You are on page 1of 5

Chemistry A2

Marlborough School

Scheme of Work
Chains, Rings and Spectroscopy

Autumn Term – Marlborough School

Syllabus Content
5.4.7 Spectroscopy

Content
• Review of appropriate material on infra-red spectroscopy from AS
Chemistry – Module 2812: Chains and Rings, 5.2.5(f).
• Mass spectrometry: molecular mass determination.
• n.m.r. spectroscopy: structure elucidation.

[In examinations, infra-red absorption data and n.m.r. chemical shift values
will be provided on the Data Sheet (Appendix G).]

Assessment outcomes
Candidates should be able to:

(a) use a simple infra-red spectrum to identify the presence of functional
groups in a molecule (limited to alcohols (O−H), carbonyl compounds (C=O),
carboxylic acids (COOH) and esters (COOR) (see also 5.2.5(f)).

(b) use the molecular ion peak in a mass spectrum to determine the relative
molecular mass of an organic molecule.

(c) predict, from the high resolution n.m.r. spectrum of a simple molecule
containing carbon, hydrogen and/or oxygen,
(i) the different types of proton present from chemical shift values;
(ii) the relative numbers of each type of proton present from the
relative peak area;
(iii) the number of protons adjacent to a given proton from the spin-spin
splitting pattern, limited to splitting patterns up to a quadruplet only.
(iv) possible structures for the molecule.

(d) predict the chemical shifts and splitting patterns of the protons in a given
molecule.

Background theory will not be tested on examination papers: the emphasis
is on the
interpretation of spectra. Thus, candidates will not be tested on why nuclear
magnetic
resonance takes place, the reasons for different chemical shift values or why
spin-spin
splitting occurs.
The relative peak areas will be given on any provided spectra.
For splitting patterns, the n + 1 rule can be used, where n is the number of H
atoms on
adjacent carbon atoms. Limited to singlet, doublet, triplet and quadruplet.

(e) describe the use of D2O to identify the n.m.r. signal from –OH groups.
Chains, Rings and Spectroscopy

Autumn Term - Marlborough School - Lesson Overview
W Lesson title Syllabus link Suggested Activities Homelearning
eek
1 IR (a) use a simple infra-red spectrum to identify the presence of Revision of previous work Analysis of IR spectra
functional groups in a molecule (limited to alcohols (O−H),
on IR spectroscopy. The questions
carbonyl compounds (C=O), carboxylic acids (COOH) and esters
(COOR) (see also 5.2.5(f)). use of this to predict
more complicated
patterns (detailed lesson
plan available)
2 Mass (b) use the molecular ion peak in a mass spectrum to determine Revision of Mass Mass spectrometer
the relative molecular mass of an organic molecule.
Spectroscopy spectroscopy and its use questions (taken from
to determine isotopic foundation)
mass. Explanation and
examples of how this is
used to calculate the
mass of an organic
molecule
3 NMR (c) predict, from the high resolution n.m.r. spectrum of a simple Introduction to Nmr and NMR identification
Spectroscopy molecule containing carbon, hydrogen and/or oxygen,
how the technique works, questions.
(i) the different types of proton present from chemical
shift values; analysis of low intensity
(ii) the relative numbers of each type of proton present traces.
from the relative peak area;
(iii) the number of protons adjacent to a given proton
from the spin-spin splitting pattern, limited to splitting
patterns up to a quadruplet only.
(iv) possible structures for the molecule.

(d) predict the chemical shifts and splitting patterns of the
protons in a given molecule.

Background theory will not be tested on examination papers:
the emphasis is on the
interpretation of spectra. Thus, candidates will not be tested on
why nuclear magnetic
resonance takes place, the reasons for different chemical shift
values or why spin-spin
splitting occurs.
The relative peak areas will be given on any provided spectra.
For splitting patterns, the n + 1 rule can be used, where n is the
number of H atoms on
adjacent carbon atoms. Limited to singlet, doublet, triplet and
quadruplet.
(e) describe the use of D2O to identify the n.m.r. signal from –
OH groups.

4 NMR (c) predict, from the high resolution n.m.r. spectrum of a simple Splitting patterns and Preparation for test
molecule containing carbon, hydrogen and/or oxygen,
Spectroscopy analysis of high intensity
(i) the different types of proton present from chemical
again shift values; patterns. Identifying
(ii) the relative numbers of each type of proton present possible structures
from the relative peak area;
(iii) the number of protons adjacent to a given proton
Spectroscopy unifying
from the spin-spin splitting pattern, limited to splitting
patterns up to a quadruplet only. questions.
(iv) possible structures for the molecule.

(d) predict the chemical shifts and splitting patterns of the
protons in a given molecule.

Background theory will not be tested on examination papers:
the emphasis is on the
interpretation of spectra. Thus, candidates will not be tested on
why nuclear magnetic
resonance takes place, the reasons for different chemical shift
values or why spin-spin
splitting occurs.
The relative peak areas will be given on any provided spectra.
For splitting patterns, the n + 1 rule can be used, where n is the
number of H atoms on
adjacent carbon atoms. Limited to singlet, doublet, triplet and
quadruplet.

(e) describe the use of D2O to identify the n.m.r. signal from –
OH groups.

5 Exam
Preparation