You are on page 1of 16

www.hopewellsun.

com
JULY 25-31, 2012
FREE
Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-15
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Pool drowning
Man drowns at Hopewell
residence. PAGE 2
HEATHER FIORE/The Hopewell Sun
The new turf fields construction continues
to unfold at Hopewell Valley Central High
School, and is set to be finished by early
September.
BY HEATHER FIORE
The Hopewell Sun
On July 5, the Recreation Foundation
of Hopewell Valley held a ground-break-
ing ceremony for the new turf field that is
in its beginning stages of construction at
Hopewell Valley Central High School
(CHS).
Trustee of the Recreation Foundation
Sheryl Stone hosted the event, which
drew about 75 people, including all of the
supporters who helped raise almost $1
million to fund this community-based
project.
I know for a number of years theres
been some discussion about having a turf
field, Principal of Hopewell Valley CHS
Mike Daher said. Probably everyone
here, at one time or another, it crossed
your mind that it was never going to hap-
pen, including me. And, I know we all
probably thought that except for Sheryl
Stone; she probably never thought that
Breaking
ground
Construction begins on new turf field
please see CEREMONY, page 10
2 THE HOPEWELL SUN JULY 25-31, 2012
Coupon must be presented at time of
purchase. *Additional parts & labor in
excess of one hour will be billed at our
scheduled rates. One coupon per cus-
tomer / per household. Expires 8/31/12.
Coupon must be presented at time of
purchase. Not accepted at time of instal-
lation. Not valid with any other discounts,
repairs or prior purchases. One coupon
per customer / per household. Coupon
has no cash value. Expires 8/31/12.
Coupon must be presented at time of
purchase. Not accepted at time of instal-
lation. Not valid with any other discounts,
repairs or prior purchases. One coupon
per customer / per household. Coupon
has no cash value. Expires 8/31/12.

Pennington Shopping Center Route 31 South, Pennington


609-737-7338 www.B4NCLwBRkSHLRCLR.CBH
new
location
Ballet
*
Tap
*
Jazz
Tapping Tots
*
Modern
Lyrical
*
Hip Hop
Pre-School
*
Adult
RLBlS1LR NBw
FBR 1BL F4LL
Come Dance With Us!
A 21-year-old man drowned at a
Hopewell Township residence, po-
lice said.
On July 14 at 2:50 a.m., a 21-
year-old man of Creek Rim Drive
in the Forrest Blend section of
Hopewell Township had several
people over to the house with an
in-ground swimming pool. The
pool is approximately 8-feet deep
at the deepest section.
The victim was last seen swim-
ming in the pool by himself ap-
proximately 30 minutes prior to
being discovered, according to
township police.
A 21-year-old man, a friend, dis-
covered the victim at the bottom
of the pool and pulled him from
the deep end. A 9-1-1 call was
placed via cell phone and received
by Bucks County Communica-
tions.
The call was routed to Mercer
County emergency services (Life
Com) where police and EMS were
immediately dispatched. Union
Fire and Rescue Squad responded
along with the Hopewell Town-
ship Police.
Hopewell Township Police
were the first to arrive and CPR
was in progress. Officers contin-
ued CPR and the victim was
transported to Capital Health Sys-
tems Hopewell Campus by Union
Fire and Rescue Squad. The vic-
tim died at approximately 4 a.m.
at the hospital.
Hopewell Township Police are
investigating the incident to de-
termine the cause. It is believed
the victim could swim at the time
of the incident.
The incident remains under in-
vestigation by Officer Joseph Mc-
Neil and Detective Michael Sher-
man of the Hopewell Township
Police Department. The Mercer
County Prosecutors and Medical
Examiners offices have been noti-
fied as well.
Man drowns in pool
at township residence
JULY 25-31, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 3
Now Enrolling For Fall
Richard Eakins, Reverse Mortgage Loan Officer NMLS#523001
908-672-3320 cell 888-519-7677 ext 5850
reakins@1stconstitution.com
86 East Broad Street Hopewell, NJ 08525
(609) 466-2100 www.1stconstitution.com
Branch Hours:
Mon-Thu 8:30am-5pm
Fri 8:30am-6pm
Sat 9am-1pm
New Lower-Cost FHA
Saver Reverse Mortgages
Now Available At
We know that seniors are cost conscious and now you can save thousands of
dollars with an FHA Home Equity Conversion Mortgage (HECM) Saver
Reverse Mortgage.
Come in or call and get the facts.
The HECM Saver virtually eliminates the initial mortgage insurance
premiumsaving you thousands
We now have a fixed rate HECM Saver that eliminates the origination fee!
Why pay more? Come in and check out the HECM Savers
and save twice with our lowest cost reverse mortgage!
BY HEATHER FIORE
The Hopewell Sun
Hopewell Townships Commit-
tee held a special meeting on July
16 to talk about its future plans
for sewer capacity at the afford-
able housing units located off of
Denow Road The Hamptons in
Pennington.
Originally, the Ewing-
Lawrence Sewerage Authority
(ELSA) was to provide capacity to
the 19-unit residential unit at a
rate of $45 per gallon for a maxi-
mum of 267,000 gallons per day.
However, in May, the residents
of Hopewell voted down the $4.1
bond ordinance to approve the
move, which would have raised
taxes.
Now, the township is trying to
figure out whats next.
There were many suggestions
that were given at the meeting, in-
cluding alternative wastewater
technology sources.
Although Mayor Michael
Markulec mentioned creating a
package plant on a piece of
Hopewell Townships useable
land or installing sewer lines,
members of local environmental
organizations and of the public
suggested otherwise.
Executive Director of the
Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed
Association Jim Waltman intro-
duced the idea of alternative
technology sources that have
been implemented and executed
in various other areas to conserve
energy and resources. He specifi-
cally noted how Hopewell Town-
ship could create an artificial wet-
land, which is better and more en-
vironmentally-friendly than
bringing in sewer lines.
There are basically three
steps in the treatment, he said.
The first two steps have a liner
so that theres no water thats per-
colating down into the aquifer,
and beyond that liner, you have a
layer of gravel and soil through
which wetland plants are grow-
ing. You move the water through
the liner and the wetland plants
and roots, and the microbes that
grow on plants and in root zone
actually treat the wastewater. The
last stage, where the remaining
water that should be cleaner than
what comes out of a normal sep-
tic system, is where that water
percolates down through and into
the aquifer.
Chief Executive Officer of Nat-
ural Systems Utilities Ed Clerico
also spoke about his company
Meeting looks at options for sewer capacity
Initial plan for affordable housing units was voted down in May
please see OPTION, page 9
4 THE HOPEWELL SUN JULY 25-31, 2012
FBBB BSTImATBSI
NO mONBY DOWN
0 FINANCINO
ASH FOB DBTAILS.
www.tricountyexteriors.com
ug to
10 OFF
Any roof or siding repair
With this coupon. Not valid with other offers or prior services.
609-882-S800
BOOF LBAHINO?
ug to
$2S0 OFF
Any complete roofing or siding job
With this coupon. Not valid with other offers or prior services.
FREE
Roof Accessories
with every roof!
Ask for detaiIs!
FREE
Gutter CIeaning
with every roof!
Lic.# 13VH06774500
609-882-S800
BOOF LBAHINO?
WE CAN REPAIR IT!
"We'll fix your drip in just one trip!"
Did you know
Crooked Teeth can cause
Tooth Decay
& Periodontal Disease?
Ask us how you can
Save $500 with Invisalign
(wireless teeth straightening)
QuaIity Dentistry with a GentIe Touch
7 Tree Farm Road, Suite 200, Pennington, NJ
609.818.9797
drvagnozzibucci.com
Blue Moon Acres grand open-
ing of its farm market, the Blue
Moon Acres Farm Market, is on
Saturday, Aug. 4, from noon to 4
p.m. at its Pennington farm locat-
ed at 11 Willow Creek Drive in
Pennington just off Route 31 by
Rosedale Mills. The market will
provide quality, locally produced
goods to the community.
There will be live music, pizza
from the Nomad Pizza Truck,
wine tastings from Unionville
Vineyards, kids games, beer sam-
ples from Triumph Brewing Co.,
a cooking demonstration by Chef
Will of Brother's Moon, and an
opportunity to meet the folks who
are growing the Certified Organic
produce in our fields, as well the
makers of some goods they carry
in store.
The ABCs of exercise, a dia-
betes series, will be held from 2 to
3 p.m. on Thursday Aug. 2 at the
Novo Nordisk Diabetes Family
Resource Room at Capital
Health Medical Center in Pen-
nington.
Learn about starting an exer-
cise program, the importance of
warm-up and cool-down and also,
self monitoring during exercise
from Jack Stolte, exercise physiol-
ogist.
Call (609) 537-7081 to register.
Farm market opens Aug. 4
Diabetes series on Aug. 2
Parents Anonymous/Family Helpline
(800) 843-5437
PSA
JULY 25-31, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 5
2/1 SPECIAL
Bring in 2 Pieces Of Dry Cleaning,
Get 1 Shirt Laundered For FREE
With this coupon. Not valid with any other
offers or prior services. Exp. 7/31/12.
25% OFF
Household Items
With this coupon. Not valid with any other
offers or prior services. Exp. 7/31/12.
20% OFF
Repairs
With this coupon. Not valid with any other
offers or prior services. Exp. 7/31/12.
Theyre back!
SUMMER SAVINGS!
CALL 609-737-3373
Or email us at service@craftpennington.com
Pennington Market Shopping Center 25 Route 31 South, Pennington
Tailor On Premises Suedes and Leathers Wedding Gown Specialists (Cleaning and Preservations)
Fast and Friendly Service Same-Day Dry Cleaning Senior Citizen Discount: 15% Off Any Dry Cleaning
Shoe Repair
SmaII Rug CIeaning
Up to 6' x 9'
Not valid on landscaping services or
any bulk products. Cannot be com-
bined with any other offers. Expires
8/31/12. Cash and carry only.
Not valid on landscaping services or
any bulk products. Cannot be com-
bined with any other offers. Expires
8/31/12. Cash and carry only.
Not valid on landscaping services.
Cannot be combined with any other
offers. Expires 8/31/12.
Cash and carry only.
$S off
Any purchasc
of $S0 or morc
lANDSCAPf lNSTAllATlON & RfNOVATlON:
PATlOS - WAlkWAYS - RfTAlNlNG WAllS - ClfAN-UPS - MUlCHlNG

All NURSfRY STOCk


Mix & Match - 3 GaIIon

PfRfNNlAlS
Mix & Match
(reg. $22.95-26.95)
$40 off
Any purchasc
of $200 or morc
20% off
AII
Pottcd Trccs
10 WOOSAMONSA RD. - PfNNlNGTON
WWW.]ACkSNURSfRYANDlANDSCAPlNG.COM
Grccnhousc & farm
609-737-0224

oooa/s Vaoyoy as/c/s


-o/ca/s v/ao/c-s
police report
The following reports are on
file with the Hopewell Township
Police Department:
On July 8 at 11:13 p.m., Officer
George Sabatino responded to a
burglar alarm at the Pennington
Exxon Gas Station. Officer
Sabatino arrived and found that
someone had entered the busi-
ness and removed money from
the cash register and a safe. The
loss was estimated at over $4,000.
Detective Kevin Zorn is assisting
with this investigation.
On July 5 at 11 a.m., Officer
Mandy Grey observed a car trav-
eling at 44 mph in a 25 mph zone
along Princeton Avenue. Officer
Grey stopped the car and spoke
with the driver, a 20-year-old fe-
male, who had the odor of alcohol
on her breath. After performing
field sobriety tests, she was
placed under arrest and trans-
ported to police headquarters for
processing. She was charged with
underage DWI, reckless driving,
speeding and failure to maintain
lane. She was later released to an
acquaintance and her case will be
heard in municipal court.
On July 9 at 1:15 a.m., Officer
Gerard Infantino observed a car
traveling along Pennington Road
with an obstructed license plate.
A computer check revealed that
the registered owners drivers li-
cense was suspended and that
there was also an arrest warrant
out of Florence Township. Officer
Infantino stopped the car and
spoke with the driver, a 40-year-
old female, who was the regis-
tered owner of the car. She was
placed under arrest and trans-
ported to police headquarters for
processing. She was charged with
unclear plates and driving while
suspended which will be heard in
municipal court. She was later re-
leased after posting bail on the
outstanding warrant.
please see POLICE, page 11
6 THE HOPEWELL SUN JULY 25-31, 2012
20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A
Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A,
Princeton, NJ 08542. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08560, 08525 and
08534 ZIP codes. If you are not on the mail-
ing list, six-month subscriptions are avail-
able for $39.99. PDFs of the publication are
online, free of charge. For information,
please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@hopewellsun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@hopewellsun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers. Brief
and to the point is best, so we look for letters
that are 300 words or fewer. Include your
name, address and phone number. We do not
print anonymous letters. Send letters to
news@hopewellsun.com, via fax at 609-751-
0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can drop
them off at our office, too. The Hopewell Sun
reserves the right to reprint your letter in any
medium including electronically.
PUBLISHER Steve Miller
GENERAL MANAGER & EDITOR Alan Bauer
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Joe Eisele
NEWS
MANAGING EDITOR, NEWS Kevin Canessa Jr.
MANAGING EDITOR, PRODUCTION Mary L. Serkalow
HOPEWELL EDITOR Heather Fiore
OPERATIONS
DIGITAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Tim Ronaldson
ART DIRECTOR Tom Engle
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Barry Rubens
VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Dan McDonough, Jr.
VICE CHAIRMAN Alan Bauer
M
egans Law was, if anything,
an extremely forward-think-
ing way of ensuring that
convicted sex offenders were easily
identifiable wherever they might live
after spending time locked away. Now,
if one state senator has his way, sex of-
fenders would not only have to register
their residential locations, theyd also
be required to identify themselves as
convicted sex offenders on social-
media websites such as Facebook.
We applaud this bill, and hope it ulti-
mately winds up on the governors
desk to be signed into law.
In addition to having to publicly dis-
close sex-offense convictions, the bill,
sponsored by state Sen. Kip Bateman,
R-Somerset, would also require offend-
ers to list, on their public profiles,
home addresses, where crimes took
place and a self description.
While there will be some who say a
bill such as this one goes too far and
is an invasion of privacy we believe
its for the best.
Far too often, we hear stories of sex-
ual predators who use the Internet to
prey on the vulnerabilities of young
people.
A few years ago, the Dateline NBC
specials To Catch a Predator re-
vealed just how many people used the
Internet to set up what they believed
were trysts with young people.
The penalties for failing to comply
with the proposed law are swift, as
well. A sex offender caught with a pub-
lic profile that doesnt identify a
Megans Law status would carry with
it a potential fine of $10,000 and up to a
year-and-a-half in prison.
A similar law was adopted in
Louisiana recently.
We commend Bateman for propos-
ing this bill. And we hope other states
take notice and enact similar legisla-
tion. There is no doubt that by having a
law such as this one on the books, pred-
ators will think twice about preying
upon the young.
And the children of our state will be
that much safer because of it.
in our opinion
Taking Megans Law to Facebook
State Senate bill would require sex offenders to self-ID on social-networking sites
Is the proposed law
too invasive?
A bill proposed by state Sen. Kip
Bateman, R-Somerset, would require
convicted sex offenders to identify
themselves, as such, on social-network-
ing websites. Would such a law be fair?
Special to The Sun
The Hopewell 12U District A team
was runner-up in the recent District 1
tournament losing a heartbreaker to
Upper Freehold in the championship
game 7-6. Both teams will be repre-
senting District 1 in the Southern
States tournament that started on
July 11 hosted by Brick American. The
highlight of the district tournament
was when Hopewell defeated Mont-
gomery, the defending southern state
champs, 10-1, and sent them home.
The team is comprised of: front row,
Max Brass, Adam Wijaya, Michael
Savas, Sean OBrien, Andy Blake and
Sam Margulis; middle row, Robbie
Wiley, Nick Psomaris, Jack Kandell,
Cole Hare, Jake Tobia and Dom Gam-
bino; back row coach Al Kandell, man-
ager Joe Gambino, coach Chris Tobia
and coach John Savas.
Hopewell team finishes runner-up in tournament
JULY 25-31, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 7

AsphaIt Paving

Concrete & Brick Pavers

Septic, Drainage and Grading

BeIgium BIock Curbing

CommerciaI and ResidentiaI

Project Management Services


WEST WIXBSBR 09180220
37 W. Broad Street
Hopewell, NJ 08525
(609) 466-8200
FEATURING:
Rojo's Roastery Coffee and Terra
Momo Breads & Pastries
Free Wi Fi
Serving Breakfast,
Lunch and
Afternoon Tea
Tue-Fri 7AM-6PM Sat and Sun 9AM-6PM
TEA HOUSE AND CAF
Come see our new
menu additions!
Private room
available for parties
facebook.com/painttherosestearoom
Singers from the Princeton
area and Bucks County, Pa., are
invited to join VOICES Chorale
for an informal reading of vari-
ous Christmas carols and an-
thems on Wednesday, Aug. 1, at
7:30 p.m. at the Music Together
Community Room located at 225
Pennington-Hopewell Road (Rt.
654) in Hopewell.
Conductors will be Lyn Ran-
som, VOICES Music Director, An-
drew Monath, VOICES Associate-
Conductor, Paul Chapin, vocal
music teacher at Riverside Ele-
mentary School in Princeton, and
Janice Chapin, choir director at
West Windsor-Plainsboro HS.
Camilla Jarnot will accompany at
the piano. Scores will be provided.
Following the songs, an old-
fashioned ice-cream social will be
provided with fresh fruit and ice
cream. There is a suggested dona-
tion of $10 at the door.
Singers interested in joining
VOICES Chorale in the fall for its
25th Anniversary season should
contact Sandy Duffy, membership
chair at (609) 799-2211, or write to
auditions@VOICESChorale.org
to schedule an audition before or
after the sing. The audition is in-
formal and conducted in a friend-
ly atmosphere.
The 2012-2013 concert season
includes Christmastide: Choral
Gems from the Past 500 Years in
December; The Year 1887 in
March, with works by Brahms,
Debussy, and Gilbert & Sullivan
premiered in that year; Anniver-
saries Time Passing, Time
Standing Still with the Prince-
ton Area Homeschool Choir in
May, with music by Michael Tip-
pett, Randall Thompson, Stephen
Chatman; a 25th Anniversary
Gala event in June to close the
season.
Rehearsals are held on Monday
evenings from 7:30 to 9:45 p.m. at
Music Together in Hopewell and
will start again on Sept. 10.
VOICES Chorale, an audi-
tioned chorus with more than 60
members from New Jersey and
Pennsylvania, was founded in
1992 to provide outstanding per-
formance opportunities for com-
munity singers.
For further information on
VOICES Chorale, please visit
www.VOICESChorale.org, or sub-
scribe to VOICES Newsletter at
www.enewsarchive.com/VOICES.
Christmas carols planned for Aug. 1
WEDNESDAY JULY 25
Movies for Adults: 1:30 to 3:45 p.m.
and 6:15 to 8:30 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch Library. Watch J. Edgar,
starring Leonardo DiCaprio and
Naomi Watts. Rated R.
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 11 to 11:45 a.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Action
rhymes, songs and felt board
activities. Age-appropriate craft
follows story time. Parental
supervision required.
PJ Story Time: Ages 2 to 5. Siblings
welcome. 7 to 7:45 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Introduce
children to best age-appropriate
stories in childrens literature.
Action rhymes, songs and felt
board activities are part of the
program. Content of each story
time centers on a different
theme. Age-appropriate craft fol-
lows.
Bookworms Book Club: First to
third graders. 1 to 2 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Bring a
favorite book with the theme
outer space to share with the
group. Bring a lunch to eat during
the meeting. Registration
required.
Page Turners: Fourth to fifth
graders. 2 to 3 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. A different kind
of book club. Every week will read
aloud for the same book and then
work on an activity related to
what was read. Each week will get
further into the book. The book is
From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs.
Basil E. Frankweiler by E. L.
Konigsburg.
THURSDAY JULY 26
Create a Website Free and Easy:
7 to 8:15 p.m. at Hopewell Branch
Library. Using Google Sites you
can easily create and edit a web-
site for any organization or on
any topic of your choice. This
hands-on workshop includes an
overview and demonstration of
Google Sites, covering many of
the features available plus some
tips to create a user-friendly web-
site. You are encouraged to bring
your own laptop to follow along
using the librarys wireless net-
work. A limited number of laptops
may be reserved at the time of
sign up. Registration requested.
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 11 a.m. to noon at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Action
rhymes, songs and felt board
activities. Age-appropriate craft
follows story time. Parental
supervision required.
Toddler Rock: Ages 18 months to 3.
10 to 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Singing, dancing
ad rhymes. Play with musical
instruments, puppets, parachutes
and more.
Super Scientists: First to third
grade. 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Each
week focuses on a different
experiment to explain the world.
This week is Simple Machines:
Use an Inclined Plane to Make Ice
Cream. Registration required.
Game Night: Third grade and older.
6 to 7 p.m. at Hopewell Branch of
the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Play board games, listen to
music and enjoy some snacks.
Feel free to bring favorite board
games and friends!
Jr. Game Night: Kindergarten to
second grade. 7 to 8 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Board
games, group games and snacks.
Feel free to bring a favorite board
game or some friends!
Teen Game Night: Ages 12 and old-
er. 7 to 8 p.m. at Hopewell Branch
of the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Magic the Gathering, Set-
tlers of Catan, Pokemon, Chess,
Poker and more! Play board
games, listen to music and enjoy
some snacks. Feel free to bring
favorite games and some friends!
Hopewell Township Planning Board
meeting: 7:30 p.m. the fourth
Thursday of the month in the
Municipal Auditorium. For more
information visit hopewelltwp. org.
SUNDAY JULY 29
Hopewell Presbyterian Church:
Worship service at 10:30 a.m.
Intergenerational Sunday School
from 9 to 10:15 a.m. Coffee fellow-
ship from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
80 West Broad St., Hopewell.
Hopewell United Methodist
Church: Worship service at 10
a.m. Teen/adult education from 9
to 9:45 a.m. Sunday school at 10
a.m. Youth group at 6:30 p.m. 20
Blackwell Ave., Hopewell.
St. Alphonsus Roman Catholic
Church: Mass at 7:30, 9 and 11:15
a.m. 54 East Prospect St., Hopewell.
Word Christian Fellowship Interna-
tional: Worship service at 10 a.m.
Sunday school at 10:30 a.m. 44
Van Dyke Road, Hopewell.
MONDAY JULY 30
Yoga: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Bring yoga mat
or large towel. Registration
required; call (609) 737-2610.
Tai Chi: 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Learn
this ancient art to promote good
health and relaxation. No regis-
tration required.
nineAbove Craft Time: Ages 9 and
older. 6 to 7 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Make a cool craft
project every week. Registration
required.
Story time: 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell
Public Library. For toddlers and
pre-schoolers. Stories, songs and
fingerplays. Registration is not
required.
TUESDAY JULY 31
Tuesday Night Knitters: 7:30 to 9
p.m. at Hopewell Public Library.
Welcomes knitters of all levels. A
cozy evening of stitching and
conversation.
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 2 to 3 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Action rhymes,
songs and felt board activities.
Age-appropriate craft follows sto-
ry time. Parental supervision
required.
Baby Time: Ages birth to 2. 11 to
11:30 a.m. Adult supervision
required. This program is a great
way to introduce children to
library story times and reading.
Age appropriate books are
shared with the group. Songs,
nursery rhymes, puppets, and felt
board figures create a rich audio-
visual and social experience.
After about 20 minutes of struc-
tured group time, there is time
for play and for socializing.
Glow Party: All ages. 7:30 to 8:30
p.m. at Hopewell Branch Library.
An outside campfire with stories
and snacks and glow-in-the-dark
games. This is a closing party to
celebrate everyone who has read
during the summer. Inside activi-
ties planned in case of rain.
CALENDAR PAGE 8 JULY 25-31, 2012
Passenger Tires
Performance Tires
Truck & SUV Tires
Always the BEST PRICE!
No coupons needed!
Commercial
Lawn & Garden
Heavy Equipment
Tractor Tires
Bob-Cats
Vogue Tires & More!
1735 North Olden Extension

Ewing, NJ
609-895-8811 HOURS: Mon-Fri 7:30am-5pm Sat 8am-Noon
With us your price doesnt change! Price includes tire balance, valves, etc
Wholesale Tires Open to The Public
WHERE HONESTY AND INTEGRITY COMES FIRST!
Tire mounting on premises.
All major and minor brands.
38d robb|nsv|||e
a||entown rd
robb|nsv|||e, nj 08691
609.208.3028
Expires July 31, 2012.
P|ease schedu|e an appo|ntment w|th Jena our sk|ncare spec|a||st.
Now offers a var|ety of sk|ncare serv|ces featur|ng:
Darph|n Products
D|amond Tome M|crodermabras|on
Hydro Wand Treatments
Oustom Fac|a| 1 hour $50 ($90 va|ue}
Braz|||an B|k|n| Wax $30 ($50 va|ue}
Jena
JULY 25-31, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 9
JERSEY
Sweet Cozn Tomatoes
Peaches MeIons
216 Pennington-Lawrenceville Road Pennington, NJ
609-737-6502
www.littleacresfarmmarket.com
Hours
Mon-Fri 10-6:30
Sat 10-6 Sun 10-5
Growing quality produce since 1988
More Veggies, Fruits and Fresh Baked Pies
1666 Hamilton Ave.
Hamilton, NJ 08629
609-584-5252
www.priornami.com
Its not too early for Back-To-School supplies!
15% OFF
CARRYING CASE
WITH PURCHASE OF ANY
LAPTOP OR TABLET
FREE
LAPTOP TUNE-UP
Tune-up Includes:
Full Scan of Virus, Malware & Spyware
Install all Microsoft updates & security patches
Hard drive integrity scan
and its projects, and how hes
worked with several towns in
New Jersey and other states to
help them find ways to imple-
ment alternative resource man-
agement.
Clerico mentioned several al-
ternative approaches to creating
a sewerage infrastructure for The
Hamptons, which included dis-
tributed and soft path ap-
proaches, groundwater recharge
and natural systems.
The distributed approach en-
tails spreading out water accord-
ing to the development of the
community to easily manage it,
keeping with what nature would
typically do, as opposed to gather-
ing it in one place.
One of the soft path ap-
proaches was using wetlands,
which Clerico explained. You can
create an artificial wetland,
which uses a liner so that the
water passes through the stones
and roots and is treated by natu-
ral microbiology.
Essentially, when you see one,
you think youre going to be walk-
ing upon a wetland, but then its
dry, he said. But, down under-
neath is where the water is con-
tained to support the vegetative
growth.
Clerico further explained that
the depth varies with each site,
because of the different soils that
each plot of land in New Jersey
houses, but theyre usually four
to five feet deep.
The practice of groundwater
recharge involves ground water
water below plants roots being
recharged through a routed sys-
tem so it essentially mimics na-
tures water cycle.
Lastly, Clerico explained a nat-
ural system, which is more cost-
effective than building another
infrastructure or installing sewer
lines.
The cost is about the same or
comparable with a package
plant, he said. Using a natural
system might not cost less at the
outset, but it costs much less over
the life cycle of the system be-
cause its using much less energy
and much less labor to maintain.
Overall, Clerico volunteered to
work with Hopewell in devising a
plan, and suggested that it look
into one of these methods. He ex-
plained how there are alternative
means of funding systems like
these, and how they last for near-
ly 50 years.
Leader of Citizens for Tax
Choice the group that petitioned
against the ELSA referendum
and ultimately defeated it
Robert Kecskes added to Clericos
comments and stated how there
are plenty of alternatives op-
posed to using ELSA.
I think that some people on
the committee may have it nar-
rowed down to ELSA or wet-
lands, he said. I would say look
at it further and a bit deeper. But,
here are some types of options
that you may want to think about
including spray irrigation. There
are people out there who are pay-
ing $5 for 1,000 gallons to spray
water, and it only costs $8 to treat
water. Maybe you could sell some
of this water to people. Theres
also using gray water systems.
Let some of these neighborhoods
continue to use their septic sys-
tems for gray water, and send the
dark water to wetlands or spray
irrigation. If youre going to
recharge the wetlands, you may
not need to bring in other water
now. So, 25 to 30 percent of that
cost could be offset.
After much discussion about
the alternatives, Markulec sug-
gested forming a working group
of experts to research all of the
alternatives, and provide the com-
munity and committee members
with more extensive information.
Committee members and the resi-
dents attending all agreed, and
concluded that it should contain
some members of the Affordable
Housing Committee, Planning
Board, the Green Team, Environ-
mental Commission, professional
consultants, and other local busi-
ness experts such as Waltman
and Clerico.
The group, which will be
known as the Wastewater Alter-
native Group (WAG) at the sug-
gestion of Committee member
Vanessa Sandom, will consist of
eight to 12 people. According to
Markulec, they will be given 90
days an accelerated timeline
to devise an analysis and present
it to the committee and public for
review.
From my perspective, this is
going to be a process, Markulec
said. Were going to get to a part
where were going to have diffi-
cult discussions. I dont think
weve solved anything here
tonight, but hopefully weve taken
the first couple steps in the right
direction toward the solution.
OPTION
Continued from page 3
Option of a natural system would
be more cost-effective, says Clerico
CALL US 856.697.8222 Ext. 308 / 609-915-9500 (C)
Well answer your questions and help you develop a plan that works around your budget.
Rodney Newman, RegionaI SaIes Manager
ASC SoIar SoIutions / Muccio EIectric RNewman@ascsoIar.com
NJ HIC# 13VHO5234500 / PA HIC# 059553
948 Harding Highway Buena, New Jersey 08310
ASC Solar Solutions
Take advantage of a solar PV system for $ 0 down,
No installation fee and PAY LESS than you currently
pay the utility for the next 20 years
Become Energy independent
even for a second. But if you look
not that far behind me, its truly
happening.
Although the construction of
the field has already begun, the
purpose of the ceremony was to
formally recognize the strenuous
efforts of all of the parties in-
volved in this project over the last
year.
At the fields site, Stone organ-
ized a grand scenario for a
groundbreaking ceremony, which
included a two-foot golden bull-
dog statue (the mascot of
Hopewell Valley CHS), a table
with all of the information re-
garding the field, a proposed lay-
out and picture of what the field
is expected to look like, and a
podium for donor speeches.
This is so exciting, she said.
When we were preparing the in-
vitation for this afternoons cele-
bration, my instinct was to in-
clude a line that said, Bring your
shovel, because I know we would
not be here today without each
one of you.
By each one you, Stone is re-
ferring to over 40 more than busi-
nesses, organizations and individ-
uals that helped either raise
funds or donate materials and
time to make this community-
wide venture possible.
To honor these dignitaries,
Stone had a selection of
Hopewells student athletes ac-
companied by four golden shovels
to symbolize each of the major
contributors. Each of the shovels
represented the Recreation Foun-
dation, the Hopewell Valley Re-
gional School District, major fi-
nancial contributors and in-kind
contributors.
Representatives from the
Recreation Foundation included
President of the Hopewell Valley
Soccer Association Brian Barr
and President of Hopewell Valley
Lacrosse Steve Faber, whose or-
ganizations collectively con-
tributed $250,000.
Representatives from the
Hopewell Valley Regional School
District and the Hopewell Town-
ship Committee included Super-
intendent Dr. Thomas Smith,
President of the Board of Educa-
tion Lisa Wolff, Hopewell Town-
ship Mayor Michael Markulec,
Committee member Allen Can-
non and Township Administrator
and Engineer Paul Pogorzelski.
The major financial contribu-
tors included owner of The Front
Porch Chris Murphy, Chairman
of the Hopewell Valley Communi-
ty Bank Pat Ryan, and President
Jim Hyman, who each donated
$25,000. The donations will be per-
manently recognized on the
field.
The in-kind contributors,
which represent more than
$600,000 of the $1 million raised,
included Secretary/Treasurer of
Trap Rock Industries George
Conway, who donated $140,000 of
stone and paving materials; Presi-
dent and CEO of IEW Construc-
tion Group Chip Grundy; and
owner of Ackerson Contracting,
Inc. Mike Ackerson, who is the
general contractor that is essen-
tially making this field come to
life, and who is also donating
more than $400,000 of time, equip-
ment, energy and expertise.
Whatever problems or chal-
lenges crop up, Mike seems to be
able to find a solution by making
a call or just taking on more work
himself, Stone said. With the
townships support, Mike is able
to work his regular job from 7
a.m. until 3 p.m., and then come
and work here until 9 p.m. and all
weekend.
Aside from the donations that
were already collected, Robert
Coleman from the Hopewell Val-
ley CHS GridIron Club also pre-
sented a $25,000 donation check to
Stone and the Recreation Founda-
tion at the ceremony.
We made a pledge about a
year ago for this, because we
think its a great opportunity for
all sports, Coleman said. We re-
ally wanted to thank the commu-
nity who really supports us in all
of our fundraising, attending the
games, buying our concessions
and everything we do.
Stone also explained that the
Recreation Foundation is within
$20,000 of the $1 million it set out
to raise in June 2011.
With continued community
support and your enthusiasm and
endorsement, we hope to com-
plete this phase of fundraising by
the time our field is complete, and
Im sure that will happen, she
said.
Stone noted how this project
wouldnt have been possible with-
out the help of every individual
involved.
It has just all come together
like a puzzle, really, she said.
We couldnt have done it without
each piece happening, so its real-
ly a true community project.
Since Ackersons predicted
completion date is Sept. 8, just in
time for the first sports game of
the season, the turf for the field
should be arriving between Aug.
13 and 20.
This is a Cadillac turf, repre-
sentative from AstroTurf Dan
Driscoll said. We do not do this
program to put down an economi-
cal turf. This turf is the premier
product in the industry, and thats
what you guys paid for.
10 THE HOPEWELL SUN JULY 25-31, 2012
NOT ENOUGH TIME
to watch your child play soccer and list
your baseball cards in an online auction?
We can help.
www.NoStressSales.com
(609) 792-0606
Skip the hassle. Just get paid.
Wilson-Apple Funeral Home Wilson-Apple Funeral Home
zaco reiiiicroi rob - reiiiicroi, iJ
rioie coo) vov-+=oe - www.wiLsoi==Le.co:
RobertA.Wilson,ManagerNJ Lic.No.2520 R.AsherWilson,Director,NJLic.No.3823
CEREMONY
Continued from page 1
Ceremony recognized efforts of all parties involved
Meredith Megaffin, a resident
of Hopewell, was named to the
School of Engineering 2012
spring honor roll at the Universi-
ty of Kansas.
Meredith Megaffin
makes honor roll
Visit us online at
www.hopewellsun.com
Poison Control Center
(800) 222-1222
PSA
On July 6 at 7:18 p.m., while
checking an unoccupied car, a
1998 Mercury, parked in the
Phillips Farm parking lot, Offi-
cer Christopher Vaccarino
smelled the odor of burnt mari-
juana coming from it. A short
time later Officer Vaccarino ob-
served the car exit the parking lot
and travel at a slow rate of speed
along Bear Tavern Road. Officer
Vaccarino stopped the car and
spoke with the driver, a 19-year-
old male, and a passenger, an 18-
year-old male. Officer Vaccarino
could again smell the odor of
burnt marijuana. The Mercury
was impounded and a search war-
rant was obtained. Over 50 grams
of marijuana, three glass pipes
and a bong with marijuana
residue, several packs of rolling
papers, a digital scale, a partially
consumed marijuana cigarette
and over $2,000 in cash was found
during the search of the car. The
driver was charged with the pos-
session of marijuana (over 50
grams), possession with the in-
tent to distribute CDS, possession
with the intent to distribute CDS
within 500 feet of a park, posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia, CDS
in a motor vehicle and obstruct-
ing traffic. The passenger was
charged with the possession of
marijuana (over 50 grams), pos-
session with the intent to distrib-
ute CDS, possession with the in-
tent to distribute CDS within 500
feet of a park, and possession of
drug paraphernalia. Both men
were processed at police head-
quarters on July 8 and were later
released. Their cases will be for-
warded to the Mercer County
Prosecutors Office for review.
On July 10 at 9:57 a.m., Officer
James Rosso responded to Route
546 near Independence Way for
the report of a one car motor ve-
hicle crash. Officer Rosso arrived
and found a car, a 2000 Subaru
Forrester, overturned in the road-
way. An investigation found that
the driver, a 29-year-old male, had
been traveling eastbound and
failed to negotiate a curve in the
roadway. The car left the roadway,
struck a utility pole, struck a tree
and then overturned. The driver
was treated on the scene by
Hopewell Valley Emergency Serv-
ices personnel for chest pain. He
was issued a summons for care-
less driving, which will be heard
in municipal court. Route 546 was
closed between Bear Tavern Road
and Jacobs Creek Road for ap-
proximately four hours while
PSE&G personnel replaced the
downed utility pole.
On July 8 at 9:12 p.m., Officer
Louis Vastola responded to the in-
tersection of Broad and Green-
wood for the report of a one car
motor vehicle crash. Officer Vas-
tola arrived and found a 2004 Mer-
cedes had crashed into a utility
pole and a traffic signal box. The
driver, a 50-year-old female, was
transported by the Hopewell First
Aid Squad to an area hospital
where she was admitted for chest
and leg injuries. She was charged
with DWI, reckless driving, fail-
ure to maintain lane and failure
to observe a traffic signal, which
will be heard in municipal court.
On July 13 at 12:50 p.m., Officer
Gerard Infantino responded to
Brandon Road West for the report
of criminal mischief. Sometime
between 6 p.m. on July 11 and 9
a.m. on July 12, someone dam-
aged two mailboxes along the
roadway. The damage was esti-
mated at $40.
On July 12 at 1 p.m., Officer
George Sabatino responded to a
Reed Road address for the report
of a burglary. Sometime between
12:30 p.m. and 1 p.m., someone en-
tered the home and removed
banking documents from the
home. It is believed that the
homeowner was distracted by a
thin male outside of the resi-
dence who was talking about cut-
ting a neighbors trees. During
this time, two other males who
had been with him, disappeared
from the homeowners sight.
Once the men left, the homeown-
er noticed items moved and some
banking documents missing from
within the house. The males may
have been driving a tan or white
SUV. An estimate of the loss was
unavailable. Detective Michael
Sherman is assisting with this in-
vestigation.
On July 14 at 9:52 a.m., Officer
Christopher Vaccarino stopped a
car along Route 29 after observing
a large crack in the windshield.
Officer Vaccarino spoke with the
driver, a 47-year-old male, who
was found to have a suspended
drivers license and outstanding
warrants out of Trenton and Rob-
binsville. A passenger, a 41-year-
old female, was also found to have
outstanding warrants out of
Trenton and Lawrence Township.
They were both placed under ar-
rest and transported to police
headquarters for processing. The
driver was charged with having a
cracked windshield and driving
while suspended, which will be
heard in municipal court. He was
later turned over to Robbinsville
Police on their outstanding war-
rant. The passenger was later
turned over to Trenton Police on
their outstanding warrant.
JULY 25-31, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 11
police report
POLICE
Continued from page 5
The following are statistics for
the month of June 2012:
Township
Officers responded to 56 motor
vehicle crashes; six of these
crashes involved deer.
461 traffic summonses were is-
sued and five DWI arrests were
made.
Officers investigated seven as-
saults, seven burglaries, 10 thefts,
seven domestic violence inci-
dents, seven CDS violations, six
criminal mischief incidents, 10
harassment incidents and one
trespassing complaint.
28 adult males, 12 adult fe-
males, and one juvenile female
were arrested.
Officers assisted with 70 ambu-
lance calls and 17 fire calls.
Officers responded to 83 alarm
calls. Officers investigated 16 sus-
picious occurrence calls and 40
suspicious car/person calls.
Borough
Officers responded to 3 motor
vehicle crashes.
78 traffic summonses were
issued and 1 DWI arrest was
made.
Officers investigated three
thefts, two domestic violence inci-
dents, one criminal mischief inci-
dent and one harassment inci-
dent.
Two adult males, two adult fe-
males, and six juvenile males
were arrested.
Officers assisted with four am-
bulance calls and three fire calls.
Officers responded to two
alarm calls. Officers investigated
two suspicious occurrence calls
and three suspicious car/person
calls.
Police release June statistics
Why choose P. Cooper Roofing and Siding?
30 Years Experience Family Owned and Operated High Quality Products Senior Citizen Discount
No High Pressure Sales Tactics Professional Installation
www.cooperroofing.com
Virtual Home
Remodeler
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 7/31/12.
$1,000 OFF
UP TO
Any new
complete roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 7/31/12.
10% OFF
UP TO
Any
roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 7/31/12.
FREE
ROOF AND
GUTTER
INSPECTION
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 7/31/12.
FREE
GUTTERS
With any new roof
and siding job
If your home comfort system is on the blink, help is on the way.
When your home comfort system isnt working, it seems help can't get there fast enough. But the good news is,
your local independent American Standard Heating & Air Conditioning dealer is close
by, with the training and expertise to fix nearly any make or model. And if it doesnt make
sense to fix your system one more time, youll get an honest opinion, and real solutions
from our reliable, efficient line of products. If you're uncomfortable, were on the way.
Lic #10199 Cont Lic #13VH01382900
classified
T HE HO P E WE L L S U N
JULY 25-31, 2012 PAGE 14
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 Add color to any box ad for $20. Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. Your Classified ad will run in all 10 of The Sun newspapers each week! Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE
ADS
Only
$
20per week
H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
Call us: 609-751-0245 or email us: classifieds@elauwitmedia.com
Hopewell Sun Lawrence Sun
Montgomery Sun Princeton Sun
Robbinsville Sun West Windsor Sun
CHECK OUT THE SUN CLASSIFIEDS!
BOX
ADS Only
$
25per week List a text-only ad for your yard
sale, job posting or merchandise.
Roofing
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 7/31/12.
$1,000 OFF
UP TO
Any new
complete roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 7/31/12.
10% OFF
UP TO
Any
roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 7/31/12.
FREE
ROOF AND
GUTTER
INSPECTION
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 7/31/12.
FREE
GUT TERS
With any new roof
and siding job
Virtual Home
Remodeler
www.tricountyexteriors.com
609-882-S800
BOOF LBAHINO?
WE CAN REPAIR IT!
"We'llfixyourdripinjustonetrip!"
Lic.#13VH06774500
WE OFFER:
NewShingleRoofsSeamlessGutters Skylights
SidingSlateRoofRepairsRubberRoofs
Windows&DoorsCappingSoffits
Licensed Insured ResidentiaI & CommerciaI
FBBB BSTImATBSI
NO mONBY DOWN
0 FINANCINO
ASH FOB DBTAILS.
TBI-CO0NTY BNTBBIOBS
CIeaning
MiIa's CIeaning Service
Reliable, Affordable
Free estimates
Call Mila
609-620-0849
Email:
mila.iaskevich@gmail.com
EIectricaI Services
Concrete Masonry
POOLS
New Rebuild Service
Open Close Liners
Paint Removals
Patios Decks
Call: 908-359-3000
Home Improvement
Concrete Repair
For a free estimate Call CSI
NJ License #13VH06184500
(856)381-0249
Absolutely all concrete problems solved
Cracks are our specialty.
Residential and Commercial Services
1oo pooped 1o scoop?
We provide weekly scooper service s1or1ing o1
$
I3/week
saving our planet, one pile at a time
856-665-6769
www.alldogspoop.com
GET $10.00 OFF YOUR FIRST SERVICE!
Locally owned and operated.
Pet Care
Wanted To Buy
UP TO $1100 CASH
For Cars or Trucks w|th bad
Eng|nes or Transm|ss|ons
$500 CASH For
Any Comp|ete Junk Car or Truck
W|th or W|thout T|t|e

2 MONTHS FREE
OMEGA
SELF STORAGE
300 Lawrence Station Road
Lawrenceville, NJ 08648
609-584-1133
Services
4 pc. bedroom set &
queen mattress set
tables, 2 pc. sofa bed
Great price & condition
609-613-3014
Furniture For SaIe
CLASSIFIED JULY 25-31, 2012 - THE HOPEWELL SUN 15
If youre reading your competitors ad?
Whos making money you or them?
Advertise with us!
Special Classified offers available.
Dont delay! Call today!
(856) 427-0933 x 512
INTO ACTION!
(609) 751-0245
Ocean City New Jerseys #1 Real Estate Team!
The Team You Can Trust!
Matt Bader
Cell 609-992-4380
Dale Collins
Cell 609-548-1539
Let the Bader-Collins Associates make all of your Ocean City
dreams come true! If you are thinking about BUYING, SELLING or
RENTING, contact us for exceptional service and professionalism.
3160 Asbury Avenue Ocean City, NJ 08226
Office: 609-399-0076 email: bca@bergerrealty.com
4337 Asbury Avenue
Rare south-end Asbury Ave sin-
gle family home. This gorgeous
home features 5 large bedrooms
3.5 baths. Located only 1 block
from the beach this home has it
all. Spacious describes the size
of this home. This home has
large deck spaces, 2 car garage,
plenty of parking, c/a, g/h, gran-
ite counter-tops, 2 living areas,
s/s appliances, comes fully fur-
nished and much much more!
Being Freshly painted!!
$999,990
Academic Success:
Tutoring
Certified K-12 Honors
Graduate
Over 25 years exp.
Caring,ndividualized
nstruction
SAT Reading, Writing,
Math, Subject Tests
ACT, All Standardized Tests
H.S. Eng. Lit. and Writing;
Math to Pre-Calc., History
Elem. Phonics, Reading,
Math; Study Skills; E.S.L.
Excellent Ref.
609-924-2610
Tutoring
2012 VCLVC S601S
Lease for 36 Months
SIGN & DkIVL
$
338
*
CUk NLIGn8CknCCD VCLVC DLALLkS
Closer Than You Think!
*Acquisition fee $995. No security deposit required. Available to qualified customers. Stock #12644. All prices with tax, tags, registration, acq. fees and documentation
fees additional. 36 month, 10,000 mile lease. Expires 7/31/12. MSRP $33,525. Total 4 Pay Max $1,800. Owner Loyalty included in example $1,000.
Volvo builds the cars, we build relationships.
VCLVC CI kINCL1CN
2931 U.S. 1 South
Lawrencev|||e, NI 08648
(609) 882-0600
8kIDGLWA1Lk VCLVC
1028 U.S. 22 Last
Somerv|||e, NI
(908) S26-7700
VCLVC CI LDISCN
842 U.S. 1 North
Ld|son, NI
(732) 248-0S00
VCLVCCCUN1k.CCM

WL WILL A
4 MCN1nS
1CWAkDS CUk
AMLN1S
*