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Sherman Hemsley of ‘The Jeffersons’ dies, p2

Open swim set Aug. 1

Upfront

Families United will host an open swim for individuals with special needs 5:30-8 p.m. on Aug. 1 at the Delphos Municipal Swimming Pool. A rain date of Aug. 2 is set. The pool will be closed to the general public during the swim.

Record Penn State fine to help abused kids
By MICHAEL RUBINKAM and MARC LEVY The Associated Press

Wednesday, July 25, 2012

Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869

HERALD
Delphos, Ohio

US beats Spain in basketball exhibition, p6

The NCAA’s unprecedented $60 million fine against Penn State will hurt the university in its pocketbook. The silver lining is that it will help plenty of abused kids, and it Jefferson Athletic Boosters could even wind up preventwill hold its second annual ing abuse — if it is distribPurse Bingo on Aug. 3 at uted carefully, child welfare the Delphos Eagles Lodge advocates say. Tickets cost $30 for 20 As part of its punishment games of bingo and a meal. over the Jerry Sandusky sex There will also be raffles abuse scandal, Penn State and a 50/50 drawing. agreed Monday to pay $12 Proceeds benmillion a year for the next efit Jefferson’s payfive years into an endowto-participate fund. ment to fund programs for Tickets are availthe detection, prevention and able by calling Brenda treatment of child abuse. Bonifas at 567-204-1992. Penn State and the NCAA have not settled on the procedure by which the money will be given out. But for nonprofit organizations living hand to mouth after years of cutbacks in state, federal and Allen County Council foundation aid, the cash could on Aging will host an open have a huge impact. house for Medicare benefi“You’re not going to find ciaries from 1-4 p.m. Aug. 8 anybody in our line of work at 215 N. Central in Lima. who’s going to say, ‘No, we’re Resource specialists will good,”’ said Chris Newlin, help Medicare beneficiaries executive director of the age 18 or older complete National Children’s Advocacy applications for Medicare Center in Huntsville, Ala. Prescription Drug Coverage “I think whenever there’s Low Income Subsidy as pot of money, people will well as applications for the hover,” added Debra Schilling Medicare Savings Program. Wolfe, executive direcNo appointment is necessary. Attendees must bring their Medicare card, record of monthly income and a record of assets, such as checking and savings accounts.

Boosters offer purse bingo

Council on Aging to host Medicare open house

tor of the Field Center for Children’s Policy, Practice & Research at the University of Pennsylvania. “It’s like drawing flies to honey.” The NCAA walloped Penn State with sanctions on Monday, including the fine, a four-year bowl ban and a sharp reduction in the number of football scholarships it may offer. The governing body acted swiftly following a report by former FBI Director Louis Freeh that accused coach Joe Paterno and three top officials of hiding child sexual abuse allegations against Sandusky more than a decade ago to protect the school and its powerful football program. Sandusky was convicted last month of 45 counts of abuse of 10 boys. He awaits sentencing. In a statement after the NCAA announced the sanctions, Penn State President Rodney Erickson said the $60 million fine will help the school meet its mandate to “become a national leader to help victims of child sexual assault and to promote awareness across our nation.” With so many organizations nationwide expected to vie for the cash, Penn State should set up a competitive grant program to set priorities and make sure the funds are See FINE, page 2

The Delphos Public Library Summer Reading Program Pool Party was held at the Delphos Municipal Swimming Pool Tuesday. Of the 210 readers in grades K-5 who signed up for the program, 146 finished their books and received invitations to the party along with their families.

Summer Reading Program ends with a splash

Stacy Taff photos

Local schools slate OHSAA meetings St. John’s and Jefferson are holding their mandatory Ohio High School Athletic Association information meetings for those who will be playing a fall sport at their respective schools. St. John’s is slated for 7:30 p.m. Thursday in the Arnzen Gymnasium for all parents and students, grades 7-12. Jefferson will be hosting its session 6 p.m. Aug. 2 at the high school for all parents of fall athletes. Midget football sign-ups announced Sign-ups for the 2012 Delphos midget football season will run from 6-7 p.m. July 30 at the Stadium Park shelterhouse. This is for anyone 9-12 years old not currently on a team. You must be 9 by or on Sept. 1 and no older than 12. Try-outs will run from 6-7 p.m. Aug. 6-7 near Diamond 4. Contact Ron Ebbeskotte at (419) 6927191 with any questions. Hot Thursday with high in low 90s and 50 percent chance of showers, storms. See page 2.

Sports

Long-awaited rainfall this week gives corn crops a bath and a drink as plants struggle to survive in drought conditions. Though Delphos has had a few short-lived showers in recent weeks, Monday and Tuesday was the first steady, long-lasting rainfall in several weeks. BY MIKE FORD mford@delphosherald.com

Stacy Taff photo

Thrift Shop preparing for sales

Nancy Spencer photos

Rain, rain, don’t go away!
As drought conditions persist through the midwest, farmers are glad for any rain that falls on their crops. In the Tri-county, some fields have been at the brink of disaster while others had enough rain to hold steady thus far this summer. The Delphos area finally saw steady rainfall for several hours at a time Monday and Tuesday, causing farmer to breathe a sigh of relief. Van Wert County OSU Extension Educator Dr. Curtis Young said fields to the east had more rain this summer than those on the western edge of the region. For those plants, this weeks rain may not be their salvation. “There is quite a water deficit out there in the fields, so this rain is appreciated. With drought like this, any rain we get will at least help reduce the overall impact the drought has had but we aren’t out of the woods,” Young said. “With corn, we don’t know how much the rain may help it recover. Some fields were still in pretty good condition when the rain came. With soybeans, the plants will

Forecast

Delphos Interfaith Thrift Shop Co-ordinator Barb Haggard and her crew of dedicated, hard-working volunteers are busy preparing for this weekend’s half-price sale. On Thursday, Friday and Saturday, everything in the store will be on sale at halfprice, excluding the items located in the Boutique Department. Following this sale, the bi-annual 25-cent sale will be held Aug. 2, 3 and 4 and the following weekend, the annual school uniform sale will take place Aug. 9, 10 and 11 to coincide with the change-over from summer to the fall and winter items, which will be made available at that time. “With these big sales coming up, it’s an excellent time to pick up clothing for the kids to start the school year and then with the change-over to the fall and winter items, to find some great buys then as well,” Haggard said. Sale hours are 5-7 p.m. Thursdays; 1-4 p.m. Fridays and 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays. Above: Donna Hohlbein, left, and Karen Hartman sort children’s clothing. Below: An Indian display can be found in the Boutique Dept.

Index

Obituaries State/Local Politics Community Sports Business Classifieds TV World News

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

take great advantage of the rain and continue to grow, set pods and fill some of them with beans.” Several weather-related elements will factor into whether crops recover or not, according to Young. “The rain’s impact on fields will depend on how much more we get and the temperatures through the end of July and August, which is usually our hottest month of the year. So, we could still suffer some peril before we get to the point of adding up how much we have in the bins at the end of the season,” he said. Young also indicated those who raise livestock have been concerned about low feed supply and high grain prices brought on by drought in other parts of the Midwest. For now, local crops need more rain before ag leaders will know if Tri-county plants will help or hurt the nationwide issue. “As dry as we were, it will take a couple more days of constant rain — enough to give us about an inch or so every day to help crops be in less peril and make a recovery,” Young concluded.

2 – The Herald

Wednesday, July 25, 2012

www.delphosherald.com

Sherman Hemsley TV’s ‘The Jeffersons’ dies
The Associated Press EL PASO, Texas — George Jefferson was a bigot. A loudmouth. Rude. Obsessed with money. Arrogant. And yet he was one of the most enjoyable, beloved characters in television history. Much of that credit belongs to Sherman Hemsley, the gifted character actor who gave life to the blustering black Harlem businessman on “The Jeffersons,” one of TV’s longest running and most successful sitcoms — particularly noteworthy with its mostly black cast. The Philadelphia-born Hemsley, who police said late Tuesday died at his home in El Paso, Texas, at age 74, first played George Jefferson on CBS’s “All in the Family” before he was spun off onto “The Jeffersons.” The sitcom ran for 11 seasons from 1975 to 1985. With the gospel-style theme song of “Movin’ On Up,” the hit show depicted the wealthy former neighbors of Archie and Edith Bunker in Queens as they made their way on New York’s Upper East Side. Hemsley and the Jeffersons (Isabel Sanford played his wife) often dealt with contemporary issues of racism, but more frequently reveled in the sitcom archetype of a short-tempered, opinionated patriarch trying, often unsuccessfully to control his family. Hemsley’s feisty, diminutive father with an exaggerated strut was a kind of black corollary to Archie Bunker — a stubborn, high-strung man who had a deep dislike for whites (his favorite word for them was honkies). Yet unlike the blue-collar Bunker, played by Carroll O’Connor, he was a successful businessman whose was as rich as he was crass. His wife, Weezie, was often his foil — yet provided plenty of zingers as well. Despite the character’s many faults — money-driven, prejudiced, temperamental, a boor — Hemsley managed to make the character endearing, part of the reason it stayed on the air for so long. Much like O’Connor’s portrayal of Archie Bunker, deep down, Hemsley’s Jefferson loved his family, his friends (even the ones he relentlessly teased) and had a good heart. His performance was Emmy and Golden Globe nominated. “He was a love of a guy”

For The Record Fine of

(Continued from page 1)

OBITUARY

Hemsley and “immensely talented,” Norman Lear, producer of “The Jeffersons” and “All in the Family,” said after learning of his death. El Paso police said the actor was found dead at a local home where neighbors said he’d lived for years, and that no foul play is suspected. “When the Jeffersons moved in next door to the Bunkers, I wanted to deliver the George Jefferson who could stand up to Archie Bunker,” Lear recalled Tuesday. “It took some weeks before I remembered having seen Sherman in ‘Purlie’ on Broadway.” Hemsley read for the part and “the minute he opened his mouth he was George Jefferson,” Lear said. Hemsley was smaller than O’Connor’s Archie but “he was every bit as strong as Archie,” Lear said. Sherman Alexander Hemsley, though, was far less feisty. The son of a printing press-working father and a factory-working mother, Hemsley served in the Air Force and worked for eight years as a clerk for the Postal Service. Having studied acting as an adolescent at the Philadelphia Academy of Dramatic Arts, he began acting in New York workshops and theater companies, including the Negro Ensemble Company. For years, he kept his job at the post office while acting at night, before transitioning to acting full-time. He made his Broadway debut in 1970’s “Purlie,” a musical adaptation of Ossie Davis’ Jim Crow-era play “Purlie Victorious.” (Hemsley would later star in a 1981 made-for-TV version

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of “Purlie,” as well.) It was while touring the show that Hemsley was approached by Lear about playing a character on the sitcom that would become “All in the Family.” Hemsley joined the show in 1973, immediately catapulting himself from an obscure theater actor to a hit character on the enormously popular show. Two years later, “The Jeffersons” was spun off. Among the numerous “All in the Family” spin-offs (“Maude,” “Archie Bunker’s Place, “704 Hauser”), “The Jeffersons” was the longest-running. The character, the owner of a chain of dry-cleaning stores, was devised, Hemsley said, as “pompous and feisty.” “All of it was really hard ... because — rude, I don’t like to be that way,” Hemsley said in a 2003 interview for the Archive of American Television. “But it was the character, I had to do it. I had to be true to the character. If I was to pull back something, then it just wouldn’t work.” After “The Jeffersons” was abruptly cancelled, Hemsley starred in the sitcom “Amen” as a fiery Philadelphia church deacon, Ernest Frye. The show latest five years, running 1986 to 1991. Hemsley frequently turned up as a guest on sitcoms like “Family Matters,” “The Hughleys” and even, in a voice role, “Family Guy.” He twice reprised George Jefferson, appearing as his famous character on “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air” and, in 2011, on “House of Payne.” Hemsley, whose films include 1979’s “Love at First Bite,” 1987’s “Stewardess School” and 1987’s “Ghost Fever,” released an album, “Ain’t That a Kick in the Head,” in 1989. In an interview with the Gloucester County Times in 2011, Hemsley said his show business career actually began in childhood. “Making people laugh was automatic,” he said. “I was in a play in elementary school and had to jump up and run away. I was nervous and tripped and fell down and everyone laughed. Their laughter made me relax, so I pretended it was part of the show.” “I always told my mother I wanted a job where I could have a lot of fun and have a lot of time off,” Hemsley added. “She asked me where I was going to find that, and I said, ‘I don’t know, but it’s out there.”’

given to organizations with a record of success, said Delilah Rumburg, chief executive officer of the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Rape. And the funding decisions should be made by an independent body of experts, she said. “It has to be very well thought out,” said Rumburg, who spoke with a Penn State vice president on Tuesday about the process by which the funds will be granted. “Because if you just randomly and without forethought make decisions, it won’t have any impact at all.” Even before the NCAA fine, Penn State had sought to make amends over its failure to protect the children that Sandusky molested on campus. Rumburg’s group, which operates rape crisis centers across the state, received a $1.5 million donation from Penn State out of its 2011 Big 10 bowl proceeds. Another $1.1 million in bowl revenues went to Penn State’s new center for child abuse research and treatment. And Penn State alumni have raised nearly $540,000 for the Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network, which bills itself as the nation’s largest anti-sexual violence organization. The donations went to RAINN’s sexual assault hotline, an anonymous instant messaging service that allows victims of sexual abuse to speak about their trauma. Scott Berkowitz, RAINN’s founder, said the donations allowed him to add staff and cut wait times in half. But with usage up nearly 50 percent since November, RAINN needs all the help it can get, he said. Berkowitz expects to pursue some of the NCAA money.

Nancy Spencer, editor Ray Geary, general manager Delphos Herald Inc. Don Hemple, advertising manager Tiffany Brantley, circulation manager

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By The Associated Press Today is Wednesday, July 25, the 207th day of 2012. There are 159 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: On July 25, 1972, the notorious Tuskegee syphilis experiment came to light as The Associated Press reported that for the previous four decades, the U.S. Public Health Service, in conjunction with the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, had been allowing poor, rural black male patients with syphilis to go without treatment, even allowing them to die, as a way of studying the disease. On this date: In 1866, Ulysses S. Grant was named General of the Army of the United States, the first officer to hold the rank. In 1898, the United States invaded Puerto Rico during the Spanish-American War. In 1909, French aviator Louis Bleriot (bleh-ree-OH’) became the first person to fly an airplane across the English Channel, traveling from Calais (kah-LAY’) to Dover in 37 minutes.

IN HISTORY

TODAY

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May 22, 1946-July 22, 2012 George D. Abbott, 66, of rural Nevada, Ohio, died at 8:10 a.m. Sunday at Bucyrus Community Hospital. He was born on May 22, 1946 in LaRue, Ohio to George A. and Edna (Armstrong) Abbott. His father is deceased and his mother survives in rural Nevada. He married Cathy Clapp on March 17, 1968 in Delphos, Ohio and she survives. Also surviving are children Robert (Tammy) Abbott of Nevada and Beckie (Jim) Shuck of Upper Sandusky; grandchildren Ellie Abbott, Levi Abbott, Mary Shuck, Cassie Shuck and Natalie Shuck; sisters Mary Paynter of Florida, Audrey (Ron) Ault of Galion and Velma Potts of Nevada; and “adopted” sons, Paul England and Billie Beltz who who spent a lot of time at the family home growing up. He was preceded in death by his father; and two brothers, Roger and Bill Abbott. Mr. Abbott was the founder and owner of Abbott’s Auctions in Nevada that he ran along with his son, Rob for many years. He also had worked for the former Eaton Axle Corporation in Marion retiring in 2008. He was a member of the Nevada United Methodist Church and Nevada Masonic Lodge #343. He enjoyed being outside, whether hunting or fishing or just working in the yard or garden. He constantly kept himself busy always being on the move doing something. He will be remembered by his love for his wife, children, grandchildren, his mother and siblings, whom he cherished, along with his appreciation and fondness for all his friends in this community who made his life complete. He never knew a stranger and touched many he came in contact with during his journey here on earth. Funeral services begin at 11 a.m. Friday at the Nevada United Methodist Church. The Rev’s Matt Garrabrant, Brian Spangler, Carl Angel and Rex King will officiate. Burial will take place at a later date. Visitations will be from 2-8 p.m. Thursday at the Lucas-Batton Funeral Home in Upper Sandusky with a Masonic Memorial service at 8 p.m. and for an hour before the service at the church on Friday. Memorial contributions may be made to the Pheasants Forever-Wyandot County Chapter and can be sent to Lucas-Batton, 476 S. Sandusky Ave. Upper Sandusky, Ohio 43351.

George D. Abbott

The Daily Herald (USPS 1525 8000) is published daily except Sundays, Tuesdays and Holidays. By carrier in Delphos and area towns, or by rural motor route where available $1.48 per week. By mail in Allen, Van Wert, or Putnam County, $97 per year. Outside these counties $110 per year. Entered in the post office in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as Periodicals, postage paid at Delphos, Ohio. No mail subscriptions will be accepted in towns or villages where The Daily Herald paper carriers or motor routes provide daily home delivery for $1.48 per week. 405 North Main St. TELEPHONE 695-0015 Office Hours 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to THE DAILY HERALD, 405 N. Main St. Delphos, Ohio 45833

ST. RITA’S A boy was born July 24 to Michael and Sarah Kill of Venedocia. Sara and Daniel Goecke of Spencerville had a baby girl July 23.

BIRTHS

High temperature Tuesday in Delphos was 83 degrees, low was 71. Rainfall was recorded at .87 inch. High a year ago today was 87, low was 71. Record high for today is 103, set in 1934. Record low is 49, set in 1911. WEATHER FORECAST Tri-county Associated Press TONIGHT: Mostly clear in the evening then becoming partly cloudy. Warmer. Lows in the upper 70s. Southwest winds 10 to 20 mph. THURSDAY: Hot. Partly cloudy in the morning then becoming mostly cloudy. A 50 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Highs in lower 90s. West winds 10 to 20 mph. Heat index readings 96 to 101. THURSDAY NIGHT: Partly cloudy. Chance of showers and thunderstorms in the evening. Then chance of showers overnight. Lows in the upper 60s. West winds 5 to 10 mph. Chance of measurable precipitation 50 percent. FRIDAY: Partly cloudy with a 40 percent chance of showers and storms. Highs in the upper 80s. West winds 5 to 10 mph. FRIDAY NIGHT: Partly cloudy. Lows in the mid 60s. SATURDAY: Mostly sunny. Highs in the lower 80s. SATURDAY NIGHT: Clear. Lows in the lower 60s. SUNDAY, SUNDAY NIGHT: Mostly clear. Highs in the mid 80s. Lows in the mid 60s.

Delphos weather

WEATHER

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Wednesday, July 25, 2012

The Herald –3

CINCINNATI (AP) — The parents of an unarmed black Florida teenager who was shot and killed by a neighborhood watch volunteer plan to participate in a town hall in southwest Ohio on violence and racial healing. It’s unclear whether Tracy Martin and Sybrina Fulton will speak Wednesday at the Children’s Defense Fund’s national conference in downtown Cincinnati. The February shooting of their son, 17-year-old Trayvon Martin, led to nationwide protests over race and self-defense laws after police didn’t arrest the shooter, George Zimmerman, for more than a month. Zimmerman now faces a charge of second-degree murder and has pleaded not guilty.

Martin’s parents to attend an Ohio town hall

BRIEFS

Ohio soldier’s mom says he was protector, fulfilling dream
By DAVID FONG Troy Daily News TROY (AP) — Sandy Wheelock stared down at the tiny figure standing in front of her, clad from head-to-toe in a black ninja costume. From behind the black ninja mask, with eyes beaming, came a muffled voice: “I checked everything out, Mom. Everything is OK.” “He would always wear that little ninja costume with a wooden spoon tucked in his belt because I didn’t like guns,” Wheelock said. “He would play outside and when he would come in, he would tell me, ‘I checked everything out, Mom. Everything is OK.’ He was always worried about protecting me. His whole life, that’s how he was — he was always worried about protecting his mom and his sisters.” That was more than 15 years ago, when Jeffrey Rice was a young man growing up in Troy. On July 19, Army Private First Class Rice, 24, lost his life while serving in Afghanistan as a part of Operation Enduring Freedom. Early Sunday morning, Wheelock was at Dover Air Force Base in Delaware to greet her son’s body as it arrived from the Middle East. Funeral services still are pending and the United States Department of Defense has yet to reveal any details regarding his death. “All they will say is that they still have to do the investigation and the autopsy,” Wheelock said. “I really don’t know any details — and I don’t think I want to know any details.” While details of his death may be unknown, those who knew Rice best are willing to offer plenty of details about his life. His mother remembers him as a voracious eater who would devour her homemade Rice Krispie treats by the pan and consume packages of Ramen noodles by the half-dozen. She said he “loved fishing, looking at the stars through this big telescope he had and drinking beer.” Much more than any of that, however, the people in his life — particularly the women in his life, his mother, aunt, sisters and nieces — remember him as someone who always put family first and looked to protect his loved ones. Even while stationed in Afghanistan, Rice would frequently call and write to check up on his nieces, Ali, Kristen and Makayla. Rice also grew up loving football. He played his first two years in high school and, entering his junior season in the fall of 2005, the 6-foot-2, 220pound Rice appeared ready to

STATE/LOCAL

Ohioans arrested at suspected dog fight

Cleveland Clinic and Ohio State to partner Columbus stadium sale approved; racetrack planned
COLUMBUS (AP) — Ohio State University and Cleveland Clinic, two of the state’s most powerful research institutions, are forming a partnership aimed at getting more good ideas for patients into the field. The two institutions said at a Tuesday conference that one of the first research areas will be using electrical stimulation to relieve and cure disease. The Plain Dealer reports research also will include developing a small neurological pacemaker that can be inserted in one’s cheek and activated with a cellphone. The alliance was struck between Ohio State’s Technology Commercialization and Knowledge Transfer Office and Cleveland Clinic Innovations, the clinic’s commercialization arm. COLUMBUS (AP) — The old minor league ballpark near downtown Columbus is getting new life as an autoresearch center and racetrack. Franklin County officials approved the sale of Cooper Stadium to developers Tuesday for $3.4 million, culminating a yearslong quest to find a new use for the shuttered facility. The 80-year-old ballpark has hosted three minor league teams but has been mostly idle since the Columbus Clippers, the AAA affiliate of the Cleveland Indians, left for their new digs at Huntington Park downtown in 2009. Plans for the 47-acre site include a racetrack, amphitheater and an automotiveresearch center where new technologies will be developed and tested. Also proposed is conference space with a hotel and restaurants. The complex is being developed by King Holding Corp., a division of Arshot Investment Corp. Demolition and redevelopment is set to begin early next year, with the Sports Pavilion and Automotive Research Complex expected to open in 2014. Developers say it could bring up to 300 new jobs, from entry-level to high-paying research positions. A deal to sell the stadium was written in 2008 but was delayed to allow more time to develop plans for the site and address quality-of-life concerns from nearby residents and business owners. This year, the Columbus

CINCINNATI (AP) — Police in Cincinnati say five people were arrested after officers broke up an apparent dog fight. An animal-control officer was bitten at the scene Tuesday by one of the pit bulls that ran away. The officer will have to have painful rabies injections unless the animal is found. Media reports said officers responded to a call reporting dogs fighting and people cheering at a home. Police said the suspects were arrested as they tried to scatter. A pit bull was found at the scene with injuries officers said were consistent with dogfighting, including a cut over an eye and bite marks on its leg. Dog-fighting is a fourthdegree felony in Ohio, punishable by up to 18 months in prison and a $5,000 fine.

First lady campaigns on husband’s behalf in Ohio
By ANDREW WELSHHUGGINS and DAN SEWELL Associated Press to ensure college education opportunities and a stronger middle class. “Everyone in America should do their fair share, which means teachers and firefighters shouldn’t pay higher taxes than millionaires and billionaires,” she said. Before she left Ohio, she stopped by the campaign’s Dayton office and joined people making calls seeking volunteers for door-to-door campaigning and voter registration drives this weekend. “No, really. Really truly,” she assured one woman she called after identifying herself. “We’re going to spend a lot of time in Ohio,” she told the woman.

assume a starting role along the offensive line for a powerhouse Troy team that had just been to the playoffs the year before. Just before the season started, however, Rice gave it all up to help take care of his family. Rice’s father, Bruce, had suffered a stroke in 2003. He never recovered from the stroke, and Rice quit football to help take care of his ailing father, who passed away in 2007. His junior year, Rice, a Troy High School student, began taking classes in Piqua at the Upper Valley Joint Vocational School, which has since been renamed the Upper Valley Career Center. He studied welding, which his mother said seemed a natural fit. His welding skills were enough to earn him a scholarship to the Hobart School of Welding following his high school graduation in 2007, but by then he already had decided to pursue his lifelong dream of entering the military. Rice was assigned to the 20th Engineer Battalion, 36th Engineer Brigade in Fort Hood, Texas. His natural curiosity for taking things apart and putting them back together, coupled with his welding background, served him well when he was shipped off to Afghanistan in January 2010.

Charter captains help monitor Lake Erie water
SANDUSKY (AP) — Charter boat captains are helping the state monitor water quality and watch for harmful algae blooms in Lake Erie’s western basin between Toledo and Sandusky. Participating members of the Lake Erie Charter Boat Association will coordinate with one another to make sure at least four offshore locations are checked as part of their regular charter outings. The boat crews will turn the samples over to the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency to track water quality, the agency announced

Marion Township Trustees met Monday at the Marion Township Office with the following members present: Jerry Gilden, Howard Violet and Joseph Youngpeter. The purpose of the meeting was to pay bills and conduct ongoing business. The minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved as read. The trustees then reviewed the bills and gave approval for 15 checks totaling $7,014.24. Road Foreman Elwer presented an application from Fort Jennings Telephone Co. to do some work in the area of Mericle and German roads. He also contacted Wehri Drainage to get an estimate to fix the tile along Evans Road and reported the Road and Sign Inventory for July was completed. A phone call was received from a resident on 802 S. Adams St. regarding a tree that needed removed. After some discussion, the trustees

Marion Township Trustees

didn’t think it was in the township but would check on it to make sure. Jim Marihugh advised Elwer of a sink hole along Old Delphos Road. Elwer made the county aware of this. Police Chief Vermillion advised the trustees he needed to spend around $100 to upgrade some equipment. Fiscal Officer Kimmet reported the bill with Farmer’s Equipment had been resolved. Trustee Youngpeter advised nothing has been done to the property at 13910 Landeck Road and asked Kimmet to make another call. The trustees then discussed roads to be considered for paving with Issue 1 money for 2013 and sent them to the Allen County Engineers. There being no further business a motion to adjourn by Trustee Youngpeter was seconded by Trustee Violet and passed unanimously.

DAYTON — Michelle Obama promoted her husband in the electoral battleground state of Ohio on Tuesday as a president for opportunity and economic fairness, and making progress that could slip away if he isn’t re-elected. She highlighted President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul as helping people get needed treatment and avoid financial ruin from bills. She told a boisterous crowd of about 1,800 people at the Dayton Convention Center that he also is trying

Among signs on the walls in the small room was one that showed the state with the heading: “It all comes down to Ohio.” Mrs. Obama stopped earlier at a suburban Columbus high school, exhorting people to keep things “moving forward.” She also made an unannounced stop at a nearby recreation center. She quizzed, hugged and played with children, but declined some older youths’ urging to do “the Dougie” dance. She explained later there was “no beat” to dance to. Mrs. Obama told a crowd of around 2,000 in a Westerville school gymnasium that the count City Council approved a 10-year, 75 percent tax-abatement plan for the site. The ballpark has had four names over the years and has been home to three minor league teams: the Columbus Red Birds, the Columbus Jets and, from 1977 to 2009, the Clippers. County Commissioner John O’Grady said the new development will return the site to a regional tourism draw. “If it’s even half of what (the developer) hopes it will be, it will be great for Franklin County,” O’Grady said.

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4 — The Herald

POLITICS

Wednesday, July 25, 2012

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“The truth is all things seen under the form of eternity.” — George Santayana, Spanish-American philosopher (1863-1952)

Budget office: Obama’s health law shrinks deficit
By RICARDO ALONSOZALDIVAR and ANDREW TAYLOR Associated Press WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul will shrink rather than increase the nation’s huge federal deficits over the next decade, Congress’ nonpartisan budget scorekeepers said Tuesday, supporting Obama’s contention in a major election-year dispute with Republicans. About 3 million fewer uninsured people will gain health coverage because of last month’s Supreme Court ruling granting states more leeway, and that will cut the federal costs by $84 billion, the Congressional Budget Office said in the biggest changes from earlier estimates. Republicans have insisted that “Obamacare” will actually raise deficits — by “trillions,” according to presidential candidate Mitt Romney. But that’s not so, the budget office said. The office gave no updated estimate for total deficit reductions from the law, approved by Congress and signed by Obama in 2010. But it did estimate that Republican legislation to repeal the overhaul — passed recently by the House — would itself boost the deficit by $109 billion from 2013 to 2022. “Repealing the (health care law) will lead to an increase in budget deficits over the coming decade, though a smaller one than previously reported,” budget office director Douglas Elmendorf said in a letter to House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio. The law’s mix of spending cuts and tax increases would more than offset new spending to cover uninsured people, Elmendorf explained. Tuesday’s budget projections were the first since the Supreme Court upheld most of the law last month but gave states the option of rejecting a planned expansion of Medicaid for their lowincome residents. As a consequence, the budget office said the law will cover fewer uninsured people. Thirty million uninsured people will be covered by 2022, or about 3 million fewer than projected this spring before the court ruling, the report said. As a result, taxpayers will save about $84 billion from 2012 to 2022. That brings the total cost of expanding coverage down to $1.2 trillion, from about $1.3 trillion in the previous estimate. The Congressional Budget Office has consistently projected that Obama’s over-

Dear Editor: For the last three years, I have been traveling with the escorted tours sponsored by the Museum of Postal History. Although I have enjoyed the numerous vacations I have taken with family and friends, it has occurred to me that having someone else plan the trip and be “in charge” has added something delightful to the experience of traveling. Some people have asked me if I miss the independence of just going wherever I want, whenever I want. But the truth of the matter is we are given choices throughout the trip. Just last week, my husband and I went on the MPH tour of Nashville, Tennessee. We relaxed on the bus watching movies and chatting with several old and new friends. We stopped frequently to stretch and for meals- forgetting about the chore of driving. The miles just seemed to fly by. In Nashville, we were taken to several places off the beaten path – as our tour guide, Gary Levitt would say, “We go where only the natives go”. The Monell Manor, the Pied Piper, and the Parthenon were places I would have never thought to visit. Each of our meals provided great food and several choices. I had never heard the expression of a “meat-and-three”, but I know now what southern hospitality is all about. Part of the fun was to be able to pick on our tour guide when the GPS took us to someone’s private home rather than the breakfast restaurant where we were supposed to be. But the real fun was when we finally got there. This small restaurant buried in the middle of a residential section of Nashville was like stepping back in time. The menus were on vinyl records tucked inside old jacket covers. The atmosphere took on a new meaning for us as we all had our picture taken with a stand up of Liberace dressed in a red-white-and blue cheerleader’s outfit complete with baton and boots. Besides the great restaurants and cafes, we enjoyed the entertainment at the Grand Old Opry watching Randy Travis perform and the show on the General Jackson Riverboat. There was plenty of free time both at our hotel – the magnificent Gaylord Opryland Hotel and in the heart of downtown Nashville with all the honky tonks and clubs. The old saying leave the driving to us – has taken on a bigger meaning now that I have enjoyed the escorted tours. We are really looking forward to our next trips with MPH Tours to New York City in October and Chicago in December. Marg Ashby

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Senate ready for symbolic tax cut showdown

One Year Ago • The Delphos Public Library’s Summer Reading Program concluded Tuesday evening with a pool party at the Delphos Municipal Swimming Pool for the participants and their families. Childrens’ Librarian Denise Cressman expressed her gratitude to those who make the program possible. 25 Years Ago — 1987 • A 1932 Ford coupe owned by Jim Bechtel of Lima took best of show honors Saturday at the Delphos Area Car Club show and swap meet. Although the parade was to be one of the highlights of the show, less than half of the cars participated because of the extreme heat and possibility of engines overheating on older cars, said Ron Siefker, president of the club. • The Delphos Braves recently won the Fourth of July tournament when they narrowly defeated the VFW Cardinals. Team members included Eric Kerner, Ryan Illyes, Eric Mueller, Chad MacWhinney, Todd Elwer, Jon Brenneman, batboy Aaron Elwer, Coach Roger Wilhelm, Ed Mueller, Troy Joseph, Coach Dave Fought, Phil Lawrence, Luke Vonderwell, Dave Blockberger and Coach Jim Friemoth. • Mr. and Mrs. Terry Kleman of Fort Jennings will assume ownership of the Dairy Hut, 910 E. Fifth St., from Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Williams of Delphos. The Klemans said they plan no immediate changes. They said they are considering catering soup and sandwiches for pickup and-or delivery to the lunch hour crowd during the off-season. 50 Years Ago — 1962 • Boy Scout Troop 48, sponsored by St. John’s Church, recently spent a week at Camp Lakota, Defiance. Scoutmaster Bernard Niemeyer had eleven boys at camp. William Wiesenberg and Ed Wurst camped with the boys for part of the week. Troop members are Tom Lehmkuhle, Tom Meyers, Robert Burger, David Ditto, Robert Dannhausen, John Grothouse, Will Wiesenberg, Mike Wurst, Mike Niemeyer, Andrew Shenk and Andrew Shenk. • Mrs. Ralph Best, president of the Delphos Green Thumb Garden Club, has received notice from the state publicity chairman of the Ohio Association of Garden Clubs, that the local club won first place in the state for the 1962-63 program yearbook. This is the first time the local received first place in the state. • Members of the ladies branch of the Catholic Knights of America held their annual picnic meeting Thursday at the home of Mrs. Anton Van Autreve, East Fourth Street. Cards were played in the afternoon followed by a basket supper. High honors went to Mrs. Joseph Busch and low to Mrs. Eugene Williams. 75 Years Ago — 1937 • A balloon ascension will be one of the features of the Allen County Delphos Fair again this year. Claude Shaffer of Indianapolis, will be placed under contract by the fair board to make triple parachute drops each day from a free balloon. The ascensions will be made from the Old Mill Lot on North Canal Street this year as in the past. • Miller’s Opticians defeated Fleming Markets of Van Wert 4 to 1 Monday night in a game played at Waterworks Park. W. Briggs was on the mound for Miller’s. He gave up three hits. Miller’s collected a total of six hits off the delivery of Hawk. • Delphos Waterworks Park track and field meet will be held Wednesday under the direction of Philip Hall and John Miller, supervisors under the WPA recreational program. Competition is being held for the purpose of picking a track team of boys to go to Lima July 29 to represent Waterworks Park in an All-County Track Meet. A team of girls will also be entered on July 30.

IT WAS NEWS THEN

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate is bracing for a taxcut showdown that is all about Democrats and Republicans showing voters their differences over taxing the well-off while accusing each other of threatening to shove the government over a fiscal cliff. Senators planned to vote today on a $250 billion Democratic bill that would extend expiring tax cuts next year for all but the highest earners. Democrats will need 60 votes to advance the proposal, which they do not have. It seemed unlikely that senators also would vote on a rival GOP plan that includes the best-off Americans in the tax reductions, a measure that was destined to lose. House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, was ready to push legislation through his chamber next week that closely mirrors the Senate GOP measure. Republicans there introduced their bill on Tuesday, accompanied by another measure designed to speed work next year on legislation overhauling the entire tax code. The clash in the Senate underscored how little the partisan tax-cutting duel had to do with actually passing a law this year. If anything, it highlighted how entrenched both parties’ views were. “Democrats will simply never agree we should hand out more tax breaks to the richest 2 percent of Americans while this economy is in the situation it’s in now,” said Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada, sponsor of the Democratic bill. “Our friends on the other side are practicing what could best be described as ‘Thelma & Louise’ economics,” Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said. “Let’s just march the whole country right off the cliff and see how that works out,” McConnell said, referring to the movie’s memorable climax. If the two sides don’t compromise, a massive $600 billion in tax increases and spending cuts for 2013 would be triggered automatically in January — the so-called fiscal cliff, which analysts say would jar the already weak economy. Mostly following President Barack Obama’s proposal, the Democratic bill would continue Bush-era tax cuts for everyone except individuals making at least $200,000 yearly and couples earning more than $250,000. Those taxpayers would face top rates of 36 percent and 39.6 percent, respectively, instead of today’s 33 percent and 35 percent. That would mean higher taxes for 2.5 million households, or 2 percent of all 140.5 million tax returns, according to 2009 data from the Internal Revenue Service. Democrats say levies on the wealthy should rise because all income groups should contribute to deficit reduction. Republicans say those tax increases would burden the owners of many companies, leaving them less money to create jobs. The Democratic bill also would let the top estate tax rate grow to 55 percent next year, with only the first $1 million in an estate’s value exempted. That’s an uncomfortable move for Democratic senators from farming and high-cost states.

Romney-Bain contacts outlasted exit
By STEPHEN BRAUN and JACK GILLUM Associated Press WASHINGTON — Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney has said he had no active role in Bain Capital, the private equity firm he founded, after he exited in February 1999 to take over Salt Lake City’s Winter Olympics bid. But according to Bain associates and others familiar with Romney’s actions at the time, he stayed in regular contact with his partners over the following months, tending to his partnership interests and negotiating his separation from the company. Those familiar with Romney’s discussions with his Bain partners said the contacts included several meetings in Boston, the company’s home base, but were limited to matters that did not affect the firm’s investments or other management decisions. Yet Romney continued to oversee his partnership stakes even as he disengaged from the firm, personally signing or approving a series of corporate and legal documents through the spring of 2001, according to financial reports reviewed by The Associated Press. The details of Romney’s contacts with his Bain partners between his 1999 departure and his separation from the company in mid-2001 could show how involved he was — either as CEO or passive investor — in several multimillion-dollar investment deals, bankruptcies and a spate of layoffs and overseas job shifts at Bain-owned companies that reportedly occurred during that span. Romney’s role became a campaign issue in recent weeks because corporate records from the time showed his interests in some of those deals — despite his insistence that he gave up any decision-making authority once he left Bain. “When partners depart a private equity company and are no longer active, there are various ways that their interests may be affected,” said Colin C. Blaydon, director of Dartmouth University’s Center for Private Equity and Entrepreneurship. “In some cases it may not be affected at all, but they still own points in the funds and the carried interest that is paid as part of their partnership stake. It’s entirely possible to step back from a previous management role, but that all depends on the arrangements they make and the management structure created to replace them.” A clear accounting of Romney’s contacts with Bain

haul will reduce the deficit, although previous estimates aren’t strictly comparable with Tuesday’s report because of changes in the law and other factors. At the time it was approved in 2010, CBO estimated the law would reduce the deficit by $143 billion from 2010 to 2019. And CBO estimated that last year’s Republican repeal legislation would increase deficits by $210 billion from 2010 to 2021. That may sound like a lot of money, but it’s actually a hair-thin margin at a time when federal deficits are expected to average around $1 trillion a year for the foreseeable future. When the law is fully in effect, 92 percent of citizens and legal residents are estimated to have coverage, as compared to 81 percent now. Democrats hailed Tuesday’s estimates as vindication for the president. “This confirms what we’ve been saying all along: the Affordable Care Act saves lots of money,” said Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev. Actually, the government will spend more. It just won’t go onto the national credit card because the health care law will be paid for with a combination of spending cuts and tax increases.

Board: BP missed the big hazard issues in spill
By SETH BORENSTEIN AP Science Writer WASHINGTON — BP focused too much on the little details of personal worker safety instead of the big systemic hazards that led to the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill and wasn’t as strict on overall safety when drilling rigs involved other companies that they hired, a government safety panel concludes. Eleven workers were killed in the April 2010 explosion of the Deepwater Horizon rig and about 200 million gallons of oil flowed into the Gulf from the blown-out Macondo well. The company formerly known as British Petroleum had the lease on the well, but the drilling rig was owned and operated by another company and BP has faulted drilling contractor Transocean. That contractor-owner split made a difference in major accident prevention with the oil disaster, the U.S. Chemical Safety Board concluded in a presentation to be made in a hearing in Houston Tuesday. “BP applied lesser process safety standards” to rigs contracted out than it does to its own facilities, safety board managing director Daniel Horowitz told The Associated Press in an interview. “In reality, both Transocean and BP dropped the ball on major accident hazards in this case.” The oil company “did not conduct an effective comprehensive hazard evaluation of the major accident risks for the activities of the Deepwater Horizon rig or for the Macondo well” because BP’s large risk evaluation program “looked only at BP assets, NOT drilling rigs that it contracted” to other firms for operation, investigators said in the 50-page Power Point presentation. A BP spokesman in a statement emailed to AP said the company “stepped up” and developed more rigorous safety indicators following the accident. The safety board said when BP looked at offshore endeavors it “focused on financial risks, not process safety risks.” And after the Deepwater Horizon explosion, the company’s own accident investigation report “recommended requiring hazard reviews of BP-owned and contracted rigs,” the safety board’s presentation says. “That’s very disturbing because the Gulf of Mexico belongs to the American people,” said former Sen. Bob Graham, who co-chaired a different government oil spill investigation, one appointed by President Barack Obama.

has been hampered by his presidential campaign’s reluctance to discuss the period in detail and complicated by conflicting accounts in some of Romney’s comments and financial reports. Both the Romney campaign and Bain have declined to provide documentary materials that could shed light on Romney’s role after 1999. Romney’s campaign says that once he agreed to head the Olympics bid, he was no longer “involved in the management of that business or the investment decisions that occurred.” Campaign spokeswoman Andrea Saul added that “it took some time to transfer his ownership to the other partners, which is not surprising given the growth and success of the firm.” Romney testified during a 2002 Massachusetts court case that he flew back and forth between Boston and Salt Lake City frequently in the first half of 1999, returning at least four times to attend board meetings of office supply giant Staples Inc., which had named him a director. Romney said nothing about his dealings with Bain during that testimony, which came during a legal challenge to his Massachusetts residency that was aimed at thwarting his campaign for governor.

The Chemical Safety Board’s findings, which mostly mirror the report from Graham’s panel and another, pointed at a second standard for what BP owned and operated and what it didn’t. Graham said he didn’t know that. “If that’s true, it’s reprehensible,” Graham told The Associated Press Monday night. Congressional Democrats requested the safety board investigation. The panel usually investigates deadly industrial accidents and makes recommendations but has no power to regulate, much like the National Transportation Safety Board. The panel has been criticized for its role in investigating the disaster. Transocean resisted complying with a subpoena arguing that the spill fell outside the board’s jurisdiction that involves industrial accidents onshore. An offshore rig is an ocean-going vessel that is motionless when drilling. The board also had to push to gain access to the examination of the blowout preventer, and at one point demanded that the analysis stop, saying representatives of the companies that made and maintained the 300-ton device have been getting preferential and sometimes hands-on access to it.

www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, July 25, 2012

The Herald – 5

LANDMARK

Hobo supper and butchering time Honoring
BY LOVINA EICHER

COMMUNITY

Delphos Welcome Sign

CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
TODAY 6 p.m. — Shepherds of Christ Associates meet in the St. John’s Chapel. 7 p.m. — Bingo at St. John’s Little Theatre. THURSDAY 9-11 a.m. — The Delphos Canal Commission Museum, 241 N. Main St., is open. 11:30 a.m. — Mealsite at Delphos Senior Citizen Center, 301 Suthoff Street. 5-7 p.m. — The Interfaith Thrift Shop is open for shopping. 7:30 p.m. — American Legion Post 268, 415 N. State St. FRIDAY 7:30 a.m. — Delphos Optimist Club, A&W DriveIn, 924 E. Fifth St. 11:30 a.m. — Mealsite at Delphos Senior Citizen Center, 301 Suthoff Street. 1-4 p.m. — Interfaith Thrift Store is open for shopping. SATURDAY 9 a.m.-noon — Interfaith Thrift Store, North Main Street. St. Vincent DePaul Society, located at the east edge of the St. John’s High School parking lot, is open. 10 a.m to 2 p.m. — Delphos Postal Museum is open. 12:15 p.m. — Testing of warning sirens by Delphos Fire and Rescue 1-3 p.m. — The Delphos Canal Commission Museum, 241 N. Main St., is open. 5 p.m. — Delphos Coon and Sportsman’s Club hosts a chicken fry. 7 p.m. — Bingo at St. John’s Little Theatre. SUNDAY 1-3 p.m. — The Delphos Canal Commission Museum, 241 N. Main St., is open. MONDAY 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. — Ottoville Branch Library is open. 11:30 a.m. — Mealsite at Delphos Senior Citizen Center, 301 Suthoff Street. TUESDAY 11:30 a.m. — Mealsite at Delphos Senior Citizen Center, 301 Suthoff Street. Al-Anon Meeting for Friends and Families of Alcoholics at St. Rita’s Medical Center, 730 West Market Street, Behavioral Services Conference Room 5-G, 5th Floor 7:30 p.m. — Alcoholics Anonymous, First Presbyterian Church, 310 W. Second St. Please notify the Delphos Herald at 419-695-0015 if there are any corrections or additions to the Coming Events column.

We had a steady rain earlier this morning. It amounted to almost twotenths of an inch. Every little bit helps the grass, crops and gardens. Our grass and hay fields are looking a lot greener now. The gardens are looking better and the rain put off needing to water the garden today. The rainwater seems to boost the garden a lot more than when we water with a sprinkler. The first thing Joseph said when he woke up and heard it raining was, “Oh I am glad we don’t have to water the garden!” We have only one water sprinkler so they have to move it from one end of the yard to the other to get both gardens. They usually set a timer for a certain time and then move it on to the next area. Joseph is excited as he will be 10 tomorrow. He is more excited about this birthday because he’ll now get to sit with the big boys in church. In our community when they reach 10 years children don’t have to sit with their parents anymore

during church services. Yesterday we had dinner at Emma and Jacob’s in honor of Emma’s 39th birthday which was on the 19th. Mother’s was the 18th and she would be 76 years now. Those birthdays of loved ones gone on before us are still always thought of. May she rest in peace and bless her for the wonderful mother and friend that she was. Saturday we butchered the 12 chickens we raised for fresh eating. I want to cut them up today and get them in the freezer. I will leave a few whole so we can do whole chickens on the grill one day. That along with baked potatoes on the grill make for an easy meal. Saturday we did something different on the grill. We made a hobo supper. I’ll share the recipe at the end of this column. We use vegetables out of our own garden. It is an easy supper as Joe grills fish to go with it. He also grilled one of the chickens that we had butchered earlier in the day. I think that was a big mistake because after butchering

chickens that day the children say they can’t eat any right away. I remember my mother always going out to the chicken coop and chopping a few heads off and we would have them for the next meal. Back then it never bothered me until I started doing the work. Although I don’t do the actual butchering myself, I decided to be braver than the children and taste a piece of the fresh chicken breast. I was managing okay until daughter Elizabeth teased me and asked if there was a feather on my chicken,. That did it for me so I can’t blame the children if they need a few weeks to forget the butchering part. They did enjoy the hobo supper and the grilled fish. I had enough cucumbers that I could make 3 gallons of freezer pickles. Also 9 quarts of sweet and sour garlic dill pickles. We are now enjoying tomatoes, green beans, hot and green peppers, and red potatoes out of our garden. We lost the first few patches of sweet corn. We have another one coming along that we hope will make it. The others didn’t survive the drought.

I want to express my sympathy to the family of Patricia Walmers. She has been a long time reader of this column and great friend to the family. Her death was a few weeks ago at age 86. Thanks to her son Andy for letting us know. The children have many books that she gave to them for their birthdays. We will miss the visits that we have had from her the last 10 years. Our children knew her as Grandma Pat. Hobo Supper 10 red potatoes, cut into chunks with skins left on 1 /2 cup onion, diced 1 /2 cup green peppers, diced 3 /4 cup sliced carrots 3 /4 cup celery 1 package of smoky links Seasoning of your choice Sliced cheese Mix all together except for the cheese. Divide into the amount you want for each serving and place onto tin foil. Wrap up and set up on grill for 10 minutes on each side. Open up foil and if potatoes are soft add a slice of cheese, rewrap and grill a few minutes or until cheese is melted.

Ohio veterans

On Aug. 4, the Ohio Veterans’ Memorial Park will unveil the names of the currently 304 brave men and women that gave the ultimate price during Beirut, the Gulf War, Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation New Dawn. The dedication will begin at noon. Color guard from each branch of service will be on hand along with five Gold Star families giving a very short speech and a US Marine and author of “Every Other Four,” which is a first-hand account of the Lcpl Wojtecki first deployment in Iraq. Jason A Dominguez, the assistant director of the Department of Veterans Services, will also be on-site for the dedication. In addition to the dedication we will be holding a 5K/10K run and many of the currently 171 registered runners are having their T-shirt personalized to honor one of the fallen. The 5K/10K registration starts at 6 a.m. and the run begins at 7:30 a.m.

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DELPHOS COMMUNITY GARAGE SALES Thursday, Friday & Saturday August 9-11, 2012
Place your ad in the Delphos Herald by Aug. 3 and your location will appear on our Delphos Community Garage Sale Map that will be available at local businesses, the Chamber and the Delphos Herald office starting August 8th.

LINCOLN HIGHWAY YARD SALE

OPTION 1 - $21
*2 DAYS GARAGE SALE AD *LOCATED ON GARAGE SALE MAP

OPTION 2 - $26

OPTION 3 - $30

*3 DAYS GARAGE SALE AD *LOCATED ON GARAGE SALE MAP

*4 DAYS GARAGE SALE AD *LOCATED ON GARAGE SALE MAP

Garage sale ad must be 40 words or less. Send your typed or clearly written ad with payment, indicating what days you would like it published in the paper to COMMUNITY GARAGE SALES C/O THE DELPHOS HERALD 405 N. MAIN ST., DELPHOS, OHIO 45833 email: classifieds@delphosherald.com

6 – The Herald

Wednesday, July 25, 2012

US beats Spain 100-78 in basketball exhibition
BARCELONA, Spain (AP) — There is no exhibition game gold medal. The only prize was some player of the game award LeBron James and Carmelo Anthony shared. Not counting doesn’t mean not mattering. Once U.S. coach Mike Krzyzewski told the U.S. Olympic team that it was playing in probably the biggest basketball game here since the Dream Team ruled Barcelona, the Americans couldn’t help wanting to take it to Spain — even if it may have messed them up in the beginning. “Today was one of those games that as a team, as a unit, we really tried to lock in from the start,” Anthony said. “I think we came out a little bit too focused, a little bit overzealous at the beginning and they jumped on us quick. “They came out with a lot of intensity and got some easy shots, easy baskets. Once we settled down and made a couple plays defensively, got back to our comfort zone, we didn’t look back from there.” Anthony came off the bench to score 23 of his 27 points in the first half, and the Americans beat Spain 100-78 Tuesday night in a rematch of the 2008 Olympic gold-medal game — and a possible preview of the next one. James added 25 and Kevin Durant had 13, including 10 in the first 3 1/2 minutes of the third quarter to help the U.S. break open the teams’ final exhibition game before heading to London. “We knew that this was a big game,” U.S. guard Chris Paul said. “When Coach K talked to us, he told us this was probably the biggest game here in Barcelona since the ‘92 team was here, so we approached it like that and it was a good win for us.” The teams played a memorable gold-medal game four years ago, the Americans pulling away for a 118-107 victory after leading by only four points with less than 2 1/2 minutes left.

SPORTS

LIMA JUNIOR GOLF
McDonald’s Junior Series - Dick BOYS 16-18 Clark Real Estate Open 1. Blaine Ricketts 35-37-72; 2. Delphos Country Club - Par 71 Evan Crites 36-42-78; 3. (tie) Jordan Monday’s Results Bollenbacher 39-39-78, John Copella BOYS 12-13 41-37-78 and Darin Bergman 38-40-78 1. Erik Verhoff 44; 2. Jared (Crites birdied the first playoff hole to take Hernandez 44 (Verhoff defeated 2nd place); 4. Lucas Herrmann 36-44Hernandez in a playoff for 1st place); 80; 5. Cody Mathew 43-38-81; 6. Zach 3. (tie) Josh Klausing and Sam Reed Weber 43-39-82; 7. Grady Gudakunst 48; 4. Collin Nartker 50; 5. (tie) Jacob 40-43-83; 8. Ian Haidle 38-46-84; 9. (tie) Black and Derek Buss 54; 6. (tie) Drew Caleb Acheson 42-44-86, Tim Levers Ambroza, Jared Miller and Ryan Moody 40-46-86, Evan Nartker 39-47-86 and 56; 7. Christian Nartker 57; 8. (tie) Tyler Turnwald 43-43-86; 10. Samuel Marcus McGee and Andrew Slusher Slusher 45-42-87; 11. Eric Jordan 46-4260; 9. Mark Janowski 66; 10. Ethan 88; 12. Connor Mosier 45-44-89; 13. John Grant 70. Burke 44-46-90; 14. (tie) Sean Flanagan BOYS 14-15 43-48-91 and Derek Langmeyer 42-491. Carter Bowman 35-36-71; 2. 91; 15. Cole Fischbach 47-45-92; 16. Grant Ricketts 38-38-76; 3. Joshah (tie) Craig Klausing 48-45-93 and Jarrod Rager 41-39-80; 4. Evan Hall 40-42Stober 46-47-93; 17. (tie) Nate Cellar 82; 5. Wesley Markward 38-45-83; 6. 44-50-94 and Lucas Etzler 48-46-94; 18. (tie) Cole Jordan 45-41-86 and Drew Thomas Nolte 44-53-97; 19. Reed Bok Wayman 42-44-86; 7. Alex Britton 44-4455-44-99; 20. (tie) Matt Holt 51-49-100 88; 8. (tie) Parker Frey 42-47-89 and and Adam Jurczyk 48-52-100; 21. Alex Brandon Hernandez 47-42-89; 9. (tie) Turner 51-60-111. Brady Mathew 46-44-90, Carter Mox GIRLS 15 & UNDER 47-43-90 and James Riepenhoff 45-451. Emily Knouff 40; 2. Jennifer 90; 10. (tie) Joseph Slusher 46-45-91 Mitchell 61; 3. Sara Rex 62. and Westin Young 45-46-91; 11. Jake GIRLS 16-18 Shivley 49-44-93; 12. (tie) Spencer 1. Shelby Warner 37-36-73; 2. Stubbs 43-55-98 and Adam Vieira Kelsey Koesters 41-38-79; 3. Morgan 46-52-98; 13. Nathan Meyers 48-56Van Meter 41-41-82; 4. Heather Comer 104; 14. Jacob Nolte 58-52-110. 44-48-92. ---McDonald’s Junior Series - Bob Fridley Junior Golf Tournament Thursday’s Tee Times Notes: Final regular-season event of the summer. Tournament of Champions is Monday and the banquet is that night. Hole Tee Time Team No. Age Division/Names 01 8:00 am Team #1 Boys 16-18/Freddie Purdy, Blaine Ricketts, John Copella 01 8:08 am Team #2 Boys 16-18/Jordan Sosby, Matt Holt, John Burke 01 8:16 am Team #3 Boys 16-18/Xavier Francis, Treg Francis, Darin Bergman 01 8:24 am Team #4 Boys 16-18/Reed Bok, Thomas Nolte, Caleb Acheson, Mike Omlor 01 8:32 am Team #5 Boys 16-18/Bobby Crow, Austin Tebbe, Brian Schatzer, Tyler Turnwald 01 8:40 am Team #6 Boys 16-18 01 8:48 am Team #7 Boys 14-15/Britton Hensel, Alex Britton, Grant Ricketts 01 8:56 am Team #8 Boys 14-15/Evan Hall, Jacob Nolte, Jake Shivley 01 9:04 am Team #9 Boys 14-15/Luke Dapore, Devin Mouser, Spencer Stubbs, Brandon Hernandez 01 9:12 am Team #10 Boys 14-15/Adam Vieira, Ryan Smelewski, Caleb Meadows, Drew Wayman 01 9:20 am Team #11 Boys 14-15 01 9:28 am Team #12 Girls 16-18/Sydney Holdren, Zoe Rayburn, Heather Comer 01 9:36 am Team #13 Girls 16-18/Sean Pusey, Shelby Warner, Morgan VanMeter 01 9:44 am Team #14 Girls 16-18 10 8:00 am Team #15 Boys 12-13/Collin Nartker, Brad Gottemoeller, Jared Hernandez 10 8:08 am Team #16 Boys 12-13/Jacob Good, Jared Miller, Ryan Moody 10 8:16 am Team #17 Boys 12-13/Marcus McGee, Sam Reed, Christian Nartker 10 8:24 am Team #18 Girls 15 & Under/Alyssa Campbell, Jennifer Mitchell 10 8:32 am Team #19 Girls 15 & Under/Jessica Armstrong, Kristin Barhorst, Emily Knouff 10 8:40 am Team #20 Girls 15 & Under

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ASSOCIATION

Penn St. early foes planning to keep focus on game
By ERIC OLSON The Associated Press Ohio coach Frank Solich knows what to expect Sept. 1 when his team is the first to play Penn State. “There’s going to be lots of buzz around the game and it’s going to be for negative reasons,” Solich said Tuesday at Mid-American Conference Media Day in Detroit. “The only thing we can do is come in and play good football. There will be a lot of emotions, I’m sure, but we just have to play good football.” Solich’s Bobcats are favored to win the MAC and go to a fourth straight bowl — all of which will be deemed irrelevant in the buildup for the opener in State College, Pa. The question there, and throughout college football, will be what kind of team will the Nittany Lions have in 2012 and beyond after the crippling sanctions imposed by the NCAA? On the flip side, are opponents eager to play the fallen traditional power. Or, will they bring heavy hearts into games against a program tarnished by the horrific crimes perpetrated by former defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky? After Ohio, the Lions play at Virginia and host Navy and Temple before opening Big Ten play at Illinois. The eight Big Ten coaches who will face the Nittany Lions this season weren’t available or declined to comment. They’ll meet with reporters at the conference’s media day in Chicago on Thursday. Ohio cornerback Travis Carrie said it will be “real strange” to visit Penn State. The Bobcats, who went 10-4 last season, will be playing the Lions for the first time since 1974, and an ESPN national television audience will be watching and wondering how the Lions will come out. “We’re going to be ready to play on Sept. 1, and I think the biggest thing for us is remembering where we’re going,” Carrie said. “Penn State has always been good and the guys they have there when we play them are going to be ready to play.” Solich, as is his nature, will take nothing for granted against what could be a depleted Penn State team. In 2002, Solich and his seventh-ranked Nebraska Cornhuskers went to Happy Valley and endured a 40-7 nationally televised embarrassment that marked the first of seven losses that season — the Huskers’ most since 1961. Solich beat Penn State in Lincoln, Neb., the next year but was fired after the season. Solich’s straight-ahead mantra already is being followed by quarterback Tyler Tettleton. “We have to treat it as just another game,” he said. “I’m excited to get the chance to play there, and we can’t get caught up in anything more than playing the best we can.” Virginia is picked fourth in the Atlantic Coast Conference’s Coastal Division after going 8-5 last year. The Midshipmen were 5-7 last

This one turned out much easier once the U.S. controlled the final three quarters. “It was a good test for us tonight, but the exhibition games are over, the friendlies are over and we look forward to the real challenge of going to London,” James said. Pau Gasol scored 19 points and Oklahoma City forward Serge Ibaka, a native of the Republic of Congo who became a Spanish national last year, had 16. Both teams have been weakened by injuries, with the U.S. missing Dwyane Wade, Dwight Howard and Chris Bosh, all key contributors in Beijing, along with Derrick Rose.

No ordinary rookie, Weeden takes control of Browns
By TOM WITHERS The Associated Press BEREA — Brandon Weeden once dreamed of wearing blue Yankees pinstripes. He settled for a logo-less orange helmet. Despite a highpowered right arm that got him drafted out of high school in the second round by the New York Yankees, Weeden’s baseball career fizzled out in the low minor leagues, where hitters weren’t fooled by a 95 mph fastball that sometimes left the ballpark at an even higher rate of speed. “I gave up some bombs,” he said. The Browns, who have spent 13 years searching for a franchise quarterback, are counting on Weeden delivering a different kind of long ball. Although he hasn’t officially been declared Cleveland’s starter, and Colt McCoy remains on the roster, Weeden will begin training camp this month as the Browns’ presumptive No. 1 quarterback, a soon-to-be 29-year-old rookie they believe could finally end years of futility for a onceproud organization that has yet to make the Super Bowl and a loyal fan base out of patience. “We know he knows how to compete,” said secondyear coach Pat Shurmur, whose future could hinge on Weeden’s success — or failure. Selected with No. 22 overall pick in April’s draft — much earlier than predicted — Weeden impressed the Browns’ coaching staff and teammates during offseason minicamps with his accuracy and intellect. He displayed a nice touch on short tosses and showed off his long-range capability by launching a few 60-yard throws. He looked and acted the part, which didn’t surprise former Oklahoma State teammate Justin Blackmon. “He’s got a strong arm and makes great decisions and he knows how to put the ball in the right spot at the right time,” said Blackmon, Weeden’s primary target in college now with Jacksonville. “I wouldn’t trade him for anyone. He can throw the ball from sideline to sideline and with lots of velocity and speed. He can put it there. He knows how to read the coverage and he makes hsmart decisions. “He loves to compete.” Shurmur has been adamant in saying he won’t hand Weeden the starting job, but the Browns didn’t take him in the first round to sit on the bench or groom him for the future. Not at his age, and the Browns are confident he’ll be ready when they open against Philadelphia on Sept. 9. On Tuesday, Weeden signed a four-year, $8.1 million contract. “Instead of waiting and rolling the dice just a little bit and seeing another way to go, we said, ‘Let’s not run the risk and take Brandon at No. 22,”’ Browns president Mike Holmgren said. “We’re excited to have him. How he’s different than all the other quarterbacks that were drafted ahead of him or behind him is his age and

season. Temple, 9-4 with a bowl win a year ago, is leaving the MAC to play in the Big East this season. First, the Owls must play at Penn State — a team they haven’t beaten in 37 meetings since 1943. Owls coach Steve Addazio declined to comment. Coaches Mike London of Virginia and Ken Niumatalolo of Navy said they wouldn’t be surprised to see a number of Penn State players transfer, though Nittany Lions coach Bill O’Brien said in a conference call Tuesday that no current member of the team has indicated they will leave. Regardless of what happens with the Lions’ personnel, Niumatalolo said, Navy won’t look at them as lesser opponents. “We’re the Naval Academy,” he said. “We’re always smaller than everybody we play. We don’t ever go to anybody saying we’re going to have a physical, size or speed advantage. Our mentality is to approach every game the same way.”

Bengals have new camp look, rookies in spotlight
CINCINNATI (AP) — A white-topped tent is anchored at the entrance to the Cincinnati Bengals’ practice field. Workers are cleaning seats inside Paul Brown Stadium, getting ready for a franchise first. The team opens training camp this weekend without leaving home. The Bengals spent their first 44 training camps at Wilmington College and Georgetown College, small schools that were more than an hour’s drive away from Cincinnati. They preferred having their players in an isolated environment. The slimmed-down training camp schedule mandated by the new collective bargaining agreement prompted them to change. The Bengals were one of only a dozen teams that held training camp away from team headquarters last year. “It’s new and different for us, but not for most teams in the league,” owner Mike Brown said on Tuesday. “We have better facilities here than we could find anywhere else. Training camp anymore has dwindled down to just three weeks. We used to leave for training camp after the July 4 holiday and come back after Labor Day weekend. Three weeks — it seems we no sooner get there and it’s time to come back. “I think it’s good for that reason and most of all, we can reach out to our fans. They don’t have to drive far, they can watch us downtown. All those things are good.” The Bengals hope that by holding camp at their stadium and practice field across the street, fans will get more excited about a team coming off only its third winning season in the last 20 years. The Bengals went 9-7 in the regular season and gained a wild card berth when the rest of the competition melted down in the closing weeks. They lost to Houston in the playoffs, leaving them 0-3 in the postseason since their last playoff win in1990. Cincinnati still has a lot of work to do in winning back fans. Six of the eight games at Paul Brown Stadium failed to sell out last season and were blacked out on local television, even though the team was in the playoff chase. The six blackouts were the most in the league. The NFL eased its blackout rules after the season, allowing teams to set a lower threshold of ticket sales for a game to count as a sellout. They can count a game as sold out if only 85 percent of the stadium is full. Ticket sales are up from a year ago, when the team was coming off a 4-12 season and the NFL was in the midst of a lockout. The Bengals started winning fans back with a playoff push led by then-rookie quarterback Andy Dalton and receiver A.J. Green. The spotlight will be on

maturity.” Weeden had better be the right pick. The Browns can’t afford to waste any more time that they already have in stabilizing the game’s most important position. Since 1999, Cleveland has had 16 quarterbacks start games. It’s imperative the Browns get Weeden as many reps as possible during camp, which is why it’s likely the team will move McCoy, who has gone 5-16 in two seasons as a starter, before they get too deep into the summer. Weeden must also quickly develop chemistry with Cleveland’s receiving corps, now a little deeper after the team selected former Baylor wide receiver Josh Gordon in the recent NFL supplemental draft. Before they took Weeden, the Browns tried but failed to move up in the draft to get quarterback Robert Griffin III. When that failed, they were determined not to let running back Trent Richardson slip away and moved up to No. 3 to pick the former Alabama star, who could have a greater impact as a rookie than Weeden.

rookies again starting at the opening practice on Friday. The Bengals need to find a receiver to complement Green. Third-round pick Mohamed Sanu from Rutgers can earn significant playing time. Cornerback Dre Kirkpatrick, the 17th overall pick in the draft, will get a chance to win a starting job across from Leon Hall. Hall is returning from a torn Achilles tendon that has limited him during offseason workouts. Defensive coordinator Mike Zimmer said on Tuesday that Hall is expected to pass his physical exam before the first practice and line up as a starter. The secondary is the biggest question on defense. The Bengals have stocked up on veterans who struggled with other teams, hoping they can get something out of them in Zimmer’s defense. “Are we the most talented in the league? No,” Zimmer said. “But we have a lot of intangibles.”

AL Capsules By The Associated Press MARINERS 4, YANKEES 2 SEATTLE — Alex Rodriguez sustained a broken left hand when he was hit by a pitch from Seattle ace Felix Hernandez in the Mariners’ 4-2 win over the New York Yankees on Tuesday night. The Yankees said Rodriguez has a non-displaced fracture and there is no timetable for his return. He will be put on the disabled list. Hernandez (9-5) got his fifth straight win. He hit three batters, plunking Derek Jeter, former teammate Ichiro Suzuki and later getting Rodriguez in the eighth inning. Tom Wilhelmsen pitched the ninth for his 11th save in 13 chances. Yankees starter Freddy Garcia (4-4) struck out a season-high eight and retired his final 15 batters before being pulled with one out in the eighth. ATHLETICS 7, BLUE JAYS 2 TORONTO — Yoenis Cespedes hit a three-run single and the streaking Oakland Athletics beat Toronto for their season-best sixth win in a row. Derek Norris hit a two-run homer and Travis Blackley won his third straight decision as the A’s improved to 15-2 in July. Oakland (52-44) is eight games over .500 for the first time since July 12, 2008. Travis Snider and J.P. Arencibia each hit solo homers and Brett Lawrie had three hits for the Blue Jays, whose three-game winning streak came to an end. Blackley (3-2) allowed one run and five hits in seven innings. He struck out a career-best eight. RED SOX 2, RANGERS 1 ARLINGTON, Texas — Mike Aviles blooped a tiebreaking single in the ninth inning and the Boston Red Sox beat Texas, ending a four-game losing streak. Red Sox reliever Vicente Padilla (4-0) escaped a first-and-third jam in the eighth. He hit Adrian Beltre in the helmet with a pitch, leaving the Texas star with a bruise on his head. Rangers closer Joe Nathan (1-3) issued a pair of two-out walks in the ninth and Aviles singled just beyond the reach of shortstop Elvis Andrus. INDIANS 3, TIGERS 2 CLEVELAND — Aaron Cunningham drove in the go-ahead run with a suicide squeeze in the seventh inning and the Cleveland Indians defeated Detroit. Travis Hafner tripled with one out in the seventh inning off Doug Fister (4-7) and Lou Marson ran for him. Marson took off running as Cunningham, a defensive replacement hitting .175, dropped a bunt in front of the plate. Fister quickly got the ball and tried to shovel it to catcher Alex Avila. It rolled away, Marson scored, and Cunningham took second on the error. Miguel Cabrera’s two-run homer off reliever Joe Smith (6-2) tied it at 2 in the top half. Chris Perez pitched the ninth for his 28th save in 30 chances. WHITE SOX 11, TWINS 4 CHICAGO — Adam Dunn hit his major league-leading 30th homer and a two-run double as the Chicago White Sox rallied past Minnesota. Paul Konerko went 4 for 4 for the White Sox with his 16th homer of the season.. Josh Willingham homered twice for the Twins, his 24th and 25th of the season. Nate Jones (4-0), who relieved Chicago starter Jose Quintana in the seventh, got the win. RAYS 3, ORIOLES 1 BALTIMORE — Jeremy Hellickson took a three-hitter into the seventh inning to earn his first win in 10 starts, and the Tampa Bay Rays got a home run from light-hitting Brooks Conrad against Baltimore. Jeff Keppinger had two hits and an RBI for the Rays, who were playing their first road game since the All-Star break. Tampa Bay made the most of six hits in bouncing back from two straight 2-1 defeats against Seattle. Hellickson (5-6) was 0-6 since beating Boston on May 16, although he allowed more than three earned runs only once during his losing streak. Fernando Rodney got three outs around two walks to complete the threehitter. ROYALS 4, ANGELS 1 ANAHEIM, Calif. — Will Smith pitched two-hit ball over seven innings in the longest of his five major league starts, Lorenzo Cain hit a two-run homer and the Kansas City Royals beat the Angels. Smith (2-3) allowed a run, struck out four and walked four against the club that drafted him in 2007 and traded him to Kansas City in 2010. Jonathan Broxton allowed two singles during a scoreless ninth for his 23rd save in 27 chances. NL Capsules REDS 4, ASTROS 2 HOUSTON — Drew Stubbs hit a go-ahead homer and Cincinnati rallied for three runs in the ninth inning against former teammate Francisco Cordero, beating Houston 4-2 on Tuesday night and tying its longest winning streak of the year at six. The NL Central-leading Reds sent Houston to its eighth straight loss. Cordero (3-6) got his first save chance since being acquired in a trade with Toronto last week. Stubbs hit a tworun homer for a 3-2 lead and Xavier Paul added an RBI single. Justin Maxwell’s two-run homer in the fourth gave Houston a 2-0 lead. Brandon Phillips doubled and scored on Paul’s single in the Cincinnati sixth, his third hit.

MLB CAPSULES

Zack Cozart singled with one out in the Reds ninth and Stubbs hit his 10th home run. Jay Bruce drew a two-out walk, moved up on a wild pitch and after Scott Rolen walked, Paul singled. METS 5, NATIONALS 2 NEW YORK — Adam LaRoche and Washington handed R.A. Dickey his first loss in three months, beating New York behind Gio Gonzalez’s seven crisp innings. LaRoche hit a tiebreaking homer and Gonzalez (13-5) gave up only two singles in a rematch of All-Star pitchers, five days after New York hit him hard to back Dickey during his 13th win. Dickey (13-2) allowed five consecutive hits in the sixth, ending his 11-game winning streak, as the Mets lost their fifth straight and 11th in 12 games. Their lone victory since July 7 was Dickey’s 9-5 win over Gonzalez last Thursday in Washington. CUBS 5, PIRATES 1 PITTSBURGH — Paul Maholm pitched eight strong innings to win his fifth straight start for Chicago. Maholm gave up one run and four hits in handing the Pittsburgh its first consecutive home losses since May 22-23. He struck out seven and walked one. Maholm (9-6) has allowed just four earned runs in 38 1-3 innings during his winning streak for an 0.94 ERA in that span. The left-hander spent his first seven seasons with the Pirates before signing with the Cubs as a free agent last winter. PHILLIES 7, BREWERS 6 PHILADELPHIA — Hunter Pence singled in the go-ahead run after Carlos Ruiz hit a tying, three-run double and Philadelphia rallied with six runs in the eighth inning. A night earlier, the Phillies scored four runs in the ninth off Francisco Rodriguez to beat Milwaukee by the same score. The Brewers wasted a sensational outing by Zack Greinke, who outpitched and homered off Cliff Lee. Greinke allowed one run and three hits, striking out five. He retired the last 14 batters he faced, but left after seven innings with the Brewers up 6-1 only to see them lose their season-worst fifth straight. Pinch-hitter Eric Kratz got the Phillies started in the eighth with a two-run homer off Manny Parra to cut it to 6-3. Shane Victorino, Chase Utley and Ryan Howard worked consecutive two-out walks to load the bases. Kameron Loe (4-4) entered to face Ruiz, who ripped a 1-2 pitch to the gap in left-center to clear the bases. Pence followed with a looping RBI single to right. BRAVES 4, MARLINS 3 MIAMI — Tim Hudson pitched seven innings and Jason Heyward drove in two runs for Atlanta. Martin Prado and Freddie Freeman both drove in a run for the Braves, who snapped a three-game losing streak. Jose Reyes homered and drove in two runs for the Marlins as he extended his hitting streak to 12 games. After issuing the home run to Reyes in the second inning, Hudson (9-4) retired 16 straight before he was relieved. Hudson allowed five hits and three runs. He improved to 13-4 in 24 starts against the Marlins. Heyward broke a 3-all tie in the seventh inning with an RBI single off Wade LeBlanc (1-1) that scored Prado, who tripled to lead off the inning. CARDINALS 8, DODGERS 2 ST. LOUIS — Adam Wainwright got his first two RBIs of the season and St. Louis beat Clayton Kershaw and ended Los Angeles’ five-game winning streak. Wainwright (8-10) allowed two runs and seven hits with seven strikeouts in 7 1-3 innings. He was a career .223 hitter entering the year with five homers and 23 RBIs but was batting .079 (3-for-38) with three singles and 17 strikeouts this season. Wainwright doubled to left-center with two outs in the fifth for St. Louis’ first run, then scored the tying run on Rafael Furcal’s single. After Daniel Descalso was intentionally walked to load the bases in the sixth, Wainwright walked on five pitches to give the Cardinals a two-run lead in a six-run sixth that put them up 8-2. DIAMONDBACKS 6, ROCKIES 2 PHOENIX — Joe Saunders scattered three hits over seven innings and Chris Young homered to help Arizona to its fifth straight win. Stephen Drew and Willie Bloomquist added RBI doubles and Miguel Montero had a two-run single for the Diamondbacks, winners of eight straight at home. Young also singled, walked twice, stole a base and scored two runs. Saunders (5-6) allowed only a single to reliever Josh Roenicke in the fifth and solo home runs to Michael Cuddyer in the fourth and sixth en route to his first win since June 10. Saunders struck out nine and walked one. Edwar Cabrera (0-2), who was recalled from Triple-A Colorado Springs earlier Tuesday, lasted only 3 1-3 innings and allowed two runs, four hits and four walks. Colorado has lost three straight and six of seven. GIANTS 3, PADRES 2 SAN FRANCISCO — Brandon Crawford singled home the winning run in the ninth inning and San Francisco won its ninth in 11 games since the AllStar break. Brandon Belt walked to open the ninth and Angel Pagan singled. Both runners moved up on a wild pitch ahead of Crawford’s single against Joe Thatcher (0-4). Santiago Casilla (4-4) pitched the ninth for the victory.

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Wednesday, July 25, 2012

The Herald — 7

LA City Council ban marijuana shops
By GREG RISLING The Associated Press LOS ANGELES — Unable to rein in hundreds of medical pot shops that blossomed around the nation’s secondbiggest metropolis, the Los Angeles City Council banned them Tuesday until the state’s highest court weighs in. The 14-0 vote drew an angry, profanity-laced response from some medical marijuana advocates who attended the council meeting. Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa was prepared to sign the ordinance, according to his spokeswoman, Vicki Curry. The storefront ban would then go into effect after 30 days. In the interim, letters will be sent to as many as 900 dispensaries advising them of the ban. The city has fumbled with its medical marijuana laws for years, trying to provide safe and affordable access to the drug for legitimate patients while addressing worries by neighborhood groups that streets were being overrun by dispensaries and pot users. “Relief is on the way,” said Councilman Jose Huizar, who introduced the so-called “gentle ban.” Many cities have struggled with medical marijuana ordinances, but none has had a bigger problem than Los Angeles, where pot shops have proliferated. At one point, the city ordered closure of the shops — a process that failed amid lawsuits and conflicting rulings by appellate courts. This time around, the city has a stronger case if faced with lawsuits by pot shop owners, city officials said. A recent appellate court ruling seems to support the new ordinance that refers to a marijuana collective as three or fewer people. The ban also allows hospices and home health agencies to provide medical pot. “A judge could file an injunction but we think that is unlikely,” said Jane Usher, a special assistant city attorney.

BUSINESS votes to Buying health policy vs cancer policy Smart Money

The Meadows campuses donate over $4,000 and 650 pounds of food to local food pantries
The Meadows of Kalida, Leipsic and Ottawa-Glandorf, all part of Trilogy Health Services’ communities and local providers of senior health and living services, donated a total of $4,142 and 666 pounds of food to The Circle of Friends Food Bank in Continental, The Leipsic Food Pantry and The Ottawa Food Pantry as part of their annual “Independence from Hunger” food drive held during the months of May and June. Employees at The Meadows of Kalida, Leipsic and Ottawa-Glandorf health campuses donated food, cash or personal time off to support this worthy cause. “The Meadows health campuses are committed to strengthening each community they serve,” commented Stephanie Clark, Executive Director at The Meadows of Kalida. “Supporting organizations such as our local food pantries helps to make a difference by improving the quality of life and making a positive difference in Putnam County,” stated Jim Sherry, Executive Director of The Meadows of Leipsic and Ottawa-Glandorf. The “Independence from Hunger” Food Drive was a company-wide initiative in which each of the 70 Trilogy Health Services communities participated; each designating their own local

The ban comes during a confusing time for Californians — despite voter approval in 1996 for medicinal use of marijuana with a doctor’s recommendation. The state Supreme Court has decided to clarify marijuana’s hazy legal status by addressing whether local governments can ban medical marijuana clinics. But a hearing has yet to be set by the high court. Meanwhile, U.S. authorities have cracked down on pot clinics around the state, saying such operations remain illegal under federal law. Los Angeles passed an ordinance two years ago that was supposed to shutter hundreds of pot dispensaries while capping the number in operation at 70. But a set of legal challenges against the city by collectives and last month’s expiration of the ordinance thanks to a sundowner clause led to another surge of pot shops. City officials said 762 collectives have registered with the city and as many as 200 more could exist.

food bank as the recipient. The company as a whole donated over 650,000 pounds of food. The average person eats about 4.7 pounds of food per day, making this donation equivalent to feeding every person in the city of Dayton, OH for one day. In last year’s food drive, the company raised just over 540,000 pounds of food company-wide.

DEAR BRUCE: I don’t understand why BRUCE WILLIAMS you always advise against getting a cancer insurance policy. You seem to think cancer happens almost never, but in reality, it exists in almost every family. I bought such a policy many years ago and always was afraid to cancel it. It was lucky I kept it, because in 1995 I was diagnosed with breast cancer. I had a reoccurrence in 2010. The first time the insurance was a big help; all my medical bills were always paid on time. By the time the treatment was over, said, “I ran your credit report and saw that everything was paid in full. It even paid $100 you had outstanding balances on a couple of a week for lost work and for the expensive credit cards.” How on earth can they run my credit report medicine I needed. By the time my cancer without me applying for anything? It seems came back, I had canceled the insurance and to me this was done just to solicit business. was on Medicare. It is like car insurance: You hope you I thought credit reports could be run only to never need it, but you still should have it. My see if you were creditworthy because you had daughter has this insurance, too, and it makes applied for a loan of some kind, not to solicit her feel better to have it. It costs her $16 a someone. I feel this is unethical. -- Reader, via email month. DEAR READER: You are correct when I know a lot of people who have cancer, but almost nobody is insured against it. It’s you say that the basic reason for credit reports important to do your research and find a plan is to help businesses weed out credit with good benefits. Not all companies are applications based on potential customers’ However, the reality equal. I wonder if this will change your mind. creditworthiness. is that many companies can pull credit -- U.H., via email DEAR U.H.: I recall vividly many times reports before making offers. I am not making the comment that I don’t think it’s prepared to make a comment on whether wise to buy cancer insurance. I then follow using the information as you’ve described is that statement by saying it is far better to buy ethical. The company’s offer to help you an all-encompassing health policy that covers consolidate your debt makes me nervous. all illnesses rather than one that focuses on a specific ailment such as cancer, heart disease, If that is something you need to look into, I would do just that: Look into it. Do your etc. If you talk to someone in the insurance homework. There are so many of these debt industry who is speaking candidly, I’m sure consolidation/negotiation firms that it leaves they will tell you there is a great deal more one questioning their motives. Walk softly. profit for the insurance companies in policies (Send questions to bruce@brucewilliams. that focus on one disease than on general com or to Smart Money, P.O. Box 7150, medical policies. Everything you say is valid in terms of the Hudson, FL 34674. Questions of general protection offered by the policy you bought, interest will be answered in future columns. and I have no quarrel with folks who protect Owing to the volume of mail, personal replies themselves. But I believe the correct way to cannot be provided.) do that is by purchasing general coverage in ** the way I’ve described. DEAR BRUCE: I recently received Copyright 2012, United Feature Syndicate a phone solicitation that has left me just a Distributed by Universal UClick for UFS little bit disturbed. The call supposedly came from a wellknown financial institution COLUMBUS ZOO/COSI/ZOOMBEZI BAY WATER PARK wanting to consolidate and refinance my debt. What Your summer family getaway package includes: disturbed me was that she •Discounted Zoo and water park passes

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Quotes of local interest supplied by EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS Close of business July 24, 2012 Description Last Price
12,617.32 2,862.99 1,338.31 376.34 61.98 41.00 39.81 53.01 41.44 44.59 25.24 16.30 16.21 9.06 63.40 19.02 9.80 60.85 51.17 30.48 6.30 67.35 34.73 48.05 25.77 88.06 29.15 68.79 64.02 1.17 3.45 37.88 33.47 9.00 43.77 72.14

STOCKS

We’re proud of the news coverage we’ve received, and we hope to build upon these accomplishments. We know that our success is your success. Thank you.

Change

-104.14 -27.16 -12.21 -1.29 -0.86 +0.43 -0.59 -0.49 -0.25 -0.22 -0.10 -0.87 +0.04 -0.11 -0.52 -0.28 -0.24 0 +0.21 -0.58 +0.09 -0.76 +0.29 -0.75 0 -0.88 -0.13 -0.55 -0.37 -0.02 -0.12 +0.39 +0.05 -0.01 -0.58 +0.29

SmartMoney June 2012 Edward Jones was named the No. 1 full-service brokerage firm in the June 2012 edition of SmartMoney magazine. The magazine lauded the firm for its reputation for excellent client service. The firm consistently has been ranked highly in the SmartMoney survey as No. 1 in 2005, 2007 and 2010, and No. 2 in 2008, 2009 and 2011. J.D. Power and Associates May 2012 Edward Jones ranked “Highest in Investor Satisfaction with Full Service Brokerage Firms”according to the J.D. Power and Associates 2012 Full Service Investor Satisfaction StudySM.1
1 Edward Jones received the highest numerical score among full service brokerage firms in the proprietary J.D. Power and Associates 2012 Full Service Investor Satisfaction StudySM. Study based on responses from 4,401 investors measuring 16 investment firms and measures opinions of investors who used full-service investment institutions. Proprietary study results are based on experiences and perceptions of consumers surveyed in February 2012. Your experiences may vary. Visit jdpower.com.

Andy North
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Financial Advisor
1122 Elida Avenue Delphos, OH 45833 419-695-0660

www.edwardjones.com

Member SIPC

8 – The Herald

Classifieds
times - $9.00 11:30 next day’s issue. 010 word is $.30 22-5 days080 Help Wanted a.m. for the is 11:00 a.m. Friday 080 Help Wanted Each Announcements Saturday’s paper Minimum Charge: 15 words,

Wednesday, July 25, 2012
T 080 Help Wanted
HE

www.delphosherald.com

www.delphosherald.com
Deadlines:

To PART-TIME place an ad phone7/27 8am-5pm, ext. 122 419-695-0015 7/28 HOUSE FOR SALE 8am-noon. DOWN-SIZ817 Metbliss Ave. PARTS ING TO ST. Come See! FREE ADS: 5 days free if item is free THANKSSALE, JUDE: Runs 1 day at the or less than $50. Only 1 item per ad, 1 price of $3.00. Completely and tastefully Collectibles, nice variety, DELIVERY GARAGE SALES: Each day is $.20 per ad per month.
Thermo $8.00 you come word. $8.00 minimum charge. BOX REPLIES: King ofifDelphos 1 “I 3, boy’s jeans. RESPONSIBLE FOR 1/2 bath, 2 car garage, WILL NOT BE DEBTS”: Ad must be placed in person by new hardwood and tile all the person whose nameStreet will appear in the ad. 404 E. Third Must show ID & pay when placing ad. Regu-flooring, beautiful new Thurs 9-5. Small fridge, lar rates apply custom cabinets with granite
Fuji camera, kitchen items, household items galore, cosmetics, teen boy clothes, & much more! aquariums, girl’s baby-size

DELPHOS

340 Garage Sales

Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869

1501 S. Bredeick St.

HERALD

800 House For Sale

810 Parts/Acc.

Auto Repairs/

999 Legals
RESOLUTION #2012-4 A Resolution setting a time and place for a public hearing on proposed amendments and changes to the Zoning Ordinance of the City of Delphos, Allen and Van Wert Counties. Passed and adopted this 16th day of July 2012. James Knebel, President Pro-Tem ATTEST: Marsha Mueller, Council Clerk Kimberly Riddell, Acting Mayor A complete text of this legislation is on record at the Municipal Building and can be viewed during regular office hours. Marsha Mueller, Council Clerk 7/25/12, 8/1/12

$.25 6-9 days and pickis looking for part-time to them up. $14.00 if we have Monday’s paper is 1:00 p.m. Friday $.20 10+ days send them to you. ADVERTISERS: YOU can Herald Extra is 11 a.m. Thursday parts delivery $2.00 base CARD OF THANKS: person. Each a 25 word classified months word is $.10 for 3 place charge +This positionword. $.10 for each includes or more prepaid We accept ad in more than 100 newsSTAFFING SERVICE occasional lifting of up to Thermo King of Delphos papers with over one and We are hiring for long term 75 pounds. Contact Tom is looking for a truck a half million total circulatemporary positions or Don at Thermo King refrigeration technician. tion across Ohio for $295. 6 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. and of Delphos, or please If you have mechanical It's easy...you place one 4:30 p.m. to 5 a.m. - 2 Shifts order and pay with one E-Mail your resume to training in Auto, Ag, Overtime required check through Ohio tom@tkofohio.com Heavy Duty, MUST MEET BACKGROUND Scan-Ohio Statewide or Industrial Mechanics, AND DRUG TEST Classified Advertising Netor are an experienced REQUIREMENTS work. The Delphos Herald mechanic, advertising dept. can set and are interested in this up for you. No other ancrest learning some new classified ad buy is simHealth Care Centers skills, contact Tom or pler or more cost effective. $8.00 /hour Call 419-695-0015, ext Don at Thermo King of 138. Delphos, or please Visit us in-person between E-Mail your resume to the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 4 p.m. Notice tom@tkofohio.com at Vancrest of Delphos Monday through Friday Ask us about our We’re looking for outSigning bonus! going, energetic, car-

remodeled 3 bedroom,

Midwest Ohio Auto Parts Specialist
Windshields Installed, New Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors, Hoods, Radiators 4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima

MECHANIC

counter tops; also includes new furnace, central air, roof and much more!

1-800-589-6830

Packers / Material Handlers

V

6 FAMILY Garage Sale 2158 Middle Point Wetzel Rd. Go to Van Del, turn right, 2 miles North of Wetzel. Clothes, lots of misc. Thurs Fri & Sat 10-5 COMBINED ESTATE & Household Sale. 626 Moening & 615 Moening. Thursday, Friday 9am-6pm. Bedding, material, cookbooks, dishes, crafts, clothes, stove, washer, dryer, sewing machine, lawn mower, air conditioner, TV, hu midifier, exercise equipment, vintage items. GARAGE SALES Thursday, Friday 9am-? 1100, 1150, 1190 Wildwood Circle of North St. Furniture, household, nice childrens clothes, toys, home decor, HO Train set, misc. GARAGE/MOVING SALE 1240 Joshua Street, off Carolyn. Baby and toddler girl NB-2T clothing, toys and gear, adult clothing, furniture items, deck/patio set, other misc. 7/26-7/27, 8am-3pm

419-303-4122 419-303-5206

840 Mobile Homes
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2 bedroom, 1 bath mobile home. 419-692-3951.

We need you...

020

Now hiring –

HOUSE FOR Sale. 626 Moening St. Newly remodeled. 3BR, 1-1/2 Bath, 2 car garage, Deep back yard, Large side yard. Shown by appointment. 419-692-2951

890 Autos for Sale
1994 BUICK Park Avenue Gold. Mechanically sound. 2nd owner of 16yrs. Can be seen @406 E. Fifth St.

Classifieds Sell

Fresh Local Produce
•Sweet Corn •Squash •Peppers •Tomatoes, etc.
ON STATE RT. 309 - ELIDA 419-339-6800

HIRING DRIVERS with 5+ years OTR experience! Our drivers average 42cents per mile & higher! Home every weekend! $55,000-$60,000 annually. Benefits available. 99% no touch freight! We will treat you with respect! PLEASE CALL 419-222-1630

Axcess Staffing 707 N. Cable Road Suite H Lima, Ohio 45805 567-712-2200
(Behind Walgreens) Evening appointments available Ask us about our benefit offerings! Send resumes to: limaresumes@axcessstaffing.com

ing RN/LPN to join the team at our longterm care facility. Full and part-time positions available. Benefits package available. Stop by and fill out an application For details visit

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

www.vancrest.com
Vancrest of Delphos
1425 E. Fifth St. Delphos, OH 45833

040 Services
LAMP REPAIR Table or floor. Come to our store. Hohenbrink TV. 419-695-1229

at Vancrest Health Care Center

We need you...
DANCER LOGISTICS, Inc. 900 Gressel Drive Delphos, OH 45833 is in need of a Maintenance Service Manager to monitor our fleet of tractors and trailers. The service manager will coordinate the work needed on the equipment and direct the technicians accordingly. This person will be responsible for the supervision and delegation of the after hours service communications. Preferred candidate will have worked in a similar position for at least two years. If interested in this position please contact Shawn @ 419-692-1435, submit a resume at the address noted above or submit a resume via jobs@dancerlogistics.com

Housekeeper position available
Vancrest of Delphos is a long-term care facility providing skilled rehabilitation services, assisted living, post acute medical care and more. We are looking for caring, outgoing, energetic, HOUSEKEEPER to join our team. Part time positions are available, for all shifts. Check us out online and stop by to complete an application.

120 Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Delphos Herald urges our readers to contact The Better Business Bureau, (419) 223-7010 or 1-800-462-0468, before entering into any agreement involving financing, business opportunities, or work at home opportunities. The BBB will assist in the investigation of these businesses. (This notice provided as a customer service by The Delphos Herald.)

080 Help Wanted
FULL TIME AUTO BODY REPAIR TECHNICIAN WANTED
Minimum of 3 years auto body experience. Must have own tools. Excellent wages. Monday thru Friday 8-5. Send resume to PO Box 306, Ottoville, OH 45876 or see Mark at Mark’s Auto Body 24074 US 224 East, Ottoville.
DELPHOS DISCOUNT Drugs is looking for a part-time cashier. Please send resume to Sherry at 660 Elida Avenue, Delphos, Ohio 45833. No Calls, please.

501 Misc. for Sale
3-PIECE SOLID oak end table and cocktail tables with wicker and glass -$100 or best offer. (2) Brass lamps with shades -$20 pair. (1) Navy blue playpen -$20. (2) Brass chandeliers -1 modern with glass shades, 1 traditional -$30 each. (1) Musical baby swing -$7. (1) Self standing infant play station -$30. Call 419-232-2158 for information.

www.vancrest.com
Vancrest of Delphos
1425 E. Fifth St. Delphos, OH 45833

IMMEDIATE POSITIONS for Full-time Drivers. Dedicated Routes/Home daily. Full benefits including 401K, Dental & Vision, Paid vacations & Holidays. CDL Class A required. 2yrs experience. Good MVR. Call 419-733-0642 or email: dkramer_mls@aol.com

at Vancrest Health Care Center

We need you...

290 Wanted to Buy
LOOKING FOR a good, used, self-propelled lawn mower, under $100. Call Sandy at 419-692-2720

REGIONAL CARRIER LOOKING FOR LOCAL CLASS A CDL DRIVERS
* 2 YRS. EXPERIENCE REQUIRED WITH TRACTOR/TRAILER COMBINATION * BULK HOPPER/PNEUMATIC WORK – COMPANY WILL TRAIN * MUST HAVE GOOD MVR * F/T – NO WEEKENDS, HOME HOLIDAYS, WITH OPPORTUNITY TO BE HOME DURING THE WEEK * P/T WORK ALSO AVAILABLE * ASSIGNED TRUCKS LAST YR OUR DRIVERS AVERAGED 47 CENTS PER ALL ODOMETER MILES INCLUDING SAFETY BONUSES. EMPLOYMENT BENEFITS: • HEALTH, DENTAL & LIFE INSURANCE • SHORT/LONG TERM DISABILITY • PAID HOLIDAYS & VACATION • 401K WITH COMPANY CONTRIBUTIONS

Vancrest of Delphos is a long-term care facility providing skilled rehabilitation services, assisted living, post acute medical care and more. We are looking for caring, outgoing, energetic, skilled STNA’s to join our team. Full time and part time positions are available, for all shifts. Visit us at Vancrest for details and application information.

STNAs

550 Pets & Supplies
FREE: 7 week old Adorable PUPPIES. Will be medium sized. Call 419-303-3851 or 419-303-1126

290 Wanted to Buy

Raines Jewelry
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry, Silver coins, Silverware, Pocket Watches, Diamonds.

Cash for Gold
2330 Shawnee Rd. Lima (419) 229-2899

• Pet Food • Pet Supplies • Purina Feeds

www.vancrest.com
Vancrest of Delphos
1425 E. Fifth St. Delphos, OH 45833

419-339-6800
On S.R. 309 in Elida
SHIH TZU, Adult male $50 PUPPIES: Malti-poms, Chihuahuas, Yorkie/Shih Tzus, Morkie-poos. Soon: Shih Tzus. Garwick’s the Pet People 419-795-5711. See them at: garwicksthepetpeople.com

OTR SEMI DRIVER NEEDED Benefits: Vacation, Holiday pay, 401k. Home weekends & most nights. Call Ulm!s Inc. 419-692-3951

300 Household Goods
LIVING ROOM furniture, dining room furniture, 8x10 rug, surround sound system, other household items. 419-692-0069

ACROSS 1 Navigator’s need 6 Edges 11 Former Israeli PM 12 Identifying tag 13 Landlord’s income 15 -- the Hun 16 Tall blooms 18 Hog’s abode 19 Mr. Ameche 21 Cleaning cloth 22 Admirer 23 Sooner city 25 Travel guide 28 Los Angeles cager 30 Mao -- -tung 31 Vane dir. 32 Andy Capp’s quaff 33 Cassius Clay 35 Soft candy 37 Form 1040 info 38 Without a mixer 40 “Star Trek” captain 41 Freud topic 42 Starfish arm 43 Granted approval 46 Beethoven’s Third 48 Tartly 50 Dillydally 54 Hunts for food 55 Like helium 56 Blender button 57 Car dealer’s option

DOWN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 14 15 17 19 20 22 24 25 26 27 29 34 36 39 43 44 45 46 47 49 51 52 53

ER practice Laugh syllable Comic strip prince Entourage Romanov title Luncheonette orders Wharf denizen Long-legged wading bird Thaw Vanquish a dragon Old Italian money Athena’s shield Chile’s capital Transactions Bucket of song Lesage hero Gil -Dict. entry TV and radio Hot under the collar Quick look Kept in shape Somewhat suspicious Black Sea country Work like a drudge Reindeer herder Pantyhose color Wedding cake part If not Bedspring Apply henna Herbal infusion Uh cousins AAA sugg.

OPEN THURSDAY
Dick CLARK Real Estate

www.DickClarkRealEstate.com JULY 26 4:00-6:00 PM

600 Apts. for Rent
1BR APT for rent, appliances, electric heat, laundry room, No pets. $425/month, plus deposit, water included. 320 N. Jefferson. 419-852-0833. FOR RENT or rent to own. 2 Bdrm, 2 bath double wide located in Southside community in Delphos. Call 419-692-3951. LARGE UPSTAIRS Apartment, downtown Delphos. 233-1/2 N. Main. 4BR, Kitchen, 2BA, Dining area, large rec/living room. $650/mo. Utilities not included. Contact Bruce 419-236-6616

COME DRIVE FOR US AND BE PART OF OUR TEAM. APPLY IN PERSON AT:

1330 JOSHUA ST. DELPHOS • $229,500 Chuck Peters 419-204-7238
View all our listings at dickclarkrealestate.com

S
950 Car Care

D & D TRUCKING & SERVICES, INC. 5025 NORTH KILL ROAD, DELPHOS, OHIO 45833 419-692-0062 or 855-338-7267

Don’t make a move without us!

675 W. Market St., Suite 120, Lima, OH Phone: 419-879-1006 Phone: 419-695-1006 312 N. Main St. Delphos, OH

ervice
Amish Crew
Needing work
Roofing • Remodeling Bathrooms • Kitchens Hog Barns • Drywall Additions • Sidewalks Concrete • etc. FREE ESTIMATES

AT YOUR

950 Lawn Care

Geise
Transmission, Inc.
• automatic transmission • standard transmission • differentials • transfer case • brakes & tune up
2 miles north of Ottoville

SPEARS
LAWN CARE
Total Lawncare & Snow Removal
22 Years Experience • Insured

COMMUNITY SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES NEWER FACILITY

800 House For Sale
604 W. Seventh St., Delphos. Rent To Own and Land Contract available on this remodeled 3 bedroom home. chbsinc.com or 419-586-8220 720 W. First. St. 4BR, 1BATH, in Delphos. New Kitchen, New Bathroom. 1900sqft. $79,000. Call 419-234-8319

419-733-9601
POHLMAN POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential & Commercial • Agricultural Needs • All Concrete Work

Commercial & Residential

419-692-0032
Across from Arby’s

419-453-3620
OIL - LUBE FILTER

$
Only

22.95*

FLANAGAN’S CAR CARE
816 E. FIFTH ST. DELPHOS Ph. 419-692-5801 Mon.-Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-2

*up to 5 quarts oil

•LAWN MOWING• •FERTILIZATION• •WEED CONTROL PROGRAMS• •LAWN AERATION• •SPRING CLEANUP• •MULCHING & MULCH DELIVERY• •SHRUB INSTALLATION, TRIMMING & REMOVAL•
Lindell Spears

950 Tree Service

TEMAN’S
OUR TREE SERVICE
• Trimming • Topping • Thinning • Deadwooding Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal Since 1973

419-695-8516
check us out at

Is your ad here? Call today! 419-695-0015

Dear Sara: I’m trying to figure out a way to get that last little bit of wax out from the bottom of my jar candles. I have some jars that are tall and some that are short and would like to recycle or repurpose them versus throwing them out. Got any tried-and-true ways to do this? -- Libby, Canada Dear Libby: You can use a candle warmer. If you don’t own one, you can buy a new one for less than $10. Use it to enjoy the candle scent a little longer and melt the wax, then pour the wax out and wash the jar. You can buy a tart mold (or use a foil muffin pan) and pour the wax into the mold to make candle tarts. Another option to remove the wax is to boil a saucepan of water and place the jar in the pan for a couple minutes (you’ll see the wax pull away from the jar), then pour out the wax. It doesn’t have to completely melt. The wax chunk will fall right out. Dear Sara: What do you think about storing clothing for your children if there are seven years of age between them? My daughter just had another boy in January. Her older son is 7 years old. I feel there are too many years between them. Won’t the styles change before the clothes can be put to use? -- Nini, Pennsylvania Dear Nini: My boys are seven years apart. I saved a few clothes. Styles do change a bit, and oftentimes elastic doesn’t hold up well, but some clothes are fairly classic, such as solid colored shirts, t-shirts, winter gear and jeans. We have wonderful sources in my area for secondhand clothes, so I figured I had access to cheap clothing. It’s

Removing wax from jars is simple
SARA NOEL

Frugal Living
hard for me to store much of anything for seven years, so I limited it to one small tote of clothing and toys. Boys tend to be much harder on clothes than girls, so it’s nice to at least have some clothes saved for play. My kids have always had their nicer clothing for school and outings and play clothes that I didn’t care as much about if they got stains or torn. My girls are four years apart and I saved almost everything. Now here’s a funny thing: I gave a neighbor a lot of clothes for her son, who was only four years younger than my oldest. She then gave me clothes for my youngest son when her son had outgrown them. Some of the clothes were originally my oldest son’s, but I didn’t have them taking up space at my house for years. As for your daughter, if the clothes are good quality and just a little dated, you could place them on consignment, sell them on eBay or at a yard sale, or host a clothing swap. **

Dick CLARK Real Estate

(Sara Noel is the owner of Frugal Village (www.frugalvillage.com), a website that offers practical, moneysaving strategies for everyday living. To send tips, comments or questions, write to Sara Noel, c/o Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut Street, Kansas City, MO, 64106, or email sara@frugalvillage.com.)

Mark Pohlman

419-339-9084 cell 419-233-9460

www.spearslawncare.com

419-692-7261
Bill Teman 419-302-2981 Ernie Teman 419-230-4890

Answer to Puzzle

950 Construction
Tim Andrews

950 Miscellaneous
POHLMAN BUILDERS
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK SERVICE FREE ESTIMATES FULLY INSURED

MASONRY RESTORATION

SAFE & SOUND
SELF-STORAGE
Security Fence •Pass Code •Lighted Lot •Affordable •2 Locations
Why settle for less?

L.L.C.

DELPHOS

Chimney Repair

• Trimming & Removal • Stump Grinding • 24 Hour Service • Fully Insured

Mark Pohlman

419-204-4563

419-339-9084 cell 419-233-9460

KEVIN M. MOORE

419-692-6336

(419) 235-8051

Putnam County Allison E. Whitacre, Lot 5, Columbus Grove, to Amy L. Jesko and Joseph Young. G. Donald Pierman TR, 1.544 acres, Blanchard Township to Richard P. Hermiller and Christine H. Hermiller. Rita M. Pierman TR and George D. Pierman Sr. TR, 1.544 acres, Blanchard Township to Richard P. Hermiller and Christine H. Hermiller. Herman E. Wolke, Rita K. Wolke and Michael Wolke, 8.577 acres, Ottawa Township, to Joshua L. Wolke and Elizabeth S. Wolke. Connie M. Miller, Lot 383, Kalida, to Andy M. Fortman and Brittany Smith. SMH Con LLC, Lot 383,

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS

Kalida, to Andy M. Fortman and Brittany Smith. Donald Thomas and Norma Thomas, Lot 23, Rice addition Sub., Continental, to Donald R. Thomas and Norma J. Thomas. Donald R. Thomas LE aka Don Thomas LE and Norma J. Thomas LE, 80.00 acres, Monroe Township, 10.04 acres, Monroe Township, 10.03 acres, Monroe Township, 20.00 acres, Monroe Township, Lot 23, Continental and Lot 23, Rice Addition Sub, Continental, to D & N Thomas LLC. Mark A. Thomas, 80.00 acres, Monroe Township, to D & N Thomas LLC. D & N Thomas LLC, 80.00 acres, Monroe Township, to Donald R. Thomas LE and Norma J. Thomas LE. Michael Merschman and Jane Merschman, 1.49 acres, Union Township, to Michael Merschman and Jane Merschman.

www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, July 25, 2012

The Herald – 9

Woman has thinning hair
Dear Annie: I am an attrac- distracted. I have perused hair tive 30-something female who loss forums on the Internet for began experiencing thinning advice and have found that many hair in my late 20s due to a women are very open about it as thyroid disorder. Many women a means to educate others. I’m have the confidence to accept not like that. My experience has their hair loss and do nothing to been painful and personal. Other hide it. I admire that. However, than my doctor, I never have for me, it contributes admitted to anyone that I to embarrassment, wear a wig. It’s no one’s low self-esteem and a business. lack of confidence. Why on earth are When I started these people so fixated wearing wigs several on my hair? How do I years ago, I could only respond to these intruafford synthetics, but sive, thoughtless and found some affordinsensitive people withable, realistic ones. out raising any fuss? The problem? There -- Wigged Out in the have been a handful U.S.A. of times when people Annie’s Mailbox Dear Wigged Out: -- namely co-workers What colossal nerve. and guests at social gatherings Even if your wig is more obvi-- have come right out and asked ous than you think, it does not me, in the company of others no excuse such terrible behavior. less, whether I wear a wig. Their We know you don’t want to tactlessness never fails to stun disclose your hair loss, but it me, and the only response I can might be quite liberating and muster is, “Why do you ask?” certainly would put an end to The most common response is, the anxiety you are experienc“It always looks too perfect.” ing over discovery. Until then, More appalling is when however, feel free to respond to people touch or tug on my hair these idiots with wide eyes and without my permission to “see a shocked expression, saying, if it’s real.” Sometimes people “I’m sure you didn’t intend to be ask where I get my hair done, so rude.” Then walk away. which I know is an attempt to Dear Annie: My son is getfind out whether I wear a wig. I ting married, and my husband fear that one day someone will and I are paying for the rehearsal pull it off. dinner. My mother is adamant I don’t like to lie, so I usu- that all out-of-town guests be ally change the subject or act invited.

HI AND LOIS

My son and his fiancee prefer to keep the guest list to the wedding party, parents and grandparents. Otherwise it risks becoming too large. And if we include out-of-towners from our side, we also have to include those from the bride’s side. Is it normal protocol to invite out-of-town guests to the rehearsal dinner? Could we invite only some of them? -Rehearsal Blues Dear Blues: If there are large numbers of out-of-town guests, you do not need to invite them to the rehearsal dinner, although you should provide some type of refreshment when they arrive, either in their hotel rooms or by way of a hospitality suite. If there are people traveling a great distance who are special to the family, you may invite them individually, but we don’t recommend including most of the groom’s side and none of the bride’s. Dear Annie: As for egregious etiquette errors, how’s this one? At the end of a wedding shower, a guest who had brought no gift stood up and said, “I am giving a special gift to the bride: She doesn’t need to send anyone here a thank-you note.” And we never received any acknowledgement for our generous present. -- Miffed Guest Dear Miffed: How charming. A smart bride would have ignored that “gift.”

BLONDIE

BEETLE BAILEY

Tomorrow’s Horoscope
THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 Joint endeavors could be extremely rewarding for you in the year ahead, especially when they are predicated upon sound assumptions. When they are not, however, it’s likely to be a completely different story. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- There is a possibility that certain key elements might not be as advantageous as you first thought, so be smart and carefully screen all proposals that are presented to you. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -Although your perceptions and insights are quite sharp, the methods you use to implement them might be impractical. Try to execute your ideas as cleverly as they deserve. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- You might know what you want, but if you are clueless about how to transmit your ideas, you won’t get anywhere. Try to do your best to lucidly communicate your brainstorms. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- The possibilities for achieving success look quite encouraging, but only if you do not involve yourself with persons who have no real interests in your aims. Stick with supporters only. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Honor all the commitments you’ve made, even if you have second thoughts. Though other alternatives may look promising, keeping your word will count the most. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Be sure to render full service for what you are being paid to do. If your performance fails to meet expectations, it could damage your reputation. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -When risky involvements are at stake, follow your instincts and don’t go against your prudent judgment. If your inner voice warns you about taking a chance, heed it. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- If you do something kind for another, do it without making the recipient feel as if he or she is now obligated to you in some manner. That would negate whatever nice thing you’ve just done. ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Don’t hesitate to revive some of your long-standing plans if they didn’t produce as hoped. Some kind of minor change might turn out to be just what the doctor ordered. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Spend any small surplus you might have on something you consider to be worthwhile, instead of frittering it away. At least you’ll have something to show for it. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- If you feel what is being asked of you is unjust, don’t make any concessions, even if you’re under pressure. Make sure to take a firm position and stand up for what you believe. CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Even though they might not be as substantial as you’d hoped, be appreciative of any gains that come your way. Anything is better than coming up empty-handed.

By Bernice Bede Osol

SNUFFY SMITH

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10 – The Herald

Wednesday, July 25, 2012

www.delphosherald.com

Movie theater massacre
By MIKE BAKER and KRISTEN WYATT Associated Press

Fear prompts gun sales, panic after massacre
DENVER — Firearms sales are surging in the wake of the Colorado movie theater massacre as buyers express fears that antigun politicians may use the shootings to seek new restrictions on owning weapons. In Colorado, the site of Friday’s shooting that killed 12 and injured dozens of others, gun sales jumped in the three days that followed. The state approved background checks for 2,887 people who wanted to purchase a firearm — 25 percent more than the average Friday to Sunday period in 2012 and 43 percent more than the same interval the week prior. Dick Rutan, owner of Gunners Den in suburban Arvada, Colo., said requests for concealed-weapon training certification “are off the hook.” His four-hour course in gun safety, required for certification for a concealed-weapons permit in Colorado, has drawn double the interest since Friday. “What they’re saying is: They want to have a chance. They want to have the ability to protect themselves and their families if they are in a situation like what happened in the movie theater,” Rutan said. Day-to-day gun sales frequently fluctuate, but the numbers also look strong outside of Colorado, too. Seattle’s home county, King, saw nearly twice as many requests for concealed pistol licenses than the same timeframe a year ago. Florida recorded 2,386 background checks on Friday, up 14 percent from the week before. Oregon sales on Friday and Saturday were up 11 percent over the month prior. Four days of checks in California were up 10 percent month-to-month. During the past decade, June and July have consistently been the slowest months for gun sales, according to FBI data. Jay Wallace, who owns Adventure Outdoors in Smyrna, Ga., found that his sales on Saturday were up 300 percent from the same day a year ago — making it one of the best Saturdays his business has ever had. He said customers are often afraid when there’s a gun-related tragedy that some lawmakers might try and push through an anti-gun agenda. “We shouldn’t let one sick individual make us forget and lose sight of freedoms in this country,” Wallace said. Authorities have said that the suspected Colorado shooter, James Holmes, methodically stockpiled weapons and explosives at work and home in recent months. He purchased thousands of rounds of ammunition and a shotgun, a semi-automatic rifle and two Glock pistols, authorities said. On Friday, clad in head-to-toe combat gear, he burst into a midnight showing of “The Dark Knight Rises,” tossed gas canisters into the crowd and opened fire. The shooting killed 12 people and wounded dozens of others. Police in the Denver suburb of Aurora say Holmes also booby-trapped his apartment. Holmes is now in solitary confinement at a local jail. The rise in gun sales reflects but one of the anxieties created by the shootings. Since the massacre, there have been reports of

Arizona sheriff shows none of trademark swagger
By JACQUES BILLEAUD Associated Press PHOENIX — There were no TV cameras, no scrum of reporters, no protesters — and there was no swagger inside the courtroom when the typically brash Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio took the stand to face critics who say he and his deputies racially profile Hispanics. Under questioning from lawyers representing a group Latinos who are suing him and his department, Arpaio spoke in a hush, offering that he was suffering from the flu. He was asked: Why did you call illegal immigrants “dirty?” The Maricopa County sheriff responded quietly, clearing his throat often, and saying the statement was taken out of context. He added that if a person were to cross the U.S.-Mexico border on foot over four days in the desert that person “could be dirty.” “That’s the context on how I used that word,” he said. The case represents the first time the sheriff’s office has been accused of systematic racial profiling and will serve as a precursor to a similar yet broader civil rights lawsuit filed against Arpaio by the U.S. Justice Department. Arpaio has long denied racial profiling allegations and said Tuesday, “We don’t arrest people because of the color of their skin.” Letters in the sheriff’s immigration file took center stage during his more than five hours of testimony — as did his previous statements, which critics say show prejudiced thinking on his part. Lawyers in court asked Arpaio: What about your statement on a national TV news show saying you considered a 2007 comparison between your department and the Ku Klux Klan “an honor”? Arpaio responded that he doesn’t consider the comparison an honor, adding that he has no use for the KKK.

chaos at movie theaters, apparently sparked by misunderstandings or careless words. A confrontation with an intoxicated man in an Arizona theater caused about 50 people to flee, authorities said. A southern California man was arrested after authorities say he made allusions to the Aurora massacre after the movie didn’t start on time. In New Jersey, a showing of “Batman” was canceled after someone stood up during the movie, opened an emergency exit and then returned to their seat. About 90 minutes into a Monday night showing of “Batman” in Santa Monica, Calif., shrieks from some girls sent about two dozen people sprinting for the exit. It turned out that a large man with a backpack was actually not a threat and was simply having a medical problem. “This was nothing, and yet it startled us and rattled us so much,” said moviegoer Paria Sadighi. Nationally, the shootings have triggered a fierce debate over gun control and whether government has a role in reining in the ownership of firearms.

The plaintiffs’ attorneys also turned to Arpaio’s famous practice of putting county jail inmates in pink underwear, using statements he made during a 2009 speech to an antiillegal immigration group in Houston. “I always have an official reason so I can win the lawsuits,” Arpaio said, after stating the pink shorts are less likely to be smuggled out of jail and sold on the black market. “And then I have my reasons,” he went on. “And my reason is they hate pink. They do. They may like it in California, but they don’t like it in Arizona.” He was asked whether he says one thing in court and does another when he leaves. “This is in humor,” Arpaio said. “I make sure we do things properly in case I get sued.” The group of Latinos who say they have been discriminated against say Arpaio launched some immigration sweeps based on emails and letters that don’t allege crimes, but complain only that “dark-skinned people” are congregating in a given area or speaking Spanish. During the sweeps, sheriff’s deputies flood an area of a city — in some cases, heavily Latino areas — over several days to seek out traffic violators and arrest other offenders. Illegal immigrants accounted for 57 percent of the 1,500 people arrested in the 20 sweeps conducted by Arpaio’s office since January 2008, according to figures provided by the sheriff’s department, which hasn’t conducted any such patrols since October. Arpaio was asked whether a white person was ever arrested on an immigration violation during the first two years of such sweeps, to which he replied, “I can’t recall.” The plaintiffs aren’t seeking money in the suit. They are seeking a declaration that Arpaio’s office racially profiles Latinos and an order requiring policy changes. If Arpaio loses the case, he won’t face jail time or fines. If he wins, it would be likely to severely undercut the government’s case against him.

Answers to Monday’s questions: The turkeys that are reprieved by the president at the White House’s annual Thanksgiving Day pardoning ceremony retire to either Disneyland or Disney World, where they get to spend the rest of their lives. During a golf swing, the face of a club spends approximately 450-millionths of a second in contact with the ball. Today’s questions: What bestselling book was a result of a friendly dispute over which bird is faster, the golden plover or the red grouse? Who is the only U.S. athlete in history to be drafted in four professional leagues? Answers in Thursday’s Herald. Today’s Words: Jimberjaw: a jutting chin Physiolatry: nature worship Today’s joke: Bill, Jim, and Scott were at a convention together and were sharing a large suite on the top of a 75-story skyscraper. After a long day of meetings they were shocked to hear the elevators in their hotel were broken and they would have to climb 75 flights of stairs to get to their room. Bill said to Jim and Scott, “Let’s break the monotony of this unpleasant task by concentrating on something interesting. I’ll tell jokes for 25 flights and Jim can sing songs for 25 flights and Scott can tell sad stories the rest of the way.” At the 26th floor, Bill stopped telling jokes and Jim began to sing. At the 51st floor Jim stopped singing and Scott began to tell sad stories. “I will tell my saddest story first,” he said. “I left the room key in the car!”