check of the aircraft. It has a hard time holding grid and spiral searches over the kind of terrain found in central Virginia. crew-defined search pattern over water.500 ft 5. we steered back to Stafford Regional for a break.0 m 1. a nice feature. But that’s not all. Most hose fittings. R O T O R A N D W I N G .524 m 4.981 m 1. If a VIP or litter patient is getting too rough of a ride. so it comes equipped with an autopilot that will fly a hands-off.000 hours of flight time on the entire fleet of S-92s produced to date. so it had a tough time when I tried it.PRODUCTS | AIRFRAMES Performance Maximum Gross Weight Maximum Cruise Speed Maximum Range No Reserve HIGE Ceiling HOGE Ceiling OEI Service Ceiling AEO Service Ceiling 26. who was specially selected to travel with N146UK. As Phillips conducted his visual inspection of the titanium main rotor blades.000 ft 6.740 shp 2.0 ft 6.6 ft 6. inspection ports and linkages can be seen without mirrors. I followed Chad Phillips. C O M . a mechanic with Sikorsky’s final production team. since 70 percent of all S-92s delivered are used in offshore support missions.1 m 2. Sikorsky built this aircraft with SAR in mind. that same set of force generators can be commanded to smooth out the ride in that passenger’s particular zone. and make the appropriate adjustments to permanently correct the problem while cruising at altitude. After a nice airborne visit with the S-92.743 m 1. or having to assume contortionist’s positions.520 shp 1. Once back. “This is the easiest aircraft to maintain.000 ft 15.000 ft 12.8 m Cabin Width Cabin Height 2. But having flown the same system over Long Island Sound.572 m Powerplant and fuel system Number of Engines Engine Type Take-off Shaft horsepower (5 min) OEI Shaft horsepower (30 sec) 2 GE CT7-8A 2.” said Phillips.043 kw all eight blades.897 kw Cabin Length Accommodations 20 ft 6.

At the end of the day. Photo by Ernie Stephens thing is really easy to get to. R O T O R A N D W I N G .” he said. and police personnel. I guess the best way to describe it is to say that it flies along with you. and practicing with the systems. I just wanted a couple more turns around the airport to enjoy the feel of hand-flying the S-92.S. it began a six-month world tour that included scheduled stops throughout the Americas. In October 2011. the Sikorsky S-92 gave a great showing. cockpit design. I went up with Stacy Sheard. whose silhouettes appear on each side. After our break. C O M F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 | R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E 37 . Sikorsky was—as would most helicopter manufacturers—reluctant to discuss sticker prices. avionics. a former Army Black Hawk pilot. was specially painted to salute the contributions of U. as if it’s an extension of your own body and thoughts. And what better compliment can a pilot give an aircraft? W W W.Sikorsky S-92 & S-76D N146UK. designated Sikorsky’s Legacy of Heroes S-92 aircraft. military. “How much is an S-92?” you ask? With all the variations of equipment and contract deals available. fire. and ease of maintenance puts it high on my list of impressive helicopters. Asia and India. but this was more of a fun flight. Don’t tell Sikorsky. Interior-space versatility. since I had concluded the evaluation portion with Vigue. But my educated guess puts the Legac y ship that I flew in the neighborhood of $20 million. rescue.

manager. Editor-at-Large Virginia’s Fairfax County Police Department is displaying its new Bell 429 at Heli-Expo in Dallas.aviationtoday. While Appareo will only have a prototype of the EFB at Heli-Expo. including its latest unit. of course it’s Heli-Expo. According to John Pederson. NASCAR has the Daytona 500. When it comes to the biggest event in helicopters. marketing communications for Appareo Systems. Vision 1000 captures inertial and positioning data. visit www. With all that floor space and all those exhibitors to cover—not to mention navigating through an expected attendance of above 18. look for Rotor & Wing’s Show Day publication at HeliExpo. which is best known for its ALERTS (Aircraft Logging and Event Recording for Training and Safety) system. In an effort to help save time and energy before hitting the convention floor. I ers uncovered leading up to the show. we’ve collected a handful of the announcements that helicopter suppli- Photo by Ernie Stephens. For more highlights. educational courses and the ever-popular Job Fair.” he adds. For the full story and coverage from the event. plans to introduce electronic flight bag (EFB) software that is being developed for CHC Helicopter. Cobham (Booth 3122) Cobham and Carson Helicopters recently announced a program to retrofit Sikorsky S-61. The NFL has the Super Bowl.000 people— trying to take it all in three days can be just a bit overwhelming.” notes Barry Batcheller. The CHC project “taps into our considerable software development expertise. Jointly developed by Appareo and Eurocopter. the new CHC EFB will run on the Apple iPad. Heli-Expo has grown to be the world’s largest helicopter event. taking up more than 1 million square feet of the Dallas Convention Center.com/rw/heliexpo2012 and look for Rotor & Wing’s Show Day publication on the convention center floor. The 2012 edition will feature 600-plus exhibitors with more than 60 helicopters on display. The software will help CHC flight crews increase efficiency by providing a tool for routing. By Dale Smith n case you haven’t attended in the past few years (and why not?). “We’re honored to be partners with CHC. the company will have its full array of ALERTS systems on hand. news and coverage from the show. leveraging our experience in mobile development and cloud computing. and visit our dedicated web page: www.COMMERCIAL | EVENT COVERAGE Heli-expo preview THE BIGGEST ‘LITTLE HELICOPTER SHOW’ IN TEXAS Major league baseball has the World Series. fuel planning and weight and balance calculations. Take a minute to check out a few of these not-to-be-missed exhibitors.com/rw/ heliexpo2012 Appareo Systems (Booth 7834) Appareo Systems. That’s on top of hundreds of hours of meetings. this year’s iteration will be one of the biggest ever.aviationtoday. president and CEO of Appareo. R O T O R A N D W I N G . as well as cockpit imagery and audio. C O M . ALERTS Vision 1000. According to Helicopter Association International. S-76 and UH-60 38 R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 W W W. technical briefings.

More courses. Texas. Simulation-based training from FlightSafety is the single most effective way to enhance safety in helicopter flight operations. We were the first to bring Level D performance to full flight helicopter simulation and the first to introduce the quiet precision of simulator electric motion and control loading. England. We continue our decades-long helicopter safety leadership with the world’s first Level 7 helicopter flight training devices for effective and economical training. Our Lafayette Learning Center dedicates its efforts wholly to helicopter safety training. London Farnborough.com A Berkshire Hathaway company Outstanding Customer Service . more top-level fully qualified simulators. and Lafayette. including Bell Helicopter and Sikorsky Aircraft. emergency medical transport. and the world’s only Level D Eurocopter EC135 simulator. and Level D full flight simulator EC135 training at DFW Airport. Vice President Marketing • 718. more instructors. you receive much more than just basic instruction. Texas. Florida. allowing wide-ranging scenarios not possible in the aircraft while leaving your helicopter free for its intended mission. Our Eurocopter training includes cost-effective AStar training on a Level 7 FTD in Tucson. our industry-leading training focuses on your particular challenges. more training locations. Mission-specific training uses realistic scenarios to prepare pilots and crew for the conditions and situations they encounter in the field. and Lafayette.565. Louisiana. You leverage the unmatched resources of the world’s leading aviation training company.com flightsafety.400 Highly Qualified Instructors Dedicated to Enhancing Safety Since 1951 Integrated Customer Training System Worldwide Network of 40 Learning Centers Online Training Program Management Flexible and Convenient Scheduling For information.Label Feature First to Deploy Level 7 Helicopter FTDs Programs Tailored to Enhancing Safety by Delivering Superior Helicopter Training in the Areas That Matter Most Your Individual Needs Quality • Value • Service • Technology Inadvertent IMC Training Mission-Specific Training � Emergency Medical Corporate/Executive Transport � � Law Enforcement Newsgathering Offshore � � New HelicopterDedicated Lafayette Learning Center Exceptional Overall Value eLearning Convenience When you choose to train with FlightSafety International. which delivers comprehensive instruction night or day. offering Customer-specific training supporting multiple aircraft manufacturer product lines. including the large and diverse fleet operating in the Gulf of Mexico. contact Scott Fera. And we are the only source for simulation-based night vision goggle training. The center’s training programs serve all sectors of the industry. law enforcement or newsgathering. Arizona. helping ensure that you’re prepared when the routine turns into the unforeseen. and for Sikorsky helicopters at West Palm Beach. We offer training for Bell helicopters at Fort Worth. We’re the authorized trainer for the majority of aircraft manufacturers.4774 • • sales@flightsafety. Whether your mission is corporate/executive transportation. Training to Proficiency First to Develop Level D Helicopter Simulators 1. offshore support.

and dual-pilot IFR configurations. 1. “The Afghanistan mission is a prefect fit for the skill levels and expertise we have built over our 55-year history and our understanding that we are making a difference. “we do not expect our business model to change. The company also offers a variety of training programs for helicopter pilots and crewmembers.S. According to Frank Carson. Columbia Helicopters (Booth 7334) Columbia Helicopters is looking toward Heli-Expo to kick-off a big 2012. high level of availability and the flexibility of our crews to perform our missions in a timely. coastlines and other geographic features. It currently operates seven Model 234 Chinooks and 14 Model 107-IIs. president of the Aurora. According to Fahey. owner of Carson Helicopters. law enforcement. including for the Bell 206/407 and the Eurocopter AS350 and EC130.COMMERCIAL | EVENT COVERAGE operators.” The FSTD includes the latest flight software for the AW139’s FMS and replicates the aircraft in every detail. “The military has repeatedly expressed great appreciation of our operational tempo. VHF com/nav. R O T O R A N D W I N G . 40 R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 W W W. we are continually developing new contracts with our global petroleum and logging customers. full-motion flight simulation training device (FSTD). According to Marc Schechter. Columbia continues its support work for its global commercial To help meet the rapidly growing demand for the AgustaWestland AW139. Era Training Center has two other FAAapproved Level 6 FSTDs—one Eurocopter EC135P2+ and one AS350B2. Columbia deployed five heavy-lift helicopters and support personnel to Afghanistan on Dec. ENG. the demand for AW139 training has been surging. “Our pursuit of commercial and military helicopter maintenance and operational contracts in new areas has resulted in our ability to hire more people. Columbia’s aircraft fleet is pretty healthy. The new deck will include Cobham’s large-format EFIS displays with 3D synthetic vision/ highway-in-the-sky (HITS).” Fahey says. Transportation Command.” reports Michael Fahey. Both simulators are designed by Frasca International to provide training for both single. including in the corporate. with nearly 200 jobs added since late 2009. Era Training Center in Lake Charles. That brings its global workforce to nearly 700 with over 200 more employed by international subsidiaries or affiliate support organizations. 2011 as part of a multi-million dollar contract to supply non-tactical support for the U. as well as other operators who use helicopters similar to those in the Columbia fleet. C O M .” In addition to the growth in its military sector. The company has also received Brazilian validation for aftermarket installation of its 3D synthetic vision system aboard the Eurocopter AS350/355 series. which includes over 10. too. hiring is up 12 percent over 2010.” Cobham also comes to Heli-Expo 2012 with some additional supplemental type certificate (STC) approvals for its HeliSAS autopilot and stability augmentation system. oil and gas. To keep up with demand the company has recently invested in upgrading maintenance capabilities for both groups. traffic and weather). La. the simulator is the second in North America to receive FAA certification. has received FAA certification for its Level 6. It features a high-fidelity simulation of the helicopter’s flight characteristics and. increases safety and provides for future growth. Along with the AW139 program. delivers a “realistic” flying experience. government and military sectors. “At the same time. audio/ radio management and more.” Era Training Center (Booth 4023) Cobham Sikorsky S-61 panel from Carson Helicopters and Cobham. helicopters with Carson’s performance modifications and Cobham’s suite of integrated avionics. “With the resounding popularity of this type of aircraft.” Fahey says. integrated flight hazard alerting (terrain. The FSTD features a high-resolution visual imagery system presented on a spherical screen using TruVision Global database. and very professional manner.” The company is certainly enjoying growth across the board. adding Cobham’s avionics “dramatically reduces pilot workload.000 runways. EMS. Ore. with the aid of a high-performance electric control loading system. According to its year-end release. general manager. “While we have grown conservatively. much of the recent growth has been fueled by the company’s entry into the military operation market.-based company.

PRESAGIS. Presagis can help take your training programs to new heights. our integrated off-the-shelf software allows you to build applications that address your unique needs. SEE FOR YOURSELF AT HELI-EXPO BOOTH 8840 OR VISIT WWW.Label Label TAKE YOUR TRAINING TO NEW HEIGHTS COST-EFFECTIVE ROTARY WING SIMULATION PRE-LIVE THE FUTURE Your training programs maintain pilot and operator readiness. and/or Presagis USA Inc. 2012. C O M F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 | R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E 41 . All other trademarks contained herein are the property of their respective owners.COM/HELI © Presagis Canada Inc. R O T O R A N D W I N G . All rights reserved. W W W. Working with Presagis enables you to develop high fidelity cost-effective rotary-wing training and simulation systems on time and on budget. With proven software solutions and expert technical services.

simplified interface and enhanced safety features” of the GTN series. In addition to the S-61 panel and its new ADS-B Out transponder. The units recently received EASA validation. A Garmin spokesperson said that the company is currently working on a blanket STC from the FAA and EASA covering helicopter installations for the GTN series. “we’ve moved that aircraft well into the future with respect to operations.31(k).” Rockwell Collins is “bringing nextgen capabilities to legacy aircraft. the SKYe SH09 is a light.” Photo by Ernie Stephens Rockwell Collins (Booth 6119) and Vector Aerospace Helicopter Services (Booth 7139) For a company that’s not normally viewed a leader in commercial helicopter avionics systems. making it one of the fastest single-engine light helicopters in the category. runway charts. single-engine turbine designed to provide multiple missions in adverse weather environments. All of this is certified for Part 29 IMC operations. He adds that because of the EASA validation. Operations facility to see how the NVGs are made. Rockwell Collins is seeing an increase in demand for the upgrade with S-61 operators around the world. Garmin’s vice president of aviation sales and marketing.” says Bryan Cox.COMMERCIAL | EVENT COVERAGE Garmin (Booths 31 and 9432) For many Heli-Expo attendees. ERAU. students will also get to the tour L-3 Warrior Systems’ Electron Tube 42 R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 W W W. Rockwell Collins is headed to Heli-Expo aiming to further position itself in the rotorcraft market. adding that Vector has “already delivered two aircraft into service. charts. he continues. Marenco Swisshelicopter (Booth 4417) Marenco Swisshelicopter is planning to bring a full-size pre-prototype carbonfiber mock-up of the SKYe SH09 light helicopter to Heli-Expo. adding that it “provides a host of features that you typically see on the latest OEM aircraft like graphical weather. which will be View of the show floor at Heli-Expo 2011.” From an avionics perspective. the field trip to L-3 also gives students an appreciation for emerging technology that will undoubtedly be useful in the helicopter industry. director of avionics and flight controls marketing for Rockwell Collins. Peterson says. The highlight of the GTN design is a large touchscreen for data entry and radio tuning.800 kg) and feature a new modular cabin design with a large flat floor and a “unique high ceiling” concept. video inputs. Marenco Swisshelicopter says that the first flying prototype is in the assembly stage and the program is on track to begin deliveries in 2015. campus. their first stop this year will be the Garmin booth for the opportunity to reach out and touch the new GTN 650 and GTN 750 series avionics—successors to Garmin’s GNS 430/530 GPS/nav/ com. C O M .” says Carl Wolf. The ground instruction on NVG operations course will be administered in accordance with the requirements outlined in FAR Part 61.” with the Pro Line 21. The avionics maker’s booth will feature a mock-up of the Sikorsky S-61 Pro Line 21 avionics upgrade program that Vector Aerospace announced at last year’s event. Preliminary specifications indicate a cruise speed of 145 knots (270 km/h). The SKYe SH09 will have a maximum takeoff weight of 6. This optional installation configuration will enable the GTN 750 to act as a touchscreen control head for the aircraft’s audio and intercom functions. an augmented sling load capability and faster cruise speed. notes that Vector Aerospace received an STC in June 2011 for the Pro Line 21 installation. greater payload capacity. The NVG system will train students in a variety of environmental conditions. R O T O R A N D W I N G . available on the Vector S-61 upgrades. “It provides not only hands-on training. Unveiled during last year’s convention. Peterson said the company is also in the process of certifying Pro Line 21’s synthetic vision suite. offering multiple seating configurations for up to seven passengers. Ariz. “NVGs are playing an ever-increasing role in night helicopter operations. John Peterson. Garmin also recently announced that its new GMA 35 remote mount audio processor has the ability to interface with the GTN 750. L-3 Communications (Booth 8056) L-3 Communications recently donated a set of night vision goggles (NVGs) to Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University’s Prescott. according to the company. (2. The GTN series has received a good market response. maps.170 lbs. The SKYe SH09 is being developed specifically to meet the needs of operators who require hot and high altitude performance. European operators can now employ “the latest technology. helicopter specialty degree program. Rockwell Collins is also displaying its Venue cabin management system for executive and VIP helicopters. assistant professor. ADS-B Out as well as solid-state AHARS. As part of the program. solid state MEMS. efficiency and reliability. The NVGs will be used in the university’s bachelor of aeronautical science. “with thousands of units already installed.

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and I’m just throwing figures out there. director of sales and marketing for ASU. president of the Bedford. probably 10 percent of rotary wing aircraft required NVGs.” says Dennis Trout. on both operators and modifiers. Our sales have continued to rise at a pretty healthy rate over the past four and a half years. (ADI). general manager of Euless. and 2012 is starting out to be a boom year too.152 that took effect in April 2011. posting higher year-end returns and expanding at a time when many businesses are pulling back on the reins. due to U. We do foresee that it’s probably already hitting its peak—maybe.” he adds. they’re all turning to NVG. he sees “more and more air applications needing and benefiting from the use of NVGs. Now. “Across the board. All market sectors are up—EMS. Texas-based Aero Dynamix. Texas-based company. military—it’s across the board. “NVG is an operational requirement in many cases these days. Rotor & Wing spoke with three of the major commercial NVG cockpit modifiers—Aero Dynamix Inc. but under the ‘new economy. “Once the economy returns in earnest. “It used to be police.’ public uses have taken the biggest hit on extra spending.” notes Richard Borkowski. C O M .” Trout observes. Idaho. police. government export regulations and varying rules among different countries. NVG demand lately is high. “Back in the old days.” She adds that ASU sees the global marketplace as a major growth area— although that brings its own challenges. Many in the law enforcement field have seen their operational budgets cut drastically to the point of not being able to acquire NVG equipment at the moment. law enforce- D ment. we expect to see the demand for NVG to go even higher than it is today. Borkowski observes that some taxpayer-funded operations are “being forced to go with the lowest modification bid over a source which is sometimes preferred by the pilots and maintenance personnel. says his colleagues have been expecting this business to start dropping off soon. cutbacks by public-use helicopter operators and new guidance in the form of FAA Order N8900. even in the economic situation that we have. R O T O R A N D W I N G .152. Special Emphasis Inspection of Night Vision Imaging System Lighting Installations. Shawn Woodworth.” The percentage of NVG users “has continued to grow. offshore. roughly 30 percent of new aircraft require NVG. or in piece parts over a period of time. director of maintenance for ASU out of Boise.” The worldwide economy “has had only a slight impact on REBTECH over the past few years. Aviation Specialties Unlimited (ASU) and REBTECH—to gauge the state of the specialized market and find out the impacts of N8900. The increased awareness of the importance of NVGs as a safety tool has helped isolate some of the losses experienced in the public use arena.” While the numbers are steadily going up overall. “But for the past three years. companies that provide night vision goggle (NVG) cockpit modifications are doing well.” including those units who had previously held back because of budget concerns. every year we’ve been [modifying] more and more aircraft—2011 was a booming year for us despite all the challenges we’ve had. but today a lot of operators won’t do without it.” But in the next few years.S. even though the market for aircraft is down overall.” Hannah Gordon. Before it was a luxury.SERVICES | NIGHT VISION espite the challenges of the global marketplace. “The market is pretty strong right now. explains that EMS is the company’s biggest sector. Aero Dynamix 44 R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 W W W.

By Andrew Parker. R O T O R A N D W I N G . looks at a panel at the company’s facility in Euless. C O M F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 | R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E 45 . chief inspector and R&D supervisor for Aero Dynamix. W W W.NVG Modifications MOD MARKET FLOURISHES As the attitudes and perceptions of night vision goggles (NVGs) has evolved from “luxury” or “toy” to an essential safety device. Editor-in-Chief Gilbert Martinez. which recently underwent an expansion. the night vision cockpit modification business remains healthy despite challenges in the global economy and new guidance from FAA governing this niche market.

A good 30-40 percent of those problems have to do with an operator upgrading their GPS but not realizing that they have to get an ECO [engineering change order] to do that. another might have a different opinion. but can you read it during the day? That really is the challenge. will drop NVG—but it’s a pretty rare occasion comparative to what it was four or five years ago.152 and are implementing it into their quality system as well. “So in that regard. “ultimately an individual is making a decision that is based on perception or opinion. Stubbs says that the FAA Special Emphasis Inspection “was not only needed but long overdue. “These new demands have a big impact on their budget—some instruments either have to be updated.” says Gordon.” Aero Dynamix has experienced “a huge increase in demand [to answer] questions. director of operations for ASU. “Back then NVGs might be the first thing off the list. Stubbs says that the biggest challenge for NVG operators and modifiers in dealing with the FAA “is that unlike any other STC.” Kim Harris.” But in reality.000 square feet. “one of the biggest challenges is the budget. “Filtering infrared light today is not the hardest part of modifying equipment.” Trout says of N8900. with a few exceptions.152 has provided the FSDOs with initial NVG training and a regulatory format in which to insure the NVG STC is maintained and documentation is current.152. Many of our operators have taken N8900.” Hufford continues. with a workforce now approaching 100 people. They are flying all the time and they’re realizing that they’re a lot safer if they are trained properly. while they may have added a couple small units over the years and thought everything was just fine. “has driven the operators to realize that. adding that when the special emphasis inspection guidelines came out in 2011. It really did not impact us much at all. there’s a lot of discrepancies a lot of modifiers are dealing with. I was probably the ‘chicken little’ of REBTECH. Both Woodworth and Harris elaborate that NVG evaluations can be very subjective—while one inspector might decide that daylight readability in a particular aircraft is adequate. have historically “been treated as an unwanted evil.” According to Stubbs. offshore operator.” Harris says.” says Borkowski. the FAA and the operators. it’s the balance and the daylight readability. have an STC-approved cockpit. and NVGs as toys. and that three percent was solely operators who had modifications a few years ago and they lost documentation. EMS. says Jeff Stubbs. That’s driven a very large. we really did have less than three percent of our fleet affected by 152.” “There are obviously times when we know that an operator’s going to get a couple of aircraft completed and due to their budget situation.” Regardless of experience. Unfortunately. or the user wants to make changes to improve safety or effectiveness. operations manager for Aero Dynamix.” Gordon explains. Hufford explains. The company worked with FAA in 2007/2008 in a process that involved “paperwork cleanup and a lot of special emphasis inspections.” That increased awareness.” the process of developing and enforcing the regulations has created additional time and costs for NVG modifiers. They can’t do it with a [Form] 337 anymore. often times the maintenance providers may have overlooked the impact the change may have had on the NVG certification. C O M . and using a good quality set of goggles.’ then we can move forward. R O T O R A N D W I N G . he says. running around concerned about what was going to come out of it. “the lessons learned from our experience helped the entire industry. Much of the NVG program within the FAA is kind of a round peg in a square hole. for example—those that fly power lines at night. it nearly ruined them. he continues. agrees. The initial aircraft reviews were “a huge expense for us. Once we can convince a decision maker that this could save lives and avert a possible ‘incident. For other companies. which took effect in April 2011. “when we were first made aware of N8900. “It’s easy to make a cockpit NVIS compatible. “it’s an entire shift in how they perceive modifying their aircraft. While the sector involves a very complicated product—with issues like daylight readability still a case-by-case challenge—it clearly isn’t on the decline.” From an operator’s perspective. We do a lot with operators like the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources. or even as far back as the late 90s.” Trout explains.” One of the recent issues impacting operators in the NVG modification industry is FAA’s N8900. aircraft that were field approved before 2003/2004. etc. today it’s one of the biggest things that people fight to keep on the list. Describing it as an ongoing “learning experience for both the industry and the FAA. The increased demand has been a factor in helping drive a recent expansion of the Aero Dynamix headquarters in Euless to 23. those that check on control towers or cell phone towers. senior vice president of operations and systems technology for REBTECH. education or training. They’re seeing that there’s not as many nighttime crashes” for operators with NVGs. “whether you’re a law enforcement.152. he continues.” notes Tonka Hufford.” For operators.” adds Woodworth. but a definite learning experience for everyone—us. new requirement for STC updates and re-certifications. the regulations have given the operators and maintenance providers more awareness of what the FAA guidelines have evolved to. and the demand for NVG modifications remains high and it should continue to be a productive segment for many years to come. That is. that are now coming back and requiring a full FAA STC. civil NVG approval can be subjective. 46 R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 W W W.SERVICES | NIGHT VISION “We’ve seen a trend to go toward NVG.” Economics is based on filling a demand. From our side. “out of our 300 aircraft. N8900.152 a couple months before it came out. according to Harris. public service aircraft units.

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as the number of fatalities due to drowning of conscious occupants is still unacceptable. Operators may want to have their helicopters floating longer.TRAINING | SPECIALTY Bristow Group’s Eurocopter EC225s fly over water on a regular basis. Underwater evacuation training helps. A ditching event is an emergency landing on water. As John 48 R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 W W W. Why focus on ditching and water impacts? According to a review of world civil water impacts. It is performed so that it enables a “safe and orderly egress” of the occupants. chief of Kazan’s calculation bureau. An underwater escape (from a flooded helicopter cabin) too often mismatches breath-hold time. including 192 caused by drowning. Shell Aircraft senior aviation advisor Alan Ward insisted his company has “a strong belief in using more modern aircraft. making ditching a necessary part of pilot and crew training. Improving floatability is a major focus. helicopter makers and equipment manufacturers are struggling to improve the survivability of these accidents. Russia-based Kazan Helicopter is thus endeavoring to properly model these forces. R O T O R A N D W I N G .9 fatal accidents per million flight hours. Just as important. avoiding helicopter capsizing would save many lives.” said Dmitry Nedelko. Germany. Commercial airlines have 0. too. but only happens once every four years. Let’s first define what they are dealing with. but can be challenging to use. although there was enough survivable volume after the impact. Estonia. they may want to have manufacturers better understand ditching dynamics. offshore transportation. A water impact is uncontrolled or partially controlled. At December’s European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) helicopter ditching workshop in Cologne. They caused 338 fatalities. All 14 passengers and crewmembers drowned (they inhaled water). Emergency breathers can help. Offshore helicopter transportation has 5. C O M . Statistics show that what is probably the most strictly run helicopter activity. “This will help determine proper piloting. 98 survivable water impacts happened between 1971 and 1992. Civil aviation authorities. lags behind in terms of safety.” Oil companies wanting to buy safer aircraft is one more incentive for the manufacturers to carry on with their efforts in this direction. about 65 attendees—a lot of them representing North Sea oil-and-gas offshore operators—heard how difficult it will be to make this safety picture somewhat rosier. Helicopter Industry Struggles to Improve Ditching Survivability By Thierry Dubois M ost ditching events and water impacts would be survived if on the ground.7 (2010 numbers). An example is a Sikorsky S-76C+ accident in 2005 near Tallin. First.

the major drowning cause is the inability to escape an inverted helicopter.” Howson reminded. C O M F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 | R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E 49 . marine and general airframe systems Introducing the Lowest acquisition and operating costs of any turbine helicopter Hover ceiling OGE at maximum gross weight over 10. using speed or altitude switches for example. it was just complying with the regulation—sea state 4 (moderate). automatic activation. R O T O R A N D W I N G .robinsonheli. The two upper floats bring redundancy and a side-floatation capability. The Anglo-Italian manufacturer recalculated float and structural loads. “You either have to demonstrate inadvertent deployment does not jeopardize the flight or certify a system. computation has shown that a 100-percent increase of EFS design strength translates into a modest crashworthiness improvement. This has a cost. A designer should think of a greater number of floats rather than stronger floats. the helicopter sank much too early. Other ways to save lives by improving floatation include. They proved their value in a Super Puma (G-REDU) accident there in February 2009. Surprisingly. UK civil aviation authority (CAA) flight operations research manager. noted. it has to be armed at all times. “Most of us believe that the helicopter would have capsized and drowned at least some of the occupants if it hadn’t been for the automatic activation system.000. then deflated. the helicopter stayed afloat in all impacts. However. an EASA safety analysis coordinator.000 ft 300 lb capacity dedicated baggage compartment www.com 310-539-0508 W W W. This is considered highly cost effective. said Daniele Robustelli.” noted Dave Howson. to automatically activate the EFS.” Howson explained. in 26 of 184 accidents (since 1970) that involved ditches. providing it had two highmounted floats—in addition to the usual four floats at the bottom of the airframe. “Oil & Gas UK uses a figure around $7 million per life saved. to prevent such inadvertent deployment. Sometimes they inflated. Sometimes floats did not inflate. As a result. Indeed.Ditch Training Franklin. Initially. It then performed tests in a water tank on a 1/12th model. In simulations. the estimated cost per life saved would be about $380. The flight manual now refers to sea state 6. for example.” Howson told Rotor & Wing. So what about emergency floatation system (EFS) crashworthiness? “Statistics indicate improving floatation is the most important factor for better survivability. All of the North Sea helicopters already have automatic floats. AgustaWestland claims to have demonstrated its AW139 medium twin is seaworthy up to sea state 6 (very rough sea). This was immediately or during the evacuation. This can be done with immersion switches.

the reason why helicopters roll over is that a lot of weight is located on the top—engines and main rotor. The audience expressed surprise at seeing smooth water surface on the video.” Robustelli added. Other ideas have been pitched to avoid capsizing and sinking. specialist. The EFS would then just cost 10 percent more or so. Robustelli was challenged. “should we mandate sea state 6?” As for post-ditch stability. A Eurocopter representative pointed out that irregular wave testing would require a huge water tank.” Howson noted. though. It remains that capsizing is a nonlinear process. As a result.” warned UK CAA’s Tony Eagles. Fundamentally. A float scoop is a small. for example. The added weight of the water acts to increase the aircraft’s righting moment when above the water. “I agree irregular waves may be a more severe environment. “Don’t stay in the aircraft if it seems to keep upright.TRAINING | SPECIALTY This model shows an example of the “side floating” concept. it is difficult to relate it to measurable helicopter parameters such as dimensions. adding float scoops would be a significant improvement. a former Royal Navy pilot. R O T O R A N D W I N G . The drag of the pocket also dampens rolling when below the surface. C O M . flexible bucket. EASA rotorcraft certification manager Massimo Mazzoletti wondered. “It W See us at Heli-Expo. which we have not tested. as it may capsize. the AW139 model appears not to capsize. Mazzoletti pleaded for the “jettison fuel” item to be removed from the ditching checklist. It turned out that the rules that govern such demonstrations are quite relaxed. attached to the exterior of the float. the helicopter can withstand one more sea state—sea state 5 instead of sea state 4. It naturally fills up with water when the float immerses. “Therefore. On a video. booth 4021 50 R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 W W W. This would be to accommodate the drift caused by the simulated wind over the irregular wave scheme period. despite the simulated waves and wind.

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and design issues faced by designers and operators of commercial and civil aircraft. Moreover. It provides a single rather than two-side floating position. What about a sea anchor? Howson said it is good because it helps keep the helicopter facing waves—hence much more stability. On the asymmetric configuration. military aircraft.” he summarized. is preferred.” Sparkes stressed. with only one upper Conference & Exhibition 21-22 March 2012 M. As things stand.C. This avoids the helicopter switching from one position to the other. emergency floats make the helicopter’s exterior less smooth). “But the time it takes to deploy a sea anchor is an issue. we are not sure of the risk-benefit ratio of side floating. Germany for the annual gathering of avionics professionals to learn and discover the latest information and future for the avionics industry. Howson supports it. Eurocopter had quite a different view. once inverted. Therefore. the helicopter has a better chance to avoid rolling over. the proximity of gas exhaust requires new fabrics or thermal protection.” Seats should be aligned with windows. does not quite like seeing a float near the main rotor. François Hochart. if the efforts to keep some exits “dry” fail and the helicopter actually inverts. the weight of the extra floats can be close to 200 lbs. the occupants’ allies will be training. Germany www. Owned and Produced by Sponsors Presented by Supporting Organisations Media Partner float. workshops and forums visit Join us in Munich. It brings a risk of capsizing when the water rolls—this is called the “free surface effect. It doesn’t work until the connecting line is tight and the helicopter could capsize before that is achieved. “Were other ways investigated in terms of design or training to improve safety?” he asked. in case of inadvertent deployment. equipment “and a lot of good luck. technologies and avionics solutions – FREE to attend presentations on the exhibition oor For the full conference programme. R O T O R A N D W I N G . Event Centre Munich. a UK CAA flight operations inspector. in charge of EFS design. an investigator at the French BEA (the equivalent of the NTSB).avionics-event. it is cheaper. Not all mod- 52 R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 W W W. policy. Delorme said it does not provide as much air volume in the cabin as a symmetrical one.” The side-floating concept brought a lot of attention and debate. occupant disorientation is immediate.TRAINING | SPECIALTY does not improve floatability and makes the cg higher. Be up-to-date on: n Register online before 21 February and bene t from Early Bird discount at The Avionics Europe 2012 conference and exhibition will highlight and explore the technological.” he added. “Otherwise. helicopters and UAVs as global aviation moves into the new frontier of air traf c management exempli ed by SESAR and NextGen. you’ll never find your way. He suggested to find other locations for emergency exits and to enhance passenger training. Then. Moreover. Event Highlights: – with leading commercial and defence industry representatives – with 12 conference sessions and over 35 presentations from industry leading professionals and speakers – showcasing the latest products. C O M . Louis Delorme. Human subject trials showed it is much easier to escape from a helicopter that is floating on its side. According to Paul Sparkes. noted additional equipment to prevent helicopter capsizing appears to be difficult to design.com DRIVING SES & NEXT-GEN INNOVATION AND PERFORMANCE COMMON SKY: OPERATING IN ONE AIR SPACE. Separately. lighter and generates less aerodynamic drag (even when stored.” he said. An asymmetric configuration. rather than inverted. he said. Eurocopter is therefore focusing on upright stability. the suggestion to let some water in (the “wet floor” concept) to stabilize the aircraft has been ruled out.O. “Today.

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Although the fuselage offers little to hang on. Typical escape time is 45 to 60 seconds in a real accident. To help solve the mismatch between underwater escape and breath-hold time. breath-hold time can be as short as 20 seconds in cold water. The first one uses a small bottle of compressed air. In addition. One passenger may be carried in several different helicopters over the four-year interval. Once the occupant has pushed the window out. director of research and development with Survival Systems Training. The third type is a hybrid of the first two. an occupant has to wear a well-sized immersion suit. C O M . Also. as Paul Hannant. Designing an EBS with a deployment time clearly below breath-hold time is still a challenge. “It helps overcome panic and disorientation.TRAINING | SPECIALTY ern helicopters used today in offshore operations have such alignment. the emergency breather should not prevent harness release. to ensure there is a net safety benefit in using EBS. in one instance. This does not make egress easier. complex safety devices. a UK Aircraft Accident Investigation Branch (AAIB) senior inspector emphasized. The idea is to have at least one minute of breathing time.” Sparkes said. For example. Regulations only call for one such training session every four years.” Michael Cunningham. Research is going on The North Sea is a Hostile Environment—But What About Other Places? As one attendee. Consultant Sue Coleshaw is developing a technical standard for EBS. About aircraft ditching certification. should helicopter occupants off Nigeria wear immersion suits? Yes. Meanwhile. There is also a risk of snagging. The second one is a rebreather. survival equipment should not be mounted on a door that can be jettisoned.” he said. he or she often needs something to hang on the fuselage to help egress. for the military. But recent aircraft have smooth. This affected his vision. Involved can be emergency breathers or. R O T O R A N D W I N G . It even had a hull properly designed for landing on water. However. said. several speakers noted. three types of emergency breathing systems (EBS) are available. the added buoyancy can impede egress from an inverted aircraft. investigator in charge of the 2009 Cougar flight 91 (a Sikorsky S-92) crash. the simulator also should be representative for several types. aerodynamic surfaces. Howson hopes the EASA will adopt the resulting specification. the attendee pointed out. The simulated cabin has to be as realistic as possible with accurate window and handle locations etc. a survivor got his fingers so cold that he could not AgustaWestland AW139 flying over water. It could then issue it as a European Technical Standard Order (ETSO). it appeared this brings somewhat contradictory requirements. The Sikorsky S-61 Sea King had a lifeline rope. representing an operator flying off West African coasts. they will dehydrate. Water temperature can add one challenge. 54 R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 W W W. some participants suggested sea state 4 is perfectly acceptable for environments like the Mediterranean and the Gulf of Mexico. as training sessions do not occur often. do all occupants there have the necessary culture to take benefit from safety training? “The cooks we fly to oil platforms may find it challenging to use European-designed. “We have to delethalize the fuselage. survival equipment (such as a dinghy) attached to the back of the pilot. She pointed out that using an EBS should be easy. the mouthpiece should not be hidden in the folds of the stored air pocket. it happens that it damages liferafts. don his goggles. told Rotor & Wing. In addition to the snagging hazard. But. Training is needed. Also. Photo courtesy AgustaWestland. like the Sud Aviation SA321 Super Frelon. To keep dexterity. Underwater escape training is obviously very useful but it must be properly done. though. rulemakers should not forget about those environments that are less hostile than the North Sea. For example. if one thinks helicopter searchand-rescue services there are virtually non-existent—rescue will come by boat.” Howson added. But. if they wear an immersion suit during a flight in Africa’s hot environment. Taber also insisted the stress level in underwater escape training should be high enough for knowledge and skills to be retained. In a presentation by Michael Taber. Then. occupants are encouraged to put gloves on only after egress. “They are sometimes chosen too large for comfort reasons.

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TRAINING | MILITARY TEST PERSONNEL RECOVERY TECHNIQUES In October the Spanish Air Force hosted the European Air Group’s 5th Annual Personnel Recovery Training Meet. 56 R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 W W W. based at RAF High Wycombe in the UK. although he was deputy commander the first time around. 2011 under the auspices of the European Air Group. Uwe Schleimer (JPR-1). CJPRSC. Military Editor T Spanish Air Force AS332B behind one of the international extraction forces. R O T O R A N D W I N G . By Andrew Drwiega. C O M . organized under the direction of the EAG’s Lt. he fifth gathering of European international military aircrews that were seeking to improve their knowledge and skills in personnel recovery techniques met at the Albacete airbase in Spain from October 14-26. The basis for the course actually goes back to 2002-2006 with the VOLCANEX/CSAR exercises. formally known as the Combined Joint Combat Search and Rescue course (CJCSAR). Col. This was Schleimer’s fourth course in as many years. This was the annual Combined Joint Personnel Recovery Standardization course (CJPRSC).

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multinational environment embedded in a COMAO [Composite Air Operation]. “the only real difference was that the course was more operator-oriented and a little more away from the theoretical. Those on the course get to know tactics. with each group receiving their own separate task. Which is a good balance. Once again however. followed by a further planning meeting at the airbase in Spain during June. most have no experience. During the flying phase.” The structure of the CJPRSC “is virtually unchanged since last year. as in recent years. The course has matured over the years and although some of the participants are knowledgeable in its requirements. The Program of Instruction (PoI) is based around four days of theoretical instruction and seven days of fly- ing sorties. EAG held the initial planning meeting at its RAF High Wycombe headquarters in January 2011. Forward Air Refuelling Points (FARPS) were once again used although the Spanish conditions led to some unscheduled ‘brownout’ training.” Most of the participants are new to the course although a good number of the instructors and directors return to assist with instruction. techniques and procedures (TTPs) and identify common operating principals instead of using their own standard operating procedures (SOPs) and standing SPINS (Special Instructions). The program calls for the aircraft present to be divided into two PR Task Force groups. The concept behind the annual CJPRSC is to provide individual training for those with responsibility for personnel recovery tasks. It trains and tests their knowledge and proficiency in planning and executing PR missions “in a non permissive. adding that. Once again the course attracted a good international attendance with 13 nations sending a total of 319 personnel and 17 helicopters and fixedwing aircraft. no night flying exercises were possible due to limited residual conditions and the two night missions became day missions instead. using operational documents. The main nations con- 58 R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 W W W.” said Schleimer. C O M .TRAINING | MILITARY A pair of Spanish Air Force Super Pumas acting as recovery vehicles. explained Schleimer. Schleimer revealed that 90 percent of the scheduled sorties took place. R O T O R A N D W I N G .

the Asian Business Aviation Association (AsBAA) and The Shanghai Exhibition Center. C O M F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 | R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E 59 . 28. China March 27. in Partnership With Shanghai Airport Authority.Label Feature BUSINESS AVIATION ON FULL DISPLAY IN SHANGHAI — MAKE PLANS TO BE THERE Shanghai. 2012 Shanghai Hawker Pacific Business Aviation Service Centre on Hongqiao International Airport Exhibits. Dozens of Aircraft on Side-by-Side Display and Education Sessions All in One Location WWW.ABACE. 29. R O T O R A N D W I N G . W W W.AERO The Asian Business Aviation Conference & Exhibition is co-hosted by The National Business Aviation Association (NBAA).

We have a moral obligation to try and get our people back. “The shift in focus away from pure CSAR missions towards the wider scope of Personnel Recovery operations continues to prove beneficial to tailor the course objectives towards real time requirements. There was also the chance to use fast jet pilots as on scene commanders—something that rarely happens in exercise but can happen operationally. Spanish Air Force 2 x F-18M. “Now what is more usual is expeditionary warfare. Spain. Sweden and the United States.” Participating Aircraft: CJPRSC Exercise 1 x MC-130. Schleimer. It is scheduled to run from October 8 through Oct. The next European Air Group CJPRSC training course will be held later this year. France. 2012 in the Schönewalde/Holzdorf region in Germany. “The Spanish forces should be recognized for the great effort that they put into making this CJPRSC one of the best with 10 fixed-wing sorties per day. Spanish Air Force 2 x AS555. Italy. Poland. French and Italian militaries provided the extraction forces. Italian Air Force Total hours flown: 227 60 R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 W W W. As Schleimer outlined in his debriefing document. Overall the course achieved its training objectives. the role was performed by an EH 101 C2 from the Italian Navy. tributing forces and benefiting from the CJPRSC training were Spain. cuts to training will mean that individuals will be harder and costlier to replace in the future.TRAINING | MILITARY (Above) Italian Navy EH101 on the ground prior to takeoff with an extraction force. The amount of financial investment that countries make in training and qualifying their flying personnel makes them expensive assets. R O T O R A N D W I N G . German Army 1 x SA330. Enemy ground forces were provided by the Spanish Military Police with the Swedish. Personnel from six other nations contributed to support and observer roles. Germany. despite the lack of night flying.” said Schleimer. Polish. Italian Navy 1 x CH-53G. Italian Air Force 2 x HH3F. French Air Force 2 x AS332B. Italian Air Force 1 x EH101.” The ultimate lessons learned by the teams that participate in the CJPRSC will hopefully be taken away and used when they are called upon to plan and execute real PR missions in a non-permissive multinational scenario operating within a Combined Air Operation (COMAO). 26. Col. Italian Navy 2 x F1M.” explained Lt. Although a fixed-wing NATO E-3A Sentry airborne early warning (AEW) aircraft wasn’t available. “Today we are not looking at highintensity warfare or home country defense. C O M . Schliemer stated. (Bottom) The CJPRSC 2011 group photo at the Tactical Leadership Program (TLP) facilities at Albacete Air Base. In the current difficult financial climate. USAF 1 x EH-101 C2. French Air Force 2 x AB212.

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Mexico location is CAE’s ninth for civil helicopter training. MH-60S and HH-60H crew members will practice aerial gunnery. R O T O R A N D W I N G . C O M . Pilots flying the Block III.Bell 412 FFS in Toluca. Capt. The facility features a Bell 412 Level D-equivalent fullflight simulator (FFS) as well as various fixed-wing simulators. Ariz. Army Unit First to Train on Upgraded Block III Apaches The U. The unit currently has 85 Apache pilots that will require training on the Block III. but the aircraft is significantly different. 1st Aviation Regiment. Col. part of the 1st Attack Reconnaissance Battalion. It doesn’t take additional skills to fly it. Lt. cargo replenishment. 62 R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 W W W. torate General of Civil Aviation (DGAC). has become the first unit to fly the Boeing Apache Block III. in addition to the current iteration.S. “At Block II.” notes Vedder. confined area landings and search and rescue (SAR) with the new fullmotion simulator. CAE has launched a new training center in Mexico for Bell helicopter and business jet pilot training.S. Naval Aviation Training Systems Program Office (PMA-205) program manager. it has a certain level of power when you pick it up. Army’s 1st Infantry Division. This is totally different. Navy Employs Sikorsky Virtual Bell Sim Opens Environment Trainer at CAE Mexico The U. explains that there are new components to the helicopter. Edward Vedder using an AH-64D Apache Block III simulator at Boeing’s facility in Mesa. Col.” The simulator is based at Naval Air Station North Island in San Diego. The first 75 will train in Mesa. as well as watching the UAV video feed and taking control of the UAV. which features 26 new technological upgrades. Combat Aviation Brigade.S. all qualified by Mexico’s Direc. Calif. Ariz. commander of the 1-1 ARB. with the remainder handled via mobile training at Fort Riley. will receive three weeks of training on the revamped helicopters at Boeing’s facility in Mesa. says that future plans call for the Navy to “network this trainer with the tactical operational flight trainers for multi-crew mission rehearsal training. John Feeney. a new helmet and new flight pages. Edward Vedder. Kan. Army of having flown all three incarnations of the Apache—the AH-64A Block I and AH-64D Longbow Block II.CATEGORY | INFO INFO TRAINING NEWS EASA Prepares for ‘the Ditch’ 48 Apache Block III Enters Service 62 Enhancing Safety & Professionalism 68 Lt. “There is new head tracker. a Sikorsky MH-60S aircrew virtual environmental trainer (AVET). Jeff Troth contributed to this report. He also has the distinction U. —Information from Sgt. All pilots will be trained on the Block III prior to their next deployment.” The Block III variant also comes with the ability to communicate with unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and its controllers. “When you pick this aircraft up you are going to immediately feel the power difference.” Vedder is one of the first 10 Apache pilots to undergo Block III training in Arizona. The Toluca. Navy has begun using its first virtual reality training device. should the situation warrant it.

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smoother-riding helicopters. and those who are on the ground complain less. The manufacturer’s passive system. smoother helicopter makes those who fly in them smile bigger. Eurocopter has publicized its latest efforts to make friendlier-sounding. There can be increased vibrations in the cockpit due to BVI. it causes a sudden change in angle of attack and an associated change in pressure on the surface of the blade. As you begin to “ride the burble. Knowing what causes BVI and the regimes of flight it is commonly encountered in allows us to do our best to avoid it. involves redesigning the conventional straight rotor blade from the root outward. In recent months. Under normal conditions in level flight. in a partial-power descent. a win-win for all. otherwise known as “blade slap. according to the company. which is called Blue Edge.COMMERCIAL | TECHNOLOGY Leading Edge By Frank Lombardi Quiet Please T he beginning of a new year seems like an appropriate time to look at what lies ahead with evolving helicopter systems and technologies. and create a strong corkscrewing swirl of air. Until these newer systems are fully integrated into the helicopter production line. There are many oscillating forces and moments at work creating sources of noise and vibration in flight. effectively flying it up and over or down and under the approaching vortex with every revolution. it falls upon us to keep the negative public perception of our flying to a minimum. they pass above the helicopter as the aircraft descends quickly. Eurocopter’s Blue Pulse technology is an active noise/vibration canceling system that uses piezoelectric actua- tors to control trailing edge flaps on each rotor blade. to include forward sweep. these vortices tend to sink and lose energy as they get blown below the rotor. or when the helicopter is rolled into a turn.” Just like an airplane wing. higherpressure air will spill out from under a rotor blade at the tip. and anhedral (droop) at the tip. However. With Blue Pulse. The forward and aft sweep of the blade sit at an oblique angle to the vortex during contact. The unconventional shape of the Blue Edge rotor would plague engineers with difficult bending and twisting loads that try to distort the shape of the blade in flight. Eurocopter has reported a 5-decibel decrease with the system. There is more than one way to lessen BVI. or tip vortex. something that has long-troubled earlier projects exploring active-blade control. especially as the aircraft is slowed on approach. In autorotation. oscillatory environment of the spinning rotor. C O M . The intensity of the BVI is governed by the distance between the vortex center and the plane of the blade. into the fuselage. greatly reducing transmitted noise and vibration. and into the seat of your pants until the helicopter slows to a hover and the vortices are once again blown down beneath the rotor. while the anhedral. 64 R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 W W W. This is what creates the loud impulsive noise that can be annoying to those on the ground. and actuate those flaps at 15-40 times per second. Piezoelectric actuators can change their shape when an electrical voltage is applied. When the high-energy swirling air strikes the rotor blade. since reducing the strength of tip vortices will increase rotor efficiency. aft sweep. R O T O R A N D W I N G . Blue Edge combats all three of these. giving the approaching blade more clearance over the top. The constant development of materials technology is what has allowed this to be so. This has produced a reduction of noise levels by 3-4 decibels. but only now are they coming into their own. developing both passive and active systems to combat bladevortex interaction. One of the most well known sources is due to blade-vortex interaction (BVI). One area that always welcomes improvement is that of helicopter noise and vibration. get sucked toward its upper surface.” the tip vortices impart high vibratory loads on the blades that pass down the rotor shaft. These methods of BVI reduction have been around for a while. piezoelectric actuators made largely of ceramic light-weight materials and virtually no mechanical parts have proven to be very robust while living in the high-g. Blue Edge has been said to increase hover performance as well. and we should continue to be good neighbors and use “fly friendly” techniques until technology gives us a quiet helping hand. were it not for the advent of composite materials that can resist such aeroelastic effects. and how parallel the vortex is to the blade edge when they meet. or drooped tip weakens and deposits the vortex lower. A quieter. the strength of the vortex at the time it meets the blade. an approaching blade will often come into the vicinity of a tip vortex left by a preceding blade.

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It worked well. It isn’t that I would feel obligated to give preferential treatment to a sponsor. and a couple of other outfits. C O M . which can divest. and don’t blame him for looking for outside sponsors if that’s his last resort. there are plenty who are less honorable. and withdraw its support if it doesn’t get it? And if the sponsor legitimately deserves priority. not to mention a happy little bundle of cash. jet fuel. and the laundry detergent logo on the hood to. if I were stuck in the unenviable position of having to rely on sponsors to operate my unit. San Diego Fire Department (SDFD) did the same thing several years ago when they invited area companies and organizations to place logos on the department’s Bell 212. Now. I’d do my best to limit it to those who probably wouldn’t need my services. (Refer to the politics section of your local newspaper to learn more about money can corrupt decision-making. Unlike private businesses. The deal made some in the SDFD nervous. and do a bunch of other things. and might very well allow contribution-dollars to cloud their better judgment. That said. that agency’s helicopter will be a flying billboard for whichever companies take the sheriff up on his offer. merge. The woes of the housing market clobbered the tax base that public services need to operate. government agencies are pretty much limited to cutting costs. maybe a local grocery store chain. if the choice has to be made between which fire to work now and which one to work later—and a sponsor’s interest is one of the properties in harm’s way— how will it play out? Will the involved sponsor expect—or subtly demand— priority consideration. you’d skin your knees trying to get low enough to read it. and you’ll be dead on. Hopefully. I would. I’m betting he has already reduced staffing to the bare bone. and must hold his fleet of patrol cars together with bailing wire. his helicopter operation—which not only patrols. a Native American resort. as the SDFD was able to do. in exchange for a donation toward the then-one ship operation. It would keep my unit from having to face accusations that I gave better police service to a sponsor than to a non-contributor. Deputy Chief Brian Fennessey. So. such as the non-resident providers of my unit’s radio gear. especially since things got really ugly back in 2008.PUBLIC SERVICE | POLICE By Ernie Stephens A Paid Advertisement?! On a Police Helicopter?! A good friend of mine sent me a news clipping the other day. but is needed for search and rescue services in remote areas—could go the way of other units that have had to sell their ships due to lack of funding. raising taxes and selling bonds to makeup for the shortfall. They had logos from a medical center. he can discontinue the whole sponsorship deal once things get better. So. too. R O T O R A N D W I N G . you’re headed in the right direction. Basically. said the sponsorship method was the only option the SDFD had to get their unit up and running—a unit that battles brush fires nearly all year. Air assets are extremely important. as this sheriff is. will the “regular citizen” assume money drove that decision? For the record. But for every honorable public servant like him. or mission equipment. and moaning passes. And now. Just change the car to a helicopter. he has decided to solicit sponsors to help cover the costs of the operation. I know Fennessey. if the image of a decal-laden NASCAR vehicle comes to mind. Once all of the discussions. oh. however. After all. because I wouldn’t. I sure hope it works for him. be concerned if I were an appointed official. Because just like Tony Stewart’s #14 Chevy with “Home Depot” emblazoned across the hood. who might have to deal with a boss or political figure that might lean on me to play favorites based upon who send in the largest check. here is where I land: Trading ad space on a police helicopter for operating cash would be so far down on my list of unitsaving options. I wouldn’t be too worried about outside influence trying to make me do otherwise.) The meat and potatoes of this whole method for finding revenue is just another piece of the economic-meltdown pie. a lieutenant at the time I met him in 2007. the sheriff of a fair-size department is having such a tough time financing his air unit. 66 R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 W W W. while I salute that sheriff ’s efforts to keep his deputies flying. And if I were an elected unit head. I’m sure he would never let sponsorship interfere with how the SDFD prioritized its missions. gnashing of teeth. The only reason this news didn’t shock me was because it was not the first time I had heard of such an idea. who is wedged between a financial rock and an operational hard place with his helicopter unit. here we have a sheriff. virtually cut out all overtime.

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Liberty Helicopters is one of the major tour operators and hires low-time pilots to fly the river for several years before they are upgraded to other types of flying. most of which have less than five aircraft. a topic I have written about several times. Its first priority always has been.J. Of course. Their ad hoc meetings in New York City. Pilots must know their competition. the FAASafety Team conducted a seminar concerning areas of interest such as the ongoing work of IHST and how with PRIA a pilots training history will be tracked. He went on to say that HAI is a lobbyist organization promoting safety and helicopter aviation worldwide while representing interests of owners. gave an update regarding sightseeing along the Hudson River and how they’ve adjusted to the new airspace limitations in the New York area. The first several sessions were focused around employment in the rotary wing industry. Paul Tramontana. 68 R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 W W W. In 1982. but because of the poor performance of their 401K plans. Smith spoke on the state of the industry and explained what the ERHC is and what they do. featuring very professional presenters and and opportunity for operators and pilots to network. Long Island Business Aviation Association (LIBAA). ERHC has promoted communication among local-elected officials. and HAI’s Safety Director Stan Rose. obtaining legal weather briefings. N. In other words. renaming the non-profit organization Eastern Region Helicopter Council. they incorporated in 1979. Part 136. Rose presented several sessions on the “State of the Industry” and safety awareness. Attending were young pilots looking to get that “perfect” flying job and a few more experienced pilots trying to back into the cockpit. Jeff Smith. With many of these pilots retiring in the next five years. East 34th Street Heliport. Rose went on to say how pilots are task overloaded and how risk management is not performed on all occasions. Other companies flying in the area are Manhattan Helicopters. Shortly after his session. Since 1977. to represent their interests in aviation. He spoke on the reasons why we crash aircraft and that these mishaps are all preventable. He stated that 30 percent of the Vietnam Era pilots (many of which are approximately 65 years old) would retire. the chief pilot of Liberty Helicopters. Good job guys. efficiency and community compatibility. Following Smith’s presentation. Zip Aviation and Helicopter Flight Services. There are three heliports in use. and the Downtown Heliport. He explained that local helicopter pilots who were interested in the availability of IFR flight for rotorcraft started the organization in 1977. it stays on your record permanently. the ERHC was awarded the first-ever Fly Neighborly Award from HAI. there may be opportunities for employment. and reviewing safety “hot spots. They also discussed that there is no evidence that twin-engine helicopters are safer than single-engine models and the need for LARS. I was very glad the focus was on safety and risk management. it was a great event. Overall. we then talked about new CFIs and how many of them do not have the ideal cognitive skills and aeronautical experience. the public and the region’s helicopter operators to enhance safety. R O T O R A N D W I N G . The air tours operate under CFR 49. The council meets five times yearly. the group has strengthened its bonds with other local aviation groups. relating to helicopter and heliport issues. West 30th Street. and New Jersey Aviation Association (NJAA). as there are limitations to see and avoid and how it is the responsibility of the PIC to manage the workload. still need to work.” We discussed how pilots need to plan for all flight conditions on the ground prior to each flight. using the initial name of Northeast Helicopter Operator Council (NEHOC). After the charter member pilots realized their success in joining together with respect to the IFR issue. ERHC has always had an active community outreach program to address the concerns of residents. C O M . Mid-Atlantic Aviation Coalition (MAAC). professionalism. Inc. He believes every solution begins with each and every pilot. and is featured as an example in the Fly Neighborly Guide. and enjoyed spending time with the council’s President. I had the opportunity to speak with Stan and we talked about many areas of safety in our industry. were the initial step in forming the eastern seaboard’s first locally organized aviation group to represent helicopters. if you fail a check ride. ERHC is an affiliate member of HAI and NBAA. FAA.TRAINING | EVENT COVERAGE Safety & Training By Keith Cianfrani Enhancing Safety and Professionalism had the pleasure of attending the Eastern Region Helicopter Council (ERHC) seminar in September last year in Mahwah. such as the Mid-Atlantic Pilots Association I (MAPA). We discussed how HAI is working with ERHC to reduce accidents in the community by promoting aeronautical decision-making assessments. Since 2007. Finally. Rose finished our interview with mentioning what pilots need to know about the industry. and remains— safety.

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it will be very tempting for financiers to contemplate slipping back into the mindset that placed the Guard at a lower level of requirement to the regulars—but this must not happen if they are to be relied upon to be interchangeable operationally with the regular force. 70 R OTO R & W I N G M AGA Z I N E | F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 2 W W W. And we have to rethink the current way of doing business in our acquisition process. Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta said. and it will be leaner. then the build up in its force structure and ability to integrate with regular formations must continue. the challenge ahead for U. Speaking in January 2012. “. “We need to be happy with what is good enough. The challenge will be to ensure that the Guard is equipped. Crutchfield’s will lay down his line on the general way ahead for Army Aviation in April at Quad-A in Nashville. as has already been stated. joint force will be smaller. military commitments in Iraq and the drawdown that is already under way in Afghanistan.S. Panetta added to his remarks saying the “U. Panetta also stated the requirement to the future force being able to regenerate and mobilize quickly.” But Army Aviation is starting this new phase in U. but gave a brief insight as to its contents during AUSA. the variety of training aircraft at Fort Rucker. the Army and Marines will no longer need to be sized to support the kind of large-scale. long-term stability operations that have dominated military priorities and force generation over the past decade. everyone in aviation needs to take an “appetite suppressant” for the journey ahead. and that it was a priority to maintain a strong National Guard. it is likely that Army Aviation will be reduced accordingly. Army Aviation commanders will be to maintain the quality. The first players in this development will have an opportunity to shape the design for the future—those coming to the table reluctantly at a later stage may be limited in their ability to influence such a program. measured against the overall capability of the force available.” By this he didn’t mean cutting capability.with the end of U. capability. trained and paid in line with the level of commitment expected of it in the future. one in Kuwait (still supporting the Iraq forces in spite of the heavy PR campaign emphasizing departure of all troops from that country) and one in South Korea. It is well on the way to modernizing its entire fleet—with the exception of the Kiowa Warrior and the oldest fleet in the books. global defense strategy from a position of strength. but having what was required to get the job done in a balanced way. He will release his Vision 2030 paper and campaign plan for the future. he said. Gen. But the “elephant in the room” is the government’s declared commitment to cutting $487 billion from defense spending in the next decade. Anthony Crutchfield stated during his opening address at the recent AUSA Institute of Land Warfare (ILW) aviation conference. Six CABs are currently committed globally: four in Afghanistan.” Finally. C O M . In the case of the Guard.. So better for the Army. remember. this is why the Joint Multi-Role (JMR) aircraft is—this time—unlikely to go away. it will continue to take its share of front line duties. Joint equipment programs are going to increasingly appeal to DoD financiers because a shared platform across different forces equates to reductions in not only procurement but also through-life ownership costs.” So if there is a reduction in ground force numbers. while possible at times in Afghanistan. “the last 10 years of war are not the blueprint for the next war. particularly in terms of pre-deployment training with regular units. carrying out the same tasks and missions as its regular colleagues. In short. R O T O R A N D W I N G .S. there won’t be any more Comanches.S. Ala. “We need to sustain the active reserve when the Army is not at war.” So joint is also in. volume and performance of the force it has built up since the windfall in spending following the cancellation of the Comanche program. the Marines.MILITARY | COMBAT Military Insider By Andrew Drwiega The Challenge to be Good Enough W ith Afghanistan already in the drawdown stages in the minds of politicians. As its commander Maj. Many have stated in recent times that it’s still not at a level that will be required. If. We need to know what our advisories can exploit in our current equipment.. It is also well into the process of constituting its 13th Combat Aviation Brigade (CAB)—getting it through the budgetary door before it slams shut.S. the Air Force and the Navy to have their share of JMR aircraft rather than lose out by not participating—then have no option further down the road. Tenn. may not be possible next time around. unmanned aerial systems (UAS) and Special Forces. On-the-job training.

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