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UNDP Burundi
Chausse du Peuple Murundi, BP 1490 Bujumbura
tel: + 257 22 30 11 00
website: www.bi.undp.org
BURUNDI REPORT
2008 towards 2010
Caption, cover: 73,200 saplings were planted across the ve military zones of the
country in 2009, bringing together the National Police Force of Burundi (PNB), locally
elected leaders and the population, through UNDPs support to security sector reform.
United Nations Development Programme
August 2010
UNDP is the UNs global development network, advocating for change and connecting
countries to knowledge, experience and resources to help people build a better life.
Report prepared under the coordination of Gustavo Gonzalez and K. Danae Pauli with
the participation of Martina Bacigalupo, Fiona Davies, Molly Firkaly, Francis James,
Elfrida Kaneza, Jean Kabahizi and Rose Nitunga.
Photos by Martina Bacigalupo (MB) for UNDP, K. Danae Pauli (KDP) and Sylvain
Liechti (SL) for BINUB
Photos on pages 15 and 71 by Aaron Nsavyimana
Photos 1 and 4 in lmstrip on pages 36-37 by Afke Bootsman
Photo on page 27T provided by the International Conference on the Great Lakes
Region
Photo on page 33 provided by the Press Cell of the Burundian National Assembly
Design and Production by Phoenix Design Aid A/S, Denmark
ISO 14001/ISO 9000 certied.
e boundaries and names shown and the designations used on the included maps do
not imply ocial endorsement or acceptance by the United Nations.
Copyright 2010
United Nations Development Programme, Burundi
Chausse du Peuple Murundi, Bote Postale 1490, Bujumbura, Burundi
http://www.bi.undp.org
e content of this publication may be freely reproduced for non-commercial purposes
with attribution to the copyright holders.
Printed on ocial environmentally approved paper with
vegetable-based inks. e printed matter is recyclable.
BURUNDI REPORT
2008 towards 2010
United Nations Development Programme
UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010 3
UNDP Burundi
in Figures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Taking Stock. . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Looking Ahead. . . . . . . . . . . 86
Table of
Contents
Foreword . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Burundi at a Glance. . . . . . 6
Weaving One UN
in Burundi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
UNDPs Contribution to UN Integration. . . . 8
Fostering
Trust . . . . . . . . . . 10
restoration of Personal Safety. . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
promotion of Inclusive Communication . . . . . 24
Transforming
Capacity. . . . . . . 28
empowerment of Human Capital . . . . . . . . . . 32
revitalization of Physical Resources . . . . . . . . 40
ownership of a Collective Future . . . . . . . . . . 44
Nurturing
Equity . . . . . . . 54
reduction of Social Vulnerability. . . . . . . . . . . 58
expansion of Economic Opportunities . . . . . . 66
rebalancing of Legal Protection . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Delivering
Accelerated
Recovery
the UN Integrated Service Center . . . . . . . . . 76
4 UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010
One of the many farm-workers employed by a
micro-enterprise in the oral industry, north of
Bujumbura (UNDPs Small and Microenterprise
Promotion Project). MB
UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010 5
Foreword
At the time of writing, Burundi is in the midst of
historic 2010 elections - historic because they rep-
resent the rst time that an electoral cycle has been
completed without institutional disruption (2005-
2010). A succession of equally historic events has
laid the foundation for this 2010 milestone. With
the inux of returnees from neighboring countries,
the demilitarization of the last armed group, the
launching of civilian disarmament operations, the
successful completion of national consultations
on transitional justice and the massive turnout of
more than 3.5 million people in the electoral census,
Burundi has already shown, without a doubt, that
it has chosen the path of peace and development.
e speed with which peace consolidation has ac-
celerated in the past few years can even invoke a
momentary feeling of giddiness. Millions of Burun-
dian women and menpeasants, artisans, nurses,
entrepreneurs, soldiers and political leadershave
set the pace of this transformation. Certainly, the
road has not always been smooth, and there remains
a distance to travel. However, the richly positive
experience already accumulated provides a powerful
tool for avoiding the mistakes of the past.
In this context, it has been, and remains, an honor
for the United Nations Development Programme
(UNDP) to accompany Burundi as it makes the
journey towards this signicant moment in its
history. Of particular satisfaction is the fact that
this partnership takes place within the framework
of a United Nations system in Burundi that is more
integrated than ever before.
Burundi Report: 2008 towards 2010 summarizes
the main results UNDP has achieved during the past
two years within the context of the United Nations
Integrated Oce in Burundi (BINUB) and with the
valuable support of a wide range of national and
international partners. It takes stock of the major
accomplishments, identies a set of lessons learned
and explores the challenges ahead.
This report bears witness to UNDP Burundis
transformation during this period, responding to
the demands of peace consolidation and the chal-
lenges of integration. Indeed, the Country Oce
has experienced an unprecedented expansion in
delivery capacity, resource mobilization, launching
of new service lines and exploration of innovative
partnerships in order to fulll its role supporting
national priorities.
At the same time, 2010 marks UNDPs celebration
of 35 years of work in Burundi. It has been a long
and rich partnership, throughout the most beautiful
as well as the most tragic moments in this countrys
history. us, this report also pays tribute to the
numerous colleagues in the United Nations system
that have lost their lives in the name of peace and
development in Burundi.
e report is structured around three major chal-
lenges of transitioning toward development: (a)
fostering trust in order to rebuild social cohesion
and faith in the state, (b) transforming capacity
to be better able to meet the physical and institu-
tional demands of a peaceful developing society,
and (c) nurturing equity in order to ensure that all
Burundians are empowered to maintain peace and
have access to opportunities to improve their lives.
Accompanying the report is a DVD linking the
images and the testimonies of this journey toward
peace and development, as deant as it is passionate.
Charles Petrie
Executive Representative of the UN Secretary General/
UN Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator
Gustavo Gonzalez
Country Director
UNDP Burundi
6 UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010
Located at the heart of the African continent, Bu-
rundi is a country of paradoxes. It is sandwiched
between francophone inuences to the west, and
anglophone inuences in the southeast. It is a
very small country, but has a very high population
density (2nd highest in Africa). It has incredibly
fertile soil and a favorable climate and yet is stricken
with extreme poverty. e countrys citizens have
suered their fair share of violence in the past de-
cades with more than 300,000 deaths as a result of
the conict since 1993nevertheless, things are
Burundi
at a Glance
The ag of the Republic of Burundi was
ofcially adopted in 1967. The stars stand
for the three elements of the country's motto:
Unity, Work, Progress. The red represents
love of country, the green represents hope
and the white represents peace. KDP
looking positive. Armed conict in Burundi is over
and more than 100,000 refugees have returned
since January 2008 to contribute toward rebuilding
the country. Participation in primary education is
above 90% of school-aged children. e current
President of the Republic, Pierre Nkurunziza, is
the rst democratically elected leader to remain
in oce for longer than a year. Although Burundi
faces enormous challenges in the face of the 2010
democratic cycle, its potential to continue develop-
ing swiftly is undeniable.
2009 Human Development Index Ranking (4 Main Indicators)
182
121
161
81
41
1
Japan:
82.4 yrs
50.1 years
Afghanistan:
43.6 yrs
Life Expectance at
Birth (yrs)
Georgia:
100 %
59.3%
Mali:
26.2 %
Adult Literacy rate
(% ages 15 & above)
Australia:
114.2 %
40.0%
Djibouti:
25.5 %
Combined primary,
secondary & tertiary
gross enrolment ratio
(%)
Liechtenstein:
$85,382
$341
DR Congo:
$298
GDP per capita
(PPP $US)
Burundi
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UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010
International
Conference of the
Great Lakes Region
Central
African Republic
Congo
Angola
Democratic
Republic
of Congo
Guinea
Chad
Sao Tome
& Principe
Cameroon
Gabon
Economic
Community of
Central African
States
East African
Community
Tanzania
Uganda
Rwanda
Kenya
Egypt
Sudan
Zambia
Djibouti, Ethiopia,
Eritrea, Zimbabwe,
Malawi, Mauritius,
Seychelles, Namibia,
Swaziland
Common Market
for Eastern &
Southern Africa
2009 GDP
Total = US $1.417 million
Return of Burundian Refugees
2002/2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
0
30,000
60,000
90,000
120,000
150,000
135,649
90,327
68,108
44,915
39,798
31,769
95,068
B
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G
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N
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E
Conict/Instability Transition Phase Peacebuilding Phase
Population
8,053,574 people
51% female
Median age = 16.7 years
Land
Total area = 27,830 km
2
289 people per km
2
35.57% arable land
Administration
17 Provinces
129 Communes
2,639 Collines
Politics
44 political parties
Parliament = 30% female
15 % Industry
35 % Sevices
50 % Agriculture
Republic of
Burundi
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UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010 7
8 UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010
e UN Integrated Oce in Burundi (BINUB) con-
stitutes an innovative model of UN cooperation to
support peacebuilding
1
in a post-conict context.
Part of the UN reform process
2
initiated in 1996,
BINUB has mainly evolved as an approach and a
modus operandi, where dierent UN agencies fo-
cus their eorts in three thematic areas: Peace and
Democratic Governance, Security Sector Reform
and Small Arms, and Justice and Human Rights.
Within countries in transition where the UN has a
Country Team and a political mission, integration
is the guiding principle linked to UN reformthe
purpose being to maximize the individual and collec-
tive impact of the UNs response by concentrating all
agency eorts toward consolidating peace
3
.
1 In practice, two integrated UN peacebuilding Missions
have been launchedthe rst in Sierra Leone, which has
since been converted to an integrated political oce, and the
other in Burundi, whose mandate has been extended through
2010.
2 e UN has vastly expanded since its post-World War
II inception. In order to meet the demands asked of the
organization in the 21st century, reform was and is necessary
to streamline the response of the various UN agencies in
each country for greater eciency and ecacy. e complex
process of reform started in 1996 with Secretary General Ko
Annans acceptance speech outlining his term goals, which
included a leaner, more responsive UN. e idea of creating
One UN country team by integrating all agencies on the
ground into a single oce, is currently being piloted in eight
countries spread around the world.
3 United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon
Weaving One UN
in Burundi
UNDPs Contribution to UN Integration
A handicapped artisan weaves a traditional-style
Burundian basket, Bujumbura (UNDPs Small
and Microenterprise Promotion Project). KDP
While integration looks dierently in every country,
shaped in response to the priorities of national
politics and development situations, it includes four
essential elements that are also found in Burundi:
A shared vision of the UNs strategic objectives;
Closely aligned or integrated planning;
A set of agreed results, timelines and responsi-
bilities for the delivery of tasks critical to peace
consolidation;
Agreed mechanisms for monitoring and evalu-
ation.

Accordingly, BINUB was ocially established in
January 2007 as a mechanism to bring a coher-
ent and coordinated UN response to the chal-
lenges of peace consolidation and to provide a
transition from peacekeeping to development-
focused activities. e United Nations system in
Burundi has integrated the tasks mandated by
Security Council Resolution 1719 with the various
United Nations agencies present in the country
4

4 e following UN agencies have a physical presence in
Burundi: UN Development Programme (UNDP), UN Refugee
Agency (UNHCR), UN Food and Agriculture Organization
(FAO), World Food Programme (WFP), UN Childrens Fund
(UNICEF), Oce of the High Commissioner for Human
Rights (OHCHR), World Health Organization (WHO), UN
Population Fund (UNFPA), UN Educational, Scientic and
Cultural Organization (UNESCO), UN Development Fund
for Women (UNIFEM), UN Joint Programme on HIV/AIDS
(UNAIDS). e non-resident agencies include: UN Oce for
UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010 9
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by strategically focusing on peace consolidation.
ese tasks were articulated in the United Na-
tions Integrated Peacebuilding Support Strategy
2007-2008, an expansion of the United Nations
Development Assistance Framework (UNDAF) for
the same timeframe, which has guided the peace
consolidation eorts of the UN system for the
past three years in support of the Governments
priorities.
During this critical peacebuilding phase, UNDP has
played a key role within the integrated framework.
With critical support from the UNDP Bureau for
Crisis Prevention and Recovery (BCPR), UNDP
supports BINUB with a network of post-conict
experience and a comparative advantage in ad-
dressing the root causes of conict, promoting the
rule of law and enhancing community security,
developing capacity for good governance, including
dialogue at the community level, and supporting
the creation of sustainable livelihoods in conict-
aected communities.
UNDP Burundi supports the integration process
and the missions goals in multiple ways. rough
BINUBs three joint programmes, UNDP contributes
Project Services (UNOPS), International Labor Organiza-
tion (ILO), International Fund for Agricultural Development
(IFAD), UN Human Settlements Programme (UN HABITAT),
and UN Capital Development Fund (UNCDF)
human, planning and nancial resources to the
integrated mission. In close collaboration with the
Government, UNDP also implements 17 of the
21 projects nanced by the Peacebuilding Fund
in Burundi. With signicant support from BCPR,
UNDP contributes 70 sta members to BINUB,
30 of who are in management positions, totaling a
nancial contribution of more than USD $2.5 mil-
lion in technical assistance since 2007.
In October 2009, UNDP actively participated in
the strategic planning exercise to develop the new
UNDAF cycle for 2010-2014, with the participa-
tion of all 15 United Nations agencies and the
Government of Burundi. In addition to dening
the UN strategic priorities for 2010-2014in-
cluding (A) support to strategic planning and
coordination; (B) support to community recovery;
(C) support to national reconciliation and the
protection and promotion of human rights; (D)
support to democratic governance, including the
electoral process and related institutionsthe
strategic planning exercise also established the
joint Government-UN steering group to continue
the planning exercise. Taking into account the
comparative advantage of the United Nations and
its partnering with other key stakeholders, UNDP
is committed to supporting the remaining peace
consolidation and development challenges in an
integrated manner.
KDP
KDP
KDP
10 UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010
Children playing at the ground breaking ceremony for
the Tribunaux de Residence, Cibitoke province (UN-
DPs Greater Access to Justice Support Project). MD
UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010 11
Fostering
TRUST
Trust \`tr
e
st\ (n): cannot be imposed, im-
ported or bought. It emerges slowly and re-
luctantly and is built through collective en-
gagement on issues small and large, and
through consistent daily commitment to and
application of a common vision. More than the
revitalization of infrastructure or the presence
of government, trust is the glue that keeps so-
ciety together in intangible but crucial ways.
1
1 Interpeace: 5 Peacebuilding Principles, (http://www.interpeace.org/index.php?option=com_
content&task=view&id=156&Itemid=290)
12 UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010
F
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uring the extended civil conict that began in
1993 and lasted more than a decade, uncon-
trolled violence erupted and relationships be-
tween friends and neighbors broke down across the
country. Ensuring a lasting peace in Burundi, therefore,
requires rebuilding trust between civilians and the state
as well as between individuals. To support this, UNDP
has adopted a dual approachon the one hand reinforc-
ing institutions and mechanisms that improve citizens
sense of personal security, and on the other empowering
open and inclusive dialogue to reestablish trust in the
community. UNDPs catalytic support aims at enhancing
the trust necessary to consolidate sustainable peace.
F
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UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010 13
F
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2008-2009 investment
Project Name
Project
Cycle
Project
Budget
International Partners National Counterpart
National Dialogue Framework Support 2007-2009 $3,148,000 PBF
Ministry of Good Governance, General State Inspection, and Local
Administration, Ministry of Communication, Ministry of External Relations
and International Cooperation, Ministry of Interior and Public Security
Transitional Justice Consultations 2008-2010 $1,254,757 PBF, TRAC 1 Presidency of the Republic
Executive Secretary of the International Con-
ference on the Great Lakes Region Support
2008-2009 $546,448 Norway N/A
Military Barrack Rehabilitation 2007-2010 $6,789,420 Netherlands, PBF, TRAC 1 Ministry of Defense and Veterans Affairs
Military Morale Building 2008-2009 $400,000 PBF Ministry of Defense and Veterans Affairs
National Police Census 2007-2009 $992,232 Netherlands International Commission for Transitional Justice (NGO)
Regional Facilitation Action Plan Support 2008-2009 $1,702,588
PBF Emergency Window,
TRAC 1
Government & Political Parties
Emergency Basket Fund for DDR Phase 1 2009/2010 $1,660,000
PBF Emergency Window,
Germany, Switzerland
Ministry of National Solidarity, Repatriation, National Reconstruction, Hu-
man Rights and Gender, Ministry of Defense, Ministry of Public Security
Local Security Force Strengthening 2007-2010 $6,900,000 PBF Ministry of Public Security
Judgment Implementation and Judiciary
Reinforcement
2007-2009 $1,158,520 PBF Ministry of Justice
National Intelligence Service Respecting the
Rule of Law
2007-2009 $500,000 PBF National Intelligence Service
Small Arms Disarmament and Proliferation
Control
2007-2009 $2,306,962
BCPR, CPR TTF (France),
PBF, Switzerland, USA
Ministry of Defense, Ministry of Public Security, National Disarmament
Commission
Mine Action 2006-2008 $1,693,288
EC, CPR TTF (SIDA),
TRAC 1
Ministry of Interior and Public Security
Security Sector Reform 2007-2009 $800,000 BCPR
Ministry of Defense and Veterans Affairs, Ministry of Interior and Public
Security
PBF - Peacebuilding Fund, a multi-donor thematic trust fund
TRAC 1 - UNDP internal funds for programmatic support
EC - European Commission
CPR TTF - Crisis Prevention and Recovery thematic trust fund
BCPR - Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery, a specialized bureau within UNDP
SIDA - Swedish International Development Agency
17 % Inclusive Communication
83 % Personal Safety
Fostering Trust 30 %
Other Projects 70 %
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Ofcial handover ceremony for renovated
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Military Barrack Rehabilitation Project). MB
restoration of
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reedom from harm and conict is a right
that every human being should be able to
enjoy. Without such freedoms individuals
and communities cannot thrive. It is the respon-
sibility of the state to protect these freedoms from
threatunfortunately, in a civil conict, such as
the one that ravaged Burundi for more than a
decade, citizens naturally lose faith in the national
security institutions to protect them, as well as
trust in their neighbors and friends not to turn
on them in violence. As the basis for a stable and
peaceful nation, assisting the national authorities
to rehabilitate these and other complementary
institutions is one of UNDPs top priorities in
Burundi.
Military Reform
Burundis uneasy civil-military relations are com-
mon to most post-conict countries. To address
this issue, UNDP is supporting the Government to
professionalize the military as part of the Security
Sector Reform and Small Arms Joint Programme
within the United Nations Integrated Oce for
Burundi (BINUB), aiming to separate the military
from the civilian population. To this end, thanks to
nancing from the Peacebuilding Fund (PBF) and
the Netherlands, UNDP supported the renovation
of 17 previously unsafe and uninhabitable military
barracks between 2008 and 2009. In addition to
the enhanced command and control resulting from
the ocers proximity to the enlisted men, these
barracks contribute to professionalizing the military
through newly constructed training classrooms
as well as secure armories to better control the
circulation of arms and munitions among o-duty
soldiers.
e successful relocation of 90% of existing military
personnel previously living amongst civilians in
2008 and 2009 has lead to the closure of 240 of
the 255 identied military positions country-wide.
In addition, the construction and renovation work,
performed with the help of local civilians, helped to
generate a more positive perception of the military
in these communities, whose members gained em-
ployment as well as the opportunity to communicate
with military personnel in a peaceful setting.
Further contributing to rebuilding the social percep-
tion of the military, which was demonstrated to be
highly negative during a 2007 survey
5
, the National
Defense Force (FDN) has started to strengthen and
5 Kristiana Powell, CENAP/NSI Working Paper: Security
Sector Reform and the Protection of Civilians in Burundi:
Accomplishments, Dilemmas and Ideas for International
Engagement, July 2007
Ocial handover ceremony for renovated military barracks, Kayanza province (UNDP's Military Barrack Rehabilitation Project).
The Building Blocks of
Defense Sector Reform
Ofcers and Enlisted Soldiers Trained in 2009
Ofcers and Enlisted
Soldiers Trained in 2008
Ofcers Trained as Trainers
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Meet an
average
Associated
Woman
On April 8, 2009, the Government of Burundi
and the National Liberation Forces (FNL) rebel
group agreed to the transformation of the move-
ment into a political party. In addition to the
8,500 combatants who were demobilized or
integrated with the National Police and Army
forces, the Government agreed to support up to
10,000 adults associated with the rebel move-
ment to disengage and return to their communi-
ties of origin.
In accordance with UN Security Council Reso-
lution 1325, special support was pledged for
up to 1,000 women associated with the armed
movement. Often neglected in traditional DDR
exercises, Associated Women are dened as
females who have not participated directly in
combat but lled support roles in the armed
group(such as porters, cooks, laundry women,
concubines, etc.), either voluntarily or by compul-
sion. UNDPs support to this population included
organizing special registration days in the com-
munities of the Associated Women, providing
them with the option to open a savings account
and join a local credit and savings association,
and undertaking a study to determine their past
and present socio-economic proles and recom-
mend sustainable reintegration strategies. The
following are the salient characteristics of the
average Associated Woman. She:
Is from Bujumbura Rural or Bubanza province.
Is between 25-54 years old.
Was recruited between 1991 and 2000.
Provided logistical aid in the role of cook,
porter or supply manager.
Has at least some formal education.
Owns at least a small parcel of land and lives
primarily by farming.
Does not own any livestock.
Is a widowed head of household, in charge
of 5 dependants.
Among the suggestions provided by the study,
it was recommended that the Government and
organizations avoid privileging the Associated
Women over other members of their commu-
nities when implementing recovery programs
and that such programs include training for the
creation of small and microenterprises to enable
economic self-sufciency.
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improve military conduct. anks to support from
the Peacebuilding Fund, 38 ocers benetted from
a training of trainers on human rights and respect
for the rule of law and were subsequently charged
with training the remaining military forces. ese
strategically chosen trainers were able to invigo-
rate force-wide behavior transformationtraining
almost 22,000 military personnel, including 90%
of all ocers and sub-ocers over the life of the
project. In addition, the FDN lead community-
building activities with local citizens and elected
leaders in the ve military zones across the country,
including planting 73,200 trees to foster community
reconciliation.
Police Reform
Following the Arusha Accords, a new National Police
of Burundi (PNB) was created in late 2004, consisting
of former members of the national police, military
sta of the Burundian armed forces and combatants
from various armed movement signatories to the
cease-re. Without the time to gather all the relevant
sta data and develop the appropriate Human Re-
sources tools, the PNB quickly faced serious dicul-
ties managing its inated and diversied personnel.
Moreover, the PNB was confronted with allegations
of misconduct by uniformed individuals and realized
that it was not possible to identify with certainty an
actual police ocer from someone posing as one.
Police ocers model the forces new standardized uniforms at the ocial handover, Bujumbura (UNDPs Local Security Force
Strengthening Project). SL
To respond to these challenges, in partnership with
the Netherlands and the Ministry of Public Security,
as part of BINUBs Security Sector Reform and Small
Arms Joint Programme, UNDP launched a Police
Identication and Census Programme in March
2008. At its completion in mid-2009, the census had
registered 18,164 police ocers who were ocially
recognized by the Ministry of Public Security. With
technical assistance from the International Center
for Transitional Justice, the project supported the
reorganization of the PNB, and rendered its human
resource management system more transparent as
well as its police ocers more visible. By creating
an expandable database that includes biometric
data to track all personnel, and helping to provide
ocers with service cards, badges, and numbered
uniforms, UNDP supported the PNB to remodel its
institutional identity into a more accountable police
force trusted by the civilian population.
Furthermore, the operational capacity of the 17 pro-
vincial judicial branches of the police was expanded
through provision of transport vehicles, each fully
equipped with two-way radio systems. An additional
500 handheld two-way radios were distributed,
thanks to the Peacebuilding Fund, enhancing co-
ordination as well as reinforcing command and
Human Rights workshop for military personnel, Bujumbura
(UNDPs Military Morale Building Project). SL
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control of police ocers movement outside the
oce. ese interventions enable the local police to
react more rapidly and appropriately to the popula-
tions needs as well as bolster the public perception
of the PNB as a professional police force protecting
citizens rights.
Intelligence Reform
In one of the most innovative of the Governments
initiatives, the National Intelligence Service (SNR)
is demonstrating a will to rapidly reform itself in
respond to intense national and international scru-
tiny. In Partnership with the National Assembly and
the Peacebuilding Fund, within the framework of
BINUB, UNDP helped the SNR develop a new Code
of Ethics, adopted in 2008, that provides greater
direction and regulation to its mission and practices.
e SNR was made further accountable through the
reform of ambiguous national oversight legislation
creating a greater supervisory role for the National
Assembly. For this, UNDP trained the 25 members
of the Defense and Security Commission of the
National Parliament on security sector oversight
responsibilities. In 2009, the SNR organized its
rst ever open doors session, inviting the public
to enter its buildings in Bujumbura and learn about
the services mandate and mission. is unprec-
edented initiative was followed by other similar
events throughout the country, and resulted in
a series of civilian-issued recommendations for a
better working relationship with the SNR. ese
mechanisms encouraging behavior modication
and a democratized system of checks and balances
foster greater public faith in the SNRs ability to
respect the rule of law and protect citizens safety.
Beyond DDR
In April 2009, the Forces Nationales de Libration
(FNL) was ocially transformed from an armed
rebel group into a political party, marking the true
end of armed conict in Burundi through the in-
tegration of 3,500 combatants into the national
army and police forces. It was also agreed that a e steps of Demobilization and Disengagement (UNDPs
Emergency Basket Fund for DDR Phase 1 Project).
Members of the National Intelligence Service are trained on sexual violence prevention, Bujumbura (UNDPs National Intelligence
Service Project). SL
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further 5,000 combatants would be demobilized
along with up to 11,000 men and women associated
with the party. With support from the Peacebuilding
Fund, Germany and Switzerland, UNDP was able
to process all 10,186 Associated Adults, including
a total of 1,052 women by the end of August 2009.
All Associated Adults were ocially registered in
a biometric database, given return kits with the
rst installment of their return assistance, and
transported to their communities of origin. By the
end of 2009, the return of all Associated Adults
to their communities was veried and the second
half of their return assistance distributed. is
timely and critical action provided relief for the
communities that have hosted the FNL members
in two formal assembly areas and six informal pre-
assembly areas for as long as a year. With the rst
phase of DDR completed, UNDP is supporting the
national institutions in the implementation of a
national programme for sustainable reintegration of
war aected populations, including ex-combatants
and Associated Adults.
Judgment Enforcement
In a society plagued by petty crimes and mistrust, a
functioning justice system at the local level is criti-
cal to re-establishing the rule of law and avoiding
self-help acts of vengeance. Citizens need to believe
that their cases will be heard within a reasonable
period of time and that once a judgment is reached,
through a fair and transparent process, it will be
A member of the PNB tosses discarded fatigues onto a pile during the demobilization process, Rubira Site (UNDPs Emergency
Basket Fund for DDR Phase 1 Project). SL
Judgments Enforced
1,903 2008 Progress
2,117 Remaining
Backlog
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enforced. Strengthening these aspects of the justice
system is therefore of key importance. us, with
support from the Peacebuilding Fund and BINUB,
UNDP helped the national judiciary to address a
backlog of more than 3,000 long-standing pending
cases and more than 4,000 unenforced judgments
between 2008 and March 2009.
Additionally, more than 500 magistrates underwent
training in the proper enforcement of judgments,
decreasing the wait-time for cases to be judged and
increasing the quality of the judgments made. Fur-
thermore, with the provision of means of transport
for each of the 17 Tribunaux de Grande Instances
(provincial courts), judges are now able to make
follow-up eld visits and ensure that their judg-
ments are enforced.
Small Arms Control
Controlling the circulation and proliferation of small
arms and light weapons (SALWs) is an essential part
of curbing violence and rebuilding a safe environ-
ment. Burundi, with almost a third of its border a
short distance from the shores of the Democratic
Republic of Congo across Lake Tanganyika, is par-
ticularly vulnerable to the proliferation and circula-
tion of illegal arms among civilians. In 2008 alone,
more than 1,500 incidences involving arms and
explosives occurred across the country, resulting
in more than 1,000 deaths and more than 1,200
injuries. Reducing the number of civilian-owned
small arms is an obvious and important focus area
Riders pass before one of the billboards of the Disarmament
Commissions campaign during an awareness raising bicycle
ride, Bujumbura (UNDPs Small Arms Disarmament and
Proliferation Control Project).
A Burundian technician at the
national arms destruction site,
Bujumbura (UNDPs Small Arms
Disarmament and Proliferation
Control Project). MB
A container overowing with
destroyed arms at the national de-
struction site, Bujumbura (UNDPs
Small Arms Disarmament and
Proliferation Control Project). SL
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A surrendered gun is taken permanently out of circulation at the rst national arms destruction site, Bujumbura (UNDPs Small
Arms Disarmament and Proliferation Control Project). KDP
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in a post-conict context such as that of Burundi,
directly impacting personal security.
UNDP, with support from Switzerland, France,
USA, the Peacebuilding Fund and the UNDP Bu-
reau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery (BCPR),
established a Small Arms Programme in 2007 as
part of BINUBs broader Security Sector Reform
strategy, to support the Government in reducing vio-
lence. In close partner-
ship with the National
Commission for Civil-
ian Disarmament and
Prevention of Weapons
Proliferation (CDCPA),
UNDP helped establish
a National Observatory
of Armed Violence that has monitored the inci-
dences of armed violence across the country since
2008. With UNDPs assistance, the Government was
able to establish a computer center at the Armys
Logistical Brigade in 2009 with trained operators to
tag, register and track SALWs. Between 2008 and
2009, UNDP also facilitated the establishment of a
national explosives destruction site and a weapons
destruction workshop with trained personnel, at
the Logistics Base of the National Defense Force
in Bujumbura. In the 2008 calendar year alone, a
total of 5,925 documented SALWs were destroyed.
After a public media campaign developed with the
CDCPA and carried out in early 2009 in Bujumbura,
UNDP supported the Commission to carry out a
voluntary disarmament campaign across the nation.
Meet Susane
Susane Nshimiramana lived next to a mineeld. A mother in her thirties
living with her 5 children and husband in a suburb of Bujumbura, Susane
remembers several years ago being abruptly awakened in the middle of
the night by a loud sound and nding the body of a female neighbor in
the eld next to her home the following morning. Her small adobe brick
house in Mutanga Nord, just below Lumire University, borders a sec-
tion of land that was suspected to contain landmines planted during the
conict. Susane and her community were afraid to step foot on the land,
and no one was able to live there or use the land to farm, fetch wood
or feed their goats. This created problems for Susane and for the other
members of her community, who survive on subsistence farming and
who already suffer from tight land constraints. Susane lived in fear that
her young children might accidentally step foot on the land, and when
she heard loud noises at night she worried that she might wake up to
nd another body in the eld.
From 2006 to 2008 UNDPs Mine Action Programme cleared 99% of
the land in the country suspected of containing landmines, removing any
explosive remnants of war
found and otherwise assuring
the neighboring communities
that there are no landmines
with the potential to maim
or kill. The eld next to Su-
sanes house was among the
last 31,000 square meters
cleared during 2008. She is
extremely relieved that the
land next to her house has been declared mine-free. Now her children
are able to play in the eld. She can fetch rewood, cultivate manioc
leaves and take her goats to graze there, all of which are important eco-
nomic activities for Susane. Community relations have eased since there
is less land pressure and the population is able to exercise their daily
activities. More importantly, Susane no longer fears hearing the sound
of explosions near her house in the middle of the night and waking up
to nd someone gravely injured or dead next door.
There was a long period during which
no one would put a foot here because
someone had placed mines during the
war...Now we are happy that you have
come and removed these mines.
With help from the Peacebuilding fund, during an
eight-day period in October across 138 posts in all 17
provinces, UNDP supported the CDCPA to collect:
160,657 munitions (all kinds)
12,820 grenades
2,186 assault weapons
389 handguns
540 bombs
38 mines
19 multi-person weapons (requiring more than
one person to operate)
6
6 e nal results of the national campaign will not be pre-
cisely known until mid-2010 once all the individual discharge
sheets tracking the exchange of arms and tools have been
veried and the arms and munitions have been recovered
from the police posts.
1,513Num-
ber of incidents
of armed, non-
armed violence and
explosives in 2008
KDP
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A recent analysis of armed violence trends across
the country reveals a post-amnesty (the period
following the voluntary disarmament campaign
in October 2009) drop in criminality in 15 of the
17 provinces, by 38% on average, compared to the
previous 10 months in 2009. In Muramvya province,
the rate of violence dropped by 77% compared to
pre-amnesty levels.
Ensuring appropriate control of the arms held by
security forces is another key factor in fostering
trust within the population. To this end, UNDP suc-
cessfully rehabilitated and constructed six armories
in between 2008 and 2009 to be ocially handed
over to the Government by mid-2010.
In 2008 UNDP provided support for an updated
baseline study on small arms proliferation, and
in 2009, supported a joint study on the impact of
armed violence in Burundi with Ligue Iteka carried
out by Small Arms Survey
7
. Information from both
these documents contributed to the preparation
of a National Five-Year Action Plan for the Control
7 Geneva Declaration on Armed Violence and Develop-
ment & Small Arms Survey, An Assessment of Armed Violence
in Burundi, available at http://www.genevadeclaration.org/
leadmin/docs/Geneva-Declaration-Armed-Violence-Burun-
di-EN.pdf
and Management of Small Arms and Light Weapons
and the Disarmament of the Civilian Population
that was validated by relevant actors in early 2009
and is in the nal stages of being adopted by the
Government. UNDP also helped the Government
to adopt a new SALW law in late August 2009 that
harmonizes the previous law with the Nairobi Pro-
tocol for the Prevention, Control and Reduction of
Small Arms and Light Weapons in the Great Lakes
Region and the Horn of Africa, which was ratied
by Burundi in 2006.
Mine Removal
UNDP, within the framework of the UN Opera-
tion in Burundi (mandate completed in 2006) and
then BINUB, helped the Government establish the
National Mine Humanitarian Mine Action Centre
(DAHMI) in November 2007, to coordinate and
oversee Burundis compliance with international
mine removal and destruction treaties. In 2008, by
declaring the last 31,000 square meters of suspected
hazardous areas mine-free, UNDP supported the
Burundi National Humanitarian Mine Action Centre
(BURMACC) to return the land to the almost 32,000
people in Bujumbura and Bubanza provinces (see
prole of Susane) who were living in fear of the
ground surrounding them and were unable to live
on or farm them. In destroying the 3,905 antiper-
sonnel landmines and other explosive remnants
of war found during the process (which started in
2006), Burundi was able to fulll its obligations
under the Ottawa Convention to clear and destroy
landmines six years prior to the deadline and is
now in compliance with Article 4 of the Ottawa
Convention against the use, storage, production and
transfer of antipersonnel mines. rough UNDPs
assistance to destroy the 664 unplanted mines being
stocked by the National Defense Force (FDN), the
Government also contributed to the future safety of
individuals in Burundione of the Governments
most remarkable achievements in 2008.
A government ocial reading the study on the impact of armed violence in Burundi, Bujumbura (UNDPs Small Arms Disarma-
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Gender & the Security Sector
In Burundi, as in many post-conict countries, the
rate of sexual and gender-based violence remains
very high although it is dicult to precisely pin-
point the rate of incidence due to underreporting.
Integrating a gender-balanced approach, particularly
in the security sector, is essential to promoting the
protection of women (and children) against violence.
During 2008, with help from the UNDP Bureau
for Crisis Prevention and Recovery as part of BI-
NUBs Security Sector Reform and Small Arms Joint
Programme, UNDP helped the National Police of
Burundi (PNB) empower the 64 provincial Gen-
der Focal Points. Appointed in 2007 for Cibitoke,
Bubanza, Bujumbura and Rural Bujumbura, the
Gender Focal Points are now better able to assume
Watching the destruction of anti-personnel mines, Bubanza province (UNDPs Mine Action Project) MB
their roles in upholding gender equality and respect
for the rights of women thanks to training on their
responsibilities. With UNDPs help, an additional
65 female police ocers formulated policy recom-
mendations on the role of women in the police
force and in upholding respect for human rights.
e Oce of the Inspector General of the PNB was
also reinforced with and with transport to facilitate
eld inspections as well as training on administra-
tion and management, ethics, public security and
administrative investigation, and maintaining law
and order. A reformed security sector, respectful
of citizens rights, helps to resurrect public trust
in the capacity of national institutions to protect
civilians and their property, thereby cementing the
building blocks upon which nation-wide develop-
ment is founded.
Observing weapons being
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Bubanza province (UNDPs Small
Arms Project) MB
An area of land is roped off during
International Day for Mine Aware-
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Action, Bujumbura (UNDPs Mine
Action Project) MB
Preparing to explode a mine found
in Musaga, Bujumbura (UNDPs
Mine Action Project) MB
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promotion of
INCLUSIVE
COMMUNICATION
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W
hether through dialogue or other forms
of exchange, communication is critical
for fostering understanding and trust
in any relationship. Just as in a marriage, citizens
and the state in a post-conict context also require
sincere dialogue in order for trust to be rebuilt
particularly in the latter case because miscommu-
nication or the entire lack thereof, is often at the
root of conict. In Burundi, the United Nations
Integrated Oce for Burundi (BINUB)through
UNDPhas been at the forefront of enhancing
the dialogue agenda across all levels of society with
communal, national and even regional projects
for inclusive communication and open exchange.
National Dialogue
Honest and open communication at all levels of
society must take place in order for past and present
dierences to be resolved peacefully. At the political
level in particular, Burundi lacked the space for such
dialogue to take place. rough BINUBs leadership
and UNDPs support, an inclusive and participatory
framework for continued dialogue and consensus
was created, assembling all relevant socio-political
actors, including political groups, parliamentar-
ians, the media and civil society organizations (the
four sectoral groupssee prole of Calixte), with
a national forum session held for 180 participants
in 2008 and a national monitoring and evaluation
committee established to ensure follow-through and
maintain the positive momentum. During phase
I, which ended in February 2009, the four sectoral
groups were able collectively determine the major
peace consolidation challenges that Burundi faces
today. is phase, in particular, helped ll the con-
sensus gap that presented itself when Parliamentary
sessions were blocked during 2008. e second
phase, which began in March and nished in May
2009, allowed the sectoral groups to concretize their
roles in promoting sustained democratic dialogue
through action plans and expanded dialogue work-
shops to the private sector, youth groups and univer-
sity students, and a special session on the electoral
process with the political parties. Furthermore, the
Solution: Dialogue billboard in the center of Bujumbura (UNDPs Forums for Dialogue Project). KDP
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4 Quadrant Tool
Four quadrant tool used to identify common problems
amongst diverse dialogue participants and facili-
tate nding shared solutions (UNDPs Forums for
Dialogue Project).
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Problem
Identify the
Problem
Possible
Responses
The Best
Solution
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Meet Calixte
Calixte Ndayishimiye, a late twenty-something from Bukeye Commune in
Muramvya Province, has been doing work in the area of conict resolu-
tion and peaceful cohabitation since he was in high school. Together
with his classmates from all different ethnic backgrounds, he formed an
association called SAMMOURAI (Solidarit, Amour, Mutuel, Morale,
Organisation, Unit, Responsabilit, Animation, Intellectuelle) to act as a
role model for engagement across ethnic and other divides. Throughout
the extended conict, Calixte has remarked that people from different
ethnic groups have become more guarded and do not speak openly
around each other. He and his friends were afraid of the stateof their
local government administrators, and of the policebecause they saw
mismanagement and corruption, but did not feel free to criticize it. Calixte
remains Vice President of SAMMOURAI, which allowed him to participate
with more than 40 other representatives of associations, media and police
representatives, communal administrators, and religious representatives
from around the province in two separate 4-day dialogue forums in 2008.
UNDPs Framework for Dialogue project, started in 2007 and nanced
by the Peacebuilding Fund, has worked with groups like that of Calixte,
as well as groups of Parliamentarians, political parties, the media, youth
and the private sector, to carry out constructive dialogue sessions. Each
session has a set of ground rules that include: Do not personalize the
debates; Respect the views of other participants; All criticism should be
accompanied by proposals; Be empathic towards others (allow the right
to be wrong and to be
corrected nicely); and
Be specic and concise
in participating (3 minute
maximum), among others.
Calixte believes that it is
not part of Burundian cul-
ture to speak out when
you have something nega-
tive to say, and during his
forums it took the entire
rst day for participants
to open up and start communicating honestly. He never thought that the
diverse range of participants would be able to see eye-to-eye on what
constitute the major challenges of the province and how to best address
them. In the end, the entire group of more than 60 participants was able
to elaborate a series of concrete actions to carry out within their respec-
tive communities. Calixte left feeling more comfortable expressing himself
with his local administrators and police and was able to tell them how
the community is affected by what it perceives to be poor governance.
In a subsequent, self-organized session of more than 500 members from
different associations to openly communicate with the communes local
governance, Calixte was amazed that even the administrator was able to
admit to the existing management and corruption problems!
sessions led to the establishment in early October
2009 of a permanent Forum for dialogue amongst
the political parties, which will, in turn, contribute
to preventing a future relapse into violence.
For communities torn apart by violence, transitional
justice is often the thread that sews back together
the fabric of society and signals the beginning of
national reconciliation. Often shedding light on
divergent views and interpretations of history,
transitional justice can reconcile neighbors, fam-
ily members, and friends, helping them to move
beyond a tortured past toward a united future. In
2000, the Arusha Peace and Reconciliation Agree-
ment for Burundi called for a transitional justice
process, consisting of a dual system: a Truth and
Reconciliation Commission and an International
Criminal Tribunal, in the case where an Interna-
tional Commission of Inquiry found that genocide,
war crimes and crimes against humanity had been
committed during the conict.
e Government of Burundi has chosen to pursue
national consultations across all levels of society
Logo of the
Tripartite Steer-
ing Committee
of the National
Consultations
on Transitional
Justice (UNDPs
Transitional Jus-
tice Consultations
Project).
We can now voice ourselves clearly
without fear when we dont like what
the local government is doing. Even the
communal administrator admitted to
governance problems!
KDP
UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010 27 27
to gather views on transitional justice and encour-
age local ownership of the process. Speaking with
more than 4,500 people nationwide, the consulta-
tions take the form of individual interviews, focus
group sessions and community-wide meetings with
Burundians across all socio-economic levels. With
the Oce of the High Commissioner for Human
Rights in Burundi providing technical guidance
and UNDP acting as the implementing agency, a
Tripartite Steering Committee composed of the
Government of Burundi, civil society and the UN
was established in 2008 to oversee the national
consultations on the establishment of transitional
justice mechanisms. Early 2009 was devoted to
preparing the media, the public and the Tripartite
Steering Committee for understanding the histori-
cal context and political signicance of transitional
justice as well as the methodology of the consulta-
tions. is included the creation of a network of
transitional justice journalists in January, as well as
a series of 7 informative radio broadcasts across all
eight stations, 2 television broadcasts across the two
main channels, and 16 newspaper articles printed in
four dierent local papers. e consultations began
in July and proceeded rapidly across the country,
nishing on December 17, 2009. Preparation is
underway for the nal phaseconsultations with
members of the Burundian diaspora in East Africa
and Europein early 2010 after which the project
will develop a nal report and recommendations. e
report will provide the Government with important
input from a wide spectrum of Burundian society
on transitional justice mechanisms and facilitating
reconciliation between formerly opposing groups.
Regional Collaboration
rough Norways nancial support, UNDP assisted
the Executive Secretariat of the International Confer-
ence on the Great Lakes Region to hold its mandatory
Regional Inter-Ministerial and Summit meetings,
during which 2008-2010 regional action plans for
Peace and Security, Democracy and Good Governance,
Economic Development and Regional Integration,
and Humanitarian and Social Issues (the four priority
areas of the Pact on Security, Stability and Develop-
ment) were developed. Action plans for the six cross-
cutting issues and for combating sexual violence were
also developed. e Secretariats Documentation
Centre was fully operational by mid-2009, with rel-
evant documents in all the working languages of the
Conference. By helping to establish the Secretariat
and the Institutions of the Pact, UNDP is contribut-
ing to Burundis integration in the East African and
Great Lakes Region Communitiesa critical boost
toward sustaining regional partnerships.
A member of the National Defense Force shares his opinions on transitional justice with a diverse cross-section of Burundian society
during a focus group consultation, Ngozi province (UNDPs Transitional Justice Consultations Project). SL
Session of the International Conference on the Great Lakes Region, Bujumbura (UNDPs ICGLR Permanent Secretariat Support
Project).
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A craftsman from the Mutoyi pottery factory, Gitega province. MB
UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010 29
Transforming
CAPACITY
Capacity \k
e
-`pa-s
e
-te
_
\ (n): the ability of
individuals, institutions and societies to per-
form functions, solve problems, and set and
achieve objectives in a sustainable manner.
Capacity Development is thereby the process
through which individuals, organisations and
societies obtain, strengthen and maintain
the capabilities to set and achieve their own
development objectives over time.
1

1 UNDP Denition of Capacity, (http://www.capacity.undp.org/)
A
fter more than a decade of crisis, Burundi has
been left with signicantly depleted human and
physical resources. Regardless of the inux of
international support, the sustainability of Burundis
transformation will not be ensured without the strength-
ened capacity of national actors (i.e. the government,
civil society, communities and the local private sector).
UNDP is investing in key physical infrastructure, while
also supporting national authorities and civil society to
identify and transform existing sources of capacity. This
critical transformation is essential to the ongoing pro-
cess of peace consolidation. UNDPs interventions not
only aim at reinforcing institutional skills and behaviors,
but also at establishing deeper national ownership to
ensure a lasting impact.
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Project Name
Project
Cycle
Project
Budget
International Partners National Counterpart
Strategic Planning Support 2008-2009 $212,532 TRAC 2 Ministry of Planning and Reconstruction
Second National Communication on
Climate Change
2005-2010 $405,000 GEF Ministry of Environment, Physical Planning and Public Works
Sustainable Land Management 2009-2010 $475,000 GEF Ministry of Environment, Physical Planning and Public Works
Disaster Risk Management Planning 2008-2010 $1,648,904 CPR TTF (Spain), TRAC 1 Ministry of Public Security
Avian Flu Emergency Response Update 2006-2008 $16,657 BCPR
Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock, Ministry of Environment,
Physical Planning and Public Works
National Urban Strategy Development 2008-2009 $8,770 TRAC 2 Ministry of Environment, Physical Planning and Public Works
Human Development Report Creation 2008-2009 $176,460 TRAC 2 Ministry of Planning and Reconstruction
Burundi Emergency Programme Support 2006-2010 $22,595,569 DFID, Belgium, Norway, Morocco, TRAC Ministry of Health, Ministry of National Education
Public Administration, Parliament and
Local Governance Support
2007-2010 $2,764,244 TRAC 1
Ministry of Interior and Communal Development, Ministry of
Good Governance, Ministry of Planning
Support to National Decentralization 2008-2009 $115,047 Switzerland Vice Minister of the Interior and Communal Development
Rutana Local Development 2007-2011 $394,941 TRAC 1 Vice Minister of Community Development
Civil Registry Capacity Building 2008-2009 $300,000 DG TTF Ministry of Interior and Communal Development
2010 Electoral Cycle Support 2009-2010 $20,939,451
Belgium, DFID, Egypt, European Commission,
France, Japan, Netherlands, Norway, PBF,
Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, TRAC 1
National Independent Electoral Commission (CENI)
Greater Electoral Participation Promotion 2009-2010 $1,840,000 BCPR, GTTF, Switzerland, TRAC 1 National Independent Electoral Commission (CENI)
Civic Education Promotion 2007-2009 $302,450 UNDEF COSOME
Support to National Aid Coordination
Commission (CNCA)
2008-2010 $1,926,294 Netherlands, DFID, Belgium 2nd Vice Presidency
PRSP Monitoring and Evaluation 2008-2009 $175,586 TRAC 2 Ministry of Planning and Reconstruction
TRAC 1 - UNDP internal funds for programmatic support
TRAC 2 - UNDP internal funds for research and study
DG TTF - Democratic Governance thematic trust fund
UNDEF - UN Democratic Fund
PBF - Peacebuilding Fund, a multi-donor thematic trust fund
DFID - UK Department for International Development
CPR TTF - Crisis Prevention and Recovery thematic trust fund
BCPR - Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery, a special-
ized bureau within UNDP
GEF - Global Environment Facility
GTTF - Gender thematic trust fund
6 % Collective Future
43 % Physical Resources
51 % Human Capital
2008-2009 investment
Transforming Capacity 52 %
Other Projects 48 %
32 UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010
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empowerment of
HUMAN CAPITAL
A locally elected leader participates
in a workshop on leadership and
personal development, Bubanza
Province (UNDPs National Decen-
tralization Support Project). SL
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he people of Burundi are the countrys rich-
est resource, with enormous potential for
aecting change. Although the serious loss
of human capital during the conict has held Bu-
rundi back until recently, UNDP is working with
other partners to help transform the countrys
human resources into the driving engine of change.
We are investing the countrys human assets with
the capacities and tools they need to play their
various roles in reconstructing the nation, from
local civic leadership and participation to ecient
administration of government at all levels.
National Governance
As part of BINUBs Peace and Governance Joint
Programme, UNDP is working closely with the Gov-
ernment of Burundi on the ongoing transformation
of the Public Administration. rough its participa-
tion in the 7th African Governance Forum (FAG
VII) in Burkina Faso, Burundi was able to outline
its national strategy objectives to strengthen state
capacity. is draft document will be rened and
validated by a broader government group in 2009.
Furthermore, UNDPs provision of technical and
communication tools to central administration
services, including the Consultative Committee for
the Amelioration of Public Administration (ASAP),
the Ministers Cabinet for Public Administration,
and the National Public Administration School,
among others, has helped modernize and render
their services operational. e Documentation Cen-
tre of the National Public Administration School was
updated with more than 600 new works in social
science, humanities and other subjects correspond-
ing with the new courses oered in 2009. UNDPs
technical and advisory support to the Presidency
of the Republic also resulted in the submission of
Ocial session of the National Parliament of Burundi, Bujumbura.
34 UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010
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a legislative text towards establishing an Ombuds-
mans Oce to resolve bottlenecks and accelerate
Public Administration performance, in conformity
with the Arusha Peace Agreement and the nations
Constitution.
UNDP helped reinforce the skills of 96 ocials and
Members of Parliament through a capacity develop-
ment program on drafting and analyzing legal texts.
UNDP also encouraged Burundis participation in
the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM), sup-
porting the participation of 67 parliamentarians
and members of civil society in a training on this
south-south approach of ensuring that national
policies and practices conform to the agreed political,
economic and corporate governance values, codes
and standards contained in the African Unions
Declaration on Democracy, Political, Economic and
Corporate Governance.
In addition to transforming the capacity of the
Parliament, UNDP is also encouraging greater bal-
ance within it. With UNDPs support to establish a
Womens Caucus, the voices of female parliamentar-
ians and their inuence in governance were ampli-
ed, ensuring the promotion of issues that aect
more than half of the Burundian population. e
medias potential to encourage greater transparency
and enhance public comprehension of political and
legislative matters was also expanded through the
training of 25 representative media professionals,
on issues ranging from televised, written and spoken
media to thorough and even-handedly reporting on
parliamentary activities. Although plenty of work
remains, Burundi has made its rst steps toward
cementing a healthy legal framework for free and
fair governance.
Decentralized Governance
As a counterbalance to the deep-seated ethnic
issues fueling much of Burundis violence in the
recent past, the Government has chosen to fo-
cus on re-establishing civil identities at a local
level, with each community in the country more
strongly invested in their respective communes.
By enhancing local governance mechanisms, and
encouraging accountability at the communal level,
decentralization aims to promote a greater sense
of belonging and individual aliation with ones
immediate neighbors.
Facilitating greater ownership through general
consultations in each of the 17 provinces, UNDP,
in partnership with the Peacebuilding Fund and
Switzerland and within the framework of BINUB,
enabled more than 2,000 representatives of the
general public, local elected ocials, administration
civil society, community development committees
and decentralized services across the country to
evaluate the current state of decentralization and
contribute to the formulation of a new National
Policy Document on Decentralization. e subse-
quent framework of the National Policy Document
and a three-year Action plan, providing an inclusive
vision for the future of the decentralization process,
were adopted in early 2009 during a national work-
shop including almost 250 participants from civil
society, local government, development partners
and various government ministries.
In order to enhance national ownership, the project
kicked-o with 17 joint eld missions (one in each
province), informing over 1,500 representatives of
local elected ocials about decentralization and the
projects objectives, and inviting the representatives
to contribute their ideas to the evolution of the
project. UNDP further empowered members of
Parliament, local elected ocials, administrative
authorities at the national and provincial levels,
civil society organizations and other relevant actors
with a reference tool on the legal framework for
decentralization. 7,500 copies of the compilation
booklet containing the 18 existing national laws
and rules on decentralization were printed and
distributed across all 129 communes.
At the national level, in perhaps the greatest achieve-
ment of 2008 with regard to empowering local
representation the ultimate goal of the decentral-
ization processUNDP successfully supported the
formation of the Burundian Association of Locally
Elected Leaders (ABELO). Representing more than
Representation structure
of ABELO
(Burundian Association of
Locally Elected Ofcials)
Executive Board Members
21
Members of ABELO
256
Locally Elected Leaders
17,000+
An ABELO member consults the handbook of Decentraliza-
tion laws of Burundi in his oce, Bujumbura (UNDPs Local
Governance Support Project). SL
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A civil registry ocial legalizes a new marriage in the register, wearing the ceremonial gown and hat, Ngozi province (UNDPs Civil
Registry Capacity Building Project). KDP
17,000 locally elected ocials nationwide, ABELO
will allow the ocials to share experiences and best
practices, will act as a union to raise resources for
local governance, and will rapidly diuse relevant
central information rapidly across the country. At
the community level, UNDP supported account-
ability for these same locally elected leaders through
trainings for 100 representatives of civil society
organizations, media and relevant ministry depart-
ments on their respective roles in educating and
motivating the population on its right to responsive
civil services.
As part of a pilot project initiated in 2007 to enable
more responsive and accessible local governance,
UNDP, in partnership with the UN Capital Devel-
opment Fund (UNCDF), has been working with
the 6 communes of Rutana province to develop
Communal Development Plans. ese plans were
completed in 2008 and implementation is underway.
It began with a series of trainings for 183 provincial
technicians and elected ocials across the province,
providing greater understanding of the objectives
and technical aspects of the decentralization pro-
cess and their role within it. Additionally, 12 local
committees were established across the communes
to manage shared socio-economic infrastructure,
such as schools, health facilities and local govern-
ment buildings.
e elaboration of the Communal Development
Plans by communal council members and technical
teams would not have been possible without the
skills provided by the 6 Decentralization Technical
Agents. ese Technical Agents were trained as
trainers with support from UNDP and UNCDF to
carry out this activity in Rutana, and assist other
communes in developing individually tailored
decentralization plans in 2009 and beyond. UNDP
and UNCDF further supported the sustainability
of the decentralization process in Rutana and its
application to the rest of the country through
the development of a tool for communal self-
evaluation, which was adopted in early 2009. Sub-
sequently, all 6 communes of Rutana province were
able to use the tool to identify weaknesses in their
administrations transformation progress. e
self-evaluation tool suggests relevant responses
based on the evaluation, and includes indicators
that allow for the eventual tracking of national
decentralization progress.
Another aspect of the decentralization eorts in-
cludes re-empowering civil registry services (births,
deaths, marriage, etc.) at the community level. In
early 2008, with help from the Democratic Gover-
nance ematic Trust Fund and the Peacebuilding
Fund, UNDP supported a comprehensive analysis
of the current state of civil registries around the
country to inform the rehabilitation process and
ensure the accuracy and appropriateness of future
interventions. Although most of Burundis civil
36 UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010
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registry archives and oces were damaged or de-
stroyed during the countrys recent crisis, UNDP
re-equipped all 129 communal Civil Registry oces
to enable them to archive public records safely.
e 67 oces that have electricity were provided
with computers and other electronic administra-
tive equipment in order to modernize their civil
registry services. In addition, UNDP is supporting
the construction and renovation of 19 communal
oces to be handed over to the Government in
early 2010. In addition, UNDP strengthened Civil
Registry management capacity through training
for the 17 Provincial Inspectors, who had received
little previous orientation, to carry out their jobs.
Civic Engagement
In 2005 Burundi held its first elections in twelve
years, returning the nation to constitutional dem-
ocratic rule after more than a decade of intense
violence and political instability. Through the
UN Democracy Fund, UNDP has been supporting
the Coalition of Civil Society Organizations for
Election Monitoring (COSOME) since 2007 to
enhance the populations capacity to fully partake
in the upcoming political process and uphold
the democratic cycle. Building on 2007s work
in nine north-eastern provinces, the citizens
in the eight remaining provinces were provided
greater access to information on these subjects
through the mobilization and training of an
additional 1,193 community organizers. These
organizers taught their local populations on civic
rights and responsibilities. Furthermore, 6 radio
programs were broadcast on the same subject in
collaboration with Radio Isanganiro during 2008.
Broader civic inclusion was encouraged through
a sensitization session for 34 representatives
of womens associations, parliamentarians and
delegations of Batwa on how to better integrate
traditionally excluded groups in political activity.
Steps of the National Identity Card exercise carried out across the country (UNDP's Greater Electoral Participation Promotion Project). SL
Construction workers renovate the Communal Oce, Ngozi
province (UNDPs Local Public Services Support Project). KDP
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Achieving open dialogue in anticipation of the chal-
lenges of the 2010 electoral cycle, a debate was held
between 61 journalists and representatives of civil
society organizations, the Administration, the Sen-
ate and the National Assembly, and of 13 dierent
political parties. An additional 55 representatives
of 10 dierent political parties, civil society organi-
zations and the media were able to reach a shared
understanding of the Code of Conduct for Political
Parties during an Election Period, through a valida-
tion workshopboding well for the potential to
minimize violence in 2010.
In further support of the democratic cycle, CO-
SOMEs project convened a diverse range of 93
stakeholders, including Parliamentarians, represen-
tatives of political parties, civil society organizations,
international partners, communal councils and
administrators, and the Gutwara Neza program,
among others, to contribute to and agree upon
updated versions of the communal law. Address-
ing a widely acknowledged limitation of the 2005
elections, during which only 40% of election sites
had ocial observers trained by the National Elec-
tion Commission, COSOME organized a training
of trainers session for 38 delegates from the Pro-
vincial Coordination Committees of COSOME in
2008, the Ministry of the Interior, and other civil
society organizations who were mobilized to train
a peaceful force of 2,515 non-partisan election
observers for 2010.
In April 2009 the National Independent Electoral
Commission (CENI) was officially established
with the swearing in, under oath, of the mem-
bers nominated by the President and approved
by Parliament. The five Commission members,
two of whom are female, come from varied back-
grounds: the Inspector of Finances at the Bank
of the Republic of Burundi, the Acting General
Public Prosecutor of the Prosecutor General of the
Republic, the Cabinet Director of the Ministry of
Human Rights and Gender, an ex-judge/ex-gov-
ernment Minister and an ex-Ambassador/African
Union Electoral Expert. After the establishment
of the CENI, President Nkurunziza sent a formal
request in May to the UN Secretary General for
assistance to prepare the historic 2010 general
elections. Thus, a Needs Assessment Mission was
deployed in July and a project document to assist
the CENI was signed in September 2009 between
UNDP and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. To
facilitate the support of the international com-
munity, a basket fund was established by UNDP,
with contributions and pledges from Belgium, the
UK Department for International Development
(DFID), Egypt, Japan, Norway, the Netherlands,
Sweden, Switzerland, and the European Com-
mission totaling more than USD $23 million at
the end of 2009.
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Burundi's 2009 code requires citizens to present
a national identification card to register to vote,
withdraw their electoral card or vote. Data col-
lected by the Government suggests that about
1,000,000 highly vulnerable Burundian citizens
do not have an officially recognized national ID.
Between pictures, transport, and other related
expenses acquiring an ID card costs between USD
$3 and $5 per person, which is unaffordable for
most citizens, but especially for women in rural
areas and other underprivileged citizens. In ad-
dition, the process of applying and receiving a
card is normally time consuming as it entails 5
steps at different locations. To empower poor and
marginalized citizens to be able to exercise their
civic duties, UNDP rapidly helped the Govern-
ment undertake a one-month campaign starting
December 21, 2009, to issue free identity cards in
one-stop-shops set up in the Communal Offices
across all 129 communes. With support from
Switzerland and the UNDP Gender Thematic
Trust Fund, the campaign was very successful
at mobilizing citizens. Massive turnout resulted
in an average of 40,000 cards issued per day for
a total of more than 968,000 cards and an addi-
tional almost 1 million Burundians empowered
to pursue their right to vote in the upcoming
electoral cycle.
Aid Coordination
In a post-conict country, one of the most im-
portant aspects of state building is restoring the
Governments capacity to coordinate, plan and
monitor the inux of international aid. By ren-
dering aid management more transparent, ac-
countable and results-oriented, conict-aected
countries can enhance aid eectiveness for sus-
tainable development. e increasing likelihood
of diminished international aid as a result of the
global nancial crisis makes these challenges all
the more urgent.
us, in 2008, the Government adopted an action
plan to maximize aid contributions and, with the
support of the Netherlands and Belgium, a UNDP-
managed basket fund was established to support
the plans implementation. UNDPs support to the
Executive Secretariat of the National Aid Coordi-
nation Commission (CNCA) helped establish the
Partner Coordination Group (GCP), with 13 sectoral
working groups, as well as facilitate the Strategic and
Political Forums and the meetings of the overarching
monitoring and evaluation group to follow progress
on implementing Burundis Strategic Framework
for Poverty Reduction (CSLP) throughout 2008 and
2009. Among other concrete results, this framework
has led to the adoption of progress reports on the
Poverty Reduction and Peace Consolidation Strategy
Papers (CSLP and CSCP, respectively), examination
of the UN Development Assistance Framework for
2010-2014, an evaluation of the GCP to propose new
strategic orientations to improve its eciency, and
preparation of the Burundi delegation to the Consul-
tative Group on Burundi in Paris in October 2009.
UNDP also supported the setup and progressive
usage of an Aid Management Platform by relevant
stakeholders, as well as a website to disseminate
information on international aid to Burundi.
In September 2008, the Government of Burundi
and UNDP participated in the Accra High Level
Forum on Aid Eectiveness, during which the
government delegation was able to take part in
two high-level panels on Fragile States. e project
further supported the Governments participation
in the Doha International Conference on Financing
for Development at the end of 2008. Both events
helped Burundi to increase its eorts in implement-
ing the Paris Declaration on Aid Eectiveness and
subsequent action plans. UNDP is also supporting
the CNCA to carry out a series of studies to improve
Burundis coordination system and align country
practices with the Paris Declaration.
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revitalization of
PHYSICAL RESOURCES
Constructing a primary school, Bubanza province
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Emergency Response
Post-conict recovery also requires physical invest-
ment to facilitate the populations access to shelter
and basic social services, among other things. e
massive inux of repatriated citizens, internally
displaced people and the resettlement of thousands
of demobilized soldiers constitutes an extraordinary
challenge for the Burundian government and each
individual community. In 2006 an Emergency
Programme Multi-Donor Trust Fund (EMDTF)
was established as an early recovery mechanism to
respond rapidly to the challenges of reintegration
and resolve bottlenecks that could potentially aect
the peace process. With nancial support from the
UK, Belgium, Norway and Morocco totaling more
than US$17 million, the EMDTF has supported the
Governments investment in critical areas through-
out Burundi.
e Emergency Programme Multi-Donor Trust Fund
has developed focused and catalytic interventions in
areas with high concentrations of war aected popu-
lations to cover basic needs, such as access to educa-
tion, health, and shelter. Executed by UNDPs United
Nations Integrated Service Center (UNISCsee
Building a new primary school (UNDPs Burundi
Emergency Programme Support Project).
A doctor adjusts the new operating light at the Kamenge Military Hospital, Bujumbura (UNDPs Burundi Emergency Programme
Support Project). SL
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Meet Vnusie
Vnusie Ndabagoye has been teaching as a 6th
form teacher at the Bihara Primary School, on
the outskirts of Bujumbura, since 2006. When
he began, the school consisted of 6 classrooms
built many years ago by Belgians out of adobe
clay. Although Vnusie is an energetic and
engaging teacher his job was hard because
the classrooms physical structure was literally
falling apart with age and the schools bare equipment had
mostly disappeared throughout the years and was no longer
enough for the number of students. Vnusie and the other
teachers had a mobile chalkboard, but no permanent xed
chalkboards in their classrooms to facilitate lessons. Nor
was there a staff room for the teachers to securely keep their
educational materials or to hold meetings. Vnusies students
often had trouble following lessons because there were not
enough benches for the students to sit on and with the doors
and windows destroyed during the conict the students were
often distracted by noises and activity outside the classroom.
In 2008, UNDPs Emergency Program completed the construc-
tion of 32 schools across the country, one of which replaced
Bihara Primary School. In addition to the 6 new classrooms,
UNDP also constructed several ofces, where Vnusie and
the other teachers now safely store their teaching supplies
and conduct staff and parent-teacher meetings. In September
2008, the new buildings welcomed Vnusie and a class of
students in the 6th form. The school is so much better that it
has attracted some students from nearby schools as well as
students who were not previously going to school at all. While
this has not improved the student-teacher ratio, Vnusie still
nds it easier to teach the children in the new school build-
ing now that they all sit at proper desks. The blackboards,
stretching the length of the walls at the front and back of the
classroom, are easy for Vnusie to write on while teaching and
if something is happening outside the class that is distracting,
he can now close the windows and better keep the students
focused on the lesson at hand.
I am better able to lead and teach
the students in the new school be-
cause there is a real blackboard and
if there is a distraction outside I can
close the windows and door.
MB
UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010 43
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Delivering Accelerated
Recovery chapter), the
EMDTF launched a to-
tal of 7 projects across
a wide range of sectors.
Specifically, the EM-
DTF helped improve
the quality of primary
education for approxi-
mately 96,000 children
across the country in
2008 through the construction, provision of equip-
ment and ocial handover of 32 primary schools
across the nation (see prole of Vnusie). e extent
and quality of primary education in the subjects of
English, Kiswahili and Civic Education was further
improved through the training of 4,500 teachers,
facilitating the re-entry of recently returned Burun-
dian children who have spent a majority of their
childhood in refugee camps in Tanzania. Supporting
the states physical capacity to respond to the basic
health needs of the existing and returning popu-
lations, UNDP provided 35 hospitals and health
centers throughout the country with much needed
medical equipment and supplies. ese materials
ranged in complexity from disposable gloves and
arm pressure bands to facilitate basic preventive
health care, to more high-tech equipment such as
centrifuges for blood testing, operating lights and
incubators. With UNDPs construction of 4 Peace
Villages in Rural Bujumbura, Muyinga, Bururi, and
Bubanza provinces in 2008, 1,000 returnee and IDP
families were able to move from temporary shelters
to solid houses, where they may begin to rebuild
their lives. In 2009, the EMDTF expanded its sup-
port for physical investment to the transportation
sector, including enhancing aerial access to Burundi
through marking and lighting the national airport
in accordance with international civil aviation safety
and security standards.
5,248
Tons of cement
used in 2008 to
build and renovate
1 prison, 4 Peace
Villages, 9 military
barracks,
16 tribunals and
32 schools.
e Muyanga Peace village, Bubanza province (UNDPs Burundi Emergency Programme Support Project).
A prematurely born baby inside an incubator at the Roi Khaled Hospital, Bujumbura (UNDPs Burundi Emergency Programme
Support Project).
SL
SL
44 UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010
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ownership of a
COLLECTIVE FUTURE
A chain of people pass bricks during Saturday
morning Communal Work, Bujumbura. KDP
UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010 45
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D
uring the previous decades of conict,
envisioning the shape of the medium and
long-term future of Burundi was nearly as
impossible as planning for it. Now that the country
has been experiencing relative peace since 2005,
imagining Burundis future and preparing for it
are real options. From elaborating a future vision
for the country, planning for population expansion
and setting up contingency arrangements, among
other planning activities, the Government has
been supported by UNDP to move beyond reactive
policies towards strategically preparing for a bet-
ter Burundi in the medium and long-term future.
A National Vision
Conceiving and drafting a coherent vision for the
future toward which a country wants to progress
helps to provide focus and motivation for obtain-
ing it. Visioning exercises, often developed around
achieving the Millennium Development Goals and
frequently undertaken with the assistance UNDP,
have been carried out in a number of countries,
UN Development Assistance Framework Strategic Planning Retreat with all UN agencies & the Government of Burundi, Gitega province. MB
Igihugu camata nubuki, iteka
nijambo
In 2025, Burundi is a united Nation, in
solidarity and in peace; a country built on
a rights-based society with a rich cultural
heritage; a prosperous economy for the
well-being of all.
- Burundi Vision 2025
46 UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010
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including Botswanas Vision 2016, and the Vision
2020s of Trinidad and Tobago, Guyana, and Ma-
laysia, among others. e exercise of developing the
Vision involves creating a space for open dialogue
on the current challenges a country is facing and
determining goals that will help the nation work
toward shared aspirations. e idea of the Vision
as a lighthouse, guiding a nations people forward
through rocky waters toward a stable and secure
future is particularly powerful in a post-conict
setting, where the Vision can serve as a power-
ful reconciliation tool for moving beyond the past.
Looking to build upon the positive momentum af-
ter the countrys successful democratic elections in
2005, the President of the Republic launched such
a visioning exercise in Burundi in mid-2006. With
UNDPs support, the draft Vision 2025, which has
been developed through ve national broad-based
workshops and the participation from more than
150 local development partners, governmental
and parliament ocials, and representatives from
media and civil society organizations, is proceeding
to national adoption. e vision encompasses three
possible scenariosBurije (dark, deteriorating
conditions), Ntarataze (half hearted, lacking fun-
damental change), and Burundi Buhire (Burundi
prosperous and proud)and how each would look
in terms of peace and security, governance and the
role of public powers, economic growth and poverty
reduction, and the role of the southern region and
the international community. Capitalizing on the
positive developments that have occurred in the
previous 18 monthsgreater regional integration,
demobilization of the last rebel group, repatriation
of a large number of refugeesand mobilizing
against the continuing challenges, complicated
further by the global economic crisis, the President
launched a series of validation workshops around
the country in October 2009. e Ministry of Plan-
ning and Reconstruction is leading the workshops
Vision
Burundi
2025
Burundis Vision 2025 document (UNDPs Strategic Planning Support Project).
UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010 47
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at the provincial level before extending them to
the communal level, in order that the Vision
2025 of Burundi is widely known and understood,
providing motivation as well as orientation for all
Burundians.
Environmental Change
One of UNDPs key on-going projects, enabled by
the Global Environmental Facility, is to strengthen
Burundis institutional and technical capacity to
regularly prepare and submit national communica-
tions on the countrys progress in the eight sectoral
development plans to the Conference of Parties to
the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change.
To date, this project has led a series of studies on
the countrys vulnerability and adaptation to climate
change and mitigation of its eects, as well as on
reducing human-made emissions of greenhouse
gases. e project also created an informational
publication to raise public awareness on the im-
portance of protecting the environment and on the
ways in which individuals can reduce their impact
on environmental degradation. Additionally, with
UNDPs help, the Government was able to develop
a National Action Plan for Adaptation to Climate
Change, which has become one of the main reference
documents for mobilizing partner support toward
environmental protection in Burundi.
UNDP is also overseeing the recently launched
Regional Programme for jointly integrated man-
agement of Lake Tanganyika, which is executed by
UNOPS and the Executive Secretariat of which is in
Bujumbura. Although the projects 4th phase is in
its early stages, it aims to implement the regionally
agreed Strategic Action Plan for Lake Tanganyika
in Burundi, the Democratic Republic of Congo,
Tanzania and Zambia and to reinforce the Lake
Tanganyika Authority and Secretariat. In doing
so, the project plans to improve lake processes and
productivity through enhanced catchment manage-
ment, reducing siltation and waste water pollution
to protect the lakes biodiversity.
A second new UNDP project, Capacity Building for
Sustainable Land Management in Burundi, will con-
tribute to the mitigation of land degradation as well
as promote the integrity and stability of ecosystems
by increasing ecological services, strengthening
national and local management capacity, and by in-
tegrating the issue of sustainable land management
into national development strategies and policies.
UNDP is currently also commencing a micro-grants
project. By generating sustainable living condi-
tions through micro-grants to non-governmental
organizations and community-based organizations
that propose relevant activities, the programme
will contribute to (a) the alleviation of the impact
of climate change, (b) biodiversity conservation, (c)
management and protection of water, (d) reduction
of the impact of persistent organic pollutants, and
(e) ght against land degradation.
Another nascent project on the protection of biodi-
versity across Burundi will focus on strengthening
A nation united
in solidarity and
peace
A country
founded on the
rule of law
A prosper-
ous economy,
supporting the
socio-economic
well-being of
Burundian men
and women
An urbanized ter-
ritory, organized
in a balanced and
sustainable manner,
with controlled de-
mographic growth
A country blessed
with national and
regional develop-
ment strategies
to revitalize a rich
cultural heritage
and maintain
cultural diversity
An open Burundi,
spreading forth
and attractive,
fully integrated in
sub-regional, re-
gional and world-
wide dynamics
A country taking its place
in the world of information
and knowledge through the
promotion of Information
and Comunication Technol-
ogy across all sectors
7 pillars
of Vision 2025
48 UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010
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the management capacity of Ruvubu National Park
and Kibira Forest. By developing a strong partner-
ship between the authority in charge of Burundis
management network of protected areas (parks,
nature reserves and forests) and other stakehold-
ers, the project aims to conserve biodiversity in
the countrys outdoor spaces in an integrated and
sustainable manner.
Contingency Preparation
Promoting sustainable development requires a
strong capacity for disaster risk management, par-
ticularly in a country such as Burundi that has been
severely aected by global warming. Tackling the
countrys vulnerability to natural disaster entails
understanding and identifying the risk factors that
cause disasters such as the exposure and vulnerabili-
ties of society to natural hazards as well as preparing
comprehensive responses to prevent damage to hu-
man life and property. Burundi possesses a number
of vulnerabilitiesto ooding, to famine, and to
earthquakes, among others, including the cyclical
droughts that have annually interrupted the harvest
cycle in Kirundo province since 1994any of which
could present themselves without warning and
cause an enormous threat to the nations citizens.
Moreover, if incorrectly managed, any such human
security threat could also threaten the countrys
hard-won peace.
To mitigate and prevent the damage of these po-
tential disasters, UNDP, thanks to support from
Spain, has helped Burundi prepare a coordinated
response mechanismthe National Platform for
Risk Prevention and Disaster Management, with
17 Provincial Platforms to coordinate at the lo-
cal level. In addition to equipping and training
the National Platform and Provincial Platforms,
UNDP helped the Government form a ministerial
committee for Disaster Risk Prevention within the
Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock. In 2008, Consulting equipment at the National Meteorological Society during a Joint UN Evaluation Mission, Kirundo Province. SL
UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010 49
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A local expert identies the diminishing water level during a Joint UN Evaluation Mission, Kirundo Province. SL
50 UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010
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UNDP, OCHA and UNICEF were able to prepare a
joint GovernmentUN inter-agency contingency
plan based on a national map developed by UNDP
that overlays current physical vulnerability indexes
(rainfall, erosion, food insecurity, etc.) with the
current presence of international NGOs. Provincial
contingency plans were also prepared for the most
vulnerable provincesNgozi, Kayanza, Muyinga
and Kirundo.
During the year 2009 a study on the Organiza-
tion Plan of Civil Security (Plan ORSEC) was con-
ducted and the plan implemented, conjointly with
UNICEF, in ve provinces. anks to this tool
the National Platform for Risk Prevention and
Disaster Management, the Directorate General
of Civil Defense and the provincial governors bet-
ter understand the serious nature of their new
responsibilities to coordinate and organize the
dierent phases of risk reduction and disaster
management. In October 2009, local authorities
were able to respond quickly to ooding in Rural
Bujumbura province, thanks to the rst aid tools
and training provided by UNDP, ushing a chan-
nel and widening the river bed to minimize the
ood damage.
In its planning for 2010-2014, UNDP has focused on
an approach to capacity building that emphasizes the
synergy between reducing disaster risk and adapta-
tion to climate change, as well as their integration
with planning programs and development projects
to stabilize and preserve the gains of development.
To this end, UNDP supported the participation of
a Burundian delegation, including the rst Vice
President, at the world summit on Climate Change
in Copenhagen in December 2009.
For the specic threat of Avian Flu, UNDP supported
the updating and adoption of the National Avian
Flu Emergency Response Plan in 2009. Prelimi-
nary implementation of the plan included public
health messages, informing 230 people across the
10 provinces considered particularly vulnerable to
the disease on basic prevention as well as training
for 118 veterinary and medical provincial health
sta in 16 provinces on prevention and treatment
of the disease.
Urban Expansion
Burundi has the second highest population density
of any country on the continent of Africabehind
only Rwandainevitably leading to intense com-
petition for land. In particular, with the return of
thousands of refugees and displaced citizens, the
number of land tenure conicts is on the rise and
people are ocking to urban areas. is has led to
the rapid expansion of ghettos and shanty-towns
and a sharp deterioration of the standards of living
in the nations few urban spaces. e impact of
this phenomenon on the environment as well as
the health sector cannot be overstated. However,
since 1993, Burundi has lacked a strategic vision or
policy on how to deal with the countrys increasing
urbanization.
Risk maps
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Lac Rweru
LacCohoha Lac Gacamirindi
LacRwihinda
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Parc NationaI de Ia Kibira
Parc NationaI de Ia Ruvubu
LEGENDE
Scheresse Faible
Scheresse Moyenne
Scheresse Persistante
20 0 20 40 10
Kilometers
1:1 200 000 EcheIIe:
BURUNDI: INDICE DE SECHERESSE
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10 0 10 20 5
Kilometers
EcheIIe: 1:1 200 000
BURUNDI: Indice de Mouvements de Terrains et Autres formes d'Erosion du SoI
LEGENDE
Zones Relativement Stables
Zones en Apparente Stabilis
Hauts Risques de Mouvements de Terrain
Trs Hauts Risques de Mouvements de Terrain
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LEGENDE
Innondation de Forte Intensit
Innondation de Moyenne Intensit
Innondation de Faible Intensit
20 0 20 40 10
Kilometers
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BURUNDI: INDICE D' INNONDATION
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LEGENDE
Plus vulnrable
Vulnrable
Moins Vulnrable
Milieu Urbain
20 0 20 40 10
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Carte de VuInrabiIit/Scurit AIimentaire et Nutrition par Province
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Drought Erosion Flood Food Insecurity
Vulnerability Index Maps developed to assist in disaster response planning (UNDPs Disaster Risk Management Project).
UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010 51
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A new Urban Expansion photo (Urban Expansion - Additional SL) has been uploaded to the ftp folder, with a sample of the crop that I would prefer you use. e caption should read: Aerial portrait of
an ever-expanding cityBujumbura. SL
52 UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010
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In 2008, UNDP partnered with UN HABITAT and
the Ministry of the Environment to address this
gap, in view of the annual urban growth rate of
6.8%. A policy letter was developed, describing
the national urban development vision for 2020,
in line with the Millennium Development Goals.
e policy note includes ve specic objectives: 1)
strengthen the institutional framework to include
urban development and progressive environmental
improvements, 2) establish a viable and sustainable
urban tradition in the country , 3) ensure decent
housing for all segments of the population, 4) slow
down the deterioration of urban living standards,
and 5) strengthen governance to enhance urban
productivity. Following the letters adoption by the
Government in July 2008, UNDP and UN HABITAT
are continuing to work together with the Ministry
of the Environment toward developing a national
action plan to implement the national habitat and
urbanization policy.
Measuring Development
First launched in 1990, with the single goal of put-
ting people back at the center of the development
debate, the Global Human Development Report
(HDR) focuses on telling the story of development
in terms of peoples wellbeing and quality of life,
rather than focusing solely on economic measures.
Tracking indicators of life expectancy, literacy and
education, and income level, the HDR is an inde-
pendent report commissioned by UNDP, translated
into at least 13 languages, and launched in more
than 100 countries annually. Each annual report
focuses on a dierent salient theme in the current
development debate, including relevant analysis and
policy recommendations. Analyzing the prospect for
people to lead lives that they value in light of current
global challenges and, since 2000, tracking progress
towards the Millennium Development Goals, the
Human Development Report aims to motivate
progress toward achieving the MDGs, as well as
provide an accurate source of development data.
Burundi rst participated in this process in 1997,
and in 2008 the Ministry of Planning and Recon-
struction began the process of determining an
overarching theme, gathering statistical data and
writing the countys fourth National Human De-
velopment Report (the last was published in 2005).
With UNDPs support, a national steering commit-
tee was formed and successfully adopted the theme
of Good Governance and Sustainable Development
in Burundi to frame the report. Including in-depth
analysis of the various components contributing
to Good Governance, in addition to the traditional
development indicators, Burundis 2009 National
Human Development Report was launched in De-
cember 2009 to a broad audience of government,
UN and civil society representatives.
e report shows that the human development
index (HDI) in Burundi has improved between 2005
and 2007 from 0.375 to 0.394, in some part due to
an emerging culture of good governance. e report
details that progress has been made in terms of good
governance in the areas of Public Administration
reform, partnership between the state and the main
actors of public life, challenges of demography, ur-
banization, environment and land management, as
well as competitiveness of Burundi's economy and
its integration into regional and global economies.
Nevertheless, it was also concluded that further
progress is necessary regarding respect for human
rights, ght against corruption, access to justice, and
modernization and professionalization of govern-
ment and democratic institutions.
e Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), eight
time-bound development targets adopted by 189
countries in 2000, make up an integral part of
UNDPs mission worldwide. UNDP Country Oces
are periodically called to assist developing world
countries to provide an update on their progress
toward the MDGs. In 2009 UNDP assisted the
Human Development Index (HDI) in Burundi
1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2007
0.25
0.30
0.35
0.40
UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010 53
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Ministry of Planning and Reconstruction to un-
dertake this important review particularly in view
of the few remaining years to reach the goals. Not
surprisingly, the many years of violent conict in
Burundi have had a negative eect on the countrys
ability to achieve the MDGs, in many cases derail-
ing, and even reversing, progress. For example, the
percentage of households living below the poverty
line, which Burundi aims to cut in half as the goal
indicates, has doubled since its 1990 baseline. e
only goal that Burundi is likely to reach by 2015 is
that concerning gender parity in primary educa-
tion, in large part due to the Presidents declaring
free primary education for all Burundians in 2005.
Nevertheless concerted eorts could lead to positive
results in the areas of ensuring that boys and girls
complete a full course of primary education, halting
the spread and reducing the incidence of malaria,
reducing by half the proportion of people without
access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation,
reducing Burundis debt load to a sustainable level,
formulating and implementing strategies for decent
and productive jobs for youth, and providing access
to aordable essential drugs.
Presenting at a Consultation Workshop on Burundis 2009 National Human Development Report (UNDPs Human Development Report Creation Project). SL
54 UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010
A bean seller from the Asian Quarter in Bujumbura, Burundi. MB
UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010 55
Nurturing
EQUITY
Equity \`e-kw
e
-te
_
\ (n): involves the de-
gree of fairness and inclusiveness with which
resources are distributed, opportunities af-
forded, and decisions made. It includes the
provision of comparable opportunities of
employment and social services, including
education, health and justice. The notion can
be relevant both within and between com-
munities and nations.
1

1 Indicators of Sustainable Development: Guidelines and Methodologies,
(http://www.un.org/esa/sustdev/natlinfo/indicators/isdms2001/isd-ms2001isd.htm)
56 UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010
E
merging from more than a decade of bloodshed
and destruction, Burundi is experiencing an in-
frastructure decitthe countrys human, material
and procedural resources have been dispersed, are out
of date, and suffer from general neglect. Regardless of
the inux of international monetary and logistical aid,
national actors (i.e. the government, civil society, com-
munities and the local private sector), must have the
relevant tools to transform their capabilities and realize
a better future in order for progress to be sustainable.
In addition to UNDP Burundis investment in key physi-
cal infrastructure, without which very little substantial
development can take place, we are also committed to
supporting national authorities and civil society to iden-
tify and transform existing sources of capacity. This criti-
cal transformation is at the heart of the ongoing peace
consolidation process. Following the lines of UNDPs
capacity development approach, our projects focusing
on human capital and planning for the future not only re-
inforce institutional skills and behaviors, but also inspire
deeper national ownership to ensure a lasting impact.
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oday, it is largely accepted that development
without equity is unsustainable. In addition to its
intrinsic value as a moral principle, equity is also
critical in addressing some of the root causes of conict
in Burundi and preventing a return to violence. UNDP is
enabling equity in Burundi through initiatives that strive
to promote the basic social rights of the most vulner-
able members of society, to jump-start the economy at
the grassroots level, and to rebuild an even-handed and
effective justice system. By leveling the playing eld,
UNDP is empowering Burundian men and women to
ensure that the dividends of peace and development
are accessible to all.
N
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UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010 57
2008-2009 investment
Project Name
2008
Budget
2008
Expenditure
2009
Budget Donors
Program
Cycle
Public Administration, Parliament and Local Governance Support $1.479.940 $1.330.739 $1.002.044 TRAC 1 2007-2009
Support to National Decentralization $115.047 $98.714 N/A Switzerland 2008
Rutana Local Development $250.000 $228.799 $159.633 TRAC 1 2007-2009
Civil Registry Capacity Building $300.000 $187.456 $110.179 DG TTF 2008-2009
2010 Elections Cycle Support N/A N/A $1.060.000 TRAC 1
Civic Education Promotion $113.741 $115.040 $29.751 UNDEF 2007-2009
Support to National Aid Coordination Commission (CNCA) $267.000 $188.407 $250.000 Netherlands, TRAC 2 2008-2009
PRSP Monitoring and Evaluation $40.220 $37.086 $70.000 TRAC 2 2008-2009
Burundi Emergency Programme Support $11.413.755 $7.413.748 $3.714.169 DFID, Belgium,Norway, Morocco, TRAC 2 2006-2009
Strategic Planning Support $92.300 $61.532 $85.000 TRAC 2 2008-2009
Second National Communication on Climate Change $178.600 $114.500 $108.400 GEF 2005-2009
Sustainable Land Management N/A N/A $64.800 GEF 2009-2010
Disaster Risk Management Planning $517.000 $513.949 $592.000 CPR TTF (Spain), TRAC 1 2008-2009
Avian Flu Emergency Response Update $11.169 $11.022 N/A BCPR 2006-2008
National Urban Strategy Development $12.000 $6.106 $7.571 TRAC 2 2008-2009
Human Development Report Creation $45.000 $27.460 $110.000 TRAC 2 2008-2009
TRAC 1 - UNDP funds for programmatic support
TRAC 2 - UNDP internal funds for research and study
DG TTF - Democratic Governance ematic Trust Fund
UNDEF - UN Democratic Fund
DFID - UK Department for International Development
CPR TTF - Crisis Prevention & Recovery ematic Trust Fund
BCPR - Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery, a specialized bureau within UNDP
GEF - Global Environment Facility"
Transforming Capacity 32 %
Other Projects 68 %
12 % Collective Future
23 % Human Capital
64 % Physical Resources
Project Name
Project
Cycle
Project
Budget
International Partners National Counterpart
Small and Micro Enterprise Promotion 2008-2009 $263,260 PBF Ministry of Commerce, Industry and Tourism
DIMAC (Plastic Tubing) Competitiveness
Enhancement
2006-2008 $140,000 IFTF Ministry of Commerce, Industry and Tourism
Rugofarm Essential Oils Industry Support 2005-2008 $66,648 IFTF Ministry of Commerce, Industry and Tourism
Burundi Normalization Bureau Quality Testing
Support
2007-2008 $115,092 IFTF Ministry of Commerce, Industry and Tourism
COTRIEX (Dried Fruits and Vegetables)
Competitiveness Enhancement
2006-2008 $110,000 IFTF Ministry of Commerce, Industry and Tourism
Greater Access to Justice Support 2008-2009 $1,106,128 Luxemburg, PBF Ministry of Justice and Keeper of the Seals
Reduction of Impunity for Sexual Violence 2008-2009 $200,000 Luxemburg Ministry of Justice and Keeper of the Seals
Justice Sector Reform 2007-2009 $1,799,174 BCPR, TRAC 1 Ministry of Justice and Keeper of the Seals
Reintegration, Rehabilitation and Poverty
Reduction
2005-2008 $4,511,764
BCPR, Netherlands, Norway,
TRAC 2
Ministry of National Solidarity, Repatriation, National Reconstruction, Human
Rights and Gender
Displaced Family Reintegration 2008-2009 $212,447 PBF Ministry of National Defense and Veterans Affairs
Human Security 2008-2009 $1,567,751 UNTFHS
Ministry of National Solidarity, Repatriation, National Reconstruction, Human
Rights and Gender
Community Recovery Programme 2009-2010 $5,457,553 BCPR, Netherlands, PBF
Ministry of National Solidarity, Repatriation, National Reconstruction, Human
Rights and Gender
Reintegration of Ex-Combattants 2009-2010 $2,500,000 Japan
Ministry of National Solidarity, Repatriation, National Reconstruction, Human
Rights and Gender
Corruption Reduction 2007-2009 $499,420 PBF
Ministry of Good Governance, Privatization, the General Inspectorate of State and
Local Government
HIV/AIDS Support 2006-2008 $151,571 UNAIDS, TRAC 1 Ministry of Health
PBF - Peacebuilding Fund, a multi-donor thematic trust fund
TRAC 1 - UNDP internal funds for programmatic support
TRAC 2 - UNDP internal funds for research and study
IFTF - Institute for the Future
BCPR - Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery, a specialized bureau within
UNDP UNTFHS - UN Trust Fund for Human Security
4 % Economic Opportunities
17 % Legal Protection
80 % Social Vulnerability
2008-2009 investment
Nurturing Equity 19 %
Other Projects 81 %
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reduction of
SOCIAL VULNERABILITY
A young returnee washes dishes in front of her new home at the Muyanga
Peace Village (UNDPs Burundi Emergency Programme Support Project). KDP
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U
NDPs goal in pursuing equitable develop-
ment is to support the eorts of a wide
range of national players government,
private sector, civil society organizations, and
community leaders, among othersto create
an environment in which the people of Burundi
can expand their choices and opportunities. e
cornerstones of this environment include access
to basic social services: health care, education,
shelter, and nutrition, without which a person is
vulnerable to falling short of reaching his or her
potential. In supporting all Burundians, and the
most vulnerable in particular, to access education,
to be protected from the elements with proper
shelter, to receive improved health care services,
and to have reliable sustenance, UNDP is support-
ing national players to ensure that every citizen
has the opportunity to pursue the life that she
or he desires.
Reintegrating ex-combatants, internally
displaced people & returned refugees
Inequitable management of recovery resources
related to reintegration of returnees, internally
displaced people, demobilized ex-combatants and
other aected vulnerable groups could be a source
of conict within a community undergoing recovery
from extended conict. Since 2005, UNDPs Reinte-
gration Programme, in partnership with Germany,
Japan, Norway, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Swit-
zerland, has worked to reduce conict by supporting
the peaceful return of internally displaced people
and refugees to their communities and ensure an
equitable share of recovery dividends.
Starting in 2006, to enhance decision making at
the local level, UNDP supported the completion
of Provincial Operational Reintegration Plans in
14 of the 17 provinces by the end of 2009. ese
plans support the peaceful return of internally
displaced people and refugees to their communities
by ensuring that recovery dividends are equita-
bly shared and reintegration initiatives are in line
with the priorities determined by the community.
UNDP also supported the empowerment of a total
of 1,550 members of traditional and local systems
of conict management across 31 communes in
Makamba, Rutana, Ruyigi, Cankuzo and Karuzi
provinces. ese members included village elders/
wise men, local elected leaders, and representatives
from womens associations, among others. rough
training in techniques to resolve the high number
of disputes arising from the inux of returnees to
these areas, the conict management facilitators
have been able to increase their role in preventing
and managing local conicts.
rough the Reintegration Programme, UNDP has
assisted the Government to rehabilitate and im-
prove physical infrastructure across the country,
Sorting beans outside a communal seed center, Karuzi province
(UNDPs Reintegration, Rehabilitation and Poverty Reduction
Programme). KDP
Potatoes sprouting in a communal seed shed, Karuzi province (UNDPs Reintegration, Rehabilitation and Poverty Reduction
Programme). KDP
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including: the creation of 90 kilometers of rural
roads and bridges, construction and rehabilitation
of 30 primary schools, 10 health centers, 4 veteri-
nary clinics, and 139 seed centers and warehouses,
rehabilitation of 585 hectares of swampland and
watersheds, distribution of 969,100 saplings, in-
cluding 3,600 palm oil saplings, distribution of 28
tons of enhanced seed and other agricultural sup-
port including henhouses, beehives, fertilizers, sh
farms, farming tools and grain processing machines,
training for 159 agricultural associations, distribu-
tion of 2,289 livestock animals, and support to 988
vulnerable families to build or receive new homes
(see prole of Yohan). e HIMO (High Intensity
Physical Labor) activities, implemented in partner-
ship with the UN Food and Agricultural Organiza-
tion (FAO) and the World Food Programme (WFP),
served a number goalslocal economic stimulation
through the provision of temporary employment
to the laborers (Work for Cash and Work for Food),
easing pressure on overcrowded social services, and
bringing together dierent social groups to foster
acceptance of returnees to host communities and
peaceful co-existence.
Within the Reintegration Programme, UNDP sought
to support micro-projects with highly diversied
value chains, in order that direct interventions
Transporting goods along a new dirt road, Karuzi province
(UNDPs Reintegration, Rehabilitation and Poverty Reduction
Programme). KDP
Buying vegetables at the newly built marketplace, Karuzi
province (UNDP's Reintegration, Rehabilitation and Poverty
Reduction Programme). KDP
Returning from Tanzania to the refugee familys house of
origin, Makamba province. MB
A new bridge over the Ndurumu River connects two neighbor-
ing communes, Karuzi province (UNDPs Reintegration,
Rehabilitation and Poverty Reduction Programme). KDP
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A block of small storefronts, Karuzi province (UNDPs Reintegration, Rehabilitation and Poverty Reduction Programme). KDP
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stimulated other correlated economic activities
in turn. One example is the palm-oil community
project, which involved exploiting the ubiquitous
palm trees found on the south-western, coastal
area of Burundi and providing a palm-oil extraction
machine to an association of 22 returnees and local
community members to extract oil more eciently
and eectively. Previously the group extracted the
oil with a hand-powered machine that was labor
intensive and time consuming. Now the Associa-
tion is able to process the fruit of their communally
owned palm trees more quickly, as well as to oer
the machine for the use of other local community
members who pay a small fee, allowing the Associa-
tion to maintain their infrastructure. Furthermore,
the waste from the processing is sold to local women
who supplement their family incomes by separat-
ing out and cracking the nuts to sell the seeds to a
nearby soap factory. By providing a source of income
for many returnee families the mechanization of
the oil extraction station contributes to their eco-
nomic reintegration in the community, reducing
the competition for scarce resources and improving
community relations.
A general goods seller, operating out of a new store at the marketplace, Karuzi province (UNDPs Reintegration, Rehabilitation and Poverty Reduction Programme). KDP
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Another of the longer-term and most successful
of these interventions was a project to support ac-
cess to basic food security through solidarity chain
initiatives at the colline level. e solidarity chain
initiative, carried out across a number of collines
throughout the country, involves an initial dona-
tion of goats and cows to community members who
use the animal dung to improve their crop yield
in addition to selling and drinking the milk from
the female animals. Each family only assumes full
ownership of their animal once it has bred and the
ospring is successfully passed on to another fam-
ily, thus creating a chain of solidarity. e process
has created goodwill between neighbors, easing
the reintegration of various vulnerable groups, by
providing them with the ability to contribute to
their communities. Moreover, it has proved one of
the most successful reintegration strategies in the
long-run, as the animals provide both a sustainable
source of protein through their milk as well as a
sustainable source of fertilizer to enhance crops
for families otherwise vulnerable to food insecurity.
In 2009, with support from the UNDP Bureau of
Crisis Prevention and Recovery and the Peacebuild-
ing Fund, UNDP is preparing a targeted Community
Recovery Programme in Bubanza, Bujumbura Rurale
and Cibitoke provinces, in northern Burundi. ese
three provinces have a specically high concentra-
tion of returned refugees and internally displaced
citizens and have been largely neglected by previous
waves of rehabilitation interventions due to the
continued presence of the last armed rebel group
until early 2009.
e project supported the development of a National
Reintegration Strategy, which was adopted in Feb-
ruary 2010 by the Government. e strategy falls
under the commitments of the Republic of Burundi
and the UN Peacebuilding Commission as outlined
in the conclusions of the third semi-annual review
of the implementation of the Strategic Framework
for Peacebuilding in Burundi and is the result of a
long series of consultations led by the Government
with UNDPs support. e consultations included
participants from various government ministries,
civil society organizations and the international
community, via the Sectoral Group on Community
Recovery, Repatriation and Reintegration.
In addition, thanks to Japan, UNDP is follow-
ing up the recently completed disarmament and
Meet Yohan
One of the most vulnerable among vulnerables, Yohan Kazungu is a
member of the pygmy Twa people that make up less than 1% of the
population of Burundi. Although the Twa are a separate ethnicity from
the majority of the population and were not politically involved in the
protracted ethnic conict that started in 1993, they nevertheless lost a
signicant percentage of their population during the violence and gener-
ally suffer social exclusion from land ownership, formal employment and
education. Surrounded by other Twa families in Shombo commune, in
Karuzi province, Yohan, until recently, was living in a traditional Twa round
hut, made of thatch, with his wife and four children. When it rained the
water leaked through the roof and onto the family. He often felt that his
living conditions were behind those of many other people in the country.
Between 2005 and 2008, the Reintegration Programme helped Yohanas
well as 974 other displaced people, repatriated refugees and other vul-
nerable individualsconstruct his own house and contribute towards the
construction of other houses in his community by teaching him to make
bricks, and providing other building materials. As soon as he had 5,000
bricks, Yohan was able to build
himself a small house with four
rooms, a tin roof, windows and
a door. Yohan now feels that
he and the other members of
his community have been able
to move forward to a similar
level as that of other groups
in the country. Rainwater no
longer enters his house, so he,
his wife and children can stay dry by waiting inside until the storm passes.
In addition to being better lit, the new house is more spacious than his
previous dwelling such that Yohan is now able to stand and stretch his
arms fully overhead. He felt motivated by the work that he invested in
building his own home and working together with other members of his
community to make bricks. Most importantly, Yohan feels that he now
lives well, and is nally able to partake of the dividends of peace as do
other Burundians in the rest of the country.
We were always behind, but now we
are on the same level as others
KDP
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demobilization process with a one-year project
focused on peaceful and sustainable socio-economic
reintegration of the ex-combatants and demobilized
people in their host communities. By facilitating
psychosocial support, access to agricultural facilities
and Income Generating Activities, as well as involve-
ment in community development organizations and
structures, UNDP will support the ex-combatants,
demobilized population and their dependents to
reintegrate successfully, contributing to enhanced
security and accelerated development. Capacity
building for local reintegration actors and centralized
services will further help communities absorb the
ex-combatants and demobilized people and ensure
that all community members have equal opportuni-
ties to provide for themselves and their families.
Combating Corruption
Reducing corruption in Burundi will allow all citizens
equal access to the basic social services provided by
the state, regardless of means or connections. In
2008, with support from the Peacebuilding Fund,
UNDP facilitated the formation and activation of
17 Local Anti-Corruption Task Forces. ese Task
Forces are comprised of representatives from local
civil societies working to reduce corruption and
promote good economic governance, to advocate
against corruption and serve as watchdogs reporting
potential abuses. In an example of south-south co-
operation, the Government of Burundis corruption
case-building capacity was sustainably improved
through the training of 4 ocials in South Africa as
trainers, who subsequently trained 73 special court
members and representatives from the Supreme
Court and the Public Finance Oce on proof, fraud,
internet fraud and performing searches.
Mechanisms to enforce anti-corruption, including
the special Anti-Corruption Court, based in Bu-
jumbura, and the four regional commissariats, as
well as OLUCOME, the National Anti-Corruption
and Economic Misspending Observatory, are better
equipped to carry out their work thanks to UNDPs
An anti-corruption sticker decorates a detention center hallway
in Bwiza, Bujumbura. SL
Palm nuts being processed in a mechanical oil extraction machine, Makamba province (UNDPs Reintegration, Rehabilitation and
Poverty Reduction Programme). KDP
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of representatives from civil society organizations
working to reduce corruption, enhancing their co-
ordination and resulting in a jointly organized cel-
ebration of the 3rd International Anti-Corruption
Day in Kayanza in 2008. e day included the par-
ticipation of representatives from the private sector
and provincial ocials. An address from the Head
of State, as well as educational performances and
games helped inform the thousands of participants
on the importance of reducing corruption and its
resulting burden on Burundis development.
HIV/AIDS Support
With Burundis current HIV/AIDS prevalence rate
at 3.47% of the population and climbing, estimated
support in 2008 and 2009. UNDP supplied them
with basic equipment, such as vehicles, comput-
ers, furniture and other administrative material as
well as with training in relevant areas. OLUCOME
now has even greater visibility, and citizens are
better informed on anti-corruption measures tak-
ing place in Burundi through UNDPs support to
build a public website, (www.olucome.bi). UNDP
further promoted public access to anti-corruption
information through a week-long television spot
broadcast across public and private media chan-
nels and a series of sensitization sessions for local
leaders on their responsibilities to ght corruption
and how to report to the Special Anti-Corruption
Brigades. UNDP helped establish a national forum
Surng the OLUCOME website, Bujumbura (UNDPs Corruption Reduction Project). SL
at up to 10% in urban areas, the disease is and will
continue to be a signicant vulnerability factor in the
populations health. Moreover, high rates of HIV/
AIDS negatively aects productivity, longevity and
other key indicators traditionally associated with
the disease. UNDP has partnered with UNAIDS
to focus its interventions on coordination at the
national and regional levels, and on building lo-
cal advocacy and support for people aected and
infected by the disease.
rough 4 regional workshops in Bujumbura, Gitega,
Ruyigi and Muyinga, UNDP assisted the National
AIDS Reduction Commission (CNLS) to develop a
national and regional coordination and monitoring
mechanism, comprised of civil society representa-
tives, local elected leaders and people living with
HIV/AIDS (PLWHAs) to maximize the impact of
Burundis prevention of and response to the disease.
At the community level, the PLWHAs and their de-
pendants in Bujumbura Mairie province now have
advocacy focal points, thanks to UNDPs support for
empowering 120 local community leaders to defend,
protect and promote the rights of this population.
Further support was leant to seropositive pregnant
women and mothers across the country, through
the training of 549 community volunteers and
facilitators in the prevention of mother to child
transmission, 2,474 home visits, the distribution
of 162 socio-economic kits to bedridden women,
supplemental nutritional support to 8,629 babies
and 6,415 women on anti-retroviral medicine, and
the participation of more than 5,500 people in thera-
peutic psychosocial educations sessions nationwide.
An additional 150 PLWHAs were provided with legal
assistance. Helping this population overcome its
added vulnerability helps level the playing eld so
that Burundians infected and aected by HIV/AIDS
can focus their energy on the ever challenging task
of consolidating peace and regaining the means to
thrive in this post-conict context.
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expansion of
ECONOMIC
OPPORTUNITIES
Operating a crane at the Bujumbura port. SL
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populations across Burundi. With UNDPs sup-
port for a series of ve national exhibition fairs,
and participation in an international exhibition
in Rwanda these small businesses, engaged in
industries as wide-ranging as embroidery, carpen-
try, pottery, basketry, sewing, livestock-farming,
candle-making, leatherwork, honey gathering,
shoes, and oral arrangements, to name a few, and
have been able to network and expand their client
bases. To further promote national and interna-
tional partnerships, as well as share best practices,
a guide to best practices for micro-entrepreneurs
was developed and a training tool was conceived
for future trainings of micro entrepreneurs as
trainers in eective business and peacebuilding
practices. In 2009 and 2010, UNDP is working
with the Ministry of Commerce, Industry and
Tourism as well as the Ministry of Youth and
Sports to further promote peacebuilding micro-
entrepreneurs by establishing a permanent expo-
sition and market place in Bujumbura for greater
visibility and access to a larger market.
T
he impact of sustained violent conict
on a countrys economy can be devastat-
ingmarkets can cease to exist or function,
qualied personnel and physical assets are often
lost, production capacity can be wiped out, and
condence in the market almost always disap-
pears. Too often, the role of the local private
sector is then overlooked by both national and
international actors during the process of building
and consolidating peace. Needless to say, the long-
lasting conict that ravaged Burundi for more
than a decade has had a destructive impact on its
economy. UNDP recognized from the early stages
the essential role of supporting local economic
stimulation. A sustainable peace that establishes
a culture of hope and allows citizens to restart
livelihoods cannot be achieved without having
meaningful and viable economic opportunities
available that involve the people who have been
aected by conict. With projects promoting
small enterprises, private sector mechanisms and
companies as well as projects facilitating deeper
regional integration, UNDP is contributing to
an enhanced economic environment. Such an
environment will strengthen the ability of the
domestic private sector to contribute to poverty
reduction and peacebuilding.
Local Markets
Despite the eorts of micro and small entrepre-
neurs to run their businesses, the day-to-day
reality is challenging and complex in Burundi. In
2008 and 2009, thanks to Peacebuilding Funds and
in conjunction with the Ministry of Commerce,
Industry and Tourism within the framework of
BINUB, UNDP promoted the role of 52 small
and micro enterprises in peace consolidation and
reconciliation. ese enterprises are successfully
run by women, youth, ex-combatants, return-
ees, handicapped people and other vulnerable Select small and micro entrepreneurs supported through
fairs and workshops (UNDPs Small and Micro Enterprise
Promotion Project). SL
-2.8
Percentage annual growth rate
of GDP per capita in Burundi
between 1990 and 2005. Jumpstarting
economic recovery in an equitable way
is an essential element in consolidating
peace.
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The National Market
At a more macro level, UNDP partnered with the
United Nations Conference on Trade and Develop-
ment, the International Trade Center, the World
Trade Organization, and the World Bank to sup-
port the implementation of the Global Action Plan
of the Integrated Framework for Less Developed
Countries. rough the Framework, Burundi was
granted USD $1 million to strengthen the countrys
exports, reduce its international trade decit, and
create new jobs to ght poverty. Working with
the Ministry of Commerce, Industry and Tourism,
UNDP empowered the Dimac Society to compete
in regional markets and provide lower-cost supplies
of PVC tubes within Burundi through the provi-
sion of an industrial strength machine meeting
international standards. Dimac, based in Bujum-
bura, is one of the rst companies in the country
capable of producing connecting plastic PVC tubes,
used for piping clean drinking water in and out
of buildings. Other projects in the Global Action
Plan include projects to promote the exportation
of patchouli and citronella essential oils, to dry and
conserve agricultural products (fruits, vegetables,
aromatic and medicinal plants) for exportation, and
to strengthen the capacity of the national Quality
Control Oce to test the chemical composition of
products to be exported according to international
standards. Although logistical and other obstacles
have prevented some of these other projects from
being implemented to the fullest degree possible,
UNDP is in the process of identifying potential
areas for the development of inclusive markets as
part of a broader strategy that is being elaborated
to encourage pro-poor private sector growth at the
national level.
Select small and micro entrepreneurs supported through
fairs and workshops (UNDPs Small and Micro Enterprise
Promotion Project).
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rebalancing of
LEGAL PROTECTION
Young prisoners of the renovated Rumonge Prison, Bururi province
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T
ogether with the executive and legislative
branches, the judiciary forms the third pillar
of a just, balanced and democratic form of
government. Equal opportunities for all citizens
cannot be reinforced if there is no equity before the
law or a functioning legal system through which
to demand recourse in case of a rights violation.
Following more than a decade of civil war, Burundis
legal system was both physically destroyed and
operationally undermined. Courts, prisons, and
professional training were completely neglected
and impunity reigned unchecked. With a strong
emphasis on empowering ordinary citizens, UNDP
has responded with several key catalytic projects to
strengthen the rule of law in Burundi. By support-
ing improved access to justice, capacity-building for
magistrates and court personnel, and the reduction
of sexual and gender-based violence against women
and children, UNDP is helping Burundi re-establish
a judiciary that is seen to be accessible, equitable,
and an eective means for peaceful conict resolu-
tion and accountability for all citizens.
Judiciary Investment
anks to Peacebuilding Funds and the support of
Luxemburg, UNDP assisted the Ministry of Justice
to improve access to the legal system for more than
1.1 million citizens in Makamba, Rutana, Ngozi
and Mwaro provinces through the construction
and equipping of 17 Communal tribunals that had
been entirely destroyed during the crisis. Previ-
ously, these citizens had to travel to a neighboring
commune in order to reach a tribunal, which was
exceedingly dicult given the very hilly terrain and
Ocial handover of a newly constructed Communal Tribunal in Busiga Commune, Ngozi province (UNDPs Greater Access to Justice Project).
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the practical nonexistence of paved roads in these
rural areas. e new tribunals not only enhance local
accountability, but also serve to dramatically reduce
the average processing time for cases awaiting trial.
Within the framework of Justice Sector Reform,
UNDP supported the improved functioning of the
Tribunaux de Grands Instances (provincial courts)
in Ngozi and the Oce of the Public Prosecutor in
2008 by empowering 12 Magistrates to become
trainers for managing courts and tribunals. ese
trainers were subsequently able to train 205 clerks
and magistrates on this subject. e position of
magistrate was further professionalized through
the training of 254 magistrates from all jurisdic-
tions on human rights and on drafting arrests and
judgments and an additional 1,078 magistrates on
ethics. Furthermore, a comprehensive analysis, jus-
tifying the basis for legal assistance and specifying
what types of cases are entitled to representation
according to Burundi law, was completed in April
2009. is enables the Ministry of Justice to put into
practice the necessary obligations and guarantees for
juveniles, victims of sexual violence, the mentally
ill, and those facing severe penalties as prescribed
in the new criminal code.
Sexual Violence
e extended years of violent conict between
numerous armed rebel groups saw a spike in the
Opposing parties make their cases at the Communal Tribunal, Mwaro Province (UNDPs Greater Access to Justice Project). KDP
Newly trained and robed magistrates pass their judgments (UNDPs Greater Access to Justice Project). KDP
Where the United Nations succeeds in sup-
porting change that results in the betterment
of peoples lives through their equal protec-
tion under the law and the attainment of jus-
tice, it strengthens the rule of law. Ultimately,
the equal protection of the law as the means
to achieve freedom from fear and freedom
from want is the most sustainable form of pro-
tection. Perhaps the United Nations contribu-
tions to such protection are its most profound
achievements. Yet, success in this pursuit is
among the hardest to attain.
UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon,
August 2008 (A/63/226)
UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010 73
number of rapes and other forms of sexual and
gender-based violence (SGBV) against women and
children. Most of these victims have not been able
to seek justice to date for a number of reasons,
including the great distance to the nearest court,
widespread social acceptance of impunity for such
crimes, and lack of knowledge about legal protection.
To combat this last point, thanks to support from
Luxemburg, UNDP supported a broad-reaching
public awareness campaign carried out by the 14
national Family Development Committees (CDF),
who were able to inform more than 10,000 women
and children across 51 communes nationwide about
their legal rights. In March 2009, the campaign
spread to the airwaves, when UNDP supported a
three-hour simultaneous broadcast across 13 public
and private radio stations on the subject Men and
Women: Together for the eradication of violence
against women. In addition, 25 SGBV focal points
from government Ministries, local NGOs and the
UN System were trained as trainers to enhance
sensitivity to SGBV concerns across their respec-
tive organizations. UNDP is continuing to work
with the Ministry of Justice and the Ministry of
Human Rights and Gender to develop a national
strategy to reduce sexual violence against women
and children as well as with the Burundian Bar
Association to further support justice for victims
of sexual violence by providing them with free and
low-cost legal counsel in accordance with the Beijing
73
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A female prisoner in her newly renovated and equipped prison,
Muramvya province (UNDPs Justice Sector Reform Project).
KDP
Meet
Annonciate
Annonciate Ndikumana is a slight, 17-year-old student whose life events
once lead her to jail. Her father died before she can remember, and An-
nonciate spent the majority of her formative years living with her mother
and step-father in Murambi Colline in Ngozi Province. When her mother
fell sick and passed away in 2004, Annonciates step-father began to
sell the mothers property, including the land her mother had owned.
Although she was only 12 at the time of her mothers death, Annonciate
eventually realized that she and her four younger brothers and sisters
were being deprived of their rightful possessions by their step-father. In
following the step-fathers instructions for recuperating her mothers land,
Annonciate was arrested for property destruction and imprisoned at the
police post in her commune. For a week she was the only prisoner in a
station full of male ofcers and she was petried that they might rape her.
At night she asked for a candle and was so afraid that she kept it lit until
each morning. She exited her cell only once, when her step-uncle and
aunt were able to pay the ofcers to visit Annonciate for a few minutes.
UNDPs Juvenile Justice pilot project, a collaborative effort between the
Government of Burundi and BINUBs Justice and Human Rights Joint
Programme, found Annonciate in the prison a week after she arrived.
The projects legal counsel con-
vinced the police to release her
temporarily and pushed for the
case to be heard as quickly as
possible in a system where lim-
ited capacity to process cases
and inequitable access to legal
representation means cases are frequently ignored for months, even years.
In January 2008, a judge pronounced a light sentence and Annonciates
case was closed. The lawyer, provided through UNDPs assistance, was
further able to bring a second case to court, where it was judged that the
step-father return all her mothers property to Annonciate and her siblings.
She is incredibly grateful for the projects intervention, implemented in
partnership with the International Non-governmental Organization Terre
des Hommes, without which she believes she would still be in jail wait-
ing for her case to be heard and would have had a breakdown from fear
and the trauma of the experience. Since she no longer worries about
her legal problems, she is able to study well and go to school every day,
where she is usually the rst or second student in her 10th form class.
Her favorite subjects are Biology, Chemistry and Physics.
If it werent for the intervention, I would still
be in jail waiting for my case to be heard
Now my legal problems no longer worry me
and I can study well for school where I am
usually rst or second in my class
KDP
74 UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010
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Declaration. Specically, 5 select SGBV cases are
to act as test cases for close follow-up and "high
prole" supervision by the Justice Joint Programme.
Furthermore, a one-stop-shop model for care and
treatment of victims of SGBV is to be piloted in the
four Northern Provinces.
Penitentiary Rehabilitation
Similarly to the judiciary, the penal system in Bu-
rundi was also neglected and damaged during the
years of violent conict. With support from PBF
and Luxemburg, UNDP is working with the Min-
istry of Justice to provide structural renovations
and equipment to 7 prisons, many of which have
not been maintained since their construction soon
after Burundis independence from Belgium and are
lacking such basic material as mattresses, blankets,
dishes and utensils. Between 2008 and 2009, ve
of the prisons were completed, raising the living
standards of 3,216 prisoners in conformity with
minimum international human rights standards for
incarceration and pre-trial detention. e remaining
prisons are expected to be rehabilitated by the end
of 2010. UNDP further supported the updating of
Burundis Penal Code, which was adopted at the end
Entrepreneurial training for prisoners of the Central Prison of
Mpimba, Bujumbura (UNDPs Justice Sector Reform Project).
MB
Muramvya prison is equipped with a new rain water storage system, Muramvya province (UNDPs Justice Sector Reform Project).
KDP
UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010 75
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of April 2009, and its printing and distribution to all
upper-level magistrates across the country. A revised
Criminal Procedure Code, which animates the Penal
Code, is underway, to be completed by mid 2010.
By supporting the Director General of Prison Aairs
(DGAP) to launch a pilot project to reduce pretrial
juvenile detention and to undertake a month-long
series of public sessions between prison and court
ocials and magistrates, UNDP was able to help the
judiciary close 440 of 924 backlogged juvenile case
les (almost half), releasing many of these minors
back to their families to await trial (see prole of
Annonciate). Such reforms of the Justice Sector in
Burundi provide more equal legal protection and
access to citizens of all ages from rural and urban,
IDP and returned refugee backgrounds.
Distribution of the revised Penal Code, Bujumbura (UNDPs Justice Sector Reform Project). MB
UNDP supported the reform of the justice proce-
dures for minors through four consultative sessions
in 2008 for magistrates, judicial police ocers and
social workers, providing a basis for the development
of a national strategy. ese sessions further served
to identify a number of particularly strong candi-
dates from each of the three branches to implement
the training of trainers module developed by UNDP
on supporting juveniles within the justice system.
76 UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010
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UNISC engineer surveys the site for a new primary
school, Buhomba, Bujumbura Rural province (UNDP's
Burundi Emergency Programme Support Project). MB
UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010 77
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Delivering Accelerated Recovery in a difcult post-conict
environment
Timely program delivery is crucial to recovery
Delivering
ACCELERATED
RECOVERY
The true measure of the success of the United
Nations is not how much we promise, but how
much we deliver for those who need us most.
United Nations Secretary-General, Ban Ki-moon,
acceptance speech to the General Assembly upon election
78 UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010
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the UN Integrated
SERVICE CENTER
Engineers and architects discuss a blueprint, UNISC. SL
UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010 79
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I
n an unstable post-conict environment, the
timing and the quality of recovery interven-
tions is crucial. e UN Integrated Service
Center (UNISC) is Burundis one-stop shop for
accelerated program delivery, providing UN
agencies, the Government and NGOs with critical
goods and services to quickly implement appropri-
ate recovery responses.
Established in 2007 to enhance national aid absorp-
tion capacity and facilitate the UN systems program
implementation in Burundi, UNISC plays a key role
in maximizing the peacebuilding momentum in Bu-
rundi by providing strategic and technical assistance
in the preparation, implementation and monitoring
of development projects. UNISC is responsible for
the procurement of a large variety of goods, from
vehicles, computers, oce furniture and reintegra-
tion kits to sophisticated health service equipment
and radio communication materials. UNISC is also
in charge of recruiting a large spectrum of national
and international experts in the various elds of
governance, early recovery, and private sector de-
velopment, among many others.
rough the negotiating power of economies of
scale, local and international Long Term Agree-
ments, a database of suppliers and partners, and
standardized practices the UN Integrated Service
Center limits the need to duplicate work, making it
the fastest and most cost-ecient option to acceler-
ate the provision of supplies for the population. With
A one stop shop within
the framework of UN Integration


L
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Lake Rweru
Lake Cohoha
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RWANDA
TANZANIA
D
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O
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O
Lake Kanzigiri
Lake Rwihinda
Lake Gacamirindi
10 0 10 20 5
Kilometers

Les limites portes sur cette carte sont traces titre indicatif et n'ont aucune valeur juridique
1:1 200 000 Echelle:
Prepared by United Nations Integrated Service Centre (UNISC)
Sources: IGEBU, ISTEEBU, UNDP, CISNU- GIS
Carte des Chantiers du Programme d'Urgence et du Fonds de Consolidation de la Paix
CISNU/ PNUD BURUNDI - Juin 2009
UNISC work sites
80 UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010
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89% of 251goods providers located within Burundi,
UNISC ensures local investment in peacebuilding
projects and encourages greater national ownership
in the results achieved.
Diverse materials and equipment provided by UNISC in 2008
and 2009.
While some organizations only prioritize cost in
making procurement decisions, UNISC also empha-
sizes quality, meaning its results are more durable
and ultimately more valuable. ree dierent major
modes of procurement and an impressive pool of
expertise, including engineers, logisticians, and
procurement and recruitment experts, ensures
that UNISCs tailored support meets the needs of
a large diversity of clients.
Supporting a total of 47 varied projects through-
out the country, across more than six dierent
UNISC's own Delivery Growth
2006 2007 2008
Number of Purchase Orders
0
200
400
600
800
1,000
757
648
992
2006 2007 2008
Expenditures (in USD thousands)
0
5,000
10,000
15,000
20,000
25,000
30,000
35,000
40,000
$10,416
$36,394
$19,084
2006 2007 2008
Number of contruction sites
0
$36,394
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
32
112
MB MB
UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010 81
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e UNISC Director manages a strategy meeting with BINUBs Security Sector Reform and Small Arms Joint Programme. MB
implementation areas, UNISC experienced rapid
growth throughout 2008 and into 2009. With
more than double the number of transactions and
explosively expanding delivery by almost twice
the total value in 2007, UNISC proved to be up
to the task of accelerating delivery directly to the
population.
Building on the successes of 2008 and 2009,
UNISC will continue providing its advice and
operational support to the Government and UN
agencies in 2010, as well as commence its de-
velopment of national capacities in programme
planning, monitoring and evaluation, and pro-
curement of goods and services. UNISC is also
playing a critical role in the implementation of the
Harmonized Approach for Cash Transfer (HACT)
to government entities, building state capacity in
nancial management while encouraging transpar-
ency in conformity with the Accra Action Agenda
and the Paris Declaration.
MB MB SL
82 UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010
UNDP Burundi
In Figures
208
Number of new personnel
contracts signed by UNDP
in 2008, including National, ALD, Interna-
tional, Service and SSA contracts
1
as part
of the rapid increase in program activities.
The ofce is building its human resource
capacity to expand the quantity and quality
of delivery in response to Burundis needs.
1 Source: UNDP Burundi Human Resources Unit
1st
Rank of Burundi among all 44
UNDP ofces in the Regional
Bureau for Africa for number of partici-
pants in the 2008 and 2009 Global Staff
Surveys (3rd among all 138 Country Of-
ces worldwide). With more than 90% of
staff members
4
anonymously registering
their individual perceptions of the ofce,
this rank represents an all-time record for
UNDP Burundi as well.
4 Source: UNDP Burundi Human Resources Unit
1 : 1
Approximate ratio of perma-
nent female employees work-
ing for UNDP Burundi at all levels at the
beginning of 2009, including project staff,
compared to 105 men
2
. Among profes-
sional positions the ratio in 2008 was 1 in
3 (33.3%), up from 23.1% in 2007. UNDP
Burundis improved gender balance indica-
tor demonstrates dedication toward includ-
ing female perspectives and strengths
in all areas, particularly in management
positions.
2 Source: UNDP Burundi Human Resources Unit
9 in 10
Proportion of staff who
felt that the UNDP
Burundi ofce was free from prejudice and
harassment, as indicated in the anony-
mous 2008 Global Staff Survey
3
. Addition-
ally, 86% indicated that they felt job pride,
and 87% felt that the ofce had ethical
transparency.
3 Source: page 5, Global Sta Survey Results for Burundi
KDP
UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010 83
U
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F
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7th
Rank of UNDP Burundi among
the other ofces under the
Regional Bureau for Africa in terms of
programme expenditure in 2008. In 2006
and 2007 Burundi ranked 25th, and 14th,
respectively.
10
10 Source: Balanced Scorecard, 7 Feb. 2009
511
Number of ofcial eld mis-
sions undertaken by UNDP staff
to monitor and evaluate on-going projects
in the interior of Burundi between January
2008 and June 2009.
12
12 Source: UN Security Cell, Burundi
255
Number of active UNDP email
addresses in the Burundi
Country Ofce.
11
11 Source: UNDP Burundi Information Technology Unit
15
Number of distinct bilateral in-
ternational partners supporting
UNDPs work in Burundi in 2008 and 2009,
including Belgium, Egypt, the European
Commission, France, Germany, Japan,
Luxemburg, Morocco, the Netherlands,
Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the
United Kingdom and the United States of
America.
6
6 Source: UNDP Programme Management Support Unit
$1.35 m
Surplus, in US
dollars, recovered
from third parties for use of UNDP ser-
vices in 2008, representing a forty-fold
improvement compared to the -$32,000
balance at the beginning of 2007.
7
7 Source: Extrabudgetary Status Report, 25 Aug. 2009
80.0 %
Actual delivery rate
for 2008, based on a
ratio of money spent compared to money
budgeted.
8
8 Source: Balanced Scorecard, 29 Jan. 2009
325 %
percentage improve-
ment of UNDPs delivery
(in US dollar value) in 2008 compared to
delivery in 2006.
9
9 Source: Balanced Scorecard, 11 Sep. 2009, actual ratio is
approximately 3.246
$28,618,670
Value,
in US
dollars, of Peacebuilding Fund projects in
Burundi, which are nancially managed
by UNDP in 2008 and 2009
5
. Burundi
is currently in a peace consolidation (as
opposed to peace-keeping) phase, which
the UN system is supporting through a
number of integrated and non-integrated
programs and projects.
5 Source: http://www.unpbf.org/burundi/burundi-projects.
shtml, http://www.unpbf.org/emergency.shtml
84 UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010
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UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010 85
2008 and 2009 were record-setting years for UNDP
Burundi, with programme delivery almost tripling,
eective insertion into the UN integrated frame-
work, as well as the oces highest ever participa-
tion rates in the Global Sta Survey
1
two years in a
row. However, the UNDP Country Oce was also
exposed to enormous operational challenges due
to the sudden increase of nancial resources and
engagement in critical areas. Reecting upon the
achievements and disappointments has led to a
number of conclusions in various dierent areas,
from which UNDP hopes to draw wisdom for its
continued work in Burundi.
It is often said that change comes from within.
Much of UNDPs success in Burundi in 2008 and
2009 would have been impossible without the re-
inforced human resource capacity that grew rapidly
throughout this period. While project management
and reporting, as well as ATLAS (UNDPs online
management system) skills were sharpened in 2008,
they are not the oces greatest strength. If the
oce focuses on these areas for internal capac-
ity building in 2010, it should continue to deliver
outstanding results. e development of a tailor-
made partnership and communication strategy, able
to capture the specicity of the aid-coordination
landscape in Burundi, could substantially help the
Oce in improving still more its partnering capac-
1 An anonymous online survey to evaluate the Country
Oce open to all UNDP sta members
ity. Timely and substantial reporting should also
be part of these eorts.
UNDP has found that focusing on transforming
existing capacities, rather than trying to build new
ones, particularly in this post-conict environ-
ment, is the best path towards national ownership
and sustainability. National ownership is certainly a
process rather than an end point, reaching beyond
the state and beyond institutions. Expanding the
network of partners (civil society organizations,
private sector, community-based organizations,
etc.) has been also one of UNDPs key achieve-
ments in 2008 and 2009. Supporting national
stakeholders in modeling Burundis future pros-
pectsthrough the Vision 2025 exercisehas
laid the foundation for a promising partnership
in view of the upcoming Strategic Framework for
Poverty Reduction and achievement of the Mil-
lennium Development Goals.
UNDP certainly could not have achieved its 2008
and 2009 results in Burundi on its own. e UN
integrated frameworkBINUBhas been a
crucial environment for targeted peacebuilding
initiatives and throughout the past two years
UNDP collaborated closely with other UN agen-
cies and non-UN partners to harmonize goals and
actions. Partnership at all levels has proven to be
the best way to produce greater impact and cost
eciency. Specically within the UN system in
Burundi, while there is still a long way to go to
Taking
Stock
take full advantage of the benets of integration
at all levels, the integrated approach has allowed
UNDP and the UN to optimize their comparative
advantages and improve the results of their joint
interventions in support of Burundi.
At the programmatic level, UNDP Burundi found
that the quick availability of Peacebuilding Fund
resources to respond to post-conict emergen-
cies has been critical, allowing the deployment of
at times catalytic and at times stabilizing actions
critical to peace consolidation in Burundi. Among
other lessons learned, UNDP Burundi has con-
cluded that the project approach used (as opposed
to a geographically-based programme approach)
tended toward a certain fragmentation of initiatives,
diminishing the desired impact. Introducing the
early recovery approach to dening priorities from a
comprehensive understanding of community-based
needs constitutes an essential programmatic tool
to guarantee the interdependence of the peace and
the development agenda, as Burundi looks forward
to transitioning from a peace consolidation phase
to one focused on equitable growth.
T
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86 UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010
Main southern road away from Bujumbura. SL
UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010 87
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e positive and peaceful momentum in Burundi at
the beginning of 2009 paved the road toward 2010
in a clear and encouraging direction. Many of the
less visible accomplishments involved laying the
groundwork for greater concrete results in peace
consolidation and sustainable development in 2010
and beyond. UNDP has enjoyed a strategic position
within BINUB, the UN Integrated mission, whose
mandate was extended through the end of 2010. In
the lead-up to the 2010 national elections, UNDP
will continue supporting the three joint programmes
in fostering trust, transforming capacity and nurtur-
ing equity, to create an enabling environment for a
peaceful democratic process.
In order to continue fostering greater trust through
improved community safety, UNDP will maintain
its support to the Government to professionalize
the police and army forces and local justice system,
to ght the proliferation of small arms and light
weapons and to disarm the civilian population. In
partnership with the Oce of the High Commis-
sioner for Human Rights in Burundi and BINUB,
UNDP will support the Government to conduct
expansive and inclusive country-wide consultations
on the implementation of transitional justice mecha-
nisms for national reconciliation. Furthermore, by
supporting the consolidation of the practice of open
dialogue and peaceful resolution of dierences at
every level of society, UNDP will promote reconcili-
ation and greater social cohesion.
In order to continue transforming the nascent
capacity in Burundi, UNDP aims to improve the
states role as the primary driving force behind, and
manager of, sustainable development. By support-
ing Parliament and other democratic institutions,
building the capacity of political leaders, reforming
the Public Administration, and expanding the ca-
pacity of civil society and the media, UNDP aims to
promote the consolidation of a democratic culture.
Outside the framework of the integrated mission,
UNDP will continue its support to the Governments
strategic planning and aid coordination. To this
end, UNDP will help to nalize Burundis Vision
2025 and translate it into workable policies, as
well as support Burundis further alignment with
the Declaration of Paris, the Accra Forum and the
Doha Conference on Aid Eectiveness. In addition,
UNDP will continue to support Burundis preven-
tion of, and preparedness for, disasters, including
executing the Governments action plan for adapting
to climate change.
In order to continue nurturing equity, UNDP will
maintain its support for reviving the judiciary and
penitentiary sectors by promoting the independence
and eectiveness of the magistrate, improving access
to justice, ghting to end sexual violence against
women and children, and enhancing respect for hu-
man rights. Building on the previous reintegration
program and capitalizing on the preparation and
planning carried out in 2008 and early 2009, UNDP
Looking
Ahead
is implementing a new community recovery and
local development program. Using an early recov-
ery approach, UNDP will support the relaunch of
local economies, access to land and functional basic
social services, and accountable local governance,
ensuring that even the most vulnerable popula-
tions are able to overcome their disadvantages and
access the opportunities stemming from improved
stability and peace.
Aiming to shift the balance of project execution
to the Government, from 2010 forward, UNDP
Burundi will fully apply the ve global UNDP capac-
ity development conceptsengaging stakeholders
on capacity development, assessing capacity assets
and needs, formulating a capacity development re-
sponse, implementing the response and evaluating
the capacity developmentacross the sectors of
aid coordination, disaster risk management, local
governance and reintegration management. is will
ensure improved impact measurement and greater
accountability, in line with the Paris Declaration on
Aid Eectiveness, for UNDPs peacebuilding and
sustainable development interventions in 2010
and as the oce looks ahead.
88 UNDP BURUNDI REPORT 2008 towards 2010
UNDP
national
CAPACITY
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is wordart is a recreation based on a word cloud automatically generated from the report text on http://www.wordle.net/.
Caption, cover: 73,200 saplings were planted across the ve military zones of the
country in 2009, bringing together the National Police Force of Burundi (PNB), locally
elected leaders and the population, through UNDPs support to security sector reform.
United Nations Development Programme
August 2010
UNDP is the UNs global development network, advocating for change and connecting
countries to knowledge, experience and resources to help people build a better life.
Report prepared under the coordination of Gustavo Gonzalez and K. Danae Pauli with
the participation of Martina Bacigalupo, Fiona Davies, Molly Firkaly, Francis James,
Elfrida Kaneza, Jean Kabahizi and Rose Nitunga.
Photos by Martina Bacigalupo (MB) for UNDP, K. Danae Pauli (KDP) and Sylvain
Liechti (SL) for BINUB
Photos on pages 15 and 71 by Aaron Nsavyimana
Photos 1 and 4 in lmstrip on pages 36-37 by Afke Bootsman
Photo on page 27T provided by the International Conference on the Great Lakes
Region
Photo on page 33 provided by the Press Cell of the Burundian National Assembly
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e boundaries and names shown and the designations used on the included maps do
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Copyright 2010
United Nations Development Programme, Burundi
Chausse du Peuple Murundi, Bote Postale 1490, Bujumbura, Burundi
http://www.bi.undp.org
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UNDP Burundi
Chausse du Peuple Murundi, BP 1490 Bujumbura
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website: www.bi.undp.org
BURUNDI REPORT
2008 towards 2010